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Sample records for affect plasma corticosterone

  1. Corticosterone metabolism by chicken follicle cells does not affect ovarian reproductive hormone synthesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rettenbacher, Sophie; Henriksen, Rie; Groothuids, Ton G.; Lepschy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect reproductive hormone production in many species. In chickens, elevated plasma corticosterone down-regulates testosterone and progesterone concentrations in plasma, but also in egg yolk. This suppression could be mediated via the hypothalamic-pituitary system but also via local inhibition of gonadal activity by glucocorticoids. As the latter has not been tested in birds yet, we tested if corticosterone directly inhibits ovarian steroid synthesis under in vitro conditions. We hypothesized that degradation of corticosterone by follicular cells impairs their ability to synthesize reproductive hormones due to either inhibition of enzymes or competition for common co-factors. Therefore, we first established whether follicles degrade corticosterone. Follicular tissue was harvested from freshly euthanized laying hens and incubated with radiolabelled corticosterone. Radioactive metabolites were visualized and quantified by autoradiography. Follicles converted corticosterone in a time-dependent manner into metabolites with a higher polarity than corticosterone. The predominant metabolite co-eluted with 20β-dihydrocorticosterone. Other chicken tissues mostly formed the same metabolite when incubated with corticosterone. In a second experiment, follicles were incubated with either progesterone or dehydroepiandrosterone. Corticosterone was added in increasing dosages up to 1000 ng per ml medium. Corticosterone did not inhibit the conversion of progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone into a number of different metabolites, including 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and testosterone. In conclusion, avian tissues degrade corticosterone mostly to 20β-dihydrocorticosterone and even high corticosterone dosages do not affect follicular hormone production under in vitro conditions. PMID:23333751

  2. [Cortisol and corticosterone plasma levels in different Psittaciformes].

    PubMed

    Hochleithner, M; Nowotny, P

    1992-12-01

    Plasma cortisol and corticosterone levels were measured in macaws, African Grey Parrots, Amazon Parrots and budgerigars using a RIA after preliminary cleaning. As in other avian species, the plasma contains predominantly corticosterone. PMID:1481215

  3. Elevated plasma corticosterone increases metabolic rate in a terrestrial salamander.

    PubMed

    Wack, Corina L; DuRant, Sarah E; Hopkins, William A; Lovern, Matthew B; Feldhoff, Richard C; Woodley, Sarah K

    2012-02-01

    Plasma glucocorticoid hormones (GCs) increase intermediary metabolism, which may be reflected in whole-animal metabolic rate. Studies in fish, birds, and reptiles have shown that GCs may alter whole-animal energy expenditure, but results are conflicting and often involve GC levels that are not physiologically relevant. A previous study in red-legged salamanders found that male courtship pheromone increased plasma corticosterone (CORT; the primary GC in amphibians) concentrations in males, which could elevate metabolic processes to sustain courtship behaviors. To understand the possible metabolic effect of elevated plasma CORT, we measured the effects of male courtship pheromone and exogenous application of CORT on oxygen consumption in male red-legged salamanders (Plethodon shermani). Exogenous application of CORT elevated plasma CORT to physiologically relevant levels. Compared to treatment with male courtship pheromone and vehicle, treatment with CORT increased oxygen consumption rates for several hours after treatment, resulting in 12% more oxygen consumed (equivalent to 0.33 J) during our first 2h sampling period. Contrary to our previous work, treatment with pheromone did not increase plasma CORT, perhaps because subjects used in this study were not in breeding condition. Pheromone application did not affect respiration rates. Our study is one of the few to evaluate the influence of physiologically relevant elevations in CORT on whole-animal metabolism in vertebrates, and the first to show that elevated plasma CORT increases metabolism in an amphibian. PMID:22047668

  4. Disuse atrophy, plasma corticosterone, and muscle glucocorticoid receptor levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of whole-body suspension on the time course and the extent of plasma corticosterone changes and the tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids were investigated in rats subjected to seven days of whole-body suspension. Plasma corticosterone increased significantly on the first and the third days of suspension, but returned to control levels by day seven. Muscle glucocorticoid receptors exhibited a characteristic hormonal specificity (evaluated in competitive-displacement experiments). In controls, receptor site concentration in the slow-twitch soleus was comparable to that in the fast-twitch gastrocnemius and plantaris, but was significantly less than in the extensor; seven days of suspension resulted in significant differential effects on muscle receptor levels. The largest increase in receptor concentration was observed in the soleus in which it remained elevated after the receptor levels in other muscles returned to normal.

  5. Elevated Plasma Corticosterone Decreases Yolk Testosterone and Progesterone in Chickens: Linking Maternal Stress and Hormone-Mediated Maternal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Despite considerable research on hormone-mediated maternal effects in birds, the underlying physiology remains poorly understood. This study investigated a potential regulation mechanism for differential accumulation of gonadal hormones in bird eggs. Across vertebrates, glucocorticoids can suppress reproduction by downregulating gonadal hormones. Using the chicken as a model species, we therefore tested whether elevated levels of plasma corticosterone in female birds influence the production of gonadal steroids by the ovarian follicles and thus the amount of reproductive hormones in the egg yolk. Adult laying hens of two different strains (ISA brown and white Leghorn) were implanted subcutaneously with corticosterone pellets that elevated plasma corticosterone concentrations over a period of nine days. Steroid hormones were subsequently quantified in plasma and yolk. Corticosterone-implanted hens of both strains had lower plasma progesterone and testosterone levels and their yolks contained less progesterone and testosterone. The treatment also reduced egg and yolk mass. Plasma estrogen concentrations decreased in white Leghorns only whereas in both strains yolk estrogens were unaffected. Our results demonstrate for the first time that maternal plasma corticosterone levels influence reproductive hormone concentrations in the yolk. Maternal corticosterone could therefore mediate environmentally induced changes in yolk gonadal hormone concentrations. In addition, stressful situations experienced by the bird mother might affect the offspring via reduced amounts of reproductive hormones present in the egg as well as available nutrients for the embryo. PMID:21886826

  6. Corticosterone facilitates begging and affects resource allocation in the black-legged kittiwake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and their dependent chicks respond to food shortages by increasing circulating levels of corticosterone. To examine the behavioral significance of corticosterone release, we experimentally increased levels of circulating corticosterone in parents and chicks up to the levels observed during food shortages. We found that corticosterone-implanted chicks begged more frequently than sham-implanted controls. Corticosterone-implanted chicks in broods of two begged more frequently than singletons. Parent kittiwakes then responded to the increase in corticosterone levels in their chicks by increasing chick-feeding rates. However, feeding rates were not different among corticosterone-implanted chicks in broods of two and singletons. We also found that corticosterone-implanted parents spent more time away from the nest - perhaps foraging - and less time brooding/guarding chicks than sham-implanted controls. Untreated mates of the corticosterone-implanted bird did not compensate for the change in their partner's behavior; consequently, chicks were left unattended about 20% of the time compared to 1% at the control nests. However, corticosterone-implanted parents did not decrease their chick-feeding rates. Our findings suggest two functional implications of the increased corticosterone secretion during food shortages in the black-legged kittiwake: it facilitates begging in chicks, and it affects time allocated by parents to guarding young at the nest. Thus, release of corticosterone might provide a mechanistic link between physiological condition and behavioral interactions among adults and their young.

  7. Beeswax corticosterone implants produce long-term elevation of plasma corticosterone and influence condition.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michelle L; Davies, Scott; Moore, Ignacio T; Schoenle, Laura A; Kerman, Kaan; Vernasco, Ben J; Sewall, Kendra B

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids can play a critical role in modulating life-history trade-offs. However, studying the effects of glucocorticoids on life-history often requires experimentally elevating plasma glucocorticoid concentrations for several weeks within normal physiological limits and without repeated handling of the animal. Recently, implants made of beeswax and testosterone (T) were shown to have release dynamics superior to some currently available T implants, and these beeswax implants dissolved, eliminating the need to recapture the animal. We evaluated the utility of beeswax implants containing four different dosages of corticosterone (CORT; the primary glucocorticoid in birds) and their effect on several condition indices in a captive colony of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). The three implants with the greatest CORT doses (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5mg) produced spikes in plasma CORT concentrations 20h after treatment, but were within the limits that zebra finches may normally experience. The 0.5mg CORT implant elevated plasma CORT between typical baseline and restraint stress levels reported in other studies of zebra finches for the entire 35day experiment. Birds in the 0.5mg implant group were heavier, had greater furcular fat scores, and had lower hematocrit than birds in the control and other CORT implant groups. Beeswax CORT implants are a low cost method of elevating plasma CORT for a prolonged time. Furthermore, because there is no need to remove these implants at the end of a study, this method may be amenable to studies of free-ranging animals. PMID:27222349

  8. Effect of Ocimum sanctum Linn on noise induced changes in plasma corticosterone level.

    PubMed

    Sembulingam, K; Sembulingam, P; Namasivayam, A

    1997-04-01

    Ethanol extract of leaves of ocimum sanctum was screened for its antistressor actions against acute and chronic noise stress in albino rats by investigating the plasma corticosterone level in these animals. There was a significant elevation of the corticosterone level in plasma of rats subjected to 30 min noise (100 dB) stress. Chromic exposure (4 hr daily for 30 days) to noise with same intensity reduced the hormonal level significantly. Treatment of animals with ethanol extract of Ocimum sanctum prevented the changes in plasma level of corticosterone induced by exposure to both acute and chronic noise stress, indicating the antistressor property of the plant against noise. PMID:9142558

  9. Amphetamine withdrawal differentially affects hippocampal and peripheral corticosterone levels in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Bray, Brenna; Scholl, Jamie L; Tu, Wenyu; Watt, Michael J; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-08-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal is associated with heightened anxiety-like behavior, which is directly driven by blunted stress-induced glucocorticoid receptor-dependent serotonin release in the ventral hippocampus. This suggests that glucocorticoid availability in the ventral hippocampus during stress may be reduced during amphetamine withdrawal. Therefore, we tested whether amphetamine withdrawal alters either peripheral or hippocampal corticosterone stress responses. Adult male rats received amphetamine (2.5mg/kg, ip) or saline for 14 days followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal. Contrary to our prediction, microdialysis samples from freely-moving rats revealed that restraint stress-induced corticosterone levels in the ventral hippocampus are enhanced by amphetamine withdrawal relative to controls. In separate groups of rats, plasma corticosterone levels increased immediately after 20min of restraint and decreased to below stress-naïve levels after 1h, indicating negative feedback regulation of corticosterone following stress. However, plasma corticosterone responses were similar in amphetamine-withdrawn and control rats. Neither amphetamine nor stress exposure significantly altered protein expression or enzyme activity of the steroidogenic enzymes 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1) or hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) in the ventral hippocampus. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that amphetamine withdrawal potentiates stress-induced corticosterone in the ventral hippocampus, which may contribute to increased behavioral stress sensitivity previously observed during amphetamine withdrawal. However, this is not mediated by either changes in plasma corticosterone or hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Establishing enhanced ventral hippocampal corticosterone as a direct cause of greater stress sensitivity may identify the glucocorticoid system as a novel target for treating behavioral symptoms of amphetamine withdrawal. PMID:27208490

  10. Effect of ACTH on plasma corticosterone and cortisol in eagles and condors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zenoble, R.D.; Kemppainen, R.J.; Young, D.W.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ACTH on plasma corticosterone and cortisol was determined in 12 eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and in 6 Andean condors (Vultur gryphus). In all raptors, the concentration of plasma corticosterone was substantially greater than that of cortisol. After ACTH administration, the eagles had a marked increase (P less than 0.001) in plasma corticosterone concentrations, but not in plasma cortisol. Administration of saline solution did not induce increased plasma corticosterone concentrations in the eagles. The condors had a smaller increase (P less than 0.002) in plasma corticosterone concentrations after ACTH administration, as compared with that of the eagles. However, administration of saline solution in 2 condors resulted in an increase in corticosterone similar to the increase after ACTH administration. In the condor, a stress-related release of endogenous ACTH may have an effect similar to that induced by exogenously administered ACTH. Plasma cortisol concentrations did not increase significantly after administration of ACTH or saline solution in either raptor species.

  11. Seasonal and daily plasma corticosterone rhythms in American toads, Bufo americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Pancak, M.K.; Taylor, D.H.

    1983-06-01

    Concentrations of corticosterone were measured in the plasma of American toads, Bufo americanus, on a seasonal basis using a radioimmunoassay technique. Two populations of toads, maintained under different light conditions, were monitored to observe the effects of photoperiod on the seasonal rhythm of plasma corticosterone. Under a natural photoperiod toads demonstrated a rhythm consisting of a spring peak and a fall peak in corticosterone concentration. Toads maintained under a 12L:12D photoperiod all year round demonstrated a similar rhythm with peaks in the spring and fall. This suggests that an endogenous (circannual) rhythm of corticosterone may be playing an important role in the seasonal change of overt behavior and physiology of Bufo americanus. A daily rhythm of corticosterone was also detected in toads when blood samples were taken every 4 hr. When compared to a previously published circadian rhythm study of locomotor activity, the surge in corticosterone concentration for the day occurred at 1730 just prior to the peak in locomotor activity.

  12. Plasma corticosterone and thyroxine concentrations during chronic ingestion of crude oil in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Eastin, W.C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    1. Blood samples were collected from mallard ducks after 6, 12, and 18 weeks of dietary exposure to mash containing 0.015%, 0.150%, and 1.500% crude oil. 2. Plasma corticosterone concentrations in ducks fed mash containing 0.150% or 1.500% Alaskan Prudhoe Bay crude oil were uniformly depressed when compared to values in untreated control birds. 3. Plasma thyroxine concentration was not altered in ducks chronically exposed to crude oil. 4. The observed alteration in corticosterone concentration could reduce tolerance to temperature and dietary fluctuations in the environment.

  13. Relationships between environmental organochlorine contaminant residues, plasma corticosterone concentrations, and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in Great Lakes herring gull embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, A; Moon, T W; Kennedy, S W; Glen, G A

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to survey and detect differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in herring gull (Larus argentatus) embryos environmentally exposed to organochlorine contaminants in ovo. Unincubated fertile herring gull eggs were collected from an Atlantic coast control site and various Great Lakes sites in 1997 and artificially incubated in the laboratory. Liver and/or kidney tissues from approximately half of the late-stage embryos were analyzed for the activities of various intermediary metabolic enzymes known to be regulated, at least in part, by corticosteroids. Basal plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined for the remaining embryos. Yolk sacs were collected from each embryo and a subset was analyzed for organochlorine contaminants. Regression analysis of individual yolk sac organochlorine residue concentrations, or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQs), with individual basal plasma corticosterone concentrations indicated statistically significant inverse relationships for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-ortho PCBs, and TEQs. Similarly, inverse relationships were observed for the activities of two intermediary metabolic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme) when regressed against PCDDs/PCDFs. Overall, these data suggest that current levels of organochlorine contamination may be affecting the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and associated intermediary metabolic pathways in environmentally exposed herring gull embryos in the Great Lakes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10064546

  14. Alteration in plasma corticosterone levels following long term oral administration of lead produces depression like symptoms in rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saida; Saleem, Sadia; Tabassum, Saiqa; Khaliq, Saima; Shamim, Saima; Batool, Zehra; Parveen, Tahira; Inam, Qurat-ul-ain; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2013-03-01

    Lead toxicity is known to induce a broad range of physiological, biochemical and behavioral dysfunctions that may result in adverse effects on several organs, including the central nervous system. Long-term exposure to low levels of lead (Pb(2+)) has been shown to produce behavioral deficits in rodents and humans by affecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These deficits are thought to be associated with altered brain monoamine neurotransmission and due to changes in glucocorticoids levels. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Pb(2+)exposure on growth rate, locomotor activity, anxiety, depression, plasma corticosterone and brain serotonin (5-HT) levels in rats. Rats were exposed to lead in drinking water (500 ppm; lead acetate) for 5 weeks. The assessment of depression was done using the forced swimming test (FST). Estimation of brain 5-HT was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Plasma corticosterone was determined by spectrofluorimetric method. The present study showed that long term exposure to Pb(2+) significantly decreased the food intake followed by the decrease in growth rate in Pb(2+)exposed rats as compared to control group. No significant changes in open field activity were observed following Pb(2+)exposure while significant increase in anxiogenic effect was observed. Increased plasma corticosterone and decreased 5-HT levels were exhibited by Pb(2+)exposed rats as compared to controls. A significant increase in depressive like symptoms was exhibited by Pb(2+)exposed rats as compared to control rats. The results are discussed in the context of Pb(2+) inducing a stress-like response in rats leading to changes in plasma corticosterone and brain 5-HT levels via altering tryptophan pyrrolase activity. PMID:23315312

  15. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta)

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Jennifer E.; Norton, Terry M.; Andrews, Kimberly M.; Nelson, Steven E.; Parker, Clare E.; Romero, L. Michael; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t0; 0–3 min) and 3 (t3; 3–6 min), 6 (t6; 6–9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t10; 10–13 min) and 30 min (t30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t0 and t3 (P = 0.014) and between t0 and t6 (P = 0.022). Values at t10 were not significantly different from those at t0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t0 and t10 (P = 0.02) and between t0 and t30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The delay in

  16. The effect of morphine consumption on plasma corticosteron concentration and placenta development in pregnant rats

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Masoomeh; Sahraei, Hedayat; Azarnia, Mahnaz; Dehghani, Leila; Bahadoran, Hossein; Tekieh, Elaheh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that morphine consumption during pregnancy may delay embryo development or cause abnormal nervous system function. Objective: The present study focused on the effect of maternal morphine consumption on development of placenta and blood corticosteron concentration in addictive pregnant mothers. Materials and Methods: 24 female rats, 170-200g weight, were used. The experimental groups after pregnancy received an oral dose of 0.05 mg/ml of morphine by tap water while the control group received only tap water. On 10th and 14th day of pregnancy, rats were anesthetized and placenta removed surgically, 1ml blood was collected from each pregnant mother from retro-orbital sinus, the concentration of blood corticosteron was determined by corticosteron Elisa kit after centrifugation. The fixed tissue was processed, sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Placenta was studied microscopically according to the thickness of layers, area of blood cisterns, and the number of cells. Results: Comparing the plasma corticosteron concentration of the treatment and the control groups, not only a severe increase in the treatment group was detected, but also the thickness of maternal and embryonic portions of the placenta at day 10th and 14th of gestation was different significantly (p≤0.05). Furthermore, an increase in number of cells in maternal and embryonic portion of placenta and a decrease in blood cistern area were demonstrated in both the experimental and the control groups. Conclusion: The effects of morphine, including an increase in blood concentration of corticosteron, in dependent pregnant mothers were seen. Development of placenta in the experimental group was delayed. PMID:25587250

  17. Effects of captivity and body condition on plasma corticosterone, locomotor behavior, and plasma metabolites in curve-billed thrashers.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Hurley, Laura; Rogowski, Christopher; Sweazea, Karen; Deviche, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The acute stress response involves the secretion of catabolic glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone (CORT) in birds, that mobilize intrinsic energy stores primarily through a gluconeogenic pathway involving fat breakdown, thus linking body condition and stress. We measured changes in CORT and gluconeogenic metabolites (triglycerides, free glycerols, glucose) during handling stress in curve-billed thrashers Toxostoma curvirostre from two habitats (urban vs. desert) that may differ in food abundance in the wild, in captivity, and in response to both food restriction and subsequent recovery. Urban thrashers were heavier and secreted more CORT than desert birds in the field, but differences did not persist in captivity. Decreased access to food resulted in decreased body mass and a diminished ability to elevate plasma CORT in response to handling stress. However, the opposite effect was observed as these birds recovered from food restriction. Plasma levels of glucose and triglycerides did not change with stress. Food restriction also increased locomotor activity, which likely further exacerbated energy loss. These observations suggest that body condition and stress differences between urban and desert birds may be related to differences in their relative energetic states, possibly due to food availability. Body condition may affect the extent to which an individual can elevate CORT and use free glycerol as energy during acute stress. PMID:22030852

  18. Effects of chronic 'Binge' cocaine administration on plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels in mice deficient in DARPP-32.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Schlussman, S D; Ho, A; Spangler, R; Fienberg, A A; Greengard, P; Kreek, M J

    1999-09-01

    The product of the DARPP-32 gene mediates intracellular signals initiated by the binding of dopamine to its receptors. Cocaine administration leads to increased activation of dopamine receptors, and causes activation of the stress-responsive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We determined the effects of chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine on HPA activity in mice containing a targeted disruption of the DARPP-32 gene. Mice received three daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg/injection) for 14 days, and were sacrificed 30 min after the last injection. We measured the levels of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone which reflect HPA activity. In wild-type controls, 'binge' cocaine administration significantly increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. In contrast, DARPP-32-deficient mice failed to show a significant elevation of either plasma ACTH or corticosterone levels following 'binge' cocaine. The results indicate that DARPP-32 plays a role in mediating the stimulatory effects of cocaine on the HPA axis. PMID:10516482

  19. Nicotine-induced plasma corticosterone is attenuated by social interactions in male and female adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Pentkowski, N S; Painter, M R; Thiel, K J; Peartree, N A; Cheung, T H C; Deviche, P; Adams, M; Alba, J; Neisewander, J L

    2011-11-01

    Most smokers begin smoking during adolescence, a period during which social reward is highly influential. Initial exposure to nicotine can produce anxiogenic effects that may be influenced by social context. This study examined play behavior and plasma corticosterone following nicotine administration (0.6 mg/kg, s.c.) in both male and female adolescent (PND39) Sprague-Dawley rats in either isolate or social contexts. In blood samples collected immediately following the 15-min test session, nicotine increased plasma corticosterone relative to saline in both male and female isolate rats, but failed to do so in both males and females placed together in same-sex pairs. Nicotine also attenuated several indices of play behavior including nape attacks, pins and social contact. In isolate rats, nicotine selectively increased locomotor activity in females; however, when administered to social pairs, nicotine decreased locomotion in both sexes. These findings suggest that the presence of a social partner may decrease the initial negative, stress-activating effects of nicotine, perhaps leading to increased nicotine reward. PMID:21782841

  20. Nicotine-induced plasma corticosterone is attenuated by social interactions in male and female adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Pentkowski, N.S.; Painter, M.R.; Thiel, K.J.; Peartree, N.A.; Cheung, T.H.C.; Deviche, P.; Adams, M.; Alba, J.; Neisewander, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Most smokers begin smoking during adolescence, a period during which social reward is highly influential. Initial exposure to nicotine can produce anxiogenic effects that may be influenced by social context. This study examined play behavior and plasma corticosterone following nicotine administration (0.6 mg/kg, s.c.) in both male and female adolescent (PND39) Sprague-Dawley rats in either isolate or social contexts. In blood samples collected immediately following the 15-min test session, nicotine increased plasma corticosterone relative to saline in both male and female isolate rats, but failed to do so in both males and females placed together in same-sex pairs. Nicotine also attenuated several indices of play behavior including nape attacks, pins and social contact. In isolate rats, nicotine selectively increased locomotor activity in females; however, when administered to social pairs, nicotine decreased locomotion in both sexes. These findings suggest that the presence of a social partner may decrease the initial negative, stress-activating effects of nicotine, perhaps leading to increased nicotine reward. PMID:21782841

  1. (+)-Methamphetamine Increases Corticosterone in Plasma and BDNF in Brain More Than Forced Swim or Isolation in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    GRACE, CURTIS E.; SCHAEFER, TORI L.; HERRING, NICOLE R.; SKELTON, MATTHEW R.; McCREA, ANNE E.; VORHEES, CHARLES V.; WILLIAMS, MICHAEL T.

    2009-01-01

    (+)-Methamphetamine (MA) administered on postnatal days (P) 11–15 (four times/day) results in increased corticosterone that overlaps the stress hyporesponsive period (SHRP; P2–14) and leads to later learning and memory deficits. Elevated corticosterone during the SHRP results in neurotrophin changes and long-term effects on learning. We determined whether two known stressors could mimic the effects of MA [10 (mg/kg)/dose] administration in neonatal rats. Stressors were four 15-min sessions of forced swim or isolation (confinement in forced swim tubes without water). Saline and weighed-only controls were included and all five treatments were represented within each litter. Corticosterone in plasma and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in neostriatum and hippocampus were examined after one or four treatments on P11 or P15 (0.5, 1.75, 6.5, or 24 h after first dose). MA increased corticosterone and BDNF; forced swim and isolation also increased corticosterone, but to a lesser extent than MA, and neither stressor increased BDNF. NGF was unaffected by saline treatment, but there was a minor reduction in NGF in the forced swim group compared with the weighed-only group. The data show that MA is more potent at releasing corticosterone and increasing BDNF than short-term, repeated episodes of forced swim or isolation. The possible relationship between these changes and the long-term cognitive effects of developmental MA administration are discussed. PMID:17992688

  2. Effects of environmental stress during pregnancy on maternal and fetal plasma corticosterone and progesterone in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D.E.; Rhees, R.W.; Williams, S.R.; Kurth, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Prenatal stress applied during a presumed critical period (third trimester) for sexual differentiation of the brain has been shown to alter development and influence sexual behavior. This experiment was designed to study the effects of environmental stress (restraint/illumination/heat) on maternal and fetal plasma corticosterone and progesterone titers. These hormones were studied since corticosterone has been shown to alter brain differentiation and progesterone has anti-androgen properties and since the secretion of both from the adrenal cortex is stimulated by ACTH. Plasma corticosterone and progesterone titers of both stressed and control gravid rats and their fetuses were measured on gestational days 18 and 20 by radioimmunoassay. Prenatal stress significantly reduced fetal body weight and fetal adrenal weight. Maternal pituitary weight was significantly increased. Prenatal stress caused a significant elevation in maternal corticosterone and progesterone titers and in fetal corticosterone titers. There was no difference between prenatal stressed and control fetal plasma progesterone levels. These data demonstrate that environmental stress significantly increases adrenal activity beyond that brought about naturally by pregnancy, and therefore may modify sequential hormonal events during fetal development.

  3. Effects of Acute Restraint Stress, Prolonged Captivity Stress and Transdermal Corticosterone Application on Immunocompetence and Plasma Levels of Corticosterone on the Cururu Toad (Rhinella icterica)

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Vania Regina; Titon, Stefanny Christie Monteiro; Barsotti, Adriana Maria Giorgi; Titon Jr., Braz; Gomes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid steroids modulate immunocompetence in complex ways with both immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive effects in vertebrates exposed to different stressors. Such bimodal effects have been associated with variation in duration and intensity of the stress response. Given that natural populations have been exposed to a multitude of stressors, a better understanding of the functional association between duration and intensity of the stress response, the resulting changes in glucocorticoid plasma levels and their impact on different aspects of immunocompetence emerges as a cornerstone for vertebrate conservation strategies. We investigated the effects of a restraint challenge (with and without movement restriction), long-term captivity, and transdermal corticosterone application on plasma levels of corticosterone (hereinafter referred to as CORT) and different parameters of innate immunocompetence in the male cururu toads (Rhinella icterica). We show that for R. icterica restraint for 24h proved to be a stressful condition, increasing CORT by 3-fold without consistent immunological changes. However, the application of a more intense stressor (restraint with movement restriction), for the same period, potentiated this response resulting in a 9-fold increase in CORT, associated with increase Neutrophil/Lymphocyte ratio (N:L) and a lower bacterial killing ability (BKA). Transdermal application of corticosterone efficiently mimics repeated acute stress response events, without changing the immune parameters even after 13 days of treatment. Interestingly, long-term captivity did not mitigate the stress response, since the toads maintained 3-fold increased CORT even after 3 months under these conditions. Moreover, long-term captivity in the same condition increased total leukocyte count (TLC) and generated an even greater decrease in BKA, suggesting that consequences of the stress response can be aggravated by time in captivity. PMID:25831055

  4. What ecological factors can affect albumen corticosterone levels in the clutches of seabirds? Timing of breeding, disturbance and laying order in rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome).

    PubMed

    Poisbleau, M; Demongin, L; Angelier, F; Dano, S; Lacroix, A; Quillfeldt, P

    2009-06-01

    Female birds deposit corticosterone into their eggs. Elevated concentrations of this hormone may interfere with the development of their offspring, and mothers should thus regulate corticosterone levels deposited into the eggs adaptively. However, if females are unable to regulate deposition, then the corticosterone concentration in eggs should reflect that in female plasma and should be influenced by stressors to the females. We measured corticosterone levels in the albumen of rockhopper penguins, and assessed their relationship with hatching order, human disturbance and laying date. Rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome) lay two eggs, of which the second egg (B-egg) is larger and hatches faster than the first egg (A-egg). The chick hatching from the B-egg is also much more likely to survive than its sibling. Albumen corticosterone concentrations were lower in B-eggs. However, as B-eggs contained more albumen than A-eggs, the total corticosterone deposited in the albumen was not significantly different between the two eggs. Daily disturbance by human observers during albumen production did not influence albumen corticosterone levels. Laying date had an effect on total albumen corticosterone through a higher albumen mass. However, we observed a high individual component in the composition of eggs from the same clutch. Thus, more work is required to explore the hypotheses of passive versus active transfer to eggs and to understand the adaptive value of contrary effects on the amount and concentration of corticosterone. PMID:19341737

  5. The Effect of Food Deprivation on Nociception in Formalin Test and Plasma Levels of Noradrenaline and Corticosterone in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gheibi, Nematollah; Saroukhani, Mohammadreza; Azhdari-Zarmehri, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The concentration of noradrenalin and corticosterone as the two nociception modulators change after fasting or stress situation. The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of food deprivation on formalin-induced nociceptive behaviours and plasma levels of noradrenalin and corticosterone in rats. Methods Food was withdrawn 12, 24 and 48 h prior to performing the formalin test, but water continued to be available ad libitum. The formalin solution (50 µL, 2%) was injected into plantar surface of hind paw. The nociception responses of the animals during the first phase (1-7 minutes), the inter-phase (8-14), the phase 2A (15-60) and the phase 2B (61-90) was separately evaluated. The plasma concentrations of noradrenalin and corticosterone were measured using specific ELISA and IRA kits, according to manufacturer's instructions. Results In contrast to the increasing of 48 h food deprived animals during phase 2, the nociceptive behaviours of 12 and 24 h groups decreased through the interphase, phase 2A and phase 2B. The injection of formalin in the normal male rats significantly decreased the plasma level of noradrenalin and corticosterone. Food deprivation for 12 and 24 h increased noradrenalin level significantly in comparison with control group which has caused by fasting induced antinociceptive behaviours. There was no significant change in food deprivation for 48 h group. Food deprivation for 12, 24 and 48 h had no effect on corticosterone level in male rats. Discussion The present study emphasizes that the acute food deprivation diminished the nociceptive behaviours in the formalin test and show a correlation with increase in plasma noradrenalin level. PMID:25337367

  6. Diffuse traumatic brain injury affects chronic corticosterone function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Rachel K; Rumney, Benjamin M; May, Hazel G; Permana, Paska; Adelson, P David; Harman, S Mitchell; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Thomas, Theresa C

    2016-07-01

    As many as 20-55% of patients with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience chronic endocrine dysfunction, leading to impaired quality of life, impaired rehabilitation efforts and lowered life expectancy. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI is thought to result from acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain within the skull, creating enduring hypothalamic and pituitary neuropathology, and subsequent hypothalamic-pituitary endocrine (HPE) dysfunction. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that a single diffuse TBI results in chronic dysfunction of corticosterone (CORT), a glucocorticoid released in response to stress and testosterone. We used a rodent model of diffuse TBI induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI). At 2months postinjury compared with uninjured control animals, circulating levels of CORT were evaluated at rest, under restraint stress and in response to dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid commonly used to test HPE axis regulation. Testosterone was evaluated at rest. Further, we assessed changes in injury-induced neuron morphology (Golgi stain), neuropathology (silver stain) and activated astrocytes (GFAP) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Resting plasma CORT levels were decreased at 2months postinjury and there was a blunted CORT increase in response to restraint induced stress. No changes in testosterone were measured. These changes in CORT were observed concomitantly with altered complexity of neuron processes in the PVN over time, devoid of neuropathology or astrocytosis. Results provide evidence that a single moderate diffuse TBI leads to changes in CORT function, which can contribute to the persistence of symptoms related to endocrine dysfunction. Future experiments aim to evaluate additional HP-related hormones and endocrine circuit pathology following diffuse TBI. PMID:27317610

  7. Diffuse traumatic brain injury affects chronic corticosterone function in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K; Rumney, Benjamin M; May, Hazel G; Permana, Paska; Adelson, P David; Harman, S Mitchell; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    As many as 20–55% of patients with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience chronic endocrine dysfunction, leading to impaired quality of life, impaired rehabilitation efforts and lowered life expectancy. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI is thought to result from acceleration–deceleration forces to the brain within the skull, creating enduring hypothalamic and pituitary neuropathology, and subsequent hypothalamic–pituitary endocrine (HPE) dysfunction. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that a single diffuse TBI results in chronic dysfunction of corticosterone (CORT), a glucocorticoid released in response to stress and testosterone. We used a rodent model of diffuse TBI induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI). At 2months postinjury compared with uninjured control animals, circulating levels of CORT were evaluated at rest, under restraint stress and in response to dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid commonly used to test HPE axis regulation. Testosterone was evaluated at rest. Further, we assessed changes in injury-induced neuron morphology (Golgi stain), neuropathology (silver stain) and activated astrocytes (GFAP) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Resting plasma CORT levels were decreased at 2months postinjury and there was a blunted CORT increase in response to restraint induced stress. No changes in testosterone were measured. These changes in CORT were observed concomitantly with altered complexity of neuron processes in the PVN over time, devoid of neuropathology or astrocytosis. Results provide evidence that a single moderate diffuse TBI leads to changes in CORT function, which can contribute to the persistence of symptoms related to endocrine dysfunction. Future experiments aim to evaluate additional HP-related hormones and endocrine circuit pathology following diffuse TBI. PMID:27317610

  8. Region-Specific Neural Corticosterone Patterns Differ From Plasma in a Male Songbird

    PubMed Central

    Comito, D.; Kosarussavadi, S.; Schlinger, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    The adrenal hormone corticosterone (CORT) acts on brain to mediate physiology and behavior. In songbirds, behavioral effects of CORT vary across species, environmental conditions, and life history stage, with several mechanisms proposed to account for these divergent results. Although blood CORT levels are well characterized, few studies measure CORT within the brain itself. Here we used in vivo microdialysis to measure CORT in two regions of the zebra finch brain, the hippocampus (HP) and caudal nidopallium (cNp). Our results show that we can successfully measure physiological levels of CORT in brain within 15- to 30-minute intervals of dialysate collection. Moreover, we found that levels in the cNp were generally lower than levels in the HP. Surprisingly, whereas plasma CORT levels increased in response to a standard stressor, no stress-induced surge was detected in the HP or cNp. In addition, although a diel CORT rhythm was observed in plasma, the rhythm in brain was attenuated and only observed when levels were integrated over a 4-hour time period. Regional differences in brain CORT levels were reflected in local mRNA expression levels of the CORT-inactivating enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 with levels elevated in the cNp relative to the HP. Region-specific CORT metabolism may therefore play a role in buffering the brain from CORT fluctuations. PMID:24914945

  9. Pre-pubertal stress exposure affects adult behavioral response in association with changes in circulating corticosterone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Noam; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Kaplan, Zeev; Matar, Michael; Golan, Hava; Zohar, Joseph; Richter-Levin, Gal; Cohen, Hagit

    2009-07-01

    Early-life stress produces a cascade of neurobiological events that cause enduring changes in neural plasticity and synaptic efficacy that appear to play pivotal roles in the pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the neurobiological mechanisms of these changes, in interaction with components of the stress response, such as corticosterone. This study examined the consequences of juvenile stress for behavior during adulthood in association with circulating corticosterone levels and BDNF expression. The experiments examined single exposure to predator scent stress (soiled cat litter for 10 min) as compared to repeated exposure, early in life and later on. Behavioral responses were assessed in the elevated plus maze and the acoustic startle response paradigms at 28, 60 and 90 days of age. Plasma corticosterone was measured and brain areas analyzed for BDNF levels. The results show that juvenile stress exposure increased anxiety-like behavior and startle amplitude and decreased plasma corticosterone. This response was seen immediately after exposure and also long term. Adult stress exposure increased anxiety-like behavior, startle amplitude and plasma corticosterone. Exposure to both early and later life trauma elicited reduced levels of corticosterone following the initial exposure, which were not raised by re-exposure, and elicited significant downregulation of BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus CA1 subregion. The consequences of adult stress exposure were more severe in rats were exposed to the same stressor as juveniles, indicated increased vulnerability. The results suggest that juvenile stress has resounding effects in adulthood reflected in behavioral responses. The concomitant changes in BDNF and corticosterone levels may mediate the changes in neural plasticity and synaptic functioning underlying clinical manifestations of PTSD. PMID:19181453

  10. Performance, behavior, plasma corticosterone, and economic returns of laying hens in several management alternatives.

    PubMed

    Koelkebeck, K W; Cain, J R

    1984-11-01

    Production, physiological, and behavioral data were collected simultaneously on commercial hens housed for 10 months of lay in housing alternatives of cages, deep litter floor pens, and outside range pens. Treatments consisted of housing 1, 2, or 3 hens in small cages 3, 4, 5, or 6 hens in large cages, floor pens housing 51 hens each at three densities, and range pens with 50 hens at .74 m2 (8 ft2) per hen. Egg production rates were greater for all caged hen treatments than for any floor or range groups. Egg numbers favored 2 hens per cage, but economic benefits favored 5 hens per cage. Viability was highest for 1 hen per cage and range pen groups. Feed efficiency was poorer in floor and range groups; however, body weight was generally greater for caged hens. Plasma corticosterone levels did not differ among any cage or range groups, but floor pen hens had significantly elevated levels. Behavioral data for walking and object pecking showed clear differences between cage and floor management alternatives. Preening, standing, and drinking activities were different between some treatments but not clearly different between management alternatives. Feeding activity did not differ among any groups. Although correlations between stress and well-being have not been well elucidated, the sum of the stressors of cage confinement appeared to be less than those from floor pens. Therefore, it was concluded that the well-being of hens in cages was equal to or better than that for free ranging hens or those in floor pens. PMID:6514660

  11. Logging Affects Fledgling Sex Ratios and Baseline Corticosterone in a Forest Songbird

    PubMed Central

    Leshyk, Rhiannon; Nol, Erica; Burke, Dawn M.; Burness, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Silviculture (logging) creates a disturbance to forested environments. The degree to which forests are modified depends on the logging prescription and forest stand characteristics. In this study we compared the effects of two methods of group-selection (“moderate” and “heavy”) silviculture (GSS) and undisturbed reference stands on stress and offspring sex ratios of a forest interior species, the Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), in Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada. Blood samples were taken from nestlings for corticosterone and molecular sexing. We found that logging creates a disturbance that is stressful for nestling Ovenbirds, as illustrated by elevated baseline corticosterone in cut sites. Ovenbirds nesting in undisturbed reference forest produce fewer male offspring per brood (proportion male = 30%) while logging with progressively greater forest disturbance, shifted the offspring sex ratio towards males (proportion male: moderate = 50%, heavy = 70%). If Ovenbirds in undisturbed forests usually produce female-biased broods, then the production of males as a result of logging may disrupt population viability. We recommend a broad examination of nestling sex ratios in response to anthropogenic disturbance to determine the generality of our findings. PMID:22432000

  12. Influence of Momordica charantia on oxidative stress-induced perturbations in brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Naga; Babu, S. Manohar; Rao, M.E. Bhanoji

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the antistress activity of Momordica charantia (MC) fruit extract on stress-induced changes in albino rats and also to explore attenuating effects of MC on in vitro lipid peroxidation in rat brain. Materials and Methods: In this study, Wistar albino rats (180–200 g) were used. Plasma corticosterone and monoamines—5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and dopamine (DA) in cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus regions of brain were determined in animals under different stressful conditions. Ethanolic fruit extract of MC, at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, was used. The oxidative stress paradigms used in in vivo models were acute stress (AS) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Panax quinquefolium (PQ) was used as a standard in in vivo models and ascorbic acid was used as a reference standard in the in vitro method. Results: Subjecting the animals to AS (immobilization for 150 min once only) resulted in significant elevation of plasma corticosterone levels and brain monoamine levels. Pretreatment with MC at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. significantly countered AS-induced changes and a similar effect was exhibited by PQ at 100 mg/kg p.o. In the CUS regimen (different stressors for 7 days), plasma corticosterone levels were significantly elevated whereas the levels of 5-HT, NE, E, and DA were depleted significantly. Pretreatment with MC (200 and 400 mg/kg) attenuated the CUS-induced changes in the levels of above monoamines in cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus regions of brain and plasma corticosterone in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, MC extract (1000–5000 μg/mL) exhibited a significant quenching effect on in vitro lipid peroxidation indicating its strong antioxidant activity which was compared with ascorbic acid. Conclusions: This study reveals the antistress activity of MC as it significantly reverted the stress-induced changes, and the activity might be attributed

  13. Effects of Topical Anesthetics on Behavior, Plasma Corticosterone, and Blood Glucose Levels after Tail Biopsy of C57BL/6NHSD Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Dudley, Emily S; Johnson, Robert A; French, DeAnne C; Boivin, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Tail biopsy is a common procedure that is performed to obtain genetic material for determining genotype of transgenic mice. The use of anesthetics or analgesics is recommended, although identifying safe and effective drugs for this purpose has been challenging. We evaluated the effects of topical 2.5% lidocaine-2.5% prilocaine cream applied to the distal tail tip at 5 or 60 min before biopsy, immersion of the tail tip for 10 seconds in ice-cold 70% ethanol just prior to biopsy, and immersion of the tail tip in 0.5% bupivacaine for 30 s after biopsy. Mice were 7, 11, or 15 d old at the time of tail biopsy. Acute behavioral responses, plasma corticosterone, and blood glucose were measured after biopsy, and body weight and performance in elevated plus maze and open-field tests after weaning. Ice-cold ethanol prior to biopsy prevented acute behavioral responses to biopsy, and both ice-cold ethanol and bupivacaine prevented elevations in corticosterone and blood glucose after biopsy. Tail biopsy with or without anesthesia did not affect body weight or performance on elevated plus maze or open-field tests. We recommend the use of ice-cold ethanol for topical anesthesia prior to tail biopsy in mice 7 to 15 d old. PMID:27423152

  14. Effects of voluntarily-ingested buprenorphine on plasma corticosterone levels, body weight, water intake, and behaviour in permanently catheterised rats.

    PubMed

    Goldkuhl, Renée; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the peri- and postoperative effect of pre-emptive analgesia through voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine in Nutella, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. An arterial catheter was inserted and the rats were connected to an automated blood sampling device (AccuSampler). Blood samples were drawn up to 18 h after surgery and the plasma concentrations of corticosterone were quantified. Postoperative changes in water intake and body weight were recorded, and the behaviour of the rats was analysed during two 30-min periods. Pre-emptive oral buprenorphine treatment reduced the plasma corticosterone levels in the postoperative period, compared to controls treated with local anaesthetics. Buprenorphine-treated rats consumed more water and maintained body weight better. Behavioural observations indicated that buprenorphine changed the behaviour in non-operated rats but there was no difference in the operated rats. The present study strengthens the hypothesis that pre-emptive oral buprenorphine in Nutella is suitable for treatment of postoperative pain in rats. PMID:20363983

  15. Brief anesthesia by isoflurane alters plasma corticosterone levels distinctly in male and female rats: Implications for tissue collection methods.

    PubMed

    Bekhbat, Mandakh; Merrill, Liana; Kelly, Sean D; Lee, Vanessa K; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2016-05-15

    Euthanasia by anesthetic agents is commonly performed prior to tissue collection in order to minimize pain and distress to the animal. However, depending on their mechanism of action as well as administration regimen, different methods of anesthesia may trigger an acute stress response through engaging the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which can impact numerous other physiological processes that the researcher may wish to examine as endpoints. We investigated the effects of the commonly used anesthetic agent isoflurane on two different endpoints related to the stress response: plasma corticosterone levels and gene expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as well as several of its regulators including FK506-binding protein 51 (Fkbp5) in the hippocampus of male and female rats. Our results indicate that brief exposure to anesthesia by isoflurane prior to decapitation can alter plasma corticosterone levels differentially in male and female rats within minutes without impacting gene expression in the hippocampus. We conclude that collection methods can influence stress-related physiological endpoints in female rats and the potential influence of even brief anesthesia as well as sex differences in response to anesthesia should be evaluated during the experimental design process and data interpretation. This finding is particularly important in light of new NIH standards regarding sex and reproducibility, and care should be taken to be certain that sex differences in endpoints of interest are not an artifact of sex differences in response to collection paradigms. PMID:26946276

  16. Protecting embryos from stress: Corticosterone effects and the corticosterone response to capture and confinement during pregnancy in a live-bearing lizard (Hoplodactylus maculatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cree, A.; Tyrrell, C.L.; Preest, M.R.; Thorburn, D.; Guillette, L.J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Hormones in the embryonic environment, including those of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, have profound effects on development in eutherian mammals. However, little is known about their effects in reptiles that have independently evolved viviparity. We investigated whether exogenous corticosterone affected embryonic development in the viviparous gecko Hoplodactylus maculatus, and whether pregnant geckos have a corticosterone response to capture and confinement that is suppressed relative to that in non-pregnant (vitellogenic) females and males. Corticosterone implants (5 mg, slow-release) administered to females in mid-pregnancy caused a large elevation of corticosterone in maternal plasma (P<0.001), probable reductions in embryonic growth and development (P=0.069-0.073), developmental abnormalities and eventual abortions. Cool temperature produced similar reductions in embryonic growth and development (P???0.036 cf. warm controls), but pregnancies were eventually successful. Despite the potentially harmful effects of elevated plasma corticosterone, pregnant females did not suppress their corticosterone response to capture and confinement relative to vitellogenic females, and both groups of females had higher responses than males. Future research should address whether lower maternal doses of corticosterone produce non-lethal effects on development that could contribute to phenotypic plasticity. Corticosterone implants also led to increased basking in pregnant females (P<0.001), and basal corticosterone in wild geckos (independent of reproductive condition) was positively correlated with body temperature (P<0.001). Interactions between temperature and corticosterone may have broad significance to other terrestrial ectotherms, and body temperature should be considered as a variable influencing plasma corticosterone concentrations in all future studies on reptiles. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term bioeffects of 435-MHz radiofrequency radiation on selected blood-borne endpoints in cannulated rats. Volume 2. Plasma ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and plasma corticosterone. Final report, 20 August 1984-16 February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, V.P.; Toler, J.C.; Bonasera, S.J.; Popovic, P.P.; Honeycutt, C.B.

    1987-08-01

    Two hundred adult male white rats with chronically implanted aortic cannulas were randomly divided into two groups. Animals in the first group were exposed to low-level (1.0 mW/cm2) pulsed-wave 435-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) for approximately 22 h daily, 7 days each week, for 6 months. Animals in the second group were maintained under identical conditions, but were not radiated. The cannulas were used to draw microsamples (0.3 mL) of aortic blood from the unrestrained, unanesthetized rats on a cyclic schedule. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassays hormone (ACTH) and plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassays. Statistical analysis of the results did not indicate increased plasma ACTH and plasma corticosterone concentrations in exposed animals when compared to sham-exposed animals. Exposure to this low-level radiofrequency environment did not induce stresses that were manifested as an alteration in plasma hormones.

  18. Elevated corticosterone levels decrease reproductive output of chick-rearing Adélie penguins but do not affect chick mass at fledging

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Raclot, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Study of physiological mechanisms can help us to understand how animals respond to changing environmental conditions. In particular, stress hormones (i.e. glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone) are described as mediating resource allocation, allowing animals to adjust their physiology and behaviour to predictable and unpredictable changes in the environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of an experimental increase in baseline corticosterone levels on the breeding effort and the reproductive output of chick-rearing male Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae). The number of chicks per nest, their body mass, and their size were monitored throughout the study. Direct observations allowed measurement of the time spent foraging at sea and caring for the young on the nest. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected for isotope analysis. Although all birds raised at least one chick, reproductive output was decreased by 42% in corticosterone-treated birds compared with control birds. The increase in corticosterone levels during the guard stage did not affect the mass of surviving chicks or the brood mass at fledging. Corticosterone-treated males spent on average 21% more time at the nest than control birds. However, the duration of foraging trips was similar between both groups. In addition, the similarity of isotopic signatures suggests that both groups foraged at similar locations and ingested the same prey species. The detailed on-land behaviour of birds should be examined in further studies to clarify the possible links between corticosterone levels, brooding time, and reproductive output. Understanding the relationships between glucocorticoids, fitness, and ultimately population dynamics is fundamental to enabling conservation physiology as a discipline to be successful in helping to manage species of conservation concern. PMID:27293591

  19. Cloacal gland and gonadal photoresponsiveness in male Japanese quail selected for divergent plasma corticosterone response to brief restraint.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, D G; Cole, C A; Castille, S A

    2006-06-01

    Corticosterone is linked to testicular depression, and in Coturnix, a relatively photorefractory species, day length and androgen dependency in cloacal gland development and foam production are evident. Furthermore, male quail selected for reduced (low stress, LS) rather than exaggerated (high stress, HS) plasma corticosterone stress response show more photo-induced reproductive development, greater resistance to reproductive declines induced by exposure to very short days, and a quicker recovery to a higher reproductive level upon return to long days. To determine whether a milder reduction in day length would also influence stress line reproductive photoresponsiveness, and perhaps photorefractoriness, males grown on 16 h of light were given 13 h of light for 4 wk followed by a return to long days for 12 wk. Cloacal gland measurements were made following the initial stimulatory photoperiod and weekly thereafter during the 2 light treatments. Plasma testosterone was determined initially, after 4 wk of light reduction, and at the end of the study, along with BW, testes weight (TWT), and TWT relative to BW. Cloacal gland volume (CVOL) was greater in LS than HS males grown on long days. Whereas exposure to 13 h of light reduced CVOL in both lines, line differences (LS > HS) persisted during the first 3 wk of light reduction. Moreover, by 2 wk of rephotostimulation, and weekly thereafter, line differences (LS > HS) in CVOL reemerged. Cloacal gland foam production and the proportion of individuals that produced cloacal gland foam responses reflected changes in CVOL. The BW did not differ by line, yet LS males had a higher TWT and TWT relative to BW than HS ones. All individuals, however, exhibited relative photorefractory responses. Whereas none of the LS males completely resisted reproductive regression induced by a 3 h light reduction, LS males showed other reproductive benefits upon mild photocastration and subsequent rephotostimulation (e.g., greater resistance to

  20. Effectiveness of different corticosterone administration methods to elevate corticosterone serum levels, induce depressive-like behavior, and affect neurogenesis levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kott, J M; Mooney-Leber, S M; Shoubah, F A; Brummelte, S

    2016-01-15

    High levels of chronic stress or stress hormones are associated with depressive-like behavior in animal models. However, slight elevations in corticosterone (CORT) - the major stress hormone in rodents - have also been associated with improved performances, albeit in a sex-dependent manner. Some of the discrepancies in the literature regarding the effects of high CORT levels may be due to different administrations methods. The current study aims to compare the effects of ∼40mg/kg given either via subcutaneous injection, through an implanted pellet, or in the drinking water, for ∼21days on CORT serum levels, depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST), and neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus (DG) in adult female rats. We found that animals exposed to the daily injections showed elevated CORT levels throughout the administration period, while the pellet animals showed only a transient increase, and drinking water animals revealed no elevation in CORT in serum. In addition, only the injection group exhibited higher levels of immobility in the FST. Interestingly, animals receiving CORT via injection or drinking water had lower numbers of doublecortin-positive cells in the ventral DG one week after the last CORT administration compared to animals implanted with a CORT pellet. These results will contribute to the growing literature on the effects of chronic CORT exposure and may help to clarify some of the discrepancies among previous studies, particularly in females. PMID:26556064

  1. Changes in plasma levels of cortisol and corticosterone after acute ACTH stimulation in rusa deer (Cervus rusa timorensis).

    PubMed

    van Mourik, S; Stelmasiak, T; Outch, K H

    1985-01-01

    Resting cortisol and corticosterone levels in immobilized mature rusa stags (Cervus rusa timorensis) and the influence of synthetic ACTH on the cortisol/corticosterone ratio (F/B ratio) were investigated. The basal concentration of cortisol was found to be 14.07 nmol/l (SD = 9.3, N = 15) and corticosterone was 3.79 nmol/l (SD = 2.3, N = 15). The cortisol/corticosterone ratio for the basal level was 5.31 (SD = 3.9, N = 15). After ACTH administration the cortisol/corticosterone ratio increased to 11.41 (SD = 5.4, N = 147) regardless of doses of ACTH administered to individual stags. The adrenal response to ACTH administration has a potential application for selection of deer most suitable for deer farming. PMID:2863041

  2. Flattening plasma corticosterone levels increases the prevalence of serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons inhibitory responses to nicotine in adrenalectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Frías-Domínguez, Carmen; Garduño, Julieta; Hernández, Salvador; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Major depression is characterized by a diminished activity of the brain serotonergic system as well as by the flattening of plasma cortisol levels. Nicotine improves mood in patients with major depression and in experimentally depressed animals by increasing brain serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline and dopamine levels. The present study was directed to determine if flattening plasma glucocorticoid levels changes nicotine's stimulatory effects upon 5-HT DRN neurons. The experiments were performed in brain slices obtained from rats previously (14 days) adrenalectomised and implanted subcutaneously with one pellet containing 75mg of corticosterone (Adx+CSR rats). Whole cell voltage and current clamp techniques were used to study the activity of immunocitochemically identified 5-HT DRN neurons. Administration of nicotine (1μM) in sham-operated animals produced stimulatory effects in all 5-HT DRN neurons studied. In Adx+CSR rats however, nicotine inhibited 75% of 5-HT DRN neurons and increased the potassium-dependent inward rectifying current. The inhibitory effect of nicotine upon 5-HT DRN neurons was dependent on serotonin release inside the DRN, since it was converted into a stimulatory response by the selective antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635, 25nM). Adx+CSR rats also presented an increased function of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, since, in these rats, serotonin (1-10μM) produced a higher increase in the potassium dependent inward rectifying current in comparison with sham-operated animals. Serotonin release inside DRN was mediated by α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors since the selective antagonist of these receptors dihydro-β-erytroidine hydrobromide (DHβE, 100nM) blocked the inhibitory effects of nicotine 5-HT DRN neurons. These data indicate that, in the experimental model of adrenalectomised rats implanted with corticosterone pellets, nicotine increases the function of

  3. Influence of the rearing system on yolk corticosterone concentration in captive Greater Rheas (Rhea americana).

    PubMed

    Della Costa, Natalia S; Marin, Raul H; Busso, Juan M; Hansen, Cristian; Navarro, Joaquín L; Martella, Mónica B

    2016-05-01

    Many environmental conditions elevate plasma corticosterone in laying birds, leading to elevated hormone accumulation in the egg. We investigated whether maternal yolk corticosterone levels in Greater Rheas differ between fresh eggs collected from an intensive (IRS) and a semi-extensive (SRS) rearing system. After HPLC validation, yolk corticosterone was measured using a corticosterone (125) I radio-immunoassay kit. Results (mean ± SE) showed that eggs collected from the IRS exhibited a significantly higher corticosterone concentration than eggs from SRS (89.88 ± 8.93 vs. 45.41 ± 5.48 ng/g yolk, respectively). Our findings suggest that rearing conditions under an intensive scheme (e.g., small pens with bare ground, no direct foraging and handling) might be perceived as more stressful for Greater Rhea females than semi-extensive rearing conditions (e.g., low animal density distributed in extensive areas and direct foraging), which would result in the transfer of higher yolk corticosterone levels. A better understanding of environmental conditions and female traits that affect yolk corticosterone deposition provides a background for future studies concerning the roles of maternal corticosterone on offspring development. Zoo Biol. 35:246-250, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928950

  4. Effects of Dietary Corticosterone on Yolk Colors and Eggshell Quality in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon-Hwa; Kim, Jimin; Yoon, Hyung-Sook; Choi, Yang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary corticosterone on egg quality. For 2 weeks hens received either control or experimental diet containing corticosterone at 30 mg/kg diet. Feed intake and egg production were monitored daily, and body weight measured weekly. Egg weights and egg quality were measured daily. Corticosterone treatment resulted in a remarkable increase in feed intake and sharp decrease in egg production compared with control (p<0.05) whereas body weight remained unchanged. Decreased albumen height, but no changes in egg weight, led to decreased Haugh unit (p<0.05). Corticosterone caused elevated eggshell thickness (p<0.05) without altering weight and strength, suggesting possible changes in shell structure. Yolk color and redness were increased by corticosterone (p<0.05) but lightness and yellowness were either not changed or inconsistent over the time period of measurements. Increased concentrations in plasma were also found for corticosterone, glucose, cholesterol, creatinine, uric acid, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, total protein, and amylase (p<0.05), suggesting that corticosterone increased protein breakdown, renal dysfunctions and pancreatitis. Together, the current results imply that dietary corticosterone affects egg quality such as yolk colors and shell thickness, in addition to its effects on feed intake and egg production. PMID:25925061

  5. Response of testosterone and corticosterone plasma levels to the challenge of sibling competition: a study in common terns.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Alexander; Becker, Peter H; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2014-08-01

    The hormonal response to social challenges has been widely studied, however, most work focused on adult behavior in a reproductive context although developing animals also encounter important social challenges early in life. We studied the relationship between acute sibling competition and plasma corticosterone (CORT) and testosterone (T) in common tern (Sterna hirundo) chicks, a species whose young compete for access to food by scramble interactions. Blood samples were taken in nests with two and only one single chick both immediately after a feeding bout and in non-challenged controls. We found that T levels were lower in siblings challenged by a feeding bout as compared to controls, which may be explained by the fact that T suppresses begging behavior and is only elevated in response to territorial intrusion but not sibling competition in a related species. Singletons had, corrected for body condition, generally lower CORT levels than siblings suggesting that growing up with siblings creates a competitive environment in which high CORT levels are sustained irrespective of a social challenge. CORT levels were also negatively correlated with body condition and were higher in males than in females. The latter may be related to sex-specific food requirements and susceptibility to stress. Our results suggest a possible suppressive effect of acute sibling competition on T secretion, and a positive effect on CORT levels by longer term sibling competition. The degree to which these dynamics are related to begging or aggression, or both, needs further experimental work. PMID:24859255

  6. Sex-dependent effects of maternal separation on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamines in response to chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, S E; Quadros, I M H; Machado, R B; Suchecki, D

    2013-12-01

    Prolonged and repeated periods of maternal separation produce behavioral phenotype of increased vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders and drug abuse. Most of the changes in behavior, corticosterone (CORT) and monoamine levels induced by long maternal separation (LMS) are observed after a challenge, but not in basal conditions. LMS increases ethanol-induced locomotor response and self-administration, possibly due to changes in CORT release and/or monoamine concentrations. This study examined the effects of LMS in association with chronic ethanol treatment on plasma CORT and brain monoamine concentrations in male and female Swiss mice, which were kept undisturbed (animal facility rearing - AFR) or separated from their mothers for 3h/day, from 2 to 14 days of age (LMS). As adults, one set of male and female mice received no drug treatment to assess the effect of LMS per se. Another set of animals received saline injections for 20 days and one ethanol injection (2.2g/kg, i.p.) on day 21 (acute) or ethanol for 21 days (chronic). Locomotor activity, plasma CORT levels and monoamines in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of AFR and LMS mice were evaluated in non-treated, acute and chronic ethanol-treated animals. In non-treated mice, no differences were found in CORT or locomotor activity, with small changes in monoamines content. In LMS females, chronic ethanol increased dopamine and serotonin concentrations in the frontal cortex, relative to acute ethanol LMS and to chronic ethanol-treated AFR groups (p<0.05). In LMS males, chronic ethanol increased hippocampal noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and metabolites when compared to respective AFR controls, as well as acute LMS. Moreover, chronic ethanol treatment resulted in higher CORT concentrations in LMS than in AFR males. Overall, these results indicate that LMS mice were more susceptible to the effects of chronic ethanol administration on CORT and brain monoamine concentrations, and that these effects

  7. Somatic and Neuroendocrine Changes in Response to Chronic Corticosterone Exposure During Adolescence in Male and Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, E T; Savenkova, M; Karatsoreos, I N; Romeo, R D

    2016-02-01

    Prolonged stress and repeated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis can result in many sex-dependent behavioural and metabolic changes in rats, including alterations in feeding behaviour and reduced body weight. In adults, these effects of stress can be mimicked by corticosterone, a major output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and recapitulate the stress-induced sex difference, such that corticosterone-treated males show greater weight loss than females. Similar to adults, chronic stress during adolescence leads to reduced weight gain, particularly in males. However, it is currently unknown whether corticosterone mediates this somatic change and whether additional measures of neuroendocrine function are affected by chronic corticosterone exposure during adolescence in a sex-dependent manner. Therefore, we examined the effects of non-invasively administered corticosterone (150 or 300 μg/ml) in the drinking water of male and female rats throughout adolescent development (30-58 days of age). We found that adolescent animals exposed to chronic corticosterone gain significantly less weight than controls, which may be partly mediated by the effects of corticosterone on food consumption, fluid intake and gonadal hormone function. Our data further show that, despite similar circulating corticosterone levels, males demonstrate a greater sensitivity to these changes than females. We also found that Npy1 and Npy5 receptor mRNA expression, genes implicated in appetite regulation, was significantly reduced in the ventral medial hypothalamus of corticosterone-treated males and females compared to controls. Finally, parameters of gonadal function, such as plasma sex steroid concentrations and weight of reproductive tissues, were reduced by adolescent corticosterone treatment, although only in males. The data obtained in the present study indicate that chronic corticosterone exposure throughout adolescent development results in significant and sex

  8. Plasma corticosterone concentrations in turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida and maintained at high and low environmental temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Simensen, E.; Olson, L.D.; Ryan, M.P.; Vanjonack, W.J.; Johnson, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay was used to determine plasma corticosterone concentration (PCC) in turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida via either the palatine air spaces or the drinking water and maintained at high (33.4-37.4 C), low (2.6-5.3 C) and moderate )19.8-22.4 C) temperatures in temperature-controlled chambers. In uninoculated turkeys maintained at high temperatures, the PCC was generally lower than in turkeys maintained at moderate temperatures, whereas the opposite occurred in turkeys maintained at low temperatures. After inoculation with P. multocida, all groups of inoculated turkeys showed an increase in the average PCC, which attained a level in some turkeys of over 40 ng/ml, in relation to the average in the uninoculated turkeys, which ranged from 1.8 to 27.3 ng/ml. This increase was proportional to the severity of the infection that developed. The PCC was found to be a sensitive indicator of an incubating infection of P. multocida, since it was markedly increased in turkeys that were bled one day before the onset of depression. In turkeys that were inoculated via the palatine air spaces and maintained at 20 C, the PCC on the day of inoculation was significantly (P less than 0.05) lower in the turkeys that later died than in those that survived. Generally, the PCC was higher in the turkeys that either died between 5 and 10 days after inoculation or were depressed aa the end of the experiment on day 10, relative to the turkeys that were alert at the end of the experiment.

  9. The relationship between adjunctive drinking, blood ethanol concentration and plasma corticosterone across fixed-time intervals of food delivery in two inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Matthew M.; Steele, Andrea M.; McCracken, Aubrey D.; Finn, Deborah A.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schedules of intermittent food delivery induce excessive fluid intake, termed schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation is important for the expression and maintenance of this adjunctive behavior. Previous work has focused of examining the relationship between water intake and plasma corticosterone (CORT) in rats at a single or a limited range of fixed time (FT) intervals. However, little remains known regarding SIP and the corresponding stress response 1) across the bitonic function that epitomizes adjunctive behavior, 2) when ethanol is the available fluid, and 3) when a species other than rat or multiple strains are studied. Here we report the findings from ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and non-preferring DBA/2J (D2) mice serially exposed to progressively larger FT intervals (0 → 60 min) and given access to either water or a 5% v/v ethanol solution. Following 2 weeks of experience with each schedule, blood samples were collected at the conclusion of the last 60-min session to evaluate CORT and the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) achieved. While both strains exhibited a bitonic function of ethanol intake and BEC that peaked at or near a 5-min interval, only D2 mice showed a similar response with water. In contrast, CORT levels rose monotonically with incremental increases in the FT interval regardless of the strain examined or fluid type offered, indicating that glucocorticoid release likely reflects the aversive aspects of increasing intervals between reinforcement rather than engagement in adjunctive behavior. These findings also caution against the use of a single intensity stressor to evaluate the relationship between stress and ethanol intake, as the magnitude of stress appears to affect ethanol consumption in a non-linear fashion. PMID:23827168

  10. Sources of variation in plasma corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in the male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis): I. Seasonal patterns and effects of stress and adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The secretion of steroids from the adrenal gland is a classic endocrine response to perturbations that can affect homeostasis. During an acute stress response, glucocorticoids (GC), such as corticosterone (CORT), prepare the metabolic physiology and cognitive abilities of an animal in a manner that promotes survival during changing conditions. Although GC functions during stress are well established, much less is understood concerning how adrenal androgens, namely dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are influenced by stress. I conducted three field studies (one experimental and two descriptive) aimed at identifying how both CORT and DHEA secretion in free-living male northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), vary during acute stress; across different circulations (brachial vs. jugular); in response to ACTH challenge; and during the annual cycle. As predicted, restraint stress increased plasma CORT, but unexpectedly DHEA levels decreased, but the latter effect was only seen for blood sampled from the jugular vein, and not the brachial. The difference in DHEA between circulations may result from increased neural uptake of DHEA during stress. Injection with exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) increased CORT concentrations, but failed to alter DHEA levels, thus suggesting ACTH is not a direct regulator of DHEA. Monthly field sampling revealed distinct seasonal patterns to both initial and restraint stress CORT and DHEA levels with distinct differences in the steroid milieu between breeding and non-breeding seasons. These data suggest that the CORT response to stress remains relatively consistent, but DHEA secretion is largely independent of the response by CORT. Although CORT functions have been well-studied in wild animals, little research exists for the role of DHEA and their variable relationship sets the stage for future experimental research addressing steroid stress responses. PMID:27255363

  11. EFFECT OF ACUTE STRESS ON PLASMA B-CORTICOSTERONE, ESTRADIOL-17B AND TESTOSTERONE CONCENTRATIONS IN JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS COLLECTED FROM THREE SITES WITHIN THE KISSIMMEE-EVERGLADES DRAINAGE BASIN IN FLORIDA (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of acute stress on plasma b-corticosterone (B), testosterone (T) and estradiol-17b (E2), concentrations in juvenile alligators collected from sites with varying sediment contaminants was examined in this study. Dramatic increases in plasma B concentrations were observe...

