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Sample records for affect protein expression

  1. Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein affect protein expression and dictate the clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Hans D

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP) are responsible for classic Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS), X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and in rare instances congenital X-linked neutropenia (XLN). WASP is a regulator of actin polymerization in hematopoietic cells with well-defined functional domains that are involved in cell signaling and cell locomotion, immune synapse formation, and apoptosis. Mutations of WASP are located throughout the gene and either inhibit or disregulate normal WASP function. Analysis of a large patient population demonstrates a strong phenotype-genotype correlation. Classic WAS occurs when WASP is absent, XLT when mutated WASP is expressed and XLN when missense mutations occur in the Cdc42-binding site. However, because there are exceptions to this rule it is difficult to predict the long-term prognosis of a given affected boy solely based on the analysis of WASP expression.

  2. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-03-07

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions.

  3. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions. PMID:28266541

  4. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle.

  5. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  6. Tetracycline treatment targeting Wolbachia affects expression of an array of proteins in Brugia malayi parasite.

    PubMed

    Dangi, Anil; Vedi, Satish; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Paithankar, Sameer; Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Kar, Santosh Kumar; Dube, Anuradha; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2009-09-01

    Wolbachia is an intracellular endosymbiont of Brugia malayi parasite whose presence is essential for the survival of the parasite. Treatment of B. malayi-infected jirds with tetracycline eliminates Wolbachia, which affects parasite survival and fitness. In the present study we have tried to identify parasite proteins that are affected when Wolbachia is targeted by tetracycline. For this Wolbachia depleted parasites (B. malayi) were obtained by tetracycline treatment of infected Mongolian jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) and their protein profile after 2-DE separation was compared with that of untreated parasites harboring Wolbachia. Approximately 100 protein spots could be visualized followed by CBB staining of 2-D gel and included for comparative analysis. Of these, 54 showed differential expressions, while two new protein spots emerged (of 90.3 and 64.4 kDa). These proteins were subjected to further analysis by MALDI-TOF for their identification using Brugia coding sequence database composed of both genomic and EST sequences. Our study unravels two crucial findings: (i) the parasite or Wolbachia proteins, which disappeared/down-regulated appear be essential for parasite survival and may be used as drug targets and (ii) tetracycline treatment interferes with the regulatory machinery vital for parasites cellular integrity and defense and thus could possibly be a molecular mechanism for the killing of filarial parasite. This is the first proteomic study substantiating the wolbachial genome integrity with its nematode host and providing functional genomic data of human lymphatic filarial parasite B. malayi.

  7. HB-EGF affects astrocyte morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Till B; Zandén, Carl; Lebkuechner, Isabell; Philippot, Camille; de Pablo, Yolanda; Liu, Johan; Pekny, Milos

    2014-03-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), a vascular-derived trophic factor, belongs to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of neuroprotective, hypoxia-inducible proteins released by astrocytes in CNS injuries. It was suggested that HB-EGF can replace fetal calf serum (FCS) in astrocyte cultures. We previously demonstrated that in contrast to standard 2D cell culture systems, Bioactive3D culture system, when used with FCS, minimizes the baseline activation of astrocytes and preserves their complex morphology. Here, we show that HB-EGF induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation by Y1068 phosphorylation, Mapk/Erk pathway activation, and led to an increase in cell proliferation, more prominent in Bioactive3D than in 2D cultures. HB-EGF changed morphology of 2D and Bioactive3D cultured astrocytes toward a radial glia-like phenotype and induced the expression of intermediate filament and progenitor cell marker protein nestin. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin protein expression was unaffected. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that HB-EGF affected the expression of Notch signaling pathway genes, implying a role for the Notch signaling in HB-EGF-mediated astrocyte response. HB-EGF can be used as a FCS replacement for astrocyte expansion and in vitro experimentation both in 2D and Bioactive3D culture systems; however, caution should be exercised since it appears to induce partial de-differentiation of astrocytes.

  8. Atrazine affects phosphoprotein and protein expression in MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Song, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Atrazine, a member of the 2-chloro-s-triazine family of herbicides, is the most widely used pesticide in the world and often detected in agriculture watersheds. Although it was generally considered as an endocrine disruptor, posing a potential threat to human health, the molecular mechanisms of atrazine effects remain unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we identified a panel of differentially expressed phosphoproteins and total proteins in human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells after being exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine. Atrazine treatments for 6 h resulted in differential expression of 4 phosphoproteins and 8 total-proteins as compared to the control cells (>1.5-fold, p<0.05). MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis revealed that the differentially expressed proteins belong to various cellular compartments (nucleus, cytosol, membrane) and varied in function, including those regulating the stress response such as peroxiredoxin I, HSP70 and HSP27; structural proteins such as tropomyosin and profilin 1; and oncogenesis proteins such as ANP32A. Six of the 12 identified proteins were verified by quantitative PCR for their transcript levels. The most up-regulated phosphoprotein by atrazine treatment, ANP32A, was further analyzed for its expression, distribution and cellular localization using Western blot and immunocytochemical approaches. The results revealed that ANP32 expression after atrazine treatment increased dose and time dependently and was primarily located in the nucleus. This study may provide new evidence on the potential toxicity of atrazine in human cells.

  9. Lenalidomide affect expression level of cereblon protein in multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226.

    PubMed

    Yang, D Y; Ren, J H; Guo, X N; Guo, X L; Cai, X Y; Guo, X F; Zhang, J N

    2015-10-29

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of immuno-modulatory drug (lenalidomide) on the protein expression of cereblon (CRBN) and their therapeutic targets in the multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226. The multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226 was cultured and treated with different concentrations of lenalidomide and bortezomib to determine the proliferation inhibition rate, apoptosis rate, and protein expression of CRBN. The results revealed that both lenalidomide and bortezomib inhibited the proliferation of RPMI8226 and promoted cell apoptosis. However, the protein expression of CRBN decreased signifi-cantly after treatment with lenalidomide, while bortezomib had no effect on the expression of CRBN. We confirmed that CRBN may be a target of lenalidomide.

  10. Changes in gravity affect gene expression, protein modulation and metabolite pools of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, R.; Martzivanou, M.; Maier, R. M.; Magel, E.

    Callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) in Petri dishes / suspension cultures were exposed to altered g-forces by centrifugation (1 to 10 g), klinorotation, and μ g (sounding rocket flights). Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, transcripts of genes coding for metabolic key enzymes (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADPG-PP; ß-amylase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBPase; glyceraldehyde-P dehydrogenase, GAPDH; hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, HMG; phenylalanine-ammonium-lyase, PAL; PEP carboxylase, PEPC) were used to monitor threshold conditions for g-number (all) and time of exposure (ß-amylase) which led to altered amounts of the gene product. Exposure to approx. 5 g and higher for 1h resulted in altered transcript levels: transcripts of ß-amylase, PAL, and PEPC were increased, those of ADPG-PP decreased, while those of FBPase, GAPDH, and HMG were not affected. This probably indicates a shift from starch synthesis to starch degradation and increased rates of anaplerosis (PEPC: supply of ketoacids for amino acid synthesis). In order to get more information about g-related effects on gene expression, we used a 1h-exposure to 7 g for a microarray analysis. Transcripts of more than 200 genes were significantly increased in amount (ratio 7g / 1g control; 21.6 and larger). They fall into several categories. Transcripts coding for enzymes of major pathways form the largest group (25%), followed by gene products involved in cellular organisation and cell wall formation / rearrangement (17%), signalling, phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (12%), proteolysis and transport (10% each), hormone synthesis plus related events (8%), defense (4%), stress-response (2%), and gravisensing (2%). Many of the alterations are part of a general stress response, but some changes related to the synthesis / rearrangement of cell wall components could be more hyper-g-specific. Using macroarrays with selected genes according to our hypergravity study (metabolism / signalling

  11. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress.

  12. Inhibition of Protein Farnesylation Arrests Adipogenesis and Affects PPARγ Expression and Activation in Differentiating Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is required for the activation of multiple proteins involved in cell differentiation and function. In white adipose tissue protein, farnesylation has shown to be essential for the successful differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. We hypothesize that protein farnesylation is required for PPARγ2 expression and activation, and therefore for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes. MSCs were plated and induced to differentiate into adipocytes for three weeks. Differentiating cells were treated with either an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) or vehicle alone. The effect of inhibition of farnesylation in differentiating adipocytes was determined by oil red O staining. Cell survival was quantified using MTS Formazan. Additionally, nuclear extracts were obtained and prelamin A, chaperon protein HDJ-2, PPARγ, and SREBP-1 were determined by western blot. Finally, DNA binding PPARγ activity was determined using an ELISA-based PPARγ activation quantification method. Treatment with an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) arrests adipogenesis without affecting cell survival. This effect was concomitant with lower levels of PPARγ expression and activity. Finally, accumulation of prelamin A induced an increased proportion of mature SREBP-1 which is known to affect PPARγ activity. In summary, inhibition of protein farnesylation arrests the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and affects PPARγ expression and activity. PMID:18274630

  13. Inhibition of Protein Farnesylation Arrests Adipogenesis and Affects PPARgamma Expression and Activation in Differentiating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Daniel; Akter, Rahima; Duque, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is required for the activation of multiple proteins involved in cell differentiation and function. In white adipose tissue protein, farnesylation has shown to be essential for the successful differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. We hypothesize that protein farnesylation is required for PPARgamma2 expression and activation, and therefore for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes. MSCs were plated and induced to differentiate into adipocytes for three weeks. Differentiating cells were treated with either an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) or vehicle alone. The effect of inhibition of farnesylation in differentiating adipocytes was determined by oil red O staining. Cell survival was quantified using MTS Formazan. Additionally, nuclear extracts were obtained and prelamin A, chaperon protein HDJ-2, PPARgamma, and SREBP-1 were determined by western blot. Finally, DNA binding PPARgamma activity was determined using an ELISA-based PPARgamma activation quantification method. Treatment with an inhibitor of farnesylation (FTI-277) arrests adipogenesis without affecting cell survival. This effect was concomitant with lower levels of PPARgamma expression and activity. Finally, accumulation of prelamin A induced an increased proportion of mature SREBP-1 which is known to affect PPARgamma activity. In summary, inhibition of protein farnesylation arrests the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and affects PPARgamma expression and activity.