  12. Are birds stressed during long-term flights? A wind-tunnel study on circulating corticosterone in the red knot.

    PubMed

    Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Hasselquist, Dennis; Lindström, Ake; Koolhaas, Anita; Piersma, Theunis

    2009-01-01

    During endurance flight most birds do not feed and have to rely on their body reserves. Fat and protein is catabolised to meet the high energetic demands. Even though the hormonal regulation of migration is complex and not yet fully understood, the adrenocortical hormone corticosterone crystallizes to play a major role in controlling physiological traits in migratory birds during flight. However, results from field studies are partially equivocal, not least because data from birds during endurance flight are hard to get and present mostly a momentary shot. A wind-tunnel experiment offered the possibility to measure repeatedly under controlled conditions the effect of long flights on the stress hormone corticosterone. In a long-distance migrating shorebird, the red knot Calidris canutus, we measured plasma concentrations of corticosterone within 3 min and after a restraint time of 30 min directly after 2h and 10h non-stop flights, respectively, and during rest. Baseline corticosterone levels were unchanged directly after the flights, indicating that endurance flight did not affect corticosterone levels. The adrenocortical response to restraint showed the typical rise in birds during rest, while birds after a 2 or 10h flight substantially decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations. We suggest that the negative adrenocortical response to restraint after flight is part of the mechanism to reduce the proteolytic effect of corticosterone to save muscle protein and to avoid muscle damaging effects. PMID:19481083

  13. Effect of Acute Swim Stress on Plasma Corticosterone and Brain Monoamine Levels in Bidirectionally Selected DxH Recombinant Inbred Mouse Strains Differing in Fear Recall and Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Caroline A.; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F.; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus, and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 minutes after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:25117886

  14. Effect of acute swim stress on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamine levels in bidirectionally selected DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains differing in fear recall and extinction.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caroline A; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 min after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:25117886

  15. Corticosterone predicts foraging behavior and parental care in macaroni penguins.

    PubMed

    Crossin, Glenn T; Trathan, Phil N; Phillips, Richard A; Gorman, Kristen B; Dawson, Alistair; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Williams, Tony D

    2012-07-01

    Corticosterone has received considerable attention as the principal hormonal mediator of allostasis or physiological stress in wild animals. More recently, it has also been implicated in the regulation of parental care in breeding birds, particularly with respect to individual variation in foraging behavior and provisioning effort. There is also evidence that prolactin can work either inversely or additively with corticosterone to achieve this. Here we test the hypothesis that endogenous corticosterone plays a key physiological role in the control of foraging behavior and parental care, using a combination of exogenous corticosterone treatment, time-depth telemetry, and physiological sampling of female macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) during the brood-guard period of chick rearing, while simultaneously monitoring patterns of prolactin secretion. Plasma corticosterone levels were significantly higher in females given exogenous implants relative to those receiving sham implants. Increased corticosterone levels were associated with significantly higher levels of foraging and diving activity and greater mass gain in implanted females. Elevated plasma corticosterone was also associated with an apparent fitness benefit in the form of increased chick mass. Plasma prolactin levels did not correlate with corticosterone levels at any time, nor was prolactin correlated with any measure of foraging behavior or parental care. Our results provide support for the corticosterone-adaptation hypothesis, which predicts that higher corticosterone levels support increased foraging activity and parental effort. PMID:22673661

  16. Regulation of plasma testosterone, corticosterone, and metabolites in response to stress, reproductive stage, and social challenges in a desert male songbird.

    PubMed

    Deviche, Pierre; Beouche-Helias, Benjamin; Davies, Scott; Gao, Sisi; Lane, Samuel; Valle, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    In many male vertebrates, the secretion of reproductive (gonadal androgens) and adrenocortical (glucocorticoids) hormones varies seasonally and in response to environmental stimuli, and these hormones exert numerous behavioral and metabolic effects. We performed two field studies on adult male Rufous-winged Sparrows, Peucaea carpalis, a Sonoran Desert rain-dependent sedentary species, to (a) determine seasonal changes in initial (baseline) and acute stress-induced plasma testosterone (T), corticosterone (CORT), and two metabolites (uric acid and glucose) and (b) compare the effects of two types of social challenge (song playback or simulated territorial intrusion consisting of song playback plus exposure to a live decoy bird) on plasma T, CORT, these metabolites, and territorial behavior. Initial plasma T was higher during the summer breeding period than during post-breeding molt. Acute stress resulting from capture and restraint for 30 min decreased plasma T in breeding condition birds but not in the fall, revealing that this decrease is seasonally regulated. Initial plasma CORT did not change seasonally, but plasma CORT increased in response to acute stress. This increase was likewise seasonally regulated, being relatively smaller during autumnal molt than in the summer. We found no evidence that acute stress levels of CORT are functionally related to stress-depressed plasma T and, therefore, that plasma T decreases during stress as a result of elevated plasma CORT. Thirty minutes of exposure to simulated territorial intrusion resulted in different behavior than 30 min of exposure to song playback, with increased time spent near the decoy and decreased number of overhead flights. Neither type of social challenge influenced plasma T, thus offering no support for the hypothesis that plasma T either responds to or mediates the behavioral effects of social challenge. Exposure to both social challenges elevated plasma CORT, but simulated territorial intrusion was more

  17. Exposure to coal combustion residues during metamorphosis elevates corticosterone content and adversely affects oral morphology, growth, and development in Rana sphenocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.D.; Peterson, V.A.; Mendonca, M.T.

    2009-01-15

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are documented to negatively impact oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. It is currently unclear what physiological mechanisms may mediate these effects. Corticosterone, a glucocorticoid hormone, is a likely mediator because when administered exogenously it, like CCRs, also negatively influences oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. In an attempt to identify if corticosterone mediates these effects, we raised larval Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, on either sand or CCR substrate and documented effects of sediment type on whole body corticosterone, oral morphology, and time to and mass at key metamorphic stages. Coal combustion residue treated tadpoles contained significantly more corticosterone than controls throughout metamorphosis. However, significantly more oral abnormalities occurred early in metamorphosis when differences in corticosterone levels between treatments were minimal. Overall, CCR-treated tadpoles took significantly more time to transition between key stages and gained less mass between stages than controls, but these differences between treatments decreased during later stages when corticosterone differences between treatments were greatest. Our results suggest endogenous increase in corticosterone content and its influence on oral morphology, growth and development is more complex than previously thought.

  18. Habituation of adult Magellanic penguins to human visitation as expressed through behavior and corticosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian G; Boersma, P Dee; Wingfield, John C

    2006-02-01

    Ecotourism is increasing worldwide; hence, it is important to know how wildlife are affected behaviorally and physiologically by human visitation. We studied the effects of human visitation on the Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at Punta Tombo, Argentina, by monitoring changes in defensive head turns and plasma corticosterone (a hormone secreted in response to stress) for penguins with and without a history of tourist visitation. Habituation to human visitation was rapid. In penguins with no previous exposure to tourists, the number of defensive head turns and level of plasma corticosterone decreased significantly within 5 days of one 15-minute visit/day. Penguins living in tourist-visited and undisturbed areas secreted more corticosterone when captured and restrained than penguins visited by a person. Penguins in tourist areas, however did not show as strong a corticosterone response to capture and restraint as did penguins in areas without tourists. This difference was due to a decreased capability of the adrenocortical tissue to secrete corticosterone in tourist-visited birds. Although our data show no direct negative effects of tourism on Magellanic Penguins at Punta Tombo, consequences of a modification of physiological capabilities (e.g., adrenocortical function) may not become apparent until much later in life. The physiological differences between tourist-visited and undisturbed groups of Magellanic Penguins emphasize the importance of monitoring the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on wildlife at multiple levels. PMID:16909667

  19. Oviposition and the plasma concentrations of LH, progesterone, and corticosterone in bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) fed parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Scanes, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    Bobwhite quail were fed concentrations of parathion (0,50, 100, 200 or 400 p.p.m.) for 10 days. Food intake, body weight change, brain acetylcholinesterase activity, egg production, and ovary weight were reduced in a dose-dependent manner. In a second experiment, birds were fed 0, 25 or 100 p.p.m. parathion or pair-fed control food to equate consumption in the 100 p.p.m. group. Egg production was not affected in birds fed 25 p.p.m. or in the pair-fed group, but the daily time of oviposition was more variable than in the control group. Cessation of egg production, inhibition of follicular development, and reduced plasma LH concentration were observed in birds fed 100 p.p.m. parathion. These findings indicate that exposure to parathion can impair reproduction, possibly by altering gonadotrophin secretion.

  20. Changes in plasma angiotensin II, aldosterone, arginine vasotocin, corticosterone, and electrolyte concentrations during acclimation to dry condition and seawater in the crab-eating frog.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Wong, Marty K S; Preyavichyapugdee, Narin; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Hyodo, Susumu; Takei, Yoshio; Matuda, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The crab-eating frog Fejervarya cancrivora inhabits mangrove swamps and marshes in Southeast Asia. In the present study, circulating angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Aldo), arginine vasotocin (AVT), and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations as well as various blood parameters were studied under osmotically stressful conditions. Following acclimation to hyperosmotic seawater and dry condition for 5days, body weight was significantly decreased. Under both conditions, plasma Na(+), Cl(-), and urea concentrations, hematocrit values (Ht; blood volume indicator), and osmolality were significantly increased. Dehydration associated with hypovolemic and hyperosmotic states of body fluids was induced during acclimation to hyperosmotic seawater and dry condition in the crab-eating frogs. Ang II, Aldo, AVT, and Cort were maintained within relatively narrow concentration ranges in the control frogs; however, in frogs under dry and hyperosmotic seawater conditions, large variations were observed among individuals in each group. Mean plasma Ang II and Aldo concentrations significantly increased in hyperosmotic seawater-acclimated and desiccated frogs. Although mean plasma AVT concentrations in dehydrated frogs of both the groups were approximately 2.0-3.5 times higher than those in the control frogs, the differences were not significant because of the variation. There was a significant correlation between plasma osmolality and AVT as well as Ang II but not Aldo. A significant correlation was also observed between Ht and AVT as well as Ang II. Plasma Ang II was significantly correlated with plasma Aldo. These results indicate that the crab-eating frogs may exhibit similar physiological responses to both seawater-acclimated and dry conditions. It appears that under dehydrated conditions, osmoregulatory mechanisms participate in stabilization of the situation. The renin-angiotensin system may have pivotal roles in body fluid regulation under volemic and osmotic stress in the

  1. Active coping toward predatory stress is associated with lower corticosterone and progesterone plasma levels and decreased methylation in the medial amygdala vasopressin system.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Michael T; Dass, Shantala A Hari; Booth, Jessica; Suraev, Anastasia; Vyas, Ajai; McGregor, Iain S

    2014-08-01

    An active coping style displayed under stress - which involves proactive investigatory responses toward environmental threats - has been associated with reduced vulnerability to psychiatric illness. However, the neurobiological determinants of coping styles are not well understood. When rats are exposed to a naturalistic stressor (cat fur) in a group, some individuals in the group show robust active investigation of the stimulus while others show a passive response involving retreat, immobility and close aggregation with conspecifics. Here we explored endocrine and epigenetic correlates of these contrasting coping styles. Male Wistar rats (n=48) were exposed to cat fur in groups of 4 and the passive and active responders were identified and assessed for endocrine and epigenetic differences. Three days after the final cat fur exposure, active responders had substantially lower plasma levels of corticosterone and progesterone than passive responders. Plasma and testicular testosterone levels did not differ between active and passive responders. Active responders had markedly less methylation of the AVP CGCG promoter region located at base 4970 in the posterodorsal region of the medial amygdala but did not differ in the methylation status of the CCGG sequence located at base 2243. This is in agreement with prior research suggesting that AVP and progesterone act in opposition within the medial amygdala to modulate stress-related behaviors. The present study reports striking endocrine and epigenetic differences between active and passive responders, providing insight into potential systems involved in the manifestation of differing coping styles. PMID:25127982

  2. Breeding under unpredictable conditions: Annual variation in gonadal maturation, energetic reserves and plasma levels of androgens and corticosterone in anurans from the Brazilian semi-arid.

    PubMed

    Madelaire, Carla Bonetti; Gomes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2016-03-01

    Anurans living in arid and semi-arid habitats are subjected to unpredictable rain patterns. Consequently, they should be prepared to reproduce at the onset of rain events. We investigated the covariation between calling behavior, testicular maturation, abdominal fat body index (FBI), plasma levels of androgens (T-DHT) and corticosterone (CORT) of males from three species of anurans in the Brazilian semi-arid during the reproductive period and drought. One of these species aestivates during the drought, while the other two species remain foraging. Although the three species display different behavioral strategies during the dry period, they present the same general reproductive patterns. T-DHT levels on the plasma and germinative cyst diameters were higher during the reproductive and breeding period compared to the drought. Additionally, the germinative cysts had all cell stages including sperm bundles during the dry season, however, it was only during the breeding event that free spermatozoa were found in the cyst lumen. These results suggest that these species present the reproductive pattern typical of desert anurans, consisting of opportunistic breeders that reproduce when triggered by a rain stimulus. Rhinella jimi and Pleurodema diplolister had higher CORT when males were calling. Moreover, Rhinella granulosa and P. diplolister showed lower FBI during breeding event, when males were calling. The high levels of CORT and lower FBI during reproductive period are associated, indicating that CORT modulates the recruitment of energy stores to prepare and maintain reproduction, particularly the expensive calling effort. PMID:26808964

  3. Context-dependent effects of feather corticosterone on growth rate and fledging success of wild passerine nestlings in heterogeneous habitat.

    PubMed

    Lodjak, Jaanis; Mägi, Marko; Rooni, Uku; Tilgar, Vallo

    2015-12-01

    Life history theory seeks answers to questions about how suites of traits, like growth rate, body mass and survival, have coevolved to maximize the fitness of individuals. In stochastic environments, individual fitness may be closely linked to environmental conditions experienced early in life. When conditions deteriorate, animals have to adapt physiologically to avoid detrimental effects to growth and survival. Hormones such as glucocorticoids are potentially important mediators of developmental plasticity, although their function is quite poorly understood in free-living animals to date. In this study, we used brood-size manipulation in wild great tits (Parus major) to see whether resource (e.g. food) availability can change feather corticosterone levels, somatic growth and fledging success in nestlings raised in habitats of different quality. Recent studies suggest that feather corticosterone offers a long-term hormonal measure for the main avian glucocorticoid by integrating the plasma levels of corticosterone over the whole nestling period. We showed that feather corticosterone, growth rate and fledging success were significantly affected by the treatment only in coniferous forests where growth conditions had a tendency to be poorer than in deciduous forests. We also found that feather corticosterone was negatively related to fledging success, and this effect was more pronounced in coniferous habitat. Our results suggest that feather corticosterone could offer an important physiological measure for nestling performance, mediated by a context-dependent developmental trade-off between immediate and future survival. PMID:26025576

  4. Daily cocaine self-administration under long-access conditions augments restraint-induced increases in plasma corticosterone and impairs glucocorticoid receptor-mediated negative feedback in rats.

    PubMed

    Mantsch, John R; Cullinan, William E; Tang, Lee C; Baker, David A; Katz, Eric S; Hoks, Michael A; Ziegler, Dana R

    2007-09-01

    Cocaine addiction appears to be associated with a drug-induced dysregulation of stressor responsiveness that may contribute to further cocaine use. The present study examined alterations in stressor-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats provided daily access to cocaine for self-administration (SA) under long-access conditions (1.0 mg/kg/infusion; 6 hx14 days). Cocaine self-administering rats displayed reduced basal plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels but showed an augmented restraint-induced percent increase response from baseline compared to saline self-administering controls when measured 24 days after SA testing. This augmented CORT response may have been attributable to impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated feedback regulation of HPA function, since cocaine self-administering rats were also less susceptible to dexamethasone (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) suppression of plasma CORT levels. GR protein expression measured using Western blot analysis was significantly reduced in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (including the paraventricular nucleus [PVN]) but not in the pituitary gland, ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsal hippocampus, ventral subiculum, medial prefrontal cortex or amygdala in cocaine self-administering rats. Surprisingly, basal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA or post-restraint increases in CRH mRNA measured at a single (90 min) time-point in the PVN using in situ hybridization did not differ between groups. The findings suggest that cocaine use produces persistent changes in individual responsiveness to stressors that may contribute to the addiction process. PMID:17689506

  5. Bovine serum albumin as the dominant form of dietary protein reduces subcutaneous fat mass, plasma leptin and plasma corticosterone in high fat-fed C57/BL6J mice.

    PubMed

    McManus, Bettina L; Korpela, Riitta; Speakman, John R; Cryan, John F; Cotter, Paul D; Nilaweera, Kanishka N

    2015-08-28

    Increasing evidence suggests that the source of dietary protein can have an impact on weight gain and fat mass during high-fat feeding in both humans and rodents. The present study examined whether dietary bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the dominant source of protein alters energy balance and adiposity associated with high-fat feeding. C57/BL6J mice were given a diet with 10 % of energy from fat and 20 % of energy from casein or a diet with 45 % of energy from fat and either 20 % of energy from casein (HFD) or BSA (HFD+BSA) for 13 weeks. The HFD+BSA diet did not significantly alter daily energy expenditure, locomotor activity and RER, but did increase cumulative energy intake and percentage of lean mass while reducing feed efficiency and percentage of fat mass when compared with the HFD (P< 0·05). In subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), the HFD+BSA diet increased the mRNA levels of PPARα (PPARA), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), but reduced the mRNA level of leptin when compared with the HFD (P< 0·05). The SAT mRNA levels of PPARA, CPT1b and UCP3 were negatively correlated (P< 0·05) with SAT mass, which was reduced in HFD+BSA mice compared with HFD controls (P< 0·01). No differences in epididymal fat mass existed between the groups. The HFD+BSA diet normalised plasma leptin and corticosterone levels compared with the HFD (P< 0·05). While differences in leptin levels were associated with the percentage of fat mass (P< 0·01), changes in corticosterone concentrations were independent of the percentage of fat mass (P< 0·05). The data suggest that the HFD+BSA diet influences plasma leptin levels via SAT mass reduction where mRNA levels of genes linked to β-oxidation were increased, whereas differences in plasma corticosterone levels were not related to fat mass reduction. PMID:26189974

  6. Sources of variation in plasma corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in the male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis): II. Effects of urbanization, food supplementation and social stress.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sarah; Fokidis, H Bobby

    2016-09-01

    Perturbations in an organism's environment can induce significant shifts in hormone secretory patterns. In this context, the glucocorticoid (GC) steroids secreted by the adrenal cortex have received much attention from ecologists and behaviorists due to their role in the vertebrate stress response. Adrenal GCs, such as corticosterone (CORT), are highly responsive to instability in environmental and social conditions. However, little is understood about how adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is influenced by changing conditions. We conducted field experiments to determine how circulating CORT and DHEA vary during restraint stress in the male northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis). Specifically, we examined how four different changes in the physical (urbanization and food availability) and social (territorial conflict, distress of a mate) environment affect CORT and DHEA levels. The majority of cardinals responded to restraint stress by increasing and decreasing CORT and DHEA, respectively, however this depended on sampling context. Cardinals sampled from urban habitats had both lower initial and restraint stress CORT concentrations, but a comparable DHEA pattern to those sampled from a forest. Supplementing food to territorial males did not alter circulating initial DHEA or CORT concentrations nor did it change the response to restraint stress when compared to unsupplemented controls. Exposing cardinals to varying durations of song playback, which mimics a territorial intrusion, did not affect CORT levels, but did attenuate the DHEA response to restraint stress. Examining a larger dataset of males captured before, after or at the same time as their female mate, allowed us to address how the stress of a captured mate affected the male's CORT and DHEA response. Males showed elevated initial and restraint CORT and DHEA when their female mate was captured first. Taken together, these data demonstrate that both CORT and DHEA secretion patterns depends on

  7. Sex differences in plasma corticosterone release in undisturbed chickens (Gallus gallus) in response to arginine vasotocin and corticotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Madison, F N; Jurkevich, A; Kuenzel, W J

    2008-02-01

    In birds, two neuropeptides, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasotocin (AVT), are major regulators of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) during the stress response. In birds, however, the relative efficacy of CRH and AVT to stimulate the HPA axis in males and females remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the time course of CORT release following central CRH and AVT administration to male and female chickens. Chickens were fitted with a stainless steel cannula surgically implanted in the lateral ventricle and a catheter chronically inserted in the jugular vein. Birds were housed individually in cages behind a one-way glass partition and unnecessary noise was avoided during the sampling period. Each bird received a single 5.0microtracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of either saline (SAL), AVT (10 and 100pmol), or CRH (10 and 100pmol). Blood was sampled remotely every 15min for 2h and plasma CORT was determined by radioimmunoassay. There was a significant increase in plasma CORT concentration in males injected with 100pmol AVT beginning at 15min post-injection through 2h compared with SAL injected birds. In males, injection of 100pmol CRH was significantly more effective in releasing CORT compared to an equal molar concentration of AVT or SAL. In females, ICV injection of 100pmol AVT induced moderate increase in CORT levels. In contrast, 100pmol CRH significantly increased plasma CORT compared to SAL injected controls but the CORT response was nearly 50% less than that obtained in males. PMID:17936761

  8. Pre- and Postnatal Effects of Corticosterone on Fitness-Related Traits and the Timing of Endogenous Corticosterone Production in a Songbird.

    PubMed

    Strange, Meghan S; Bowden, Rachel M; Thompson, Charles F; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2016-07-01

    Maternally derived corticosterone in the egg and corticosterone produced endogenously by altricial nestling birds play essential roles during development. Although persistently high corticosterone levels can be harmful, moderately elevated levels above baseline can lead to reallocation of resources between growth and maintenance to ensure immediate survival or to enhance the development of fitness-related traits. We tested two hypotheses concerning the fitness consequences of elevated corticosterone during prenatal and postnatal development in altricial house wrens: (1) elevated corticosterone shifts resources away from growth and immune function and (2) elevated corticosterone serves as a signal to allocate resources to fitness-related traits. We also explored the development of the stress response, hypothesizing that early-stage nestlings have little endogenously produced corticosterone, but that their baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels increase with age. Nestlings hatching from corticosterone-injected eggs were lighter at hatching, but through compensatory growth, ended up heavier than controls near the time of fledging, an important, fitness-related trait. Nestlings that hatched from corticosterone-injected eggs and those given oral doses of corticosterone did not differ from controls in three other fitness-related traits: immunoresponsiveness, size, or haematocrit. Early- and late-stage nestlings had similar baseline corticosterone levels, and all nestlings increased their plasma corticosterone levels in response to a capture-and-restraint protocol, with older nestlings mounting a stronger stress-induced response than younger nestlings. These results suggest that prenatal exposure to corticosterone is important in shaping offspring phenotype and are consistent with the hypothesis that maternally derived corticosterone in the egg can have long-term, fitness-related effects on offspring phenotype. PMID:27279255

  9. Pre- and Post-Natal Effects of Corticosterone on Fitness-Related Traits and the Timing of Endogenous Corticosterone Production in a Songbird

    PubMed Central

    Strange, Meghan S.; Bowden, Rachel M.; Thompson, Charles F.; Sakaluk, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    Maternally-derived corticosterone in the egg and corticosterone produced endogenously by altricial nestling birds play essential roles during development. Although persistently high corticosterone levels can be harmful, moderately elevated levels above baseline can lead to reallocation of resources between growth and maintenance to ensure immediate survival or to enhance the development of fitness-related traits. We tested two hypotheses concerning the fitness consequences of elevated corticosterone during pre-natal and post-natal development in altricial house wrens: (1) elevated corticosterone shifts resources away from growth and immune function and (2) elevated corticosterone serves as a signal to allocate resources to fitness-related traits. We also explored the development of the stress response, hypothesizing that early-stage nestlings have little endogenously produced corticosterone, but that their baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels increase with age. Nestlings hatching from corticosterone-injected eggs were lighter at hatching, but through compensatory growth, ended up heavier than controls near the time of fledgling, an important, fitness-related trait. Nestlings that hatched from corticosterone-injected eggs and those given oral doses of corticosterone did not differ from controls in three other fitness-related traits: immunoresponsiveness, size, or haematocrit. Early- and late-stage nestlings had similar baseline corticosterone levels, and all nestlings increased their plasma corticosterone levels in response to a capture-and-restraint protocol, with older nestlings mounting a stronger stress-induced response than younger nestlings. These results suggest that pre-natal exposure to corticosterone is important in shaping offspring phenotype, and are consistent with the hypothesis that maternally derived corticosterone in the egg can have long-term, fitness-related effects on offspring phenotype. PMID:27279255

  10. Effect of nestling status and brood size on concentration of corticosterone of free-living kittiwake chicks.

    PubMed

    Brewer, John H; O'Reilly, Kathleen M; Buck, C Loren

    2010-03-01

    Vertebrates respond to perceived stressors through increased plasma concentrations of glucocorticoids. However, there is considerable variation within and across species in the circumstances and degree to which glucocorticoid levels are elevated. We measured baseline and acute stress-induced levels of corticosterone of free-living, black-legged kittiwake chicks (Rissa tridactyla) across four consecutive breeding seasons in the northern Gulf of Alaska to determine the effect of hatching order and brood size on corticosterone levels of chicks. We sampled 12- to 15-day-old chicks from intact broods (i.e., no brood reduction) at three colonies from 2002-2005 (n=164). Baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone did not vary by hatching order or brood size. These results suggest that the adrenocortical function of kittiwake chicks from broods that survive intact through 12-15 days is not affected by either hatching order or brood size. PMID:19699742

  11. The metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone in lean and obese male Zucker rats

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.D.; Corll, C.B.; Porter, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    The obese Zucker rat is an animal model of human juvenile-onset obesity. These rats exhibit numerous endocrine and metabolic abnormalities. Adrenalectomy of obese rats has been shown to reduce or reverse several of these abnormalities, thereby implying that corticosterone may contribute to the expression of obesity in this animal. Furthermore, it has been shown that the circadian rhythm of plasma corticosterone is disturbed in obese Zucker rats resulting in elevated morning plasma corticosterone concentrations in obese rats as compared to lean rats. In a effort to better elucidate the mechanism of the elevated morning levels of plasma corticosterone, the metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone was determined in the morning for lean and obese male Zucker rats (12 to 20 weeks). Additionally, the biliary and urinary excretion of labeled corticosterone and/or its metabolites were determined. The metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone was significantly greater in obese rats than in their lean counterparts. Both the metabolic clearance rate and the volume of compartments significantly correlated with body weight. No correlation was found between body weight and the elimination rate constant. The increased metabolic clearance rate of obese rats appeared to be due to an increase in the physiologic distribution of corticosterone and not to an alteration in the enzymes responsible for corticosterone metabolism. It appears that the metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone in obese Zucker rats does not contribute to elevated morning concentrations of plasma corticosterone previously observed in these animals. It suggests that the adrenal corticosterone secretion rate must actually be greater than one would expect from the plasma corticosterone concentrations alone.

  12. Impaired release of corticosterone from adrenals contributes to impairment of circadian rhythms of activity in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Ahabrach, Hanan; Errami, Mohammed; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Addaoudi, Kaoutar; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-08-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present impaired sleep-wake and circadian rhythms, relative adrenal insufficiency and altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal gland (HPA) axis. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Circadian rhythms are modulated by corticosteroids which secretion is regulated by HPA axis. Hyperammonemia alters circadian rhythms of activity and corticosterone in rats. The aims were: (1) assessing whether corticosterone alterations are responsible for altered circadian rhythm in hyperammonemia: (2) to shed light on the mechanism by which corticosterone circadian rhythm is altered in hyperammonemia. The effects of daily corticosterone injection at ZT10 on circadian rhythms of activity, plasma corticosterone, adreno-corticotropic hormone (ACTH) and hypothalamic corticotropic releasing hormone (CRH) were assessed in control and hyperammonemic rats. ACTH-induced corticosterone release was analyzed in cultured adrenal cells. Corticosterone injection restores the corticosterone peak in hyperammonemic rats and their activity and circadian rhythm. Plasma ACTH and CRH in hypothalamus are increased in hyperammonemic rats. Corticosterone injection normalizes ACTH. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs adrenal function, reduces corticosterone content and ACTH-induced corticosterone release in adrenals, leading to reduced feedback modulation of HPA axis by corticosterone which contributes to impair circadian rhythms of activity. Impaired circadian rhythms and motor activity may be corrected in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy by corticosterone treatment. PMID:23376587

  13. Role of corticosterone in cleft palate formation in methylmercuric chloride-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.K.S.; Lee, M.

    1981-04-01

    The effect of simultaneous administration of sodium selenite and methylmercuric chloride on plasma corticosterone, and the effect of adrenalectomy and methylmercuric chloride treatment on the incidence of fetal cleft palate in mice were examined. After 6 consecutive days of treatment, methylmercury (as methylmercuric chloride) at 5 mg/kg per day increased plasma corticosterone to approximately twice the concentration observed in the controls. When administered together, selenium (as sodium selenite) at 0.125 to 0.5 mg/kg per day did not affect the increase of plasma corticosterone induced by methylmercuric chloride. Selenite by itself (0.125 to 0.5 mg selenium/kg per day) resulted in an increase of approximately 50% over the controls. Sham opration or adrenalectomy of mice on Day 7 of pregnancy did not result in a significant incidence of cleft palate in the fetuses. However, the administration of methylmercury (5 mg/kg per day) on Days 11, 12, and 13 of gestation to the operated mothers resulted in cleft palate in approximately 30% of the fetuses, regardless of the type of operation. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  14. Corticosterone alters materno-fetal glucose partitioning and insulin signalling in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, O R; Fisher, H M; Dionelis, K N; Jefferies, E C; Higgins, J S; Musial, B; Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Fowden, A L

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect glucose metabolism in adults and fetuses, although their effects on materno-fetal glucose partitioning remain unknown. The present study measured maternal hepatic glucose handling and placental glucose transport together with insulin signalling in these tissues in mice drinking corticosterone either from day (D) 11 to D16 or D14 to D19 of pregnancy (term = D21). On the final day of administration, corticosterone-treated mice were hyperinsulinaemic (P < 0.05) but normoglycaemic compared to untreated controls. In maternal liver, there was no change in glycogen content or glucose 6-phosphatase activity but increased Slc2a2 glucose transporter expression in corticosterone-treated mice, on D16 only (P < 0.05). On D19, but not D16, transplacental 3H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was reduced by 33% in corticosterone-treated dams (P < 0.05). However, when corticosterone-treated animals were pair-fed to control intake, aiming to prevent the corticosterone-induced increase in food consumption, 3H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was similar to the controls. Depending upon gestational age, corticosterone treatment increased phosphorylation of the insulin-signalling proteins, protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase-kinase 3β, in maternal liver (P < 0.05) but not placenta (P > 0.05). Insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor abundance did not differ with treatment in either tissue. Corticosterone upregulated the stress-inducible mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) suppressor, Redd1, in liver (D16 and D19) and placenta (D19), in ad libitum fed animals (P < 0.05). Concomitantly, hepatic protein content and placental weight were reduced on D19 (P < 0.05), in association with altered abundance and/or phosphorylation of signalling proteins downstream of mTOR. Taken together, the data indicate that maternal glucocorticoid excess reduces fetal growth partially by altering placental glucose transport and mTOR signalling. Key

  15. Effects of acrolein on the production of corticosterone in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Hsing; Chou, Jou-Chun; Weng, Ting-Chun; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Lin, Jou-Yu; Yeh, Chii-Chang; Hu, Sindy; Wang, Paulus S; Idova, Galina; Wang, Shyi-Wu

    2016-07-01

    Acrolein, an α, β-unsaturated aldehyde, exists in a wide range of sources. Acrolein can be not only generated from all types of smoke but also produced endogenously from the metabolism by lipid peroxidation. The cellular influence of acrolein is due to its electrophilic character via binding to and depleting cellular nucleophiles. Although the toxicity of acrolein has been extensively studied, there is relatively little information about its impact on hormone release. This study aimed at the effect of acrolein on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (H-P-A) axis. In an in vivo study, male rats were administrated with acrolein for 1 or 3days. The plasma corticosterone in response to a single injection of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) increased slowly in acrolein-pretreated rats than in control rats. Further investigating the steroidogenic pathway, the protein expressions of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and the upper receptor-melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) were attenuated in acrolein-treated groups. Another experiment using trilostane showed less activity of P450scc in zona fasciculata-reticularis (ZFR) cells in acrolein-treated groups. In addition to the suppressed ability of corticosterone production in ZFR cells, acrolein even had extended influence at higher concentrations. The lower ACTH was observed in the plasma from acrolein-pretreated rats. In an in vitro study, ZFR cells were incubated with acrolein and the results showed that corticosterone concentrations in media were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein also desensitized the response of the ZFR cells to ACTH. These results suggested that acrolein decreased the releasing ability of corticosterone via an inhibition on the response of ZFR cells to ACTH and the reduction of protein expressions of StAR and MC2R as well as the activity of P450scc in rat ZFR cells. The present evidences showed that the H-P-A axis was affected by the administration of acrolein. PMID:26996390

  16. Gestational and postpartum corticosterone exposure to the dam affects behavioral and endocrine outcome of the offspring in a sexually-dimorphic manner.

    PubMed

    Brummelte, Susanne; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids in utero and during the postpartum period has a detrimental effect on brain development. We created an animal model of postpartum stress/depression based on administering high levels of corticosterone (CORT) to the dams during the postpartum period which caused behavioral changes and reduced hippocampal cell proliferation in the offspring. As the consequences of early exposure to glucocorticoids may depend on the dose and the developmental stage of the offspring, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of low (10 mg/kg) or high levels of CORT (40 mg/kg) given to dams either during gestation, postpartum or across both gestation and postpartum on the outcome of the offspring. Male and female offspring were weighed throughout the experiment, tested in a series of behavioral tests (forced swim test, open field, elevated plus maze) and basal and restraint stress CORT levels were examined in adolescence or young adulthood. Results show that maternal CORT exposure, regardless of when administered, significantly attenuated body weight gain until adulthood in the offspring. Offspring exposed to low maternal CORT, but not high maternal CORT, during the postpartum had higher basal levels of CORT as young adults. Further, male and female offspring of dams exposed to high maternal CORT in utero showed more depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, while males of dams exposed to high maternal CORT postpartum exhibited more anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Taken together, maternal glucocorticoid exposure have long lasting effects on male and female offspring's behavioral and neuroendocrine measures in adolescence and adulthood depending on the time of exposure to glucocorticoids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21867716

  17. Evaluation of response to restraint stress by salivary corticosterone levels in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    NOHARA, Masakatsu; TOHEI, Atsushi; SATO, Takumi; AMAO, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Saliva as a sampling method is a low invasive technique for the detection of physiologically active substances, as opposed to sampling the plasma or serum. In this study, we obtained glucocorticoids transferred from the blood to the saliva from mice treated with 2.0 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal injection of cortisol. Next, to evaluate the effect of restraint stress using mouse saliva—collected under anesthesia by mixed anesthetic agents—we measured plasma and salivary corticosterone levels at 60 min after restraint stress. Moreover, to evaluate salivary corticosterone response to stress in the same individual mouse, an adequate recovery period (1, 3 and 7 days) after anesthesia was examined. The results demonstrate that exogenous cortisol was detected in the saliva and the plasma, in mice treated with cortisol. Restraint stress significantly increased corticosterone levels in both the plasma and saliva (P<0.001). Monitoring the results of individual mice showed that restraint stress significantly increased salivary corticosterone levels in all three groups (1-, 3- and 7-day recovery). However, the statistical evidence of corticosterone increase is stronger in the 7-day recovery group (P<0.001) than in the others (P<0.05). These results suggest that the corticosterone levels in saliva reflect its levels in the plasma, and salivary corticosterone is a useful, less-invasive biomarker of physical stress in mice. The present study may contribute to concepts of Reduction and Refinement of the three Rs in small animal experiments. PMID:26852731

  18. Individual variation and repeatability in urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Molinia, Frank C; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-15

    Urinary corticosterone metabolite enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) can be used for the non-invasive assessment of baseline levels and corticosterone responses in amphibians. In this study, urinary corticosterone responses of wild male cane toads (Rhinella marina) to confinement and repeated handling were measured to quantify individual variation in corticosterone responses for the first time in an amphibian species. Urine samples were collected at 0 h in the wild, hourly from 2 to 8 h after transfer into captivity, and again at 12 and 24 h in captivity. Toads were then held in captivity and subjected to the same sampling protocol on three occasions at 14 days intervals to quantify variation in corticosterone metabolite responses within and between toads. Baseline and individual corticosterone metabolite responses in male cane toads were generally consistent, with high statistical repeatabilities for 0 h (r=0.630), 6 h (r=0.793), 12 h (r=0.652) and 24 h (r=0.721) corticosterone metabolite concentrations, and for the total and corrected integrated corticosterone responses (r=0.567, p=0.033; r=0.728, p=0.014 respectively). Urinary corticosterone responses appear to be a stable, repeatable trait within individuals. Corticosterone responses in amphibians can be more readily measured when urine rather than plasma samples are collected, and the protocol established in the current study can now be applied to the study of variation in corticosterone responses in other amphibians. PMID:22137908

  19. Vascular Responsiveness in Adrenalectomized Rats with Corticosterone Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Kaship, Kapil; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    To determine under resting, unstressed conditions the circulating glucocorticoid concentrations that best maintain sensitivity of the vascular smooth muscle and baroreceptor responses to vasoactive agents, rats with vascular cannulas were sham-adrenalectomized (sham) or adrenalectomized (ADRX) and provided with four levels of corticosterone replacement (-100 mg fused pellets of corticosterone: cholesterol 0, 20, 40, and 80% implanted subcutaneously at the time of adrenal surgery). Changes in vascular and baroreflex responses were determined after intravenous injection of varying doses of phenylephrine and nitroglycerin with measurement of arterial blood pressure and heart rate in the conscious, chronically cannulated rats. Vascular sensitivity was decreased, and resting arterial blood pressure tended to be decreased in the adrenalectomized rats; both were restored to normal with levels of corticosterone (40%), which also maintained body weight gain, thymus weight, and plasma corticosteroid binding globulin concentrations at normal values. The baroreflex curve generated from the sham group was different from the curves generated from the ADRX+O, 20, and 40% groups, but not different from that of the ADRX+80% group, suggesting that the baroreflex is maintained by higher levels of corticosterone than are necessary for the maintenance of the other variables. These data demonstrate that physiological levels of corticosterone (40% pellet) restore vascular responsiveness, body weight, thymus weight, and transcortin levels to normal in ADRX rats, whereas higher levels (80% pellet) are necessary for restoration of the baroreflex.

  20. Both Transient and Continuous Corticosterone Excess Inhibit Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Princen, Hans; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Meijer, Onno C.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Pereira, Alberto M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The role of glucocorticoids in atherosclerosis development is not clearly established. Human studies show a clear association between glucocorticoid excess and cardiovascular disease, whereas most animal models indicate an inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on atherosclerosis development. These animal models, however, neither reflect long-term glucocorticoid overexposure nor display human-like lipoprotein metabolism. Aim To investigate the effects of transient and continuous glucocorticoid excess on atherosclerosis development in a mouse model with human-like lipoprotein metabolism upon feeding a Western-type diet. Methods Pair-housed female APOE*3-Leiden.CETP (E3L.CETP) mice fed a Western-type containing 0.1% cholesterol for 20 weeks were given corticosterone (50 µg/ml) for either 5 (transient group) or 17 weeks (continuous group), or vehicle (control group) in the drinking water. At the end of the study, atherosclerosis severity, lesion area in the aortic root, the number of monocytes adhering to the endothelial wall and macrophage content of the plaque were measured. Results Corticosterone treatment increased body weight and food intake for the duration of the treatment and increased gonadal and subcutaneous white adipose tissue weight in transient group by +35% and +31%, and in the continuous group by +140% and 110%. Strikingly, both transient and continuous corticosterone treatment decreased total atherosclerotic lesion area by −39% without lowering plasma cholesterol levels. In addition, there was a decrease of −56% in macrophage content of the plaque with continuous corticosterone treatment, and a similar trend was present with the transient treatment. Conclusion Increased corticosterone exposure in mice with human-like lipoprotein metabolism has beneficial, long-lasting effects on atherosclerosis, but negatively affects body fat distribution by promoting fat accumulation in the long-term. This indicates that the increased atherosclerosis

  1. The effect of long-term corticosterone treatment on blood cell differentials and function in laboratory and wild-caught amphibian models.

    PubMed

    Falso, Paul G; Noble, Christopher A; Diaz, Jesus M; Hayes, Tyrone B

    2015-02-01

    The effect of long-term stress on amphibian immunity is not well understood. We modeled a long-term endocrine stress scenario by elevating plasma corticosterone in two species of amphibians and examined effects on white blood cell differentials and innate immune activity. Plasma corticosterone was elevated in American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) by surgically implanting corticosterone capsules and in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) by immersion in corticosterone-treated water. To provide a context for our results within endogenous corticosterone fluctuations, diurnal plasma corticosterone cycles were determined. A daily low of corticosterone was observed in X. laevis at 12:00, while a significant pattern was not observed in L. catesbeianus. Elevated plasma corticosterone levels increased the ratio of peripheral neutrophils to lymphocytes, in both species, and decreased eosinophil concentrations in L. catesbeianus over a long-term period. Whole blood oxidative burst generally correlated with neutrophil concentrations, and thus was increased with corticosterone treatment, significantly in L. catesbeianus. In L. catesbeianus, an endogenous response of eosinophils and lymphocytes to implanted empty (sham) capsules was observed, but this effect was attenuated by corticosterone. Peripheral monocyte and basophil concentrations were not significantly altered by corticosterone treatment in either species. Our results show that long-term stress can alter amphibian immune parameters for extended periods and may play a role in susceptibility to disease. PMID:25616196

  2. Altered Entrainment to the Day/Night Cycle Attenuates the Daily Rise in Circulating Corticosterone in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sollars, Patricia J.; Weiser, Michael J.; Kudwa, Andrea E.; Bramley, Jayne R.; Ogilvie, Malcolm D.; Spencer, Robert L.; Handa, Robert J.; Pickard, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a circadian oscillator entrained to the day/night cycle via input from the retina. Serotonin (5-HT) afferents to the SCN modulate retinal signals via activation of 5-HT1B receptors, decreasing responsiveness to light. Consequently, 5-HT1B receptor knockout (KO) mice entrain to the day/night cycle with delayed activity onsets. Since circulating corticosterone levels exhibit a robust daily rhythm peaking around activity onset, we asked whether delayed entrainment of activity onsets affects rhythmic corticosterone secretion. Wheel-running activity and plasma corticosterone were monitored in mice housed under several different lighting regimens. Both duration of the light∶dark cycle (T cycle) and the duration of light within that cycle was altered. 5-HT1B KO mice that entrained to a 9.5L:13.5D (short day in a T = 23 h) cycle with activity onsets delayed more than 4 h after light offset exhibited a corticosterone rhythm in phase with activity rhythms but reduced 50% in amplitude compared to animals that initiated daily activity <4 h after light offset. Wild type mice in 8L:14D (short day in a T = 22 h) conditions with highly delayed activity onsets also exhibited a 50% reduction in peak plasma corticosterone levels. Exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) stimulation in animals exhibiting highly delayed entrainment suggested that the endogenous rhythm of adrenal responsiveness to ACTH remained aligned with SCN-driven behavioral activity. Circadian clock gene expression in the adrenal cortex of these same animals suggested that the adrenal circadian clock was also aligned with SCN-driven behavior. Under T cycles <24 h, altered circadian entrainment to short day (winter-like) conditions, manifest as long delays in activity onset after light offset, severely reduces the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of plasma corticosterone. Such a pronounced reduction in the glucocorticoid rhythm may alter rhythmic gene expression in the

  3. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    PubMed Central

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  4. Comparison of monoamine and corticosterone levels 24 h following (+)methamphetamine, (+/−)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, cocaine, (+)fenfluramine or (+/−)methylphenidate administration in the neonatal rat

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L.; Ehrman, Lisa A.; Gudelsky, Gary A.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that neonatal administration of (+/−)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and (+)fenfluramine produce deficits in spatial and path integration learning, whereas (+)methamphetamine causes deficits in spatial learning. Conversely, cocaine and (+/−)methylphenidate have no effect on either form of learning following neonatal administration. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether corticosterone and/or monoamine levels were changed following subcutaneous administration of 10 mg/kg (+)methamphetamine, (+/−)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, (+)fenfluramine, (+/−)methylphenidate or cocaine every 2 h (total of four injections) on postnatal day 11. Twenty-four hours after the first dose, plasma, striatum and hippocampus were collected. Corticosterone levels were increased in methamphetamine-, fenfluramine-, methylenedioxymethamphetamine- and methylphenidate-treated rats relative to levels in saline-treated rats, whereas cocaine-treated rats were unaffected. In the striatum and hippocampus, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid were reduced in animals treated with methylenedioxymethamphetamine or fenfluramine, compared with levels in saline controls. Dopamine levels were not changed by any of the drugs, although 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was decreased following methylenedioxymethamphetamine or methamphetamine. Minimal effects were seen in neurotransmitter levels following injection of cocaine or methylphenidate. These data suggest that drugs that affect corticosterone and hippocampal serotonin are associated with both spatial learning and path integration deficits, and those that affect corticosterone and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid are associated with spatial learning deficits only. PMID:16923155

  5. Transdermal delivery of corticosterone in terrestrial amphibians.

    PubMed

    Wack, Corina L; Lovern, Matthew B; Woodley, Sarah K

    2010-12-01

    Stressors elicit allostatic responses that allow animals to cope with changing and challenging environments and also cause release of glucocorticoid hormones (GCs). Compared to other vertebrate classes, relatively little is known about amphibian behavioral and physiological responses to GCs. To understand the effects of elevated plasma GCs in amphibians, exogenous application of GCs is necessary, but traditional methods to elevate GCs require handling and/or anesthesia which themselves are stressors. A less invasive alternative successfully used in birds and reptiles utilizes transdermal delivery by applying GCs via a dermal patch. We asked whether dermal patches containing corticosterone (CORT, the main GC in amphibians) would elevate plasma CORT in terrestrial salamanders and frogs. We explored the use of the dermal patch to deliver CORT in an acute, sustained, and repeated manner. Patches adhered well to the amphibians' moist skin and were easily removed to regulate the time course of CORT delivery. Application of CORT treated patches elevated plasma CORT concentrations compared to vehicle patches in all species. Patches delivered physiological levels of plasma CORT in ecologically relevant time frames. Repeated application and removal of CORT patches were used to simulate exposure to repeated stressors. Application of patches did not represent a stressor because plasma CORT concentrations were similar between animals that received vehicle patches and untreated animals. Thus, transdermal delivery of GCs represents a potentially useful tool to better understand amphibian allostatic responses to stressors, and perhaps amphibian population declines. PMID:20850442

  6. Dynamics and correlation of serum cortisol and corticosterone under different physiological or stressful conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuai; Miao, Yi-Long; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Sun, Ming-Ju; Li, Hong; Lin, Juan; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Although plasma corticosterone is considered the main glucocorticoid involved in regulation of stress responses in rodents, the presence of plasma cortisol and whether its level can be used as an indicator for rodent activation of stress remain to be determined. In this study, effects of estrous cycle stage, circadian rhythm, and acute and chronic (repeated or unpredictable) stressors of various severities on dynamics and correlation of serum cortisol and corticosterone were examined in mice. A strong (r = 0.6-0.85) correlation between serum cortisol and corticosterone was observed throughout the estrous cycle, all day long, and during acute or repeated restraints, chronic unpredictable stress and acute forced swimming or heat stress. Both hormones increased to the highest level on day 1 of repeated-restraint or unpredictable stresses, but after that, whereas the concentration of cortisol did not change, that of corticosterone showed different dynamics. Thus, whereas corticosterone declined dramatically during repeated restraints, it remained at the high level during unpredictable stress. During forced swimming or heat stress, whereas cortisol increased to the highest level within 3 min., corticosterone did not reach maximum until 40 min. of stress. Analysis with HPLC and HPLC-MS further confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum. Taken together, results (i) confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum and (ii) suggested that mouse serum cortisol and corticosterone are closely correlated in dynamics under different physiological or stressful conditions, but, whereas corticosterone was a more adaptation-related biomarker than cortisol during chronic stress, cortisol was a quicker responder than corticosterone during severe acute stress. PMID:25699675

  7. Dynamics and Correlation of Serum Cortisol and Corticosterone under Different Physiological or Stressful Conditions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shuai; Miao, Yi-Long; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Sun, Ming-Ju; Li, Hong; Lin, Juan; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Although plasma corticosterone is considered the main glucocorticoid involved in regulation of stress responses in rodents, the presence of plasma cortisol and whether its level can be used as an indicator for rodent activation of stress remain to be determined. In this study, effects of estrous cycle stage, circadian rhythm, and acute and chronic (repeated or unpredictable) stressors of various severities on dynamics and correlation of serum cortisol and corticosterone were examined in mice. A strong (r = 0.6–0.85) correlation between serum cortisol and corticosterone was observed throughout the estrous cycle, all day long, and during acute or repeated restraints, chronic unpredictable stress and acute forced swimming or heat stress. Both hormones increased to the highest level on day 1 of repeated-restraint or unpredictable stresses, but after that, whereas the concentration of cortisol did not change, that of corticosterone showed different dynamics. Thus, whereas corticosterone declined dramatically during repeated restraints, it remained at the high level during unpredictable stress. During forced swimming or heat stress, whereas cortisol increased to the highest level within 3 min., corticosterone did not reach maximum until 40 min. of stress. Analysis with HPLC and HPLC-MS further confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum. Taken together, results (i) confirmed the presence of cortisol in mouse serum and (ii) suggested that mouse serum cortisol and corticosterone are closely correlated in dynamics under different physiological or stressful conditions, but, whereas corticosterone was a more adaptation-related biomarker than cortisol during chronic stress, cortisol was a quicker responder than corticosterone during severe acute stress. PMID:25699675

  8. Differential Effects of Chronic Antidepressant Treatment on Swim Stress- and Fluoxetine-Induced Secretion of Corticosterone and Progesterone1

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, GARY E.; KNAPP, DARIN J.; CARSON, STANLEY W.; BREESE, GEORGE R.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersecretion of cortisol occurs in numerous patients with major depression and normalizes with clinical recovery during the course of chronic antidepressant treatment. These clinical data suggest that investigation of the effects of antidepressant treatments on the regulation of the brain-pituitary-adrenal axis may assist in elucidating the therapeutic basis of antidepressant actions. In the present investigation, both swim stress and acute fluoxetine challenge increased release of corticosterone and progesterone to reflect an activation of the brain pituitary-adrenal axis. The effects of chronic antidepressant treatment (21 days) on corticosterone and progesterone secretion induced by these challenges were investigated. Chronic fluoxetine treatment (5 mg/kg/day) completely blocked the increased secretion of corticosterone and progesterone in response to the acute fluoxetine challenge. Chronic treatment with desipramine, imipramine or amytriptyline (15 mg/kg/day) also markedly attenuated fluoxetine-induced corticosterone and progesterone secretion. However, chronic treatment with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors, phenelzine (5 mg/kg) and tranylcypromine (5 mg/kg), did not affect this hormonal response to acute fluoxetine challenge. Plasma levels of fluoxetine after acute challenge were not significantly different for the various chronic antidepressant treatment conditions from the chronic saline controls; therefore, an increase in the metabolism of fluoxetine can not explain the antagonism of the fluoxetine-induced hormonal response after chronic antidepressant treatment. In contrast to the effects of selected antidepressants on acute fluoxetine-induced steroid release, chronic treatment with imipramine (20 mg/kg/day), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) or phenelzine (5 mg/kg) did not significantly alter this swim stress-induced corticosterone or progesterone secretion. Because chronic fluoxetine and tricyclic antidepressant drugs blocked the acute action of fluoxetine to

  9. Bilateral lesions of suprachiasmatic nuclei affect circadian rhythms in (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into deoxyribonucleic acid in mouse intestinal tract, mitotic index of corneal epithelium, and serum corticosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Scheving, L.E.; Tsai, T.H.; Powell, E.W.; Pasley, J.N.; Halberg, F.; Dunn, J.

    1983-03-01

    Investigations into the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the coordination of circadian rhythms have presented differing results. Several reports have shown that ablation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNA) alters the phase and amplitude of rhythms but does not abolish them. The present study investigates the effect of SCNA on the rhythms in cell proliferation in various regions of the intestinal tract as measured by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine into deoxyribonucleic acid, in the mitotic activity of the corneal epithelium, and in serum corticosterone levels. The study involved mice with verified lesions of the SCN (six to 13 mice per time point) and control groups of both sham-operated and unoperated mice (seven of each per time point). The mice were killed in groups that represented seven time points over a single 24 hr span (3 hr intervals with the 0800 hr sampled both at start and end of the series). The tissues examined were the tongue, esophagus, gastric stomach, and colon for DNA synthesis, the corneal epithelium for mitotic index, and blood serum for corticosterone level. The most consistent result of SCNA was a phase advance in the rhythms in cell proliferation in the tongue, esophagus, gastric stomach, colon, and corneal epithelium. A reduction in rhythm amplitude occurred in the tongue, esophagus, and corneal epithelium; however, there was an amplitude increase for the stomach, colon, and serum corticosterone. The mesor (rhythm-adjusted mean) was increased by SCNA in all tissues except the corneal epithelium. These findings further support the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclear area in the control of rhythms in cell proliferation and corticosterone production, by acting as a ''phase-resetter'' and as a modulator of rhythm amplitude.

  10. Effects of chronic elevated levels of CO2 on the concentration of blood cellular elements and plasma corticosterone in the male rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. A.; Lang, C. K.; Steele, M. K.; Corbin, B. J.; Wade, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The mean CO2 concentration on the Space Shuttle is 0.3% and has reached 0.7%, for extended periods of time. Following space flight, it has been shown that both humans and animals have significant changes in red blood cell counts (RBC) and white blood cell counts (WBC). In other studies, where no significant change did occur in the total WBC, a significant change did occur in the distribution of WBC. WBC are affected by circulating levels of glucocorticoids, which often increase when animals or humans are exposed to adverse and/or novel stimuli (e.g. elevated CO2 levels or weightlessness). The purpose of this study was to determine if elevations in CO2 concentration produce changes in total WBC and/or their distribution.

  11. Effects of Endotoxin and Psychological Stress on Redox Physiology, Immunity and Feather Corticosterone in Greenfinches.

    PubMed

    Meitern, Richard; Sild, Elin; Lind, Mari-Ann; Männiste, Marju; Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Hõrak, Peeter

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of costs accompanying activation of immune system and related neuroendocrine pathways is essential for understanding the selective forces operating on these systems. Here we attempted to detect such costs in terms of disruption to redox balance and interference between different immune system components in captive wild-caught greenfinches (Carduelis chloris). Study birds were subjected to an endotoxin-induced inflammatory challenge and temporary exposure to a psychological stressor (an image of a predator) in a 2*2 factorial experiment. Injection of bacterial endotoxin resulted in up-regulation of two markers of antioxidant protection - erythrocyte glutathione, and plasma oxygen radical absorbance (OXY). These findings suggest that inflammatory responses alter redox homeostasis. However, no effect on markers of oxidative damage to proteins or DNA in erythrocytes could be detected. We found no evidence that the endotoxin injection interfered with antibody production against Brucella abortus antigen or the intensity of chronic coccidiosis. The hypothesis of within-immune system trade-offs as a cost of immunity was thus not supported in our model system. We showed for the first time that administration of endotoxin can reduce the level of corticosterone deposited into feathers. This finding suggests a down-regulation of the corticosterone secretion cascade due to an endotoxin-induced immune response, a phenomenon that has not been reported previously. Exposure to the predator image did not affect any of the measured physiological parameters. PMID:23805316

  12. Effects of Endotoxin and Psychological Stress on Redox Physiology, Immunity and Feather Corticosterone in Greenfinches

    PubMed Central

    Meitern, Richard; Sild, Elin; Lind, Mari-Ann; Männiste, Marju; Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Hõrak, Peeter

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of costs accompanying activation of immune system and related neuroendocrine pathways is essential for understanding the selective forces operating on these systems. Here we attempted to detect such costs in terms of disruption to redox balance and interference between different immune system components in captive wild-caught greenfinches (Carduelis chloris). Study birds were subjected to an endotoxin-induced inflammatory challenge and temporary exposure to a psychological stressor (an image of a predator) in a 2*2 factorial experiment. Injection of bacterial endotoxin resulted in up-regulation of two markers of antioxidant protection – erythrocyte glutathione, and plasma oxygen radical absorbance (OXY). These findings suggest that inflammatory responses alter redox homeostasis. However, no effect on markers of oxidative damage to proteins or DNA in erythrocytes could be detected. We found no evidence that the endotoxin injection interfered with antibody production against Brucella abortus antigen or the intensity of chronic coccidiosis. The hypothesis of within-immune system trade-offs as a cost of immunity was thus not supported in our model system. We showed for the first time that administration of endotoxin can reduce the level of corticosterone deposited into feathers. This finding suggests a down-regulation of the corticosterone secretion cascade due to an endotoxin-induced immune response, a phenomenon that has not been reported previously. Exposure to the predator image did not affect any of the measured physiological parameters. PMID:23805316

  13. Comparative analysis of ACTH and corticosterone sampling methods in rats.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Torsten P; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Ostrander, Michelle M; Dolgas, C Mark; Elfers, Eileen E; Seeley, Randy J; D'Alessio, David A; Herman, James P

    2005-11-01

    A frequently debated question for studies involving the measurement of stress hormones in rodents is the optimal method for collecting blood with minimal stress to the animal. Some investigators prefer the implantation of indwelling catheters to allow for frequent sampling. Others argue that the implantation of a catheter creates a chronic stress to the animal that confounds stress hormone measures and therefore rely on tail vein sampling. Moreover, some investigators measure hormones in trunk blood samples obtained after anesthesia, a practice that may itself raise hormone levels. To address these controversies, we 1) compared plasma ACTH and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations in pre- and poststress rat blood samples obtained via previously implanted vena cava catheters, tail vein nicks, or clipping the tip off the tail and 2) compared plasma ACTH and Cort in rat blood samples obtained by decapitation with and without anesthesia. Rats sampled via indwelling catheters displayed lower prestress ACTH levels than those sampled by tail vein nick if the time to acquire samples was not limited; however, elevated basal ACTH was not observed in samples obtained by tail clip or tail nick when the samples were obtained within 3 min. Baseline Cort levels were similar in all groups. After restraint stress, the profile of the plasma ACTH and Cort responses was not affected by sampling method. Decapitation with prior administration of CO2 or pentobarbital sodium increased plasma ACTH levels approximately 13- and 2-fold, respectively, when compared with decapitation without anesthesia. These data indicate that tail vein nicking, tail clipping, or indwelling venous catheters can be used for obtaining plasma for ACTH and Cort during acute stress studies without confounding the measurements. However, the elevation in basal ACTH seen in the tail vein nick group at baseline suggests that sampling needs to be completed rapidly (<3 min) to avoid the initiation of the pituitary stress

  14. Anticoagulants used in plasma collection affect adipokine multiplexed measurements.

    PubMed

    Allione, Alessandra; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Dani, Nadia; Barberio, Davide; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important health problem worldwide. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that secretes various bioactive substances, called adipokines, including pro-inflammatory biomarkers such as TNF-α, IL-6, leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) and anti-inflammatory molecules such as adiponectin. The deregulated production of adipokines in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of various disease processes and monitoring their variation is critical to understand metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the plasma concentration of adipokines in healthy subjects by multiplexed measurements and the effect of anticoagulants on their levels. Plasma samples from 10 healthy donors were collected in two different anticoagulants (sodium citrate or heparin). All markers, excluding TNF-α, showed significantly higher concentrations in heparinized compared to citrate plasma. However, levels of adipokines in different plasma samples were highly correlated for most of these markers. We reported that different anticoagulants used in the preparation of the plasma samples affected the measurements of some adipokines. The importance of the present results in epidemiology is relevant when comparing different studies in which blood samples were collected with different anticoagulants. PMID:26945995

  15. ABCC1 confers tissue-specific sensitivity to cortisol versus corticosterone: A rationale for safer glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Mark; Mackenzie, Scott D; Taylor, Ashley I; Homer, Natalie Z M; Livingstone, Dawn E; Mouras, Rabah; Morgan, Ruth A; Mole, Damian J; Stimson, Roland H; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Elfick, Alistair P D; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R

    2016-08-17

    The aim of treatment in congenital adrenal hyperplasia is to suppress excess adrenal androgens while achieving physiological glucocorticoid replacement. However, current glucocorticoid replacement regimes are inadequate because doses sufficient to suppress excess androgens almost invariably induce adverse metabolic effects. Although both cortisol and corticosterone are glucocorticoids that circulate in human plasma, any physiological role for corticosterone has been neglected. In the brain, the adenosine 5'-triphosphate-binding cassette transporter ABCB1 exports cortisol but not corticosterone. Conversely, ABCC1 exports corticosterone but not cortisol. We show that ABCC1, but not ABCB1, is expressed in human adipose and that ABCC1 inhibition increases intracellular corticosterone, but not cortisol, and induces glucocorticoid-responsive gene transcription in human adipocytes. Both C57Bl/6 mice treated with the ABCC1 inhibitor probenecid and FVB mice with deletion of Abcc1 accumulated more corticosterone than cortisol in adipose after adrenalectomy and corticosteroid infusion. This accumulation was sufficient to increase glucocorticoid-responsive adipose transcript expression. In human adipose tissue, tissue corticosterone concentrations were consistently low, and ABCC1 mRNA was up-regulated in obesity. To test the hypothesis that corticosterone effectively suppresses adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) without the metabolic adverse effects of cortisol, we infused cortisol or corticosterone in patients with Addison's disease. ACTH suppression was similar, but subcutaneous adipose transcripts of glucocorticoid-responsive genes were higher after infusion with cortisol rather than with corticosterone. These data indicate that corticosterone may be a metabolically favorable alternative to cortisol for glucocorticoid replacement therapy when ACTH suppression is desirable, as in congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and justify development of a pharmaceutical preparation. PMID

  16. Exercise-induced stimulation of murine macrophage chemotaxis: role of corticosterone and prolactin as mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, E; Forner, M A; Barriga, C

    1997-01-01

    1. Exercise provokes changes in the immune system, including macrophage activity. Chemotaxis is a necessary function of macrophages if they are to reach the focus of infection and strenuous acute exercise may modulate chemotaxis. However, the precise mechanisms remain unknown. 2. Three experiments were performed in the present study. (1) The effect of strenuous acute exercise (swimming until exhaustion) on the chemotactic capacity of macrophages was evaluated. (2) Peritoneal macrophages from control mice were incubated with plasma from exercised mice or control (no exercise) mice. The differences in the resulting chemotactic capacity were measured. (3) Changes in the concentration of plasma corticosterone and prolactin after exercise were also measured, and the effect of incubation with the post-exercise levels of plasma corticosterone and prolactin on the chemotactic capacity of the peritoneal macrophages was then studied in vitro. 3. Exercise induced an increase in the macrophage chemotaxis index (103 +/- 8 vs. 47 +/- 11 in controls). Incubation with plasma from exercised mice led to an increased level of chemotaxis (68 +/- 18 vs. 40 +/- 6 with plasma from controls). Incubation with concentrations of corticosterone and prolactin similar to those observed in plasma immediately after exercise (corticosterone, 0.72 mumol l-1; prolactin, 88 pmol l-1) raised the chemotactic capacity with respect to that following incubation with the basal concentrations of the hormones in control animals (90 +/- 9 vs. 37 +/- 4 for corticosterone; 72 +/- 9 vs. 41 +/- 4 for prolactin). 4. It is concluded that corticosterone and prolactin may mediate the increased chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages induced by exercise. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9051584

  17. The effect of exogenous corticosterone on West Nile virus infection in Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis).

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer C; Nakamura, Ayaka; Coon, Courtney Ac; Martin, Lynn B

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between stress and disease is thought to be unambiguous: chronic stress induces immunosuppression, which likely increases the risk of infection. However, this link has not been firmly established in wild animals, particularly whether stress hormones affect host responses to zoonotic pathogens, which can be transmitted to domesticated animal, wildlife and human populations. Due to the dynamic effects of stress hormones on immune functions, stress hormones may make hosts better or poorer amplifying hosts for a pathogen contingent on context and the host species evaluated. Using an important zoonotic pathogen, West Nile virus (WNV) and a competent host, the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), we tested the effects of exogenous corticosterone on response to WNV infection. Corticosterone was administered at levels that individuals enduring chronic stressors (i.e., long-term inclement weather, food shortage, anthropogenic pollution) might experience in the wild. Corticosterone greatly impacted mortality: half of the corticosterone-implanted cardinals died between five - 11 days post-inoculation whereas only one of nine empty-implanted (control) birds died. No differences were found in viral titer between corticosterone- and empty-implanted birds. However, cardinals that survived infections had significantly higher average body temperatures during peak infection than individuals that died. In sum, this study indicates that elevated corticosterone could affect the survival of WNV-infected wild birds, suggesting that populations may be disproportionately at-risk to disease in stressful environments. PMID:22520572

  18. Rapid formation of plasma protein corona critically affects nanoparticle pathophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Docter, Dominic; Kuharev, Jörg; Musyanovych, Anna; Fetz, Verena; Hecht, Rouven; Schlenk, Florian; Fischer, Dagmar; Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Maskos, Michael; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stauber, Roland H.

    2013-10-01

    In biological fluids, proteins bind to the surface of nanoparticles to form a coating known as the protein corona, which can critically affect the interaction of the nanoparticles with living systems. As physiological systems are highly dynamic, it is important to obtain a time-resolved knowledge of protein-corona formation, development and biological relevancy. Here we show that label-free snapshot proteomics can be used to obtain quantitative time-resolved profiles of human plasma coronas formed on silica and polystyrene nanoparticles of various size and surface functionalization. Complex time- and nanoparticle-specific coronas, which comprise almost 300 different proteins, were found to form rapidly (<0.5 minutes) and, over time, to change significantly in terms of the amount of bound protein, but not in composition. Rapid corona formation is found to affect haemolysis, thrombocyte activation, nanoparticle uptake and endothelial cell death at an early exposure time.

  19. Corticosterone administration in drinking water decreases high-fat diet intake but not preference in male rats.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Gretha J; Tamashiro, Kellie L; Moran, Timothy H; Liang, Nu-Chu

    2016-04-15

    One of the mechanisms through which regular exercise contributes to weight maintenance could be by reducing intake and preference for high-fat (HF) diets. Indeed, we previously demonstrated that wheel-running rats robustly reduced HF diet intake and preference. The reduced HF diet preference by wheel running can be so profound that the rats consumed only the chow diet and completely avoided the HF diet. Because previous research indicates that exercise activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increases circulating levels of corticosterone, this study tested the hypothesis that elevation of circulating corticosterone is involved in wheel running-induced reduction in HF diet preference in rats.Experiment 1 measured plasma corticosterone levels under sedentary and wheel-running conditions in the two-diet-choice (high-carbohydrate chow vs. HF) feeding regimen. The results revealed that plasma corticosterone is significantly increased and positively correlated with the levels of running in wheel-running rats with two-diet choice.Experiments 2 and 3 determined whether elevated corticosterone without wheel running is sufficient to reduce HF diet intake and preference. Corticosterone was elevated by adding it to the drinking water. Compared with controls, corticosterone-drinking rats had reduced HF diet intake and body weight, but the HF diet preference between groups did not differ. The results of this study support a role for elevated corticosterone on the reduced HF diet intake during wheel running. The elevation of corticosterone alone, however, is not sufficient to produce a robust reduction in HF diet preference. PMID:26818055

  20. Seminal plasma affects sperm sex sorting in boars.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Diego V; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Tarantini, Tatiana; Del Olmo, David; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted in boar semen samples to evaluate how both holding time (24h) and the presence of seminal plasma (SP) before sorting affect sperm sortability and the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to tolerate liquid storage. Whole ejaculate samples were divided into three aliquots immediately after collection: one was diluted (1:1, v/v) in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS; 50% SP); the SP of the other two aliquots was removed and the sperm pellets were diluted with BTS + 10% of their own SP (10% SP) or BTS alone (0% SP). The three aliquots of each ejaculate were divided into two portions, one that was processed immediately for sorting and a second that was sorted after 24h storage at 15-17°C. In the first experiment, the ability to exhibit well-defined X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm peaks (split) in the cytometry histogram and the subsequent sorting efficiency were assessed (20 ejaculates). In contrast with holding time, the SP proportion influenced the parameters examined, as evidenced by the higher number of ejaculates exhibiting split and better sorting efficiency (P<0.05) in semen samples with 0-10% SP compared with those with 50% SP. In a second experiment, the quality (viability, total and progressive motility) and functionality (plasma membrane fluidity and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species) of sex-sorted spermatozoa were evaluated after 0, 72 and 120h storage at 15-17°C (10 ejaculates). Holding time and SP proportion did not influence the quality or functionality of stored sex-sorted spermatozoa. In conclusion, a holding time as long as 24h before sorting did not negatively affect sex sorting efficiency or the ability of sorted boar spermatozoa to tolerate long-term liquid storage. A high proportion of SP (50%) in the semen samples before sorting reduced the number of ejaculates to be sorted and negatively influenced the sorting efficiency, but did not affect the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to tolerate liquid

  1. Relationship of climatic conditions to fecal corticosterone levels of captive cheetahs reared in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uetake, Katsuji; Une, Yumi; Ito, Shu; Yamabe, Marino; Toyoda, Hideto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    To assess the stress level of cheetahs reared in Japan and to identify the prime components of the climatic conditions that affect their thermal stress, fecal corticosterone was monitored for 8 months from May to the following January. A total of 203 fecal samples were gathered in the morning from seven adult cheetahs that were kept at a zoological garden in Wakayama, Japan. Cheetahs were on exhibit singly or together with a harmonious conspecific during the day, but housed singly at night. Although the monthly fluctuation in corticosterone concentrations was not significant, the concentrations were relatively low during the summer season. Individual differences among cheetahs and the interaction effect between individual and month on the corticosterone concentrations were significant. Whereas the corticosterone concentrations negatively correlated with air temperature, they were positively correlated with the amount of rainfall. The highest air temperature and the amount of rainfall were extracted as the prime factors affecting corticosterone concentrations. These results suggest that cheetahs reared in Japan are somewhat subjected to thermal stress, particularly on cooler and/or rainy days. PMID:24841707

  2. Plasma stress hormones in resting rats - Eighty four day study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Vojin; Honeycutt, Clegg

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a repeated mild stress of handling and placing rats temporarily into unfamiliar cages on the blood-plasma concentration of the stress hormones (corticosterone, ACDH, and prolactin) were investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to this type of stress once every week during a period of three months. Results showed that repeated mild stress of handling (as well as repeated blood sampling) did not affect the plasma stress-hormone concentrations in these animals.

  3. Delayed Effects of Corticosterone on Slow After-Hyperpolarization Potentials in Mouse Hippocampal versus Prefrontal Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Anup G.; Henckens, Marloes J. A. G.; Fernández, Guillén; Joëls, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The rodent stress hormone corticosterone changes neuronal activity in a slow and persistent manner through transcriptional regulation. In the rat dorsal hippocampus, corticosterone enhances the amplitude of calcium-dependent potassium currents that cause a lingering slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP) at the end of depolarizing events. In this study we compared the putative region-dependency of the delayed effects of corticosterone (approximately 5 hrs after treatment) on sAHP as well as other active and passive properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from three prefrontal areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortex, with the hippocampus of adult mice. In agreement with previous studies, corticosterone increased sAHP amplitude in the dorsal hippocampus with depolarizing steps of increasing amplitude. However, in the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortices we did not observe any modifications of sAHP amplitude after corticosterone treatment. Properties of single action potentials or % ratio of the last spike interval with respect to the first spike interval, an indicator of accommodation in an action potential train, were not significantly affected by corticosterone in all brain regions examined. Lastly, corticosterone treatment did not induce any lasting changes in passive membrane properties of hippocampal or cortical neurons. Overall, the data indicate that corticosterone slowly and very persistently increases the sAHP amplitude in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, while this is not the case in the cortical regions examined. This implies that changes in excitability across brain regions reached by corticosterone may vary over a prolonged period of time after stress. PMID:24901987

  4. Dietary zinc depletion and repletion affects plasma proteins: an analysis of the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Wickwire, Kathie; Ho, Emily; Chung, Carolyn S.; King, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a problem worldwide. Current methods for assessing Zn status are limited to measuring plasma or serum Zn within populations suspected of deficiency. Despite the high prevalence of Zn deficiency in the human population there are no methods currently available for sensitively assessing Zn status among individuals. The purpose of this research was to utilize a proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry to identify protein biomarkers that were sensitive to changes in dietary Zn levels in humans. Proteomic analysis was performed in human plasma samples (n = 6) obtained from healthy adult male subjects that completed a dietary Zn depletion/repletion protocol, current dietary zinc intake has a greater effect on fractional zinc absorption than does longer term zinc consumption in healthy adult men. Chung et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 87 (5):1224–1229, 2008). After a 13 day Zn acclimatization period where subjects consumed a Zn-adequate diet, the male subjects consumed a marginal Zn-depleted diet for 42 days followed by consumption of a Zn-repleted diet for 28 days. The samples at baseline, end of depletion and end of repletion were pre-fractionated through immuno-affinity columns to remove 14 highly abundant proteins, and each fraction separated by 2DE. Following staining by colloidal Coomassie blue and densitometric analysis, three proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as affected by changes in dietary Zn. Fibrin β and chain E, fragment double D were observed in the plasma protein fraction that remained bound to the immuno-affinity column. An unnamed protein that was related to immunoglobulins was observed in the immunode-pleted plasma fraction. Fibrin β increased two-fold following the Zn depletion period and decreased to baseline values following the Zn repletion period; this protein may serve as a viable biomarker for Zn status in the future. PMID:23255060

  5. Operant Task Performance and Corticosterone Concentrations in Rats Housed Directly on Bedding and on Wire

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Carrie; Martinez, Vicente; Sarter, Martin; DeVries, Courtney; Bergdall, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to investigate the effect of housing conditions on task performance and corticosterone response. Two groups of male F344BNF1 rats were housed on a ventilated rack with ad libitum access to water and a restricted feeding regime. Group 1 was housed in solid-bottom caging with corn cob bedding, whereas group 2 was housed in wire-bottom caging. After learning an operant task, each rat was exposed to acute restraint followed 48 h later by exposure to continuous light. Corticosterone concentrations were determined before and after exposure to each intervention. Contrary to assumptions, housing did not affect task performance. Baseline corticosterone concentrations were similar for the 2 experimental groups, but corticosterone concentrations were significantly higher for the wire-bottom group than the solid-bottom group immediately after the restraint and remained elevated 2 d later. Corticosterone levels decreased in both groups after exposure to continuous light. Overall, the data indicate that subtle but significant differences occur in responses of rats housed on wire-bottom versus solid-bottom caging when the animals are exposed to acute restraint. PMID:18947165

  6. Synergistic effects of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: central monoamine, corticosterone, and behavioral variations.

    PubMed

    Brebner, K; Hayley, S; Zacharko, R; Merali, Z; Anisman, H

    2000-06-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) influence neuroendocrine activity, promote central neurotransmitter alterations, and induce a constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as sickness behaviors. These cytokines may also elicit anxiety and anhedonia, and have been associated with psychological disturbances in humans. In the present investigation, systemic IL-1beta and TNF-alpha dose-dependently and synergistically disrupted consumption of a highly palatable food source (chocolate milk), possibly reflecting anorexia or anhedonia engendered by the treatments. As well, these cytokines synergistically increased plasma corticosterone levels. Although IL-1beta and TNF-alpha provoked variations of amine turnover in the hypothalamus, locus coeruleus, and central amygdala, synergistic effects were not evident in this respect. Nevertheless, in view of the central amine variations induced by the cytokines, it is suggested that immune activation may come to influence complex behavioral processes, as well as affective state. PMID:10788757

  7. Developmental responses to opioids reveals a lack of effect on stress-induced corticosterone levels in neonatal rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, C. C.; Kitchen, I.

    1987-01-01

    The neonate has an unusual capacity for survival and the possibility exists that mechanisms for controlling stress responses may differ in the developing animal. In adults both endogenous and exogenous opioids can modulate the corticosterone responses to stress. We have studied this effect in neonatal rats and found that opioid modulation is absent in early postnatal development. Neonatal rats of either sex were injected with morphine (5-50 mg kg-1), fentanyl (10-100 micrograms kg-1), buprenorphine (0.1-30 mg kg-1) or naloxone (0.1-10 mg kg-1) and plasma corticosterone measured fluorimetrically 15 or 20 min later. In addition naloxone reversibility studies (1 mg kg-1, co-administered) were carried out for the opioid agonists. In adult rats, elevations in plasma corticosterone caused by injection stress were potentiated by morphine, fentanyl and buprenorphine. In neonates, though injection stress-induced rises in plasma corticosterone were absent at 10 days, elevations were observed at 21 days and later. However, significant potentiation of this corticosterone response by fentanyl was absent at 21 days and at later ages (30 and 40 days) for morphine and buprenorphine. The potentiating effect of all three agonists did not become fully effective until day 45. In addition, in animals acclimatized to injection stress by 7 day injection pretreatment, fentanyl did not significantly alter corticosterone levels in 30 day old neonates. High doses of naloxone (10 mg kg-1) significantly increased the corticosterone response to injection stress in adult rats but this effect was absent in 30 day old animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3594070

  8. Chronic non-invasive corticosterone administration abolishes the diurnal pattern of tph2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Montoya, Christian D.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Both hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and serotonergic systems are commonly dysregulated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We describe here a non-invasive rat model for hypercortisolism, as observed in major depression, and its effects on physiology, behavior, and the expression of tph2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) synthesis. We delivered corticosterone (40 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml or 400 µg/ml) or vehicle to adrenal-intact adult, male rats via the drinking water for three weeks. On days 15, 16, 17 and 18, respectively, the rats’ emotionality was assessed in the open-field (OF), social interaction (SI), elevated plus-maze (EPM), and forced swim tests (FST). On day 21, half of the rats in each group were killed 2 h into the dark phase of a 12/12 h reversed light/dark cycle; the other half were killed 2 h into the light phase. We then measured indices of HPA axis activity, plasma glucose and interleukin-6 (IL-6) availability, and neuronal tph2 expression at each time point. Chronic corticosterone intake was sufficient to cause increased anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in a dose-dependent manner. It also disrupted the diurnal pattern of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), corticosterone, and glucose concentrations, caused adrenal atrophy, and prevented regular weight gain. No diurnal or treatment-dependent changes were found for plasma levels of IL-6. Remarkably, all doses of corticosterone treatment abolished the diurnal variation of tph2 mRNA expression in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) by elevating the gene’s expression during the animals’ inactive (light) phase. Our data demonstrate that chronic elevation of corticosterone creates a vulnerability to a depression-like syndrome that is associated with increased tph2 expression, similar to that observed in depressed patients. PMID:21924839

  9. Genetic and Clinical Factors Affecting Plasma Clozapine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Edman, Gunnar; Bertilsson, Leif; Hukic, Dzana Sudic; Lavebratt, Catharina; Eriksson, Sven V.; Ösby, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess (1) the variance of plasma clozapine levels; (2) the relative importance of sex, smoking habits, weight, age, and specific genetic variants of cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A4 (UGT1A4), and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) on plasma levels of clozapine; and (3) the relation between plasma clozapine levels, fasting glucose levels, and waist circumference. Method: There were 113 patients on clozapine treatment recruited from psychosis outpatient clinics in Stockholm County, Sweden. Patients had genotype testing for single nucleotide polymorphisms: 2 in MDR1, 3 in CYP1A2, and 1 in UGT1A4. Multiple and logistic regression were used to analyze the relations. Results: There was a wide variation in plasma concentrations of clozapine (mean = 1,615 nmol/L, SD = 1,354 nmol/L), with 37% of the samples within therapeutic range (1,100–2,100 nmol/L). Smokers had significantly lower plasma clozapine concentrations than nonsmokers (P ≤ .03). There was a significant association between the rs762551 A allele of CYP1A2 and lower plasma clozapine concentration (P ≤ .05). Increased fasting glucose level was 3.7-fold more frequent in CC and CA genotypes than AA genotype (odds ratio = 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.10–0.72). There was no significant relation between higher fasting glucose levels, larger waist circumference, and higher clozapine levels. Conclusions: It is difficult to predict plasma clozapine concentration, even when known individual and genetic factors are considered. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended in patients who are treated with clozapine. PMID:26137357

  10. Repeated swim impairs serotonin clearance via a corticosterone-sensitive mechanism: organic cation transporter 3, the smoking gun.

    PubMed

    Baganz, Nicole; Horton, Rebecca; Martin, Kathryn; Holmes, Andrew; Daws, Lynette C

    2010-11-10

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is associated with increased extracellular serotonin (5-HT) in limbic brain regions. The mechanism through which this occurs remains unclear. One way could be via HPA axis-dependent impairment of serotonin transporter (SERT) function, the high-affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT. Consistent with this idea, we found that 5-HT clearance rate in hippocampus was dramatically reduced in mice exposed to repeated swim, a stimulus known to activate the HPA axis. However, this phenomenon also occurred in mice lacking SERT, ruling out SERT as a mechanism. The organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) is emerging as an important regulator of brain 5-HT. Moreover, corticosterone, which is released upon HPA axis activation, blocks 5-HT uptake by OCT3. Repeated swim produced a persistent elevation in plasma corticosterone, and, consistent with prolonged blockade by corticosterone, we found that OCT3 expression and function were reduced in these mice. Importantly, this effect of repeated swim to reduce 5-HT clearance rate was corticosterone dependent, as evidenced by its absence in adrenalectomized mice, in which plasma corticosterone levels were essentially undetectable. Behaviorally, mice subjected to repeated swim spent less time immobile in the tail suspension test than control mice, but responded similarly to SERT- and norepinephrine transporter-selective antidepressants. Together, these results show that reduced 5-HT clearance following HPA axis activation is likely mediated, at least in part, by the corticosterone-sensitive OCT3, and that drugs developed to selectively target OCT3 (unlike corticosterone) may be candidates for the development of novel antidepressant medications. PMID:21068324

  11. Corticosterone and propranolol's role on taste recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Ruetti, E; Justel, N; Mustaca, A; Boccia, M

    2014-12-01

    Taste recognition is a robust procedure to study learning and memory processes, as well as the different stages involved in them, i.e. encoding, storage and recall. Considerable evidence indicates that adrenal hormones and the noradrenergic system play an important role in aversive and appetitive memory formation in rats and humans. The present experiments were designed to characterize the effects of immediate post training corticosterone (Experiment 1) and propranolol administration (Experiment 2 and 3) on taste recognition memory. Administration of a high dose of corticosterone (5mg/kg, sc) impairs consolidation of taste memory, but the low and moderate doses (1 and 3mg/kg, sc) didn't affect it. On the other hand, immediate post-training administration of propranolol (1 and 2mg/kg, ip) impaired taste recognition memory. These effects were time-dependent since no effects were seen when drug administration was delayed 3h after training. These findings support the importance of stress hormones and noradrenergic system on the modulation of taste memory consolidation. PMID:25268313

  12. Plane of nutrition affects plasma ghrelin concentrations in neonatal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigating different planes of nutrition on appetite-related hormones could provide knowledge into the role of these hormones on growth performance in neonatal calves. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of feeding rates on ghrelin in plasma from preruminant calves....

  13. Reset of feedback in the adrenocortical system: an apparent shift in sensitivity of adrenocorticotropin to inhibition by corticosterone between morning and evening.

    PubMed

    Akana, S F; Cascio, C S; Du, J Z; Levin, N; Dallman, M F

    1986-11-01

    There is evidence in man and rats that higher circulating levels of glucocorticoids are required to normalize basal unstimulated ACTH levels at the peak of the circadian rhythm than at the trough. To explore this phenomenon, we tested the inhibitory effect of constant levels of corticosterone on plasma ACTH in the morning (AM) and evening (PM) in young male rats implanted with fused pellets of corticosterone-cholesterol at the time of adrenalectomy (ADX+B) and studied 5 days later. There was a marked shift of the plasma corticosterone-ACTH inhibition curve to the right between AM and PM, demonstrating that the efficacy of corticosterone feedback inhibition of ACTH is less in the PM. Comparison of plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels during 24 h in sham-adrenalectomized rats (SHAM-ADX), adrenalectomized rats (ADX), and ADX+B revealed constantly low ACTH in SHAM-ADX, constantly high ACTH in ADX, and biphasic ACTH levels in ADX+B. Corticosterone levels were biphasic in SHAM-ADX and were constant in the other two groups. These results again showed a shift in corticosterone feedback efficacy as a function of the time of day and also suggested that basal ACTH secretion is maintained in the low normal range in intact rats because of the marked diurnal rhythm in corticosterone. The sensitivity of the pituitary ACTH response to exogenous CRF did not change between AM and PM in either intact or ADX+B showing that the shift in feedback sensitivity to corticosterone does not reside in the pituitary. The response of the entire adrenocortical system to histamine stress was shown to be equivalent in both the AM and PM, suggesting that feedback sensitivity of the entire system to corticosterone does not change as a function of the time of day. We conclude from these results that there is an apparent diurnal change in ACTH sensitivity to corticosterone feedback that can be defined operationally as reset. We believe that the site of feedback being tested shifts solely from the

  14. Corticosterone alters materno-fetal glucose partitioning and insulin signalling in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, O R; Fisher, H M; Dionelis, K N; Jefferies, E C; Higgins, J S; Musial, B; Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Fowden, A L

    2015-03-01

    Glucocorticoids affect glucose metabolism in adults and fetuses, although their effects on materno-fetal glucose partitioning remain unknown. The present study measured maternal hepatic glucose handling and placental glucose transport together with insulin signalling in these tissues in mice drinking corticosterone either from day (D) 11 to D16 or D14 to D19 of pregnancy (term = D21). On the final day of administration, corticosterone-treated mice were hyperinsulinaemic (P < 0.05) but normoglycaemic compared to untreated controls. In maternal liver, there was no change in glycogen content or glucose 6-phosphatase activity but increased Slc2a2 glucose transporter expression in corticosterone-treated mice, on D16 only (P < 0.05). On D19, but not D16, transplacental (3) H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was reduced by 33% in corticosterone-treated dams (P < 0.05). However, when corticosterone-treated animals were pair-fed to control intake, aiming to prevent the corticosterone-induced increase in food consumption, (3) H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was similar to the controls. Depending upon gestational age, corticosterone treatment increased phosphorylation of the insulin-signalling proteins, protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase-kinase 3β, in maternal liver (P < 0.05) but not placenta (P > 0.05). Insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor abundance did not differ with treatment in either tissue. Corticosterone upregulated the stress-inducible mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) suppressor, Redd1, in liver (D16 and D19) and placenta (D19), in ad libitum fed animals (P < 0.05). Concomitantly, hepatic protein content and placental weight were reduced on D19 (P < 0.05), in association with altered abundance and/or phosphorylation of signalling proteins downstream of mTOR. Taken together, the data indicate that maternal glucocorticoid excess reduces fetal growth partially by altering placental glucose transport and mTOR signalling. PMID:25625347

  15. Naltrexone effects on male sexual behavior, corticosterone, and testosterone in stressed male rats.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Vázquez-Palacios, G; Martínez-García, R

    2009-02-16

    first day. NTX administration to control naive males caused a decrease in mount, intromission, and ejaculation latencies, as well as an increase in ejaculatory frequency/30 min, compared to control-saline only on day 1. Stressed naive males showed higher mount, intromission and ejaculation latencies, compared to control and stressed sexually experienced males, as well as comparable increase in corticosterone and decrease in testosterone plasma levels. NTX administration before exposure to stress prevented the modifications caused by stress in sexual parameters. Sexual behavior in control sexually-active males injected with saline or NTX was not modified. Saline stressed males showed the previously reported alterations in sexual behavior, as well as an increase in corticosterone and a decrease in testosterone plasma levels. Stressed males injected with NTX before exposure to stress showed no alterations in male sexual behavior. NTX in control non-stressed males did not modify corticosterone plasma levels, but did cause a significant increase in plasma testosterone. The increase in corticosterone and the decrease in testosterone due to stress, were attenuated with the opioid antagonist, both in naive and sexually experienced males. Prevention of ICW stress effects was more effective with higher doses of NTX (3 mg/kg). These data suggest that endogenous opioids could be participating in the effects caused by stress on male sexual behavior, corticosterone, and testosterone. PMID:19027764

  16. Corticosterone-immune interactions during captive stress in invading Australian cane toads (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Graham, Sean P; Kelehear, Crystal; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Vertebrates cope with physiological challenges using two major mechanisms: the immune system and the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal axis (e.g., the glucocorticoid stress response). Because the two systems are tightly integrated, we need simultaneous studies of both systems, in a range of species, to understand how vertebrates respond to novel challenges. To clarify how glucocorticoids modulate the amphibian immune system, we measured three immune parameters and plasma corticosterone (CORT), before and after inflicting a stressor (capture and captive confinement) on introduced cane toads (Rhinella marina) near their invasion front in Australia. Stress increased CORT levels, decreased complement lysis capacity, increased leukocyte oxidative burst, and did not change heterologous erythrocyte agglutination. The strength of the CORT response was positively correlated with leukocyte oxidative burst, and morphological features associated with invasiveness in cane toads (relative leg length) were correlated with stress responsiveness. No immune parameter that we measured was affected by a toad's infection by a parasitic nematode (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala), but the CORT response was muted in infected versus uninfected toads. These results illustrate the complex immune-stress interactions in wild populations of a non-traditional model vertebrate species, and describe immune adaptations of an important invasive species. PMID:22713726

  17. Common and Rare Gene Variants Affecting Plasma LDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, John R; Hooper, Amanda J

    2008-01-01

    The plasma level of LDL cholesterol is clinically important and genetically complex. LDL cholesterol levels are in large part determined by the activity of LDL receptors (LDLR) in the liver. Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) – with its high LDL cholesterol levels, xanthomas, and premature atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in either the LDLR or in APOB – the protein in LDL recognised by the LDLR. A third, rare form – autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia – arises from mutations in the gene encoding an adaptor protein involved in the internalisation of the LDLR. A fourth variant of inherited hypercholesterolaemia was recently found to be associated with missense mutations in PCSK9, which encodes a serine protease that degrades LDLR. Whereas the gain-of-function mutations in PCSK9 are rare, a spectrum of more frequent loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 associated with low LDL cholesterol levels has been identified in selected populations and could protect against coronary heart disease. Heterozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia (FHBL) – with its low LDL cholesterol levels and resistance to atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in APOB. In contrast to other inherited forms of severe hypocholesterolaemia such as abetalipoproteinaemia - caused by mutations in MTP - and homozygous FHBL, a deficiency of PCSK9 appears to be benign. Rare variants of NPC1L1, the gene encoding the putative intestinal cholesterol receptor, have shown more modest effects on plasma LDL cholesterol than PCSK9 variants, similar in magnitude to the effect of common APOE variants. Taken together, these findings indicate that heritable variation in plasma LDL cholesterol is conferred by sequence variation in various loci, with a small number of common and multiple rare gene variants contributing to the phenotype. PMID:18566665

  18. Maternal Exposure to Low Levels of Corticosterone during Lactation Protects against Experimental Inflammatory Colitis-Induced Damage in Adult Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Carla; Giuli, Chiara; Agostini, Simona; Bacquie, Valérie; Zinni, Manuela; Theodorou, Vassilia; Broccardo, Maria; Casolini, Paola; Improta, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Opposing emotional events (negative/trauma or positive/maternal care) during the postnatal period may differentially influence vulnerability to the effects of stress later in life. The development and course of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease are negatively affected by persistent stress, but to date the role of positive life events on these pathologies has been entirely unknown. In the present study, the effect of early life beneficial experiences in the development of intestinal dysfunctions, where inflammation and stress stimuli play a primary role, was investigated. As a “positive” experimental model we used adult male rat progeny nursed by mothers whose drinking water was supplemented with moderate doses of corticosterone (CORT) (0.2 mg/ml) during the lactation period. Such animals have been generally shown to cope better with different environmental situations during life. The susceptibility to inflammatory experimental colitis induced by intracolonic infusion of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid) was investigated in CORT-nursed rats in comparison with control rats. This mild increase in maternal corticosterone during lactation induced, in CORT-nursed rats, a long lasting protective effect on TNBS-colitis, characterized by improvements in some indices of the disease (increased colonic myeloperoxidase activity, loss of body weight and food intake) and by the involvement of endogenous peripheral pathways known to participate in intestinal disorder development (lower plasma corticosterone levels and colonic mast cell degranulation, alterations in the colonic expression of both corticotrophin releasing factor/CRF and its receptor/CRH-1R). All these findings contribute to suggesting that the reduced vulnerability to TNBS-colitis in CORT-nursed rats is due to recovery from the colonic mucosal barrier dysfunction. Such long lasting changes induced by mild hormonal manipulation during lactation, making the adult also better adapted

  19. Effects of chronic stress and corticosterone on sialidase activity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wielgat, Przemyslaw; Walesiuk, Anna; Braszko, Jan J

    2011-09-23

    Sialidases are acid exoglycosidases that catalyse the removal of sialic acid from non-reducing end of sialoglucoconjugated substrates. Synaptic plasticity depends on sialylation state of proteins and lipids mediated by sialic acid-metabolizing enzymes. Since chronic stress causes both, hippocampal atrophy and impairment of learning, it is reasonable to investigate whether sialidase is implicated in these processes. In this study, we tested effects of chronic stress (immobilization, 2h daily, 21 days) or chronic corticosterone administration (5 mg/kg, sc, daily) on sialidase activity and sialylated NCAMs expression in rat hippocampus. The results showed that chronic stress affects hippocampus-depended spatial learning in the Barnes maze. Both, stress (p > 0.05) and corticosterone (p < 0.001), increased latencies to enter the escape tunnel of the maze in comparison to control animals. Similar but not significant differences between control and other experimental groups were observed in the numbers of errors. Chronic stress (p > 0.05) and corticosterone (p < 0.05) decreased sialidase activity in the brain homogenates and synaptosomes (p < 0.05, both). In the stressed animals, these changes were related to significantly higher expression of polysialic acid. These results indicate that changes in sialidase activity caused by stress and chronic corticosterone administration reflect disturbances of polysialylated glycoconjugates known to be related to synaptic plasticity in hippocampus. PMID:21501633

  20. Behavioral stereotypies induced by "binge' cocaine administration are independent of drug-induced increases in corticosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Spangler, R; Zhou, Y; Schlussman, S D; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    1997-07-01

    Cocaine administration causes dramatic stereotypic behavior and elevation of circulating corticosterone levels in rodents. The present study tested the possible role of increased corticosterone in mediating stereotypic behavior caused by "binge' pattern cocaine administration. Animals were administered saline or cocaine intraperitoneally for 3 days, with or without pretreatment with a D1 (SCH 23390, 2 mg/kg) or D2 (sulpiride, 50 mg/kg) dopamine receptor antagonist. Three days of cocaine "binges' significantly increased corticosterone levels in vehicle pretreated rats (P < 0.01). Both SCH 23390 and sulpiride pretreatment daily significantly attenuated this increase (P < 0.01). Cocaine administration caused stereotypic behaviors in vehicle pretreatment rats (P < 0.01). These behavioral responses were blocked by the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390, but not by the D2 antagonist sulpiride. These findings reaffirm the dominant role of the D1 receptor in mediating behavioral stereotypy caused by elevations of extracellular dopamine in the synaptic cleft. The fact that the dose of sulpiride used in these studies prevented the elevation of plasma corticosterone caused by cocaine, without blocking the stereotypy caused by cocaine, indicates that this stereotypic behavior does not require drug-induced elevation in circulating levels of corticosterone. PMID:9134155

  1. Dietary restriction causes chronic elevation of corticosterone and enhances stress response in red-legged kittiwake chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Kitaiskaia, E.V.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Release of corticosterone in hungry kittiwake chicks facilitates begging and allows them to restore depleted energy reserves by increasing parental food provisioning. However, in order to avoid detrimental effects of chronic elevation of corticosterone, chicks might suppress adrenocortical activity in response to prolonged food shortages. In this study we examined temporal dynamics of corticosterone release in red-legged kittiwake (Rissa brevirostris) chicks exposed to prolonged restrictions in energy content and/or nutritional quality (low versus high lipid content) of their food. Starting at the age of 15 days, chicks were fed either high- or low-lipid fish at 40%, 65%, and 100% of ad libitum energy intake. Body mass measurements and baseline plasma samples were taken on a weekly basis after beginning of the treatment. After 3 weeks of treatment, chicks were exposed to a standardized acute handling and restraint stress protocol, where in addition to a baseline sample, three plasma samples were taken at intervals up to 50 min. We found that food-restricted chicks had lower body mass, chronically (during 2-3 weeks) elevated baseline and higher acute stress-induced levels of corticosterone compared to chicks fed ad libitum. Low lipid content of food further exacerbated these effects. An increase in baseline levels of corticosterone was observed within a week after energy requirements of food-restricted chicks exceeded their daily energy intake. A tendency for suppression of adrenocortical activity was observed in treatments fed low-lipid diets only at the end of the experiment. We suggest that nest-bound chicks, if food-stressed, might suffer deleterious effects of chronic elevation of corticosterone.

  2. Sex and storage affect cholinesterase activity in blood plasma of Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Freezing at -25?C had confounding effects on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in blood plasma from breeding female quail, but did not affect ChE activity in plasma from males. Plasma ChE activity of control females increased consistently during 28 days of storage while both carbamate- and cidrotophos-inhibited ChE decreased. Refrigeration of plasma at 4?C for 2 days had little effect of ChE activity. Plasma ChE activity was averaged about 34% higher in breeding males than in females. Extreme caution should be exercised in use of blood plasma for evaluation of anti ChE exposure in free-living birds.

  3. How Rotation affects Instabilities and the Plasma Response to Magnetic Perturbations in a Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBono, Bryan Angelo

    This thesis presents the systematic study of the multimode external kink mode structure and dynamics in the High-Beta Tokamak Extended-Pulse experiment (HBT-EP) when the plasma rotation is externally controlled using a source of toroidal momentum input. The capabilities of the HBT-EP tokamak to study rotation physics was greatly extended during a 2009--2010 major upgrade, when a new adjustable conducting wall, a high-power modular control coil array system, and an extensive set of 216 poloidal and radial magnetic sensors were installed on the machine. HBT-EP was additionally equipped with a biased edge electrode which made it possible to adjust the plasma ion and plasma magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) mode rotation frequencies by imparting an electromagnetic torque on the plasma. The design of this biased edge electrode, and its capability to torque the plasma is described. The rotation frequency of the helical kink modes was directly inferred from analysis of the magnetics dataset. To directly measure the plasma ion acceleration as the plasma was torqued by the biased electrode, a novel high-throughput and fast-response spectroscopic rotation diagnostic was installed on HBT-EP. This spectroscopic rotation diagnostic was designed to measure the velocity of He ions, therefore when conducting experiments using the spectroscopic rotation diagnostic a gas mixture of 90%D and 10%He was used. With its current power supplies the bias probe is capable of accelerating the primary m/n=3/1 helical kink mode (which has a natural rotation frequency between +7→+9kHz) to somewhere between -50kHz→+25kHz depending on the probe bias. At a probe voltage of +175V the He impurity ions were seen to accelerate by 3km/sec. Biorthogonal decomposition (BD) analysis was applied to the large magnetics dataset and used to determine the multimode m/n spectrum of the helical kink modes present in HBT-EP. The dominant helicities present as revealed by the BD are the m/n=3/1 and m/n=6/2 modes

  4. TCDD and corticosterone on testicular steroidogenesis and antioxidant system of epididymal sperm in rats.

    PubMed

    Dhanabalan, S; Mathur, P P; Latha, P

    2015-09-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an endocrine-disrupting environmental pollutant, has been found to cause male reproductive toxicity. Glucocorticoids have been found to influence the metabolic pathway of TCDD. Stress, which affects the male reproductive function, is marked by an increase in the level and activity of glucocorticoids in the body. The present study was carried out to understand the effect of TCDD on testicular steroidogenesis and sperm antioxidant system under the influence of increased level of corticosterone in the body. Adult male rats were treated with either TCDD (100 ng/kg bw/ day) or corticosterone (3 mg/kg bw/day) or both for 15 days. Treatment with either TCDD or corticosterone was found to suppress the levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and androgen-binding protein and reduce the activities of steroidogenic enzymes in testis while increasing oxidative stress in ventral prostate, seminal vesicles and epididymal sperm. In rats treated with both TCDD and corticosterone, the suppression of testicular steroidogenesis and increase in oxidative stress observed in ventral prostate, seminal vesicles and epididymal sperm were significant as compared to TCDD alone treated rats. The levels of Fas and FasL proteins were also increased in rats subjected to either TCDD or corticosterone treatment. In rats treated with both compounds, the increase observed in testicular levels of Fas and FasL was significant as compared to TCDD alone treated rats. Effect of TCDD on testicular steroidogenesis and antioxidant system of epididymal sperm may get enhanced under increased level of glucocorticoids in the body. PMID:23363575

  5. Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird.

    PubMed

    Will, Alexis; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Dale M; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ito, Motohiro; Callahan, Matt; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Hatch, Scott; Elliott, Kyle; Slater, Leslie; Takahashi, Akinori; Kitaysky, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this method to examine how changes in diet composition and prey quality affect the nutritional status of free-living rhinoceros auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata). Our study sites included the following: Teuri Is. Japan, Middleton Is. central Gulf of Alaska, and St. Lazaria Is. Southeast Alaska. In 2012 and 2013, we collected "bill loads" delivered by parents to feed their chicks (n = 758) to document dietary changes. We deployed time-depth-temperature recorders on breeding adults (n = 47) to evaluate whether changes in prey coincided with changes in foraging behavior. We measured concentrations of corticosterone in fledgling (n = 71) and adult breeders' (n = 82) feathers to determine how birds were affected by foraging conditions. We found that seasonal changes in diet composition occurred on each colony, adults dove deeper and engaged in longer foraging bouts when capturing larger prey and that chicks had higher concentrations of corticosterone in their feathers when adults brought back smaller and/or lower energy prey. Corticosterone levels in feathers of fledglings (grown during the breeding season) and those in feathers of adult breeders (grown during the postbreeding season) were positively correlated, indicating possible carryover effects. These results suggest that seabirds might experience increased levels of nutritional stress associated with moderate dietary changes and that physiological responses to changes in prey composition

  6. Comparison of time-dependent effects of (+)-methamphetamine or forced swim on monoamines, corticosterone, glucose, creatine, and creatinine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Nicole R; Schaefer, Tori L; Tang, Peter H; Skelton, Matthew R; Lucot, James P; Gudelsky, Gary A; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use is a worldwide problem. Abusers can have cognitive deficits, monoamine reductions, and altered magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings. Animal models have been used to investigate some of these effects, however many of these experiments have not examined the impact of MA on the stress response. For example, numerous studies have demonstrated (+)-MA-induced neurotoxicity and monoamine reductions, however the effects of MA on other markers that may play a role in neurotoxicity or cell energetics such as glucose, corticosterone, and/or creatine have received less attention. In this experiment, the effects of a neurotoxic regimen of (+)-MA (4 doses at 2 h intervals) on brain monoamines, neostriatal GFAP, plasma corticosterone, creatinine, and glucose, and brain and muscle creatine were evaluated 1, 7, 24, and 72 h after the first dose. In order to compare MA's effects with stress, animals were subjected to a forced swim test in a temporal pattern similar to MA administration [i.e., (30 min/session) 4 times at 2 h intervals]. Results MA increased corticosterone from 1–72 h with a peak 1 h after the first treatment, whereas glucose was only increased 1 h post-treatment. Neostriatal and hippocampal monoamines were decreased at 7, 24, and 72 h, with a concurrent increase in GFAP at 72 h. There was no effect of MA on regional brain creatine, however plasma creatinine was increased during the first 24 h and decreased by 72 h. As with MA treatment, forced swim increased corticosterone more than MA initially. Unlike MA, forced swim reduced creatine in the cerebellum with no change in other brain regions while plasma creatinine was decreased at 1 and 7 h. Glucose in plasma was decreased at 7 h. Conclusion Both MA and forced swim increase demand on energy substrates but in different ways, and MA has persistent effects on corticosterone that are not attributable to stress alone. PMID:18513404

  7. Elevated corticosterone during egg production elicits increased maternal investment and promotes nestling growth in a wild songbird.

    PubMed

    Bowers, E Keith; Bowden, Rachel M; Thompson, Charles F; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids circulating in breeding birds during egg production accumulate within eggs, and may provide a potent form of maternal effect on offspring phenotype. However, whether these steroids affect offspring development remains unclear. Here, we employed a non-invasive technique that experimentally elevated the maternal transfer of corticosterone to eggs in a wild population of house wrens. Feeding corticosterone-injected mealworms to free-living females prior to and during egg production increased the number of eggs that females produced and increased corticosterone concentrations in egg yolks. This treatment also resulted in an increase in the amount of yolk allocated to eggs. Offspring hatching from these eggs begged for food at a higher rate than control offspring and eventually attained increased prefledging body condition, a trait predictive of their probability of recruitment as breeding adults in the study population. Our results indicate that an increase in maternal glucocorticoids within the physiological range can enhance maternal investment and offspring development. PMID:27189763

  8. Elevated corticosterone during egg production elicits increased maternal investment and promotes nestling growth in a wild songbird

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, E. Keith; Bowden, Rachel M.; Thompson, Charles F.; Sakaluk, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids circulating in breeding birds during egg production accumulate within eggs, and may provide a potent form of maternal effect on offspring phenotype. However, whether these steroids affect offspring development remains unclear. Here, we employed a non-invasive technique that experimentally elevated the maternal transfer of corticosterone to eggs in a wild population of house wrens. Feeding corticosterone-injected mealworms to free-living females prior to and during egg production increased the number of eggs that females produced and increased corticosterone concentrations in egg yolks. This treatment also resulted in an increase in the amount of yolk allocated to eggs. Offspring hatching from these eggs begged for food at a higher rate than control offspring and eventually attained increased prefledging body condition, a trait predictive of their probability of recruitment as breeding adults in the study population. Our results indicate that an increase in maternal glucocorticoids within the physiological range can enhance maternal investment and offspring development. PMID:27189763

  9. Time-dependent effects of posttraining intrahippocampal injections of corticosterone on retention of appetitive learning tasks in mice.

    PubMed

    Micheau, J; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1984-10-30

    In previous studies we suggested that corticosterone may modulate hippocampal functioning during memory formation. To test this assumption, we studied the effects of posttrial administration of corticosterone (1 microgram) injected bilaterally in the hippocampus. The treatment was applied at different time intervals after the learning session and the retention session took place 24 h later. Using appetitive operant conditioning tasks in a Skinner box, we found that the posttrial treatment 1) did not affect the retention of a continuously reinforced schedule, 2) improved the retention of a successive discrimination learning task, and 3) was still effective when given 3 h after the acquisition of this task, but not after 6 h. Taken together, the results suggest that corticosterone modulates the hippocampal mechanisms involved in behavioral suppression during memory formation. PMID:6529972

  10. Effect of Novel Melanocortin Type 2 Receptor Antagonists on the Corticosterone Response to ACTH in the Neonatal Rat Adrenal Gland In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nensey, Nasha K.; Bodager, Jonathan; Gehrand, Ashley L.; Raff, Hershel

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced increases in neonatal corticosterone demonstrate a unique shift from ACTH independence to ACTH dependence between postnatal day 2 (PD2) and day 8 (PD8) in newborn rats. This shift could be due to the binding of a bioactive, non-­immunoreactive plasma ligand to the adrenocortical melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) (ACTH receptor). A potent MC2R antagonist would be useful to evaluate this phenomenon in the neonate. Therefore, we investigated the acute corticosterone response to ACTH(1–39) injection in rat pups pretreated with newly developed MC2R antagonists (GPS1573 and GPS1574), which have not been tested in vivo. The doses used in vivo were based on their in vitro potency, with GP1573 being more potent than GPS1574. GPS1573 (PD2 and PD8), GPS1574 (PD2 only), or vehicle were injected intraperitoneally (ip) 10 min before baseline sampling. Then, 0.001 mg/kg of ACTH(1–39) was injected ip, and subsequent blood samples obtained for the measurement of plasma corticosterone. Pretreatment of PD2 pups with GPS1573 demonstrated augmentation, rather than inhibition, of the corticosterone response to ACTH. In PD8 pups, pretreatment with 0.1 mg/kg GPS1573, but not 4 mg/kg, augmented the corticosterone response to ACTH. Pretreatment with GPS1574 attenuated the plasma corticosterone response to ACTH at 30 min in PD2 pups. The activity of these two compounds in vivo do not match their potency in vitro, with GPS1573 leading to a small augmentation of the corticosterone response to ACTH in vivo while GPS1574 resulted in inhibition. PMID:27047449

  11. Mercury Exposure May Suppress Baseline Corticosterone Levels in Juvenile Birds.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury exposure has been associated with a wide variety of negative reproductive responses in birds, however few studies have examined the potential for chick impairment via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis regulates corticosterone levels during periods of stress. We examined the relationship between baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations and mercury concentrations in down feathers of recently hatched (Sterna forsteri) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in blood of older chicks (decreasing by 81% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and number of fledgling chicks within the colony and chick age. In recently hatched chicks, baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were weakly negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in down feathers (decreasing by 45% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for stronger positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and colony nest abundance and date. These results indicate that chronic mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone concentrations in tern chicks and suggests that a juvenile bird's ability to respond to stress may be reduced via the downregulation of the HPA axis.

  12. Mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone levels in juvenile birds.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T; Herzog, Mark P

    2012-06-01

    Mercury exposure has been associated with a wide variety of negative reproductive responses in birds, however few studies have examined the potential for chick impairment via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis regulates corticosterone levels during periods of stress. We examined the relationship between baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations and mercury concentrations in down feathers of recently hatched (<3 days) and blood of older (15-37 days) Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in blood of older chicks (decreasing by 81% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and number of fledgling chicks within the colony and chick age. In recently hatched chicks, baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were weakly negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in down feathers (decreasing by 45% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for stronger positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and colony nest abundance and date. These results indicate that chronic mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone concentrations in tern chicks and suggests that a juvenile bird's ability to respond to stress may be reduced via the downregulation of the HPA axis. PMID:22578153

  13. Acute effects of bergamot oil on anxiety-related behaviour and corticosterone level in rats.

    PubMed

    Saiyudthong, Somrudee; Marsden, Charles A

    2011-06-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO), Citrus aurantium subsp. bergamia (Risso) Wright & Arn. (Rutaceae), is used widely in aromatherapy to reduce stress and anxiety despite limited scientific evidence. A previous study showed that BEO significantly increased gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in rat hippocampus, suggesting potential anxiolytic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BEO (1.0%, 2.5% and 5.0% w/w) administered to rats on both anxiety-related behaviours (the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and hole-board tests) and stress-induced levels of plasma corticosterone in comparison with the effects of diazepam. Inhalation of BEO (1% and 2.5%) and injection of diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the percentage of open arm entries on the EPM. The percentage time spent in the open arms was also significantly enhanced following administration of either BEO (2.5% and 5%) or diazepam. Total arm entries were significantly increased with the highest dose (5%), suggesting an increase in locomotor activity. In the hole-board test, 2.5% BEO and diazepam significantly increased the number of head dips. 2.5% BEO and diazepam attenuated the corticosterone response to acute stress caused by exposure to the EPM. In conclusion, both BEO and diazepam exhibited anxiolytic-like behaviours and attenuated HPA axis activity by reducing the corticosterone response to stress. PMID:21105176

  14. Dissociation between Rat Hippocampal CA1 and Dentate Gyrus Cells in Their Response to Corticosterone: Effects on Calcium Channel Protein and Current

    PubMed Central

    van Gemert, Neeltje G.; Carvalho, Diana M. M.; Karst, Henk; van der Laan, Siem; Zhang, Mingxu; Meijer, Onno C.; Hell, Johannes W.; Joëls, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Stress and corticosterone affect, via glucocorticoid receptors, cellular physiology in the rodent brain. A well-documented example concerns corticosteroid effects on high-voltage activated (L type) calcium currents in the hippocampal CA1 area. We tested whether corticosterone also affects calcium currents in another hippocampal area that highly expresses glucocorticoid receptors, i.e. the dentate gyrus (DG). Remarkably, corticosterone (100 nm, given for 20 min, 1–4.5 hr before recording) did not change high-voltage activated calcium currents in the DG, whereas currents in the CA1 area of the same rats were increased. Follow-up studies revealed that no apparent dissociation between the two areas was observed with respect to transcriptional regulation of calcium channel subunits; thus, in both areas corticosterone increased mRNA levels of the calcium channel-β4 but not the (α) Cav1.2 subunit. At the protein level, however, β4 and Cav1.2 levels were significantly up-regulated by corticosterone in the CA1 but not the DG area. These data suggest that stress-induced elevations in the level of corticosterone result in a regionally differentiated physiological response that is not simply determined by the glucocorticoid receptor distribution and that the observed regional differentiation may be caused by a gene involved in the translational machinery or in mechanisms regulating mRNA or protein stability. PMID:19589863

  15. Pro-apoptotic Action of Corticosterone in Hippocampal Organotypic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Anna; Kucharczyk, Mateusz; Detka, Jan; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Głombik, Katarzyna; Bojarski, Bartosz; Ludwikowska, Agnieszka; Lasoń, Władysław; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2016-08-01

    Elevated levels of glucocorticoids exert neurotoxic effects, and the hippocampus is particularly sensitive to the effects of glucocorticoids. Because some data have indicated that an increased action of glucocorticoids in the perinatal period enhances the susceptibility of brain tissue to adverse substances later in life, the main purpose of the present study was to compare necrotic/apoptotic corticosterone action in hippocampal organotypic cultures obtained from control animals with the effect of this steroid in tissue from prenatally stressed rats. Because the adverse effects of glucocorticoid action on nerve cell viability appear to result mainly from an increase in the intensity of the effects of glutamate and changes in growth factor and pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis, the involvement of these factors in corticosterone action were also determined. In stress-like concentration (1 μM), corticosterone, when added to hippocampal cultures for 1 and 3 days, alone or jointly with glutamate, did not induce necrosis. In contrast, in 3-day cultures, corticosterone (1 μM) increased caspase-3 activity and the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax. Moreover, corticosterone's effect on caspase-3 activity was stronger in hippocampal cultures from prenatally stressed compared to control rats. Additionally, 24 h of exposure to corticosterone and glutamate, when applied separately and together, increased Bdnf, Ngf, and Tnf-α expression. In contrast, after 72 h, a strong decrease in the expression of both growth factors was observed, while the expression of TNF-α remained high. The present study showed that in stress-like concentrations, corticosterone exerted pro-apoptotic but not necrotic effects in hippocampal organotypic cultures. Prenatal stress increased the pro-apoptotic effects of corticosterone. Increased synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α may be connected with the adverse effects of corticosterone on brain cell viability. PMID:27189478

  16. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal.

    PubMed

    Macho, L; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Nemeth, S; Popova, I; Tigranian, R A; Noskov, V B; Serova, L; Grigoriev, I A

    1991-01-01

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the amino acid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this revcovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues. PMID:11537112

  17. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, S.; Popova, I.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Serova, L.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the aminoacid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this recovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues.

  18. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Alters Core Body Temperature and Corticosterone Rhythms in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Robert J.; Zuloaga, Damian G.; McGivern, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol’s effects on the developing brain include alterations in morphological and biochemistry of the hypothalamus. In order to examine the potential functional consequences of ethanol’s interference with hypothalamic differentiation, we studied the long-term effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on basal circadian rhythms of core body temperature (CBT) and heart rate (HR). We also examined the late afternoon surge in corticosterone (CORT). CBT and HR rhythms were studied in separate groups of animals at 4 months, 8 months and 20 months of age. The normal late-afternoon rise in plasma corticosterone was examined in freely-moving male rats at 6 months of age via an indwelling right-atrial cannula. Results showed that the CBT circadian rhythm exhibited an earlier rise following the nadir of the rhythm in fetal alcohol exposed (FAE) males at all ages compared to controls. At 8 months of age, the amplitude of the CBT circadian rhythm in FAE males was significantly reduced to the level observed in controls at 20 months. No significant effects of prenatal ethanol exposure were observed on basal HR rhythm at any age. The diurnal rise in corticosterone secretion was blunted and prolonged in 6-month-old FAE males compared to controls. Both control groups exhibited a robust surge in corticosterone secretion around the onset of the dark phase of the light cycle, which peaked at 1930 hours. Instead, FAE males exhibited a linear rise beginning in mid afternoon, which peaked at 2130 hours. These results indicate that exposure to ethanol during the period of hypothalamic development can alter the long-term regulation of circadian rhythms in specific physiological systems. PMID:18047910

  19. Phosphodiesterase-2 inhibitor reverses corticosterone-induced neurotoxicity and related behavioural changes via cGMP/PKG dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Sun, Jiao; Li, Jianxin; Nguyen, Linda; Nair, Neetu; Zhang, Hanting; O'Donnell, James M

    2013-05-01

    Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is an enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) to restrict intracellular signalling of these second messenger molecules. This study investigated how PDE2 inhibitor Bay 60-7550 affects the dysregulated glucocorticoid signalling in neuronal cells and regulates depressive behaviours after chronic stress in mice. We found that exposure of hippocampal neurons to corticosterone resulted in time- and concentration-dependent increases in PDE2 expression. These intriguing findings were confirmed in the hippocampal cell line HT-22. After corticosterone exposure for 24 h, HT-22 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in mRNA levels for PDE2 subtypes, PDE2A1 and 2A3, as well as for the total PDE2A protein expression. Bay 60-7550 was found to reverse the cell lesion induced by corticosterone (50 μm). This neuroprotective effect was blocked by pretreatment with protein kinase G inhibitor KT5823, but not protein kinase A inhibitor H89, suggesting the involvement of cGMP-dependent signalling. Although Bay 60-7550 treatment for 24 h did not change the levels of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 (pERK) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB), it down-regulated pERK at 2 h and up-regulated a CREB co-activator, CREB-binding protein, at 24 h. Both of these effects were blocked by KT 5823. Furthermore, Bay 60-7550 reversed corticosterone-induced down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels 24 h after corticosterone exposure. In behavioural testing, Bay 60-7550 produced antidepressant-like effects and reduced corticosterone levels in stressed mice, further supporting the involvement of a PDE2-dependent pathway in mediating Bay 60-7550's effect during stress hormone insults. PMID:22850435

  20. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Warren K; Bate, Lisa J; Landry, Devin W; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  1. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Warren K.; Bate, Lisa J.; Landry, Devin W.; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  2. The adaptive value of stress-induced phenotypes: effects of maternally derived corticosterone on sex-biased investment, cost of reproduction, and maternal fitness.

    PubMed

    Love, Oliver P; Williams, Tony D

    2008-10-01

    The question of why maternal stress influences offspring phenotype is of significant interest to evolutionary physiologists. Although embryonic exposure to maternally derived glucocorticoids (i.e., corticosterone) generally reduces offspring quality, effects may adaptively match maternal quality with offspring demand. We present results from an interannual field experiment in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) designed explicitly to examine the fitness consequences of exposing offspring to maternally derived stress hormones. We combined a manipulation of yolk corticosterone (yolk injections) with a manipulation of maternal chick-rearing ability (feather clipping of mothers) to quantify the adaptive value of corticosterone-induced offspring phenotypes in relation to maternal quality. We then examined how corticosterone-induced "matching" within this current reproductive attempt affected future fecundity and maternal survival. First, our results provide support that low-quality mothers transferring elevated corticosterone to eggs invest in daughters as predicted by sex allocation theory. Second, corticosterone-mediated sex-biased investment resulted in rapid male-biased mortality resulting in brood reduction, which provided a better match between maternal quality and brood demand. Third, corticosterone-mediated matching reduced investment in current reproduction for low-quality mothers, resulting in fitness gains through increased survival and future fecundity. Results indicate that the transfer of stress hormones to eggs by low-quality mothers can be adaptive since corticosterone-mediated sex-biased investment matches the quality of a mother to offspring demand, ultimately increasing maternal fitness. Our results also indicate that the branding of the proximate effects of maternal glucocorticoids on offspring as negative ignores the possibility that short-term phenotypic changes may actually increase maternal fitness. PMID:18793091

  3. Therapeutic control of plasma concentrations and long-term effect of nortriptyline in recurrent affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Kragh-Sørensen; Hansen, C E; Baastrup, P C; Hvidberg, E F

    1976-07-01

    Based on the evidence that therapeutic plasma concentration range in fact exists for the tricyclic antidepressant drug, Nortriptyline (range 50-150 ng/ml), three different investigations were under taken in order to clarify some clinical pharmacological problems during long-term treatment with this drug. The possible prophlactic effect of the drug in recurrent affective disorders was specially examined in a group of patients with a high risk of episodes in their unipolar manic-depressive disease. The results highly demonstrate the value of monitoring plasma levels in achieving therapeutic control. Depressive relapses during treatment, for months and years, were only related to therapeutic insufficient plasma levels of the drug. PMID:981330

  4. Serotonin and corticosterone rhythms in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and in patients with COPD: implication for COPD-associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Huang, Yadi; Lyda, Elizabeth; Sime, Patricia J; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    The circadian timing system controls daily rhythms of physiology and behavior, and disruption of clock function can trigger stressful life events. Daily exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) can lead to alteration in diverse biological and physiological processes. Smoking is associated with mood disorders, including depression and anxiety. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have abnormal circadian rhythms, reflected by daily changes in respiratory symptoms and lung function. Corticosterone (CORT) is an adrenal steroid that plays a considerable role in stress and anti-inflammatory responses. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT) is a neurohormone, which plays a role in sleep/wake regulation and affective disorders. Secretion of stress hormones (CORT and 5HT) is under the control of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Since smoking is a contributing factor in the development of COPD, we hypothesize that CS can affect circadian rhythms of CORT and 5HT secretion leading to sleep and mood disorders in smokers and patients with COPD. We measured the daily rhythms of plasma CORT and 5HT in mice following acute (3 d), sub-chronic (10 d) or chronic (6 mo) CS exposure and in plasma from non-smokers, smokers and patients with COPD. Acute and chronic CS exposure affected both the timing (peak phase) and amplitude of the daily rhythm of plasma CORT and 5HT in mice. Acute CS appeared to have subtle time-dependent effects on CORT levels but more pronounced effects on 5HT. As compared with CORT, plasma 5HT was slightly elevated in smokers but was reduced in patients with COPD. Thus, the effects of CS on plasma 5HT were consistent between mice and patients with COPD. Together, these data reveal a significant impact of CS exposure on rhythms of stress hormone secretion and subsequent detrimental effects on cognitive function, depression-like behavior, mood/anxiety and sleep quality in smokers and patients with COPD. PMID:24520342

  5. Liver condition affects bovine oocyte qualities by changing the characteristics of follicular fluid and plasma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Shibano, K; Monji, Y; Kuwayama, T; Iwata, H

    2013-08-01

    The liver is an important organ that contributes to milk production in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to examine whether liver conditions affect the characteristics of blood plasma and follicular fluid (FF) and whether supplementing in vitro maturation medium with FF from either cows with damaged livers (DL) or those with healthy livers (HL) affects oocyte developmental competence. Biochemical characteristics of FF were significantly correlated with those in plasma. As such, the characteristics of both plasma and FF were similarly affected by liver conditions in that the concentrations of total protein and inorganic phosphorus were higher for the DL cow group than for the HL cow group, whereas the concentrations of albumin, lactate dehydrogenase and calcium were lower for DL cows than for HL cows. In addition, supplementing the medium with DL-FF retarded the progression of the nuclear maturation of oocytes collected from the HL cows. On culturing oocytes in maturation medium containing HL-FF, DL-FF or foetal calf serum, the highest developmental rate to the blastocyst stage was observed in the HL-FF group, while the lowest developmental ratio was observed in the DL-FF group. The growth factor array of the FFs revealed that 10 growth factors were significantly downregulated in the DL-FF compared with those in HL-FF. In conclusion, the characteristics of plasma and FF are affected by liver conditions in a similar way. Concentrations of several growth factors were low in DL-FF, as was the ability of DL-FF to support oocyte maturation compared with that of HL-FF. PMID:23281835

  6. Corticosterone in thin-billed prion Pachyptila belcheri chicks: diel rhythm, timing of fledging and nutritional stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillfeldt, Petra; Poisbleau, Maud; Chastel, Olivier; Masello, Juan F.

    2007-11-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GCs) of the hypothalam-pituitary-adrenal axis play a role in association with both stressful events and daily life processes. However, relatively little is known about the role of GCs in relation to daily and seasonal life processes in animals in the wild. In this paper, we present data on basal levels of plasma corticosterone CORT in chicks of a pelagic seabird, the thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, during two predictable changes in demands, the daily activity pattern and the preparation for fledging. By comparing chicks fed recently with unfed chicks, we test how GC levels are modified according to nutritional condition. In accordance with their nocturnal feeding rhythm, chicks had a clear daily rhythm with increased CORT secretion at night, but CORT levels during the active phase were also highly elevated in unfed chicks compared with fed chicks. Close to fledging, chicks rapidly increased basal CORT levels, and again unfed chicks had higher levels than fed chicks, although the age effect here was stronger than the effect of recent feeding. The present data thus support the hypothesis that GC levels are adjusted to life stages with predictable changes in demands, but food availability and/or internal energy stores also affect the level to which GCs increase.

  7. Modulation of the prolactin and the corticosterone stress responses: do they tell the same story in a long-lived bird, the Cape petrel?

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Trouvé, Colette; de Grissac, Sophie; Chastel, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    Over the last decades, the corticosterone stress response has been suggested as a major physiological tool to understand what strategy an individual might adopt in response to environmental perturbations. More recently, another hormone related to parental care--prolactin--has been suggested as a complementary tool to investigate this question. Indeed, both of these hormones are affected by stressors and are involved in parental decisions, such as deserting the nest. Because of these similarities, it remains unclear what the functional distinction between the prolactin and corticosterone stress responses is. Here, we investigated whether natural variations of the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses are functionally linked in free-living Cape petrel (Daption capense) parents. If prolactin and corticosterone mediate the same functional response to a stressor and are the proxies of the same response, we predict that corticosterone and prolactin stress responses (1) will be modulated according to the same factors; (2) will affect reproductive performances in the same way; and, (3) of course, will be correlated. Contrary to these predictions, we found that the corticosterone and prolactin stress responses were respectively modulated according to body condition and breeding status. Moreover, prolactin levels, but not corticosterone levels, were related to hatching success in this species. Finally, we did not find any significant correlation between these two stress responses under any circumstances (failed breeders, incubating or chick rearing birds) and this result was overall supported by a review of the existing literature. Therefore, these two stress responses do not seem to be tightly linked and we believe that they may provide complementary pieces of information on parental investment in birds. PMID:23142160

  8. What factors drive prolactin and corticosterone responses to stress in a long-lived bird species (snow petrel Pagodroma nivea)?

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Moe, Børge; Blanc, Samuel; Chastel, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that individuals should adapt their parental investment to the costs and benefits of the current reproductive effort. This could be achieved by modulating the hormonal stress response, which may shift energy investment away from reproduction and redirect it toward survival. In birds, this stress response consists of a release of corticosterone that may be accompanied by a decrease in circulating prolactin, a hormone involved in the regulation of parental care. We lack data on the modulation of the prolactin stress response. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that individuals should modulate their prolactin stress response according to the fitness value of the current reproductive effort relative to the fitness value of future reproduction. Specifically, we examined the influence of breeding status (failed breeders vs. incubating birds) and body condition on prolactin and corticosterone stress responses in a long-lived species, the snow petrel Pagodroma nivea. When facing stressors, incubating birds had higher prolactin levels than failed breeders. However, we found no effect of body condition on the prolactin stress response. The corticosterone stress response was modulated according to body condition but was not affected by breeding status. We also performed an experiment using injections of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and found that the modulation of the corticosterone stress response was probably associated with a reduction in ACTH release by the pituitary and a decrease in adrenal sensitivity to ACTH. In addition, we examined whether prolactin and corticosterone secretion were functionally linked. We found that these two hormonal stress responses were not correlated. Moreover, injection of ACTH did not affect prolactin levels, demonstrating that short-term variations in prolactin levels are not governed directly or indirectly by ACTH release. Thus, we suggest that the corticosterone and prolactin responses to short

  9. Disruption of the HPA-axis through corticosterone-release pellets induces robust depressive-like behavior and reduced BDNF levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Demuyser, Thomas; Bentea, Eduard; Deneyer, Lauren; Albertini, Giulia; Massie, Ann; Smolders, Ilse

    2016-07-28

    The corticosterone mouse model is widely used in preclinical research towards a better understanding of mechanisms of major depression. One particular administration procedure is the subcutaneous implantation of corticosterone slow-release pellets. In this report we want to provide basic evidence, regarding behavioral changes, neurotransmitter and -modulator levels and some other relevant biomolecules after hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis distortion. We show that three weeks of corticosterone pellet exposure robustly induces depressive-like but not anxiety-like behavior in mice, accompanied by a significant decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, at five weeks after the start of treatment. Furthermore there is an overall decrease in plasma corticosterone levels after three weeks of treatment that lasts up until the five weeks' time point. On the other hand, no differences are observed in total monoamine, glutamate or d-serine levels, nor in glucocorticoid receptor expression, in various depression-related brain areas. Altogether this characterization delivers vital information, supplementary to existing literature, regarding the phenotyping of pellet-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis disruption in mice following three weeks of continuous corticosterone exposure. PMID:27208833

  10. Pond acidification may explain differences in corticosterone among salamander populations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David L; Wojdak, Jeremy M; Du, Pang; Belden, Lisa K

    2013-01-01

    Physiological tolerances play a key role in determining species distributions and abundance across a landscape, and understanding these tolerances can therefore be useful in predicting future changes in species distributions that might occur. Vertebrates possess several highly conserved physiological mechanisms for coping with environmental stressors, including the hormonal stress response that involves an endocrine cascade resulting in the increased production of glucocorticoids. We examined the function of this endocrine axis by assessing both baseline and acute stress-induced concentrations of corticosterone in larvae from eight natural breeding populations of Jefferson's salamander Ambystoma jeffersonianum. We surveyed individuals from each pond and also examined a variety of environmental pond parameters. We found that baseline and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations differed significantly among ponds. Population-level baseline corticosterone concentrations were negatively related to pH and positively related to nitrate, and stress-induced concentrations were again negatively related to pH, positively related to nitrate, and positively related to temperature. We followed the field survey with an outdoor mesocosm experiment in which we manipulated pH and again examined baseline and acute stress-induced corticosterone in A. jeffersonianum larvae. As in the field survey, we observed an increase in the baseline corticosterone concentration of individuals exposed to the lowest pH treatment (pH 5-5.8). Examining physiological indices using a combined approach of field surveys and experiments can be a powerful tool for trying to unravel the complexities of environmental impacts on species distributions. PMID:23434782

  11. Dexamethasone inhibits corticosterone deposition in feathers of greenfinches.

    PubMed

    Hõrak, Peeter; Männiste, Marju; Meitern, Richard; Sild, Elin; Saks, Lauri; Sepp, Tuul

    2013-09-15

    Corticosterone (CORT) content of feathers is a potent source of information about activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during feather growth, which is used for assessment of well-being and stress history of individuals and populations in avian studies. However, little is known about factors affecting deposition of CORT into feathers and how feather CORT covaries with other markers of stress imposed upon individuals during feather growth. We addressed these questions by measuring CORT levels in feathers of wild-caught greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) brought into captivity. One tail feather was removed from all the birds upon arrival to the laboratory and the CORT levels of replacement feathers, grown in captivity were recorded. The birds were subjected to treatments of immune activation (by injection of phytohaemagglutinin) and synthetic glucocorticoid (dexamethasone, DEX) administration. Only DEX injection affected feather CORT levels. DEX-injected birds deposited on average 37% less of CORT in their feathers than saline-injected birds. Despite significant effects of DEX and immune activation treatments on differential leukocyte counts, we did not find any correlations between CORT and leukocyte hemoconcentrations or heterophil/lymphocyte ratios (a haematological index of stress), measured at three stages of feather growth. Our findings provide novel evidence that feather CORT levels are sensitive to manipulation of hormonal balance of birds, thereby supporting the diagnostic value of feather CORT measurements. However, we did not find any evidence about covariation between feather CORT and other markers of stress perceived during the period of feather growth. This calls for further research on information content of feather CORT, preferably in experiments manipulating more diverse array of psychological, immunological and abiotic stressors. PMID:23856540

  12. Coloration signals the ability to cope with elevated stress hormones: effects of corticosterone on growth of barn owls are associated with melanism.

    PubMed

    Almasi, B; Roulin, A; Korner-Nievergelt, F; Jenni-Eiermann, S; Jenni, L

    2012-06-01

    Stressful situations during development can shape the phenotype for life by provoking a trade-off between development and survival. Stress hormones, mainly glucocorticoids, play an important orchestrating role in this trade-off. Hence, how stress sensitive an animal is critically determines the phenotype and ultimately fitness. In several species, darker eumelanic individuals are less sensitive to stressful conditions than less eumelanic conspecifics, which may be due to the pleiotropic effects of genes affecting both coloration and physiological traits. We experimentally tested whether the degree of melanin-based coloration is associated with the sensitivity to an endocrine response to stressful situations in the barn owl. We artificially administered the mediator of a hormonal stress response, corticosterone, to nestlings to examine the prediction that corticosterone-induced reduction in growth rate is more pronounced in light eumelanic nestlings than in darker nest mates. To examine whether such an effect may be genetically determined, we swapped hatchlings between randomly chosen pairs of nests. We first showed that corticosterone affects growth and, thus, shapes the phenotype. Second, we found that under corticosterone administration, nestlings with large black spots grew better than nestlings with small black spots. As in the barn owl the expression of eumelanin-based coloration is heritable and not sensitive to environmental conditions, it is therefore a reliable, genetically based sign of the ability to cope with an increase in blood corticosterone level. PMID:22530630

  13. Quantification of dexamethasone and corticosterone in rat biofluids and fetal tissue using highly sensitive analytical methods: assay validation and application to a pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Samtani, Mahesh N.; Jusko, William J.

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive, specific, accurate and precise LC/MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of dexamethasone and corticosterone in rat plasma. The method was extended to dexamethasone analysis in rat plasma ultrafiltrate and fetal tissues. Samples were processed using SPE involving Oasis HLB cartridges, which offered complete extraction recovery for the analytes. Samples were subsequently analyzed using LC/MS/MS. A structurally related corticosteroid, prednisolone, was used as the internal standard. Using a 500 μL plasma sample, limits of quantification of 0.2 and 2.0 ng/mL were achievable for dexamethasone and corticosterone. This level of sensitivity allowed characterization of maternal/fetal dexamethasone profiles after administration of multiple doses of dexamethasone sodium phosphate to rats. However, this sensitivity was not satisfactory for corticosterone during pharmacokinetic studies involving dexamethasone due to its strong adrenosuppressive effect. This led us to investigate the suitability of a commercially available radioimmunoassay kit, which through extensive testing and minor modifications was found to offer extremely sensitive, specific, accurate and precise analysis of corticosterone. Knowledge of the steroid profiles captured using these highly sensitive analytical tools may potentially help in the optimization of corticosteroid therapy during pregnancy. PMID:17385808

  14. Social isolation during peri-adolescence or adulthood: effects on sexual motivation, testosterone and corticosterone response under conditions of sexual arousal in male rats.