  14. Differentially expressed proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria A; Crosbie, Phil; Bridle, Andrew; Leef, Melanie; Wilson, Richard; Nowak, Barbara F

    2014-09-01

    The external surfaces of fish, such as gill and skin, are covered by mucus, which forms a thin interface between the organism and water. Amoebic gill disease (AGD) is a parasitic condition caused by Neoparamoeba perurans that affects salmonids worldwide. This disease induces excessive mucus production in the gills. The host immune response to AGD is not fully understood, and research tools such as genomics and proteomics could be useful in providing further insight. Gill and skin mucus samples were obtained from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which were infected with N. perurans on four successive occasions. NanoLC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to identify proteins in gill and skin mucus of Atlantic salmon affected by AGD. A total of 186 and 322 non-redundant proteins were identified in gill and skin mucus respectively, based on stringent filtration criteria, and statistics demonstrated that 52 gill and 42 skin mucus proteins were differentially expressed in mucus samples from AGD-affected fish. By generating protein-protein interaction networks, some of these proteins formed part of cell to cell signalling and inflammation pathways, such as C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein 1, granulin, cathepsin, angiogenin-1. In addition to proteins that were entirely novel in the context in the host response to N. perurans, our results have confirmed the presence of protein markers in mucus that have been previously predicted on the basis of modified mRNA expression, such as anterior gradient-2 protein, annexin A-1 and complement C3 factor. This first proteomic analysis of AGD-affected salmon provides new information on the effect of AGD on protein composition of gill and skin mucus. Future research should focus on better understanding of the role these components play in the response against infection with N. perurans.

  15. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  16. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  17. Proteasome affects the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takumi; Kawakami, Masayo; Baba, Hiroko; Yahata, Masahiro; Mutoh, Junpei; Takeda, Shuso; Fujita, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2008-11-01

    The effect of proteasome inhibition with N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN) on the protein expression regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was studied in T47D breast tumor cells. The luciferase reporter gene assay using a construct which has the xenobiotic responsive element showed that the inducible expression of the reporter with AhR ligands was significantly reduced by co-treatment with ALLN. The same suppressive effect by ALLN was observed for ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity induced by an AhR ligand, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC). Despite the above effects, the induced expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNAs was unaffected by ALLN. While lactacystin, another proteasome inhibitor, exhibited the same effect as ALLN on EROD activity induced by 3MC, leupeptin, which is one of the cysteine protease inhibitors, had no such effect. Based on the evidence obtained, it appears that proteasome inhibition results in a reduction in the expression of AhR-regulated proteins.

  18. Acute intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid affects the expression of the coat protein AP-2 and its interaction with membranes.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Janina; Seltzer, Alicia; Sosa, Miguel Angel

    2009-10-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis is thought to be crucial for the maintenance of synaptic transmission and for the cell plasticity at the nervous system. In this study, we demonstrated that acute intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid (QUIN), an agonist of the N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor, induces a decrease of the coat protein AP-2 expression and affects their interaction with membranes. By western blot analysis we observed that at 24 h after QUIN intrastriatal injection, alpha1 subunit of AP-2 and alpha2, at lesser extent, were reduced in the striatal membranes. The decrease of both subunits expression was extended to 48 h after treatment, although the soluble proteins were mostly affected. Other areas of the brain were not affected by the treatment, except the cerebellum, where a significant increase of soluble AP-2 (both subunits) was observed at 48 h after injection. Another coat protein, as the phosphoprotein AP-180, was not affected by the injection of QUIN. We also confirmed that QUIN injection causes increasing loss of striatal neurons after the administration of the toxin. We concluded that QUIN may affect the endocytotic machinery of the striatum, by inducing changes in the AP-2 behaviour. Consequently, the internalization of NMDAR and/or AMPAR may be affected, by QUIN, contributing to the excitotoxic effect of the drug.

  19. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  20. The two CcdA proteins of Bacillus anthracis differentially affect virulence gene expression and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hesong; Wilson, Adam C

    2013-12-01

    The cytochrome c maturation system influences the expression of virulence factors in Bacillus anthracis. B. anthracis carries two copies of the ccdA gene, encoding predicted thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that contribute to cytochrome c maturation, while the closely related organism Bacillus subtilis carries only one copy of ccdA. To investigate the roles of the two ccdA gene copies in B. anthracis, strains were constructed without each ccdA gene, and one strain was constructed without both copies simultaneously. Loss of both ccdA genes results in a reduction of cytochrome c production, an increase in virulence factor expression, and a reduction in sporulation efficiency. Complementation and expression analyses indicate that ccdA2 encodes the primary CcdA in B. anthracis, active in all three pathways. While CcdA1 retains activity in cytochrome c maturation and virulence control, it has completely lost its activity in the sporulation pathway. In support of this finding, expression of ccdA1 is strongly reduced when cells are grown under sporulation-inducing conditions. When the activities of CcdA1 and CcdA2 were analyzed in B. subtilis, neither protein retained activity in cytochrome c maturation, but CcdA2 could still function in sporulation. These observations reveal the complexities of thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase function in pathways relevant to virulence and physiology.

  1. The CJIE1 prophage of Campylobacter jejuni affects protein expression in growth media with and without bile salts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of Campylobacter jejuni temperate bacteriophages has increasingly been associated with specific biological effects. It has recently been demonstrated that the presence of the prophage CJIE1 is associated with increased adherence and invasion of C. jejuni isolates in cell culture assays. Results Quantitative comparative proteomics experiments were undertaken using three closely related isolates with CJIE1 and one isolate without CJIE1 to determine whether there was a corresponding difference in protein expression levels. Initial experiments indicated that about 2% of the total proteins characterized were expressed at different levels in isolates with or without the prophage. Some of these proteins regulated by the presence of CJIE1 were associated with virulence or regulatory functions. Additional experiments were conducted using C. jejuni isolates with and without CJIE1 grown on four different media: Mueller Hinton (MH) media containing blood; MH media containing 0.1% sodium deoxycholate, which is thought to result in increased expression of virulence proteins; MH media containing 2.5% Oxgall; and MHwithout additives. These experiments provided further evidence that CJIE1 affected protein expression, including virulence-associated proteins. They also demonstrated a general bile response involving a majority of the proteome and clearly showed the induction of almost all proteins known to be involved with iron acquisition. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000798, PXD000799, PXD000800, and PXD000801. Conclusion The presence of the CJIE1 prophage was associated with differences in protein expression levels under different conditions. Further work is required to determine what genes are involved in causing this phenomenon. PMID:24641125

  2. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  3. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  4. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  5. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Datasets Reveals Information on Protein Expressivity and Factors Affecting Translational Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Wu, Gang; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Integrated analysis of large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic data can provide important insights into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. In this chapter, we present methods to address two aspects of issues related to integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. First, due to the fact that proteomic datasets are often incomplete, and integrated analysis of partial proteomic data may introduce significant bias. To address these issues, we describe a zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP)-based model to uncover the complicated relationships between protein abundances and mRNA expression levels, and then apply them to predict protein abundance for the proteins not experimentally detected. The ZIP model takes into consideration the undetected proteins by assuming that there is a probability mass at zero representing expressed proteins that were undetected owing to technical limitations. The model validity is demonstrated using biological information of operons, regulons, and pathways. Second, weak correlation between transcriptomic and proteomic datasets is often due to biological factors affecting translational processes. To quantify the effects of these factors, we describe a multiple regression-based statistical framework to quantitatively examine the effects of various translational efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Using the datasets from sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the analysis shows that translation-related sequence features can contribute up to 15.2-26.2% of the total variation of the correlation between transcriptomic and proteomic datasets, and also reveals the relative importance of various features in translation process.