    PubMed

    Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Bulygina, Veta V; Tikhonova, Maria A; Maslova, Larissa N

    2013-02-28

    Reproductive functions in adult organism are known to be affected by different factors. Effects of social environment at the postnatal ontogenesis attract particular attention since it has deep impact on the development of physiological and emotional state of an individual. Effects of chronic social isolation at different ages on male sexual motivation, testosterone and corticosterone response under conditions of sexual arousal were studied in Wistar rats. After weaning at the 21st [corrected] day of age, rats of one group were isolated for six weeks and after that they were housed in groups of five per cage for ten weeks (Iso3-9). Rats of the second group were housed in groups of five animals per cage till 13 weeks of age, and then they were isolated for six weeks (Iso13-19). Rats of the control group were housed in groups during the experiment. Adult 19 week- old male rats were tested under conditions of sexual arousal. The expression of sexual motivation was estimated as the behavioral activity of a male at the transparent perforated partition separating a receptive female. Isolation of adult male rats reduced the number of approaches to the partition, while the period of time a male spent at the partition was not changed and testosterone response was enhanced as compared to control rats. Chronic social isolation during peri-adolescence reduced sexual motivation and prevented arousal-induced elevation of testosterone. Plasma corticosterone increases at sexual arousal in the two groups of isolated rats did not differ from that in controls. Our results are evidence that social isolation during the post-maturity stage (Iso13-19) did not diminish the manifestation of sexual motivation and hormonal response to a receptive female, while isolation during peri-adolescence attenuated behavioral and hormonal expression of sexual arousal in adult males. PMID:23347014

  15. Eggshell Appearance Does Not Signal Maternal Corticosterone Exposure in Japanese Quail: An Experimental Study with Brown-Spotted Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Camille; Cassey, Phillip; Lovell, Paul G.; Mikšík, Ivan; Reynolds, S. James; Spencer, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is a critical period for birds as they have to cope with many stressful events. One consequence of an acute exposure to stress is the release of corticosterone, the avian stress hormone. Prolonged stress can have negative impacts on the immune system, resulting in, for example, increased oxidative stress. Through maternal effects, females are known to modulate their investment in eggs content according to their own physiological condition. Less is known about maternal investment in eggshells, especially in pigments. The two main eggshell pigments may possess opposite antioxidant properties: protoporphyrin (brown) is a pro-oxidant, whereas biliverdin (blue-green) is an antioxidant. In Japanese quail, we know that the deposition of both pigments is related to female body condition. Thus, a chronic stress response may be reflected in eggshell coloration. Using female Japanese quails that lay brown-spotted eggs, we explored whether physiological exposure to corticosterone induces a change in female basal stress and antioxidant factors, and eggshell pigment concentration, spectrophotometric reflectance, and maculation coverage. We supplemented adult females over a 2 week period with either peanut oil (control) or corticosterone (treatment). We collected pre- and post-supplementation eggs and analysed the effect of corticosterone treatment on female physiology and eggshell appearance parameters. Except for corticosterone-fed birds which laid eggs with brighter spots, supplementation had no significant effect on female physiology or eggshell pigment concentration, reflectance and maculation. The change in eggshell spot brightness was not detected by a photoreceptor noise-limited color opponent model of avian visual perception. Our data confirms that eggshell reflectance in spotted eggs varies over the laying sequence, and spot reflectance may be a key factor that is affected by females CORT exposure, even if the changes are not detected by an avian visual

  16. Propofol, but not etomidate, increases corticosterone levels and induces long-term alteration in hippocampal synaptic activity in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Seubert, Christoph N; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly E

    2016-04-01

    Animal studies provide strong evidence that general anesthetics (GAs), administered during the early postnatal period, induce long-term cognitive and neurological abnormalities. Because the brain growth spurt in rodents is delayed compared to that in humans, a fundamental question is whether the postnatal human brain is similarly vulnerable. Sevoflurane and propofol, GAs that share positive modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) function cause marked increase in corticosterone levels and induce long-term developmental alterations in synaptic activity in rodents. If synaptogenesis is affected, investigation of mechanisms of the synaptic effects of GAs is of high interest because synaptogenesis in humans continues for several years after birth. Here, we compared long-term synaptic effects of etomidate with those of propofol. Etomidate and propofol both positively modulate GABAAR activity, but in contrast to propofol, etomidate inhibits the adrenal synthesis of corticosterone. Postnatal day (P) 4, 5, or 6 rats received five injections of etomidate, propofol, or vehicle control during 5h of maternal separation. Endocrine effects of the anesthetics were evaluated by measuring serum levels of corticosterone immediately after anesthesia or maternal separation. The frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were measured at P24-40 and P≥80. Only propofol caused a significant increase in serum corticosterone levels (F(4.26)=17.739, P<0.001). In contrast to increased frequency of mIPSCs in the propofol group (F(4.23)=8.731, p<0.001), mIPSC activity in the etomidate group was not different from that in the vehicle groups. The results of this study together with previously published data suggest that anesthetic-caused increase in corticosterone levels is required for GABAergic GAs to induce synaptic effects in the form of a long-term increase in the frequency of hippocampal m

  17. Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture and captivity in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture have recently been shown for the first time in amphibians, and in the present study urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture and to confinement in captivity were measured in adult cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Queensland, Australia. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge was used to provide a biological validation for urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Urinary corticosterone metabolite increased 1-2 days after ACTH but not saline injection and then returned to initial values, indicating that the RIA could detect changes in corticosterone secretion in toads. Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to short-term capture and restraint in plastic bags were first apparent 2h after capture of wild toads. Toads held communally in captivity for 5 days had elevated urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations. Mean corticosterone concentrations declined significantly after a further 7 days in individual housing chambers. There was no sex difference in urinary corticosterone metabolite responses of toads to ACTH challenge, short-term capture or captivity. The relative amount of variation in the mean corticosterone responses was quantified by calculating coefficients of variation (CV) for each mean corticosterone response. Mean corticosterone at 0 min was more variable for captive toads than wild toads. Furthermore, initial corticosterone concentrations (0 min) were more variable than concentrations during the ACTH challenge, short-term capture and captivity. There was little change in the amount of variation of mean corticosterone levels between male and female toads with increasing time in captivity (12-29 days). This study has shown individual corticosterone responses of amphibians for the first-time, and has provided a novel method for quantifying the relative amount of variation in amphibian corticosterone responses. PMID:21756910

  18. Corticosterone, food intake and refueling in a long-distance migrant.

    PubMed

    Eikenaar, Cas; Bairlein, Franz; Stöwe, Mareike; Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Elevated baseline corticosterone levels function to mobilize energy in predictable life-history stages, such as bird migration. At the same time, baseline corticosterone has a permissive effect on the accumulation of fat stores (fueling) needed for migratory flight. Most migrants alternate flight bouts with stopovers, during which they replenish the fuel used during the preceding flight (refueling). The role of corticosterone in refueling is currently unclear. In a fasting-re-feeding experiment on northern wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) in autumn we found that baseline total and free corticosterone levels were negatively related with both food intake and the rate of fuel deposition after fasting. This confirms our earlier findings in wild conspecifics in spring and indicates that corticosterone does not stimulate stopover refueling. Whether the negative relationship between baseline corticosterone level and fuel deposition rate is causal is questionable, because within-individual comparison of corticosterone metabolite levels in droppings did not reveal differences between refueling and control periods. In other words, corticosterone does not appear to be down-regulated during refueling, which would be expected if it directly hampers refueling. We discuss possible correlates of corticosterone level that may explain the negative association between corticosterone and stopover refueling. Additionally, we found that fasting decreases total corticosterone level, which contrasts with previous studies. We propose that the difference is due to the other studies being conducted outside of the migration life-history stage, and provide a possible explanation for the decrease in corticosterone during fasting in migrating birds. PMID:24721337

  19. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe*

    PubMed Central

    Di, Guo-qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-guang; Lin, Qi-li

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L WECPN) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  20. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-Guang; Lin, Qi-Li

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L(WECPN)) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  1. 21 CFR 862.1200 - Corticosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corticosterone test system. 862.1200 Section 862.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1200 - Corticosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corticosterone test system. 862.1200 Section 862.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1200 - Corticosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corticosterone test system. 862.1200 Section 862.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1200 - Corticosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corticosterone test system. 862.1200 Section 862.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1200 - Corticosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corticosterone test system. 862.1200 Section 862.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. Short term response of insulin, glucose, growth hormone and corticosterone to acute vibration in rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Leon, H. A.; Chackerian, M.

    1971-01-01

    Study carried out to obtain some notion of the initial phasing and interactive effects among some hormones known to be responsive to vibration stress. Sprague-Dawley derived rats were exposed to the acute effects of confinement and confinement with lateral (plus or minus G sub y) vibration. The coincident monitoring of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and corticosterone plasma levels, during and immediately subsequent to exposure to brief low level vibration, exhibits the effects of inhibition of insulin release by epinephrine. The ability of insulin (IRI) to return rapidly to basal levels, from appreciably depressed levels during vibration, in the face of elevated levels of glucose is also shown. Corticosterone responds with almost equal rapidity, but in opposite phase to the IRI. The immuno-assayable growth hormone (IGH) dropped from a basal level of 32 ng/ml to 7.3 ng/ml immediately subsequent to vibration and remained at essentially that level throughout the experiment (60 min). Whether these levels represent a real fall in the rat or whether they merely follow the immuno-logically deficient form is still in question.

  7. Maternal corticosterone deposition in avian yolk: Influence of laying order and group size in a joint-nesting, cooperatively breeding species.

    PubMed

    Schmaltz, Gregory; Quinn, James S; Schoech, Stephan J

    2016-06-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones play a key role in day-to-day adjustments to fluctuating metabolic needs. These hormones also mediate physiological and behavioral responses to stressful events, allowing individuals to cope with stressors. Various environmental insults, such as a food shortages, predation attempts, and agonistic encounters often elevate plasma glucocorticoid levels in vertebrates. Because exposure to maternally-derived (via circulation or egg) glucocorticoids may be detrimental to the developing embryo, maternal stress can have negative carryover effects on offspring fitness. We examined corticosterone, the primary avian glucocorticoid, concentrations in egg yolk in a plural-breeding, joint-nesting species, the smooth-billed ani (Crotophaga ani), in which females compete among themselves to lay eggs in the final incubated clutch. We investigated whether yolk corticosterone levels varied with laying order and group size. Because egg-laying competition leads to physiological and social stress that is intensified with group size and laying order, we predicted that yolk corticosterone levels should increase from the early to the late egg-laying period and from single female to multi-female groups. In this two-year field study, we found that yolk corticosterone levels of late-laid eggs within the communal clutch were higher in multi-female groups than in single female groups. Results from this study suggest that laying females experience higher levels of stress in multi-female groups and that this maternal stress influences yolk corticosterone concentrations. This study identifies a novel cost of group-living in plural-breeding cooperatively breeding birds, namely an increase in yolk corticosterone levels with group size that may result in detrimental effects on offspring development. PMID:27118704

  8. Behavior in the elevated plus maze is differentially affected by testing conditions in rats under and over three weeks of age.

    PubMed

    Albani, Sarah H; Andrawis, Marina M; Abella, Rio Jeane H; Fulghum, John T; Vafamand, Naghmeh; Dumas, Theodore C

    2015-01-01

    The late postnatal period in rats is marked by numerous changes in perceptual and cognitive abilities. As such, age-related variation in cognitive test performance might result in part from disparate sensitivities to environmental factors. To better understand how testing conditions might interact with age, we assessed anxiety behavior on an elevated plus maze (EPM) in juvenile rats around 3 weeks of age under diverse testing conditions. Plasma corticosterone and neuronal activation patterns in the forebrain were examined after maze exposure. We found that anxiety was differentially expressed during different stages of late postnatal development. Bright illumination and morning testing encouraged greatest open arm exploration on the EPM in younger animals, while older rats explored open areas more under dim illumination in the morning compared to bright illumination in the afternoon/evening. Older rats exhibited higher plasma corticosterone levels at baseline compared to younger rats; however, this trend was reversed for post-testing corticosterone. Additionally, post-testing corticosterone levels were inversely related to time of testing. Compared to testing in the morning, EPM exposure in the afternoon/evening elicited greater neuronal Arc expression in the amygdala. Arc expression in the amygdala after morning testing was greater at P22-24 than P17-19. In layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex, Arc expression was elevated in younger animals and age interacted with time of testing to produce opposing effects at P17-19 and P22-24. These data suggest that age-related differences in anxiety-associated behavior during the late postnatal period are due in part to changes in light sensitivity and emergence of a circadian cycle for corticosterone. The findings illustrate that late postnatal behavioral development in rodents is a complex orchestration of changes in neural systems involved in perception, cognition, affect and homeostatic regulation. PMID:25741257

  9. Behavior in the elevated plus maze is differentially affected by testing conditions in rats under and over three weeks of age

    PubMed Central

    Albani, Sarah H.; Andrawis, Marina M.; Abella, Rio Jeane H.; Fulghum, John T.; Vafamand, Naghmeh; Dumas, Theodore C.

    2015-01-01

    The late postnatal period in rats is marked by numerous changes in perceptual and cognitive abilities. As such, age-related variation in cognitive test performance might result in part from disparate sensitivities to environmental factors. To better understand how testing conditions might interact with age, we assessed anxiety behavior on an elevated plus maze (EPM) in juvenile rats around 3 weeks of age under diverse testing conditions. Plasma corticosterone and neuronal activation patterns in the forebrain were examined after maze exposure. We found that anxiety was differentially expressed during different stages of late postnatal development. Bright illumination and morning testing encouraged greatest open arm exploration on the EPM in younger animals, while older rats explored open areas more under dim illumination in the morning compared to bright illumination in the afternoon/evening. Older rats exhibited higher plasma corticosterone levels at baseline compared to younger rats; however, this trend was reversed for post-testing corticosterone. Additionally, post-testing corticosterone levels were inversely related to time of testing. Compared to testing in the morning, EPM exposure in the afternoon/evening elicited greater neuronal Arc expression in the amygdala. Arc expression in the amygdala after morning testing was greater at P22–24 than P17–19. In layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex, Arc expression was elevated in younger animals and age interacted with time of testing to produce opposing effects at P17–19 and P22–24. These data suggest that age-related differences in anxiety-associated behavior during the late postnatal period are due in part to changes in light sensitivity and emergence of a circadian cycle for corticosterone. The findings illustrate that late postnatal behavioral development in rodents is a complex orchestration of changes in neural systems involved in perception, cognition, affect and homeostatic regulation. PMID:25741257

  10. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Pasricha, Natasha; Smeets, Johanna A S; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate-i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  11. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Johanna A. S.; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate—i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  12. Lead level in seminal plasma may affect semen quality for men without occupational exposure to lead

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infertility affects approximately 10–15% of reproductive-age couples. Poor semen quality contributes to about 25% of infertile cases. Resulting from the direct effect on testicular function or hormonal alterations, heavy metals exposure has been related to impaired semen quality. The objective of this study was to assess the level of lead in the seminal plasma in men without occupational exposure to lead, and to determine the relationship between semen quality and lead concentration in the semen. Methods This is a prospective and nonrandomized clinical study conducted in University infertility clinic and academic research laboratory. Three hundred and forty-one male partners of infertile couples undergoing infertility evaluation and management were recruited to the study. Semen samples collected for the analyses of semen quality were also used for the measurement of lead concentrations. Semen samples were evaluated according to the WHO standards. Results All subjects were married and from infertile couples without occupational exposure to lead. There is a significant inverse correlation between the lead concentration in seminal plasma and sperm count. A higher semen lead concentration was correlated with lower sperm count, but not with semen volume, sperm motility or sperm morphology as assessed by simple linear regression. Conclusions We found that semen lead concentration was significantly higher among the patients with lower sperm count. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a high level of lead accumulation in semen may reduce the sperm count contributing to infertility of men without occupational exposure to lead. PMID:23137356

  13. Desflurane differentially affects the release of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma and bronchoalveolar fluid of endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Boost, Kim A; Hofstetter, Christian; Flondor, Michael; Betz, Christian; Homann, Markus; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Muehl, Heiko; Zwissler, Bernhard

    2006-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that volatile anaesthetics can attenuate the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other proinflammatory stimuli in vitro and in vivo. Thus far, no studies are available on the influences of desflurane on the cytokine-release. We therefore aimed to investigate the effects of desflurane on the systemic and pulmonary release of proinflammatory cytokines in endotoxemic rats. Eighteen anaesthetized and ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: LPS-only: Six animals received LPS (5 mg/kg, i.v.) with no further intervention. LPS-Desflurane: Six animals received continuous inhalation of 1MAC Desflurane before and during endotoxemia with LPS (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Sham: Six animals served as control without inhalation of desflurane and endotoxemia. After 4 h, levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma and bronchoalveolar fluid were analyzed. Nitrite production as a readout for nitric oxide (NO) release from alveolar macrophages was measured by Griess assay. IkappaB-alpha degradation and iNOS-protein in macrophage homogenates were determined by Western Blotting. Inhalation of desflurane during endotoxemia showed a significant decrease in release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (-61%, P< or =0.05) and IL-1beta (-47%, P< or =0.05) in plasma as compared to LPS-only group, whereas the release of IL-6 was not significantly affected by desflurane. Within the lung, the NO-release was notably increased in supernatants of cultured alveolar macrophages from desflurane-group compared to both LPS-only and Sham group. IkappaB-alpha degradation in alveolar macrophages was impaired in the Desflurane-group as compared to the LPS-only group. Our data implicate that inhalation of 1MAC Desflurane during experimental endotoxemia differentially affects the inflammatory response in rats. PMID:16685427

  14. Glycosaminoglycan concentrations in horse plasma and serum. Differences with other animal species and identification of affecting factors.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, A M; Vinci, R; Panzera, M; Ferlazzo, A; Calatroni, A

    1991-01-01

    1. The measured values of acid glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration in plasma or in serum show significant differences between trained and untrained horses and among sedentary horses and other animal species (cattle, rabbit, sheep). 2. Diurnal variations in serum GAG levels are reported (cattle), and changes in plasma GAG concentrations after road transport (horses) and in late pregnancy (mares, cows), while sex, age and breed do not affect them. PMID:1782758

  15. Innate immunity and testosterone rapidly respond to acute stress, but is corticosterone at the helm?

    PubMed

    Davies, S; Noor, S; Carpentier, E; Deviche, P

    2016-10-01

    When faced with a stressor, vertebrates can rapidly increase the secretion of glucocorticoids, which is thought to improve the chances of survival. Concurrent changes in other physiological systems, such as the reproductive endocrine or innate immune systems, have received less attention, particularly in wild vertebrates. It is often thought that glucocorticoids directly modulate immune performance during a stress response, but, in many species, androgens also rapidly respond to stress. However, to our knowledge, no study has simultaneously examined the interactions between the glucocorticoid, androgen, and innate immune responses to stress in a wild vertebrate. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that the change in plasma corticosterone (CORT) in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint is correlated with the concurrent changes in plasma testosterone (T) and innate immune performance (estimated by the capacity of plasma to agglutinate and lyse foreign cells) in the Abert's Towhee (Melozone aberti). Furthermore, to broaden the generality of the findings, we compared male and female towhees, as well as males from urban and non-urban populations. Acute stress increased plasma CORT, decreased plasma T in males, and decreased innate immune performance, but the increase in CORT during stress was not correlated with the corresponding decreases in either plasma T or innate immunity. By contrast, the plasma T stress response was positively correlated with the innate immune stress response. Collectively, our results challenge the proposition that the glucocorticoid stress response is correlated with the concurrent changes in plasma T, a key reproductive hormone, and innate immunity, as estimated by agglutination and lysis. PMID:27188192

  16. Transcranial light affects plasma monoamine levels and expression of brain encephalopsin in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Flyktman, Antti; Mänttäri, Satu; Nissilä, Juuso; Timonen, Markku; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-15

    Encephalopsin (OPN3) belongs to the light-sensitive transmembrane receptor family mainly expressed in the brain and retina. It is believed that light affects mammalian circadian rhythmicity only through the retinohypothalamic tract, which transmits light information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. However, it has been shown that light penetrates the skull. Here, we present the effect of transcranial light treatment on OPN3 expression and monoamine concentrations in mouse brain and other tissues. Mice were randomly assigned to control group, morning-light group and evening-light group, and animals were illuminated transcranially five times a week for 8 min for a total of 4 weeks. The concentrations of OPN3 and monoamines were analysed using western blotting and HPLC, respectively. We report that transcranial light treatment affects OPN3 expression in different brain areas and plasma/adrenal gland monoamine concentrations. In addition, when light was administered at a different time of the day, the response varied in different tissues. These results provide new information on the effects of light on transmitters mediating mammalian rhythmicity. PMID:25805701

  17. Juveniles exposed to embryonic corticosterone have enhanced flight performance

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Eunice H.; Love, Oliver P.; Verspoor, Jan J.; Williams, Tony D.; Rowley, Kyle; Burness, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to maternally derived glucocorticoids during embryonic development impacts offspring phenotype. Although many of these effects appear to be transiently ‘negative’, embryonic exposure to maternally derived stress hormones is hypothesized to induce preparative responses that increase survival prospects for offspring in low-quality environments; however, little is known about how maternal stress influences longer-term survival-related performance traits in free-living individuals. Using an experimental elevation of yolk corticosterone (embryonic signal of low maternal quality), we examined potential impacts of embryonic exposure to maternally derived stress on flight performance, wing loading, muscle morphology and muscle physiology in juvenile European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Here we report that fledglings exposed to experimentally increased corticosterone in ovo performed better during flight performance trials than control fledglings. Consistent with differences in performance, individuals exposed to elevated embryonic corticosterone fledged with lower wing loading and had heavier and more functionally mature flight muscles compared with control fledglings. Our results indicate that the positive effects on a survival-related trait in response to embryonic exposure to maternally derived stress hormones may balance some of the associated negative developmental costs that have recently been reported. Moreover, if embryonic experience is a good predictor of the quality or risk of future environments, a preparative phenotype associated with exposure to apparently negative stimuli during development may be adaptive. PMID:18842541

  18. Plasma fibrin clot phenotype independently affects intracoronary thrombus ultrastructure in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Jaroslaw; Bogaert, Jan; Sadowski, Marcin; Woznicka, Olga; Doulaptsis, Konstantinos; Ntoumpanaki, Maria; Ząbczyk, Michal; Nessler, Jadwiga; Undas, Anetta

    2015-06-01

    Determinants of intracoronary thrombus (ICT) composition in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are largely unknown. We sought to investigate whether plasma fibrin phenotype and platelet reactivity affect ICT ultrastructure. We assessed the content of fibrin, platelets and erythrocytes including polyhedrocytes by scanning electron microscopy on the surface and inside ICT aspirated from 80 STEMI patients within 12 hours since chest pain onset. Plasma fibrin clot permeability (Ks), which indicates the average pore size, lysis time (t50 %), platelet reactivity index (PRI) and ADP-induced platelet aggregation (ADP5, 20µM) were evaluated on admission. All patients received aspirin and 45 (56.3 %) 600 mg of clopidogrel, 80 (60-120) min prior to aspiration. Higher content of fibrin (61.6 vs 34.3 %, P< 0.0001) and platelets (8.2 vs 4.8 %, P=0.018) and lower erythrocyte content (15.8 vs 42.9 %, P< 0.0001) were found on ICT surface compared with its inner part. After adjustment for fibrinogen, in both ICT parts fibrin content was correlated with Ks (r≤-0.55, P< 0.0001) and t50 % (r≥ 0.29, P≤ 0.02) but not with PRI and ADP5,20µM. Polyhedrocytes were observed in 16 (20 %) patients and their large amount expressed as ≥ 50 % fields of view covered by polyhedrocytes was associated with the lower PRI values (40 vs 69 %, P=0.015), but not Ks or t50 %. By multivariate regression, Ks (β=-0.62, P< 0.0001), clopidogrel pretreatment (β=-0.36, P< 0.001), ischemia time (β=0.19, P=0.044) and family history (β=0.18, P=0.049) independently predicted fibrin content in the whole ICT (R²=0.65, P< 0.0001). Formation of denser plasma fibrin clots is independently associated with high fibrin content within the ICT in STEMI. PMID:25739375

  19. Sex and migratory strategy influence corticosterone levels in winter-grown feathers, with positive breeding effects in a migratory pelagic seabird.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cristóbal; Granadeiro, José Pedro; Dias, Maria P; Catry, Paulo

    2016-08-01

    To overcome unpredictable stressful transitory events, animals trigger an allostatic response involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex. This hormonal response, which involves the release of glucocorticoids which in turn mediate between the main physiological mechanisms that regulate the energetic demands and resource allocation trade-off with behavioural responses to environmental perturbations and may ultimately lead to variation in fitness. We have used the Cory's shearwater Calonectris borealis, a sexually dimorphic pelagic seabird with a partial migratory strategy, as a model bird species to analyse a number of traits related to the stress response. We investigated whether the activation of a stressful response, mediated by corticosterone, during the wintering period (1) correlated with the previous breeding success, (2) was affected by the migratory behaviour of male birds and (3) had consequences in the fitness of the birds. Corticosterone levels in feathers grown overwinter were analysed in 61 adult birds during three consecutive migratory periods (2009-2012) and in 14 immature birds in the wintering period 2010-2011. Moreover, the levels of corticosterone were analysed in experimental birds which were freed from their reproductive duties and compared with control birds which raised fledglings to the end of the breeding period. The results show that the levels of corticosterone were sex dependent, differed between years and were affected by the migratory strategy performed by the birds. The activation of the stressful response over the wintering period generated residual carry-over effects that positively affected the reproductive output in the subsequent breeding stage, a phenomenon previously undescribed in a long-lived pelagic seabird. Our study provides evidence that the analysis of corticosterone from feathers is a useful tool to evaluate carry-over effects in birds far away from breeding sites, opening new possibilities for future studies in

  20. Corticosterone metabolite concentrations in greater sage-grouse are positively associated with the presence of cattle grazing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jankowski, M.D.; Russell, R.E.; Franson, J. Christian; Dusek, R.J.; Hines, M.K.; Gregg, M.; Hofmeister, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    The sagebrush biome in the western United States is home to the imperiled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and encompasses rangelands used for cattle production. Cattle grazing activities have been implicated in the range-wide decline of the sage-grouse, but no studies have investigated the relationship between the physiological condition of sage-grouse and the presence of grazing cattle. We sampled 329 sage-grouse across four sites (two grazed and two ungrazed) encompassing 13 600 km2 during the spring and late summer–early autumn of 2005 to evaluate whether demographic factors, breeding status, plasma protein levels, and residence in a cattle-grazed habitat were associated with the stress hormone corticosterone. Corticosterone was measured in feces as immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM). Males captured during the lekking season exhibited higher ICM levels than all others. Prenesting female sage-grouse captured in a grazed site had higher ICM levels than those in ungrazed sites and prenesting female plasma protein levels were negatively correlated with ICM concentrations. With the use of a small-scale spatial model, we identified a positive correlation between cattle pat count and sage-grouse ICM levels. Our model indicated that ICM levels increased by 2.60 ng · g−1 dry feces for every increase in the number of cow pats found in the vicinity. Management practices will benefit from future research regarding the consistency and mechanism(s) responsible for this association and, importantly, how ICM levels and demographic rates are related in this species of conservation concern.

  1. Disruption of behavioral circadian rhythms induced by psychophysiological stress affects plasma free amino acid profiles without affecting peripheral clock gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Itoh, Nanako; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Nemoto, Tadashi; Nakakita, Yasukazu; Kaneda, Hirotaka

    2014-07-18

    Disordered circadian rhythms are associated with various psychiatric conditions and metabolic diseases. We recently established a mouse model of a psychophysiological stress-induced chronic sleep disorder (CSD) characterized by reduced amplitude of circadian wheel-running activity and sleep-wake cycles, sleep fragmentation and hyperphagia. Here, we evaluate day-night fluctuations in plasma concentrations of free amino acids (FAA), appetite hormones and prolactin as well as the hepatic expression of circadian clock-related genes in mice with CSD (CSD mice). Nocturnal increases in wheel-running activity and circadian rhythms of plasma prolactin concentrations were significantly disrupted in CSD mice. Hyperphagia with a decreased leptin/ghrelin ratio was found in CSD mice. Day-night fluctuations in plasma FAA contents were severely disrupted without affecting total FAA levels in CSD mice. Nocturnal increases in branched-chain amino acids such as Ile, Leu, and Val were further augmented in CSD mice, while daytime increases in Gly, Ala, Ser, Thr, Lys, Arg, His, Tyr, Met, Cys, Glu, and Asn were significantly attenuated. Importantly, the circadian expression of hepatic clock genes was completely unaffected in CSD mice. These findings suggest that circadian clock gene expression does not always reflect disordered behavior and sleep rhythms and that plasma FFA profiles could serve as a potential biomarker of circadian rhythm disorders. PMID:24971530

  2. The plasma dilution factor: predicting how concentrations in plasma and serum are affected by blood volume variations and blood loss.

    PubMed

    Flordal, A

    1995-10-01

    To determine the effects of therapeutic interventions on plasma protein concentrations, it is often desirable to rule out nonspecific effects of hemodilution. Because red cells are restricted to the vascular space, the hematocrit (Hct) is a convenient marker. At the bedside--and even in scientific reports--a simple ratio of Hcts (obtained before and after the change in plasma volume) is often used to "correct" the value of interest. This is incorrect, and it may introduce a sizeable error. A new method, the plasma dilution factor (PDF), has been mathematically deduced. It accounts for the influence of any blood loss, plasma osmolality changes, and blood volume variations on plasma and serum concentrations. In an in vitro experiment, blood loss and osmolality and blood volume changes were simulated through the withdrawal of various volumes of blood, which were replaced with smaller, identical, or larger volumes of hypotonic, isotonic, or hypertonic solutions. The PDF accurately predicted changes in concentrations of albumin, fibrinogen, and antithrombin III. In contrast, the Hct ratio significantly underestimated the effects of dilution. Von Willebrand factor concentrations after hemodilution through dextran infusion in volunteers were the same as predicted by the PDF. In patients undergoing orthopedic surgery who were also given dextran, the postdilution von Willebrand factor concentrations were higher than predicted by the PDF. The Hct gave a false impression of a decrease in the volunteers that was not explained by hemodilution, and it failed to detect the von Willebrand factor response to trauma in the surgical patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7561443

  3. Are baseline and short-term corticosterone stress responses in free-living amphibians repeatable?

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians respond to environmental stressors by secreting corticosterone, a stress hormone which promotes physiological and behavioral responses. Capture handling can be used to stimulate physiological stress response in amphibians. The use of single blood sampling and presentation of mean data often limits the quantification of within and between individual variation in baseline and short-term corticosterone stress responses in amphibians. It is important for studies of amphibian physiological ecology to determine whether baseline and short-term corticosterone stress responses are consistent or not. We quantified repeatability (r), a statistical measure of consistency, in baseline and short-term corticosterone stress responses to a standard capture and handling stress protocol in free-living adult male cane toads (Rhinella marina). Corticosterone metabolite concentrations were measured entirely non-invasively in male toad urine samples via an enzyme-immunoassay. During the first sampling occasion, urine samples were collected manually from individual male toads (n=20) immediately upon field capture. Toads were handled for 5min then transferred to plastic bags (constituting a mild stressor), and urine samples were collected hourly over 8h in the field. The toads were resampled for baseline (0h) urine corticosterone with hourly urine sampling over 8h (for quantification of the stress induced corticosterone) at 14 day intervals on three consecutive occasions. Within and between sample variations in urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations were also quantified. All toads expressed a corticosterone stress response over 8h to our standard capture and handling stress protocol. Variations both within and between toads was higher for corrected integrated corticosterone concentrations than corticosterone concentrations at baseline, 3 or 6h. Baseline urinary corticosterone metabolite concentration of the male toads was highly repeatable (r=0.877) together with high

  4. Synergized resmethrin and corticosterone alter the chicken's response to west nile virus

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Mark David; Franson, J Christian; Mostl, Erich; Porter, Warren P; Hofmeister, Erik K

    2009-01-01

    Debate concerning arbovirus control strategies remains contentious because concern regarding the relative risk of viral infection and environmental toxicant exposure is high but inadequately characterized. Taking this into account, mosquito control agencies employ aerial insecticides only after arbovirus surveillance data indicate high local mosquito-infection-rates. Successfully mitigating the risk of adult-mosquito-control insecticides ('adulticides') to non-target species such as humans, domestic animals, fish, beneficial insects and wildlife, while increasing their efficacy to reduce arbovirus outbreak intensity requires targeted scientific data from animal toxicity studies and environmental monitoring activities. Wild birds are an important reservoir host for WNv and are potentially exposed to insecticides used for mosquito control. However, no risk assessments have evaluated whether insecticides augment or extend the potential transmissibility of West Nile virus (WNv) in birds. In order to augment existing resmethrin risk assessments, we aimed to determine whether synergized resmethrin (SR) may cause chickens to develop an elevated or extended WN viremia and if subacute stress may affect its immunotoxicity. We distributed 40 chickens into four groups then exposed them prior to and during WNv infection with SR (50 {mu}g/l resmethrin + 150 {mu}g/l piperonyl butoxide) and/or 20 mg/I corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking-water. Corticosterone was given for 10 continuous days and SR was given for 3 alternate days starting the 3rd day of CORT exposure, then chickens were subcutaneously inoculated with WNv on the 5th day of CORT treatment. Compared to controls, CORT treatment extended and elevated viremia, enhanced WNv-specific antibody and increased the percentage of birds that shed oral virus, whereas SR treatment extended viremia, depressed WNv-specific IgG, and increased the percentage of CORT-treated birds that shed oral virus. Corticosterone and SR

  5. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  6. Corticosterone, but not Glucose, Treatment Enables Fasted Adrenalectomized Rats to Survive Moderate Hemorrhage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Chew, Gordon; Ha, Taryn; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Fed adrenalectomized rats survive the stress of hemorrhage and hypovolemia, whereas fasted adrenalectomized rats become hypotensive and hypoglycemic after the first 90 min and die within 4 hours (h). We have studied the effects of glucose and corticosterone (B) infusions after hemorrhage as well as treatment with B at the time of adrenalectomy on the capacity of chronically prepared, conscious, fasted, adrenalectomized rats to survive hemorrhage. We have also measured the magnitudes of vasoactive hormone responses to hemorrhage. Maintenance of plasma glucose concentrations did not sustain life; however, treatment of rats at the time of adrenalectomy with B allowed 100 percent survival, and acute treatment of adrenalectomized rats at the time of hemorrhage allowed about 50 percent survival during the 5-h posthemorrhage observation period. Rats in the acute B infusion group that died exhibited significantly increased plasma B and significantly decreased plasma glucose concentrations by 2 h compared to the rats that lived. Plasma vasopressin, renin, and norepinephrine responses to hemorrhage were markedly augmented in the adrenalectomized rats not treated with B, and plasma vasopressin concentrations were significantly elevated at 1 and 2 h in all of the rats that subsequently died compared to values in those that lived. We conclude that: 1) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats is not a result of lack of glucose; 2) chronic and, to an extent, acute treatment of fasted adrenalectomized rats with B enables survival; 3) fasted adrenalectomized rats exhibit strong evidence of hepatic insufficiency which is not apparent in either fed adrenalectomized rats or B-treated fasted adrenalectomized rats; 4) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats may result from hepatic failure as a consequence of marked splanchnic vasoconstriction mediated bv the actions of extraordinarily high levels of vasoactive hormones after hemorrhage; and 5) B appears to

  7. Corticosterone, brain mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis: the Lewis rat as an example of increased central MR capacity and a hyporesponsive HPA axis.

    PubMed

    Oitzl, M S; van Haarst, A D; Sutanto, W; de Kloet, E R

    1995-01-01

    In this study we report a series of differences in brain and peripheral elements regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis between male LEW and Wistar rats. We found: (i) differential properties of mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the brain (hippocampus, hypothalamus) and pituitary: LEW rats displayed an increased capacity of MRs in the hippocampus and hypothalamus and a decreased capacity of glucocorticoid receptors GRs in the pituitary. The binding affinity (Kd) for MRs and GRs in the hippocampus was comparable. (ii) Lower concentrations of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA were detected in the nucleus paraventricularis of the hypothalamus of LEW rats. (iii) Adrenal weight was similar in LEW and Wistar rats; however, LEW rats had about 30% less adrenocortical cells. Subjecting adrenocortical cells to increasing doses of ACTH1-24 in vitro resulted in about a 60% smaller release of corticosterone in LEW rats. (iv) LEW rats escaped dexamethasone suppression showing increased basal levels of endogenous ACTH, but responded with a comparable release of corticosterone to the IV injection of 5 ng ACTH1-24. (v) LEW rats responded to a variety of stimuli: adrenalectomy under ether anaesthesia, a novel environment, a tail nick and restraint or an immunological challenge, with lower circulating ACTH and corticosterone plasma levels than Wistar rats. (vi) Evening levels of ACTH and corticosterone were lower in LEW than Wistar rats but did not differ in the morning. Blockade of brain MRs in the evening by a central injection of the specific MR antagonist RU28318 in LEW rats resulted in increased circulating levels of ACTH and corticosterone. (vii) Levels of corticosteroid-binding proteins were lower in one-day adrenalectomized LEW rats, indicating higher levels of free corticosterone. (viii) LEW rats had a smaller thymus than Wistar rats. Taken together, the receptor binding data correspond to a decreased

  8. High feather corticosterone indicates better coccidian infection resistance in greenfinches.

    PubMed

    Sild, Elin; Meitern, Richard; Männiste, Marju; Karu, Ulvi; Hõrak, Peeter

    2014-08-01

    Differential exposure or sensitivity to stressors can have substantial effects on the variation in immune responsiveness of animals. However, the questions about the causes and consequences of these processes have remained largely unclear, particularly as regards wild animals and their natural pathogens. Here we ask how a potential marker of stress responses, the feather corticosterone (CORT) content, reflects the resistance to an experimental infection with natural coccidian parasites in wild-caught captive greenfinches (Carduelis chloris). CORT content of tail feathers grown in captivity correlated positively with a behavioural measure of captivity-intolerance, i.e., the amount of damage accrued to tail feathers in captivity that results from flapping against cage bars. This finding is consistent with an idea that feather CORT reflects the amount of stress experienced during feather growth. Experimental infection with heterologous coccidian strains increased feather CORT levels. Birds with highest feather CORT levels appeared most resistant to new infection, assessed on the basis of parasite oocyst shedding at the peak phase of infection. Birds with highest feather CORT levels also cleared the infection faster than the birds with lower feather CORT levels. These findings provide the first evidence about positive covariation between feather CORT and resistance to a natural pathogen in a wild bird species. Assuming that feather CORT levels reflect circulating hormone titres, these findings suggest that parasite-mediated selection may contribute to maintenance of phenotypes with high corticosterone responsiveness to stress, despite potential negative behavioural consequences. PMID:24953456

  9. Seminal plasma applied post-thawing affects boar sperm physiology: a flow cytometry study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gago, Rocío; Domínguez, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe

    2013-09-01

    Cryopreservation induces extensive biophysical and biochemical changes in the sperm. In the present study, we used flow cytometry to assess the capacitation-like status of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa and its relationship with intracellular calcium, assessment of membrane fluidity, modification of thiol groups in plasma membrane proteins, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, viability, acrosomal status, and mitochondrial activity. This experiment was performed to verify the effect of adding seminal plasma on post-thaw sperm functions. To determine these effects after cryopreservation, frozen-thawed semen from seven boars was examined after supplementation with different concentrations of pooled seminal plasma (0%, 10%, and 50%) at various times of incubation from 0 to 4 hours. Incubation caused a decrease in membrane integrity and an increase in acrosomal damage, with small changes in other parameters (P > 0.05). Although 10% seminal plasma showed few differences with 0% (ROS increase at 4 hours, P < 0.05), 50% seminal plasma caused important changes. Membrane fluidity increased considerably from the beginning of the experiment, and ROS and free thiols in the cell surface increased by 2 hours of incubation. By the end of the experiment, viability decreased and acrosomal damage increased in the 50% seminal plasma samples. The addition of 50% of seminal plasma seems to modify the physiology of thawed boar spermatozoa, possibly through membrane changes and ROS increase. Although some effects were detrimental, the stimulatory effect of 50% seminal plasma could favor the performance of post-thawed boar semen, as showed in the field (García JC, Domínguez JC, Peña FJ, Alegre B, Gonzalez R, Castro MJ, Habing GG, Kirkwood RN. Thawing boar semen in the presence of seminal plasma: effects on sperm quality and fertility. Anim Reprod Sci 2010;119:160-5). PMID:23756043

  10. Immune responses of eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) to repeated acute elevation of corticosterone.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Gail L; Langkilde, Tracy

    2014-08-01

    Prolonged elevations of glucocorticoids due to long-duration (chronic) stress can suppress immune function. It is unclear, however, how natural stressors that result in repeated short-duration (acute) stress, such as frequent agonistic social encounters or predator attacks, fit into our current understanding of the immune consequences of stress. Since these types of stressors may activate the immune system due to increased risk of injury, immune suppression may be reduced at sites where individuals are repeatedly exposed to potentially damaging stressors. We tested whether repeated acute elevation of corticosterone (CORT, a glucocorticoid) suppresses immune function in eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus), and whether this effect varies between lizards from high-stress (high baseline CORT, invaded by predatory fire ants) and low-stress (low baseline CORT, uninvaded) sites. Lizards treated daily with exogenous CORT showed higher hemagglutination of novel proteins by their plasma (a test of constitutive humoral immunity) than control lizards, a pattern that was consistent across sites. There was no significant effect of CORT treatment on bacterial killing ability of plasma. These results suggest that repeated elevations of CORT, which are common in nature, produce immune effects more typical of those expected at the acute end of the acute-chronic spectrum and provide no evidence of modulated consequences of elevated CORT in animals from high-stress sites. PMID:24852352

  11. Effects of stress and corticosterone on activity and plasticity in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kavushansky, Alexandra; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2006-11-15

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) has been repeatedly shown to mediate the effects of stress on memory-related processes. However, the way in which stress influences BLA itself has not been fully explored. We studied the effects of stress and corticosterone (CORT) on activity and plasticity in the BLA in the rat, using the electrophysiological procedure of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in vivo. Rats were exposed to an acute elevated-platform stress or administered vehicle or 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, or 25 mg/kg of CORT systemically, after which they were anesthetized and prepared for field potential recording in the BLA, in response to stimulation of the entorhinal cortex. The elevated platform stress enhanced baseline responses in BLA and plasma CORT but inhibited amygdalar LTP. Systemic injections of CORT enhanced baseline responses in BLA in a dose-dependent manner but did not influence amygdalar LTP. Posttetanic potentiation (PTP) was similarly reduced in CORT- and vehicle-injected groups, possibly because of an additional stress from the injection, thus implying that PTP and LTP in the amygdala differentially react to stress. These results suggest that the increase in amygdalar baseline activity following the exposure to stress may be mediated by the concomitant increase in plasma CORT. However, the suppression of amygdalar LTP is not a result of elevated levels of CORT, suggesting that activity and plasticity in the amygdala might be mediated by different mechanisms. PMID:16998919

  12. Factors Affecting VUV Emission Spectrum near Lyman-{alpha} from a Hydrogen Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Kasuya, T.; Shimamoto, S.; Wada, M.; Kimura, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2011-09-26

    Vacuum ultra violet (VUV) emission spectra from plasmas near walls of different metallic materials were measured to estimate the effect upon the local production rate of vibrational excited hydrogen molecules due to plasma wall interaction. Among Cu, Mo, Ni, Ta and Ti, the intensity of band spectrum around Lyman-{alpha} had become the largest when Cu wall was used while it was the smallest for Ti. The role of particle reflection from the plasma electrode surface upon the H{sup -} production by a pure electron volume process is discussed.

  13. Ciproxifan differentially modifies cognitive impairment evoked by chronic stress and chronic corticosterone administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Trofimiuk, Emil; Braszko, Jan J

    2015-04-15

    Despite the development of neuroscience and spectacular discoveries, the clear functions and the role of histamine are still not fully understood, especially in the context of the negative impact of prolonged stress exposure on the cognition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the participation of hypercortisolemia in the detrimental effect of stress on cognitive function and their preclusion by affecting the histaminergic system with ciproxifan. Specifically, we attempted to characterize the preventive action of a single dose of ciproxifan (3mg/kg, i.p.) against an impairment caused by chronic restraint stress as well as parallel exogenous corticosterone (equivalent to that seen in chronically stressed rats), and show differences in the interaction on reference and working memories tested in both aversive (Morris water maze - MWM) and appetitive (Barnes maze-BM) incentives. We found that administration of ciproxifan potently prevented equally deleterious effects of chronic restraint stress (p<0.01) as well as prolonged administration of corticosterone (p<0.01), especially in the tests, which themselves generate high levels of stress. As it turns out, test provided in the less stressful conditions (BM) showed that administration of the H3 receptor antagonist to naïve rats resulted in even memory impairment (p<0.01, in some aspects of reference memory). These data support the idea that modulation of H3 receptors represents a novel and viable therapeutic strategy in the treatment but rather not for prevention of stress-evoked cognitive impairments. Even a single dose abolishes the effect of prolonged exposure to stress or steroids. PMID:25639546

  14. A novel technique to measure chronic levels of corticosterone in turtles living around a major roadway

    PubMed Central

    Baxter-Gilbert, James H.; Riley, Julia L.; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F.; Litzgus, Jacqueline D.; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-01-01

    Conservation biology integrates multiple disciplines to expand the ability to identify threats to populations and develop mitigation for these threats. Road ecology is a branch of conservation biology that examines interactions between wildlife and roadways. Although the direct threats of road mortality and habitat fragmentation posed by roads have received much attention, a clear understanding of the indirect physiological effects of roads on wildlife is lacking. Chronic physiological stress can lower immune function, affect reproductive rates and reduce life expectancy; thus, it has the potential to induce long-lasting effects on populations. Reptiles are globally in decline, and roads are known to have negative effects on reptile populations; however, it is unknown whether individual responses to roads and traffic result in chronic stress that creates an additional threat to population viability. We successfully extracted reliable measures of corticosterone (CORT), a known, commonly used biomarker for physiological stress, from claw trimmings from painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) captured at three study sites (road-impacted site, control site and validation site). Corticosterone levels in claws were evaluated as a measure of chronic stress in turtles because CORT is deposited during growth of the claw and could provide an opportunity to examine past long-term stress levels. While male turtles had higher CORT levels on average than females, there was no difference in the level of CORT between the road-impacted and control site, nor was there a relationship between CORT and turtle body condition. In validating a novel approach for non-invasive measurement of long-term CORT levels in a keratinized tissue in wild reptiles, our study provides a new avenue for research in the field of stress physiology. PMID:27293657

  15. Effects of diet, time since defecation, and drying process of the droppings on corticosterone metabolite measurements in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, S; Busso, J M; Lèche, A; Marin, R H

    2015-05-01

    The use of noninvasive methods for measuring fecal glucocorticoid metabolites is a useful tool for endocrine assessment particularly in studies where animals cannot be captured, when they should be sampled without disturbing their activities, and/or when welfare needs to be maximized. However, still no complete standardization exists for the methodology, and some confounding variables may play an important role affecting measurements and interpretation of results. The present study focused on whether two different diets (laying feed or seed mixture), the time since defecation (0, 4, 24, or 48 h) and the drying method of those samples (oven-dried or naturally nonoven-dried) may affect concentrations of corticosterone metabolites (CM) measured in male Japanese quail. Half of the birds were provided with plain water (control) and the other half received a corticosterone solution. Birds fed with a seed mixture exhibited higher values of CM (nanogram/gram) in droppings than quail that received a laying feed diet suggesting that diet should be carefully considered as a potential source of variation. As expected both groups exhibited higher CM concentration after corticosterone treatment. While CM concentrations increased significantly in nonoven-dried samples over time (0 < 4 < 24 = 48 h), oven-dried samples exhibited similar high CM values. At 24 and 48 h postdefecation, nonoven-dried samples had similar CM concentrations as all oven-dried samples. Drying of samples may be considered a reliable method to reduce variations due to water loss over time, facilitating comparisons up to 48 h postdefecation. This finding would allow to enhance the range of application of this noninvasive and welfare friendly method to situations where samples cannot be collected or frozen shortly after defecation. PMID:25771534

  16. Elucidating Molecular Networks That Either Affect or Respond to Plasma Cortisol Concentration in Target Tissues of Liver and Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Du, Yang; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Cortisol is a steroid hormone with important roles in regulating immune and metabolic functions and organismal responses to external stimuli are mediated by the glucocorticoid system. Dysregulation of the afferent and efferent axis of glucocorticoid signaling have adverse effects on growth, health status, and well-being. Glucocorticoid secretion and signaling show large interindividual variation that has a considerable genetic component; however, little is known about the underlying genetic variants. Here, we used trait-correlated expression analysis, screening for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), genome-wide association (GWA) studies, and causality modeling to identify candidate genes in porcine liver and muscle that affect or respond to plasma cortisol levels. Through trait-correlated expression, we characterized transcript activities in many biological functions in liver and muscle. Candidates from the list of trait-correlated expressed genes were narrowed using only those genes with an eQTL, and these were further prioritized by determining whether their expression was predicted to be related to variation in plasma cortisol levels. Using network edge orienting (NEO), a causality modeling algorithm, 26 of 990 candidates in liver were predicted to affect and 70 to respond to plasma cortisol levels. Of 593 candidates in muscle that were correlated with cortisol levels and were regulated by eQTL, 2 and 25 were predicted as effective and responsive, respectively, to plasma cortisol levels. Comprehensive data integration has helped to elucidate the complex molecular networks contributing to cortisol levels and thus its subsequent metabolic effects. The discrimination of up- and downstream effects of transcripts affecting or responding to plasma cortisol concentrations improves the understanding of the biology of complex traits related to growth, health, and well-being. PMID:22904034

  17. Urinary corticosterone as an indicator of stress-mediated immunological changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Stephen; Lapointe, Jean-Martin; Reagan, William; Lawton, Michael; Kawabata, Thomas T

    2008-01-01

    Drugs that target the CNS or doses of drugs near the maximum tolerated dose may cause a non-specific stress response during routine safety testing in rodents that leads to the release of corticosterone and changes immunological parameters. In situations with mild clinical signs of stress and changes to immune organs, it may be difficult to differentiate direct immunotoxicity from changes mediated by stress. To address this concern, studies were conducted to identify potential biomarker of stress in rats that could be used in routine toxicology studies. Since serial blood collections for corticosterone levels are not practical, studies were conducted to evaluate urine corticosterone and its metabolites as a potential biomarker of stress in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exogenous corticosterone was used as a reference to identify immune system targets and determine their relative sensitivity to corticosterone. The data from rats treated with exogenous corticosterone and from rats treated with drug or chemical stressors produced linear relationships between urine corticosterone and most immunological parameters, with r-squared values greater than 0.6. Thus, quantitatively similar effects on immunological end points are produced by exogenous corticosterone and by corticosterone induced by chemical stressors with regard to their correlation to selected immunological changes. In preclinical safety testing for a new drug, the combined findings of increased urinary corticosterone and changes of the predicted magnitude and direction in blood lymphocyte and neutrophil differentials and thymus weight or cellularity would strongly suggest that the immunological effects are secondary to a drug-induced stress response. Because these results can be obtained reliably during routine preclinical evaluations, they should be useful for the weight-of-evidence approaches often used in regulatory settings. PMID:18382854

  18. Are corticosterone levels a good indicator of food availability and reproductive performance in a kittiwake colony?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanctot, Richard B.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Gill, V.A.; Eens, M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the use of corticosterone to gauge forage availability and predict reproductive performance in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) breeding in Alaska during 1999 and 2000. We modeled the relationship between baseline levels of corticosterone and a suite of individual and temporal characteristics of the sampled birds. We also provided supplemental food to a sample of pairs and compared their corticosterone levels with that of pairs that were not fed. Corticosterone levels were a good predictor of forage availability in some situations, although inconsistencies between corticosterone levels and reproductive performance of fed and unfed kittiwakes suggested that this was not always the case. In general, higher corticosterone levels were found in birds that lacked breeding experience and in birds sampled shortly after arriving from their wintering grounds. All parameters investigated, however, explained only a small proportion of the variance in corticosterone levels. We also investigated whether corticosterone, supplemental feeding, year of the study, breeding experience, body weight, and sex of a bird were able to predict laying, hatching, and fledging success in kittiwakes. Here, breeding experience, year of the study, and body weight were the best predictors of a bird's performance. Corticosterone level and supplemental feeding were good predictors of kittiwake reproductive performance in some cases. For example, corticosterone levels of birds sampled during the arrival stage reliably predicted laying success, but were less reliable at predicting hatching and fledging success. Counts of active nests with eggs or chicks may be more reliable estimates of the actual productivity of the colony. Supplemental feeding had strong effects on kittiwake productivity when natural forage was poor, but had little effect when natural forage was plentiful. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma taurine levels are not affected by vigabatrin in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Spelbrink, Emily M; Mabud, Tarub S; Reimer, Richard; Porter, Brenda E

    2016-08-01

    Vigabatrin is a highly effective antiseizure medication, but its use is limited due to concerns about retinal toxicity. One proposed mechanism for this toxicity is vigabatrin-mediated reduction of taurine. Herein we assess plasma taurine levels in a retrospective cohort of children with epilepsy, including a subset receiving vigabatrin. All children who underwent a plasma amino acid analysis as part of their clinical evaluation between 2006 and 2015 at Stanford Children's Health were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences in plasma taurine levels between children taking vigabatrin (n = 16), children taking other anti-seizure medications, and children not taking any anti-seizure medication (n = 556) (analysis of variance [ANOVA] p = 0.841). There were, however, age-dependent decreases in plasma taurine levels. Multiple linear regression revealed no significant association between vigabatrin use and plasma taurine level (p = 0.87) when controlling for age. These results suggest that children taking vigabatrin maintain normal plasma taurine levels, although they leave unanswered whether taurine supplementation is necessary or sufficient to prevent vigabatrin-associated visual field loss. They also indicate that age should be taken into consideration when evaluating taurine levels in young children. PMID:27344989

  20. Plasma of Argon Affects the Earliest Biological Response of Different Implant Surfaces: An In Vitro Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Canullo, L; Genova, T; Tallarico, M; Gautier, G; Mussano, F; Botticelli, D

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the early cell response and protein adsorption elicited by the argon plasma treatment of different commercially available titanium surfaces via a chair-side device. Sterile disks made of grade 4 titanium (n= 450, 4-mm diameter) with 3 surface topographies (machined, plasma sprayed, and zirconia blasted and acid etched) were allocated to receive 4 testing treatments (2% and 10% protein adsorption and cell adhesion with MC3T3-E1 and MG-63). Furthermore, the specimens were divided to undergo 1) argon plasma treatment (10 W, 1 bar for 12 min) in a plasma reactor, 2) ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for 2 h (positive control group), or 3) no treatment (control group). Pretreatment surface analyses based on a scanning electron microscope and profilometer images were also performed. Profilometric analysis demonstrated that the evaluated specimens perfectly suit the standard parameters. The use of argon plasma was capable of affecting the quantity of proteins adsorbed on the different surfaces, notwithstanding their roughness or topographic features at a low fetal bovine serum concentration (2%). UV light treatment for 2 h attained similar results. Moreover, both the plasma of argon and the UV light demonstrated a significant increase in the number of osteoblasts adherent at 10 min in all tested surfaces. Within its limitations, this in vitro study highlights the potential biological benefits of treating implant surfaces with plasma of argon or UV, irrespective of the roughness of the titanium surface. However, in vivo experiments are needed to confirm these preliminary data and settle the rationale of a treatment that might be clinically relevant in case of bone-reparative deficiencies. PMID:26848069

  1. Do the Levels of Maternal Plasma Trace Elements Affect Fetal Nuchal Translucency Thickness?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Ming-Song; Chang, Chia-Huang; Chien, Ling-Chu; Mao, I-Fang; Tsai, Yen-An; Chen, Mei-Lien

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness is an important marker for prenatal screening; however, studies focusing on the correlation between maternal trace element levels and NT thickness are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal trace element levels during the first trimester and to investigate the association between maternal trace element levels and fetal NT thickness. Methods In total, 113 samples were obtained from singleton pregnant women. Maternal plasma samples were collected in the first trimester of gestation. Plasma trace element levels were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Nuchal translucency thickness was measured using ultrasonography at 10–14 weeks of gestation. Results We found that maternal plasma potassium (K) levels had a significant negative correlation with both NT (r = -0.230, p < 0.05) and NT Multiples of the Median (NT MoM) (r = -0.206, p < 0.05). After adjustment for potential confounders, log-transformed maternal plasma potassium levels in the first trimester were significantly associated with fetal NT (NT MoM: β = -0.68, p < 0.05; NT: β = -1.20, p < 0.01). Although not statistically significant, the As, Hg and Pb levels in maternal plasma were positively correlated with NT, and the Mg, Cu, Zn, Na and Ca levels were negatively correlated with NT. Conclusion Maternal plasma K levels during the first trimester appeared to be associated with NT thickness. The essential elements tended to decrease NT thickness, and non-essential elements tended to increase it. PMID:26367380

  2. Exercise-associated changes in the corticosterone response to acute restraint stress: evidence for increased adrenal sensitivity and reduced corticosterone response duration.

    PubMed

    Hare, Brendan D; Beierle, Jacob A; Toufexis, Donna J; Hammack, Sayamwong E; Falls, William A

    2014-04-01

    Exercise promotes stress resistance and is associated with reduced anxiety and reduced depression in both humans and in animal models. Despite the fact that dysfunction within the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly linked to both anxiety and depressive disorders, the evidence is mixed as to how exercise alters the function of the HPA axis. Here we demonstrate that 4 weeks of voluntary wheel running was anxiolytic in C57BL/6J mice and resulted in a shorter time to peak corticosterone (CORT) and a more rapid decay of CORT following restraint stress. Wheel running was also associated with increased adrenal size and elevated CORT following systemic administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Finally, the HPA-axis response to peripheral or intracerebroventricular administration of dexamethasone did not suggest that wheel running increases HPA-axis negative feedback through GR-mediated mechanisms. Together these findings suggest that exercise may promote stress resilience in part by insuring a more rapid and shortened HPA response to a stressor thus affecting overall exposure to the potentially negative effects of more sustained HPA-axis activation. PMID:24280995

  3. Changes in patterns of corticosterone secretion concurrent with migratory fattening in a neotropical migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Holberton, R L

    1999-10-01

    Several studies on free-living birds have shown a change in corticosterone secretion (elevated baseline levels and a reduced corticosterone response to stress) during migration. It was not known, however, if this change was concurrent with the development of migratory condition or if it was an independent response to unknown environmental stressors experienced by the birds prior to capture. In this study, a Neotropical annual migrant, the yellow-rumped warbler (Dendroica coronata), held under controlled laboratory conditions, was used to test the Migration Modulation Hypothesis (MMH): during the migratory period migrants exhibit (1) elevated baseline corticosterone to facilitate migratory fattening and (2) a reduced corticosterone stress response, a means by which skeletal muscle needed for migration can be protected against catabolism by high levels of corticosterone. Fifteen hatching-year warblers were maintained on insect larvae and water ad libitum for 43 weeks, experiencing two transitions from a short- to long-day photoperiod to bring them into spring migratory condition. Corticosterone profiles comprising three blood samples from each individual (baseline at the time of initial disturbance and 30 and 60 min later), body mass, fat reserves, molt, and state of cloacal protuberance (males only) were measured at key intervals throughout the study. Over the entire study, mean baseline corticosterone levels were positively correlated with mean body mass, which increased predictably in response to long days. Individual baseline corticosterone was not correlated with individual body mass at any time. During periods when the birds were lean and held on short days, the corticosterone stress profiles were characterized by low initial hormone concentration followed by a significant increase in corticosterone with handling time. In response to long days, the warblers showed a significant increase in body mass and fat reserves concurrent with corticosterone stress

  4. Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Michelle M; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Han, Dingfen; An, Yang; Resnick, Susan M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Haughey, Norman J

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression. PMID:25345489

  5. Effects of Axial Vibration on Needle Insertion into the Tail Veins of Rats and Subsequent Serial Blood Corticosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Ryan S; Unger, Erica L; Ocón-Grove, Olga M; Cronin, Thomas L; Mulvihill, Maureen L

    2016-01-01

    Blood collection is commonplace in biomedical research. Obtaining sufficient sample while minimizing animal stress requires significant skill and practice. Repeated needle punctures can cause discomfort and lead to variable release of stress hormones, potentially confounding analysis. We designed a handheld device to reduce the force necessary for needle insertion by using low-frequency, axial (forward and backward) micromotions (that is, vibration) delivered to the needle during venipuncture. Tests with cadaver rat-tail segments (n = 18) confirmed that peak insertion forces were reduced by 73% on average with needle vibration. A serial blood-sampling study was then conducted by using Sprague–Dawley rats divided into 2 groups based on needle condition used to cause bleeds: vibration on (n = 10) and vibration off (n = 9). On 3 days (1 wk apart), 3 tail-vein blood collections were performed in each subject at 1-h intervals. To evaluate associated stress levels, plasma corticosterone concentration was quantified by radioimmunoassay and behavior (that is, movement and vocalization) was scored by blinded review of blood-sampling videos. After the initial trial, average corticosterone was lower (46% difference), the mean intrasubject variance trended lower (72%), and behavioral indications of stress were rated lower for the vibration-on group compared with the vibration-off group. Adding controlled vibrations to needles during insertion may decrease the stress associated with blood sampling from rats—an important methodologic advance for investigators studying and assessing stress processes and a refinement over current blood sampling techniques. PMID:27025813

  6. Corticosterone in ovo modifies aggressive behaviors and reproductive performances through alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelkareem A; Ma, Wenqiang; Ni, Yingdong; Wang, Song; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during embryonic development affects offspring reproduction and suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in mammals. However, whether corticosterone (CORT) causes similar effects in the chicken remains unclear. In the present study, we injected low (0.2μg) and high (1μg) doses of CORT in ovo before incubation and detected changes in aggressive behavior, tonic immobility (TI), reproductive performances, and HPG axis gene expression in posthatch chickens of different ages. High dose of CORT suppressed growth rate from 3 weeks of age, increased the frequency of aggressive behaviors, which was associated with elevated plasma CORT concentration. High-dose CORT significantly (P<0.05) down-regulated arginine vasotocin (AVT), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), while significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) and 11β-HSD1 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and 20-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-HSD) mRNA levels were not affected by CORT treatment. High-dose CORT significantly (P<0.05) reduced egg production and egg quality, which was associated with decreased ovary and oviduct weight. Moreover, CORT exposure significantly decreased (P<0.05) luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor mRNA abundance in theca cells of ovarian follicles 1 (F1), F2 and F3. In addition, yolk CORT concentration was significantly higher in eggs laid by hens prenatally exposed to high-dose CORT. Our findings suggest that in ovo administration of CORT programs the aggressive behaviors and reproductive functions in the chicken through alterations of HPG axis. PMID:24630043

  7. Lipopolysaccharide does not affect acoustic startle reflex in mice.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Blaszczyk, Janusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Sliwa, Adam T; Wolak, Patrycja; Tymosiak-Zielinska, Agnieszka; Lisowski, Pawel; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) evokes in rodents an adaptive sickness behavior. It also produces changes in stress hormones secretion and activity of brain serotonergic and noradrenergic systems that have been implicated in stress responses, fear, and anxiety. Acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is regarded as a protective behavioral response that is enhanced in threatening situations or following an aversive event, and it can be modulated by physiological and emotional state of an animal. Effects of intraperitoneal injections of LPS on ASR, prepulse inhibition (PPI), locomotor activity in open field, and blood plasma corticosterone concentration were studied in lines of mice that display high (HA line) or low (LA line) swim stress-induced analgesia and also differ in emotional behaviors, including the magnitude of ASR. In both lines LPS produced robust sickness behavior, as evidenced by a decrease in locomotion and body weight, and an increase in corticosterone concentration. However, in neither line LPS injections affected responses to acoustic stimuli as assessed by the ASR and PPI magnitudes. The findings suggest that in sickness behavior induced by LPS the protective responses to salient environmental stimuli are not impaired. The significance of this finding for the concept of sickness behavior is discussed. PMID:17651939

  8. Sight of a Predator Induces a Corticosterone Stress Response and Generates Fear in an Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Edward J.; Cockrem, John F.; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, like other animals, generate corticosterone or cortisol glucocorticoid responses to stimuli perceived to be threatening. It is generally assumed that the corticosterone response of animals to capture and handling reflects the corticosterone response to stimuli such as the sight of a predator that are thought to be natural stressors. Fijian ground frogs (Platymantisvitiana) are preyed upon by the introduced cane toads (Rhinellamarina), and we used ground frogs to test the hypothesis that the sight of a predator will induce a corticosterone stress response in an amphibian. Urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations increased in male ground frogs exposed to the sight of a toad for 1, 3 or 6 h, whereas corticosterone did not change in frogs exposed to another male ground frog, a ball, or when no stimulus was present in the test compartment. The frogs exposed to a toad initially moved towards the stimulus then moved away, whereas frogs exposed to another frog moved towards the test frog and remained closer to the frog than at the start of the test. Tonic immobility (TI) was measured as an index of fearfulness immediately after the test exposure of the frogs to a stimulus. The duration of TI was longer in frogs exposed to a toad than to another frog or to a ball. The results provide novel evidence that the sight of a predator can induce a corticosterone response and lead to increased fearfulness in amphibians. In addition, they show that endemic frogs can recognise an introduced predator as a threat. PMID:24009756

  9. Phenylbutyrate reduces plasma leucine concentrations without affecting the flux of leucine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) has been used as an alternative pathway to excrete nitrogen in urea cycle disorder patients for the last 20 years. PB, after oxidation to phenylacetate, is conjugated with glutamine and excreted in the urine. A reduction in the plasma concentration of branched amino acids (BCAA) ...