  6. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  7. Chronic intermittent hypoxia affects endogenous serotonergic inputs and expression of synaptic proteins in rat hypoglossal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Lu, Huan; Hu, Lijuan; Gong, Wankun; Wang, Juan; Fu, Cuiping; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanqun

    2017-01-01

    Evidence has shown that hypoxic episodes elicit hypoglossal neuroplasticity which depends on elevated serotonin (5-HT), in contrast to the rationale of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that deficient serotonergic input to HMs fails to keep airway patency. Therefore, understanding of the 5-HT dynamic changes at hypoglossal nucleus (HN) during chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) will be essential to central pathogenic mechanism and pharmacological therapy of OSA. Moreover, the effect of CIH on BDNF-TrkB signaling proteins was quantified in an attempt to elucidate cellular cascades/synaptic mechanisms following 5-HT alteration. Male rats were randomly exposed to normal air (control), intermittent hypoxia of 3 weeks (IH3) and 5 weeks (IH5) groups. Through electrical stimulation of dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN), we conducted amperometric technique with carbon fiber electrode in vivo to measure the real time release of 5-HT at XII nucleus. 5-HT2A receptors immunostaining measured by intensity and c-Fos quantified visually were both determined by immunohistochemistry. CIH significantly reduced endogenous serotonergic inputs from DRN to XII nucleus, shown as decreased peak value of 5-HT signals both in IH3 and IH5groups, whereas time to peak and half-life period of 5-HT were unaffected. Neither 5-HT2A receptors nor c-Fos expression in HN were significantly altered by CIH. Except for marked increase in phosphorylation of ERK in IH5 rats, BDNF-TrkB signaling and synaptophys consistently demonstrated downregulated levels. These results suggest that the deficiency of 5-HT and BDNF-dependent synaptic proteins in our CIH protocol contribute to the decompensated mechanism of OSA. PMID:28337282

  8. Jasmonic acid affects plant morphology and calcium-dependent protein kinase expression and activity in Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Rita M; Raíces, Marcela; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Maldonado, Sara; Téllez-Iñón, María T

    2002-07-01

    The effect of jasmonic acid (JA) on plant growth and on calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) activity and expression was studied in non-photoperiodic potato plants, Solanum tuberosum L. var. Spunta, grown in vitro. Stem cuttings were grown for 45 days (long treatment, LT) in MS medium with increasing concentrations of JA. For short treatments (ST) adult plants grown in MS were transferred for 1, 4 and 20 h to JA containing media. During the LT, low concentrations of JA promoted cell expansion and shoot elongation while higher concentrations caused growth inhibition. Under these conditions, treated plants showed root shortening and tuber formation was not induced. Morphological and histochemical studies using light microscopy and TEM analysis of leaves from treated plants revealed that JA also affected subcellular organelles of mesophyll cells. Peroxisomes increased in size and number, and an autophagic process was triggered in response to high concentrations of the hormone. CDPK activity, determined in crude extracts of treated plants (LT), was inhibited (up to 80%). Plant growth and CDPK inhibition were reverted upon transfer of the plants to hormone-free medium. Soluble CDPK activity decreased in response to JA short treatment. Concomitantly, a decline in the steady state levels of StCDPK2 mRNA, a potato CDPK isoform that is expressed in leaves, was observed. These data suggest that the phytohormone down-regulated the expression and activity of the kinase.

  9. Cold Stress and Nitrogen Deficiency Affected Protein Expression of Psychrotrophic Dyadobacter psychrophilus B2 and Pseudomonas jessenii MP1.

    PubMed

    Suyal, Deep C; Kumar, Saurabh; Yadav, Amit; Shouche, Yogesh; Goel, Reeta

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deficiency and low temperature conditions are the prominent facet of Western Himalayan agro-ecosystems. A slight change in the environment alters the protein expression of the microorganisms. Therefore, proteomes of the two psychrotrophs Dyadobacter psychrophilus B2 and Pseudomonas jessenii MP1 were analyzed using two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS, to determine the physiological response of altitudinally different but indigenous microorganisms in response to cold stress under N depleting conditions. Functional assessment of 150 differentially expressed proteins from both the psychrotrophs revealed several mechanisms might be involved in cold stress adaptation, protein synthesis/modifications, energy metabolism, cell growth/maintenance, etc. In both the proteomes, abundance of the proteins related to energy production and stress were significantly increased while, proteins related to biosynthesis and energy consuming processes decreased. ATP synthase subunit alpha, beta, ATP-dependent Clp protease, Enolase, groL HtpG and N(2)-fixation sustaining protein CowN proteins were found to be expressed in both B2 and MP1, similarly to previously studied diazotrophs under low temperature N2 fixing conditions and therefore, can be considered as a biomarker for monitoring the nitrogen fixation in cold niches. Nevertheless, in both the diazotrophs, a good fraction of the proteins were related to hypothetical proteins which are still uncharacterized, thereby, suggesting the need for in-depth studies on cold adapted diazotrophs and their adaptive mechanisms.

  10. Cold Stress and Nitrogen Deficiency Affected Protein Expression of Psychrotrophic Dyadobacter psychrophilus B2 and Pseudomonas jessenii MP1

    PubMed Central

    Suyal, Deep C.; Kumar, Saurabh; Yadav, Amit; Shouche, Yogesh; Goel, Reeta

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deficiency and low temperature conditions are the prominent facet of Western Himalayan agro-ecosystems. A slight change in the environment alters the protein expression of the microorganisms. Therefore, proteomes of the two psychrotrophs Dyadobacter psychrophilus B2 and Pseudomonas jessenii MP1 were analyzed using two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI–TOF–MS, to determine the physiological response of altitudinally different but indigenous microorganisms in response to cold stress under N depleting conditions. Functional assessment of 150 differentially expressed proteins from both the psychrotrophs revealed several mechanisms might be involved in cold stress adaptation, protein synthesis/modifications, energy metabolism, cell growth/maintenance, etc. In both the proteomes, abundance of the proteins related to energy production and stress were significantly increased while, proteins related to biosynthesis and energy consuming processes decreased. ATP synthase subunit alpha, beta, ATP-dependent Clp protease, Enolase, groL HtpG and N(2)-fixation sustaining protein CowN proteins were found to be expressed in both B2 and MP1, similarly to previously studied diazotrophs under low temperature N2 fixing conditions and therefore, can be considered as a biomarker for monitoring the nitrogen fixation in cold niches. Nevertheless, in both the diazotrophs, a good fraction of the proteins were related to hypothetical proteins which are still uncharacterized, thereby, suggesting the need for in-depth studies on cold adapted diazotrophs and their adaptive mechanisms. PMID:28352263

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia-13 Kv3.3 potassium channels: arginine-to-histidine mutations affect both functional and protein expression on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Thornhill, William B

    2013-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 is the causative gene of SCA13 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 13), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder. The four dominant mutations identified to date cause Kv3.3 channels to be non-functional or have altered gating properties in Xenopus oocytes. In the present paper, we report that SCA13 mutations affect functional as well as protein expression of Kv3.3 channels in a mammalian cell line. The reduced protein level of SCA13 mutants is caused by a shorter protein half-life, and blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway increases the total protein of SCA13 mutants more than wild-type. SCA13 mutated amino acids are highly conserved, and the side chains of these residues play a critical role in the stable expression of Kv3.3 proteins. In addition, we show that mutant Kv3.3 protein levels could be partially rescued by treatment with the chemical chaperone TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) and to a lesser extent with co-expression of Kv3.1b. Thus our results suggest that amino acid side chains of SCA13 positions affect the protein half-life and/or function of Kv3.3, and the adverse effect on protein expression cannot be fully rescued.

  12. Threonine Affects Intestinal Function, Protein Synthesis and Gene Expression of TOR in Jian Carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Peng, Yan; Wu, Pei; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of threonine (Thr) on the digestive and absorptive ability, proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes, and gene expression of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). First, seven isonitrogenous diets containing graded levels of Thr (7.4–25.2 g/kg diet) were fed to the fishes for 60 days. Second, enterocyte proliferation and differentiation were assayed by culturing enterocytes with graded levels of Thr (0–275 mg/l) in vitro. Finally, enterocytes were cultured with 0 and 205 mg/l Thr to determine protein synthesis. The percent weight gain (PWG), specific growth rate, feed intake, feed efficiency, protein retention value, activities of trypsin, lipase and amylase, weights and protein contents of hepatopancreas and intestine, folds heights, activities of alkaline phosphatase (AKP), γ- glutamyl transpeptidase and Na+/K+-ATPase in all intestinal segments, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) activities in hepatopancreas, and 4E-BP2 gene expression in muscle, hepatopancreas and intestinal segments were significantly enhanced by Thr (p<0.05). However, the plasma ammonia concentration and TOR gene expression decreased (p<0.05). In vitro, Thr supplement significantly increased cell numbers, protein content, the activities of GOT, GPT, AKP and Na+/K+-ATPase, and protein synthesis rate of enterocytes, and decreased LDH activity and ammonia content in cell medium (p<0.05). In conclusion, Thr improved growth, digestive and absorptive capacity, enterocyte proliferation and differentiation, and protein synthesis and regulated TOR and 4E-BP2 gene expression in juvenile Jian carp. The dietary Thr requirement of juvenile Jian carp was 16.25 g/kg diet (51.3 g/kg protein) based on quadratic regression analysis of PWG. PMID:23922879

  13. Dietary calcium concentration and cereals differentially affect mineral balance and tight junction proteins expression in jejunum of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Mann, Evelyne; Ertl, Reinhard; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wagner, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Ritzmann, Mathias; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-04-14

    Ca plays an essential role in bone development; however, little is known about its effect on intestinal gene expression in juvenile animals. In the present study, thirty-two weaned pigs (9·5 (SEM 0·11) kg) were assigned to four diets that differed in Ca concentration (adequate v. high) and cereal composition (wheat-barley v. maize) to assess the jejunal and colonic gene expression of nutrient transporters, tight junction proteins, cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, nutrient digestibility, Ca balance and serum acute-phase response. To estimate the impact of mucosal bacteria on colonic gene expression, Spearman's correlations between colonic gene expression and bacterial abundance were computed. Faecal Ca excretion indicated that more Ca was available along the intestinal tract of the pigs fed high Ca diets as compared to the pigs fed adequate Ca diets (P> 0.05). High Ca diets decreased jejunal zonula occludens 1 (ZO1) and occludin (OCLN) expression, up-regulated jejunal expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and down-regulated colonic GLUT2 expression as compared to the adequate Ca diets (P< 0.05). Dietary cereal composition up-regulated jejunal TLR2 expression and interacted (P= 0.021) with dietary Ca on colonic IL1B expression; high Ca concentration up-regulated IL1B expression with wheat-barley diets and down-regulated it with maize diets. Spearman's correlations (r> 0·35; P< 0·05) indicated an association between operational taxonomic units assigned to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and bacterial metabolites and mucosal gene expression in the colon. The present results indicate that high Ca diets have the potential to modify the jejunal and colonic mucosal gene expression response which, in turn, interacts with the composition of the basal diet and mucosa-associated bacteria in weaned pigs.

  14. Magnolol causes alterations in the cell cycle in androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro by affecting expression of key cell cycle regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Brendan T; McDougall, Luke; Catalli, Adriana; Hurta, Robert A R

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in the Western world, affects many men worldwide. This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on the behavior of 2 androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, in vitro. Magnolol, in a 24-h exposure at 40 and 80 μM, was found to be cytotoxic to cells. Magnolol also affected cell cycle progression of DU145 and PC3 cells, resulting in alterations to the cell cycle and subsequently decreasing the proportion of cells entering the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Magnolol inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins including cyclins A, B1, D1, and E, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. Protein expression levels of pRBp107 decreased and pRBp130 protein expression levels increased in response to magnolol exposure, whereas p16(INK4a), p21, and p27 protein expression levels were apparently unchanged post 24-h exposure. Magnolol exposure at 6 h did increase p27 protein expression levels. This study has demonstrated that magnolol can alter the behavior of androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggests that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  15. TDP-43 aggregation mirrors TDP-43 knockdown, affecting the expression levels of a common set of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Prpar Mihevc, S.; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Rogelj, Boris

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 protein plays an important role in regulating transcriptional repression, RNA metabolism, and splicing. Typically it shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm to perform its functions, while abnormal cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). For the purpose of this study we selected a set of proteins that were misregulated following silencing of TDP-43 and analysed their expression in a TDP-43-aggregation model cell line HEK293 Flp-in Flag-TDP-43-12x-Q/N F4L. Following TDP-43 sequestration in insoluble aggregates, we observed higher nuclear levels of EIF4A3, and POLDIP3β, whereas nuclear levels of DNMT3A, HNRNPA3, PABPC1 and POLDIP3α dropped, and cytoplasmic levels of RANBP1 dropped. In addition, immunofluorescence signal intensity quantifications showed increased nuclear expression of HNRNPL and YARS, and downregulation of cytoplasmic DPCD. Furthermore, cytoplasmic levels of predominantly nuclear protein ALYREF increased. In conclusion, by identifying a common set of proteins that are differentially expressed in a similar manner in these two different conditions, we show that TDP-43 aggregation has a comparable effect to TDP-43 knockdown. PMID:27665936

  16. Decoding Children's Expressions of Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinman, Joel A.; Feldman, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    Mothers' ability to decode their children's nonverbal expressions of four affects (happiness, sadness, fear, and anger) was contrasted with the decoding ability of a matched group of nonmothers. Results indicate that mothers were accurately able to decode expressions of happiness but had relative difficulty with decoding expressions of sadness,…

  17. The parvovirus H-1 NS2 protein affects viral gene expression through sequences in the 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Rhode, S L

    1993-05-01

    We reported previously that an NS2 null mutant of parvovirus H-1 (H-1SA) was capable of lytic growth in human and hamster cells, but not in rat cells (Li and Rhode, 1991). The host-range phenotype of H-1SA was also manifested in newborn rats and was associated with a reduction of viral protein synthesis to about 10% of wild-type virus and an absence of virions in cultured rat fibroblasts. However, the H-1SA mRNAs for NS1 and capsid proteins, R1 and R3, accumulated to wild-type levels and translated well with a cell free rabbit reticulocyte lysate. These results indicate that NS2 plays an important role in the regulation of viral protein synthesis in rat cells in vivo and in vitro, but NS2 is largely dispensable in other types of cells, such as human and hamster cells. To analyze whether the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of viral RNA are involved in the regulation by NS2, the viral VP2 gene was replaced by a reporter gene, firefly luciferase, in a plasmid clone of viral sequences and the protein synthesis under the control of P38 was evaluated by luciferase assay. Cells were transfected with luciferase expressing plasmids and subsequently infected with wild-type H-1 or H-1SA. We were able to mimic the defect in expression that we observed in cultured cells and animals with virus infection. Luciferase activity in H- 1SA-infected rat cells was about 10-fold lower than that in H-1-infected rat cells, but only 2-fold lower or less in H-1SA-infected human cells and hamster cells compared to wild-type H-1. These results are consistent with our previous data that NS2 has a host-range phenotype in the natural host of H-1, the rat. Deletion of 5' UTR sequences from P38 transcripts reduced the overall P38-luc expression but expression was NS2 independent, whereas deletion of the terminal 3' UTR sequences of viral RNA reduced NS2-dependent expression in rat cells. These results suggest that the regulation of viral protein synthesis by NS2 depends on RNA sequences in the

  18. MicroRNA138 regulates keratin 17 protein expression to affect HaCaT cell proliferation and apoptosis by targeting hTERT in psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jun; Chu, Rui-Qi; Ma, Jing; Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Zhang, Guang-Jing; Yang, Xiu-Fang; Song, Zhi; Ma, Yun-Yi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the how microRNA-138 (miR-138) affects the expression of keratin 17 (K17) and psoriasis development. Twenty-eight skin lesions from patients with psoriasis vulgaris and twenty-four normal skin tissues from healthy controls were collected. The HaCaT cells were assigned into blank, negative control (NC), miR-138 mimic, miR-138 inhibitor, hTERT siRNA and miR-138 inhibitor+hTERT siRNA groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to detect the miR-138 expression. The hTERT and K17 protein expression were testified by Western Blotting. MTT assay, flow cytometry with PI single staining and Annexin V/PI double staining were performed to detect the cell proliferation activity, cell cycle and apoptosis, respectively. Compared with the healthy skin, the expression of miR-138 decreased in the psoriatic skin, but hTERT and K17 protein expressions increased. The miR-138 mimic and hTERT siRNA groups showed significantly decreased hTERT and K17 protein expressions, inhibited cell proliferation, increased number of cells at G1 phase and elevated apoptosis rate in comparison to the rest three groups. The hTERT and K17 protein expressions in the miR-138 inhibitor group were up-regulated with promoted cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis rate as compared with the other four groups. In the miR-138 inhibitor+hTERT siRNA group, the hTERT and K17 protein expressions, cell proliferation and apoptosis were intermediate between the miR-138 inhibitor and hTERT siRNA groups. These findings indicated that the expression of miR-138 was lower in the psoriatic skin, which was negatively correlated to K17 expression. MiR-138 may regulate K17 protein expression to affect HaCaT cell proliferation and apoptosis by targeting hTERT gene.

  19. Metallothionein 2A affects the cell respiration by suppressing the expression of mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Olga; Gurjanova, Karina; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Kulp, Maria; Karro, Niina; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are involved in a broad range of cellular processes and play a major role in protection of cells towards various stressors. Two functions of MTs, namely the maintaining of the homeostasis of transition metal ions and the redox balance, are directly linked to the functioning of mitochondria. Dyshomeostasis of MTs is often related with malfunctioning of mitochondria; however, the mechanism by which MTs affect the mitochondrial respiratory chain is still unknown. We demonstrated that overexpression of MT-2A in HEK cell line decreased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the cells. HEK cells overexpressing MT-2A demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and lower cellular ATP levels. MT-2A did not affect the number of mitochondria, but reduced specifically the level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II protein, which resulted in lower activity of the complex IV.

  20. The SNF5 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a glutamine- and proline-rich transcriptional activator that affects expression of a broad spectrum of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, B C; Treitel, M A; Carlson, M

    1990-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SNF5 gene affects expression of both glucose- and phosphate-regulated genes and appears to function in transcription. We report the nucleotide sequence, which predicts that SNF5 encodes a 102,536-dalton protein. The N-terminal third of the protein is extremely rich in glutamine and proline. Mutants carrying a deletion of the coding sequence were viable but grew slowly, indicating that the SNF5 gene is important but not essential. Evidence that SNF5 affects expression of the cell type-specific genes MF alpha 1 and BAR1 at the RNA level extends the known range of SNF5 function. SNF5 is apparently required for expression of a wide variety of differently regulated genes. A bifunctional SNF5-beta-galactosidase fusion protein was localized in the nucleus by immunofluorescence. No DNA-binding activity was detected for SNF5. A LexA-SNF5 fusion protein, when bound to a lexA operator, functioned as a transcriptional activator. Images PMID:2233708

  1. Protein expression-yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline.

  2. Correlation of mRNA expression and protein abundance affected by multiple sequence features related to translational efficiency in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-12-01

    The modest correlation between mRNA expression and protein abundance in large scale datasets is explained in part by experimental challenges, such as technological limitations, and in part by fundamental biological factors in the transcription and translation processes. Among various factors affecting the mRNA-protein correlation, the roles of biological factors related to translation are poorly understood. In this study, using experimental mRNA expression and protein abundance data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris by DNA microarray and LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, we quantitatively examined the effects of several translational-efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Three classes of sequence features were investigated according to different translational stages: (1) initiation: Shine-Dalgarno sequences, start codon identity and start codon context; (2) elongation: codon usage and amino acid usage; and (3) termination: stop codon identity and stop codon context. Surprisingly, although it is widely accepted that translation initiation is a rate-limiting step for translation, our results showed that the mRNA-protein correlation was affected the most by the features at elongation stages, codon usage and amino acid composition (7.4-12.6% and 5.3-9.3% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation, respectively), followed by stop codon context and the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (2.5-4.2% and 2.3%, respectively). Taken together, all sequence features contributed to 18.4-21.8% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation. As the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the mRNA-protein correlation in bacterial D. vulgaris, our results suggest that the traditional view of the relative importance of various sequence features in prokaryotic protein translation might be questionable.