  10. Feeding milk replacer instead of whole milk affects blood plasma proteome and lipid profile in preruminant calves.

    PubMed

    Lepczyński, A; Herosimczyk, A; Ożgo, M; Skrzypczak, W F

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of feeding milk or milk-replacer on the blood plasma proteome and lipid profile in calves during the second week of life. Feeding milk-replacer significantly decreased the expression of plasma apoA-I. Age of calves affected apoA-I expression, which was higher on the 8th than on the 11th and 14th day of life. A significant effect of interaction between diet and age was also observed. The expression of apoA-IV, was significantly affected by diet and was lower in calves fed milk replacer. Expression of this protein was significantly lower at the 8th day of life and was up-regulated in the calves fed milk-replacer at the second week of life. Calves fed milk-replacer had greater expression of haptoglobin, which differed significantly between days of blood sampling, being higher on the 8th than on the 11th and 14th day. The interactive effect of diet and age affected haptoglobin expression, which was successively down-regulated in calves fed milk re- placer. Diet had a significant effect on the plasma lipid profile. Animals fed milk had a greater concentration of TC, HDLC and LDLC. The composition of milk-replacer, especially fat source, is probably the main factor that affects expression of proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism and level of components of lipid profile in calves fed formula. We claim that the initially increased level of haptoglobin, followed by its decrease during the second week of life in calves fed milk-replacer may indicate the presence of short-term stress induced by changes in the feeding system. PMID:25928915

  11. Plasma membrane lipid–protein interactions affect signaling processes in sterol-biosynthesis mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Henrik; Burgos, Asdrubal; Garapati, Prashanth; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important organelle providing structure, signaling and transport as major biological functions. Being composed of lipids and proteins with different physicochemical properties, the biological functions of membranes depend on specific protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. Interactions of proteins with their specific sterol and lipid environment were shown to be important factors for protein recruitment into sub-compartmental structures of the plasma membrane. System-wide implications of altered endogenous sterol levels for membrane functions in living cells were not studied in higher plant cells. In particular, little is known how alterations in membrane sterol composition affect protein and lipid organization and interaction within membranes. Here, we conducted a comparative analysis of the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition in Arabidopsis sterol-biosynthesis mutants smt1 and ugt80A2;B1. smt1 shows general alterations in sterol composition while ugt80A2;B1 is significantly impaired in sterol glycosylation. By systematically analyzing different cellular fractions and combining proteomic with lipidomic data we were able to reveal contrasting alterations in lipid–protein interactions in both mutants, with resulting differential changes in plasma membrane signaling status. PMID:24672530

  12. Baseline corticosterone in wintering marine birds: methodological considerations and ecological patterns.

    PubMed

    Palm, E C; Esler, D; Anderson, E M; Williams, T D; Love, O P; Wilson, M T

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have related levels of plasma corticosterone (CORT) of seabirds to variation in foraging conditions during the breeding period, but it is unclear whether similar relationships between foraging conditions and baseline CORT exist during other life stages. We validated methods for identifying baseline CORT of lethally sampled birds and assessed variation in baseline CORT relative to winter habitat conditions. We collected free-living white-winged scoters (Melanitta fusca) at four wintering sites during December and February. We found increasing CORT values beyond 3 min after time since flush (the duration between initial flush and death), presumably reflecting acute stress responses. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to obtain baseline CORT from lethally sampled birds if the time from initial flush until death is measured. Our study sites varied appreciably in exposure to wind and waves, predation danger, diving depths, and the fraction of preferred foods in scoter diets. Despite these habitat differences, baseline CORT did not vary across sites or winter periods. We interpret this lack of variation as evidence that birds select wintering areas where they can successfully manage site-specific costs and maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:23629884

  13. Lack of stress responses to long-term effects of corticosterone in Caps2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Yuriko; Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Kojima, Masami; Wakana, Shigeharu; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is associated with anxiety and depressive disorders, and can cause weight gain. Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) is involved in insulin release. Caps2 knockout (KO) mice exhibit decreased body weight, reduced glucose-induced insulin release, and abnormal psychiatric behaviors. We chronically administered the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT), which induces anxiety/depressive-like behavior and normally increases plasma insulin levels, via the drinking water for 10 weeks, and we examined the stress response in KO mice. Chronic CORT exposure inhibited stress-induced serum CORT elevation in wild-type (WT) mice, but not in KO mice. Poor weight gain in CORT-treated animals was observed until week 6 in WT mice, but persisted for the entire duration of the experiment in KO mice, although there is no difference in drug*genotype interaction. Among KO mice, food consumption was unchanged, while water consumption was higher, over the duration of the experiment in CORT-treated animals, compared with untreated animals. Moreover, serum insulin and leptin levels were increased in CORT-treated WT mice, but not in KO mice. Lastly, both WT and KO mice displayed anxiety/depressive-like behavior after CORT administration. These results suggest that Caps2 KO mice have altered endocrine responses to CORT administration, while maintaining CORT-induced anxiety/depressive-like behavior. PMID:25754523

  14. Analysis of methylprednisolone, methylprednisone and corticosterone for assessment of methylprednisolone disposition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Haughey, D B; Jusko, W J

    1988-09-01

    A sensitive, specific and precise high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the simultaneous determination of methylprednisolone, methylprednisone and corticosterone using betamethasone as the internal standard is reported. Rat serum (0.5 ml) is extracted with methylene chloride, washed with sodium hydroxide, then water and the extract is injected onto a microparticulate silica gel column with ultraviolet detection at 254 nm. Calculated limits of quantitation are less than 10 ng/ml and the intra-day coefficient of variation is less than 5% for each steroid. This assay has been applied to preliminary studies of methylprednisolone disposition in the rat. The plasma concentration-time profile for each steroid was determined following intravenous administration of methylprednisolone (10 mg/kg). Peak serum methylprednisone concentrations of ca. 250 ng/ml occurred within 5 min of methylprednisolone administration and the average area under the curve ratio (methylprednisolone/methylprednisone) was 9.3. These findings demonstrate that methylprednisone is a metabolite of methylprednisolone in the rat and suggest that the metabolic back-conversion of methylprednisone to methylprednisolone may be less than in other species. PMID:3235500

  15. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M A; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Taylor, T A; Meier, G H

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  16. Altered plasma pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur hydrochloride in cows affected with severe clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Gorden, P J; Kleinhenz, M D; Wulf, L W; KuKanich, B; Lee, C J; Wang, C; Coetzee, J F

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a frequent problem among dairy cows, reducing milk yield and increasing cull rates. Systemic therapy with the cephalosporin antimicrobial ceftiofur hydrochloride (CEF) may improve therapeutic outcomes, but the incidence of CEF violative residues has increased annually since 2011. One potential explanation is that disease status may alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) of CEF. To test this hypothesis, we compared the plasma PK of CEF in healthy cows with those with severe endotoxic mastitis. Eight cows with naturally occurring mastitis and 8 clinically healthy cows were treated with 2.2 mg of CEF per kilogram of body weight once daily for 5d via the intramuscular route. Blood was collected at 0, 0.33, 0.67, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 16, and 24h after the first CEF administration and every 8h thereafter until 120 h after the final dose. Plasma samples were analyzed for CEF concentrations using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. With the exception of time 0, CEF was detected at all time points. The disease group had a significantly higher plasma CEF concentration at t=3h after the first injection and a significantly lower plasma concentration from 40 to 152 h following the first injection, with the exception of the t=64 h time point. Data following the first injection (time 0-24 h) were fit to a single-dose, noncompartmental PK model. This model indicated that the disease group had a shorter plasma half-life. A multidose, noncompartmental model was used to determine steady-state PK. Compared with control cows, the disease group had an initially higher peak concentration and a higher volume of distribution and drug clearance rates. The disease group also had a lower area under the curve per dosing interval, steady-state concentration maximum, and dose-adjusted peak steady-state concentration. All other PK parameters were not different between the 2 groups. Altered PK, as suggested by this trial, may contribute to an increased risk for the

  17. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    van Diepen, Janna A.; Verhoef, Daniël; Voshol, Peter J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events. Objective Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD) or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD) for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F) VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding. Results HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation. Conclusions Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby

  18. Corticosterone mediates the inhibitory effect of restraint stress on the migration of mesenchymal stem cell to carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrotic liver by downregulating CXCR4/7 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Lv, Chuan; Yang, Xue; Han, Zhipeng; Zhang, Shuili; Zhang, Jianwei; Zong, Chen; Gao, Lu; Li, Li; Zhao, Qiudong; Li, Rong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Fenghai; Li, Xiaoning; Zhang, Ping; Wei, Lixin

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a great potential in therapeutic applications. The low efficiency of MSC recruitment and homing to sites of diseased organ tissue, however, remains a major hurdle in their application for treatment of diseases. Stress is commonly associated with various diseases. At the present time, little information is available about the effect of stress on MSC function. Here, we employed a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse liver fibrosis model to investigate whether constraint stress affects the migration of MSCs to fibrotic liver. MSC homing to the fibrotic liver was significantly inhibited in mice with restraint stress. Restraint stress induced an elevation of corticosterone level in the serum. Blocking glucocorticoid signaling with either corticosterone-synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (MET) or glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 attenuated restraint stress-induced inhibition of MSCs migration. The serum concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) increased in mice treated with CCl4. Restraint stress had no influence on expression of SDF-1 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the fibrotic liver. Culture with the serum of CCl4-treated mice or SDF-1 promoted MSC migration, which was suppressed by corticosterone. Exposure of MSCs to corticosterone decreased their expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CXCR7). These results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of corticosterone on MSC migration might be mediated via decreasing the expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 in MSCs. Interventions targeting the interaction between corticosterone and its receptor improve migration and homing of MSCs in hosts receiving transplantation of these cells. PMID:25268050

  19. Chlorotriazine Herbicides and Metabolites Activate an ACTH-Dependent Release of Corticosterone in Male Wistar Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we reported that atrazine (ATR) alters steroidogenesis in male Wistar rats resulting in elevated serum corticosterone (CORT), progesterone, and estrogens. The increase in CORT indicated that this chlorotriazine herbicide may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal ax...

  20. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. Results A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver–operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, α-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and α-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences

  1. Corticosterone treatment results in enhanced release of peptidergic vesicles in astrocytes via cytoskeletal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreejata; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2013-12-01

    While the effect of stress on neuronal physiology is widely studied, its effect on the functionality of astrocytes is not well understood. We studied the effect of high doses of stress hormone corticosterone, on two physiological properties of astrocytes, i.e., gliotransmission and interastrocytic calcium waves. To study the release of peptidergic vesicles from astrocytes, hippocampal astrocyte cultures were transfected with a plasmid to express pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) fused with the emerald green fluorescent protein (ANP.emd). The rate of decrease in fluorescence of ANP.emd on application of ionomycin, a calcium ionophore was monitored. Significant increase in the rate of calcium-dependent exocytosis of ANP.emd was observed with the 100 nM and 1 μM corticosterone treatments for 3 h, which depended on the activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. ANP.emd tagged vesicles exhibited increased mobility in astrocyte culture upon corticosterone treatment. Increasing corticosterone concentrations also resulted in concomitant increase in the calcium wave propagation velocity, initiated by focal ATP application. Corticosterone treatment also resulted in increased GFAP expression and F-actin rearrangements. FITC-Phalloidin immunostaining revealed increased formation of cross linked F-actin networks with the 100 nM and 1 μM corticosterone treatment. Alternatively, blockade of actin polymerization and disruption of microtubules prevented the corticosterone-mediated increase in ANP.emd release kinetics. This study reports for the first time the effect of corticosterone on gliotransmission via modulation of cytoskeletal elements. As ANP acts on both neurons and blood vessels, modulation of its release could have functional implications in neurovascular coupling under pathophysiological conditions of stress. PMID:24123181

  2. Dietary fat and corticosterone levels are contributing factors to meal anticipation.

    PubMed

    Namvar, Sara; Gyte, Amy; Denn, Mark; Leighton, Brendan; Piggins, Hugh D

    2016-04-15

    Daily restricted access to food leads to the development of food anticipatory activity and metabolism, which depends upon an as yet unidentified food-entrainable oscillator(s). A premeal anticipatory peak in circulating hormones, including corticosterone is also elicited by daily restricted feeding. High-fat feeding is associated with elevated levels of corticosterone with disrupted circadian rhythms and a failure to develop robust meal anticipation. It is not clear whether the disrupted corticosterone rhythm, resulting from high-fat feeding contributes to attenuated meal anticipation in high-fat fed rats. Our aim was to better characterize meal anticipation in rats fed a low- or high-fat diet, and to better understand the role of corticosterone in this process. To this end, we utilized behavioral observations, hypothalamic c-Fos expression, and indirect calorimetry to assess meal entrainment. We also used the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, to dissect out the role of corticosterone in meal anticipation in rats given daily access to a meal with different fat content. Restricted access to a low-fat diet led to robust meal anticipation, as well as entrainment of hypothalamic c-Fos expression, metabolism, and circulating corticosterone. These measures were significantly attenuated in response to a high-fat diet, and animals on this diet exhibited a postanticipatory rise in corticosterone. Interestingly, antagonism of glucocorticoid activity using RU486 attenuated meal anticipation in low-fat fed rats, but promoted meal anticipation in high-fat-fed rats. These findings suggest an important role for corticosterone in the regulation of meal anticipation in a manner dependent upon dietary fat content. PMID:26818054

  3. Corticosterone stress response in tree swallows nesting near polychlorinated biphenyl- and dioxin-contaminated rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franceschini, M.D.; Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Reed, J.M.; Romero, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    We assayed baseline and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations from adult female and nestling tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor, from New England, USA, sites with different levels of contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Corticosterone was compared over 2 years from a highly contaminated PCB site along the Housatonic River (Berkshire County, MA, USA), a midrange contaminated site upstream, and a reference site. Adult females (n = 29), sampled only in 2003, showed an inverted-U association with PCBs, with higher stress-induced corticosterone with midrange contamination than at the high-contamination site. In nestlings, stress-induced corticosterone was highest for the highly contaminated site compared with the other sites in 2003 (n = 53, 29 nests), with no difference among sites in 2004 (n = 93, 27 nests). In 2004, we began testing mechanisms underlying these changes in nestlings at the high- and low-PCB sites. Corticosterone response to dexamethasone injection (used to test negative feedback) was not different between sites, but stress-induced corticosterone was reduced at the contaminated site after adrenocorticotropin hormone injection (used to test adrenal responsiveness), suggesting an inhibited ability to mount a stress response. We also compared nestlings from a stretch of the Woonasquatucket River, Rhode Island, USA, heavily contaminated with TCDD (n = 80, 43 nests) with nestlings from an upstream site that had lower levels of TCDD and the Berkshire County reference site. Although there were no stress-induced differences, baseline corticosterone was lower at the higher TCDD site than at the reference site. Altogether these findings suggest that tree swallows chronically exposed to high PCB and TCDD levels exhibit altered baseline and stress-induced corticosterone responses, but the patterns of alteration might not be predictable. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  4. Corticosterone stress response in tree swallows nesting near polychlorinated biphenyl- and dioxin-contaminated rivers.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Melinda D; Custer, Christine M; Custer, Thomas W; Reed, J Michael; Romero, L Michael

    2008-11-01

    We assayed baseline and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations from adult female and nestling tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor, from New England, U.S.A., sites with different levels of contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Corticosterone was compared over 2 years from a highly contaminated PCB site along the Housatonic River (Berkshire County, MA, USA), a midrange contaminated site upstream, and a reference site. Adult females (n=29), sampled only in 2003, showed an inverted-U association with PCBs, with higher stress-induced corticosterone with midrange contamination than at the high-contamination site. In nestlings, stress-induced corticosterone was highest for the highly contaminated site compared with the other sites in 2003 (n=53, 29 nests), with no difference among sites in 2004 (n=93, 27 nests). In 2004, we began testing mechanisms underlying these changes in nestlings at the high- and low-PCB sites. Corticosterone response to dexamethasone injection (used to test negative feedback) was not different between sites, but stress-induced corticosterone was reduced at the contaminated site after adrenocorticotropin hormone injection (used to test adrenal responsiveness), suggesting an inhibited ability to mount a stress response. We also compared nestlings from a stretch of the Woonasquatucket River, Rhode Island, U.S.A., heavily contaminated with TCDD (n=80, 43 nests) with nestlings from an upstream site that had lower levels of TCDD and the Berkshire County reference site. Although there were no stress-induced differences, baseline corticosterone was lower at the higher TCDD site than at the reference site. Altogether these findings suggest that tree swallows chronically exposed to high PCB and TCDD levels exhibit altered baseline and stress-induced corticosterone responses, but the patterns of alteration might not be predictable. PMID:18476749

  5. Corticosterone enhances the potency of ethanol against hippocampal long-term potentiation via local neurosteroid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; O’Dell, Kazuko A.; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Corticosterone is known to accumulate in brain after various stressors including alcohol intoxication. Just as severe alcohol intoxication is typically required to impair memory formation only high concentrations of ethanol (60 mM) acutely inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular memory mechanism, in naïve hippocampal slices. This LTP inhibition involves synthesis of neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, and appears to involve a form of cellular stress. In the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, we examined whether a lower concentration of ethanol (20 mM) inhibits LTP in the presence of corticosterone, a stress-related modulator, and whether corticosterone stimulates local neurosteroid synthesis. Although low micromolar corticosterone alone did not inhibit LTP induction, we found that 20 mM ethanol inhibited LTP in the presence of corticosterone. At 20 mM, ethanol alone did not stimulate neurosteroid synthesis or inhibit LTP. LTP inhibition by corticosterone plus ethanol was blocked by finasteride, an inhibitor of 5α-reductase, suggesting a role for neurosteroid synthesis. We also found that corticosterone alone enhanced neurosteroid immunostaining in CA1 pyramidal neurons and that this immunostaining was further augmented by 20 mM ethanol. The enhanced neurosteroid staining was blocked by finasteride and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV). These results indicate that corticosterone promotes neurosteroid synthesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and can participate in ethanol-mediated synaptic dysfunction even at moderate ethanol levels. These effects may contribute to the influence of stress on alcohol-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:26190975

  6. Factors affecting the plasma insulin concentration shortly after accidental injury in man.

    PubMed Central

    Frayn, K N; Maycock, P F; Little, R A; Yates, D W; Stoner, H B

    1987-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on plasma insulin concentrations in the acutely injured. Plasma insulin and glucose concentrations have been measured in 504 patients within 8 h of injury, and related to the severity of injury as assessed by the injury severity score (ISS). As in previous surveys of injured patients, an extremely wide range of insulin concentrations was found (2-141 mU/l). Most of the variability occurred at lower severities of injury. In very severely injured patients (ISS greater than or equal to 30), insulin concentrations were uniformly suppressed (less than 20 mU/l), especially in relation to the hyperglycaemia in these patients. Two small subgroups, patients dying within 3 h of injury and known psychiatric patients on psycho-active drugs, differed from the general pattern in displaying elevated insulin concentrations despite very severe injuries. The results bear out the idea that insulin secretion is usually acutely suppressed by adrenaline after severe injury; after less severe injuries, however, the response is much less uniform. PMID:3304325

  7. Effects of exogenous corticosterone treatment on alloantigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in mice.

    PubMed

    DeKrey, G K; Kerkvliet, N I

    1995-05-01

    The intent of this study was to examine the effects of stress-like plasma corticosterone (CS) elevation on the generation of alloantigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in mice. Elevation of plasma CS was achieved by infusion of exogenous CS via osmotic pumps. CS infusion at 16 mg/kg/day on days -4 through 10 relative to alloantigen challenge led to slight, but significant, suppression of CTL activity on day 10 but no elevation of plasma CS levels. Infusion of lower CS doses (1, 2, 4 or 8 mg/kg/day) had no effect on CTL activity. Serial sampling of mice infused with CS at 0.09, 0.9 or 9 mg/kg/day over a 14-day period indicated that only the 9 mg/kg/day infusion rate caused significant plasma CS elevation. Peak CS levels (approximately 500 ng/ml) were observed 1 day after the start of CS infusion, but CS levels fell to below 200 ng/ml by day 7 and were approximately 50 ng/ml on day 12 indicating that elevated plasma CS levels could not be maintained for extended periods by CS infusion. An attempt to define the windows of CS sensitivity during CTL development was made by infusing mice with CS at doses of 10-16 mg/kg/day on days 0-3, 3-6, 4-7, 5-8 and 6-9, relative to alloantigen challenge; however, CS infusion had no effect on CTL activity. In contrast, dexamethasone infusion (9.4 mg/kg/day) on days 0 to 3 suppressed CTL activity by approximately 90% indicating that the generation of CTL activity is sensitive to high dose GC treatment, but is refractory to stress-like CS elevation. In mixed lymphocyte-tumor cell cultures, CTL activity was suppressed by CS (2.5 x 10(-8) M) if added on the first day of culture but not if added on subsequent days. These results suggest that CTL are most sensitive to CS-induced suppression if exposed near to the time of alloantigen challenge. PMID:7752086

  8. Acute effects of corticosterone injection on paternal behavior in California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) fathers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Breanna N; Perea-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Saltzman, Wendy

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids are thought to mediate the disruption of parental behavior in response to acute and chronic stress. Previous research supports their role in chronic stress; however, no study has experimentally tested the effects of acute glucocorticoid elevation on paternal behavior. We tested the prediction that acute corticosterone (CORT) increases would decrease paternal behavior in California mouse fathers and would lead to longer-term effects on reproductive success, as even short-term increases in CORT have been shown to produce lasting effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. First-time fathers were injected with 30 mg/kg CORT, 60 mg/kg CORT or vehicle, or left unmanipulated. Interactions between the male and its pup(s) were recorded 1.5-2h after injection and scored for paternal and non-paternal behavior. Treatment groups were combined into control (unmanipulated + vehicle, n = 15) and CORT (30 mg/kg + 60 mg/kg, n = 16) for analysis based on resulting plasma CORT concentrations. CORT treatment did not alter paternal or non-paternal behaviors or any long-term measures (male body mass or temperature, pup growth rate, pup survival, interbirth interval, number or mass of pups born in the second litter). Fathers showed a significant rise in body mass at day 30 postpartum, followed by a decrease in body mass after the birth of the second litter; however, this pattern did not differ between the CORT and control groups. In summary, acute elevation of plasma CORT did not alter direct paternal behavior, body mass, or reproductive outcomes, suggesting that acute CORT elevation alone does not overtly disrupt paternal care in this biparental mammal. PMID:21939660

  9. Chronic ANG II infusion and reflex control of norepinephrine and corticosterone in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed

    Brooks, V L; Hatton, D C

    1997-02-01

    The hypothesis that long-term increases in angiotensin II (ANG II) produce pressure-independent resetting of baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis was tested in rabbits by determining the effect of chronic ANG II infusion on reflex relationships between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and corticosterone (CS). After 2 wk, ANG II increased MAP from 61 +/- 1 to 99 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.05) without altering heart rate or plasma NE concentration, but increased CS from 9.8 +/- 1.3 to 29.5 +/- 13.7 ng/ml (P < 0.05). Heart rate, NE, and CS baroreflex curves were all reset to a higher pressure level (P < 0.05) after 24 h, 1 wk, and 2 wk of ANG II. Forty minutes after stopping ANG II on the same days, MAP decreased, and curves were shifted back toward control (P < 0.05), indicating that ANG II was required for the resetting. Two findings suggest that the resetting action ofANG II is distinct from the pressor effect. First, although stopping ANG II reversed the hypertension as it reversed the resetting, reversal of the hypertension instead by prolonged infusion of nitroprusside along with ANG II did not have the same effect. Second, NE and heart rate baroreflex curves returned toward preinfusion positions after stopping ANG II (P < 0.05), even when the hypertension was nearly maintained by phenylephrine infusion. In conclusion, chronic increases in ANG II may have a global baroreflex resetting effect by a mechanism that is in part independent of the hypertension. PMID:9124469

  10. Effect of corticosterone on gene expression of feed intake regulatory peptides in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Song, Zhigang; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai

    2012-08-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the effects of corticosterone (CORT) on the regulation of appetite-associated genes in laying hens. Forty eight laying hens were randomly divided into two groups: one received subcutaneous injection of CORT (2mg/kg body weight, CORT-exposed) and the other received sham-treatment (Control). Treatment of hens with CORT stimulated an increase (P<0.05) in plasma CORT, glucose, uric acid (UA), insulin, cholesterol (Chol) and triiodothyronine (T(3)), but the concentrations of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and triacylglycerol (TG) were decreased (P<0.05). CORT treatment had no significant effect (P>0.05) on the mRNA levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), melanocortin receptor 4 and 5 (MCR-4 and MCR-5) and cholecystokinin (CCK) in the hypothalamus when compared with control hens. However, the expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and melanocortin recepter 1 (MCR-1) were significantly (P<0.05) suppressed while the mRNA levels of ghrelin and cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) were significantly upregulated (P<0.05) in CORT-treated hens. Treatment of laying hens with CORT had no significant (P>0.05) effect on the mRNA levels of CCK in the glandular stomach and the duodenum, and those of ghrelin in the glandular stomach, the duodenum and the jejunum. However, the mRNA levels of CCK in the jejunum and the ileum, and those of ghrelin in the ileum were significantly (P<0.05) suppressed by CORT treatment. In conclusion, these results suggest that CORT plays a unique role in some special neuropeptides (e.g., ghrelin, CART, POMC, CCK and MCRs) and a dynamic balance between these appetite-associated peptides in the hypothalamus and the gastrointestinal tract defines the feeding status of CORT-exposed laying hens. PMID:22554475

  11. GABAergic transmission in the rat paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus is suppressed by corticosterone and stress.

    PubMed

    Verkuyl, J Martin; Karst, Henk; Joëls, Marian

    2005-01-01

    Parvocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus receive hormonal inputs mediated by corticosterone as well as neuronal inputs, prominent among which is a GABAergic inhibitory projection. In the present study we examined the functional properties of this GABAergic innervation when corticosteroid levels fluctuate. Frequency, amplitude and kinetic properties of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSCs), mediated by gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) were studied with whole cell recording in parvocellular neurons. Injection of a high dose of corticosterone in vivo suppressed the frequency but did not change the amplitude and kinetic properties of mIPSCs recorded 1-5 h later in vitro. Similar effects were observed after restraint stress. The corticosteroid actions do not require involvement of extrahypothalamic brain regions, because in vitro administration of 100 nM corticosterone (20 min) directly to a hypothalamic slice also suppressed the frequency of mIPSCs recorded several hours later. Corticosterone administration to hypothalamic slices from restraint rats did not result in stronger reduction of mIPSC frequency than either treatment alone, pointing to a common underlying mechanism. Paired pulse response inhibition was reduced by corticosterone, suggesting that the hormone decreases the release probability of GABA-containing vesicles. Unlike neurosteroids, corticosterone induced no rapid effects on mIPSC properties. These results indicate that increases in glucocorticoid level due to stress can slowly but persistently inhibit the GABAergic tone on parvocellular hypothalamic neurons via a hitherto unknown local mechanism independent of limbic projections. PMID:15654848

  12. A facilitative role for corticosterone in the acquisition of a spatial task under moderate stress.

    PubMed

    Akirav, Irit; Kozenicky, Maya; Tal, Dadi; Sandi, Carmen; Venero, Cesar; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2004-01-01

    Emotionally charged experiences alter memory storage via the activation of hormonal systems. Previously, we have shown that compared with rats trained for a massed spatial learning task in the water maze in warm water (25 degrees C), animals that were trained in cold water (19 degrees C) performed better and showed higher levels of the stress hormone corticosterone. Here, we examined whether manipulating the levels of corticosterone can determine the strength of spatial information acquisition and retention. Rats were injected with metyrapone (25, 50, and 75 mg/kg, i.p.) or with corticosterone (10 and 25 mg/kg, i.p.) and trained in a massed spatial task in either cold (19 degrees C) or warm (25 degrees C) water. We found that whereas animals injected with vehicle performed well in the spatial task in cold water (moderate stress), rats injected with the intermediate metyrapone dose showed impairment in performance. Moreover, whereas animals injected with vehicle on average did not perform well in warm water (mild stress), rats injected with the lower corticosterone dose showed improvement in performance in warm water. These two mirror experiments of corticosterone blockade and enhancement strongly suggest that corticosterone is instrumental in the acquisition and retention of the spatial learning task. PMID:15054134

  13. A factor in human seminal plasma which affects carnitine accumulation in bovine epididymal sperm.

    PubMed

    Carter, A L; Cho, S H; Bishop, E R; Boldt, J

    1988-05-01

    This study was initiated to determine whether factors are present in human sperm-free seminal plasma (HSP) that regulate the uptake and release of carnitine from sperm. Bovine caput epididymal sperm cells accumulated more carnitine than caudal sperm cells. A significant reduction in carnitine uptake by caput sperm was observed in the presence of HSP from normal subjects, but not from three subjects with reduced motility. A factor has been isolated from HSP that inhibits carnitine uptake by caput sperm and has the following properties: it is nondialyzable, stable to freeze-thawing, soluble in 60% ammonium sulfate, and has an approximate molecular weight of 158 kd. These data are consistent with the existence of a relatively high molecular weight protein in HSP responsible for the preservation of carnitine concentrations in sperm. PMID:3360180

  14. Condition-dependent effects of corticosterone on a carotenoid-based begging signal in house sparrows.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Claire; Fellous, Simon; Haussy, Claudy; Chastel, Olivier; Sorci, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Begging is a complex display involving a variety of different visual and auditory signals. Parents are thought to use these signals to adjust their investment in food provisioning. The mechanisms that ensure the honesty of begging displays as indicators of need have been recently investigated. It has been shown that levels of corticosterone (Cort), the hormone released during the stress response, increase during food shortage and are associated with an increased begging rate. In a recent study in house sparrows, although exogenous Cort increased begging rate, parents did not accordingly adjust their provisioning rate. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Cort might affect the expression of other components of begging displays, such as flange color (a carotenoid-based trait). We experimentally increased levels of circulating Cort and investigated the effects of the treatment on (1) the flange coloration of the nestlings, (2) the behavioral response and (3) the parental allocation of food and (4) nestling condition and cell-mediated immune response. We found that Cort affected flange coloration in a condition-dependent way. Cort-injected nestlings had less yellow flanges than controls only when in poor body condition. Parental feeding rate was also affected by the Cort treatment in interaction with flange color. Feeding rate of Cort-injected nestlings was negatively and significantly correlated with flange color (nestlings with yellower flanges receiving more food), whereas feeding rate and flange color were not correlated in control chicks. We also found that nestlings injected with Cort showed a weaker immune response than controls. These results suggest that, indeed, Cort has the potential to affect multiple components of the begging display. As Cort levels naturally raise during fasting, parents have to take into account these multiple components to take a decision as to optimally share their investment among competing nestlings. PMID:18029282

  15. Corticosterone stimulates hatching of late-term tree lizard embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stacey L.; Johnston, Gwynne; Moore, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of hatching in oviparous animals is important for successful reproduction and survival, but is poorly understood. We unexpectedly found that RU-486, a progesterone and glucocorticoid antagonist, interferes with hatching of viable tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus) embryos in a dose-dependent manner and hypothesized that embryonic glucocorticoids regulate hatching. To test this hypothesis, we treated eggs with corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle on Day 30 (85%) of incubation, left other eggs untreated, and observed relative hatch order and hatch time. In one study, the CORT egg hatched first in 9 of 11 clutches. In a second study, the CORT egg hatched first in 9 of 12 clutches, before vehicle-treated eggs in 10 of 12 clutches, and before untreated eggs in 7 of 9 clutches. On average, CORT eggs hatched 18.2h before vehicle-treated eggs and 11.6h before untreated eggs. Thus, CORT accelerates hatching of near-term embryos and RU-486 appears to block this effect. CORT may mobilize energy substrates that fuel hatching and/or accelerate lung development, and may provide a mechanism by which stressed embryos escape environmental stressors. PMID:17208477

  16. Distinct responses of baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels to genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Homberger, Benjamin; Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Jenni, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) hormones, i.e. corticosterone (CORT) in birds, support physiological homeostasis and facilitate adaptations to stressful situations. However, maintaining high GC levels are energetically costly and interfere with other physiological processes. To keep the balance of costs and benefits of GC hormones, various mechanisms act to adapt GC levels to environmental conditions on different timescales, i.e. over generations, between parents and their offspring and within the life-time of a single individual. We elucidated whether two strains (domesticated and wild) of grey partridges (Perdix perdix) differed in the developmental trajectories of baseline and stress response CORT throughout the first 80 days of life. We also explored the potential of prenatal and postnatal factors, e.g. parental origin, predictable vs. unpredictable food treatments, individual and social factors to modify these trajectories. Baseline CORT was similar between strains and unaffected by perinatal food treatments. It was negatively related to body size and body condition. Conversely, the CORT stress response was not markedly affected by physiological condition. It was stronger in wild than in domesticated birds and it increased with age. Birds subjected to prenatal unpredictable food supply exhibited an accelerated development of the CORT stress response which could reflect an adaptive maternal effect. We conclude that the vital role of baseline CORT may allow little adaptive scope since changes can quickly become detrimental. In contrast, the CORT stress response may show considerable adaptive potential which might ultimately support homeostasis in a changing environment. PMID:25307951

  17. Feather corticosterone content in predatory birds in relation to body condition and hepatic metal concentration.

    PubMed

    Strong, Rebecca J; Pereira, M Glória; Shore, Richard F; Henrys, Peter A; Pottinger, Tom G

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of measuring corticosterone in feathers from cryo-archived raptor specimens, in order to provide a retrospective assessment of the activity of the stress axis in relation to contaminant burden. Feather samples were taken from sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus, kestrel Falco tinnunculus, buzzard Buteo buteo, barn owl Tyto alba, and tawny owl Strix aluco and the variation in feather CORT concentrations with respect to species, age, sex, feather position, and body condition was assessed. In sparrowhawks only, variation in feather CORT content was compared with hepatic metal concentrations. For individuals, CORT concentration (pgmm(-1)) in adjacent primary flight feathers (P5 and P6), and left and right wing primaries (P5), was statistically indistinguishable. The lowest concentrations of CORT were found in sparrowhawk feathers and CORT concentrations did not vary systematically with age or sex for any species. Significant relationships between feather CORT content and condition were observed in only tawny owl and kestrel. In sparrowhawks, feather CORT concentration was found to be positively related to the hepatic concentrations of five metals (Cd, Mn, Co, Cu, Mo) and the metalloid As. There was also a negative relationship between measures of condition and total hepatic metal concentration in males. The results suggest that some factors affecting CORT uptake by feathers remain to be resolved but feather CORT content from archived specimens has the potential to provide a simple effects biomarker for exposure to environmental contaminants. PMID:25776461

  18. Platelet Concentration in Platelet-Rich Plasma Affects Tenocyte Behavior In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rughetti, Anna; Dal Mas, Antonella; Properzi, Gianfranco; Calvisi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Since tendon injuries and tendinopathy are a growing problem, sometimes requiring surgery, new strategies that improve conservative therapies are needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) seems to be a good candidate by virtue of its high content of growth factors, most of which are involved in tendon healing. This study aimed to evaluate if different concentrations of platelets in PRP have different effects on the biological features of normal human tenocytes that are usually required during tendon healing. The different platelet concentrations tested (up to 5 × 106 plt/µL) stimulated differently tenocytes behavior; intermediate concentrations (0.5 × 106, 1 × 106 plt/µL) strongly induced all tested processes (proliferation, migration, collagen, and MMPs production) if compared to untreated cells; on the contrary, the highest concentration had inhibitory effects on proliferation and strongly reduced migration abilities and overall collagen production but, at the same time, induced increasing MMP production, which could be counterproductive because excessive proteolysis could impair tendon mechanical stability. Thus, these in vitro data strongly suggest the need for a compromise between extremely high and low platelet concentrations to obtain an optimal global effect when inducing in vivo tendon healing. PMID:25147809

  19. Platelet concentration in platelet-rich plasma affects tenocyte behavior in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Ilaria; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Mancò, Annalisa; Di Stefano, Gabriella; Di Francesco, Marianna; Rughetti, Anna; Dal Mas, Antonella; Properzi, Gianfranco; Calvisi, Vittorio; Dolo, Vincenza

    2014-01-01

    Since tendon injuries and tendinopathy are a growing problem, sometimes requiring surgery, new strategies that improve conservative therapies are needed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) seems to be a good candidate by virtue of its high content of growth factors, most of which are involved in tendon healing. This study aimed to evaluate if different concentrations of platelets in PRP have different effects on the biological features of normal human tenocytes that are usually required during tendon healing. The different platelet concentrations tested (up to 5 × 10(6) plt/µL) stimulated differently tenocytes behavior; intermediate concentrations (0.5 × 10(6), 1 × 10(6) plt/µL) strongly induced all tested processes (proliferation, migration, collagen, and MMPs production) if compared to untreated cells; on the contrary, the highest concentration had inhibitory effects on proliferation and strongly reduced migration abilities and overall collagen production but, at the same time, induced increasing MMP production, which could be counterproductive because excessive proteolysis could impair tendon mechanical stability. Thus, these in vitro data strongly suggest the need for a compromise between extremely high and low platelet concentrations to obtain an optimal global effect when inducing in vivo tendon healing. PMID:25147809

  20. Does Feather Corticosterone Reflect Individual Quality or External Stress in Arctic-Nesting Migratory Birds?

    PubMed Central

    Legagneux, Pierre; Harms, N. Jane; Gauthier, Gilles; Chastel, Olivier; Gilchrist, H. Grant; Bêty, Joël; Soos, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The effects of environmental perturbations or stressors on individual states can be carried over to subsequent life stages and ultimately affect survival and reproduction. The concentration of corticosterone (CORT) in feathers is an integrated measure of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal activity during the molting period, providing information on the total baseline and stress-induced CORT secreted during the period of feather growth. Common eiders and greater snow geese replace all flight feathers once a year during the pre-basic molt, which occurs following breeding. Thus, CORT contained in feathers of pre-breeding individuals sampled in spring reflects the total CORT secreted during the previous molting event, which may provide insight into the magnitude or extent of stress experienced during this time period. We used data from multiple recaptures to disentangle the contribution of individual quality vs. external factors (i.e., breeding investment or environmental conditions) on feather CORT in arctic-nesting waterfowl. Our results revealed no repeatability of feather CORT within individuals of either species. In common eiders, feather CORT was not affected by prior reproductive investment, nor by pre-breeding (spring) body condition prior to the molting period. Individual feather CORT greatly varied according to the year, and August-September temperatures explained most of the annual variation in feather CORT. Understanding mechanisms that affect energetic costs and stress responses during molting will require further studies either using long-term data or experiments. Although our study period encompassed only five years, it nonetheless provides evidence that CORT measured in feathers likely reflects responses to environmental conditions experienced by birds during molt, and could be used as a metric to study carry-over effects. PMID:24391720

  1. Does feather corticosterone reflect individual quality or external stress in arctic-nesting migratory birds?

    PubMed

    Legagneux, Pierre; Harms, N Jane; Gauthier, Gilles; Chastel, Olivier; Gilchrist, H Grant; Bortolotti, Gary; Bêty, Joël; Soos, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The effects of environmental perturbations or stressors on individual states can be carried over to subsequent life stages and ultimately affect survival and reproduction. The concentration of corticosterone (CORT) in feathers is an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity during the molting period, providing information on the total baseline and stress-induced CORT secreted during the period of feather growth. Common eiders and greater snow geese replace all flight feathers once a year during the pre-basic molt, which occurs following breeding. Thus, CORT contained in feathers of pre-breeding individuals sampled in spring reflects the total CORT secreted during the previous molting event, which may provide insight into the magnitude or extent of stress experienced during this time period. We used data from multiple recaptures to disentangle the contribution of individual quality vs. external factors (i.e., breeding investment or environmental conditions) on feather CORT in arctic-nesting waterfowl. Our results revealed no repeatability of feather CORT within individuals of either species. In common eiders, feather CORT was not affected by prior reproductive investment, nor by pre-breeding (spring) body condition prior to the molting period. Individual feather CORT greatly varied according to the year, and August-September temperatures explained most of the annual variation in feather CORT. Understanding mechanisms that affect energetic costs and stress responses during molting will require further studies either using long-term data or experiments. Although our study period encompassed only five years, it nonetheless provides evidence that CORT measured in feathers likely reflects responses to environmental conditions experienced by birds during molt, and could be used as a metric to study carry-over effects. PMID:24391720

  2. Corticosterone regulates the expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin in MLO-Y4 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xiangnan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Shen, Jiefei; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hang

    2012-06-01

    Osteocytes that have a dendritic appearance are widely believed to form a complex cellular network system and play crucial roles in mechanotransduction as a principal bone mechanosensor, which is the basis of their neuronallike biology, as previously reported. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and reelin mRNA, which are brain-specific neurogenic markers, have been identified in osteocytes. However, changes in the production of NPY and reelin in response to specific biochemical stimulation are unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effect of corticosterone, one of the endogenous glucocorticoids, on the expression of NPY and reelin in the MLO-Y4 osteocyte cell line. Cells were treated with corticosterone at different concentrations (10(-9) M-10(-5) M) for 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h. As revealed, corticosterone reduced the MLO-Y4 cell viability and proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner based on an MTT assay and a Vi-CELL analyzer. The cells were then incubated with corticosterone (10(-6) μM), and the NPY and reelin expression levels were detected at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h using real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. These results demonstrated that at the gene and the protein levels, corticosterone significantly upregulated the NPY and reelin expression in a time-dependent manner. The application of a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, reversed the reduced cell viability and the increased expression of NPY and reelin that were caused by corticosterone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to verify that corticosterone regulates the NPY and reelin expression in osteocytes. PMID:22610366

  3. Does extra corticosterone elicit increased begging and submissiveness in subordinate booby (Sula nebouxii) chicks?

    PubMed

    Vallarino, A; Wingfield, J C; Drummond, H

    2006-07-01

    We tested whether in two-chick broods of the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) elevated circulating corticosterone in the socially subordinate broodmate facilitates submissive behavior and/or enhances food solicitation. Implanting corticosterone in 17 subordinate chicks (experimental broods) produced changes in the behavior of chicks and parents over the first two days, relative to 17 matched families (control broods) where subordinate chicks were implanted with empty capsules. Experimental broods showed increased activity/wakefulness of the dominant broodmate and, consequently, increased simultaneous activity of both broodmates, but there was scant evidence that subordinates submitted more readily when attacked. Implanted subordinates increased their rate of spontaneous submission over the total observation time, but this increase was mostly explained by the additional time when both broodmates were simultaneously active. There was little sign that extra corticosterone induced more begging, except possibly by eliciting increased activity. Experimental broods increased their rate of feeding, and most if not all of the increase was due to the increased activity and increased feeding rate of dominant broodmates. On the third and fourth days after implantation all effects of implanted corticosterone disappeared, except for the elevated activity and feeding rates of dominant chicks. At the end of four days, subordinates implanted with corticosterone showed no increase in circulating corticosterone and experimental broods showed no gain in mass or body size, relative to controls. Extra corticosterone, above the high level that normally circulates in subordinate chicks, apparently does not enhance submission to aggression or food solicitation, but provokes a cascade of changes in the behavior of broodmates and parents. PMID:16530762

  4. Nanosecond electric pulses affect a plant-specific kinesin at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Sebastian; Liu, Qiong; Eing, Christian; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Electric pulses with high field strength and durations in the nanosecond range (nsPEFs) are of considerable interest for biotechnological and medical applications. However, their actual cellular site of action is still under debate--due to their extremely short rise times, nsPEFs are thought to act mainly in the cell interior rather than at the plasma membrane. On the other hand, nsPEFs can induce membrane permeability. We have revisited this issue using plant cells as a model. By mapping the cellular responses to nsPEFs of different field strength and duration in the tobacco BY-2 cell line, we could define a treatment that does not impinge on short-term viability, such that the physiological responses to the treatment can be followed. We observe, for these conditions, a mild disintegration of the cytoskeleton, impaired membrane localization of the PIN1 auxin-efflux transporter and a delayed premitotic nuclear positioning followed by a transient mitotic arrest. To address the target site of nsPEFs, we made use of the plant-specific KCH kinesin, which can assume two different states with different localization (either near the nucleus or at the cell membrane) driving different cellular functions. We show that nsPEFs reduce cell expansion in nontransformed cells but promote expansion in a line overexpressing KCH. Since cell elongation and cell widening are linked to the KCH localized at the cell membrane, the inverted response in the KCH overexpressor provides evidence for a direct action of nsPEFs, also at the cell membrane. PMID:24062185

  5. Plasma components affect accuracy of circulating cancer-related microRNA quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ja; Linnstaedt, Sarah; Palma, Jaime; Park, Joon Cheol; Ntrivalas, Evangelos; Kwak-Kim, Joanne Y H; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth; Hastings, Michelle L; Martin, Jeffrey N; Duelli, Dominik M

    2012-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as candidate biomarkers of various diseases and conditions including malignancy and pregnancy. This approach requires sensitive and accurate quantitation of miRNA concentrations in body fluids. Herein we report that enzyme-based miRNA quantitation, which is currently the mainstream approach for identifying differences in miRNA abundance among samples, is skewed by endogenous serum factors that co-purify with miRNAs and anticoagulant agents used during collection. Of importance, different miRNAs were affected to varying extent among patient samples. By developing measures to overcome these interfering activities, we increased the accuracy, and improved the sensitivity of miRNA detection up to 30-fold. Overall, the present study outlines key factors that prevent accurate miRNA quantitation in body fluids and provides approaches that enable faithful quantitation of miRNA abundance in body fluids. PMID:22154918

  6. Immune challenge induces differential corticosterone and interleukin-6 responsiveness in rats bred for extremes in anxiety-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Salome, N; Tasiemski, A; Dutriez, I; Wigger, A; Landgraf, R; Viltart, O

    2008-02-19

    Disturbances in mood such as anxiety and depression are often associated with altered hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity, but also with changes in cytokine production, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), an essential immune factor produced by macrophages and lymphocytes during inflammatory processes. The reciprocal relationship between the HPA axis and the immune system is now well established. In order to understand better the endocrine reactivity of anxious individuals faced with an immune challenge, a model of innate anxiety-related behavior, HAB and LAB rats (HABs, high and LABs, low anxiety-related behavior) was used in this study. We sought to determine whether injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced a differential HPA axis reactivity and plasma IL-6 release in HABs and LABs. After LPS injection, the plasma adrenal corticotrophic hormone increase did not differ between HABs and LABs, whereas a larger increase in plasma corticosterone levels occurred in HABs than in LABs at 2 h after injection. Moreover, basal IL-6 levels were lower in HABs than in LABs, leading to a higher IL-6 2 h/basal ratio in HABs. In conclusion, we propose for the first time a link between the endocrine and immune systems of HABs and LABs and suggest that IL-6 could be a neuroendocrine correlate of trait anxiety in HABs. PMID:18207648

  7. Fasting and diet content affect stress-induced changes in plasma glucose and cortisol in Juvenile chinook salmon. [Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, B.A.; Schreck, C.B. ); Fowler, L.G. )

    1988-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared on low-, medium-, or high-lipid diets for 18 weeks were either kept on their respective diets or fasted for 20 d; then they were subjected to a 30-s handling stress or to handling plus continuous confinement. In fish that were handled but not confined, poststress hyperglycemia was greatest in fed fish that received the high-lipid diet and was generally lower in fasted than in fed fish. Plasma cortisol elevations in response to handling or handling plus confinement stress were not appreciably affected by diet type or fasting. The result indicated that prior feeding regimes and the types of diet fed should be considered when one is interpreting the magnitude of hyperglycemic stress responses in juvenile chinook salmon.

  8. Dietary fat affects plasma prolactin in female F344 rats under conditions of ether stress.

    PubMed

    Bosland, M C; Bunnik, G S; Wilbrink, B; de Bie, B T; Floor, B

    1994-01-01

    The influence of amount and type of dietary fat on circulating concentrations of prolactin and estradiol-17 beta in female F344 rats from which blood was sampled by decapitation under ether anesthesia was compared with that in rats from which blood was collected without anesthesia. The animals were fed isonutrient (adjusted for differences in energy density) semipurified diets containing 5% or 20% (by weight) sunflower seed oil or lard. Blood was sampled by decapitation with or without standardized ether anesthesia during the afternoon of proestrus-estrus or the morning of metestrus-diestrus, as determined by examination of vaginal smears. Plasma hormone concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Prolactin levels were lower during proestrus-estrus in rats fed a low-fat diet than in animals fed a high-fat diet, statistically independent of the type of dietary fat, but only when blood was sampled by decapitation under ether anesthesia [p = 0.0384, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. No such difference was found in rats decapitated without anesthesia. This effect of amount of dietary fat on prolactin in proestrus-estrus animals anesthetized with ether was predominantly present in animals fed polyunsaturated fat (p < 0.05, 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's test) and was statistically not significant in rats fed saturated fat diets. During metestrus-diestrus, prolactin levels were significantly lower in animals fed a high-saturated fat diet than in those fed low-saturated fat, low-unsaturated fat, or high-unsaturated fat diets, independent of the blood sampling conditions (p < 0.05, 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test). No consistent effects on estradiol-17 beta levels were found in type or amount of dietary fat or in presence or absence of ether anesthesia before decapitation. Growth, apparent digestibility of fat, and caloric intake were similar in all four dietary groups, but food consumption was higher and food conversion efficiency was lower in animals fed low-fat diets

  9. Microwave-induced temperature, corticosterone, and thryotropin interrelationships

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.T.; Lebda, N.; Pettit, S.; Michaelson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    To delineate acute endocrine responses to microwave energy absorption, 142 unanesthetized male Long-Evans rats acclimated to experimental procedures were subjected to far-field 2.45-GHz microwave exposure for 1 h at 1-70 mW/cm/sup 2/, 4 h at 0.1-40 mw/cm/sup 2/, or sham exposure. Controls were sham exposed in a sham-exposure chamber beginning at 030 h and killed at 1230, 1330, 1530, and 1930 h. Microwave-exposed rats were equilibrated in an anechoic chamber for 3 h prior to the start of exposure. Microwave exposure was initiated at 1130 h. Exposed rats were killed at 1230 and 1530 h. Colonic temperature (T/sub col/) was measured and serum obtained for thyrotropin (TSH) and corticosterone (CS) determination immediately after exposure. Inverse relations of TSH to power density (PD) or R/sub col/ were noted in the microwave-exposed rats while CS increased with PD or T/sub col/. Similar relations of TSH and CS to T/sub col/ were also noted among ''shams.'' The increase of T/sub col/ by microwave exposure was dependent on PD but independent of an exposure duration greater than 1 h. The serum CS level increasd with PD but the effect decreased with duration of exposure. ''Low intensity'' 4-h microwave exposure inhibited normal circadian elevation of adrenocortical function in rats if the exposure was coincident with diurnal CS elevation.Inhibition of TSH became more pronounced with duration of exposure. Differences in the endocrine-body temperature relationships between sham- and microwave-exposed rats were also noted. It was concluded that endocrine control was dissociated from body temperature in the microwave-exposed rats. The endocrine control in microwave-exposed rats is different from shams.

  10. Corticosterone responses differ between lines of great tits (Parus major) selected for divergent personalities.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Alexander T; Schaper, Sonja V; Hau, Michaela; Cockrem, John F; de Goede, Piet; van Oers, Kees

    2012-02-01

    Animal 'personality' describes consistent individual differences in suites of behaviors, a phenomenon exhibited in diverse animal taxa and shown to be under natural and sexual selection. It has been suggested that variation in personality reflects underlying physiological variation; however there is limited empirical evidence to test this hypothesis in wild animals. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is hypothesized to play a central role in personality variation. Here we tested whether in great tits Parus major variation in personality traits is related to plasma concentrations of corticosterone (CORT). Using a capture-restraint protocol we examined baseline and stress-induced CORT levels in two captive experimental groups: (1) birds selected for divergent personalities ('fast-bold' and 'slow-shy' explorers); and (2) non-selected offspring of wild parents. We first tested for differences in CORT between selection lines, and second examined the relationship between responses in a canonical personality test and CORT concentrations in non-selected birds. We found support for our prediction that the slow-shy line would exhibit a higher acute stress response than the fast-bold line, indicating a genetic correlation between exploratory behavior and stress physiology. We did not, however, find that continuous variation in exploratory behavior co-varies with CORT concentrations in non-selected birds. While our results provide support for the idea that personality emerges as a result of correlated selection on behavior and underlying physiological mechanisms, they also indicate that this link may be particularly evident when composite personality traits are the target of selection. PMID:22202603

  11. Impact of biosolids and wastewater effluent application to agricultural land on corticosterone content in lettuce plants.

    PubMed

    Shargil, Dorit; Fine, Pinchas; Gerstl, Zev; Nitsan, Ido; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2016-01-15

    We studied corticosterone occurrence in lettuce plants grown on three biosolids amended soils under irrigation with either tap water or secondary wastewater effluent. Corticosterone was examined as it has possible implications for human health. It is a major glucocorticoid, and as such has an effect on regulation of metabolism, immune functions and stress response. The plants were grown in 220-L lysimeters packed with 3 soils which represent a wide range of physicochemical properties. Lettuce was grown in cycles (two in summer and two in winter) during 3 years, and in every spring season the sludges were re-applied. Corticosterone was quantified using ELISA and LCMS, and was found in the biosolids, tap water, wastewater effluent and lettuce plants. The respective ranges of concentrations were: 11-92 ng g(-1), 0.5-1.6 ng L(-1), 4.2-4.7 ng L(-1); and 1-900 ng g(-1) dry weight. A positive relationship was found between corticosterone concentrations in winter-grown lettuces and the plants fresh weight. The corticosterone content of the plants did not correspond with either the type of irrigation water or the biosolids type and rate of application or the soil properties. PMID:26437348

  12. Moderate differences in circulating corticosterone alter receptor-mediated regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Judge, Sarah J; Ingram, Colin D; Gartside, Sarah E

    2004-12-01

    Circulating glucocorticoid levels vary with stress and psychiatric illness and play a potentially important role in regulating transmitter systems that regulate mood. To determine whether chronic variation in corticosterone levels within the normal diurnal range altered the control of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neuronal activity, male rats were adrenalectomized and implanted with either a 2% or 70% corticosterone/cholesterol pellet (100 mg). Two weeks later, the regulation of 5-HT neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus was studied by in vitro electrophysiology. At this time, serum corticosterone levels approximated the low-point (2%) and mid-point (70%) of the diurnal range. The excitatory response of 5-HT neurones to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (1-11 microM) was significantly greater in the 2% group compared to the 70% group. By contrast, the inhibitory response to 5-HT (10-50 microM) was significantly lower in the 2% group compared to the 70% group. Thus, chronic variation in circulating corticosterone over a narrow part of the normal diurnal range causes a shift in the balance of positive and negative regulation of 5-HT neurones, with increased alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated excitation and reduced 5-HT-mediated autoinhibition at lower corticosterone levels. This shift would have a major impact on control of 5-HT neuronal activity. PMID:15582914

  13. Pre-Analytical Parameters Affecting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Measurement in Plasma: Identifying Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Johanna M.; Boehringer, Daniel; Deissler, Heidrun L.; Faerber, Lothar; Goepfert, Jens C.; Heiduschka, Peter; Kleeberger, Susannah M.; Klettner, Alexa; Krohne, Tim U.; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Ziemssen, Focke; Stahl, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is intensively investigated in various medical fields. However, comparing VEGF-A measurements is difficult because sample acquisition and pre-analytic procedures differ between studies. We therefore investigated which variables act as confounders of VEGF-A measurements. Methods Following a standardized protocol, blood was taken at three clinical sites from six healthy participants (one male and one female participant at each center) twice one week apart. The following pre-analytical parameters were varied in order to analyze their impact on VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant (EDTA vs. PECT / CTAD), cannula (butterfly vs. neonatal), type of centrifuge (swing-out vs. fixed-angle), time before and after centrifugation, filling level (completely filled vs. half-filled tubes) and analyzing method (ELISA vs. multiplex bead array). Additionally, intrapersonal variations over time and sex differences were explored. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear regression model. Results The following parameters were identified as statistically significant independent confounders of VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant, centrifuge, analyzing method and sex of the proband. The following parameters were no significant confounders in our data set: intrapersonal variation over one week, cannula, time before and after centrifugation and filling level of collection tubes. Conclusion VEGF-A measurement results can be affected significantly by the identified pre-analytical parameters. We recommend the use of CTAD anticoagulant, a standardized type of centrifuge and one central laboratory using the same analyzing method for all samples. PMID:26730574

  14. Long-Term Corticosterone Exposure Decreases Insulin Sensitivity and Induces Depressive-Like Behaviour in the C57BL/6NCrl Mouse

    PubMed Central

    van Donkelaar, Eva L.; Vaessen, Koen R. D.; Pawluski, Jodi L.; Sierksma, Annerieke S.; Blokland, Arjan; Cañete, Ramón; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress or long-term administration of glucocorticoids disrupts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal system leading to continuous high levels of glucocorticoids and insulin resistance (IR). This pre-diabetic state can eventually develop into type 2 diabetes mellitus and has been associated with a higher risk to develop depressive disorders. The mechanisms underlying the link between chronic stress, IR and depression remains unclear. The present study aimed to establish a stress-depression model in mice to further study the effects of stress-induced changes upon insulin sensitivity and behavioural consequences. A pilot study was conducted to establish the optimal administration route and a pragmatic measurement of IR. Subsequently, 6-month-old C57BL/6NCrl mice were exposed to long-term oral corticosterone treatment via the drinking water. To evaluate insulin sensitivity changes, blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured at different time-points throughout treatment and mice were behaviourally assessed in the elevated zero maze (EZM), forced swimming test (FST) and open field test to reveal behavioural changes. Long-term corticosterone treatment increased body weight and decreased insulin sensitivity. The latter was revealed by a higher IR index and increased insulin in the plasma, whereas blood glucose levels remained unchanged. Corticosterone treatment induced longer immobility times in the FST, reflecting depressive-like behaviour. No effects were observed upon anxiety as measured in the EZM. The effect of the higher body weight of the CORT treated animals at time of testing did not influence behaviour in the EZM or FST, as no differences were found in general locomotor activity. Long-term corticosterone treatment via the drinking water reduces insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6 mouse. This mouse model could thus be used to further explore the underlying mechanisms of chronic stress-induced T2DM and its

  15. Long-term corticosterone exposure decreases insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6NCrl mouse.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Vaessen, Koen R D; Pawluski, Jodi L; Sierksma, Annerieke S; Blokland, Arjan; Cañete, Ramón; Steinbusch, Harry W M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress or long-term administration of glucocorticoids disrupts the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal system leading to continuous high levels of glucocorticoids and insulin resistance (IR). This pre-diabetic state can eventually develop into type 2 diabetes mellitus and has been associated with a higher risk to develop depressive disorders. The mechanisms underlying the link between chronic stress, IR and depression remains unclear. The present study aimed to establish a stress-depression model in mice to further study the effects of stress-induced changes upon insulin sensitivity and behavioural consequences. A pilot study was conducted to establish the optimal administration route and a pragmatic measurement of IR. Subsequently, 6-month-old C57BL/6NCrl mice were exposed to long-term oral corticosterone treatment via the drinking water. To evaluate insulin sensitivity changes, blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured at different time-points throughout treatment and mice were behaviourally assessed in the elevated zero maze (EZM), forced swimming test (FST) and open field test to reveal behavioural changes. Long-term corticosterone treatment increased body weight and decreased insulin sensitivity. The latter was revealed by a higher IR index and increased insulin in the plasma, whereas blood glucose levels remained unchanged. Corticosterone treatment induced longer immobility times in the FST, reflecting depressive-like behaviour. No effects were observed upon anxiety as measured in the EZM. The effect of the higher body weight of the CORT treated animals at time of testing did not influence behaviour in the EZM or FST, as no differences were found in general locomotor activity. Long-term corticosterone treatment via the drinking water reduces insulin sensitivity and induces depressive-like behaviour in the C57BL/6 mouse. This mouse model could thus be used to further explore the underlying mechanisms of chronic stress-induced T2DM and its

  16. Levels of fecal corticosterone in sandhill cranes during a human-led migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartup, B.K.; Olsen, G.H.; Czekala, N.M.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Langenberg, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen captive-reared greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were conditioned to follow ultralight aircraft to promote migration between Wisconsin and Florida (U SA) after release. Fecal samples were collected throughout the training period in Wisconsin and during a 1,977-km human-led migration to Florida to determine fecal corticosterone (FC) concentrations by radioimmunoassay. The mean (?SE) FC concentration during the training period was 1O9.5?7.5 ng/g and was representative of baseline levels recorded previously from sandhill cranes. Fecal corticosterone concentrations increased in early migration compared to concentrations 1 mo prior to departure (P<0.01) but were not different from baseline concentrations at the end of the 6-wk migration period. The variability of FC concentrations in individual samples was greater throughout the migration than the training period. Increases in FC during migration were modest and generally consistent with normal corticosterone elevations observed in migrating birds.

  17. Dairy fat blend improves brain DHA and neuroplasticity and regulates corticosterone in mice.

    PubMed

    Dinel, A L; Rey, C; Bonhomme, C; Le Ruyet, P; Joffre, C; Layé, S

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the breast milk lipid composition appears to be necessary for infant formula to cover the brain's needs in n-3 PUFA. In this study, we evaluated the impact of partial replacement of vegetable oil (VL) in infant formula by dairy fat (DL) on docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) brain level, neuroplasticity and corticosterone in mice. Mice were fed with balanced VL or balanced DL diets enriched or not in DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) from the first day of gestation. Brain DHA level, microglia number, neurogenesis, corticosterone and glucocorticoid receptor expression were measured in the offsprings. DL diet increased DHA and neuroplasticity in the brain of mice at postnatal day (PND) 14 and at adulthood compared to VL. At PND14, ARA and DHA supplementation increased DHA in VL but not in DL mice brain. Importantly, DHA and ARA supplementation further improved neurogenesis and decreased corticosterone level in DL mice at adulthood. In conclusion, dairy lipids improve brain DHA level and neuroplasticity. PMID:27269711

  18. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    PubMed

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance. PMID:25986403

  19. Corticosterone Time-Dependently Modulates [beta]-Adrenergic Effects on Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Zhenwei; Krugers, Harm J.; Joels, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining whether corticosterone exerts opposite effects on…

  20. Effects of handling and vehicle injections on adrenocorticotropic and corticosterone concentrations in Sprague-Dawley compared with Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Picetti, Roberto; Seip-Cammack, Katharine; Zhou, Yan; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a key factor in the trajectory of the addiction-like cycle (a pattern of behavior characterized by escalating drug use, withdrawal, and relapse) in preclinical and clinical studies. Concentrations of HPA hormones change in laboratory animals in response to standard experimental procedures, including handling and vehicle injections. We compared HPA activity in adult male Lewis (inbred) and Sprague-Dawley (outbred) rats, 2 common strains in rodent models of addiction, after different schedules of handling and saline injections, to explore the extent to which HPA responses differ by strain and whether interindividual differences underlie addiction vulnerability. The 4 treatment conditions were no, short, or long handling and saline injections. In handled groups, rats were handled for 1 to 2 min for 3 times daily and were euthanized after 7 d (short handling) or 14 d (long handling). The injection schedule in the saline injection group mimicked that in a model of binge-like cocaine exposure. Across all treatment groups, concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone were higher in Sprague-Dawley than in Lewis rats. In Sprague-Dawley rats, corticosterone concentrations decreased after continued handling but remained constant in Lewis rats. Interindividual variability in hormone levels was greater in Sprague-Dawley than Lewis rats, although corticosterone variability decreased after continued handling. Prolactin did not differ between groups of either Sprague-Dawley and Lewis rats before or after handling. This study underscores the importance of prolonged handling before experimenter-provided drug-administration paradigms and of strain-associated differences that may affect study outcomes. PMID:25651089

  1. Maternal corticosterone further reduces the reproductive function of male offspring hatched from eggs laid by quail hens selected for exaggerated adrenocortical stress responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, D G; Cole, C A; Castille, S A

    2007-03-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can depress the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Male quail cloacal gland (CG) size and foam production shows androgen dependency, and males selected for exaggerated [high stress (HS)] rather than reduced [low stress (LS)] plasma corticosterone (B) stress response exhibit reduced CG and testes development. High stress hens also deposit more B into egg yolks than LS ones, and quail hens given B produce chicks that have a reduced growth rate and adults with heightened HPA responsiveness. Herein, we gave LS and HS hens no B [empty implants, control (CON)] or B-filled implants and assessed the reproductive performances of these hens and their male offspring. Mortality was similarly elevated in LS and HS B-treated hens, but only HS B-implanted hens showed reduced egg production. In male offspring, CG volume (CVOL), intensity of CG foam production (CFP), and the proportion of individuals that produced CG foam were measured from 4 to 11 wk of age. At 6 wk, BW, and at 15 wk, BW, testes weight (TWT), and TWT relative to BW were also determined. Hen treatments did not affect male chick CVOL at 4 wk, but CVOL differed thereafter as follows: LS CON > LS B = HS CON = HS B at 5 and 6 wk and LS CON > LS B > HS CON = HS B from 7 to 11 wk. By 8 wk, and thereafter, CFP differed as follows: LS CON > LS B > HS CON > HS B. Group differences in the proportion of individuals that produced CG foam generally supported CFP findings from 4 to 8 wk of age. Body weight did not differ by treatment at 6 wk of age. By 15 wk, TWT were similarly depressed in both HS groups. However, similarly higher 15-wk BW in the LS-CON and HS-B groups contributed to TWT relative to BW differences as follows: LS-B > LS-CON > HS-B; LS-CON = HS-CON; LS-B > HS-CON; and, HS-CON = HS-B. Both selection for exaggerated HPA responsiveness and maternal B treatment negatively affected the reproductive function of HS male offspring. PMID:17297171

  2. Baseline corticosterone levels are higher in migrating than sedentary common blackbirds in autumn, but not in spring.

    PubMed

    Eikenaar, Cas; Müller, Florian; Klinner, Thomas; Bairlein, Franz

    2015-12-01

    Corticosterone at baseline levels is thought to be mainly involved in the regulation of uptake, storage and release of energy, processes central to avian migration. Consequently, corticosterone levels are thought to be upregulated during migration, but the temporal pattern of its secretion during migration is not well defined. For example, although it appears that corticosterone levels decrease from flight to stopover, it is unknown if levels at stopover are still elevated and it is largely unclear how these levels compare to non-migratory life-history stages. Furthermore, what role corticosterone plays in crucial migratory processes, such as refueling and departure from stopover, is far from understood. We here determined baseline corticosterone levels in migrating and resident common blackbirds (Turdus merula), sampled simultaneously on Helgoland, a stopover site that also supports a sedentary breeding population. In autumn, migrants had higher corticosterone levels than residents, but in spring levels did not differ between the two groups. Corticosterone levels of migrants were very similar in spring and autumn, whereas in residents levels tended to be higher in spring than autumn. Higher levels in residents in spring than autumn most likely reflect the higher daily workload faced by birds during the pre-breeding than the post-breeding period. Our study thus indicates that, relative to the levels observed in residents in autumn, in spring baseline corticosterone levels were moderately elevated in both migrants and residents and that in autumn levels were moderately elevated in migrants only. Currently, corticosterone's main function at stopover is thought to lie in the regulation of departure. Because most migrant blackbirds stay only one or two days on Helgoland, our results are in line with this idea and suggest that migrating blackbirds up-regulated their corticosterone level in anticipation of an oncoming flight bout. PMID:26163918

  3. Detection of high mobility group A2 specific mRNA in the plasma of patients affected by epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pasquinelli, Rosa; Pignata, Sandro; Greggi, Stefano; Vuttariello, Emilia; Bello, Anna Maria; Calise, Celeste; Scaffa, Cono; Pisano, Carmela; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Fusco, Alfredo; Califano, Daniela; Chiappetta, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and the high mortality rate is associated with advanced-stage disease at the time of the diagnosis. In order to find new tools to make diagnosis of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) at early stages we have analyzed the presence of specific HMGA2 mRNA in the plasma of patients affected by this neoplasm. HMGA2 overexpression represents a feature of several malignances including ovarian carcinomas. Notably, we detected HMGA2 specific mRNA in the plasma of 40 out 47 patients with EOC, but not in the plasma of healthy donors. All cases found positive for HMGA2 mRNA in the plasma showed HMGA2 protein expression in EOC tissues. Therefore, on the basis of these results, the analysis of circulating HMGA2 specific mRNA might be considered a very promising tool for the early diagnosis of EOC. PMID:25749380

  4. Experimental Food Restriction Reveals Individual Differences in Corticosterone Reaction Norms with No Oxidative Costs

    PubMed Central

    Schoenle, Laura A.; Fasanello, Vincent; Haussmann, Mark F.; Bonier, Frances; Moore, Ignacio T.

    2014-01-01

    Highly plastic endocrine traits are thought to play a central role in allowing organisms to respond rapidly to environmental change. Yet, not all individuals display the same degree of plasticity in these traits, and the costs of this individual variation in plasticity are unknown. We studied individual differences in corticosterone levels under varying conditions to test whether there are consistent individual differences in (1) baseline corticosterone levels; (2) plasticity in the hormonal response to an ecologically relevant stressor (food restriction); and (3) whether individual differences in plasticity are related to fitness costs, as estimated by oxidative stress levels. We took 25 wild-caught house sparrows into captivity and assigned them to repeated food restricted and control treatments (60% and 110% of their daily food intake), such that each individual experienced both food restricted and control diets twice. We found significant individual variation in baseline corticosterone levels and stress responsiveness, even after controlling for changes in body mass. However, these individual differences in hormonal responsiveness were not related to measures of oxidative stress. These results have implications for how corticosterone levels may evolve in natural populations and raise questions about what we can conclude from phenotypic correlations between hormone levels and fitness measures. PMID:25386675

  5. Faecal corticosterone levels of dogs relinquished to a shelter in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Uetake, K.; Uchida, H.; Ishihara, J.; Kushima, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the baseline level of faecal corticosterone in dogs relinquished to a shelter and compared changes in it caused by social events that dogs experienced. Faecal corticosterone was measured to assess the average stress levels of dogs that depend on the actual conditions of the shelter. One category of subject animals was dogs relinquished by their owner or stray dogs who were penned in a group (group RG) or caged individually due to their incompatibility (group RI), and the other category was demonstration dogs kept for dog training classes (group DT) and petting activities held in welfare facilities for the elderly and in elementary schools (group DP). While the number of dogs that were included in groups RG and RI fluctuated almost daily, the demonstration dogs were kept together for three months. The average level of faecal corticosterone was significantly higher in group RG than in groups DT and DP. The level of group RI was also relatively high, but the difference from the other three groups was not statistically significant. Faecal corticosterone concentrations of groups DT and DP rose somewhat from the baseline levels on the day after social service activities. The results of this study reaffirm that temporarily relinquished and socially unstable dogs especially suffer a certain level of stress in a shelter. PMID:26457191

  6. Feather corticosterone of a nestling seabird reveals consequences of sex-specific parental investment

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Graham D.; Navarro, Joan; González-Solís, Jacob; Marchant, Tracy A.; Bortolotti, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Offspring of long-lived species should face costs of parental trade-offs that vary with overall energetic demands encountered by parents during breeding. If sex differences exist in how parents make the trade-off, sex-specific differences may exist in the contribution of each parent to those costs. Adaptations of offspring facing such costs are not well understood, but the hormone corticosterone probably plays a role. We manipulated breeding effort in Cory's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) to increase costs to offspring and used an integrated measure of corticosterone from chick feathers to investigate how experimental variation in parental investment influences offspring physiology. Average foraging trip duration and foraging efficiency (FE) of breeding pairs were not related to chick corticosterone, but sex biases in FE were. Adult male investment was more strongly related to chick corticosterone than was female investment. Importantly, we show for the first time suppression of adrenocortical activity in nestling Procellariiform seabirds, and explain how our results indicate an adaptive mechanism invoked by chicks facing increased costs of parental trade-offs. PMID:21632628

  7. Timing is Essential for Rapid Effects of Corticosterone on Synaptic Potentiation in the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joels, Marian; Krugers, Harm; Wiegert, Olof

    2006-01-01

    Stress facilitates memory formation, but only when the stressor is closely linked to the learning context. These effects are, at least in part, mediated by corticosteroid hormones. Here we demonstrate that corticosterone rapidly facilitates synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampal CA1 area when high levels of the hormone and high-frequency…

  8. [Corticosterone reception by alveolar macrophages when their functional activity has changed].

    PubMed

    Shishkina, L N; Maianskiĭ, D N; Shutko, G V; Sergeev, P V

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 3H-corticosterone by rat alveolar macrophages was studied before and after stimulation with zymosan in vivo. Thirty min after incubation of the macrophagal monolayer from intact animals with 3H-corticosterone accumulation of the hormone by the cells came to an end. As the concentration of 3H-corticosterone in the incubation medium was raised, the binding of the hormone with the saturated (receptor) system of alveolar macrophages terminated upon absorption of 10.6 fmol per 10(6) cells. Further raising of the level of the bound hormone was effected by the unsaturated (lipid) system. Stimulation with zymosan led not only to an increase in the number of the cells of the bronchoalveolar tract but also to an elevation of the intensity of 3H-corticosterone engulfment by alveolar macrophages. The number of binding sites per cell in the zymosan-activated macrophages increased 1.5-fold. This may be an important moment determining the development and liquidation of mononuclear infiltrations in the lung. PMID:3967077

  9. Shuyusan-containing serum protects SH-SY5Y cells against corticosterone-induced impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Sun, Zhigao; Wang, Fawei; Xu, Chengyong; Geng, Miao; Chen, Hongyan; Duan, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese herb Shuyusan, whose main constituent is jasminoidin, has been shown to protect SH-SY5Y cells against corticosterone-induced damage. SH-SY5Y cells injured by 400 μmol/L corticosterone were treated with 5 and 30 μg/mL Shuyusan-containing serum. Results revealed that Shuyusan-containing serum elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells, reduced Bax expression, increased Bcl-2 expression, markedly elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression, and blocked cell apoptosis. Moreover, the effect of high-dose (30 μg/mL) Shuyusan-containing serum was more remarkable. Therefore, Shuyusan-containing serum appears to protect SH-SY5Y cells against corticosterone-induced impairment by adjusting the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Moreover, high-dose Shuyusan-containing serum has a protective effect on high-dose corticosterone-induced impairment. PMID:25206514

  10. Effects of repeated oral corticosterone administration on performance and stress parameters of laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of repeated stress during rearing on performance and physiology of laying hens was studied using a corticosterone (Cort) model. 240 Hisex laying hens were reared in environmentally controlled battery cages. At 7, 11, and 15 wk of age they were exposed for 1 wk to the following treatments...

  11. Experimental food restriction reveals individual differences in corticosterone reaction norms with no oxidative costs.

    PubMed

    Lendvai, Adám Z; Ouyang, Jenny Q; Schoenle, Laura A; Fasanello, Vincent; Haussmann, Mark F; Bonier, Frances; Moore, Ignacio T

    2014-01-01

    Highly plastic endocrine traits are thought to play a central role in allowing organisms to respond rapidly to environmental change. Yet, not all individuals display the same degree of plasticity in these traits, and the costs of this individual variation in plasticity are unknown. We studied individual differences in corticosterone levels under varying conditions to test whether there are consistent individual differences in (1) baseline corticosterone levels; (2) plasticity in the hormonal response to an ecologically relevant stressor (food restriction); and (3) whether individual differences in plasticity are related to fitness costs, as estimated by oxidative stress levels. We took 25 wild-caught house sparrows into captivity and assigned them to repeated food restricted and control treatments (60% and 110% of their daily food intake), such that each individual experienced both food restricted and control diets twice. We found significant individual variation in baseline corticosterone levels and stress responsiveness, even after controlling for changes in body mass. However, these individual differences in hormonal responsiveness were not related to measures of oxidative stress. These results have implications for how corticosterone levels may evolve in natural populations and raise questions about what we can conclude from phenotypic correlations between hormone levels and fitness measures. PMID:25386675

  12. Does environmental enrichment reduce stress? An integrated measure of corticosterone from feathers provides a novel perspective.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Graham D; Frey, Matthew D; Reichert, James F; Szelest, Izabela; Kelly, Debbie M; Bortolotti, Gary R

    2011-01-01

    Enrichment is widely used as tool for managing fearfulness, undesirable behaviors, and stress in captive animals, and for studying exploration and personality. Inconsistencies in previous studies of physiological and behavioral responses to enrichment led us to hypothesize that enrichment and its removal are stressful environmental changes to which the hormone corticosterone and fearfulness, activity, and exploration behaviors ought to be sensitive. We conducted two experiments with a captive population of wild-caught Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) to assess responses to short- (10-d) and long-term (3-mo) enrichment, their removal, and the influence of novelty, within the same animal. Variation in an integrated measure of corticosterone from feathers, combined with video recordings of behaviors, suggests that how individuals perceive enrichment and its removal depends on the duration of exposure. Short- and long-term enrichment elicited different physiological responses, with the former acting as a stressor and birds exhibiting acclimation to the latter. Non-novel enrichment evoked the strongest corticosterone responses of all the treatments, suggesting that the second exposure to the same objects acted as a physiological cue, and that acclimation was overridden by negative past experience. Birds showed weak behavioral responses that were not related to corticosterone. By demonstrating that an integrated measure of glucocorticoid physiology varies significantly with changes to enrichment in the absence of agonistic interactions, our study sheds light on potential mechanisms driving physiological and behavioral responses to environmental change. PMID:21412426

  13. Corticosterone excretion patterns and affiliative behavior over development in ravens (Corvus corax)

    PubMed Central

    Stöwe, Mareike; Bugnyar, Thomas; Schloegl, Christian; Heinrich, Bernd; Kotrschal, Kurt; Möstl, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Averse effects of social stress may be buffered by the presence of social allies, which mainly has been demonstrated in mammals and recently also in birds. However, effects of socio-positive behavior prior to fledging in relation to corticosterone excretion in altricial birds have not been investigated yet. We here monitored corticosterone excretion patterns in three groups of hand raised juvenile ravens (n=5, 6 and 11) in the nest, post-fledging (May–July) and when ravens would be independent from their parents (September–November). We related these corticosterone excretion patterns to socio-positive behavior. Behavioral data were collected via focal sampling in each developmental period considered. We analyzed amounts of excreted immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (CM) using enzyme immuno assays. We collected fecal samples in each developmental period considered and evaluated the most appropriate assay via an isolation stress experiment. Basal CM was significantly higher during the nestling period than post-fledging or when birds were independent. The time nestlings spent allopreening correlated negatively with mean CM. Post-fledging, individuals with higher CM levels sat close to (distance <50 cm) conspecifics more frequently and tended to preen them longer. When birds were independent and a stable rank hierarchy was established, dominant individuals were preened significantly longer than subordinates. These patterns observed in ravens parallel those described for primates, which could indicate that animal species living in a complex social environment may deal with social problems in a similar way that is not restricted to mammals or primates. PMID:18022623

  14. Early bi-parental separation or neonatal paternal deprivation in mandarin voles reduces adult offspring paternal behavior and alters serum corticosterone levels and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xibo; He, Fengqin; Tai, Fadao

    2015-07-01

    Although the effect of early social environments on maternal care in adulthood has been examined in detail, few studies have addressed the long-term effect on paternal care and its underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Here, using monogamous mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus) that show high levels of paternal care, the effects of early bi-parental separation (EBPS) or neonatal paternal deprivation (NPD) on adult paternal behavior, serum corticosterone levels, and receptor mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and medial preoptic area (MPOA) were investigated. Compared to the parental care group (PC), we found that EBPS reduced crouching behavior and increased inactivity, self-grooming, and serum corticosterone levels in adult offspring; and NPD significantly reduced retrieval behavior and increased self-grooming behavior of offspring at adulthood. EBPS displayed more dopamine type I receptor (D1R) mRNA expression in the NAcc, but less oxytocin receptor (OTR) mRNA expression than PC in the MPOA. Both EBPS and NPD exhibited more mRNA expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) than PC in the MPOA. In the EBPS group, increased serum corticosterone concentration was closely associated with reduced crouching behavior, and reduced expression of OTR was closely associated with altered crouching behavior and increased D1R expression. Our results provide substantial evidence that EBPS or NPD has long-term consequences and reduces paternal behavior in adult animals. Importantly the oxytocin system in the MPOA might interact with NAcc dopamine systems to regulate paternal behavior and EBPS may affect interactions between the MPOA and NAcc. PMID:26012712

  15. Corticosterone secretion patterns prior to spring and autumn migration differ in free-living barn swallows (Hirundo rustica L.).

    PubMed

    Raja-aho, Sari; Lehikoinen, Esa; Suorsa, Petri; Nikinmaa, Mikko; Vainio, Minna; Vosloo, Dalene; Eeva, Tapio

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies of long-distance migratory birds show that behavioural and physiological changes associated with predictable or unpredictable challenges during the annual cycle are distinctively regulated by hormones. Corticosterone is the primary energy regulating hormone in birds. Corticosterone levels are elevated during stresses but they are also modulated seasonally according to environmental conditions and life-history demands. We measured the baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica L.) just before spring and autumn migrations in South Africa and Finland, respectively. Barn swallows completing their pre-breeding moult had low body condition (residual body mass) and high baseline corticosterone levels in the wintering grounds. In contrast, baseline corticosterone levels in Finland were low and not related to residual mass. These data contradict the first prediction of the migration modulation hypothesis (MMH) by showing no association with baseline corticosterone levels and pre-migratory fuelling. Yet, the adrenocortical response to the capture and handling stress was notably blunted in South Africa compared to a strong response in Finland. Further, individuals that had started fuelling in Finland showed a reduced response to the handling stress. Taken together, elevated baseline corticosterone levels and high residual mass may blunt the adrenocortical response in long-distance migrants and aerial feeders such as the barn swallow. This observation lends support to the second prediction of the MMH. PMID:23649753

  16. Single Mutations in the Transmembrane Domains of Maize Plasma Membrane Aquaporins Affect the Activity of Monomers within a Heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Berny, Marie C; Gilis, Dimitri; Rooman, Marianne; Chaumont, François

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins are channels facilitating the diffusion of water and/or small uncharged solutes across biological membranes. They assemble as homotetramers but some of them also form heterotetramers, especially in plants. In Zea mays, aquaporins belonging to the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are clustered into two groups, PIP1 and PIP2, which exhibit different water-channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. When PIP1 and PIP2 isoforms are co-expressed, they physically interact to modulate their subcellular localization and channel activity. Here, we demonstrated by affinity chromatography purification that, when co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the maize PIP1;2 and PIP2;5 isoforms assemble as homo- and heterodimers within heterotetramers. We built the 3D structure of such heterotetramers by comparative modeling on the basis of the spinach SoPIP2;1 X-ray structure and identified amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains which putatively interact at the interfaces between monomers. Their roles in the water-channel activity, subcellular localization, protein abundance, and physical interaction were investigated by mutagenesis. We highlighted single-residue substitutions that either inactivated PIP2;5 or activated PIP1;2 without affecting their interaction. Interestingly, the Phe220Ala mutation in the transmembrane domain 5 of PIP1;2 activated its water-channel activity and, at the same time, inactivated PIP2;5 within a heterotetramer. Altogether, these data contribute to a better understanding of the interaction mechanisms between PIP isoforms and the role of heterotetramerization on their water-channel activity. PMID:27109604

  17. The Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Reverses Corticosterone-Induced Changes in Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pusceddu, Matteo M.; Nolan, Yvonne M.; Green, Holly F.; Robertson, Ruairi C.; Stanton, Catherine; Kelly, Philip; Dinan, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic exposure to the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone exerts cellular stress-induced toxic effects that have been associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Docosahexaenoic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that has been shown to be of benefit in stress-related disorders, putatively through protective action in neurons. Methods: We investigated the protective effect of docosahexaenoic acid against glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone-induced cellular changes in cortical cell cultures containing both astrocytes and neurons. Results: We found that glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone (100, 150, 200 μM) at different time points (48 and 72 hours) induced a dose- and time-dependent reduction in cellular viability as assessed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium. Moreover, glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone (200 μM, 72 hours) decreased the percentage composition of neurons while increasing the percentage of astrocytes as assessed by βIII-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining, respectively. In contrast, docosahexaenoic acid treatment (6 μM) increased docosahexaenoic acid content and attenuated glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone (200 μM)-induced cell death (72 hours) in cortical cultures. This translates into a capacity for docosahexaenoic acid to prevent neuronal death as well as astrocyte overgrowth following chronic exposure to glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone. Furthermore, docosahexaenoic acid (6 μM) reversed glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone-induced neuronal apoptosis as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated nick-end labeling and attenuated glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone-induced reductions in brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in these cultures. Finally, docosahexaenoic acid inhibited glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone-induced downregulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression on βIII- tubulin-positive neurons. Conclusions: This work

  18. Interactions between genetic variants of folate metabolism genes and lifestyle affect plasma homocysteine concentrations in the Boston Puerto Rican Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results of studies investigating relationships between lifestyle factors and elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy), an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, are conflicting. The objective of this study was to investigate genetic and lifestyle factors and their interactions on plasma Hcy c...

  19. Androgen regulation of adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone secretion in the male rat following novelty and foot shock stressors.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Nunley, K M; Lorens, S A; Louie, J P; McGivern, R F; Bollnow, M R

    1994-01-01

    To examine mechanisms responsible for sex differences in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to stress, we studied the role of androgens in the regulation of the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) responses to foot shock and novelty stressors in gonadectomized (GDX) or intact male F344 rats. Foot shock or exposure to a novel open field increased plasma ACTH and CORT, which was significantly greater in GDX vs. intacts. Testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHT) treatment of GDX animals returned poststress levels of ACTH and CORT to intact levels. Estrogen treatment of GDX males further increased poststress CORT secretion above GDX levels. There was no difference in the ACTH response of anterior pituitaries from intact, GDX, and GDX+DHT animals to CRF using an in vitro perifusion system. There were no differences in beta max or binding affinity of type I or II CORT receptors in the hypothalamus or hippocampus of intact, GDX, or GDX+DHT groups. These data demonstrate an effect of GDX on hormonal indices of stress. The increased response in GDX rats appears to be due to the release from androgen receptor mediated inhibition of the HPA axis. This inhibition by androgen is not due to changes in anterior pituitary sensitivity to CRH, nor to changes in type I or type II corticosteroid receptor concentrations. PMID:8140154

  20. Environmental Enrichment during Rearing Alters Corticosterone Levels, Thymocyte Numbers, and Aggression in Female BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Eric K; Avery, Anne C; VandeWoude, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The goal of environmental enrichment for laboratory animals is to improve welfare, but some enrichment practices may affect research in unintended ways or even be harmful to the animals themselves. We previously found that mice raised at a commercial vendor then given multiple enrichment devices upon arrival at our facilities experienced thymic atrophy and greater variation in measured parameters than did their unenriched counterparts, suggesting that enrichment conditions affected corticosteroid expression in mice. The current study verified and expanded these results, examining 120 female BALB/c mice raised with or without nesting material at a commercial vendor (n = 60 per group) and allocated (n = 20 per group) to receive no enrichment, nesting material, or ‘superenrichment’ on arrival at our facilities. Nesting material provided prior to weaning was associated with higher levels of urinary corticosteroid, whereas superenrichment and nesting material during the adult period both led to increased thymic atrophy. Paradoxically, mice that never received enrichment, despite having the lowest corticosterone levels and least thymic atrophy, had increased tail wounds resulting from aggressive interactions. Therefore, enrichment devices that are as seemingly innocuous as nesting material, even if only provided in the preweaning period, may lead to significant, lasting changes in behavioral, physical, or immunologic measures with the potential to alter research outcomes. PMID:22330863

  1. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  2. Do cortisol and corticosterone play the same role in coping with stressors? Measuring glucocorticoid serum in free-ranging guanacos (Lama guanicoe).

    PubMed

    Ovejero, Ramiro; Novillo, Agustina; Soto-Gamboa, Mauricio; Mosca-Torres, Maria E; Cuello, Pablo; Gregório, Pablo; Jahn, Graciela; Carmanchahi, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    Habitat can constrain and shape successful ecological and physiological strategies, thus providing the context for the evolution of life-history traits. However, unpredictable challenges, such as storms, natural disasters, and human activities can also have great effects on stress. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are adrenal steroid hormones that play an important role in how vertebrates cope with these predictable and unpredictable environmental challenges. Although assessing GCs levels can have many applications in the study of wildlife and/or captive animals, with or without capturing individuals, it requires a species-specific complete validation (analytical and biological) before its use. In this work, our aim was to: (a) validate a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for measuring GCs levels in L. guanicoe serum; (b) assess cortisol and corticosterone levels (if present) in serum of wild L. guanicoe individuals; and (c) compare the response to acute stressors (handling, shearing, and release). Our results successfully: (a) validated RIA for asses GCs levels in wild ungulates; (b) confirmed the presence for cortisol and corticosterone and showed that both GCs are differently affected by environmental stimuli in L. guanicoe; and (c) showed that GCs exhibit different patterns in the field and in response to acute stressors, making these camelids an interesting endocrinological model when seeking the adaptive functions of a given variation and further emphasizing the complexity of GC physiology in wild mammals. PMID:24115389

  3. Prolonged stimulation of corticosterone secretion by corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats exhibiting high preference for dietary fat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herminghuysen, D.; Plaisance, K.; Pace, R. M., III; Prasad, C.

    1998-01-01

    Through the secretion of corticosterone, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is thought to play an important role in the regulation of caloric intake and dietary fat preference. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a positive correlation between urinary corticosterone output and dietary fat preference. Furthermore, dietary fat preference was augmented following chronic but not acute hypercorticosteronemia produced by exogenous corticosterone administration. These observations led us to explore whether the HPA axis of rats exhibiting high preference for fat may have exaggerated sensitivity to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). The results of these studies show a delayed and blunted but more prolonged corticosterone response to CRH in the fat-preferring rats compared with that of the carbohydrate-preferring rats.

  4. Body Position Modulates Gastric Emptying and Affects the Post-Prandial Rise in Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Following Protein Ingestion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Holwerda, Andrew M.; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Bierau, Jörgen; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics determine the post-prandial muscle protein synthetic response. Body position may affect gastrointestinal function and modulate the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid availability. We aimed to assess the impact of body position on gastric emptying rate and the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid concentrations following ingestion of a single, meal-like amount of protein. In a randomized, cross-over design, eight healthy males (25 ± 2 years, 23.9 ± 0.8 kg·m−2) ingested 22 g protein and 1.5 g paracetamol (acetaminophen) in an upright seated position (control) and in a −20° head-down tilted position (inversion). Blood samples were collected during a 240-min post-prandial period and analyzed for paracetamol and plasma amino acid concentrations to assess gastric emptying rate and post-prandial amino acid availability, respectively. Peak plasma leucine concentrations were lower in the inversion compared with the control treatment (177 ± 15 vs. 236 ± 15 mmol·L−1, p < 0.05), which was accompanied by a lower plasma essential amino acid (EAA) response over 240 min (31,956 ± 6441 vs. 50,351 ± 4015 AU; p < 0.05). Peak plasma paracetamol concentrations were lower in the inversion vs. control treatment (5.8 ± 1.1 vs. 10.0 ± 0.6 mg·L−1, p < 0.05). Gastric emptying rate and post-prandial plasma amino acid availability are significantly decreased after protein ingestion in a head-down tilted position. Therefore, upright body positioning should be considered when aiming to augment post-prandial muscle protein accretion in both health and disease. PMID:27089362

  5. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from rats chronically treated with corticosterone: The protective effect of oxytocin treatment.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Dušanka; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Petrović, Jelena; Bogavac-Stanojević, Nataša; Sopić, Miron; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Ignjatović, Svetlana; Pešić, Vesna

    2016-08-25

    Contemporary lifestyle is commonly associated with chronic stress, an environmental factor contributing to development of various psychological and somatic disorders. Increased levels of glucocorticoids, observed in the chronic stress, induce the production of reactive oxygen species leading to genotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic administration of oxytocin (OXY) 10 IU/400 μL/day, s.c., for 14 days, a hormone presumed to exert antioxidant effect, may prevent DNA damage in the comet assay of peripheral blood lymphocytes of Wistar rats treated chronically with corticosterone (CORT) 100 mg/L ad libitum, per os, for 21 days, as well as, to influence some plasma oxidative stress parameters, i.e. levels of total lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), and malondialdehyde (MDA), and the activity of antioxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Even though there was no reduction in overall number of damaged cells after oxytocin treatment only, the marked increase in total comet score (TCS) after incubation with H2O2 in CORT group compared to controls, was absent in the CORT + OXY experimental group. Furthermore, significant decrease of highly damaged cells compared to corticosterone group was noted. Chronic oxytocin administration thus protected lymphocytes from high intensity damage that leads to cellular death. In addition, treatment with OXY along with CORT, significantly decreased concentration of LOOH in plasma, and increased SOD compared to CORT treatment only. This finding corresponds well with current reports on beneficial effects of OXY in conditions of HPA axis hyperactivity, and supports the hypothesis of OXY-mediated antioxidant action. PMID:27402529

  6. Possible involvement of corticosterone and serotonin in antidepressant and antianxiety effects of chromium picolinate in chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depression and anxiety in rats.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Vivek Kumar; Ansari, Faraha; Vohora, Divya; Khanam, Razia

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of chromium picolinate (CrP) on behavioural and biochemical parameters in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced depression and anxiety in rats. The normal and stressed male Swiss albino rats were administered CrP (8 and 16μg/mL in drinking water), they received stressors for seven days (each day one stressor) and this cycle was repeated three times for 21 days. On 22nd day, behaviour assessments followed by biochemical estimations were conducted. The results showed that treatment of CrP produced significant antidepressant effect, which has been evidenced by decrease in immobility time in modified forced swimming test (FST) in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced depression in rats. In elevated plus maze (EPM), CrP (16μg/mL) showed significant reduction in time spent in open arm. CrP (8μg/mL and 16μg/mL) also showed significant decrease in number of entries in open arm that shows antianxiety effect of CrP in CUMS rats. It was also found that CrP (8 and 16μg/mL) significantly increased 5-HT concentration in the discrete regions of brain (cortex and cerebellum). On the other hand, the plasma corticosterone level was significantly decreased with CrP (16μg/mL). The results suggested that increase in the concentration of 5-HT and decrease in plasma corticosterone levels could be responsible for improvement in symptoms of depression and anxiety in CUMS induced depression and anxiety in rats. PMID:25037773

  7. Dual Circuitry for Odor–Shock Conditioning during Infancy: Corticosterone Switches between Fear and Attraction via Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Moriceau, Stephanie; Wilson, Donald A.; Levine, Seymour; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2006-01-01

    Rat pups must learn maternal odor to support attachment behaviors, including nursing and orientation toward the mother. Neonates have a sensitive period for rapid, robust odor learning characterized by increased ability to learn odor preferences and decreased ability to learn odor aversions. Specifically, odor–0.5 mA shock association paradoxically causes an odor preference and coincident failure of amygdala activation in pups until postnatal day 10 (P10). Because sensitive-period termination coincides with a declining “stress hyporesponsive period” when corticosterone release is attenuated, we explored the role of corticosterone in sensitive-period termination. Odor was paired with 0.5 mA shock in either sensitive-period (P8) or postsensitive-period (P12) pups while manipulating corticosterone. We then assessed preference/aversion learning and the olfactory neural circuitry underlying its acquisition. Although sensitive-period control paired odor–shock pups learned an odor preference without amygdala participation, systemic (3 mg/kg, i.p.; 24 h and 30 min before training) or intra-amygdala corticosterone (50 or 100 ng; during training) permitted precocious odor-aversion learning and evoked amygdala neural activity similar to that expressed by older pups. In postsensitive-period (P12) pups, control paired odor–shock pups showed an odor aversion and amygdala activation, whereas corticosterone-depleted (adrenalectomized) paired odor–shock pups showed odor-preference learning and activation of an odor learning circuit characteristic of the sensitive period. Intra-amygdala corticosterone receptor antagonist (0.3 ng; during training) infused into postsensitive-period (P12) paired odor–shock pups also showed odor-preference learning. These results suggest corticosterone is important in sensitive-period termination and developmental emergence of olfactory fear conditioning, acting via the amygdala as a switch between fear and attraction. Because maternal

  8. The influence of dexamethasone on behaviorally conditioned immunomodulation and plasma corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Kusnecov, A W; Husband, A J; King, M G

    1990-03-01

    Utilizing a conditioned taste aversion paradigm we have previously shown that rats re-exposed to a saccharin solution previously paired with cyclophosphamide (CY) demonstrate significantly reduced in vitro mitogen-induced spleen cell proliferation and IgM secretion assessed 24 h after saccharin re-exposure. In this report treatment of similarly conditioned rats with dexamethasone (DEX) either before conditioning or before re-exposure abrogated the conditioned modulation of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced spleen cell proliferation. The finding that DEX pretreatment on the conditioning day was as effective in abrogating the conditioned response as DEX treatment prior to the test day does not support pituitary-adrenal mediation of the conditioned immusuppressive effect following re-exposure of conditioned animals to the CS. There was no significant conditioned immunosuppression observed with respect to PHA- and Con A-induced proliferation and the influence of DEX on these parameters could not be assessed. The effect on PWM-induced IgM production was inconclusive since the reduced IgM response among conditioned animals was of only borderline significance. PMID:2110491

  9. Corticosterone exposure augments sensitivity to the behavioral and neuroplastic effects of fluoxetine in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Shivon A; Brookshire, Bethany R; Lucki, Irwin

    2016-06-01

    Both genetic background and pre-existing stress play critical roles in the effects of antidepressant drugs. The current studies showed this principal by demonstrating that exposure to the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) allowed behavioral and neurogenic effects to emerge following chronic treatment with fluoxetine of C57BL/6 mice, a strain ordinarily resistant to these effects. Adult male mice were implanted subcutaneously with 21-day slow-release CORT pellets (10 mg) or placebo and then co-treated with 5 mg/kg fluoxetine (b.i.d., i.p.) or saline for 14 days. Animals were then assessed for approach behavior in the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) test, hippocampal cell proliferation, corticosteroid receptor expression, and CORT plasma levels. Co-treatment of CORT with fluoxetine significantly reduced approach behavior in the novel environment of the NIH test and increased hippocampal cell proliferation whereas fluoxetine given alone was ineffective. CORT given alone did not alter approach behavior in the novel environment and caused a smaller increase of cell proliferation. The CORT effect was blocked by adrenalectomy and was likely due to increased adrenal feedback. Cell proliferation in CORT-treated animals was associated with reduced mineralocorticoid, but not glucocorticoid, receptor mRNA expression. Although the pellets were advertised to release CORT for 21 days, plasma CORT levels were increased at 1 day after implantation but were not sustained when measured at 7 days or longer intervals. Nevertheless, the transient CORT increase was sufficient to induce long-lasting behavioral and molecular changes when followed by fluoxetine treatment. These studies warrant further investigation into the role of glucocorticoids and environmental stress as adjunctive facilitators of the response to antidepressants, especially for treatment-resistant patients. PMID:26844246

  10. Corticosterone exposure augments sensitivity to the behavioral and neuroplastic effects of fluoxetine in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Shivon A.; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Lucki, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Both genetic background and pre-existing stress play critical roles in the effects of antidepressant drugs. The current studies showed this principal by demonstrating that exposure to the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) allowed behavioral and neurogenic effects to emerge following chronic treatment with fluoxetine of C57BL/6 mice, a strain ordinarily resistant to these effects. Adult male mice were implanted subcutaneously with 21-day slow-release CORT pellets (10 mg) or placebo and then co-treated with 5 mg/kg fluoxetine (b.i.d., i.p.) or saline for 14 days. Animals were then assessed for approach behavior in the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) test, hippocampal cell proliferation, corticosteroid receptor expression, and CORT plasma levels. Co-treatment of CORT with fluoxetine significantly reduced approach behavior in the novel environment of the NIH test and increased hippocampal cell proliferation whereas fluoxetine given alone was ineffective. CORT given alone did not alter approach behavior in the novel environment and caused a smaller increase of cell proliferation. The CORT effect was blocked by adrenalectomy and was likely due to increased adrenal feedback. Cell proliferation in CORT-treated animals was associated with reduced mineralocorticoid, but not glucocorticoid, receptor mRNA expression. Although the pellets were advertised to release CORT for 21 days, plasma CORT levels were increased at 1 day after implantation but were not sustained when measured at 7 days or longer intervals. Nevertheless, the transient CORT increase was sufficient to induce long-lasting behavioral and molecular changes when followed by fluoxetine treatment. These studies warrant further investigation into the role of glucocorticoids and environmental stress as adjunctive facilitators of the response to antidepressants, especially for treatment-resistant patients. PMID:26844246

  11. Affect-related Behaviors in Mice Misexpressing the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Minati; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-01-01

    Misediting of the serotonin (5HT) 2C receptor (5HT2CR) has been implicated in both depression and anxiety. The adenosine deaminases that act on double stranded RNAs (ADARs) are reported to modify the 5HT2CR by RNA editing. Transgenic mice misexpressing the RNA editing enzyme ADAR2 show an adult onset obese phenotype due to chronic hyperphagia, but little more than this is known about the behavior of these animals. The present experiments examined whether affect-associated behaviors are also altered in ADAR2 transgenic mice. Age- and weight-matched transgenic mice misexpressing ADAR2 were tested for signs of behavioral despair with the forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests, and for anxiety by evaluating spontaneous exploration in a novel environment and by elevated plus maze performance. Plasma corticosterone was also determined by radioimmunoassay. Transgenic mice of both sexes displayed indications of increased behavioral despair on first exposures to the TST and the FST. Behavioral despair persisted in ADAR2 mice in that it was also observed in the FST in tests administered 24 hr and 1 week following the initial TST and FST. ADAR2 transgenic mice also displayed behaviors associated with anxiety as indicated by decreased entry into the open arms in an elevated plus maze test. Both sexes of ADAR2 transgenic mice displayed elevated plasma corticosterone. Taken together, the results suggest that ADAR2 transgenic mice represent a novel rodent model of endogenous behavioral despair and anxiety accompanied by elevated hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis activity. PMID:19361536

  12. Regulation of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis PACAP expression by stress and corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Lezak, Kimberly R; Roman, Carolyn W; Braas, Karen M; Schutz, Kristin C; Falls, William A; Schulkin, Jay; May, Victor; Hammack, Sayamwong E

    2014-11-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes for pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the PAC1 receptor have been associated with stress-related psychiatric disorders. Although, from recent work, we have argued that stress-induced PACAP expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) may mediate stress-related psychopathology, it is unclear whether stress-induced increases in BNST PACAP expression require acute or repeated stressor exposure and whether increased BNST PACAP expression is related to stress-induced increases in circulating glucocorticoids. In the current work, we have used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to assess transcript expression in brain punches from rats after stressor exposure paradigms or corticosterone injection. BNST PACAP and PAC1 receptor transcript expression was increased only after 7 days of repeated stressor exposure; no changes in transcript levels were observed 2 or 24 hours after a single-restraint session. Moreover, repeated corticosterone treatment for 7 days was not sufficient to reliably increase BNST PACAP transcript levels, suggesting that stress-induced elevations in corticosterone may not be the primary drivers of BNST PACAP expression. These results may help clarify the mechanisms and temporal processes that underlie BNST PACAP induction for intervention in stress-related anxiety disorders. PMID:24614974

  13. Uptake of corticosterone into isolated rat liver cells: possible involvement of Na+/K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Spindler, K D; Kanuma, K; Grossmann, D

    1991-06-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes possess a saturable glucocorticoid uptake system with high affinity (Kd value = 2.8 +/- 0.7 x 10(-8) M; 318,000 +/- 80,000 binding sites per cell; 317 fmol/mg protein). The initial rates of uptake decrease by about 30-40% if the cells are incubated simultaneously with [3H]corticosterone and either SH-reagents (N-ethylmaleimide and p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate, 1 mM), metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol, 1 mM; and antimycin, 0.1 mM) or the Na+/K(+)-ATPase-inhibitors, ouabain and quercetine. These Na+/K(+)-ATPase-blockers exert half-maximal inhibition at 3 x 10(-7) and 3 x 10(-6) M, respectively. A slight increase in K+ concentration and a corresponding decrease in Na+ in the medium leads to a significant reduction in the initial uptake rate. The uptake system from the rat hepatocytes shows a clear steroid specificity, being different from the intracellular receptor. Corticosterone and progesterone are the strongest competitors, cortisol, 5 alpha- and 5 beta-dihydrocorticosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, cortisone and testosterone have an intermediate effect and only weak competition is exerted by dexamethasone and by the mineralocorticoid, aldosterone. Estradiol and estrone sulphate as well as the synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide are unable to inhibit initial corticosterone uptake. PMID:1648377

  14. Assessing costs of carrying geolocators using feather corticosterone in two species of aerial insectivore.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Graham D; Berzins, Lisha L; Bradley, David W; Laughlin, Andrew J; Romano, Andrea; Romano, Maria; Scandolara, Chiara; Ambrosini, Roberto; Dawson, Russell D; Dunn, Peter O; Hobson, Keith A; Liechti, Felix; Marchant, Tracy A; Norris, D Ryan; Rubolini, Diego; Saino, Nicola; Taylor, Caz M; Whittingham, Linda A; Clark, Robert G

    2015-05-01

    Despite benefits of using light-sensitive geolocators to track animal movements and describe patterns of migratory connectivity, concerns have been raised about negative effects of these devices, particularly in small species of aerial insectivore. Geolocators may act as handicaps that increase energetic expenditure, which could explain reported effects of geolocators on survival. We tested this 'Energetic Expenditure Hypothesis' in 12 populations of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from North America and Europe, using measurements of corticosterone from feathers (CORTf) grown after deployment of geolocators as a measure of physiology relevant to energetics. Contrary to predictions, neither among- (both species) nor within-individual (tree swallows only) levels of CORTf differed with respect to instrumentation. Thus, to the extent that CORTf reflects energetic expenditure, geolocators apparently were not a strong handicap for birds that returned post-deployment. While this physiological evidence suggests that information about migration obtained from returning geolocator-equipped swallows is unbiased with regard to levels of stress, we cannot discount the possibility that corticosterone played a role in reported effects of geolocators on survival in birds, and suggest that future studies relate corticosterone to antecedent factors, such as reproductive history, and to downstream fitness costs. PMID:26064659

  15. Assessing costs of carrying geolocators using feather corticosterone in two species of aerial insectivore

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Graham D.; Berzins, Lisha L.; Bradley, David W.; Laughlin, Andrew J.; Romano, Andrea; Romano, Maria; Scandolara, Chiara; Ambrosini, Roberto; Dawson, Russell D.; Dunn, Peter O.; Hobson, Keith A.; Liechti, Felix; Marchant, Tracy A.; Norris, D. Ryan; Rubolini, Diego; Saino, Nicola; Taylor, Caz M.; Whittingham, Linda A.; Clark, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite benefits of using light-sensitive geolocators to track animal movements and describe patterns of migratory connectivity, concerns have been raised about negative effects of these devices, particularly in small species of aerial insectivore. Geolocators may act as handicaps that increase energetic expenditure, which could explain reported effects of geolocators on survival. We tested this ‘Energetic Expenditure Hypothesis’ in 12 populations of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from North America and Europe, using measurements of corticosterone from feathers (CORTf) grown after deployment of geolocators as a measure of physiology relevant to energetics. Contrary to predictions, neither among- (both species) nor within-individual (tree swallows only) levels of CORTf differed with respect to instrumentation. Thus, to the extent that CORTf reflects energetic expenditure, geolocators apparently were not a strong handicap for birds that returned post-deployment. While this physiological evidence suggests that information about migration obtained from returning geolocator-equipped swallows is unbiased with regard to levels of stress, we cannot discount the possibility that corticosterone played a role in reported effects of geolocators on survival in birds, and suggest that future studies relate corticosterone to antecedent factors, such as reproductive history, and to downstream fitness costs. PMID:26064659

  16. Stereotaxic delivery of corticosterone to the amygdala modulates colonic sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B; Gibson, M; Gunter, W; Shepard, J; Foreman, R; Myers, D

    2001-03-01

    Episodes of anxiety are often associated with the onset or exacerbation of visceral pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) is a key limbic structure involved in the expression of anxiety as well as a major site for regulating autonomic and visceral responses to stress. Previous experiments have shown that glucocorticoids can act directly at the CeA to increase the level of anxiety in rats. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine the effect of stereotaxic delivery of corticosterone into the CeA on the development of visceral hypersensitivity by measuring visceromotor response to colorectal distention in rats. Stereotaxic delivery of corticosterone to the CeA increases indices of anxiety and produces a hypersensitive colon as demonstrated by an exaggerated visceromotor response to colorectal distention in the F344 rat strain. Our findings suggest that modulation of anxiety by manipulating amygdala function with corticosterone induced colonic hypersensitivity via descending neuronal pathways from the CeA. PMID:11223001

  17. Offspring sex ratio is related to paternal train elaboration and yolk corticosterone in peafowl.

    PubMed

    Pike, Thomas W; Petrie, Marion

    2005-06-22

    Several recent experimental studies have provided strong evidence for the ability of birds to manipulate the sex ratio of their offspring prior to laying. Using a captive population of peafowl (Pavo cristatus), we tested experimentally the effects of paternal attractiveness on offspring sex ratio, and related sex ratio deviations to egg-yolk concentrations of testosterone, 17beta-estradiol and corticosterone. When females were mated to males whose attractiveness had been experimentally reduced by removing prominent eyespot feathers from their trains, they produced significantly more female offspring, had significantly higher yolk corticosterone concentrations and tended to have lower levels of yolk testosterone than when mated to the same males with their full complement of feathers. Concentrations of 17beta-estradiol did not vary consistently with sex ratio biases. These findings add to the small number of studies providing experimental evidence that female birds can control the primary sex ratio of their offspring in response to paternal attractiveness, and highlight the possibility that corticosterone and perhaps testosterone are involved in the sex manipulation process in birds. PMID:17148167

  18. Proteomic analysis of plasma from cows affected with milk fever using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Zhang, H Y; Wu, L; Xu, C; Zheng, J S; Yan, Y J; Yang, L J; Shu, S

    2012-10-01

    Milk fever is an important metabolic disorder of dairy cows after calving, and is characterized by hypocalcemia, tetany, lateral recumbency, and eventual coma. To date, there have been many reports about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of milk fever, but the plasma protein profile in milk fever has not been reported. The aim of our study was to investigate novel pathophysiological changes in the plasma proteome of cows affected with milk fever. Plasma samples were collected from eight Holstein cows with milk fever (T), and eight control Holstein cows without milk fever (C), at an intensive Holstein dairy farm in Heilongjiang province, China. Samples were analyzed by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), followed by in-gel digestion, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for peptide mass fingerprinting of selected protein spots. Eight of the 23 differential protein spots in the plasma of T and C cows were isolated and identified by 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF-MS. The protein spots represented five unique proteins, and had significant alterations in spot volume as determined by DeCyder differential in-gel analysis (DIA) software. The upregulated proteins were identified as serpin peptidase inhibitor (angiotensin), which regulates blood pressure and maintains fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, and endopin 2B which is involved in neural regulation. The downregulated proteins were serum albumin, which acts as a transport protein, fibrinogen beta chain which is involved in blood coagulation, and IgG heavy-chain C-region (IgG-C(H)) which participates in the immune response. In conclusion, we were able to use proteomic technologies to identify several novel plasma proteins in cows affected with milk fever. These findings may reveal new pathophysiological changes that occur in cows with milk fever. PMID:22119234

  19. Demographic and clinical variables affecting mid- to late-life trajectories of plasma ceramide and dihydroceramide species.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Michelle M; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Han, Dingfen; An, Yang; Resnick, Susan M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Haughey, Norman J

    2015-12-01

    It has been increasingly recognized at the basic science level that perturbations in ceramide metabolism are associated with the development and progression of many age-related diseases. However, the translation of this work to the clinic has lagged behind. Understanding the factors longitudinally associated with plasma ceramides and dihydroceramides (DHCer) at the population level and how these lipid levels change with age, and by sex, is important for the clinical development of future therapeutics and biomarkers focused on ceramide metabolism. We, therefore, examined factors cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with plasma concentrations of ceramides and DHCer among Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging participants (n = 992; 3960 total samples), aged 55 years and older, with plasma at a mean of 4.1 visits (range 2-6). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess the relationships between plasma ceramide and DHCer species and demographics, diseases, medications, and lifestyle factors. Women had higher plasma concentrations of most ceramide and DHCer species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. Ceramides and DHCer were more associated with waist-hip ratio than body mass index. Plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, prediabetes, and diabetes were associated with ceramides and DHCer, but the relationship showed specificity to the acyl chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate the importance of examining the individual species of ceramides and DHCer, and of establishing whether intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes occur in synchrony to disease onset and progression. PMID:26193443

  20. Plasma nesfatin-1 is not affected by long-term food restriction and does not predict rematuration among iteroparous female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Lucius K; Pierce, Andrew L; Riley, Larry G; Duncan, Christine A; Nagler, James J

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic peptide hormone nesfatin-1 has been linked to the reproductive axis in fishes. The purpose of this study was to determine how energy availability after spawning affects plasma levels of nesfatin-1, the metabolic peptide hormone ghrelin, and sex steroid hormones in rematuring female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To limit reproductive maturation, a group of female trout was food-restricted after spawning and compared with a control group that was fed a standard broodstock ration. The experiment was conducted twice, once using two-year-old trout (second-time spawners) and once using three-year-old trout (third-time spawners). During monthly sampling, blood was collected from all fish, and a subset of fish from each treatment was sacrificed for pituitaries. Pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone-beta (fsh-β) mRNA expression was analyzed with q-RT-PCR; plasma hormone levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay (17β-estradiol and ghrelin) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (11-keto-testosterone and nesfatin-1). Although plasma nesfatin-1 levels increased significantly in the months immediately after spawning within both feeding treatments, plasma nesfatin-1 did not differ significantly between the two treatments at any point. Similarly, plasma ghrelin levels did not differ significantly between the two treatments at any point. Food restriction arrested ovarian development by 15-20 weeks after spawning, shown by significantly lower plasma E2 levels among restricted-ration fish. Pituitary fsh-β mRNA levels were higher among control-ration fish than restricted-ration fish starting at 20 weeks, but did not differ significantly between treatment groups until 30 weeks after spawning. Within both treatment groups, plasma 11-KT was elevated immediately after spawning and rapidly decreased to and persisted at low levels; starting between 20 and 25 weeks after spawning, plasma 11-KT was higher among control-ration fish than restricted-ration fish. The

  1. No evidence for an effect of traffic noise on the development of the corticosterone stress response in an urban exploiter.

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Meillère, Alizée; Grace, Jacquelyn K; Trouvé, Colette; Brischoux, François

    2016-06-01

    Anthropogenic noise can have important physiological and behavioral effects on wild animals. For example, urban noise could lead to a state of chronic stress and could alter the development of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Supporting this hypothesis, several studies have found that human disturbance is associated with increased circulating corticosterone (CORT) levels. However, it remains unclear whether increased CORT levels are the result of anthropogenic noise or other anthropogenic factors. Here, we experimentally tested the impact of urban noise on the CORT stress response in an urban exploiter (the house sparrow, Passer domesticus) by exposing chicks to a traffic noise ('disturbed chicks') or not ('control chicks'). If noise exposure has a negative impact on developing chicks, we predicted that (1) disturbed chicks will grow slower, will be in poorer condition, and will have a lower fledging probability than controls; (2) disturbed chicks will have higher baseline CORT levels than control; (3) the CORT stress response will be affected by this noise exposure. Contrary to these predictions, we found no effect of our experiment on growth, body condition, and fledging success, suggesting that house sparrow chicks were not negatively affected by this noise exposure. Moreover, we did not find any effect of noise exposure on either baseline CORT levels or the CORT stress response of chicks. This suggests not only that house sparrow chicks did not perceive this noise as stressful, but also that the development of the HPA axis was not affected by such noise exposure. Our study suggests that, contrary to urban avoiders, urban exploiters might be relatively insensitive to urban noise during their development. Further comparative studies are now needed to understand whether such insensitivity to anthropogenic noise is a consistent phenomenon in urban exploiters and whether this is a major requirement of an urban way of life. PMID:26686316

  2. Corticosterone dysregulation exacerbates disease progression in the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Brett D; McBride, Jodi L

    2016-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurological disorder that causes severe and progressive motor, cognitive, psychiatric, and metabolic symptoms. There is a robust, significant elevation in circulating levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, in HD patients; however, the causes and consequences of this elevation are largely uncharacterized. Here, we evaluated whether elevated levels of corticosterone, the rodent homolog of cortisol, contributed to the development of symptomology in transgenic HD mice. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic R6/2 mice were given either 1) adrenalectomy with WT-level corticosterone replacement (10ng/ml), 2) adrenalectomy with high HD-level corticosterone replacement (60ng/ml), or 3) sham surgery without replacement. R6/2 mice on HD-level replacement showed severe and rapid weight loss (p<0.05) and a shorter latency to death (p<0.01) relative to the HD mice on WT-level replacement. We further evaluated basal and stress-induced levels of circulating corticosterone in R6/2 mice throughout the course of their life. We found that R6/2 transgenic HD mice display a spontaneous elevation in circulating corticosterone levels that became significant at 10weeks of age. Furthermore, we identified significant dysregulation of circadian rhythmicity of corticosterone release measured over a 24h period compared to wild-type controls. Unexpectedly, we found that R6/2 transgenic mice show a blunted corticosterone response to restraint stress, compared to wild-type mice. Together, these data provide further evidence that HPA-axis activity is abnormal in R6/2 mice, and highlight the important role that cortisol plays in HD symptom development. Our findings suggest that cortisol-reducing therapeutics may be of value in improving HD patient quality of life. PMID:27381424

  3. Does Cold Plasma Affect Breaking Dormancy and Seed Germination? A Study on Seeds of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božena, Šerá; Michal, Šerý; Vitězslav, Štrañák; Petr, Špatenka; Milan, tichý

    2009-12-01

    Low-pressure discharge is applied for stimulation of germination of two seed lots of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.) with different starting germinations (17%, 8%) and in different stages of dormancy. Different exposition durations with cold plasma treatment were applied. The variable of the ratio cumulative germination was calculated. The Richards' equation was used for curve-fitting and simulation of the growth curves. Population parameters, namely Vi - viability, Me - time, Qu - dispersion, and Sk - skewness, counted from the curves described the germination rate well. Significant differences among Qu confirmed the erratic dormancy and gradual germination of Lamb's Quarters. No difference in the Me parameter was found between two tested seed lots, and no interspecies characteristics were changed using low-pressure discharge. The results suggested that plasma treatment changed seed germination in Lamb's Quarters seeds.

  4. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  5. [Posttrial injections of corticosterone in dorsal hippocampus of the BALB/c mouse facilitate extinction of appetitive operant conditioning in the Skinner box].

    PubMed

    Micheau, J; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1982-06-28

    Corticosterone was injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus of BALB/c Mice immediately after the first extinction session of an operant conditioning in a Skinner box. Compared with the control animals the Mice that received 1 or 0.1 microgram corticosterone exhibited 24 hrs. later, faster extinction of this conditioning. With a 0.01 microgram dose of corticosterone in each hippocampus we obtained an accelerated extinction during the session. These data suggest that corticosterone modulates hippocampal mechanisms involved in memory processes. PMID:6812885

  6. A non-invasive method for detecting the metabolic stress response in rodents: characterization and disruption of the circadian corticosterone rhythm.

    PubMed

    Thanos, P K; Cavigelli, S A; Michaelides, M; Olvet, D M; Patel, U; Diep, M N; Volkow, N D

    2009-01-01

    Plasma corticosterone (CORT) measures are a common procedure to detect stress responses in rodents. However, the procedure is invasive and can influence CORT levels, making it less than ideal for monitoring CORT circadian rhythms. In the current paper, we examined the applicability of a non-invasive fecal CORT metabolite measure to assess the circadian rhythm. We compared fecal CORT metabolite levels to circulating CORT levels, and analyzed change in the fecal circadian rhythm following an acute stressor (i.e. blood sampling by tail veil catheter). Fecal and blood samples were collected from male adolescent rats and analyzed for CORT metabolites and circulating CORT respectively. Fecal samples were collected hourly for 24 h before and after blood draw. On average, peak fecal CORT metabolite values occurred 7-9 h after the plasma CORT peak and time-matched fecal CORT values were well correlated with plasma CORT. As a result of the rapid blood draw, fecal production and CORT levels were altered the next day. These results indicate fecal CORT metabolite measures can be used to assess conditions that disrupt the circadian CORT rhythm, and provide a method to measure long-term changes in CORT production. This can benefit research that requires long-term glucocorticoid assessment (e.g. stress mechanisms underlying health). PMID:18380537

  7. A Non-Invasive Method for Detecting the Metabolic Stress Response in Rodents: Characterization and Disruption of the Circadian Corticosterone Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Cavigelli, Sonia A.; Michaelides, Michael; Olvet, Doreen M.; Patel, Ujval; Diep, Mai N.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2009-01-01

    1. Summary Plasma corticosterone (CORT) measures are a common procedure to detect stress responses in rodents. However, the procedure is invasive and can influence CORT levels, making it less than ideal for monitoring CORT circadian rhythms. In the current paper, we examined the applicability of a non-invasive fecal CORT metabolite measure to assess the circadian rhythm. We compared fecal CORT metabolite levels to circulating CORT levels, and analyzed change in the fecal circadian rhythm following an acute stressor (i.e. blood sampling by tail veil catheter). Fecal and blood samples were collected from male adolescent rats and analyzed for CORT metabolites and circulating CORT respectively. Fecal samples were collected hourly for 24 hours pre- and post-blood draw. On average, peak fecal CORT metabolite values occurred 7–9 hours after the plasma CORT peak and time-matched fecal CORT values were well correlated with plasma CORT. As a result of the rapid blood draw, fecal production and CORT levels were altered the next day. These results indicate fecal CORT metabolite measures can be used to assess conditions that disrupt the circadian CORT rhythm, and provide a method to measure long-term changes in CORT production. This can benefit research that requires long-term glucocorticoid assessment (e.g. stress mechanisms underlying health). PMID:18380537

  8. Blood plasma collected after adrenocorticotropic hormone administration during the preovulatory period in the sow negatively affects in vitro fertilization by disturbing spermatozoa function.

    PubMed

    González, R; Kumaresan, A; Bergqvist, A S; Sjunnesson, Y C B

    2015-04-15

    Successful fertilization is essential for reproduction and might be negatively affected by stressful events, which could alter the environment where fertilization occurs. The aim of the study was to determine whether an altered hormonal profile in blood plasma caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration could affect in vitro fertilization in the pig model. In experiment 1, gametes were exposed for 24 hours to plasma from ACTH-treated, non-ACTH-treated sows, or medium with BSA. Fertilization, cleavage, and blastocyst rates were lower in the ACTH group compared with the no ACTH or BSA control groups (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, the exposure of matured oocytes for 1 hour before fertilization to the same treatments did not have an impact on their ability to undergo fertilization or on embryo development. In experiment 3, spermatozoa were incubated for 0, 1, 4, and 24 hours under the same conditions. There was no effect of treatment on sperm viability. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoa remained higher in the ACTH group compared with the non-ACTH-treated group through the incubation period (P < 0.001). Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) patterns were also affected by treatment (P < 0.001). The presence of an atypical PTP pattern was higher in the ACTH group at all the analyzed time points compared with the BSA and no ACTH groups (P < 0.001). In conclusion, this altered environment may not affect oocyte competence but might affect the sperm fertilizing ability through alterations in the acrosome reaction and correct sequence of PTP patterns. PMID:25623229

  9. Reference levels for corticosterone and immune function in farmed saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) hatchlings using current Code of Practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Finger, John W; Thomson, Peter C; Adams, Amanda L; Benedict, Suresh; Moran, Christopher; Isberg, Sally R

    2015-02-01

    To determine reference levels for on-farm stressors on immune responsiveness and growth rate, 253 hatchling crocodiles from 11 known breeding pairs were repeatedly measured and blood sampled during their first year. Plasma corticosterone (CORT) was used to quantify baseline stress levels in captive animals and were found to be lower (mean 1.83±SE 0.16 ng/mL) than previously reported in saltwater crocodile hatchlings. Two tests of immune function were also conducted. Innate constitutive immunity was assessed using bacterial killing assays (BKA) against two bacterial species: Escherichia coli and Providencia rettgeri, whereby the latter causes considerable economic loss to industry from septicaemic mortalities. Although the bactericidal capabilities were different at approximately 4 months old (32±3% for E. coli and 16±4% for P. rettgeri), the differences had disappeared by approximately 9 months old (58±2% and 68±6%, respectively). To assess immune responsiveness to a novel antigen, the inflammatory swelling response caused by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) injection was assessed but was only significantly different between Samplings 1 and 3 (5% LSD). There were no significant clutch effects for CORT or PHA but there were for both BKA traits. CORT was not significantly associated with growth (head length) or the immune parameters except for P. rettgeri BKA where higher CORT levels were associated with better bactericidal capability. As such, these results suggest that the crocodiles in this study are not stressed, therefore endorsing the management strategies adopted within the Australian industry Code of Practice. PMID:25644211

  10. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from

  11. Time-course changes in muscle protein degradation in heat-stressed chickens: Possible involvement of corticosterone and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation in induction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyohei; Kikusato, Motoi; Kamizono, Tomomi; Toyomizu, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    Heat stress (HS) induces muscle protein degradation as well as production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, to improve our understanding of how protein degradation is induced by HS treatment in birds, a time course analysis of changes in the circulating levels of glucocorticoid and N(τ)-methylhistidine, muscle proteolysis-related gene expression, and mitochondrial ROS generation, was conducted. At 25days of age, chickens were exposed to HS conditions (33°C) for 0, 0.5, 1 or 3days. While no alteration in plasma N(τ)-methylhistidine concentration relative to that of the control group was observed in the 0.5day HS group, the concentration was significantly higher in the 3-d HS treatment group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations increased in response to 0.5-d HS treatment, but subsequently returned to near-normal values. HS treatment for 0.5days did not change the levels of μ-calpain, cathepsin B, or proteasome C2 subunit mRNA, but increased the levels of mRNA encoding atrogin-1 (P<0.05) and its transcription factor, forkhead box O3 (P=0.09). Under these hyperthermic conditions, mitochondrial superoxide production was significantly increased than that of thermoneutral control. Here, we show that HS-induced muscle protein degradation may be due to the activation of ubiquitination by atrogin-1, and that this process may involve mitochondrial ROS production as well as corticosterone secretion. PMID:26883687

  12. Hormonal correlates of individual quality in a long-lived bird: a test of the 'corticosterone-fitness hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Chastel, Olivier

    2010-12-23

    Measuring individual quality in vertebrates is difficult. Focusing on allostasis mechanisms may be useful because they are functionally involved in the ability of an individual to survive and reproduce in its environment. Thus, a rise in stress hormones levels (corticosterone) occurs when an organism has to cope with challenging environmental conditions. This has recently led to the proposal of the 'cort-fitness hypothesis', which suggests that elevated baseline corticosterone levels should be found in individuals of poor quality that have difficulty coping with their environment. We tested this hypothesis by comparing an integrative measure of individual quality to baseline corticosterone in black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys). We found that individual baseline corticosterone levels were related to individual quality and highly repeatable from one breeding season to the next. Importantly, this relationship was found in males, but not in females. Therefore, we suggest that the relationship between quality and baseline corticosterone levels may depend on the environmental and energetic constraints that individuals have to cope with. PMID:20573614

  13. In-depth behavioral characterization of the corticosterone mouse model and the critical involvement of housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Demuyser, Thomas; Deneyer, Lauren; Bentea, Eduard; Albertini, Giulia; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Merckx, Ellen; De Prins, An; De Bundel, Dimitri; Massie, Ann; Smolders, Ilse

    2016-03-15

    Depression and anxiety are disabling and highly prevalent psychiatric disorders. To better understand the neurobiological basis of mood and anxiety disorders, relevant animal models are needed. The corticosterone mouse model is frequently used to study depression. Chronic stress and accompanying glucocorticoid elevation causes pathological changes in the central nervous system, which are related to psychiatric symptoms. Exogenous administration of corticosterone is therefore often used to induce depressive-like behavior in mice and in some cases also features of anxiety-like behavior are shown. However, a thorough characterization of this model has never been conducted and housing conditions of the used subjects often differ between the implemented protocols. We chronically administered a subcutaneous corticosterone bolus injection to single- and group-housed mice, and we subsequently evaluated the face validity of this model by performing a battery of behavioral tests (forced swim test, mouse-tail suspension test, saccharin intake test, novelty-suppressed feeding test, elevated plus maze, light/dark paradigm and open field test). Our results show that corticosterone treatment has a substantial overall effect on depressive-like behavior. Increases in anxiety-like behavior on the other hand are mainly seen in single housed animals, independent of treatment. The current study therefore does not only show a detailed behavioral characterization of the corticosterone mouse model, but furthermore also elucidates the critical influence of housing conditions on the behavioral outcome in this model. PMID:26707853

  14. Anatomic, Hematologic, and Biochemical Features of C57BL/6NCrl Mice Maintained on Chronic Oral Corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Amy E; White, Julie R; Penraat, Kelley A; Wilson, Christopher D; Rasmussen, Skye; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a condition that typically includes central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, a regulator of corticosterone secretion, occurs in some cases of metabolic syndrome and obesity, and Cushing hypercortisolemia is associated with obesity and metabolic disorders. We therefore assessed anatomic and clinical pathology in C57BL/6NCrl mice to evaluate the effects of chronic corticosterone in the drinking water at doses of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL for 25 d. Treated mice developed obesity, glucose intolerance, electrolyte aberrations, and dyslipidemia that were dose-dependent and most severe in the 100-μg/mL treatment group. To evaluate return to normal function, additional C57BL/6NCrl mice received corticosterone-free water for 2 wk after the 25-d treatment period. According to results of gross examination, mice appeared to recover within days of exogenous corticosterone withdrawal; however, adrenal gland vacuolation and protein, lipid, and electrolyte abnormalities persisted. Together, these findings support chronic corticosterone exposure through the drinking water as a potentially useful, noninvasive method to induce some features of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23114038

  15. Chronic exposure to coal fly ash causes minimal changes in corticosterone and testosterone concentrations in male southern toads Bufo terrestris

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.K.; Mendonca, M.T.

    2006-08-15

    More than 50% of the electricity in the United States is produced by coal-burning power plants. The byproduct of coal-burning plants is coal fly ash, which contains increased concentrations of trace metals and is disposed of in collection basins. Southern toads (Bufo terrestris) frequently use these basins for reproduction. Male toads were collected in spring 2001 and 2002 from an ash basin and a reference site and divided into four groups: toads collected at the control site and maintained on (1) control substrate and food or (2) ash and contaminated food and toads collected at the ash site and maintained in (3) control or (4) ash conditions. Blood was collected periodically during 5 months to determine testosterone and corticosterone concentrations. Reference to ash toads exhibited a significant, transient increase in corticosterone at 4 weeks, but neither corticosterone nor testosterone continued to increase beyond this time. In contrast, toads caught and maintained on ash did not exhibit increased corticosterone. Testosterone in these toads appeared to be unrelated to ash exposure. This unexpected lack of a corticosterone response and no effect on testosterone suggests that toads chronically exposed to trace metals can acclimate to a polluted environment, but they may still experience subtle long-term consequences.

  16. Long-term moderate elevation of corticosterone facilitates avian food-caching behaviour and enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Pravosudov, Vladimir V

    2003-12-22

    It is widely assumed that chronic stress and corresponding chronic elevations of glucocorticoid levels have deleterious effects on animals' brain functions such as learning and memory. Some animals, however, appear to maintain moderately elevated levels of glucocorticoids over long periods of time under natural energetically demanding conditions, and it is not clear whether such chronic but moderate elevations may be adaptive. I implanted wild-caught food-caching mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), which rely at least in part on spatial memory to find their caches, with 90-day continuous time-release corticosterone pellets designed to approximately double the baseline corticosterone levels. Corticosterone-implanted birds cached and consumed significantly more food and showed more efficient cache recovery and superior spatial memory performance compared with placebo-implanted birds. Thus, contrary to prevailing assumptions, long-term moderate elevations of corticosterone appear to enhance spatial memory in food-caching mountain chickadees. These results suggest that moderate chronic elevation of corticosterone may serve as an adaptation to unpredictable environments by facilitating feeding and food-caching behaviour and by improving cache-retrieval efficiency in food-caching birds. PMID:14728783

  17. Severity and timing: How prenatal stress exposure affects glial developmental, emotional behavioural and plasma neurosteroid responses in guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Greer A; Palliser, Hannah K; Walker, David; Hirst, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal stress has been associated with a variety of developmental changes in offspring, notably those associated with brain development and subsequent risk for neuropathologies later in life. Recently, the importance of the timing and the severity of the stressor during pregnancy has been emphasized with neurosteroids including allopregnanolone implicated in the regulation of stress and also for endogenous neuroprotection in offspring. Prenatal stress was induced using strobe light exposure in pregnant guinea pigs (term 71days) in three defined stress exposure groups (Gestational Age (GA)35-65, GA50-65 and GA60-65). Stress was induced for 2h (9-11am) every 5days via strobe light exposure. A fetal cohort were euthanased at term with fetal brains and plasma collected. Anxiety-like behaviour was evaluated at 18 days of age in a separate cohort of offspring with brains and plasma collected at 21days of age. Markers for mature oligodendrocytes and reactive astrocytes were measured in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the subcortical white matter. The neurosteroid allopregnanolone was measured by radioimmunoassay in offspring plasma. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus, fetuses from all stress groups showed reduced expression of mature oligodendrocytes and reactive astrocytes. By juvenility, all male stress exposure groups had recovered to levels of unaffected controls with the exception of the GA35-65 stress group. In juvenile females, mature oligodendrocyte marker expression was reduced in all stress groups and reactive astrocyte expression was reduced in the GA35-65 and GA60-65 stress groups by juvenility. Increased reactive astrocyte expression was also apparent in the subcortical white matter in both sexes both at term and at juvenility. Prenatally stressed offspring spent less time exploring in the object exploration test and also entered the inner zone of the open field less than controls at 18days of age. Circulating allopregnanolone concentrations were

  18. Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Graham, Devon L.; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M.; Braun, Amanda A.; Grace, Curtis E.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Erikson, Keith M.; Aschner, Michael; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to manganese (Mn) or stress can each be detrimental to brain development. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two housing conditions and Mn from postnatal day (P)4–28. Within each litter two males and 2 females were assigned to the following groups: 0 (vehicle), 50, or 100 mg/kg Mn by oral gavage every other day. Half the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. One pair/group in each litter had an acute shallow water stressor before tissue collection (i.e., standing in shallow water). Separate litters were assessed at P11, 19, or 29. Mn-treated rats raised in standard cages showed no change in baseline corticosterone but following acute stress increased more than controls on P19; no Mn effects were seen on P11 or P29. Mn increased neostriatal dopamine in females at P19 and norepinephrine at P11 and P29. Mn increased hippocampal dopamine at P11 and P29 and 5-HT at P29 regardless of housing or sex. Mn had no effect on hypothalamic dopamine, but increased norepinephrine in males at P29 and 5-HT in males at all ages irrespective of rearing condition. Barren reared rats showed no or opposite effects of Mn, i.e., barren rearing + Mn attenuated corticosterone increases to acute stress. Barren rearing also altered the Mn-induced changes in dopamine and norepinephrine in the neostriatum, but not in the hippocampus. Barren rearing caused a Mn-associated increase in hypothalamic dopamine at P19 and P29 not seen in standard reared Mn-treated groups. Developmental Mn alters monoamines and corticosterone as a function of age, stress (acute and chronic), and sex. PMID:25574457

  19. Heightened aggression and winning contests increase corticosterone but decrease testosterone in male Australian water dragons.

    PubMed

    Baird, Troy A; Lovern, Matthew B; Shine, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Water dragons (Intellegama [Physignathus] lesueurii) are large (to >1m) agamid lizards from eastern Australia. Males are fiercely combative; holding a territory requires incessant displays and aggression against other males. If a dominant male is absent, injured or fatigued, another male soon takes over his territory. Our sampling of blood from free-ranging adult males showed that baseline levels of both testosterone and corticosterone were not related to a male's social tactic (territorial versus non-territorial), or his frequency of advertisement display, aggression, or courtship behavior. Even when we elicited intense aggression by non-territorial males (by temporarily removing territory owners), testosterone did not increase with the higher levels of aggression that ensued. Indeed, testosterone levels decreased in males that won contests. In contrast, male corticosterone levels increased with the heightened aggression during unsettled conditions, and were higher in males that won contests. High chronic male-male competition in this dense population may favor high testosterone levels in all adult males to facilitate advertisement and patrol activities required for territory maintenance (by dominant animals), and to maintain readiness for territory take-overs (in non-territorial animals). Corticosterone levels increased in response to intense aggression during socially unstable conditions, and were higher in contest winners than losers. A positive correlation between the two hormones during socially unstable conditions suggests that the high stress of contests decreased androgen production. The persistent intense competition in this population appears to exact a high physiological cost, which together with our observation that males sometimes lose their territories to challengers may indicate cycling between these two tactics to manage long-term energetic costs. PMID:24907453

  20. Alternative reproductive tactics in female striped mice: Solitary breeders have lower corticosterone levels than communal breeders.

    PubMed

    Hill, Davina L; Pillay, Neville; Schradin, Carsten

    2015-05-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs), where members of the same sex and population show distinct reproductive phenotypes governed by decision-rules, have been well-documented in males of many species, but are less well understood in females. The relative plasticity hypothesis (RPH) predicts that switches between plastic ARTs are mediated by changes in steroid hormones. This has received much support in males, but little is known about the endocrine control of female ARTs. Here, using a free-living population of African striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) over five breeding seasons, we tested whether females following different tactics differed in corticosterone and testosterone levels, as reported for male striped mice using ARTs, and in progesterone and oestrogen, which are important in female reproduction. Female striped mice employ three ARTs: communal breeders give birth in a shared nest and provide alloparental care, returners leave the group temporarily to give birth, and solitary breeders leave to give birth and do not return. We expected communal breeders and returners to have higher corticosterone, owing to the social stress of group-living, and lower testosterone than solitary breeders, which must defend territories alone. Solitary breeders had lower corticosterone than returners and communal breeders, as predicted, but testosterone and progesterone did not differ between ARTs. Oestrogen levels were higher in returners (measured before leaving the group) than in communal and solitary breeders, consistent with a modulatory role. Our study demonstrates hormonal differences between females following (or about to follow) different tactics, and provides the first support for the RPH in females. PMID:25828632

  1. Corticosterone may interact with peripubertal development to shape adult resistance to social defeat.

    PubMed

    Latsko, Maeson S; Farnbauch, Laure A; Gilman, T Lee; Lynch, Joseph F; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2016-06-01

    Studies of social stress in adult mice have revealed two distinct defeat-responsive behavioral phenotypes; "susceptible" and "resistant," characterized by social avoidance and social interaction, respectively. Typically, these phenotypes are observed at least 1day after the last defeat in adults, but may extend up to 30days later. The current study examined the impact of peripubertal social defeat on immediate (1day) and adult (30day) social stress phenotypes and neuroendocrine function in male C57BL/6 mice. Initially, peripubertal (P32) mice were resistant to social defeat. When the same mice were tested for social interaction again as adults (P62), two phenotypes emerged; a group of mice were characterized as susceptible evidenced by significantly lower social interaction, whereas the remaining mice exhibited normal social interaction, characteristic of resistance. A repeated analysis of corticosterone revealed that the adult (P62) resistant mice had elevated corticosterone following the social interaction test as juveniles. This was when all mice, regardless of adult phenotype, displayed equivalent levels of social interaction. Peripubertal corticosterone was positively correlated with adult social interaction levels in defeated mice, suggesting early life stress responsiveness impacts adult social behavior. In addition, adult corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) was elevated in all defeated mice, but there were no differences in CRF mRNA expression between the phenotypes. Thus, there is a delayed appearance of social stress-responsive phenotypes suggesting that early life stress exposure, combined with the resultant physiological responses, may interact with pubertal development to influence adult social behavior. PMID:27108196

  2. Stress, geomagnetic disturbance, infradian and circadian sampling for circulating corticosterone and models of human depression?