  3. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis.

  4. MEIS1 intronic risk haplotype associated with restless legs syndrome affects its mRNA and protein expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lan; Catoire, Hélène; Dion, Patrick; Gaspar, Claudia; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Girard, Simon L.; Levchenko, Anastasia; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Fiori, Laura; St-Onge, Judith; Bachand, Isabelle; Thibodeau, Pascale; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Turecki, Gustavo; Montplaisir, Jacques; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs at night, which is often accompanied by unpleasant sensations. A recent genomewide association study identified an association between RLS and intronic markers from the MEIS1 gene. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that MEIS1 is the only gene encompassed in this evolutionarily conserved chromosomal segment, i.e. a conservation synteny block, from mammals to fish. We carried out a series of experiments to delineate the role of MEIS1 in RLS pathogenesis and the underlying genetic mechanism. We sequenced all 13 MEIS1 exons and their splice junctions in 285 RLS probands with confirmed clinical diagnosis and did not identify any causative coding or exon–intron junction mutations. We found no evidence of structural variation or disease-associated haplotype differential splicing. However, sequencing of conserved regions of MEIS1 introns 8 and 9 identified a novel single nucleotide polymorphism (C13B_2) significantly associated with RLS (allelic association, P = 1.81E−07). We detected a significant decrease in MEIS1 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and brain tissues from RLS patients homozygous for the intronic RLS risk haplotype, compared with those homozygous for the non-risk haplotype. Finally, we found significantly decreased MEIS1 protein levels in the same batch of LCLs and brain tissues from the homozygous carriers of the risk haplotype, compared with the homozygous non-carriers. Therefore, these data suggest that reduced expression of the MEIS1 gene, possibly through intronic cis-regulatory element(s), predisposes to RLS. PMID:19126776

  5. Down-Regulation of Small Rubber Particle Protein Expression Affects Integrity of Rubber Particles and Rubber Content in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Andrea; Post, Janina J.; Wurbs, David; Wahler, Daniela; Lenders, Malte; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Gronover, Christian Schulze

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthesis of rubber is thought to take place on the surface of rubber particles in laticifers, highly specialized cells that are present in more than 40 plant families. The small rubber particle protein (SRPP) has been supposed to be involved in rubber biosynthesis, and recently five SRPPs (TbSRPP1–5) were identified in the rubber-producing dandelion species Taraxacum brevicorniculatum. Here, we demonstrate by immunogold labeling that TbSRPPs are localized to rubber particles, and that rubber particles mainly consist of TbSRPP3, 4 and 5 as shown by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis. We also carried out an RNA-interference approach in transgenic plants to address the function of TbSRPPs in rubber biosynthesis as well as rubber particle morphology and stability. TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic T. brevicorniculatum plants showed a 40–50% reduction in the dry rubber content, but neither the rubber weight average molecular mass nor the polydispersity of the rubber were affected. Although no phenotypical differences to wild-type particles could be observed in vivo, rubber particles from the TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic lines were less stable and tend to rapidly aggregate in expelling latex after wounding of laticifers. Our results prove that TbSRPPs are very crucial for rubber production in T. brevicorniculatum, probably by contributing to a most favourable and stable rubber particle architecture for efficient rubber biosynthesis and eventually storage. PMID:22911861

  6. Down-regulation of small rubber particle protein expression affects integrity of rubber particles and rubber content in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Andrea; Post, Janina J; Wurbs, David; Wahler, Daniela; Lenders, Malte; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Gronover, Christian Schulze

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthesis of rubber is thought to take place on the surface of rubber particles in laticifers, highly specialized cells that are present in more than 40 plant families. The small rubber particle protein (SRPP) has been supposed to be involved in rubber biosynthesis, and recently five SRPPs (TbSRPP1-5) were identified in the rubber-producing dandelion species Taraxacum brevicorniculatum. Here, we demonstrate by immunogold labeling that TbSRPPs are localized to rubber particles, and that rubber particles mainly consist of TbSRPP3, 4 and 5 as shown by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis. We also carried out an RNA-interference approach in transgenic plants to address the function of TbSRPPs in rubber biosynthesis as well as rubber particle morphology and stability. TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic T. brevicorniculatum plants showed a 40-50% reduction in the dry rubber content, but neither the rubber weight average molecular mass nor the polydispersity of the rubber were affected. Although no phenotypical differences to wild-type particles could be observed in vivo, rubber particles from the TbSRPP-RNAi transgenic lines were less stable and tend to rapidly aggregate in expelling latex after wounding of laticifers. Our results prove that TbSRPPs are very crucial for rubber production in T. brevicorniculatum, probably by contributing to a most favourable and stable rubber particle architecture for efficient rubber biosynthesis and eventually storage.

  7. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1 expression in brain is affected by age but not by hormones or metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenjirou; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2006-04-07

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1 is a membrane-bound transcription factor that regulates the expression of several genes involved in cellular fatty acid synthesis in the peripheral tissues, including liver. Although SREBP-1 is expressed in brain, little is known about its function. The aim of the present study was to clarify the characteristics of SREBP-1 mRNA expression in rat brain under various nutritional and hormonal conditions. In genetically obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats, expression of SREBP-1 mRNA was greater in liver than in hypothalamus or cerebrum compared to the lean littermates of these rats. Fasting for 45 h and refeeding for 3 h did not affect expression in brains of Wistar rats of SREBP-1 mRNA or the mRNAs of lipogenic enzymes that are targets of SREBP-1, i.e., fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Infusion of 2.0 mIU insulin or 3.0 microg leptin into the third cerebroventricle did not affect SREBP-1 mRNA expression in either hypothalamus or cerebrum. SREBP-1 mRNA expression in brains of transgenic mice that overexpressed leptin did not differ from that of wild-type mice. However, we observed a unique age-related alteration in SREBP-1 mRNA expression in brains of Sprague-Dawley rats. Specifically, SREBP-1 mRNA expression increased between 1 and 20 months of age, while there was no such change in the expression of FAS or ACC. This raises the possibility that increased SREBP-1 expression secondary to aging-related decline of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) might compensate for the reduction of FAS expression in brain. These findings suggest that the expression of SREBP-1 and downstream lipogenic enzymes in brain is probably not regulated by peripheral nutritional conditions or humoral factors. Aging-related changes in SREBP-1 mRNA expression may be involved in developmental changes in brain lipid metabolism.

  8. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome associated protein interacts with HsNip7 and its down-regulation affects gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hesling, Cedric; Oliveira, Carla C.; Castilho, Beatriz A.; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2007-12-10

    The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal disorder with pleiotropic phenotypes including pancreatic, skeletal and bone marrow deficiencies and predisposition to hematological dysfunctions. SDS has been associated to mutations in the SBDS gene, encoding a highly conserved protein that was shown to function in ribosome biogenesis in yeast. In this work, we show that SBDS is found in complexes containing the human Nip7 ortholog. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing in a stable SBDS knock-down HEK293-derivative cell line revealed accumulation of a small RNA which is a further indication of SBDS involvement in rRNA biosynthesis. Global transcription and polysome-bound mRNA profiling revealed that SBDS knock-down affects expression of critical genes involved in brain development and function, bone morphogenesis, blood cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell adhesion. Expression of a group of growth and signal transduction factors and of DNA damage response genes is also affected. In SBDS knock-down cells, 34 mRNAs showed decreased and 55 mRNAs showed increased association to polysomes, among which is a group encoding proteins involved in alternative splicing and RNA modification. These results indicate that SBDS is required for accurate expression of genes important for proper brain, skeletal, and blood cell development.

  9. Non-cytotoxic Concentration of Cisplatin Decreases Neuroplasticity-Related Proteins and Neurite Outgrowth Without Affecting the Expression of NGF in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; Dos Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin is the most effective and neurotoxic platinum chemotherapeutic agent. It induces a peripheral neuropathy characterized by distal axonal degeneration that might progress to degeneration of cell bodies and apoptosis. Most symptoms occur nearby distal axonal branches and axonal degeneration might induce peripheral neuropathy regardless neuronal apoptosis. The toxic mechanism of cisplatin has been mainly associated with DNA damage, but cisplatin might also affect neurite outgrowth. Nevertheless, the neurotoxic mechanism of cisplatin remains unclear. We investigated the early effects of cisplatin on axonal plasticity by using non-cytotoxic concentrations of cisplatin and PC12 cells as a model of neurite outgrowth and differentiation. PC12 cells express NGF-receptors (trkA) and respond to NGF by forming neurites, branches and synaptic vesicles. For comparison, we used a neuronal model (SH-SY5Y cells) that does not express trkA nor responds to NGF. Cisplatin did not change NGF expression in PC12 cells and decreased neurite outgrowth in both models, suggesting a NGF/trkA independent mechanism. It also reduced axonal growth (GAP-43) and synaptic (synapsin I and synaptophysin) proteins in PC12 cells, without inducing mitochondrial damage or apoptosis. Therefore, cisplatin might affect axonal plasticity before DNA damage, NGF/trkA down-regulation, mitochondrial damage or neuronal apoptosis. This is the first study to show that neuroplasticity-related proteins might be early targets of the neurotoxic action of cisplatin and their role on cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy should be investigated in vivo.

  10. Survival of salmonella transformed to express green fluorescent protein on Italian parsley as affected by processing and storage.

    PubMed

    Duffy, E A; Cisneros-Zevallos, L; Castillo, A; Pillai, S D; Ricke, S C; Acuff, G R

    2005-04-01

    To study the effect of processing and storage parameters on the survival of Salmonella on fresh Italian parsley, parsley bunches were dipped for 3 or 15 min in suspensions that were preequilibrated to 5, 25, or 35 degrees C and inoculated with Salmonella transformed to express enhanced green fluorescent protein. Loosely attached and/or associated, strongly attached and/or associated, and internalized and/or entrapped Salmonella cells were enumerated over 0, 1, and 7 days of storage at 25 degrees C and over 0, 1, 7, 14, and 30 days of storage at 4 degrees C using surface-plating procedures. Leaf sections obtained from samples after 0, 1, and 7 days of storage were examined using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Temperature of the dip suspension had little effect on the attachment and survival of Salmonella cells on parsley. Regardless of the temperature or duration of dip, Salmonella was internalized. Immersion for longer times resulted in higher numbers of attached and internalized cells. Microscopic observations supported these results and revealed Salmonella cells near the stomata and within cracks in the cuticle. Storage temperature had the greatest impact on the survival of Salmonella cells on parsley. When stored at 25 degrees C, parsley had a shelf life of 7 days, and Salmonella populations significantly increased over the 7 days of storage. For parsley stored at 4 degrees C, numbers of Salmonella cells decreased over days 0, 1, and 7. After 7 days of storage, there were no viable internalized Salmonella cells detected. Storage temperature represents an important control point for the safety of fresh parsley.

  11. Down-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 adversely affects the expression of Alzheimer's disease-relevant genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuchner, Thole; Schliebs, Reinhard; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2005-10-01

    Beta-amyloid peptides play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, preventing beta-amyloid formation by inhibition of the beta site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 is considered as a potential strategy to treat AD. Cholinergic mechanisms have been shown to control amyloid precursor protein processing and the number of muscarinic M2-acetylcholine receptors is decreased in brain regions of patients with AD enriched with senile plaques. Therefore, the present study investigates the effect of this M2 muscarinic receptor down-regulation by siRNA on total gene expression and on regulation of BACE1 in particular in SK-SH-SY5Y cells. This model system was used for microarray analysis after carbachol stimulation of siRNA-treated cells compared with carbachol stimulated, non-siRNA-treated cells. The same model system was used to elucidate changes at the protein level by using two-dimensional gels followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that the M2 acetylcholine receptor down-regulation in brains of patients with AD has important effects on the expression of several genes and proteins with major functions in the pathology of AD. This includes beta-secretase BACE1 as well as several modulators of the tau protein and other AD-relevant genes and proteins. Moreover, most of these genes and proteins are adversely affected against the background of AD.

  12. The tolC locus of Escherichia coli affects the expression of three major outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Morona, R; Reeves, P

    1982-01-01

    tolC mutants, which are resistant to colicin E1 and also highly sensitive to detergents and dyes, were shown to lack the OmpF outer membrane protein. There was little effect on transcription as judged by the use of an ompF-lac operon fusion strain, and the tolC effect was probably due to a post-transcriptional effect. The NmpC protein and protein 2 were also tolC dependent. Images PMID:6281230

  13. Cadmium exposure affects mitochondrial bioenergetics and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Inna M; Sokolov, Eugene P; Ponnappa, Kavita M

    2005-07-01

    Cadmium is a ubiquitous and extremely toxic metal, which strongly affects mitochondrial function of aquatic organisms in vitro; however, nothing is known about the in vivo effects of sublethal concentrations of this metal on mitochondrial bioenergetics. We have studied the effects of exposure to 0 (control) or 25 microg L-1 (Cd-exposed) Cd2+ on mitochondrial function and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Cadmium exposure in vivo resulted in considerable accumulation of cadmium in oyster mitochondria and in a significant decrease of ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) by 30% indicating impaired capacity for ATP production. The decrease in state 3 respiration was similar to the level of inhibition expected from the direct effects of cadmium accumulated in oyster mitochondria. On the other hand, while no effect on proton leak was expected based on the mitochondrial accumulation of cadmium, Cd-exposed oysters in fact showed a significant decline of the proton leak rate (state 4+respiration) by 40%. This suggested a downregulation of proton leak, which correlated with a decrease in mRNA expression of a mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP6 and two other potential uncouplers, mitochondrial substrate carriers MSC-1 and MSC-2. Expression of other key mitochondrial proteins including cytochrome c oxidase, adenine nucleotide transporter and voltage dependent anion channel was not affected by cadmium exposure. Adenylate energy charge (AEC) was significantly lower in Cd-exposed oysters; however, this was due to higher steady state ADP levels and not to the decrease in tissue ATP levels. Our data show that adjustment of the proton leak in cadmium-exposed oysters may be a compensatory mechanism, which allows them to maintain normal mitochondrial coupling and ATP levels despite the cadmium-induced inhibition of capacity for ATP production.

  14. Human papillomavirus 16 E2 interacts with neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1 affecting ErbB-3 expression in vitro and in clinical samples of cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Francesca; Curzio, Gianfranca; Melucci, Elisa; Terrenato, Irene; Antoniani, Barbara; Carosi, Mariantonia; Mottolese, Marcella; Vici, Patrizia; Mariani, Luciano; Venuti, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    The ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors play a key role in regulating many cellular functions and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) may interact with transductional pathway of different growth factor receptors. Here, these interactions were analysed in W12 cell line carrying HPV 16 genome and in clinical samples. W12 cells, in which HPV16 becomes integrated during passages, were utilised to detect viral and ErbB family expression at early (W12E) and late passages (W12G). Interestingly, a strong reduction of ErbB-3 expression was observed in W12G. Loss of the E2 and E5 viral genes occurs in W12G and this may affect ErbB-3 receptor expression. E2 and E5 rescue experiments demonstrated that only E2 gene was able to restore ErbB-3 expression. E2 is a transcriptional factor but the expression levels of ErbB3 were unaffected and ErbB-3 promoter did not show any consensus sequence for E2, thus E2 may interact in another way with ErbB3. Indeed, HPV 16 E2 can modulate ErbB-3 by interacting with the ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1 (Nrdp-1) that is involved in the regulation of this receptor, via ubiquitination and degradation. E2 co-immunoprecipitated in a complex with Nrdp-1 leading to hypothesise an involvement of this interaction in ErbB-3 regulation. In addition, 90% of the clinical samples with integrated virus and E2 loss showed no or low ErbB-3 positivity, confirming in vitro results. In conclusion, the new discovered interaction of HPV-16 E2 with Nrdp-1 may affect ErbB-3 expression.

  15. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; van der Veer, Eric P.; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K.; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3′UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  16. DMSA-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Greatly Affect the Expression of Genes Coding Cysteine-Rich Proteins by Their DMSA Coating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xin; Zou, Jinglu; Liu, Yingxun; Wang, Jinke

    2015-10-19

    The dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was widely used to coat iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs); however, its intracellular cytotoxicity remains to be adequately elucidated. This study analyzed the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in four mammalian cells treated by a DMSA-coated magnetite FeNP at various doses at different times. The results revealed that about one-fourth of DEGs coded cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) in all cells under each treatment, indicating that the nanoparticles greatly affected the expressions of CRP-coding genes. Additionally, about 26% of CRP-coding DEGs were enzyme genes in all cells, indicating that the nanoparticles greatly affected the expression of enzyme genes. Further experiments with the nanoparticles and a polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated magnetite FeNP revealed that the effect mainly resulted from DMSA carried into cells by the nanoparticles. This study thus first reported the cytotoxicity of DMSA at the gene transcription level as coating molecules of FeNPs. This study provides new insight into the molecular mechanism by which the DMSA-coated nanoparticles resulted in the transcriptional changes of many CRP-coding genes in cells. This study draws attention toward the intracellular cytotoxicity of DMSA as a coating molecule of nanoparticles, which has very low toxicity as an orally administered antidote due to its extracellular distribution.