    PubMed

    Olah, A; Jozsa, R; Csernus, V; Sandor, J; Muller, A; Zeman, M; Hoogerwerf, W; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    2008-04-01

    While certain circadian hormonal changes are prominent, their predictable assessment requires a standardization of conditions of sampling. The 24-hour rhythm in circulating corticosterone of rodents, known since the 1950s, was studied as a presumed proxy for stress on 108 rats divided into 9 groups of 6 male and 9 groups of 6 female animals sampled every 4 hours for 24 hours. In a first stress study, the "no-rhythm" (zero-amplitude) assumption failed to be rejected at the 5% probability level in the two control groups and in 16 out of the 18 groups considered. A circadian rhythm could be detected with statistical significance, however, in three separate follow-up studies in the same laboratory, each on 168 rats kept on two antiphasic lighting regimens, with 4-hourly sampling for 7 or 14 days. In the first stress study, pooling of certain groups helped the detection and assessment of the circadian corticosterone rhythm. Without extrapolating to hormones other than corticosterone, which may shift more slowly or adjust differently and in response to different synchronizers, the three follow-up studies yielded uncertainty measures (95% confidence intervals) for the point estimate of its circadian period, of possible use in any future study as a reference standard. The happenstance of a magnetic disturbance at the start of two follow-up studies was associated with the detection of a circasemiseptan component, raising the question whether a geomagnetic disturbance could be considered as a "load". Far beyond the limitations of sample size, the methodological requirements for standardization in the experimental laboratory concerning designs of studies are considered in the context of models of depression. Lessons from nature's unforeseen geomagnetic contribution and from human studies are noted, all to support the advocacy, in the study of loads, of sampling schedules covering more than 24 hours. PMID:18515211

  3. Stress, Geomagnetic Disturbance, Infradian and Circadian Sampling for Circulating Corticosterone and Models of Human Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Olah, A.; Jozsa, R.; Csernus, V.; Sandor, J.; Muller, A.; Zeman, M.; Hoogerwerf, W.; Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    While certain circadian hormonal changes are prominent, their predictable assessment requires a standardization of conditions of sampling. The 24-hour rhythm in circulating corticosterone of rodents, known since the 1950s, was studied as a presumed proxy for stress on 108 rats divided into 9 groups of 6 male and 9 groups of 6 female animals sampled every 4 hours for 24 hours. In a first stress study, the “no-rhythm” (zero-amplitude) assumption failed to be rejected at the 5% probability level in the two control groups and in 16 out of the 18 groups considered. A circadian rhythm could be detected with statistical significance, however, in three separate follow-up studies in the same laboratory, each on 168 rats kept on two antiphasic lighting regimens, with 4-hourly sampling for 7 or 14 days. In the first stress study, pooling of certain groups helped the detection and assessment of the circadian corticosterone rhythm. Without extrapolating to hormones other than corticosterone, which may shift more slowly or adjust differently and in response to different synchronizers, the three follow-up studies yielded uncertainty measures (95% confidence intervals) for the point estimate of its circadian period, of possible use in any future study as a reference standard. The happenstance of a magnetic disturbance at the start of two follow-up studies was associated with the detection of a circasemiseptan component, raising the question whether a geomagnetic disturbance could be considered as a “load”. Far beyond the limitations of sample size, the methodological requirements for standardization in the experimental laboratory concerning designs of studies are considered in the context of models of depression. Lessons from nature's unforeseen geomagnetic contribution and from human studies are noted, all to support the advocacy, in the study of loads, of sampling schedules covering more than 24 hours. PMID:18515211

  4. Characteristics and specificity of the glucocorticoid "carrier" of rat liver plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Allera, A; Rao, G S

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of corticosterone by highly purified plasma membrane vesicles of rat liver was studied by a rapid-centrifugation technique which allows uptake measurements within 5 s. The vesicles are free of soluble cytoplasmic constituents. Therefore, association of hormone with the vesicle is attributed entirely to components of the vesicle-membrane. Half maximal uptake is reached at 8 s at 21 degrees C. At 15 degrees C transition of the lipid state in the membrane leads to a decrease of uptake, a characteristic property common to membrane mediated processes. The uptake of corticosterone is saturable and reversible but does not follow normal saturation kinetics. The apparent dissociation constants of three uptake systems bear direct relation to the concentration of free corticosterone in rat plasma (4-16 nM) supporting a physiological role for the system. Uptake of corticosterone decreases with decreases in vesicular volume; about 50% of the hormone is bound specifically and 50% is transported to the lumen of the vesicle. Since outflow of intravesicular hormone also occurs readily, the uptake and transport is proposed to be mediated by putative "carriers". The "carrier" preferentially transports glucocorticoids; dexamethasone is not taken up by this putative molecule. Steroids with 5 alpha conformation are more potent inhibitors of the "carrier" for corticosterone than 5 beta-steroids. Androgens and estrogens are weak competitors of corticosterone. The affinity of the "carrier" for several hormones differs considerably from that of the cytoplasmic receptor. Morris hepatoma cells (MH 3924) do not take up corticosterone. Our results prompt us to propose the hypothesis that the transport function of the "carrier" and the binding of the hormone by the cytoplasmic receptor are two different entities; perturbation of the "carrier" may lead to steroid unresponsiveness. Normal expression of steroid hormone activity is manifested in the concerted action of the functionally

  5. Feeding frequency has diet-dependent effects on plasma hormone concentrations but does not affect oocyte quality in dairy heifers fed fibre- or starch-based diets.

    PubMed

    Rooke, J A; Ainslie, A; Watt, R G; Alink, F M; McEvoy, T G; Sinclair, K D; Garnsworthy, P C; Webb, R

    2008-09-01

    follicle size distribution or oocyte recovery by OPU (6.2 ± 0.4 per heifer), the proportion of oocytes that cleaved following insemination (0.57 ± 0.030) or blastocyst yield (0.27 ± 0.027 of oocytes cleaved). In conclusion, by feeding diets differing in carbohydrate source at different frequencies of feeding, meal-related changes in plasma hormone profiles were altered significantly, but oocyte quality was not affected. Therefore effects of diet on oocyte quality appear not to be mediated by meal-related fluctuations in hormone concentrations. PMID:22443826

  6. Neonatal stress-induced affective changes in adolescent Wistar rats: early signs of schizophrenia-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Carlos Eduardo Neves; Zanta, Natália Cristina; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are multifactorial diseases with etiology that may involve genetic factors, early life environment and stressful life events. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia is based on a wealth of data on increased vulnerability in individuals exposed to insults during the perinatal period. Maternal deprivation (MD) disinhibits the adrenocortical response to stress in neonatal rats and has been used as an animal model of schizophrenia. To test if long-term affective consequences of early life stress were influenced by maternal presence, we submitted 10-day old rats, either deprived (for 22 h) or not from their dams, to a stress challenge (i.p. saline injection). Corticosterone plasma levels were measured 2 h after the challenge, whereas another subgroup was assessed for behavior in the open field, elevated plus maze (EPM), social investigation and the negative contrast sucrose consumption test in adolescence (postnatal day 45). Maternally deprived rats exhibited increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels which were higher in maternally deprived and stress challenged pups. Social investigation was impaired in maternally deprived rats only, while saline injection, independently of MD, was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior in the EPM and an impaired intake decrement in the negative sucrose contrast. In the open field, center exploration was reduced in all maternally-deprived adolescents and in control rats challenged with saline injection. The most striking finding was that exposure to a stressful stimulus per se, regardless of MD, was linked to differential emotional consequences. We therefore propose that besides being a well-known and validated model of schizophrenia in adult rats, the MD paradigm could be extended to model early signs of psychiatric dysfunction, and would particularly be a useful tool to detect early signs that resemble schizophrenia. PMID:25309370

  7. Neonatal stress-induced affective changes in adolescent Wistar rats: early signs of schizophrenia-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Girardi, Carlos Eduardo Neves; Zanta, Natália Cristina; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are multifactorial diseases with etiology that may involve genetic factors, early life environment and stressful life events. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia is based on a wealth of data on increased vulnerability in individuals exposed to insults during the perinatal period. Maternal deprivation (MD) disinhibits the adrenocortical response to stress in neonatal rats and has been used as an animal model of schizophrenia. To test if long-term affective consequences of early life stress were influenced by maternal presence, we submitted 10-day old rats, either deprived (for 22 h) or not from their dams, to a stress challenge (i.p. saline injection). Corticosterone plasma levels were measured 2 h after the challenge, whereas another subgroup was assessed for behavior in the open field, elevated plus maze (EPM), social investigation and the negative contrast sucrose consumption test in adolescence (postnatal day 45). Maternally deprived rats exhibited increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels which were higher in maternally deprived and stress challenged pups. Social investigation was impaired in maternally deprived rats only, while saline injection, independently of MD, was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior in the EPM and an impaired intake decrement in the negative sucrose contrast. In the open field, center exploration was reduced in all maternally-deprived adolescents and in control rats challenged with saline injection. The most striking finding was that exposure to a stressful stimulus per se, regardless of MD, was linked to differential emotional consequences. We therefore propose that besides being a well-known and validated model of schizophrenia in adult rats, the MD paradigm could be extended to model early signs of psychiatric dysfunction, and would particularly be a useful tool to detect early signs that resemble schizophrenia. PMID:25309370

  8. Variation in the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Gamma Gene Affects Plasma HDL-Cholesterol without Modification of Metabolic or Inflammatory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kächele, Martin; Hennige, Anita M.; Machann, Jürgen; Hieronimus, Anja; Lamprinou, Apostolia; Machicao, Fausto; Schick, Fritz; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Nürnberg, Bernd; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Objective Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) is a G-protein-coupled receptor-activated lipid kinase mainly expressed in leukocytes and cells of the cardiovascular system. PI3Kγ plays an important signaling role in inflammatory processes. Since subclinical inflammation is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, obesity-related insulin resistance, and pancreatic β-cell failure, we asked whether common genetic variation in the PI3Kγ gene (PIK3CG) contributes to body fat content/distribution, serum adipokine/cytokine concentrations, alterations in plasma lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity, insulin release, and glucose homeostasis. Study Design Using a tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach, we analyzed genotype-phenotype associations in 2,068 German subjects genotyped for 10 PIK3CG SNPs and characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests. In subgroups, data from hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the liver, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were available, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for gene expression analysis. Results After appropriate adjustment, none of the PIK3CG tagging SNPs was significantly associated with body fat content/distribution, adipokine/cytokine concentrations, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, or blood glucose concentrations (p>0.0127, all; Bonferroni-corrected α-level: 0.0051). However, six non-linked SNPs displayed at least nominal associations with plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations, two of them (rs4288294 and rs116697954) reaching the level of study-wide significance (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0004, respectively). More precisely, rs4288294 and rs116697954 influenced HDL2-, but not HDL3-, cholesterol. With respect to the SNPs’ in vivo functionality, rs4288294 was significantly associated with PIK3CG mRNA expression in PBMCs. Conclusions We could demonstrate that common genetic variation in the PIK3CG locus, possibly

  9. Different environmental temperatures affect amino acid metabolism in the eurytherm teleost Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858) as indicated by changes in plasma metabolites.

    PubMed

    Costas, Benjamín; Aragão, Cláudia; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Arjona, Francisco J; Mancera, Juan M; Dinis, Maria T; Conceição, Luís E C

    2012-07-01

    Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a eurytherm teleost that under natural conditions can be exposed to annual water temperature fluctuations between 12 and 26°C. This study assessed the effects of temperature on sole metabolic status, in particular in what concerns plasma free amino acid changes during thermal acclimation. Senegalese sole maintained at 18°C were acclimated to either cold (12°C) or warm (26°C) environmental temperatures for 21 days. Fish maintained at 18°C served as control. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucose, lactate, triglycerides, proteins, and free amino acids were assessed. Cold acclimation influenced interrenal responses of sole by increasing cortisol release. Moreover, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations increased linearly with temperature, presumably reflecting a higher metabolic activity of sole acclimated to 26°C. Acclimation temperature affected more drastically plasma concentrations of dispensable than that of indispensable amino acids, and different acclimation temperatures induced different responses. Asparagine, glutamine and ornithine seem to be of particular importance for ammonia detoxification mechanisms, synthesis of triglycerides that may be used during homeoviscous adaptation and, to a lesser extent, as energetic substrates in specimens acclimated to 12°C. When sole is acclimated to 26°C taurine, glutamate, GABA and glycine increased, which may suggest important roles as antioxidant defences, in osmoregulatory processes and/or for energetic purposes at this thermal regimen. In conclusion, acclimation to different environmental temperatures induces several metabolic changes in Senegalese sole, suggesting that amino acids may be important for thermal acclimation. PMID:21947601

  10. Effects of environmental stress on the depression-like behaviors and the diurnal rhythm of corticosterone and melatonin in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Liu, Li-Jing; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Guo, Tian-You; Yue, Xiao-Dong; Li, Su-Xia

    2016-06-25

    Environmental stress (ES) is commonly used in producing chronic unpredictable mild stress to study pathogenesis of depression, including the regulatory role of circadian system on depression. However, the direct effect of ES on the circadian system has been rarely explored. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of ES on depression-like behaviors and diurnal rhythm of plasma hormone/peptide levels in male rats. Rats were allocated into control group (CON group), low frequency ES group (LF group) and high frequency ES group (HF group). Sucrose preference test (SPT), open field test (OFT), weight gain, food and water intake were conducted to assess depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. A total of 7 times of the tail venous blood was collected with an interval of 4 h during 24 h from other rats who subjected to the same procedures of ES but not the behavioral tests. The alterations of diurnal rhythm of peripheral plasma corticosterone (CORT) and melatonin, and changes of the cholecystokinin (CCK), neuropeptide Y and leptin levels at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that ES led to a disturbance of diurnal rhythm of CORT and melatonin in the plasma. Besides, it also increased plasma leptin level and decreased body weight gain, but it did not produce depression- and anxiety-like behaviors compared with those rats in the control group. In short, our findings indicated that the ES could induce a disturbance of diurnal rhythm of plasma CORT and melatonin in male rats. PMID:27350193

  11. Variation of the Concentration of Isotopes Copper and Zinc in Human Plasmas of Patients Affected by Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triassi, Antonio

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the increase of copper and the reduction of zinc in the human plasma of patient with cancer, and in particular the Lymphoid Leukaemia, is a consequence of the isotopic constant of the enzymatic components copper/zinc dependent (DNA/RNA polymerase). Our hypothesis is that the reaction happens at the nuclear level in the human cell, and it is due to the action of a neutron (probably of deuterium of water) (J.F. Thomson, Biological Effects of Deuterium, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1963) with the isotopic component of 64Zn transmutation into 65Cu stable following reaction: [ ^{64}Zn + N(HDO) rightarrow ^{65}Zn rightarrow beta^+ rightarrow EC rightarrow gamma rightarrow ^{65}Cu ] this produces energy of 0.325 MeV for the β+ and equal energy of 1.118 MeV for the photon γ with a half-life of 250 days.

  12. Post-glucose-load urinary C-peptide and glucose concentration obtained during OGTT do not affect oral minimal model-based plasma indices.

    PubMed

    Jainandunsing, Sjaam; Wattimena, J L Darcos; Rietveld, Trinet; van Miert, Joram N I; Sijbrands, Eric J G; de Rooij, Felix W M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how renal loss of both C-peptide and glucose during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) relate to and affect plasma-derived oral minimal model (OMM) indices. All individuals were recruited during family screening between August 2007 and January 2011 and underwent a 3.5-h OGTT, collecting nine plasma samples and urine during OGTT. We obtained the following three subgroups: normoglycemic, at risk, and T2D. We recruited South Asian and Caucasian families, and we report separate analyses if differences occurred. Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations were analyzed as AUCs during OGTT, OMM estimate of renal C-peptide secretion, and OMM beta-cell and insulin sensitivity indices were calculated to obtain disposition indices. Post-glucose load glucose and C-peptide in urine were measured and related to plasma-based indices. Urinary glucose corresponded well with plasma glucose AUC (Cau r = 0.64, P < 0.01; SA r = 0.69, P < 0.01), S I (Cau r = -0.51, P < 0.01; SA r = -0.41, P < 0.01), Φ dynamic (Cau r = -0.41, P < 0.01; SA r = -0.57, P < 0.01), and Φ oral (Cau r = -0.61, P < 0.01; SA r = -0.73, P < 0.01). Urinary C-peptide corresponded well to plasma C-peptide AUC (Cau r = 0.45, P < 0.01; SA r = 0.33, P < 0.05) and OMM estimate of renal C-peptide secretion (r = 0.42, P < 0.01). In general, glucose excretion plasma threshold for the presence of glucose in urine was ~10-10.5 mmol L(-1) in non-T2D individuals, but not measurable in T2D individuals. Renal glucose secretion during OGTT did not influence OMM indices in general nor in T2D patients (renal clearance range 0-2.1 %, with median 0.2 % of plasma glucose AUC). C-indices of urinary glucose to detect various stages of glucose intolerance were excellent (Cau 0.83-0.98; SA 0.75-0.89). The limited role of renal glucose secretion validates the neglecting of urinary glucose secretion in kinetic models of glucose

  13. Apelin-13 Protects PC12 Cells from Corticosterone-Induced Apoptosis Through PI3K and ERKs Activation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yunjun; Wang, Bo; Fu, Wan; Zhou, Shouhong; Nie, Yaxiong; Tian, Shaowen

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that environmental stress is a risk factor for mental disorders. Glucocorticoid hormones play a vital role in the regulation of physiological response to stress. High concentrations of corticosterone can induce cellular damage in PC12 cells, which possess typical neuronal features. Apelin and its receptor APJ are widely distributed in the central nervous system including limbic structures involved in stress responses. Previous studies have suggested that apelin has a neuroprotective function. However, the effect of apelin on corticosterone-induced neuronal damage remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we explored the potential protective activity of apelin-13 in PC12 cells treated with corticosterone and its underling mechanisms. The viability of the cells, the apoptosis of the cells, the level of phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERKs) and cleaved caspase-3 expression were detected by MTT, Hoechst staining and flow cytometer assays and Western blotting. Results showed that corticosterone induced cells viability loss, cell apoptosis, down-regulation of p-Akt and p-ERKs and up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3. The effects induced by corticosterone were attenuated by apelin-13 pretreatment. Furthermore, apelin-13-mediated anti-viability loss, antiapoptosis and caspase-3 suppression activities were blocked by specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (LY294002) and ERKs (PD98059). The data suggest that apelin-13 protects PC12 cells from corticosterone-induced apoptosis through activating PI3K/Akt and ERKs signaling pathways. PMID:26961889

  14. Agmatine, by Improving Neuroplasticity Markers and Inducing Nrf2, Prevents Corticosterone-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Andiara E; Egea, Javier; Buendia, Izaskun; Gómez-Rangel, Vanessa; Parada, Esther; Navarro, Elisa; Casas, Ana Isabel; Wojnicz, Aneta; Ortiz, José Avendaño; Cuadrado, Antonio; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Lopez, Manuela G

    2016-07-01

    Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is a potential candidate to constitute an adjuvant/monotherapy for the management of depression. A recent study by our group demonstrated that agmatine induces Nrf2 and protects against corticosterone effects in a hippocampal neuronal cell line. The present study is an extension of this previous study by assessing the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in an animal model of depression induced by corticosterone in mice. Swiss mice were treated simultaneously with agmatine or imipramine at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day (p.o.) and corticosterone for 21 days and the daily administrations of experimental drugs were given immediately prior to corticosterone (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) administrations. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice (Nrf2 (+/+)) and Nrf2 KO (Nrf2 (-/-)) were treated during 21 days with agmatine (0.1 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or vehicle. Twenty-four hours after the last treatments, the behavioral tests and biochemical assays were performed. Agmatine treatment for 21 days was able to abolish the corticosterone-induced depressive-like behavior and the alterations in the immunocontent of mature BDNF and synaptotagmin I, and in the serotonin and glutamate levels. Agmatine also abolished the corticosterone-induced changes in the morphology of astrocytes and microglia in CA1 region of hippocampus. In addition, agmatine treatment in control mice increased noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine levels, CREB phosphorylation, mature BDNF and synaptotagmin I immunocontents, and reduced pro-BDNF immunocontent in the hippocampus. Agmatine's ability to produce an antidepressant-like effect was abolished in Nrf2 (-/-) mice. The present results reinforce the participation of Nrf2 in the antidepressant-like effect produced by agmatine and expand literature data concerning its mechanisms of action. PMID:25966970

  15. Feather Corticosterone Levels on Wintering Grounds Have No Carry-Over Effects on Breeding among Three Populations of Great Skuas (Stercorarius skua)

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeon, Sophie; Leat, Eliza H. K.; Magnusdóttir, Ellen; Furness, Robert W.; Strøm, Hallvard; Petersen, Aevar; Gabrielsen, Geir W.; Hanssen, Sveinn Are; Bustnes, Jan Ove

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions encountered by migratory seabirds in their wintering areas can shape their fitness. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain largely unknown as birds are relatively inaccessible during winter. To assess physiological condition during this period, we measured corticosterone concentrations in winter-grown primary feathers of female great skuas (Stercorarius skua) from three breeding colonies (Bjørnøya, Iceland, Shetland) with wintering areas identified from characteristic stable isotope signatures. We subsequently compared winter feather corticosterone levels between three wintering areas (Africa, Europe and America). Among females breeding in 2009, we found significant differences in feather corticosterone levels between wintering areas. Surprisingly, levels were significantly higher in Africa despite seemingly better local ecological factors (based on lower foraging effort). Moreover, contrary to our predictions, females sharing the same wintering grounds showed significant differences in feather corticosterone levels depending on their colony of origin suggesting that some skuas could be using suboptimal wintering areas. Among females wintering in Africa, Shetland females showed feather corticosterone levels on average 22% lower than Bjørnøya and Iceland females. Finally, the lack of significant relationships between winter feather corticosterone levels and any of the breeding phenology traits does not support the hypothesis of potential carry-over effects of winter feather corticosterone. Yet, the fitness consequences of elevated feather corticosterone levels remain to be determined. PMID:24964085

  16. The potent anti-inflammatory agent escin does not increase corticosterone secretion and immune cell apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Hongsheng; Fan, Huaying; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Yu, Pengfei; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-09-01

    Escin exerts potent glucocorticoid-like anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anti-inflammatory effect of escin is through the up-regulation of glucocorticoids and if escin induces pathological changes in immune organs. Mice were administrated with escin intravenously for 7 days before observing the relevant parameters. The results showed that escin exhibits a potent anti-inflammatory effect, but does not increase corticosterone secretion in mice, and does not increase immune cell apoptosis in the spleen and thymus of mice. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of escin is not dependent on the release of corticosterone. PMID:21596110

  17. Immune activation generates corticosterone-mediated terminal reproductive investment in a wild bird

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, E. Keith; Bowden, Rachel M.; Sakaluk, Scott K.; Thompson, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite classical expectations of a trade-off between immune activity and reproduction, an emergent view suggests that individuals experiencing activation of their immune system actually increase reproductive effort and allocation to offspring as a form of terminal investment in response to reduced survival probability. However, the components and mechanisms of increased parental investment following immunostimulation are currently unknown. We hypothesize that increased glucocorticoid production following immunostimulation modulates the increase in reproductive effort that constitutes terminal investment. We activated the immune system of breeding female house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) with an immunogen and cross-fostered the eggs they subsequently produced to separate pre- and post-natal components of maternal investment. Cross-fostering revealed an increase in both pre- and post-natal allocation from immunostimulated females, which was confirmed by quantification of egg constituents and maternal provisioning behavior. The increase in maternal provisioning was mediated, at least in part, by increased corticosterone in these females. Offspring immune responsiveness was also enhanced through transgenerational immune priming via the egg. Thus, our results indicate that maternal immunostimulation induces transgenerational effects on offspring through both pre- and post-natal parental effects, and support an important role for corticosterone in mediating parental investment. PMID:25996862

  18. Faecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations are not a good predictor of habitat suitability for common gartersnakes

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, William D.; Gilmour, Kathleen M.; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Measuring habitat suitability is important in conservation and in wildlife management. Measuring the abundance or presence–absence of a species in various habitats is not sufficient to measure habitat suitability because these metrics can be poor predictors of population success. Therefore, having some measure of population success is essential in assessing habitat suitability, but estimating population success is difficult. Identifying suitable proxies for population success could thus be beneficial. We examined whether faecal corticosterone metabolite (fCM) concentrations could be used as a proxy for habitat suitability in common gartersnakes (Thamnophis sirtalis). We conducted a validation study and confirmed that fCM concentrations indeed reflect circulating corticosterone concentrations. We estimated abundance, reproductive output and growth rate of gartersnakes in field and in forest habitat and we also measured fCM concentrations of gartersnakes from these same habitats. Common gartersnakes were more abundant and had higher reproductive outputs and higher growth rates in field habitat than in forest habitat, but fCM concentrations did not differ between the same two habitats. Our results suggest either that fCM concentrations are not a useful metric of habitat suitability in common gartersnakes or that the difference in suitability between the two habitats was too small to induce changes in fCM concentrations. Incorporating fitness metrics in estimates of habitat suitability is important, but these metrics of fitness have to be sensitive enough to vary between habitats. PMID:27293731

  19. Impact of stress and levels of corticosterone on the development of breast cancer in rats

    PubMed Central

    De la Roca-Chiapas, José María; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria; Martínez-García, Jorge Antonio; Martínez-Soto, Joel; Ramos-Frausto, Víctor Manuel; González-Ramírez, Leivy Patricia; Nowack, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Stress is experienced during cancer, and impairs the immune system’s ability to protect the body. Our aim was to investigate if isolation stress has an impact on the development of tumors in rats, and to measure the size and number of tumors and the levels of corticosterone. Breast cancer was induced in two groups of female rats (N=20) by administration of a single dose of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea 50 mg/kg. Rats in the control group (cancer induction condition) were allowed to remain together in a large cage, whereas in the second group, rats were also exposed to a stressful condition, that is, isolation (cancer induction and isolation condition, CIIC). The CIIC group displayed anxious behavior after 10 weeks of isolation. In the CIIC group, 16 tumors developed, compared with only eleven tumors in the control cancer induction condition group. In addition, compared with the control group, the volume of tumors in the CIIC group was greater, and more rats had more than one tumor and cells showed greater morphological damage. Levels of corticosterone were also significantly different between the two groups. This study supports the hypothesis that stress can influence the development of cancer, but that stress itself is not a sufficient factor for the development of cancer in rats. The study also provides new information for development of experimental studies and controlled environments. PMID:26793009

  20. Blood concentrations of lactate, glucose and corticosterone in dispersing hatchling sea turtles

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carla M.; Booth, David T.; Bradley, Adrian J.; Limpus, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Natal dispersal of sea turtles is an energetically demanding activity that is fuelled primarily by aerobic metabolism. However, during intense exercise reptiles can use anaerobic metabolism to supplement their energy requirements. We assessed anaerobic metabolism in dispersing hatchling loggerhead and flatback turtles by measuring the concentrations of blood lactate during crawling and at different times during the first four hours of their frenzy swim. We also measured concentrations of blood glucose and corticosterone. Blood lactate (12.13 to 2.03 mmol/L), glucose (6.25 to 3.8 mmol/L) and corticosterone (8.13 to 2.01 ng/mL) concentrations decreased significantly over time in both loggerhead and flatback hatchlings and no significant differences were found between the species. These results indicate that anaerobic metabolism makes a significant contribution to the dispersal phase of hatchling sea turtles during the beach crawl and the first few hours of the frenzy swim. PMID:23336077

  1. The Anxiolytic Effects of Valtrate in Rats Involves Changes of Corticosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-Ning; Shi, Jin-Li; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yan-Li; Wang, Chun-Guo; Hou, Wen-Hui; Guo, Jian-You

    2014-01-01

    Valtrate is a principle compound isolated from Valeriana jatamansi Jones, which is a Traditional Chinese Medicine used to treat various mood disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anxiolytic effects of valtrate in rats. The animals were orally administered valtrate (5, 10, and 20 g/kg daily) for 10 days and exposed to open field test (OFT) and elevated plus-maze (EPM). Then the corticosterone levels in the rat serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The valtrate (10 mg/kg, p.o.) exhibited the anxiolytic effect in rats by increasing the time and entry percentage into the open arms in the EPM and the number of central entries in the OFT. Valtrate (10 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced the corticosterone level in the rat serum. Taken together, these results suggest that the valtrate has anxiolytic activity in behavioral models that might be mediated via the function of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:24782906

  2. In vivo administration of IL-1 induces thymic hypoplasia and increased levels of serum corticosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, P.J.; Charrier, K.; Alpert, A.; Bressler, L.

    1988-09-01

    Administration of IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta to normal mice induces a decrease in thymic cellularity, the magnitude of which depends on the number of injections and dose of IL-1. Twice daily injections of 200 ng of IL-1 alpha or -beta for 4 days results in a 90% decrease in thymic cellularity, which regenerated after cessation of treatment. Study of thymocyte subpopulations revealed that the number of CD4+/CD8+ thymocytes was dramatically decreased in IL-1-treated mice. Functional assessment of the CD4-/CD8- population from treated animals showed that these cells had adequate mitogenic responses in vitro and that the proportion of these cells in cycle was not different from control CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-1 treatment also prevented the regeneration of thymic cellularity after irradiation. The use of strains of mice differing genetically at the Ly 1 locus to construct radiation bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that bone marrow-derived thymocyte precursors were able to seed the thymus in the IL-1-treated animals. Again, however, the CD4+/CD8+ thymocyte population was significantly decreased. Thymic repopulation occurred upon cessation of IL-1 therapy. Finally, we determined that a single i.p. injection of IL-1 caused a three-fold increase in serum corticosterone levels, which peaked approximately 3 h after IL-1 administration. Thus, an IL-1-dependent increase in serum corticosterone levels may be responsible for the observed thymic hypoplasia.

  3. Correlations between depression behaviors and sleep parameters after repeated corticosterone injections in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-jun; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Xue-qiong; Sheng, Zhao-fu; Li, Sheng-jie; Huang, Yuan-li; Cao, Qing; Cui, Xiang-yu; Cui, Su-ying; Zhang, Yong-he

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Disrupted sleep may be a prodromal symptom or a predictor of depressive disorders. In this study we investigated the relationship between depression symptoms and disrupted sleep using a novel model of stress-mimicked sleep disorders in rats. Methods: SD rats were injected with corticosterone (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg, sc) or vehicle for 7 d. Their sleep-wake behavior was monitored through implanted EEG and EMG electrodes. Their depressive behaviors were assessed using forced swim test, open field test and sucrose preference test. Results: The corticosterone-treated rats showed significantly reduced sleep time, disinhibition of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and altered power spectra during non-REM sleep. All depressive behavioral tests did not show significant difference across the groups. However, individual correlation analysis revealed statistically significance: the immobility time (despair) was negatively correlated with REM sleep latency, slow wave sleep (SWS) time ratio, SWS bouts and delta power density, and it was positively correlated with REM sleep bouts and beta power density. Meanwhile, sucrose preference (anhedonia) was positively correlated with total sleep time and light sleep bouts, and it was negatively correlated with the REM sleep time ratio. Conclusion: In stress-mimicked rats, sleep disturbances are a predictor of depressive disorders, and certain symptoms of depression may be related to the disruption of several specific sleep parameters. PMID:24989251

  4. Agmatine induces Nrf2 and protects against corticosterone effects in hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Andiara E; Egea, Javier; Buendía, Izaskun; Navarro, Elisa; Rada, Patricia; Cuadrado, Antonio; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; López, Manuela G

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is a common finding in major depression; this may lead to increased levels of cortisol, which are known to cause oxidative stress imbalance and apoptotic neuronal cell death, particularly in the hippocampus, a key region implicated in mood regulation. Agmatine, an endogenous metabolite of L-arginine, has been proposed for the treatment of major depression. Corticosterone induced apoptotic cell death and increased ROS production in cultured hippocampal neuronal cells, effects that were abolished in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by agmatine. Interestingly, the combination of sub-effective concentrations of agmatine with fluoxetine or imipramine afforded synergic protection. The neuroprotective effect of agmatine was abolished by yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), PD98059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SnPP (HO-1 inhibitor), and cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor). Agmatine increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation and induced the transcription factor Nrf2 and the proteins HO-1 and GCLc; induction of these proteins was prevented by yohimbine, ketanserin, LY294002, and PD98059. In conclusion, agmatine affords neuroprotection against corticosterone effects by a mechanism that implicates Nrf2 induction via α2-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors, Akt and ERK pathways, and HO-1 and GCLc expression. PMID:25084759

  5. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  6. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  7. Effects of dexamethasone before and after puberty on the daily corticosterone rhythm.

    PubMed

    Ramaley, J A

    1975-01-01

    Female Sprague-Dawley-derived rats were injected at 25 days of age (prepubertal) or 60 days of age (adult) with 1 mug dexamethasone/100 g b.w. either before the beginning of the daily rise in serum corticosterone (at 10.00 or 12.00 h in adults and 10.00 h in prepubertal rats) or after the daily rise had begun (at 14.00 h in adults, and 12.00 or 14.00 h in perpubertal rats). Blood samples were collected by decapitation at 16.00, 20.00 and 24.00 h on that day and 04.00, 08.00 and 16.00 h the following day. In adults, dexamethasone (DEX) given at 10.00 shifted the corticosterone (B) peak to 04.00. In prepubertal rats, DEX given before the B rise did not shift the subsequent peak and the patterns of B did not diverge from controls. DEX given at 12.00 or 14.00 shifted the peak to 24.00 h. At 08.00 the next day, B was depressed in adults but normal in prepubertal rats. At 16.00 h, both age groups showed depressed B in comparison to controls. Prepubertal rats appear to respond differently to dexamethasone than do adults. PMID:1143619

  8. Poststroke Depression as a Factor Adversely Affecting the Level of Oxidative Damage to Plasma Proteins during a Brain Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cichoń, Natalia; Bijak, Michał; Miller, Elżbieta; Niwald, Marta; Saluk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Poststroke depression, the second most serious psychosomatic complication after brain stroke, leads to delay of the rehabilitation process and is associated with an increased disability and cognitive impairment along with increase in term mortality. Research into the biochemical changes in depression is still insufficiently described. The aim of our study was therefore to evaluate the possible association between plasma protein oxidative/nitrative damages and the development of poststroke depression. We evaluated oxidative/nitrative modifications of specific proteins by measurement of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups levels using ELISA test. Additionally, we checked differences in proteins thiol groups by spectrophotometric assay based on reaction between DTNB and thiols. We also evaluated catalase activity in erythrocytes measured as ability to decompose H2O2. Correlation analysis was performed using Spearman's rank. We observed significant (P < 0.001) differences in all oxidative/nitrative stress parameters in brain stroke patients compared to healthy group. Our research shows that oxidative damage of proteins is correlated with the degree of poststroke depression, while nitrative changes do not show any relationship. We demonstrate a positive correlation between the concentration of carbonyl groups and the Geriatric Depression Scale and a negative correlation between the degree of depression and the concentration of -SH groups or catalase activity. PMID:25838867

  9. The concentration of plasma metabolites varies throughout reproduction and affects offspring number in wild brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Gauthey, Zoé; Freychet, Marine; Manicki, Aurélie; Herman, Alexandre; Lepais, Olivier; Panserat, Stéphane; Elosegi, Arturo; Tentelier, Cédric; Labonne, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    In wild populations, measuring energy invested in the reproduction and disentangling investment in gametes versus investment in reproductive behavior (such as intrasexual competition or intersexual preference) remain challenging. In this study, we investigated the energy expenditure in brown trout reproductive behavior by using two proxies: variation in weight and variation of plasma metabolites involved in energy production, over the course of reproductive season in a semi natural experimental river. We estimated overall reproductive success using genetic assignment at the end of the reproductive season. Results show that triglycerides and free fatty acid concentrations vary negatively during reproduction, while amino-acids and glucose concentrations remain stable. Decrease in triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations during reproduction is not related to initial concentration levels or to weight variation. Both metabolite concentration variations and weight variations are correlated to the number of offspring produced, which could indicate that gametic and behavioral reproductive investments substantially contribute to reproductive success in wild brown trout. This study opens a path to further investigate variations in reproductive investment in wild populations. PMID:25666363

  10. Copper and zinc affect the activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and thiol content in aquatic fungi.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M M; Guimarães-Soares, L; Pascoal, C; Cássio, F

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic hyphomycetes are the major microbial decomposers of plant litter in streams. We selected three aquatic hyphomycete species with different abilities to tolerate, adsorb and accumulate copper and zinc, and we investigated the effects of these metals on H+-ATPase activity as well as on the levels of thiol (SH)-containing compounds. Before metal exposure, the species isolated from a metal-polluted stream (Heliscus submersus and Flagellospora curta) had higher levels of thiol compounds than the species isolated from a clean stream (Varicosporium elodeae). However, V. elodeae rapidly increased the levels of thiols after metal exposure, emphasizing the importance of these compounds in fungal survival under metal stress. The highest amounts of metals adsorbed to fungal mycelia were found in the most tolerant species to each metal, i.e. in H. submersus exposed to copper and in V. elodeae exposed to zinc. Short-term (10 min) exposure to copper completely inhibited the activity of H+-ATPase of H. submersus and V. elodeae, whilst zinc only led to a similar effect on H. submersus. However, at longer exposure times (8 days) the most metal-tolerant species exhibited increased H+-ATPase activities, suggesting that the plasma membrane proton pump may be involved in the acclimation of aquatic hyphomycetes to metals. PMID:26916755

  11. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  12. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  13. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves.

    PubMed

    Miller, David A; Vleck, Carol M; Otis, David L

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10-15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves. PMID:19682449

  14. Labisia pumila extract down-regulates hydroxysteroid (11-beta) dehydrogenase 1 expression and corticosterone levels in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Fazliana, Mansor; Gu, Harvest F; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Yusoff, Mashitah Mohd; Wan Nazaimoon, W M

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of a standardized Labisia pumila var. alata (LPva) extract on body weight change, hydroxysteroid (11-beta) dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1) expressions and corticosterone (CORT) level in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The decoction of LPva has been used for generations among Malay women in Malaysia to maintain a healthy reproductive system.Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley OVX rats were treated orally with LPva extract (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg/day) or estrogen replacement (ERT) for 30 days. Sham operated rats were used as controls. Compared to untreated OVX rats, LPva-treated rats showed less weight gain and had significantly down-regulated HSD11B1 mRNA in liver tissues. HSD11B1 mRNA in adipose tissues increased by 55% (p < 0.05) in OVX rats but normalized in rats treated with LPva. Similarly, there was significant down-regulation (p < 0.05) of protein levels of HSD11B1 in both liver and adipose tissue of LPva and ERT groups, and CORT levels were significantly reduced in both groups of rats. This is the first study ever conducted to evaluate the beneficial effects of LPva in relation to weight gain caused by estrogen insufficiency. Results implied that the bioactive components in LPva extract affect not only HSD11B1 expressions in both adipose and liver tissues but also decrease circulating CORT. The extract should be explored for its potential use as a natural remedy for weight management. PMID:21833773

  15. Maternal high-fat diet inversely affects insulin sensitivity in dams and young adult male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Karbaschi, Roxana; Sadeghimahalli, Forouzan; Zardooz, Homeira

    2016-09-01

    This study attempts to further clarify the potential effects of maternal high-fat (HF) diet on glucose homeostasis in dams and young adult male rat offspring. Female rats were divided into control (CON dams) and HF (HF dams) diet groups, which received the diet 4 weeks prior to and through pregnancy and lactation periods. Blood samples were taken to determine metabolic parameters, then an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was performed. Maternal HF diet increased intra-abdominal fat mass and plasma corticosterone level, but decreased leptin concentration in dams. In HF offspring intra-abdominal fat mass, plasma leptin, and corticosterone levels decreased. Following IPGTT, the plasma insulin level of HF dams was higher than the controls. In HF offspring plasma insulin level was not significantly different from the controls, but a steeper decrease of their plasma glucose concentration was observed. PMID:27604865

  16. The Effect of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Plasma Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Patients with Affective Disorders: A Randomised Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Hoejman, Pernille; Pedersen, Maria; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of repeated infusions of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with affective disorders. In total, 83 patients were recruited: 40 currently depressed patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HDRS-17) score >17) (study 1) and 43 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) in partial remission (HDRS-17 and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) ≤ 14) (study 2). In both studies, patients were randomised to receive eight weekly EPO (Eprex; 40,000 IU) or saline (0.9% NaCl) infusions in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel—group design. Plasma BDNF levels were measured at baseline and at weeks 5, 9 and at follow up, week 14. In contrast with our hypothesis, EPO down regulated plasma BDNF levels in patients with TRD (mean reduction at week 9 (95% CI): EPO 10.94 ng/l (4.51-21.41 ng/l); mean increase at week 9: Saline 0.52 ng/l, p=0.04 (-5.88-4.48 ng/l) p=0.04, partial ŋ2=0.12). No significant effects were found on BDNF levels in partially remitted patients with BD (p=0.35). The present effects of EPO on BDNF levels in patients with TRD point to a role of neurotrophic factors in the potential effects of EPO seen in TRD and BD. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these effects and the interaction between EPO and peripheral levels on BDNF need to be further elucidated in human studies including a broad range of biomarkers. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00916552. PMID:26011424

  17. Repeated, but Not Acute, Stress Suppresses Inflammatory Plasma Extravasation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strausbaugh, Holly J.; Dallman, Mary F.; Levine, Jon D.

    1999-12-01

    Clinical findings suggest that inflammatory disease symptoms are aggravated by ongoing, repeated stress, but not by acute stress. We hypothesized that, compared with single acute stressors, chronic repeated stress may engage different physiological mechanisms that exert qualitatively different effects on the inflammatory response. Because inhibition of plasma extravasation, a critical component of the inflammatory response, has been associated with increased disease severity in experimental arthritis, we tested for a potential repeated stress-induced inhibition of plasma extravasation. Repeated, but not single, exposures to restraint stress produced a profound inhibition of bradykinin-induced synovial plasma extravasation in the rat. Experiments examining the mechanism of inhibition showed that the effect of repeated stress was blocked by adrenalectomy, but not by adrenal medullae denervation, suggesting that the adrenal cortex mediates this effect. Consistent with known effects of stress and with mediation by the adrenal cortex, restraint stress evoked repeated transient elevations of plasma corticosterone levels. This elevated corticosterone was necessary and sufficient to produce inhibition of plasma extravasation because the stress-induced inhibition was blocked by preventing corticosterone synthesis and, conversely, induction of repeated transient elevations in plasma corticosterone levels mimicked the effects of repeated stress. These data suggest that repetition of a mild stressor can induce changes in the physiological state of the animal that enable a previously innocuous stressor to inhibit the inflammatory response. These findings provide a potential explanation for the clinical association between repeated stress and aggravation of inflammatory disease symptoms and provide a model for study of the biological mechanisms underlying the stress-induced aggravation of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  18. Apolipoprotein A-I variants. Naturally occurring substitutions of proline residues affect plasma concentration of apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed Central

    von Eckardstein, A; Funke, H; Henke, A; Altland, K; Benninghoven, A; Assmann, G

    1989-01-01

    Six unrelated families with genetically determined structural variants of apo A-I were found in the course of an electrophoretic screening program for apo A-I variants in dried blood samples of newborns. The following structural variations were identified by the combined use of HPLC, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and automated gas phase sequencing: Pro3----Arg (1x), Pro4----Arg (1x), and Pro165----Arg (4x). All variant carriers were heterozygous for their mutant of apo A-I. Subjects heterozygous for apo A-I(Pro165----Arg) (n = 12) were found to exhibit lower mean values for apo A-I (109 +/- 16 mg/dl) and HDL cholesterol (37 +/- 9 mg/dl) than unaffected family members (n = 9): 176 +/- 41 and 64 +/- 18 mg/dl, respectively (P less than 0.001). In 9 of 12 apo A-I(Pro165----Arg) variant carriers the concentrations of apo A-I were below the fifth percentile of sex-matched controls. By two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis as well as by densitometry the relative concentration of the variant apo A-I in heterozygous carriers of apo A-I(Pro165----Arg) was determined to account for only 30% of the total plasma apo A-I mass instead of the expected 50%. Thus, the observed apo A-I deficiency may be largely a consequence of the decreased concentration of the variant apo A-I. In the case of the apo A-I(Pro3----Arg) mutant, densitometry of HDL apolipoproteins demonstrated a distinctly increased concentration of the variant proapo A-I relative to normal proapo A-I. This phenomenon was not observed in the apo A-I(Pro4----Arg) mutant or in other mutants. This suggests that the interspecies conserved proline residue in position 3 of mature apo A-I is functionally important for the regular enzymatic conversion of proapo A-I to mature apo A-I. Images PMID:2512329

  19. Abnormal response to stress and impaired NPS-induced hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic effect and corticosterone increase in mice lacking NPSR1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyan; Mingler, Melissa K; McBride, Melissa L; Murphy, Andrew J; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2010-09-01

    NPSR1 is a G protein coupled receptor expressed in multiple brain regions involved in modulation of stress. Central administration of NPS, the putative endogenous ligand of NPSR1, can induce hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic effects and activation of the HPA axis. The role of NPSR1 in the brain remains unsettled. Here we used NPSR1 gene-targeted mice to define the functional role of NPSR1 under basal conditions on locomotion, anxiety- and/or depression-like behavior, corticosterone levels, acoustic startle with prepulse inhibition, learning and memory, and under NPS-induced locomotor activation, anxiolysis, and corticosterone release. Male, but not female, NPSR1-deficient mice exhibited enhanced depression-like behavior in a forced swim test, reduced acoustic startle response, and minor changes in the Morris water maze. Neither male nor female NPSR1-deficient mice showed alterations of baseline locomotion, anxiety-like behavior, or corticosterone release after exposure to a forced swim test or methamphetamine challenge in an open-field. After intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NPS, NPSR1-deficient mice failed to show normal NPS-induced increases in locomotion, anxiolysis, or corticosterone release compared with WT NPS-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that NPSR1 is essential in mediating NPS effects on behavior. PMID:20171785

  20. Corticosterone levels in relation to trace element contamination along an urbanization gradient in the common blackbird (Turdus merula).

    PubMed

    Meillère, Alizée; Brischoux, François; Bustamante, Paco; Michaud, Bruno; Parenteau, Charline; Marciau, Coline; Angelier, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    In a rapidly urbanizing world, trace element pollution may represent a threat to human health and wildlife, and it is therefore crucial to assess both exposition levels and associated effects of trace element contamination on urban vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the impact of urbanization on trace element contamination and stress physiology in a wild bird species, the common blackbird (Turdus merula), along an urbanization gradient (from rural to moderately urbanized areas). Specifically, we described the contamination levels of blackbirds by 4 non-essential (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb) and 9 essential trace elements (As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se, Zn), and explored the putative disrupting effects of the non-essential element contamination on corticosterone levels (a hormonal proxy for environmental challenges). We found that non-essential trace element burden (Cd and Pb specifically) increased with increasing urbanization, indicating a significant trace element contamination even in medium sized cities and suburban areas. Interestingly, the increased feather non-essential trace element concentrations were also associated with elevated feather corticosterone levels, suggesting that urbanization probably constrains birds and that this effect may be mediated by trace element contamination. Future experimental studies are now required to disentangle the influence of multiple urban-related constraints on corticosterone levels and to specifically test the influence of each of these trace elements on corticosterone secretion. PMID:27213675

  1. Abnormal response to stress and impaired NPS-induced hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic effect and corticosterone increase in mice lacking NPSR1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongyan; Mingler, Melissa K.; McBride, Melissa L.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary NPSR1 is a G protein coupled receptor expressed in multiple brain regions involved in modulation of stress. Central administration of NPS, the putative endogenous ligand of NPSR1, can induce hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic effects and activation of the HPA axis. The role of NPSR1 in the brain remains unsettled. Here we used NPSR1 gene-targeted mice to define the functional role of NPSR1 under basal conditions on locomotion, anxiety- and/or depression-like behavior, corticosterone levels, acoustic startle with prepulse inhibition, learning and memory, and under NPS-induced locomotor activation, anxiolysis, and corticosterone release. Male, but not female, NPSR1-deficient mice exhibited enhanced depression-like behavior in a forced swim test, reduced acoustic startle response, and minor changes in the Morris water maze. Neither male nor female NPSR1-deficient mice showed alterations of baseline locomotion, anxiety-like behavior, or corticosterone release after exposure to a forced swim test or methamphetamine challenge in an open-field. After intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NPS, NPSR1-deficient mice failed to show normal NPS-induced increases in locomotion, anxiolysis, or corticosterone release compared with WT NPS-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that NPSR1 is essential in mediating NPS effects on behavior. PMID:20171785

  2. Corticosterone primes the neuroinflammatory response to DFP in mice: potential animal model of Gulf War Illness.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, James P; Kelly, Kimberly A; Locker, Alicia R; Miller, Diane B; Lasley, Steve M

    2015-06-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a multi-symptom disorder with features characteristic of persistent sickness behavior. Among conditions encountered in the Gulf War (GW) theater were physiological stressors (e.g., heat/cold/physical activity/sleep deprivation), prophylactic treatment with the reversible AChE inhibitor, pyridostigmine bromide (PB), the insect repellent, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), and potentially the nerve agent, sarin. Prior exposure to the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, corticosterone (CORT), at levels associated with high physiological stress, can paradoxically prime the CNS to produce a robust proinflammatory response to neurotoxicants and systemic inflammation; such neuroinflammatory effects can be associated with sickness behavior. Here, we examined whether CORT primed the CNS to mount neuroinflammatory responses to GW exposures as a potential model of GWI. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with chronic (14 days) PB/ DEET, subchronic (7-14 days) CORT, and acute exposure (day 15) to diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), a sarin surrogate and irreversible AChE inhibitor. DFP alone caused marked brain-wide neuroinflammation assessed by qPCR of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL6, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, IL-1β, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. Pre-treatment with high physiological levels of CORT greatly augmented (up to 300-fold) the neuroinflammatory responses to DFP. Anti-inflammatory pre-treatment with minocycline suppressed many proinflammatory responses to CORT+DFP. Our findings are suggestive of a possible critical, yet unrecognized interaction between the stressor/environment of the GW theater and agent exposure(s) unique to this war. Such exposures may in fact prime the CNS to amplify future neuroinflammatory responses to pathogens, injury, or toxicity. Such occurrences could potentially result in the prolonged episodes of sickness behavior observed in GWI. Gulf War (GW) veterans were exposed to stressors, prophylactic

  3. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  4. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  5. Testosterone application decreases the capacity for ACTH and corticosterone secretion in a rat model of the andropause.

    PubMed

    Ajdžanović, Vladimir; Jarić, Ivana; Živanović, Jasmina; Filipović, Branko; Ristić, Nataša; Miler, Marko; Milošević, Verica

    2015-07-01

    The culminating phase of ageing in males-andropause is characterized by enhanced activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and frequent glucocorticoid excess. In parallel, free testosterone deficiency provides the baseline hormonal milieu for the ageing male. The aim of this study was to illustrate (using diverse microscopic and biochemical methodologies) the effects of testosterone application on the capacity for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone secretion in a rat model of the andropause. Middle-aged Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated (SO; n=8), orchidectomized (Orx; n=8) and testosterone treated orchidectomized (Orx+T; n=8) groups. Testosterone propionate (5 mg/kg b.w./day) was administered for three weeks, while SO and Orx groups received the vehicle alone. ACTH cells and the adrenal cortex were stained using immuno-histochemical, immuno-fluorescent and histochemical procedures. Circulating concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, ACTH and corticosterone, as well as the adrenal tissue corticosterone levels were measured by immunoassays. Testosterone application led to increased (p<0.05) serum concentrations of sex steroids. Consequently, in Orx+T rats the ACTH cell nuclei volume increased (p<0.05) by 34%, while the volume density of ACTH cells and their relative intensity of fluorescence decreased (p<0.05) by 46% and 21%, respectively, in comparison with the corresponding parameters in the Orx group. Testosterone also induced vasodilatation in the adrenocortical zona fasciculata, and decreased (p<0.05) the ACTH concentrations and adrenal tissue corticosterone levels by 38% and 31%, respectively, compared to the Orx group. In conclusion, testosterone administration caused a decrease in the capacity for ACTH and corticosterone secretion in a rat model of the andropause. PMID:25940766

  6. Water maze performance and changes in serum corticosterone levels in zinc-deprived and pair-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y; Mouat, M F; Harris, R B S; Coffield, J A; Grider, A

    2003-04-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the learning and short- and long-term memory of zinc-deprived (ZD) and pair-fed (PF) rats in a Morris water maze (MWM) and (2) to monitor the serum corticosterone levels of these rats before and after swimming. Young Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 27-31 days) consumed AIN-93G diet for 10 days, and then were separated into ad libitum control (CT), PF and ZD groups. The zinc content of the diet was 25-30 ppm (CT and PF) or <1 ppm (ZD). After 17 days on experimental diets, a MWM was used to test spatial cognition. Delayed-matching-to-place (DMP) test results indicate that both zinc deprivation and food restriction had no effect on short-term memory. The PF rats exhibited significantly impaired learning and thigmotaxia (i.e., wall hugging) in the learning test. The PF group also demonstrated less preference for the target zone in the first 15 s of the probing test. When the total 120 s of the probing test was considered, there were no differences in preference for the target zone, but thigmotaxia was greater in the PF than the CT group. The only behavioral change of the ZD group was thigmotaxia observed during the 120-s probing test following training, indicating the increment of anxiety. Morning basal corticosterone levels before swim training were significantly elevated in the PF group on Day 15 of dietary treatment, whereas a significant elevation of the basal corticosterone level in the ZD group was not statistically significant until Day 22. The data indicate an association between impaired learning, poor searching strategy and elevated corticosterone in the PF group. In contrast, the ZD rats showed normal cognitive performance but had elevated corticosterone and increased anxiety-like behavior (thigmotaxia). PMID:12782210

  7. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels. PMID:26658172

  8. Pycnogenol ameliorates depression-like behavior in repeated corticosterone-induced depression mice model.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lin; Mochizuki, Miyako; Hasegawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a mechanism of major depression. Pycnogenol (PYC) is a natural plant extract from the bark of Pinus pinaster Aiton and has potent antioxidant activities. We studied the ameliorative effect of PYC on depression-like behavior in chronic corticosterone- (CORT-) treated mice for 20 days. After the end of the CORT treatment period, PYC (0.2 mg/mL) was orally administered in normal drinking water. Depression-like behavior was investigated by the forced swimming test. Immobility time was significantly longer by CORT exposure. When the CORT-treated mice were supplemented with PYC, immobility time was significantly shortened. Our results indicate that orally administered PYC may serve to reduce CORT-induced stress by radical scavenging activity. PMID:24901001

  9. Prodynorphin-derived peptides are critical modulators of anxiety and regulate neurochemistry and corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; Schunk, Eduard; Rosskothen, Iris; Gaburro, Stefano; Singewald, Nicolas; Herzog, Herbert; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2009-02-01

    Stress and anxiety are mainly regulated by amygdala and hypothalamic circuitries involving several neurotransmitter systems and providing physiological responses to peripheral organs via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and other pathways. The role of endogenous opioid peptides in this process is largely unknown. Here we show for the first time that anxiolytic parameters of explorative behavior in mice lacking prodynorphin were increased 2-4-fold in the open field, the elevated plus maze and the light-dark test. Consistent with this, treatment of wild-type mice with selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonists GNTI or norbinaltorphimine showed the same effects. Furthermore, treatment of prodynorphin knockout animals with U-50488H, a selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist, fully reversed their anxiolytic phenotype. These behavioral data are supported by an approximal 30% reduction in corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and central amygdala and an accompanying 30-40% decrease in corticosterone serum levels in prodynorphin knockout mice. Although stress-induced increases in corticosterone levels were attenuated in prodynorphin knockout mice, they were associated with minor increases in depression-like behavior in the tail suspension and forced swim tests. Taken together, our data suggest a pronounced impact of endogenous prodynorphin-derived peptides on anxiety, but not stress coping ability and that these effects are mediated via kappa-opioid receptors. The delay in the behavioral response to kappa-opioid receptor agonists and antagonist treatment suggests an indirect control level for the action of dynorphin, probably by modulating the expression of CRH or neuropeptide Y, and subsequently influencing behavior. PMID:18800067

  10. Changes in plasma hormone levels correlate with fledging in nestling Leach's storm-petrels.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Corinne P; Mauck, Robert A; O'Reilly, Kathleen M; Philipsborn, Jon; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2010-10-01

    Leach's storm-petrels accumulate large amounts of body mass throughout the nestling period. Approximately 4days before fledging, nestlings weigh 50-100% more than adults. In order to shed this excess mass, nestlings engage in behavioral anorexia, and leave the burrow when they are light enough to fly. During this prefledging period, we measured several plasma hormones (corticosterone, thyroxine, and testosterone) to determine whether the behavioral changes associated with fledging are correlated with endocrine changes. In several species, including petrels, corticosterone levels are known to increase near fledging. Reduced food consumption has been shown to elevate corticosterone levels and decrease thyroxine levels in nestling birds. In nestling storm-petrels, levels of both corticosterone and thyroxine increased. Storm-petrels were found to secrete measurable levels of testosterone, but levels did not change during the prefledging period. Increased corticosterone levels might be part of an endocrine signal that initiates changes in feeding behavior, or may result from reduced food intake. Elevated thyroxine levels may be related to metabolic changes involved in mass loss. Future experimental work is needed to ascertain whether the described endocrine changes are responsible for, or result from, prefledging changes in petrel feeding behavior. PMID:20688060

  11. Dietary protein ingested before and during short photoperiods makes an impact on affect-related behaviours and plasma composition of amino acids in mice.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Goda, Ryosei; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Shibata, Satomi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Mizunoya, Wataru; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-11-28

    In mammals, short photoperiod is associated with high depression- and anxiety-like behaviours with low levels of the brain serotonin and its precursor tryptophan (Trp). Because the brain Trp levels are regulated by its ratio to large neutral amino acids (Trp:LNAA) in circulation, this study elucidated whether diets of various protein sources that contain different Trp:LNAA affect depression- and anxiety-like behaviours in C57BL/6J mice under short-day conditions (SD). In the control mice on a casein diet, time spent in the central area in the open field test (OFT) was lower in the mice under SD than in those under long-day conditions (LD), indicating that SD exposure induces anxiety-like behaviour. The SD-induced anxiety-like behaviour was countered by an α-lactalbumin diet given under SD. In the mice that were on a gluten diet before transition to SD, the time spent in the central area in the OFT under SD was higher than that in the SD control mice. Alternatively, mice that ingested soya protein before the transition to SD had lower immobility in the forced swim test, a depression-like behaviour, compared with the SD control. Analysis of Trp:LNAA revealed lower Trp:LNAA in the SD control compared with the LD control, which was counteracted by an α-lactalbumin diet under SD. Furthermore, mice on gluten or soya protein diets before transition to SD exhibited high Trp:LNAA levels in plasma under SD. In conclusion, ingestion of specific proteins at different times relative to photoperiodic transition may modulate anxiety- and/or depression-like behaviours, partially through changes in plasma Trp:LNAA. PMID:26370332

  12. Increasing levels of dietary crystalline methionine affect plasma methionine profiles, ammonia excretion, and the expression of genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rolland, Marine; Skov, Peter V; Larsen, Bodil K; Holm, Jørgen; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Dalsgaard, Johanne

    2016-08-01

    Strictly carnivorous fish with high requirements for dietary protein, such as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are interesting models for studying the role of amino acids as key regulators of intermediary metabolism. Methionine is an essential amino acid for rainbow trout, and works as a signalling factor in different metabolic pathways. The study investigated the effect of increasing dietary methionine intake on the intermediary metabolism in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout. For this purpose, five diets were formulated with increasing methionine levels from 0.60 to 1.29% dry matter. The diets were fed in excess for six weeks before three sampling campaigns carried out successively to elucidate (i) the hepatic expression of selected genes involved in lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the postprandial ammonia excretion; and (iii) the postprandial plasma methionine concentrations. The transcript levels of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthase, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 a), gluconeogenesis (fructose-1,6-biphosphatase) and amino acid catabolism (alanine amino transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase) were significantly affected by the increase in dietary methionine. Changes in gene expression reflected to some extent the decrease in ammonia excretion (P=0.022) and in the hepatosomatic index (HSI; P<0.001) when dietary methionine increased. Postprandial plasma methionine concentrations correlated positively with the dietary level (P<0.001) at the different sampling points. The study shows that the expression of several genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout responded in a dose-dependent manner to increasing levels of dietary methionine. PMID:27105833

  13. Switch of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Expression in the Plasma Membrane of Chondrogenic Cells Affects Cytosolic Ca2+-Oscillations and Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Fodor, János; Katona, Éva; Bartok, Adam; Oláh, Tamás; Sebe, Attila; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Zákány, Róza

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the key elements of signaling of chondroprogenitor cells at the earliest steps of differentiation may substantially improve our opportunities for the application of mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering, which is a promising approach of regenerative therapy of joint diseases. Ion channels, membrane potential and Ca2+-signaling are important regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Our aim was to identify such plasma membrane ion channels involved in signaling during chondrogenesis, which may serve as specific molecular targets for influencing chondrogenic differentiation and ultimately cartilage formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using patch-clamp, RT-PCR and Western-blot experiments, we found that chondrogenic cells in primary micromass cell cultures obtained from embryonic chicken limb buds expressed voltage-gated NaV1.4, KV1.1, KV1.3 and KV4.1 channels, although KV1.3 was not detectable in the plasma membrane. Tetrodotoxin (TTX), the inhibitor of NaV1.4 channels, had no effect on cartilage formation. In contrast, presence of 20 mM of the K+ channel blocker tetraethyl-ammonium (TEA) during the time-window of the final commitment of chondrogenic cells reduced KV currents (to 27±3% of control), cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation: to 39±4.4% of control), expression of cartilage-specific genes and consequently, cartilage formation (metachromasia: to 18.0±6.4% of control) and also depolarized the membrane potential (by 9.3±2.1 mV). High-frequency Ca2+-oscillations were also suppressed by 10 mM TEA (confocal microscopy: frequency to 8.5±2.6% of the control). Peak expression of TEA-sensitive KV1.1 in the plasma membrane overlapped with this period. Application of TEA to differentiated chondrocytes, mainly expressing the TEA-insensitive KV4.1 did not affect cartilage formation. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that the differentiation and proliferation of chondrogenic cells depend

  14. Effects of temperature on urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to short-term capture and handling stress in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    Extreme temperature can cause metabolic, immune and behavioural changes in amphibians. Short-term stress hormonal response via increased secretion of corticosterone enables amphibians to make necessary physiological and behavioural adjustments for coping with stressors. The effect of temperature on short-term corticosterone responses has not been studied in amphibians. In this study, this relationship was evaluated in adult male cane toads (Rhinella marina). We acclimated male toads (n=24 toads per group) at low, medium and high temperature (15, 25 or 35°C) under controlled laboratory conditions for a 14 day period. After thermal acclimation, short-term corticosterone responses were evaluated in the toads subjected to a standard capture and handling stress protocol over a 24h period. Corticosterone metabolites in toad urine were measured via enzyme-immunoassay. During acclimation, mean baseline urinary corticosterone level increased after transfer of the toads from wild into captivity and returned to baseline on day 14 of acclimation for each of the three temperatures. At the end of the 14 days of thermal acclimation period, baseline corticosterone level were highest for toad group at 35°C and lowest at 15°C. All toads generated urinary corticosterone responses to the standard capture and handling stressor for each temperature. Both individual and mean short-term corticosterone responses of the toads were highest at 35°C and lowest at 15°C. Furthermore, Q(10) values (the factor by which the reaction rate increases when the temperature is raised by 10°) were calculated for mean corrected integrated corticosterone responses as follows; (15-35°C) Q(10)=1.51, (15-25°C) Q(10)=1.60; (25-35°C) Q(10)=1.43. Both total and corrected integrated corticosterone responses were highest for toads at 35°C followed by 25°C and lowest for the 15°C toad group. Overall, the results have demonstrated the thermodynamic response of corticosterone secretion to short

  15. Quantitative analysis of human serum corticosterone by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ghulam, A; Kouach, M; Racadot, A; Boersma, A; Vantyghem, M C; Briand, G

    1999-04-30

    An original method based upon high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for corticosterone (B) quantification in human serum. After extraction by diethyl ether using triamcinolone (T) as an internal standard, solutes are separated on a C18 microbore column (250 X 1.0 mm, I.D.), using acetonitrile-water-formic acid (40:59.9:0.1, v/v/v) as the mobile phase (flow-rate 40 microl/min). Detection is performed on an API 1 single quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with a ESI interface and operated in positive ionization mode. Corticosterone quantifications were realized by computing peak area ratios (B/T) of the serum extracts analyzed in SIM mode (m/z 347 and m/z 395 for B and T. respectively), and comparing them with the calibration curve (r=0.998). PMID:10360442

  16. Parental care, loss of paternity and circulating levels of testosterone and corticosterone in a socially monogamous song bird

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In biparental birds testosterone levels of males are typically high during the mating phase and decrease during the parental phase. Testosterone implants may enhance mating behaviors, increase the likelihood of males to engage in extra-pair mating behavior and may reduce paternal care. Thus, sex steroids such as testosterone influence reproductive behaviors. Little is known, however, as to whether the more subtle differences in physiological concentrations of testosterone that occur between individuals are related to differences in paternal care, extra-pair behavior, and genetic paternity between those males. Here, we investigate these relationships in the male black redstart (Phoenicurus ochruros), a socially monogamous songbird with a low breeding synchrony. We used nestling provisioning as a proxy for parental care behavior and genetic paternity loss as a proxy for the efficiency of mate-guarding. Results There was no relationship between nestling provisioning and paternity loss of males. Baseline and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced levels of testosterone, but not baseline corticosterone, were significantly higher during the mating than during the provisioning phase. Males fed more often when temperatures decreased and fed less when they sang more, but we found no correlation between parental behavior and baseline or GnRH-induced testosterone, and baseline corticosterone – both measured during either the mating or the parental phase. However, males that experienced loss of paternity had lower levels of testosterone during the provisioning phase than males that did not lose paternity. Further, males that lost paternity also expressed higher baseline levels of corticosterone. Conclusions Physiological differences in testosterone or baseline corticosterone were not related to differences in parental care, suggesting that the variation of testosterone within a physiological range may not relate to the degree of paternal care in this

  17. Chronic Deep Brain Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Nucleus in Wistar Rats Alters Circulatory Levels of Corticosterone and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Calleja-Castillo, Juan Manuel; De La Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Morales-Espinoza, Gabriel; Moreno-Aguilar, Julia; Hernández, Maria Eugenia; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic option for several diseases, but its effects on HPA axis activity and systemic inflammation are unknown. This study aimed to detect circulatory variations of corticosterone and cytokines levels in Wistar rats, after 21 days of DBS-at the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMHvl), unilateral cervical vagotomy (UCVgX), or UCVgX plus DBS. We included the respective control (C) and sham (S) groups (n = 6 rats per group). DBS treated rats had higher levels of TNF-α (120%; P < 0.01) and IFN-γ (305%; P < 0.001) but lower corticosterone concentration (48%; P < 0.001) than C and S. UCVgX animals showed increased corticosterone levels (154%; P < 0.001) versus C and S. UCVgX plus DBS increased IL-1β (402%; P < 0.001), IL-6 (160%; P < 0.001), and corsticosterone (178%; P < 0.001 versus 48%; P < 0.001) compared with the C and S groups. Chronic DBS at VMHvl induced a systemic inflammatory response accompanied by a decrease of HPA axis function. UCVgX rats experienced HPA axis hyperactivity as result of vagus nerve injury; however, DBS was unable to block the HPA axis hyperactivity induced by unilateral cervical vagotomy. Further studies are necessary to explore these findings and their clinical implication. PMID:24235973

  18. Plasma IL-12 levels are suppressed in vivo by stress and surgery through endogenous release of glucocorticoids and prostaglandins but not catecholamines or opioids.