  17. A genetic polymorphism affects the risk and prognosis of renal cell carcinoma: association with follistatin-like protein 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Han, Xue; Yu, Yongwei; Ding, Yibo; Ni, Chong; Liu, Wenbin; Hou, Xiaomei; Li, Zixiong; Hou, Jianguo; Shen, Dan; Yin, Jianhua; Zhang, Hongwei; Thompson, Timothy C.; Tan, Xiaojie; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have been identified, yet genetic predisposition contributes significantly to this malignancy. We previously showed that follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) was significantly down-regulated in clear cell RCC (ccRCC), in particular metastatic ccRCC. In the present study, we systemically investigated the associations of the 6 SNPs within FSTL1-coding genomic region with RCC risk and postoperative prognosis. Age- and gender-matched case-control study (417 vs 855) indicated that rs1259293 variant genotype CC was significantly associated with an increased risk of RCC, with an odds ratio of 2.004 (95% confidence internal [CI] = 1.190–3.375). Multivariate Cox regression analysis in 309 of 417 cases showed that rs1259293 genotype (CC vs TT + CT) independently predicted an unfavorable prognosis, with a hazard ratio of 2.531 (95% CI = 1.052–6.086). Expression of FSTL1 was significantly higher in adjacent renal tissues than in tumors, and significantly higher in the tissues with rs1259293 TT genotype than in those with rs1259293 TC+CC genotypes. rs1259293 C allele might generate a CTCF binding site that blocks trans-activation of FSTL1 expression. Our results indicate that rs1259293 is associated with an increased risk and unfavorable postoperative prognosis of RCC, possibly by down-regulating FSTL1 expression in renal tissues. PMID:27225192

  18. Arsenic affects expression and processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of human APP.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Sergio; Bürger, Susanne; Delgado, Juan M; Jiménez-Capdeville, Maria E; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic poisoning due to contaminated water and soil, mining waste, glass manufacture, select agrochemicals, as well as sea food, affects millions of people world wide. Recently, an involvement of arsenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized (Gong and O'Bryant, 2010). The present study stresses the hypothesis whether sodium arsenite, and its main metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), may affect expression and processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using the cholinergic cell line SN56.B5.G4 and primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP, as experimental approaches. Exposure of cholinergic SN56.B5.G4 cells with either sodium arsenite or DMA decreased cell viability in a concentration- and exposure-time dependent manner, and affected the activities of the cholinergic enzymes acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase. Both sodium arsenite and DMA exposure of SN56.B5.G4 cells resulted in enhanced level of APP, and sAPP in the membrane and cytosolic fractions, respectively. To reveal any effect of arsenic on APP processing, the amounts of APP cleavage products, sAPPβ, and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, released into the culture medium of primary neuronal cells derived from transgenic Tg2576 mice, were assessed by ELISA. Following exposure of neuronal cells by sodium arsenite for 12h, the membrane-bound APP level was enhanced, the amount of sAPPβ released into the culture medium was slightly higher, while the levels of Aβ peptides in the culture medium were considerably lower as compared to that assayed in the absence of any drug. The sodium arsenite-induced reduction of Aβ formation suggests an inhibition of the APP γ-cleavage step by arsenite. In contrast, DMA exposure of neuronal cells considerably increased formation of Aβ and sAPPβ, accompanied by enhanced membrane APP level. The DMA-induced changes in APP processing may be the result of the enhanced APP expression. Alternatively, increased Aβ production

  19. Hippocampal protein expression is differentially affected by chronic paroxetine treatment in adolescent and adult rats: a possible mechanism of “paradoxical” antidepressant responses in young persons

    PubMed Central

    Karanges, Emily A.; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Sarker, Ranjana; Ahmed, Eakhlas U.; Ahmed, Selina; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S.; Kemp, Andrew H.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2013-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly recognized as the pharmacological treatment of choice for patients with depressive disorders, yet their use in adolescent populations has come under scrutiny following reports of minimal efficacy and an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior in this age group. The biological mechanisms underlying these effects are largely unknown. Accordingly, the current study examined changes in hippocampal protein expression following chronic administration of paroxetine in drinking water (target dose = 10 mg/kg for 22 days) to adult and adolescent rats. Results indicated age-specific changes in protein expression, with paroxetine significantly altering expression of 8 proteins in adolescents only and 10 proteins solely in adults. A further 12 proteins were significantly altered in both adolescents and adults. In adults, protein changes were generally suggestive of a neurotrophic and neuroprotective effect of paroxetine, with significant downregulation of apoptotic proteins Galectin 7 and Cathepsin B, and upregulation of the neurotrophic factor Neurogenin 1 and the antioxidant proteins Aldose reductase and Carbonyl reductase 3. Phosphodiesterase 10A, a signaling protein associated with major depressive disorder, was also downregulated (-6.5-fold) in adult rats. Adolescent rats failed to show the neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects observed in adults, instead displaying upregulation of the proapoptotic protein BH3-interacting domain death agonist (4.3-fold). Adolescent protein expression profiles also suggested impaired phosphoinositide signaling (Protein kinase C: -3.1-fold) and altered neurotransmitter transport and release (Syntaxin 7: 5.7-fold; Dynamin 1: -6.9-fold). The results of the present study provide clues as to possible mechanisms underlying the atypical response of human adolescents to paroxetine treatment. PMID:23847536

  20. Phosphoglucose isomerase genotype affects running speed and heat shock protein expression after exposure to extreme temperatures in a montane willow beetle.

    PubMed

    Rank, Nathan E; Bruce, Douglas A; McMillan, David M; Barclay, Colleen; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P

    2007-03-01

    Eastern Sierra Nevada populations of the willow beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis commonly experience stressfully high and low environmental temperatures that may influence survival and reproduction. Allele frequencies at the enzyme locus phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) vary across a climatic latitudinal gradient in these populations, with PGI allele 1 being most common in cooler regions and PGI allele 4 in warmer ones. PGI genotypes differ in heat and cold tolerance and in expression of a 70 kDa heat shock protein. Here we examine genetic, behavioral and environmental factors affecting a performance character, running speed, for willow beetles, and assess effects of consecutive cold and heat exposure on running speed and expression of Hsp70 in the laboratory. In nature, running speed depends on air temperature and is higher for males than females. Mating beetles ran faster than single beetles, and differences among PGI genotypes in male running speed depended on the presence of females. In the laboratory, exposure to cold reduced subsequent running speed, but the amount of this reduction depended on PGI genotype and previous thermal history. Effects of exposure to heat also depended on life history stage and PGI genotype. Adults possessing allele 1 ran fastest after a single exposure to stressful temperature, whereas those possessing allele 4 ran faster after repeated exposure. Larvae possessing allele 4 ran fastest after a single stressful exposure, but running speed generally declined after a second exposure to stressful temperature. The ranking of PGI genotypes after the second exposure depended on whether a larva had been exposed to cold or heat. Effects of temperature on Hsp70 expression also varied among PGI genotypes and depended on type of exposure, especially for adults (single heat exposure, two cold exposures: PGI 1-1>1-4>4-4; other multiple extreme exposures: 4-4>1-4>1-1). There was no consistent association between alleles at other polymorphic enzyme loci

  1. Increased expression of latent TGF-β-binding protein 4 affects the fibrotic process in scleroderma by TGF-β/SMAD signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiaying; Liu, Qingmei; Wang, Lei; Tu, Wenzhen; Chu, Haiyan; Ding, Weifeng; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Yanyun; Shi, Xiangguang; Pu, Weilin; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wang, Jiucun; Wu, Wenyu

    2017-03-06

    Scleroderma is a fibrosis-related disorder characterized by cutaneous and internal organ fibrosis, and excessive collagen deposition in extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major cause of fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/SMAD signaling has a central role in the pathogenesis of fibrosis by inducing abnormal collagen accumulation in ECM, and latent TGF-β-binding protein 4 (LTBP-4) affects the secretion of latent TGF-β to ECM. A previous study indicated that bleomycin (BLM) treatment increased LTBP-4 expression in lung fibroblasts of Thy-1 knockout mice with lung fibrosis, and LTBP-4 further promoted TGF-β bioavailability as well as SMAD3 phosphorylation. However, the expression and function of LTBP-4 in human scleroderma remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the potential role of LTBP-4 in scleroderma through clinical, in vivo and in vitro studies. LTBP-4 and TGF-β expressions were significantly upregulated in systemic scleroderma (SSc) patients' plasma compared with normal controls (LTBP-4, 1,215±100.2 vs 542.8±41.7 ng/ml, P<0.0001; TGF-β, 1.5±0.2 vs 0.7±0.1 ng/ml, P=0.0031), while no significant difference was found between localized scleroderma (LSc) and normal controls. The plasma concentrations of LTBP-4 and TGF-β were even higher in SSc patients with lung fibrosis (LTBP-4, 1462± 137.3 vs 892.8±113.4 ng/ml, P=0.0037; TGF-β, 2.0±0.4 vs 0.9±0.2 ng/ml, P=0.0212) and esophagus involvement (1390±134.4 vs 940.7±127.0 ng/ml, P=0.0269; TGF-β, 1.9±0.3 vs 0.9±0.2 ng/ml, P=0.0426). The area under receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of LTBP-4 was 0.86. Immunohistochemistry measurement also demonstrated a higher LTBP-4 expression in sclerotic skin tissue of LSc and SSc compared with normal controls. More positive fibroblasts were also found in BLM-induced scleroderma mouse model than the saline-treated group. In in vitro studies, knockdown of LTBP-4 in SSc skin fibroblasts prominently reduced downstream COL1A1, COL1A2

  2. Sulfation of the FLAG epitope is affected by co-expression of G protein-coupled receptors in a mammalian cell model

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Morag Rose; Grimsey, Natasha Lillia; Glass, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets and therefore extensively studied. Like most transmembrane proteins, there has been considerable difficulty in developing reliable specific antibodies for them. To overcome this, epitope tags are often used to facilitate antibody recognition in studies on fundamental receptor signalling and trafficking. In our study of cannabinoid CB1/dopamine D2 interactions we sought to generate HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged D2 for use in antibody-based assays of GPCR localisation and trafficking activity, however observed that stable FLAG-hD2 expression was particularly challenging to maintain. In contrast, when expressed in cell lines expressing hCB1 robust and stable FLAG-hD2 expression was observed. We hypothesised that co-expression of CB1 might stabilise surface FLAG-hD2 expression, and therefore investigated this further. Here, we describe the observation that co-expression of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors in HEK293 decreases the sulfation of a FLAG epitope appended at the N-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor. Sulfation alters epitope recognition by some anti-FLAG antibodies, leading to the detection of fewer receptors, even though expression is maintained. This demonstrates that cannabinoid receptor expression modifies posttranslational processing of the FLAG-hD2 receptor, and importantly, has wider implications for the utilisation and interpretation of receptor studies involving epitope tags. PMID:27273047

  3. Decoding Children's Expressions of Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinman, Joel A.; Feldman, Robert S.