    PubMed

    Shaashua, Lee; Rosenne, Ella; Neeman, Elad; Sorski, Liat; Sominsky, Luba; Matzner, Pini; Page, Gayle G; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2014-04-01

    IL-12 is a prominent Th1 differentiator and leukocyte activator. Ample studies showed suppression of IL-12 production by numerous stress factors, including prostaglandins, catecholamines, glucocorticoids, and opioids, but did so in vitro and in the context of artificial leukocyte activation, not simulating the in vivo setting. In a recent study we reported in vivo suppression of plasma IL-12 levels by behavioral stress and surgery. The current study aims to elucidate neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in naïve F344 rats. To this end, both adrenalectomy and administration of specific antagonists were used, targeting the aforementioned stress factors. The results indicated that corticosterone and prostaglandins are prominent mediators of the IL-12-suppressing effects of stress and surgery, apparently through directly suppressing leukocyte IL-12 production. Following surgery, endogenous prostaglandins exerted their effects mainly through elevating corticosterone levels. Importantly, stress-induced release of epinephrine or opioids had no impact on plasma IL-12 levels, while pharmacological administration of epinephrine reduced plasma IL-12 levels by elevating corticosterone levels. Last, a whole blood in vitro study indicated that prostaglandins and corticosterone, but not epinephrine, suppressed IL-12 production in non-stimulated leukocytes, and only corticosterone did so in the context of CpG-C-induced IL-12 production. Overall, the findings reiterate the notion that results from in vitro or pharmacological in vivo studies cannot indicate the effects of endogenously released stress hormones under stress/surgery conditions. Herein, corticosterone and prostaglandins, but not catecholamines or opioids, were key mediators of the suppressive effect of stress and surgery on in vivo plasma IL-12 levels in otherwise naïve animals. PMID:24636497

  19. Plasma IL-12 levels are suppressed in vivo by stress and surgery through endogenous release of glucocorticoids and prostaglandins but not catecholamines or opioids

    PubMed Central

    Shaashua, Lee; Rosenne, Ella; Neeman, Elad; Sorski, Liat; Sominsky, Luba; Matzner, Pini; Page, Gayle G.; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2014-01-01

    IL-12 is a prominent Th1 differentiator and leukocyte activator. Ample studies showed suppression of IL-12 production by numerous stress factors, including prostaglandins, catecholamines, glucocorticoids, and opioids, but did so in vitro and in the context of artificial leukocyte activation, not simulating the in vivo setting. In a recent study we reported in vivo suppression of plasma IL-12 levels by behavioral stress and surgery. The current study aims to elucidate neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in naïve F344 rats. To this end, both adrenalectomy and administration of specific antagonists were used, targeting the aforementioned stress factors. The results indicated that corticosterone and prostaglandins are prominent mediators of the IL-12-suppressing effects of stress and surgery, apparently through directly suppressing leukocyte IL-12 production. Following surgery, endogenous prostaglandins exerted their effects mainly through elevating corticosterone levels. Importantly, stress-induced release of epinephrine or opioids had no impact on plasma IL-12 levels, while pharmacological administration of epinephrine reduced plasma IL-12 levels by elevating corticosterone levels. Last, a whole blood in vitro study indicated that prostaglandins and corticosterone, but not epinephrine, suppressed IL-12 production in non-stimulated leukocytes, and only corticosterone did so in the context of CpG-C-induced IL-12 production. Overall, the findings reiterate the notion that results from in vitro or pharmacological in vivo studies cannot indicate the effects of endogenously released stress hormones under stress/surgery conditions. Herein, corticosterone and prostaglandins, but not catecholamines or opioids, were key mediators of the suppressive effect of stress and surgery on in vivo plasma IL-12 levels in otherwise naïve animals. PMID:24636497

  20. Embryonic exposure to corticosterone modifies the juvenile stress response, oxidative stress and telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Haussmann, Mark F.; Longenecker, Andrew S.; Marchetto, Nicole M.; Juliano, Steven A.; Bowden, Rachel M.

    2012-01-01

    Early embryonic exposure to maternal glucocorticoids can broadly impact physiology and behaviour across phylogenetically diverse taxa. The transfer of maternal glucocorticoids to offspring may be an inevitable cost associated with poor environmental conditions, or serve as a maternal effect that alters offspring phenotype in preparation for a stressful environment. Regardless, maternal glucocorticoids are likely to have both costs and benefits that are paid and collected over different developmental time periods. We manipulated yolk corticosterone (cort) in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) to examine the potential impacts of embryonic exposure to maternal stress on the juvenile stress response and cellular ageing. Here, we report that juveniles exposed to experimentally increased cort in ovo had a protracted decline in cort during the recovery phase of the stress response. All birds, regardless of treatment group, shifted to oxidative stress during an acute stress response. In addition, embryonic exposure to cort resulted in higher levels of reactive oxygen metabolites and an over-representation of short telomeres compared with the control birds. In many species, individuals with higher levels of oxidative stress and shorter telomeres have the poorest survival prospects. Given this, long-term costs of glucocorticoid-induced phenotypes may include accelerated ageing and increased mortality. PMID:22072607

  1. Corticosterone regulates fear memory via Rac1 activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Ding, Ze-Yang; Gan, Cheng; Mao, Rong-Rong; Zhou, Heng; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Qi-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Stressful events can generate enduring memories, which may induce certain psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms in these processes remain unclear. In this study, we examined whether the active form of the small G protein Rac1, Rac1-GTP, is involved in fear memory. Firstly, we detected the time course changes of Rac1-GTP after foot shocks (a strong stressor) and exogenous corticosterone (CORT) treatment. The data showed that stress and CORT induced the downregulation of Rac1-GTP in the hippocampus. Changes in the serum CORT level were negatively correlated with the level of Rac1-GTP. Additionally, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU38486, not only recovered the expression of Rac1-GTP but also impaired fear memory. Furthermore, systemic administration of NSC23766, an inhibitor of Rac1-GTP, improved fear memory at 1.5 and 24h. Therefore, Rac1 activity plays a critical role in stress-related cognition and may be a potential target in stress-related disorders. PMID:27249795

  2. Differential Regulation of Bcl-xL Gene Expression by Corticosterone, Progesterone, and Retinoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, Steve J; Sun, Haipeng; Zhang, Jack; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M

    2016-06-01

    Corticosterone (CT), progesterone (PG), and retinoic acid (RA) are capable of inhibiting Doxorubicin (Dox) from inducing apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, CT, PG, and RA induce increases of Bcl-xL protein and mRNA, and activate a 3.2 kb bcl-x gene promoter. CT and RA, but not PG, induced the activity of a 0.9 kb bcl-x promoter, containing sequences for AP-1 and NF-kB binding. RA, but not CT or PG, induced NF-kB activation. CT, but not PG or RA, induced AP-1 activation, and induction of the 0.9 kb bcl-x reporter by CT was inhibited by dominant negative c-Jun TAM-67 or removal of AP-1 binding site. Therefore, although CT, PG, and RA all induce Bcl-xL mRNA and protein, three independent mechanisms are in operation: while CT induces Bcl-xL via AP-1 transcription factor, and RA induces NF-kB activation and bcl-x promoter activity, PG induces Bcl-xL via a mechanism independent of NF-kB or AP-1. PMID:26915917

  3. Effects of population density on corticosterone levels of prairie voles in the field.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Dimitri V; Wallace, Gerard N; Calderone, Stefanie; Gorinshteyn, Marija; St Mary, Colette M; Phelps, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    High population density is often associated with increased levels of stress-related hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT). Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are a socially monogamous species known for their large population density fluctuations in the wild. Although CORT influences the social behavior of prairie voles in the lab, the effect of population density on CORT has not previously been quantified in this species in the field. We validated a non-invasive hormone assay for measuring CORT metabolites in prairie vole feces. We then used semi-natural enclosures to experimentally manipulate population density, and measured density effects on male space use and fecal CORT levels. Our enclosures generated patterns of space use and social interaction that were consistent with previous prairie vole field studies. Contrary to the positive relationship between CORT and density typical of other taxa, we found that lower population densities (80 animals/ha) produced higher fecal CORT than higher densities (240/ha). Combined with prior work in the lab and field, the data suggest that high prairie vole population densities indicate favorable environments, perhaps through reduced predation risk. Lastly, we found that field animals had lower fecal CORT levels than laboratory-living animals. The data emphasize the usefulness of prairie voles as models for integrating ecological, evolutionary, and mechanistic questions in social behavior. PMID:26342968

  4. Parity modifies the effects of fluoxetine and corticosterone on behavior, stress reactivity, and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Workman, Joanna L; Gobinath, Aarthi R; Kitay, Nicole F; Chow, Carmen; Brummelte, Susanne; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-06-01

    The postpartum confers considerable risk for developing depression. Depressed patients have elevated cortisol concentrations and impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis negative feedback. Chronic stress or corticosterone (CORT) induces a depressive-like phenotype in rodents, including during the postpartum. The present study examined whether nulliparous and postpartum rats were differentially vulnerable to chronic high CORT and whether fluoxetine (FLX) would differentially alter the brain, behavior, and neuroendocrine function depending on reproductive experience. Nulliparous and postpartum female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups that received 21 d of injections of CORT or oil plus FLX or saline. CORT reduced maternal behaviors whereas FLX reversed CORT-induced decreases in maternal care. CORT increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST), but FLX did not significantly alter immobility in either nulliparous or postpartum rats. Dams spent less time immobile and had lower CORT concentrations after the FST compared with nulliparae, indicating that aspects of the postpartum period may provide resilience against a depressive-like phenotype. Both CORT and parity reduced neurogenesis (doublecortin expression) in the dentate gyrus. FLX-treated rats had lower CORT concentrations following the FST and more immature neurons, but only in the nulliparous, and not postpartum, groups. These data suggest that the postpartum may inherently protect against some deleterious effects of high CORT but also confer resistance to the neurogenic and endocrine effects of FLX. Our findings are important for understanding how females in different reproductive states respond to glucocorticoids and antidepressants. PMID:26808316

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyl exposure and corticosterone levels in seven polar seabird species.

    PubMed

    Tartu, S; Angelier, F; Bustnes, J O; Moe, B; Hanssen, S A; Herzke, D; Gabrielsen, G W; Verboven, N; Verreault, J; Labadie, P; Budzinski, H; Wingfield, J C; Chastel, O

    2015-02-01

    The role of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on exposure-related endocrine effects has been poorly investigated in wild birds. This is the case for stress hormones including corticosterone (CORT). Some studies have suggested that environmental exposure to PCBs and altered CORT secretion might be associated. Here we investigated the relationships between blood PCB concentrations and circulating CORT levels in seven free-ranging polar seabird species occupying different trophic positions, and hence covering a wide range of PCB exposure. Blood ∑₇PCB concentrations (range: 61-115,632 ng/g lw) were positively associated to baseline or stress-induced CORT levels in three species and negatively associated to stress-induced CORT levels in one species. Global analysis suggests that in males, baseline CORT levels generally increase with increasing blood ∑₇PCB concentrations, whereas stress-induced CORT levels decrease when reaching high blood ∑₇PCB concentrations. This study suggests that the nature of the PCB-CORT relationships may depend on the level of PCB exposure. PMID:25541072

  6. [The individual characteristics of the nociceptive sensitivity of Wistar rats correlated with the content of steroid hormones in the blood plasma].

    PubMed

    Polyntsev, Iu V; Bykova, E V; Rogatina, E L; Samko, Iu N

    1991-01-01

    In male rats of Wistar strain individual nociceptive sensitivity properties were studied in correlation with steroid hormones level in the plasma. Seven groups of experimental animals were observed remarkable for dynamics of nociceptive sensitivity. Repeatedly applied test painful stimuli caused reliable changes of corticosterone and testosterone level in the plasma. Individual differences were found of the level of steroid hormones in the plasma in rats from different groups. PMID:1656640

  7. p-Chloro-diphenyl diselenide reverses memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone and modulates hippocampal [(3)H]glutamate uptake in mice.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Vanessa A; Sari, Marcel H M; Heck, Suélen O; Stangherlin, Eluza C; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress or chronically high levels of glucocorticoids can result in memory impairment. This study aimed to investigate if 4,4'-dichloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2 reverses memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone administration in mice and its possible mechanism of action. Swiss mice received corticosterone (20μg/ml) in their drinking water during four weeks. In the last week, the animals were treated with (p-ClPhSe)2 (1 or 5mg/kg) by the intragastric route (i.g.) once a day for 7days. The cognitive performance of mice was assessed through the object recognition test (ORT), the object location test (OLT) and the step-down passive avoidance test (SDPA), some of predictive tests of memory. Biochemical parameters were determined and locomotor activity of mouse was performed to gain insight in (p-ClPhSe)2 toxicity. The findings demonstrated that treatment with (p-ClPhSe)2 in both doses was effective in reversing memory deficits in the ORT, the OLT and the SDPA caused by corticosterone exposure in mice. Treatment with (p-ClPhSe)2 at both doses reversed the increase in the [(3)H] glutamate uptake by hippocampal slices of mice treated with corticosterone. By contrast, [(3)H] glutamate uptake by brain cortical slices was not altered in mice exposed to corticosterone. The Na(+)K(+)ATPase activity was not altered in hippocampus and cerebral cortices of mice treated with corticosterone. There was no sign of toxicity in mice treated with (p-ClPhSe)2. This organoselenium compound reversed memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone and modulated hippocampal [(3)H]glutamate uptake in mice. PMID:27211333

  8. Benefits and costs of increased levels of corticosterone in seabird chicks.

    PubMed

    Kitaysky, A S; Kitaiskaia, E V; Piatt, J F; Wingfield, J C

    2003-01-01

    Seabird chicks respond to food shortages by increasing corticosterone (cort) secretion, which is probably associated with fitness benefits and costs. To examine this, we experimentally increased levels of circulating cort in captive black-legged kittiwake chicks fed ad libitum. We found that cort-implanted chicks begged more frequently and were more aggressive compared to controls. These behavioral modifications must be beneficial to chicks as they facilitate acquisition of food from the parents and might trigger brood reduction and reduced competition for food. Cort-implanted chicks also increased food intake; however, their growth rates were similar to controls. To examine the costs of chronically increased circulating levels of cort, we removed cort implants and, after a 10-day recovery period, tested cognitive abilities of young kittiwakes. We found that the ability of kittiwakes to associate a visual cue with the presence of food in a choice situation was compromised by the experimental elevation of cort during development. To examine the long-term costs of increased levels of cort, 8 months later we tested the performance of the same individuals in a spatial task requiring them to make a detour around a barrier in order to escape from an enclosure. Individuals treated with cort during development took significantly more time to solve this task compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that the adrenocortical response of a developing bird to environmental stressors is associated with both benefits (increased food intake, foraging behavior, and aggression) and costs (low growth efficiency and compromised cognitive abilities later in life). This provides an evolutionary framework for relating juvenile physiological traits to fitness of birds in subsequent life-history stages. PMID:12614644

  9. Corticosterone primes the neuroinflammatory response to DFP in mice: potential animal model of Gulf War Illness

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, James P.; Kelly, Kimberly A.; Locker, Alicia R.; Miller, Diane B.; Lasley, Steve M.

    2016-01-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a multi-symptom disorder with features characteristic of persistent sickness behavior. Among conditions encountered in the Gulf War (GW) theater were physiological stressors (e.g., heat/cold/physical activity/sleep deprivation), prophylactic treatment with the reversible AChE inhibitor, pyridostigmine bromide (PB), the insect repellent, N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), and potentially the nerve agent, sarin. Prior exposure to the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, corticosterone (CORT), at levels associated with high physiological stress, can paradoxically prime the CNS to produce a robust proinflammatory response to neurotoxicants and systemic inflammation; such neuroinflammatory effects can be associated with sickness behavior. Here, we examined whether CORT primed the CNS to mount neuroinflammatory responses to GW exposures as a potential model of GWI. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with chronic (14 days) PB/DEET, subchronic (7–14 days) CORT, and acute exposure (day 15) to diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), a sarin surrogate and irreversible AChE inhibitor. DFP alone caused marked brain-wide neuroinflammation assessed by qPCR of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL6, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, IL-1β, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. Pre-treatment with high physiological levels of CORT greatly augmented (up to 300-fold) the neuroinflammatory responses to DFP. Anti-inflammatory pre-treatment with minocycline suppressed many proinflammatory responses to CORT+DFP. Our findings are suggestive of a possible critical, yet unrecognized interaction between the stressor/environment of the GW theater and agent exposure(s) unique to this war. Such exposures may in fact prime the CNS to amplify future neuroinflammatory responses to pathogens, injury, or toxicity. Such occurrences could potentially result in the prolonged episodes of sickness behavior observed in GWI. PMID:25753028

  10. Benefits and costs of increased levels of corticosterone in seabird chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Kitaiskaia, E.V.; Piatt, J.F.; Wingfield, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Seabird chicks respond to food shortages by increasing corticosterone (cort) secretion, which is probably associated with fitness benefits and costs. To examine this, we experimentally increased levels of circulating cort in captive black-legged kittiwake chicks fed ad libitum. We found that cort-implanted chicks begged more frequently and were more aggressive compared to controls. These behavioral modifications must be beneficial to chicks as they facilitate acquisition of food from the parents and might trigger brood reduction and reduced competition for food. Cort-implanted chicks also increased food intake; however, their growth rates were similar to controls. To examine the costs of chronically increased circulating levels of cort, we removed cort implants and, after a 10-day recovery period, tested cognitive abilities of young kittiwakes. We found that the ability of kittiwakes to associate a visual cue with the presence of food in a choice situation was compromised by the experimental elevation of cort during development. To examine the long-term costs of increased levels of cort, 8 months later we tested the performance of the same individuals in a spatial task requiring them to make a detour around a barrier in order to escape from an enclosure. Individuals treated with cort during development took significantly more time to solve this task compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that the adrenocortical response of a developing bird to environmental stressors is associated with both benefits (increased food intake, foraging behavior, and aggression) and costs (low growth efficiency and compromised cognitive abilities later in life). This provides an evolutionary framework for relating juvenile physiological traits to fitness of birds in subsequent life-history stages. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  11. Transient increase in alcohol self-administration following a period of chronic exposure to corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Besheer, Joyce; Fisher, Kristen R; Lindsay, Tessa G; Cannady, Reginald

    2013-09-01

    Stressful life events and chronic stressors have been associated with escalations in alcohol drinking. Stress exposure leads to the secretion of glucocorticoids (cortisol in the human; corticosterone (CORT) in the rodent). To model a period of heightened elevations in CORT, the present work assessed the effects of chronic exposure to the stress hormone CORT on alcohol self-administration. Male Long Evans rats were trained to self-administer a sweetened alcohol solution (2% sucrose/15% alcohol) resulting in moderate levels of daily alcohol intake (0.5-0.7 g/kg). Following stable baseline operant self-administration, rats received CORT in the drinking water for 7 days. A transient increase in alcohol self-administration was observed on the first self-administration session following CORT exposure, and behavior returned to control levels by the second session. Control experiments determined that this increase in alcohol self-administration was specific to alcohol, unrelated to general motor activation, and functionally dissociated from decreased CORT levels at the time of testing. These results indicate that repeated exposure to heightened levels of stress hormone (e.g., as may be experienced during stressful episodes) has the potential to lead to exacerbated alcohol intake in low to moderate drinkers. Given that maladaptive drinking patterns, such as escalated alcohol drinking following stressful episodes, have the potential to put an individual at risk for future drinking disorders, utilization of this model will be important for examination of neuroadaptations that occur as a consequence of CORT exposure in order to better understand escalated drinking following stressful episodes in nondependent individuals. PMID:23643750

  12. Effects of chronic corticosterone and imipramine administration on panic and anxiety-related responses.

    PubMed

    Diniz, L; Dos Reis, B B; de Castro, G M; Medalha, C C; Viana, M B

    2011-10-01

    It is known that chronic high levels of corticosterone (CORT) enhance aversive responses such as avoidance and contextual freezing. In contrast, chronic CORT does not alter defensive behavior induced by the exposure to a predator odor. Since different defense-related responses have been associated with specific anxiety disorders found in clinical settings, the observation that chronic CORT alters some defensive behaviors but not others might be relevant to the understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic CORT administration (through surgical implantation of a 21-day release 200 mg pellet) on avoidance acquisition and escape expression by male Wistar rats (200 g in weight at the beginning of the experiments, N = 6-10/group) tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM). These defensive behaviors have been associated with generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. Since the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine is successfully used to treat both conditions, the effects of combined treatment with chronic imipramine (15 mg, ip) and CORT were also investigated. Results showed that chronic CORT facilitated avoidance performance, an anxiogenic-like effect (P < 0.05), without changing escape responses. Imipramine significantly reversed the anxiogenic effect of CORT (P < 0.05), although the drug did not exhibit anxiolytic effects by itself. Confirming previous observations, imipramine inhibited escape responses, a panicolytic-like effect. Unlike chronic CORT, imipramine also decreased locomotor activity in an open field. These data suggest that chronic CORT specifically altered ETM avoidance, a fact that should be relevant to a better understanding of the physiopathology of generalized anxiety and panic disorder. PMID:21915474

  13. Circadian dependence of corticosterone release to light exposure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Pargament, Jonathan M; Lee, Theresa M

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a positive correlation between glucocorticoid levels and circadian reentrainment time following a shift in the light:dark (LD) cycle. We conducted a series of experiments to examine the circadian dependence of the corticosterone (CORT) response to light. Exp. 1 measured CORT release in rats exposed to light at six timepoints. Light presented during the subjective night increased CORT (p<0.05), while light presented during the subjective day did not. In Exp. 2, we documented the time course of the CORT response to light in entrained animals. Rats exposed to light at zeitgeber time (ZT) 18 had a maximal increase in CORT levels following 60 min of stimulus presentation (p<0.05). There was also an increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone following 15 min of light at ZT18 (p<0.05). In an effort to elucidate the effect of changes in the LD cycle on the circadian profile of CORT, Exp. 3 followed the CORT rhythm (in cerebrospinal fluid) of rats prior to and following a shift in the LD cycle. The CORT nadir was elevated following a 6 h photic advance (p<0.05), as was the mean CORT concentration during the peak phase (p<0.05). Most components of the circadian CORT rhythm, however, failed to show an immediate shift towards the change in the light cycle. Together, these data support the hypothesis that a photic phase-shift results in elevated CORT levels, while the rhythm of CORT secretion is robust against changes in the photic environment. PMID:17628617

  14. Maternal Condition but Not Corticosterone Is Linked to Offspring Sex Ratio in a Passerine Bird

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Lindsay J.; Evans, Neil P.; Heidinger, Britt J.; Adams, Aileen; Arnold, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence of offspring sex ratio adjustment in a range of species, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unknown. Elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT) is associated with factors that can favour brood sex ratio adjustment, such as reduced maternal condition, food availability and partner attractiveness. Therefore, the steroid hormone has been suggested to play a key role in sex ratio manipulation. However, despite correlative and causal evidence CORT is linked to sex ratio manipulation in some avian species, the timing of adjustment varies between studies. Consequently, whether CORT is consistently involved in sex-ratio adjustment, and how the hormone acts as a mechanism for this adjustment remains unclear. Here we measured maternal baseline CORT and body condition in free-living blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) over three years and related these factors to brood sex ratio and nestling quality. In addition, a non-invasive technique was employed to experimentally elevate maternal CORT during egg laying, and its effects upon sex ratio and nestling quality were measured. We found that maternal CORT was not correlated with brood sex ratio, but mothers with elevated CORT fledged lighter offspring. Also, experimental elevation of maternal CORT did not influence brood sex ratio or nestling quality. In one year, mothers in superior body condition produced male biased broods, and maternal condition was positively correlated with both nestling mass and growth rate in all years. Unlike previous studies maternal condition was not correlated with maternal CORT. This study provides evidence that maternal condition is linked to brood sex ratio manipulation in blue tits. However, maternal baseline CORT may not be the mechanistic link between the maternal condition and sex ratio adjustment. Overall, this study serves to highlight the complexity of sex ratio adjustment in birds and the difficulties associated with identifying sex biasing mechanisms. PMID:25347532

  15. Corticosterone mediates stress-related increased intestinal permeability in a region-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gen; Wu, Shu-Pei; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E; Wiley, John W.; Hong, Shuangsong

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic psychological stress (CPS) is associated with increased intestinal epithelial permeability and visceral hyperalgesia. It is unknown whether corticosterone (CORT) plays a role in mediating alterations of epithelial permeability in response to CPS. Methods Male rats were subjected to 1-hour water avoidance (WA) stress or subcutaneous CORT injection daily for 10 consecutive days in the presence or absence of corticoid-receptor antagonist RU-486. The visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) was measured. The in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion was used to measure intestinal permeability in jejunum and colon simultaneously. Key Results We observed significant decreases in the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and tight junction proteins in the colon but not the jejunum in stressed rats. These changes were largely reproduced by serial CORT injections in control rats and were significantly reversed by RU-486. Stressed and CORT-injected rats demonstrated a 3-fold increase in permeability for PEG-400 (MW) in colon but not jejunum and significant increase in VMR to CRD, which was significantly reversed by RU-486. In addition, no differences in permeability to PEG-4,000 and PEG-35,000 were detected between control and WA groups. Conclusions & Inferences Our findings indicate that CPS was associated with region-specific decrease in epithelial tight junction protein levels in the colon, increased colon epithelial permeability to low-molecular weight macromolecules which were largely reproduced by CORT treatment in control rats and prevented by RU-486. These observations implicate a novel, region-specific role for CORT as a mediator of CPS-induced increased permeability to macromolecules across the colon epithelium. PMID:23336591

  16. Changes in corticosterone concentrations and behavior during Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus).

    PubMed

    Love, Ashley C; Foltz, Sarah L; Adelman, James S; Moore, Ignacio T; Hawley, Dana M

    2016-09-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones are important for energy mobilization as well as regulation of the immune system, and thus these hormones are particularly likely to both influence and respond to pathogen infection in vertebrates. In this study, we examined how the glucocorticoid stress response in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) interacts with experimental infection of the naturally-occurring bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We also investigated whether infection-induced concentrations of corticosterone (CORT), the primary glucocorticoid in birds, were associated with the expression of sickness behavior, the lethargy typically observed in vertebrates early in infection. We found that experimental infection with MG resulted in significantly higher CORT levels on day 5 post-infection, but this effect appeared to be limited to female house finches only. Regardless of sex, infected individuals with greater disease severity had the highest CORT concentrations on day 5 post-infection. House finches exposed to MG exhibited behavioral changes, with infected birds having significantly lower activity levels than sham-inoculated individuals. However, CORT concentrations and the extent of sickness behaviors exhibited among infected birds were not associated. Finally, pre-infection CORT concentrations were associated with reduced inflammation and pathogen load in inoculated males, but not females. Our results suggest that the house finch glucocorticoid stress response may both influence and respond to MG infection in sex-specific ways, but because we had a relatively low sample size of males, future work should confirm these patterns. Finally, manipulative experiments should be performed to test whether the glucocorticoid stress response acts as a brake on the inflammatory response associated with MG infection in house finches. PMID:27288634

  17. Role of corticosterone in the murine enteric nervous system during fasting

    PubMed Central

    Lowette, Katrien; Tack, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Food intake depends on a tightly controlled interplay of appetite hormones and the enteric (ENS) and central nervous system. Corticosterone (CORT) levels, which are mainly studied with regard to stress, are also increased during fasting. However, the role of CORT in the ENS remains elusive. Therefore, we investigated whether CORT modulates activity of enteric neurons and whether its intracellular regulator, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type 1, is present in the myenteric plexus, using immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Effects of CORT on neuronal activity and expression of neuronal markers in the myenteric plexus were assessed via Ca2+ imaging and RT-qPCR, respectively, whereas modulations in mixing behavior were measured by video imaging. 11β-HSD-1 was present in enteric neurons along the gastrointestinal tract, and its expression increased after fasting (control: 0.58 ± 0.09 vs. fasted: 1.5 ± 0.23; P < 0.05). CORT incubation significantly reduced neuronal Ca2+ transients in tissues stimulated by electrical pulses (control: 1.31 ± 0.01 vs. CORT: 1.27 ± 0.01, P < 0.01) and in cultured neurons (control: 1.85 ± 0.03 vs. CORT: 1.76 ± 0.03, P < 0.05). CORT decreased small intestinal mixing (P < 0.05). Incubation of muscle myenteric plexus preparations with CORT induced an increase in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1, P < 0.05) and synaptobrevin (P < 0.05) but not in 11β-HSD-1 mRNA expression. In addition, fasting induced significant elevations in synaptobrevin (P < 0.05) and CB1 (P < 0.01) mRNA expression. In conclusion, we suggest CORT to be a downstream factor in a feeding state-related pathway that modulates important proteins in the fine tuning of enteric neurotransmission and gastrointestinal motility. PMID:25214399

  18. Diurnal Corticosterone Presence and Phase Modulate Clock Gene Expression in the Male Rat Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Chun, Lauren E; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2016-04-01

    Mood disorders are associated with dysregulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) function, circadian rhythms, and diurnal glucocorticoid (corticosterone [CORT]) circulation. Entrainment of clock gene expression in some peripheral tissues depends on CORT. In this study, we characterized over the course of the day the mRNA expression pattern of the core clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the male rat PFC and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) under different diurnal CORT conditions. In experiment 1, rats were left adrenal-intact (sham) or were adrenalectomized (ADX) followed by 10 daily antiphasic (opposite time of day of the endogenous CORT peak) ip injections of either vehicle or 2.5 mg/kg CORT. In experiment 2, all rats received ADX surgery followed by 13 daily injections of vehicle or CORT either antiphasic or in-phase with the endogenous CORT peak. In sham rats clock gene mRNA levels displayed a diurnal pattern of expression in the PFC and the SCN, but the phase differed between the 2 structures. ADX substantially altered clock gene expression patterns in the PFC. This alteration was normalized by in-phase CORT treatment, whereas antiphasic CORT treatment appears to have eliminated a diurnal pattern (Per1 and Bmal1) or dampened/inverted its phase (Per2). There was very little effect of CORT condition on clock gene expression in the SCN. These experiments suggest that an important component of glucocorticoid circadian physiology entails CORT regulation of the molecular clock in the PFC. Consequently, they also point to a possible mechanism that contributes to PFC disrupted function in disorders associated with abnormal CORT circulation. PMID:26901093

  19. Effect of arousing stimuli on circulating corticosterone and the circadian rhythms of luteinizing hormone (LH) surges and locomotor activity in estradiol-treated ovariectomized (ovx+EB) Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Legan, S J; Peng, X; Yun, C; Duncan, M J

    2015-06-01

    In most proestrous hamsters, novel wheel exposure phase advances activity rhythms and blocks the preovulatory LH surge, which occurs 2h earlier the next day. Because wheel immobilization does not prevent these effects we hypothesized that arousal alone blocks and phase advances the LH surge. Ovariectomized (ovx) hamsters received a jugular vein cannula and estradiol benzoate (EB) or vehicle was injected sc. The next day (Day 1), at zeitgeber time (ZT) 4-5 (ZT 12 = lights off), after obtaining a blood sample, each hamster was exposed to constant darkness (DD), and either remained in her home cage or was transferred to a new cage and exposed to a running wheel or a 2-hour arousal paradigm. Blood samples were obtained in dim red light and activity was recorded hourly until ~ZT 10-11 on Days 1 and 2. For the next 1-2 weeks, activity was monitored in DD. Plasma LH and corticosterone were assessed by RIA. Novel wheel exposure or arousal at ZT 4 greatly attenuated the Day 1 LH surge in ovx+EB hamsters, and phase advanced the Day 2 LH surge by about 2h. In proestrous hamsters, novel wheel exposure led to a prolonged (>2h) increase in corticosterone levels only when LH surges were blocked. Phase advances in activity rhythms were enhanced by estradiol and arousal. The results suggest that estradiol modulates the effectiveness of non-photic stimuli. The role of the increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis associated with novel wheel-induced attenuation of LH surges in ovx+EB hamsters remains to be determined. PMID:25958077

  20. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. PMID:25776460

  1. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 3; Plasma Analysis Hormone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.; Popova, I. A.; Grossman, E.; Rudolph, I.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma from space flight and tail suspended rats was analyzed for a number of constituents in order to evaluate their metabolic status and endocrine function. The data presented here cover plasma hormone measurements. Corticosterone, thyroxine, and testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Prolactin and growth hormone were measured by double antibody immunoassays using hormones and antisera prepared in house. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  2. Alterations in body temperature, corticosterone, and behavior following the administration of 5-methoxy-diisopropyltryptamine ('foxy') to adult rats: a new drug of abuse.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael T; Herring, Nicole R; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Campbell, Nicholas G; Lipton, Jack W; McCrea, Anne E; Vorhees, Charles V

    2007-06-01

    Many drugs are used or abused in social contexts without understanding the ramifications of their use. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly popular drug, 5-methoxy-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MEO-DIPT; 'foxy' or 'foxy-methoxy'). Two experiments were performed. In the first, 5-MEO-DIPT (0, 10, or 20 mg/kg) was administered to rats four times on a single day and animals were examined 3 days later. The animals that received 5-MEO-DIPT demonstrated hypothermia during the period of drug administration and delayed mild hyperthermic rebound for at least 48 h. Corticosterone levels in plasma were elevated in a dose-dependent manner compared to saline-treated animals with minor changes in 5-HT turnover and no changes in monoamine levels. In experiment 2, rats were examined in behavioral tasks following either 0 or 20 mg/kg of 5-MEO-DIPT. The animals treated with 5-MEO-DIPT showed hypoactivity and an attenuated response to (+)-methamphetamine-induced stimulation (1 mg/kg). In a test of path integration (Cincinnati water maze), 5-MEO-DIPT-treated animals displayed deficits in performance compared to the saline-treated animals. No differences were noted in the ability of the animals to perform in the Morris water maze or on tests of novel object or place recognition. The data demonstrate that 5-MEO-DIPT alters the ability of an animal to perform certain cognitive tasks, while leaving others intact and disrupts the endocrine system. 5-MEO-DIPT may have the potential to induce untoward effects in humans. PMID:17047665

  3. Corticosterone, prolactin and egg neglect behavior in relation to mercury and legacy POPs in a long-lived Antarctic bird.

    PubMed

    Tartu, S; Angelier, F; Wingfield, J C; Bustamante, P; Labadie, P; Budzinski, H; Weimerskirch, H; Bustnes, J O; Chastel, O

    2015-02-01

    Seabirds often have high loads of contaminants. These contaminants have endocrine disrupting properties but their relationships with some endocrine mechanisms are still poorly investigated in free-living organisms. This is the case for the stress response which shifts energy investment away from reproduction and redirects it towards survival. In birds, this stress response is achieved through a release of corticosterone and is also accompanied by a decrease in circulating prolactin, an anterior pituitary hormone widely involved in regulating parental cares. We measured blood concentrations of some legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and mercury (Hg) and examined their relationships with the corticosterone and prolactin responses of known-age (9-46 years old) incubating snow petrels (Pagodroma nivea) to a standardized capture/handling stress protocol. In this Antarctic seabird, we also investigated whether high contaminant burden correlates with a higher occurrence of egg neglect, a frequently observed behavior in snow petrels. POPs and Hg were unrelated to age. Stress-induced corticosterone concentrations were positively related to POPs in both sexes, and stress-induced prolactin concentrations were negatively related to Hg in males. Egg-neglect behavior was not related to POPs burden, but males with higher Hg concentrations were more likely to neglect their egg. This suggests that in birds, relationships between age and contaminants are complex and that even low to moderate concentrations of POPs and Hg are significantly related to hormonal secretion. In this Antarctic species, exposure to legacy POPs and Hg could make individuals more susceptible to environmental stressors such as ongoing disturbances in Polar Regions. PMID:25461020

  4. Resveratrol reverses the effects of chronic unpredictable mild stress on behavior, serum corticosterone levels and BDNF expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dexiang; Xie, Kai; Yang, Xudong; Gu, Jianhua; Ge, Li; Wang, Xueer; Wang, Zhen

    2014-05-01

    Depression is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders and has been associated with the neuroendocrine system and alterations in specific brain proteins. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol enriched in polygonum cuspidatum and has diverse biological activities, including potent antidepressant-like effects. The present study attempts to explore the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like action of resveratrol by measuring serum corticosterone levels and the content of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats exposed to the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Male Wistar rats were subjected to the CUMS protocol for a period of 5 weeks to induce depressive-like behavior. Resveratrol treatment (20, 40 and 80mg/kg/i.p. 5 weeks) significantly reversed the CUMS-induced behavioral abnormalities (reduced sucrose preference, increased immobility time and decreased locomotor activity) and the elevated serum corticosterone levels observed in stressed rats. Additionally, 5-weeks of CUMS exposure significantly decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and amygdala, and was accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB), while resveratrol treatment normalized these levels. All of these effects of resveratrol were essentially identical to that observed with the established antidepressant, desipramine. In conclusion, our study shows that resveratrol exerted antidepressant-like effects in CUMS rats, mediated in part by normalizing serum corticosterone levels while up-regulating pERK, pCREB and BDNF levels in the hippocampus and amygdala. PMID:24503118

  5. Effects of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour in the corticosterone model of depression.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Sinead; Dalton, Victoria; Harkin, Andrew; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2014-09-01

    Brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (BP ECT; pulse width 0.5-1.5 ms) is the most effective treatment available for severe depression. However, its use is associated with side-effects. The stimulus in ultrabrief pulse ECT (UBP ECT; pulse width 0.25-0.3 ms) is more physiological and has been reported to be associated with less cognitive side-effects, but its antidepressant effectiveness is not yet well established. Using electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS), the animal model of ECT, we previously reported UBP ECS to be significantly less effective than well-established BP ECS in eliciting behavioural, molecular and cellular antidepressant-related effects in naïve rats. We have now compared the effects of BP and UBP ECS in an animal model of depression related to exogenous supplementation with the stress-induced glucocorticoid hormone, corticosterone. Corticosterone administration resulted in an increase in immobility time in the forced swim test (FST) (p < 0.01) and decreases in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (p < 0.05) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (p < 0.001) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. There was no significant difference in the duration or type of seizure induced by BP (0.5 ms) or UBP (0.3 ms) ECS. UBP ECS proved to be as effective as BP ECS at inducing a behavioural antidepressant response in the FST with a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in immobility seen following administration of ECS. Both forms of ECS also induced significant increases in BDNF protein (p < 0.01) expression in the hippocampus. BP ECS (p < 0.05) but not UBP ECS induced a significant increase in GFAP levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall, UBP ECS effectively induced antidepressant-related behavioural and molecular responses in the corticosterone supplementation model, providing the first preclinical data on the potential role of this form of ECS to treat a depression phenotype related to elevated corticosterone. PMID

  6. Moving house: long-term dynamics of corticosterone secretion are unaltered in translocated populations of a rare reptile (the tuatara, Sphenodon punctatus)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lindsay E.; Cree, Alison; Towns, David R.; Nelson, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Translocations are an important conservation tool used to restore at-risk species to their historical range. Unavoidable procedures during translocations, such as habitat disturbance, capture, handling, processing, captivity, transport and release to a novel environment, have the potential to be stressful for most species. In this study, we examined acute and chronic stress (through the measurement of the glucocorticoid corticosterone) in a rare reptile (the tuatara, Sphenodon punctatus). We found that: (i) the acute corticosterone response remains elevated during the initial translocation process but is not amplified by cumulative stressors; and (ii) the long-term dynamics of corticosterone secretion are similar in translocated and source populations. Taken together, our results show that translocated tuatara are generally resistant to cumulative acute stressors and show no hormonal sign of chronic stress. Translocation efforts in tuatara afford the potential to reduce extinction risk and restore natural ecosystems. PMID:27293699

  7. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell’Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant’Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p < 0.05) when boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  8. Corticosterone shifts reproductive behaviour towards self-maintenance in the barn owl and is linked to melanin-based coloration in females.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Bettina; Roulin, Alexandre; Jenni, Lukas

    2013-06-01

    Trade-offs between the benefits of current reproduction and the costs to future reproduction and survival are widely recognized. However, such trade-offs might only be detected when resources become limited to the point where investment in one activity jeopardizes investment in others. The resolution of the trade-off between reproduction and self-maintenance is mediated by hormones such as glucocorticoids which direct behaviour and physiology towards self-maintenance under stressful situations. We investigated this trade-off in male and female barn owls in relation to the degree of heritable melanin-based coloration, a trait that reflects the ability to cope with various sources of stress in nestlings. We increased circulating corticosterone in breeding adults by implanting a corticosterone-releasing-pellet, using birds implanted with a placebo-pellet as controls. In males, elevated corticosterone reduced the activity (i.e. reduced home-range size and distance covered within the home-range) independently of coloration, while we could not detect any effect on hunting efficiency. The effect of experimentally elevated corticosterone on female behaviour was correlated with their melanin-based coloration. Corticosterone (cort-) induced an increase in brooding behaviour in small-spotted females, while this hormone had no detectable effect in large-spotted females. Cort-females with small eumelanic spots showed the normal body-mass loss during the early nestling period, while large spotted cort-females did not lose body mass. This indicates that corticosterone induced a shift towards self-maintenance in males independently on their plumage, whereas in females this shift was observed only in large-spotted females. PMID:23583559

  9. 5-(4-hydroxy-3-dimethoxybenzylidene)-rhodanine (RD-1)-improved mitochondrial function prevents anxiety- and depressive-like states induced by chronic corticosterone injections in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Ren, Zhili; Zheng, Ji; Feng, Lu; Li, Dongmei; Gao, Kai; Zhang, Lianfeng; Liu, Yanyong; Zuo, Pingping

    2016-06-01

    Most current pharmacologic antidepressant treatments target monoaminergic systems confronts some problems such as low rate of remission and high risk for relapse indicating new therapeutic strategy is urgently need. Evidences showed that impairments in mitochondrial function were associated with the pathogenesis of mood disorders and improvement in its function may be a novel therapeutic choice. In the present study, effects of 5-(4-hydroxy-3-dimethoxybenzylidene)-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone (RD-1) were investigated in mice model of depression/anxiety induced by corticosterone (20 mg/kg) subcutaneously repeated injections in 5-week male BALB/c mice. Our results showed that five weeks of corticosterone administration induced anxiety/depressive-like behavioral changes, including decreased central activities in open field test, increased the immobility time in forced swimming test and the latency in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, as well as reduced bodyweight. Results showed that oral administration with RD-1 at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg for five weeks significantly improved the anxiety/depressive-like behavioral changes induced by corticosterone. In glucose metabolism analysis by photon emission computed tomography/-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, corticosterone significantly deactivated the prefrontal cortex (PFC), temporal lobe and hippocampus. RD-1 treatment obviously improved the energy metabolism in the involved brain regions. In primary cultured hippocampal neuron, corticosterone reduced speed of anterograde transport, yet speed of retrograde transport was increased. Furthermore, RD-1 enhanced the mitochondrial anterograde transport to supply energy for the neurotransmitter release. In conclusion, RD-1 prevents anxiety/depressive-like behavior of mice induced by corticosterone repeated injections with novel mechanism of improvement in the mitochondrial function. PMID:26926430

  10. Hypericum Perforatum Decreased Hippocampus TNF-α and Corticosterone Levels with No Effect on Kynurenine/Tryptophan Ratio in Bilateral Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasanin, Amany H

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect Hypericum Perforatum (HP), on behavioral changes, corticosterone, TNF-α levels and tryptophan metabolism and disposition in bilateral ovariectomized rats compared to 17α -ethinylestradiol. Behavioral analysis by measuring immobility time in forced swimming test and open field test, serum and hippocampal corticosterone and TNF-α along with hippocampal kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were determined in mature ovariectomized rats treated orally either by HP at three different doses 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg/day or by 17α-ethinylestradiol 30 µg/kg/day for 30 days. Ovariectomized rats showed significant increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test. Along with elevation in serum and hippocampal TNF-α and corticosterone levels associated with significant increase in hippocampal kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Immobility time in the forced swimming test was decreased in rats treated by different doses of HP in a dose dependent manner and 17α-ethinylestradiol with no concomitant changes in the open field test. Only Rats treated with HP exhibited significant decrease in the elevated serum and hippocampal TNF-α and corticosterone, which couldn't explain the associated insignificant effect on hippocampaus kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in comparison to ovariectomized untreated rats. It is concluded that increased tryptophan metabolism toward kynurenine secondary to elevated corticosterone and TNF-α might be one of the pathohphysiological mechanisms that could explain depression like state observed in this rat model. Further, the observed attenuating effect of HP on TNF-α and corticosterone could contribute in its antidepressant effect in this animal model by other ways than their effects on tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism pathway. PMID:24976763

  11. Changes in the Sterol Composition of the Plasma Membrane Affect Membrane Potential, Salt Tolerance and the Activity of Multidrug Resistance Pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of the deletions of genes from the final steps in the biosynthesis of ergosterol (ERG6, ERG2, ERG3, ERG5, ERG4) on the physiological function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma membrane by a combination of biological tests and the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay. Most of the erg mutants were more sensitive than the wild type to salt stress or cationic drugs, their susceptibilities were proportional to the hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes. The different sterol composition of the plasma membrane played an important role in the short-term and long-term processes that accompanied the exposure of erg strains to a hyperosmotic stress (effect on cell size, pH homeostasis and survival of yeasts), as well as in the resistance of cells to antifungal drugs. The pleiotropic drug-sensitive phenotypes of erg strains were, to a large extent, a result of the reduced efficiency of the Pdr5 efflux pump, which was shown to be more sensitive to the sterol content of the plasma membrane than Snq2p. In summary, the erg4Δ and erg6Δ mutants exhibited the most compromised phenotypes. As Erg6p is not involved in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, it may become a target for a new generation of antifungal drugs. PMID:26418026

  12. Aldosterone, corticosterone, and thyroid hormone and their influence on respiratory control development in Lithobates catesbeianus: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Bairam, Aida; Kinkead, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of air breathing during Lithobates catesbeianus development requires significant changes to the brainstem circuits that generate and regulate breathing; however, the mechanisms responsible for initiating this transformation remain largely unknown. Because amphibian metamorphosis is regulated by hormones such as aldosterone, corticosterone, and thyroid hormone (T3), we tested the hypothesis that exposing the brainstem to these hormones augments the fictive air breathing frequency in pre-metamorphic tadpoles. Brainstems were isolated and were placed either in the recording chamber (acute; 1h+1h recovery) or in a bottle (chronic exposure; 24h) for treatment. Brainstems were exposed to artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF; sham treatment) or one of the following hormones: aldosterone (100nM), corticosterone (100nM), or T3 (100nM). While acute exposure had limited effects on respiratory motor output, chronic incubation with any hormone significantly increased fictive air breathing; the burst frequencies observed following treatment were similar to those observed in adult bullfrogs. We conclude that through their long term effects, hormones regulating metamorphosis can initiate the maturation of the neural circuits that generate and regulate breathing in this species. PMID:25476838

  13. Serum corticosterone as a quantitative test of the phlogistic potency of various agents topically applied in the rat.

    PubMed

    Giagnoni, G; Marsi, A; Parolaro, D; Sala, M; Gori, E

    1976-12-01

    The application into the rat conjunctiva of various phlogistic agents, such as croton oil, mustard oil and formaldehyde, elicits an increase of serum corticosterone linearly related to the log of the applied concentrations, so that from their parallelized regression lines it is possible to calculate the phlogistic potency of each tested agent in reference to croton oil. The time kinetic of such an increase (elicited by croton oil) is compared with that of two other parameters previously adopted as indirect quantitative indices of the phlogosis: the adrenal ascorbic acid depletion and the liver tyrosine-alpha-ketoglutarate transaminase increase. Serum corticosterone is shown to be the quickest and the most sensitive of the adopted indices, even if the phlogistic potency of the tested agents and the precision of these evaluations substantially coincides whatsoever the index adopted. Finally the pathways of adrenocortical activation are investigated and it is shown that the activation may be peripherally blocked by topical application of corticosteroids (but not of local anesthetics) and centrally by hypophysectomy or parenteral administration of pentobarbital plus morphine. PMID:13751

  14. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  15. Corticosterone levels and behavioral changes induced by simultaneous exposure to chronic social stress and enriched environments in NMRI male mice.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Ramos-Campos, Marta; Redolat, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental model which is believed to counteract some of the effects induced by stressors, although few studies have exposed rodents simultaneously to EE and stress. Our aim was to compare the short- and long-term effects of different housing conditions in mice submitted to chronic stress. 128 NMRI male mice arrived at our laboratory on postnatal day (PND) 21. During Phase I (PND 28), animals were randomly assigned to four experimental conditions: 1) EE+STRESS: mice housed in EE and submitted to social stress (n=32); 2) EE+NO STRESS: mice housed in EE without stress (n=32); 3) SE+STRESS: mice maintained in standard conditions (SE) and submitted to social stress (n=32); and 4) SE+NO STRESS (n=32). At the end of Phase I (PND 77), one cohort of 32 animals was used for behavioral assessment whereas another cohort of 32 was sacrificed for corticosterone analysis. Results indicated that EE animals showed less body weight, higher water and food intake, diminished anxiety response and decreased motor and exploratory behavior than SE mice. Mice exposed to stress gained less body weight, showed higher food and fluid intake and displayed decreased exploratory behavior than non-stressed mice. Furthermore, EE+STRESS group displayed significantly higher corticosterone levels than EE+NO STRESS group whereas EE+NO STRESS group showed lower levels than SE+NO STRESS. On PND 83, Phase II of the study began. Animals (n=96) were assigned to two different housing conditions: EE (n=48) and SE (n=48). On PND 112, corticosterone analysis (n=32) and behavioral study (n=64) were done. The factor "Housing Phase II" reached statistical significance. Results indicated that EE animals showed lower body weight and higher fluid intake than SE group, as well as decreased anxiety. No clear effects on motor and exploratory behavior or learning were observed. When long-term effects were analyzed, results indicated that "Initial Housing" condition was significant

  16. Chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum disrupts corticosterone receptor signalling in a tissue-specific manner in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Lattin, Christine R.; Romero, L. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Stress-induced concentrations of glucocorticoid hormones (including corticosterone, CORT) can be suppressed by chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum. However, endocrine-disrupting chemicals could interfere with CORT signalling beyond the disruption of hormone titres, including effects on receptors in different target tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of exposure to a petroleum-laced diet (1% oil weight:food weight) on tissue mass and intracellular CORT receptors in liver, fat, muscle and kidney (metabolic tissues), spleen (an immune tissue) and testes (a reproductive tissue). In the laboratory, male house sparrows were fed either a 1% weathered crude oil (n = 12) or a control diet (n = 12); glucocorticoid receptors and mineralocorticoid receptors were quantified using radioligand binding assays. In oil-exposed birds, glucocorticoid receptors were lower in one metabolic tissue (liver), higher in another metabolic tissue (fat) and unchanged in four other tissues (kidney, muscle, spleen and testes) compared with control birds. We saw no differences in mineralocorticoid receptors between groups. We also saw a trend towards reduced mass of the testes in oil-exposed birds compared with controls, but no differences in fat, kidney, liver, muscle or spleen mass between the two groups. This is the first study to examine the effects of petroleum on CORT receptor density in more than one or two target tissues. Given that a chronic low dose of ingested petroleum can affect stress-induced CORT titres as well as receptor density, this demonstrates that oil can act at multiple levels to disrupt an animal’s response to environmental stressors. This also highlights the potential usefulness of the stress response as a bioindicator of chronic crude oil exposure. PMID:27293679

  17. Plasmas for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahedo, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Plasma thrusters are challenging the monopoly of chemical thrusters in space propulsion. The specific energy that can be deposited into a plasma beam is orders of magnitude larger than the specific chemical energy of known fuels. Plasma thrusters constitute a vast family of devices ranging from already commercial thrusters to incipient laboratory prototypes. Figures of merit in plasma propulsion are discussed. Plasma processes and conditions differ widely from one thruster to another, with the pre-eminence of magnetized, weakly collisional plasmas. Energy is imparted to the plasma via either energetic electron injection, biased electrodes or electromagnetic irradiation. Plasma acceleration can be electrothermal, electrostatic or electromagnetic. Plasma-wall interaction affects energy deposition and erosion of thruster elements, and thus is central for thruster efficiency and lifetime. Magnetic confinement and magnetic nozzles are present in several devices. Oscillations and turbulent transport are intrinsic to the performances of some thrusters. Several thrusters are selected in order to discuss these relevant plasma phenomena.

  18. A Conserved Motif in the Membrane Proximal C-Terminal Tail of Human Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Affects Plasma Membrane Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Shults, Crystal A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the functional role of a conserved motif, F(x)6LL, in the membrane proximal C-tail of the human muscarinic M1 (hM1) receptor. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, several different point mutations were introduced into the C-tail sequence 423FRDTFRLLL431. Wild-type and mutant hM1 receptors were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and the amount of plasma membrane-expressed receptor was determined by use of intact, whole-cell [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding assays. The plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors possessing either L430A or L431A or both point mutations was significantly reduced compared with the wild type. The hM1 receptor possessing a L430A/L431A double-point mutation was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and atropine treatment caused the redistribution of the mutant receptor from the ER to the plasma membrane. Atropine treatment also caused an increase in the maximal response and potency of carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis elicited by the L430A/L431A mutant. The effect of atropine on the L430A/L431A receptor mutant suggests that L430 and L431 play a role in folding hM1 receptors, which is necessary for exit from the ER. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we also identified amino acid residues at the base of transmembrane-spanning domain 1 (TM1), V46 and L47, that, when mutated, reduce the plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors in an atropine-reversible manner. Overall, these mutagenesis data show that amino acid residues in the membrane-proximal C-tail and base of TM1 are necessary for hM1 receptors to achieve a transport-competent state. PMID:19841475

  19. Respiratory Mechanics and Plasma Levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin 6 Are Affected by Gas Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Jiménez, Claudia; García-Torrentera, Rogelio; Olmos-Zúñiga, J. Raúl; Jasso-Victoria, Rogelio; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, Miguel O.; Baltazares-Lipp, Matilde; Gutiérrez-González, Luis H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of dry gases during mechanical ventilation has been associated with the risk of serious airway complications. The goal of the present study was to quantify the plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 and to determine the radiological, hemodynamic, gasometric, and microscopic changes in lung mechanics in dogs subjected to short-term mechanical ventilation with and without humidification of the inhaled gas. The experiment was conducted for 24 hours in 10 dogs divided into two groups: Group I (n = 5), mechanical ventilation with dry oxygen dispensation, and Group II (n = 5), mechanical ventilation with oxygen dispensation using a moisture chamber. Variance analysis was used. No changes in physiological, hemodynamic, or gasometric, and radiographic constants were observed. Plasma TNF-alpha levels increased in group I, reaching a maximum 24 hours after mechanical ventilation was initiated (ANOVA p = 0.77). This increase was correlated to changes in mechanical ventilation. Plasma IL-6 levels decreased at 12 hours and increased again towards the end of the study (ANOVA p>0.05). Both groups exhibited a decrease in lung compliance and functional residual capacity values, but this was more pronounced in group I. Pplat increased in group I (ANOVA p = 0.02). Inhalation of dry gas caused histological lesions in the entire respiratory tract, including pulmonary parenchyma, to a greater extent than humidified gas. Humidification of inspired gases can attenuate damage associated with mechanical ventilation. PMID:25036811

  20. Acute changes in whole body corticosterone in response to perceived predation risk: A mechanism for anti-predator behavior in anurans?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Amanda M; Longhi, Jessica N; Chin, Eunice H; Burness, Gary; Kerr, Leslie R; Murray, Dennis L

    2016-04-01

    Anuran larvae exhibit behavioral and morphological plasticity in response to perceived predation risk, although response type and magnitude varies through ontogeny. Increased baseline corticosterone is related to morphological response to predation risk, whereas the mechanism behind behavioral plasticity remains enigmatic. Since tadpoles alter behavioral responses to risk immediately upon exposure to predator cues, we characterized changes in whole body corticosterone at an acute (<1h post-exposure) timescale. Tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) at Gosner stage (GS) 25 (free-swimming, feeding larvae) increased corticosterone levels to a peak at 10-20min post-exposure to predator cues, paralleling the acute stress response observed among other taxa. Tadpoles reared for 3weeks (mean GS29) with predation risk (caged, fed Aeshnid dragonfly nymph) had lower corticosterone levels at 10-20min post-exposure to dragonfly cues than predator-naïve controls, suggesting habituation, although the magnitude of increase was markedly diminished when compared to younger tadpoles (GS25). These experiments represent the first assessment of tadpole hormonal responses to predation risk at the acute timescale. Further research is required to establish causality between hormonal responses and behavioral changes, and to examine how and why responsiveness changes over ontogeny and with chronic exposure to risk. PMID:26944484

  1. Schisandra chinensis produces the antidepressant-like effects in repeated corticosterone-induced mice via the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingxu; Xu, Mengjie; Wan, Shutong; Wang, Mengshi; Wu, Bo; Xiao, Feng; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-09-30

    The present study aimed to examine the antidepressant-like effects and the possible mechanisms of Schisandra chinensis on depressive-like behavior induced by repeated corticosterone injections in mice. Here we evaluated the effect of an ethanol extract of the dried fruit of S. chinensis (EESC) on BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Three weeks of corticosterone injections in mice resulted in depressive-like behavior, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase the immobility time in the forced swim test, but without any influence on the locomotor activity. Further, there was a significant increase in serum corticosterone level and a significant downregulation of BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in CORT-treated mice. Treatment of mice with EESC (600mg/kg) significantly ameliorated all the behavioral and biochemical changes induced by corticosterone. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of BDNF signaling by K252a abolished entirely the antidepressant-like effect triggered by chronic EESC treatment. These results suggest that EESC produces an antidepressant-like effect in CORT-induced depression in mice, which is possibly mediated, at least in part, by rectifying the stress-based hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction paradigm and upregulation of BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:27387555

  2. A flexible Bayesian hierarchical approach for analyzing spatial and temporal variation in the fecal corticosterone levels in birds when there is imperfect knowledge of individual identity.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Guthrie S; Millspaugh, Joshua J; Link, William A; Woods, Rami J; Gutiérrez, R J

    2013-12-01

    Population cycles have long interested biologists. The ruffed grouse, Bonasa umbellus, is one such species whose populations cycle over most of their range. Thus, much effort has been expended to understand the mechanisms that might control cycles in this and other species. Corticosterone metabolites are widely used in studies of animals to measure physiological stress. We evaluated corticosterone metabolites in feces of territorial male grouse as a potential tool to study mechanisms governing grouse cycles. However, like most studies of corticosterone in wild animals, we did not know the identity of all individuals for which we had fecal samples. This presented an analytical problem that resulted in either pseudoreplication or confounding. Therefore, we derived an analytical approach that accommodated for uncertainty in individual identification. Because we had relatively low success capturing birds, we estimated turnover probabilities of birds on territorial display sites based on capture histories of a limited number of birds we captured. Hence, we developed a study design and modeling approach to quantify variation in corticosterone levels among individuals and through time that would be applicable to any field study of corticosterone in wild animals. Specifically, we wanted a sampling design and model that was flexible enough to partition variation among individuals, spatial units, and years, while incorporating environmental covariates that would represent potential mechanisms. We conducted our study during the decline phase of the grouse cycle and found high variation among corticosterone samples (11.33-443.92 ng/g [x=113.99 ng/g, SD=69.08, median=99.03 ng/g]). However, there were relatively small differences in corticosterone levels among years, but levels declined throughout each breeding season, which was opposite our predictions for stress hormones correlating with a declining population. We partitioned the residual variation into site, bird, and

  3. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  4. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice. PMID:27233827

  5. Multidrug resistance after retroviral transfer of the human MDR1 gene correlates with P-glycoprotein density in the plasma membrane and is not affected by cytotoxic selection.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, K; Frommel, T O; Stern, R K; Perez, C F; Kriegler, M; Tsuruo, T; Roninson, I B

    1991-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells is associated with the expression of the MDR1 gene encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an and active efflux pump for various lipophilic compounds. MDR transfectants can be isolated after MDR1 gene transfer and selection with cytotoxic drugs; low levels of drug resistance have also been observed in unselected NIH 3T3 mouse cells after retrovirus-mediated transfer of mouse mdr1 cDNA. MDR cell lines possess multiple phenotypic changes, suggesting that P-gp function could be complemented by some additional mechanisms associated with cytotoxic selection. To determine whether cytotoxic selection contributes to the MDR phenotype of MDR1-expressing cells, NIH 3T3 cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus carrying the human MDR1 gene were selected by two different procedures: (i) noncytotoxic selection for increased P-gp expression on the cell surface by multiple rounds of immunofluorescence labeling and flow sorting or (ii) one or more steps of selection with a cytotoxic drug. The levels of MDR in both types of infectants showed an excellent correlation with the P-gp density in the plasma membrane, expressed as immunoreactivity with a P-gp-specific antibody normalized by reactivity with an antibody against an unrelated antigen. Cytotoxic selection conferred no additional increase in resistance relative to P-gp density. These results indicate that P-gp density in the plasma membrane may be sufficient to determine the level of MDR. Images PMID:1678523

  6. The role of corticosterone and toxicity in the antipredator behavior of the Rough-skinned Newt (Taricha granulosa).

    PubMed

    Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; Stokes, Amber N; Greenfield, Sydney; Hopkins, Gareth R; Brodie, Edmund D; French, Susannah S

    2015-03-01

    A variety of mechanisms are responsible for enabling an organism to escape a predatory attack, including behavioral changes, alterations in hormone levels, and production and/or secretion of toxins. However, these mechanisms are rarely studied in conjunction with each other. The Rough-skinned Newt (Taricha granulosa) is an ideal organism to examine the relationships between these mechanisms because its behavioral displays and toxin secretion during a predator attack are well documented and readily characterized. While we found no direct relationship between antipredator behavior and endogenous levels of corticosterone (CORT), antipredator behavior was inhibited when exogenous CORT and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were administered, resulting in high circulating concentrations of CORT, indicating that CORT may play a role in mediating the behavior. There was no correlation between the animal's toxicity and either CORT or behavior. The results of this study provide evidence that CORT plays an important, yet complex, role in the antipredator response of these amphibians. PMID:25556312

  7. Chemically Bonding of Amantadine with Gardenamide A Enhances the Neuroprotective Effects against Corticosterone-Induced Insults in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiaqiang; Peng, Lizhi; Zheng, Wenhua; Wang, Rikang; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Heru

    2015-01-01

    Two amantadine (ATD)-gardenamide A (GA) ligands have been designed and synthesized. The bonding of ATD with GA through a methylene carbonyl brigde (L1) enhances the neuroprotective effect against corticosterone (CORT)-induced impairments in PC12 cells; while the bonding through a succinyl brigde (L2) does not. L1 reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell apoptosis generated by CORT. It restores CORT-changed cell morphology to a state that is closed to normal PC12 cells. One mechanism of L1 to attenuate CORT-induced cell apoptosis is through the adjustment of both caspase-3 and Bcl-2 proteins. Like GA, both nNOS and eNOS might be involved in the neuroprotective mechanism of L1. All the evidences suggest that L1 may be a potential agent to treat depression. PMID:26402670

  8. Dietary contaminant exposure affects plasma testosterone, but not thyroid hormones, vitamin A, and vitamin E, in male juvenile arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Jørgensen, Even H; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Muir, Derek C G; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2012-01-01

    Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are high in many Arctic top predators, including the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The aim of this study was to examine possible endocrine-disruptive effects of dietary POP exposure in male juvenile Arctic foxes in a controlled exposure experiment. The study was conducted using domesticated farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) as a model species. Two groups of newly weaned male foxes received a diet supplemented with either minke whale (Baleneoptera acutorostrata) blubber that was naturally contaminated with POP (exposed group, n = 5 or 21), or pork (Sus scrofa) fat (control group, n = 5 or 21). When the foxes were 6 mo old and had received the 2 diets for approximately 4 mo (147 d), effects of the dietary exposure to POP on plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroid hormones (TH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), retinol (vitamin A), and tocopherol (viramin E) were examined. At sampling, the total body concentrations of 104 PCB congeners were 0.1 ± 0.03 μg/g lipid weight (l.w.; n = 5 [mean ± standard deviation]) and 1.5 ± 0.17 μg/g l.w. (n = 5) in the control and exposed groups, respectively. Plasma testosterone concentrations in the exposed male foxes were significantly lower than in the control males, being approximately 25% of that in the exposed foxes. There were no between-treatment differences for TH, TSH, retinol, or tocopherol. The results suggest that the high POP levels experienced by costal populations of Arctic foxes, such as in Svalbard and Iceland, may result in delayed masculine maturation during adolescence. Sex hormone disruption during puberty may thus have lifetime consequences on all aspects of reproductive function in adult male foxes. PMID:23030655

  9. Untargeted Metabolomic Analysis of Human Plasma Indicates Differentially Affected Polyamine and L-Arginine Metabolism in Mild Cognitive Impairment Subjects Converting to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Stewart F.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Hölscher, Christian; Johnston, Janet; McGuinness, Bernadette; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Passmore, Anthony Peter; Green, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    This study combined high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), advanced chemometrics and pathway enrichment analysis to analyse the blood metabolome of patients attending the memory clinic: cases of mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n = 16), cases of MCI who upon subsequent follow-up developed Alzheimer’s disease (MCI_AD; n = 19), and healthy age-matched controls (Ctrl; n = 37). Plasma was extracted in acetonitrile and applied to an Acquity UPLC HILIC (1.7μm x 2.1 x 100 mm) column coupled to a Xevo G2 QTof mass spectrometer using a previously optimised method. Data comprising 6751 spectral features were used to build an OPLS-DA statistical model capable of accurately distinguishing Ctrl, MCI and MCI_AD. The model accurately distinguished (R2 = 99.1%; Q2 = 97%) those MCI patients who later went on to develop AD. S-plots were used to shortlist ions of interest which were responsible for explaining the maximum amount of variation between patient groups. Metabolite database searching and pathway enrichment analysis indicated disturbances in 22 biochemical pathways, and excitingly it discovered two interlinked areas of metabolism (polyamine metabolism and L-Arginine metabolism) were differentially disrupted in this well-defined clinical cohort. The optimised untargeted HRMS methods described herein not only demonstrate that it is possible to distinguish these pathologies in human blood but also that MCI patients ‘at risk’ from AD could be predicted up to 2 years earlier than conventional clinical diagnosis. Blood-based metabolite profiling of plasma from memory clinic patients is a novel and feasible approach in improving MCI and AD diagnosis and, refining clinical trials through better patient stratification. PMID:25803028

  10. Stress Management Affects Outcomes in the Pathophysiology of an Endometriosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Myrella L.; Hernández, Siomara; Thompson, Kenira J.; Bayona, Manuel; Flores, Idhaliz

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown detrimental effects of stress in an