    Mothers' ability to decode the emotional expressions of their male and female children was compared to the decoding ability of non-mothers. Happiness, sadness, fear and anger were induced in children in situations that varied in terms of spontaneous and role-played encoding modes. It was hypothesized that mothers would be more accurate decoders of…

  4. Evidence for regulatory genes on mouse chromosome 7 that affect the quantitative expression of proteins in the fetal and newborn liver.

    PubMed Central

    Giometti, C S; Gemmell, M A; Taylor, J; Tollaksen, S L; Angeletti, R; Gluecksohn-Waelsch, S

    1992-01-01

    A series of deletions around the albino locus on mouse chromosome 7 is believed to include one or more regulatory genes that control the activities of a cluster of liver enzymes. To further characterize the functions of this region of the mouse genome, we have used quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis to analyze the effects of two of these deletions, c3H and c14CoS, on the expression of liver proteins. More than 400 distinct protein gene products were quantitated in livers from fetal and newborn wild-type homozygous (cch/cch), heterozygous (cch/c3H or cch/c14CoS), and deletion homozygous (c3H/c3H or c14CoS/c14CoS) mice. Livers of fetal and newborn c3H heterozygotes and homozygous wild-type littermates produced qualitatively identical protein patterns after two-dimensional electrophoresis. In livers of c3H homozygous fetuses, however, abnormal amounts (either increased or decreased relative to homozygous wild-type and heterozygous littermates) of 29 proteins were found. Twenty-eight of these 29 protein anomalies were also found in livers of newborn c3H homozygotes. Livers of fetal and newborn mice homozygous for the c14CoS deletion, which overlaps the c3H deletion and produces a similar phenotype, expressed normal amounts of these proteins. One of the 29 proteins (MSN807) has an amino-terminal sequence similar to a 23-kDa translationally controlled protein abundant in mouse erythroleukemia and sarcoma-180 cells. These results suggest that normal chromosome 7 contains genes, located within the region of the c3H but not the c14CoS deletion, that regulate the abundance of specific proteins in the liver. These proteins cannot be related to the phenotypic alterations shared by the c3H and c14CoS deletions. Images PMID:1549608

  5. Suppression of the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of MARCKS-related protein (MRP) affects transmigration in activated RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kwang-Rok; Bae, Eun Mi; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Won-Ha

    2009-01-01

    The molecular action mechanism of MRP, one of the protein kinase C (PKC) substrates, has been under intense investigation, but reports on its role in macrophage function remain controversial. The treatment of macrophage cell lines with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced a high level of MRP expression suggesting that MRP plays a role in the function of activated macrophages. In order to investigate the role of MRP in activated RAW264.7 cells, we stably transfected MRP-specific shRNA expression constructs and tested for alterations in macrophage-related functions. The down-regulation of MRP expression resulted in a marked reduction in chemotaxis toward MCP-1 or extracellular matrix proteins. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibitors of PKC significantly inhibited the chemotaxis in RAW264.7 cells. These data reveals the pivotal role of MRP in the transmigration of activated RAW264.7 cells.

  6. TGF-β1 pathway affects the protein expression of many signaling pathways, markers of liver cancer stem cells, cytokeratins, and TERT in liver cancer HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Ming-Na; Sun, Xun; Xu, Chun-Huan; Liu, Jing; Chen, Jing; Xu, Rui-Ling; Li, Bao-Xin

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common human malignancies, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway plays a key role in its pathogenesis. To study the relationship between TGF-β pathway and the related protein expression of many signaling pathway, markers of stem cells, CK family, and others, liver cancer HepG2 cells were transfected with siRNA directed against TGF-β1 or were treated with exogenous TGF-β1. Then, these protein levels were measured by Western blotting. After siRNA transfection, TGF-β1 protein level was decreased, indicating that the siRNA against it was effective. In exogenous TGF-β1 group, the expression of smad4, smad2/3, and β-catenin proteins was increased, whereas that of p-smad2/3, CD133, cleaved Notch1, and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) proteins at 48 h was decreased. The expression of CK8 and CK18 proteins was increased at 24 h and was decreased at 48 and 96 h. In TGF-β1-silenced group, the expression of smad2/3, β-catenin, cleaved-notch1, and CK18 proteins was decreased, while that of smad4, p-smad2/3, CD133, EpCAM, and CK8 proteins was increased. TERT protein expression was slightly increased in exogenous TGF-β1 group at 48 h and in TGF-β1-silenced group at 96 h. TGF-β1 did not affect the protein expression of CK19 and HIF-1. Thus, TGF-β1 pathway plays an important role in cell regulation of liver cancer through the modulation of these proteins. These data will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer and the role of TGF-β pathway in this process.

  7. Expression of TaCYP78A3, a gene encoding cytochrome P450 CYP78A3 protein in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), affects seed size.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Wang, Qian; Li, Zhanjie; Cheng, Huihui; Li, Zhaojie; Liu, Xiangli; Song, Weining; Appels, Rudi; Zhao, Huixian

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have described quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed size in wheat, but the relevant genes and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report the functional characterization of the wheat TaCYP78A3 gene and its effect on seed size. TaCYP78A3 encoded wheat cytochrome P450 CYP78A3, and was specifically expressed in wheat reproductive organs. TaCYP78A3 activity was positively correlated with the final seed size. Its silencing caused a reduction of cell number in the seed coat, resulting in an 11% decrease in wheat seed size, whereas TaCYP78A3 over-expression induced production of more cells in the seed coat, leading to an 11-48% increase in Arabidopsis seed size. In addition, the cell number in the final seed coat was determined by the TaCYP78A3 expression level, which affected the extent of integument cell proliferation in the developing ovule and seed. Unfortunately, TaCYP78A3 over-expression in Arabidopsis caused a reduced seed set due to an ovule developmental defect. Moreover, TaCYP78A3 over-expression affected embryo development by promoting embryo integument cell proliferation during seed development, which also ultimately affected the final seed size in Arabidopsis. In summary, our results indicated that TaCYP78A3 plays critical roles in influencing seed size by affecting the extent of integument cell proliferation. The present study provides direct evidence that TaCYP78A3 affects seed size in wheat, and contributes to an understanding of the cellular basis of the gene influencing seed development.

  8. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  9. Tuberous sclerosis complex protein 1 expression is affected by VHL Gene alterations and HIF-1α production in sporadic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damjanovic, Svetozar S; Ilic, Bojana B; Beleslin Cokic, Bojana B; Antic, Jadranka A; Bankovic, Jovana Z; Milicevic, Ivana T; Rodic, Gordana S; Ilic, Dusan S; Todorovic, Vera N; Puskas, Nela; Tulic, Cane D

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) do not determine deregulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in clear-cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC). Their effects on tuberous sclerosis proteins (TSC1/2) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) expressions in sporadic ccRCC are unknown. Therefore, we analyze the impact of VHL alterations and HIF-α production on the expression of TSC proteins and Hsp90 in these tumors. Alterations in VHL gene region exhibited 37/47 (78.7%) tumors. Monoallelic inactivation (intragenic mutation or LOH) was found in 10 (21.3%) and biallelic inactivation (intragenic mutation plus LOH) in 27 (57.4%) ccRCCs. Tumorous expression of HIF-α mRNAs, HIF-α, Hsp90 and TSC2 were VHL independent; TSC2 was underexpressed in all tumors by immunostaining (P<0.001). Immunoblotting revealed that TSC1 production was lower in tumors with monoallelic VHL inactivation than in control (P=0.01) and tissues with biallelic VHL inactivation (P=0.019), while tumors lacking HIF-1α (16/47) concurrently overexpressed HIF-2α and underexpressed TSC1 in comparison to controls (P=0.01 for both) and HIF-1α positive tumors (P=0.015 and P=0.050). Significant portion of variability (56.4%) in tumor diameter was explained by oscillations in nuclear grade, and TSC1 and HIF-2α expression in VHL altered tumors. In conclusion, while TSC2 is broadly downregulated in sporadic ccRCC, TSC1 expression is reduced in two subsets of these tumors, those with monoallelic VHL gene inactivation and those with concurrent low HIF-1α and high HIF-2α expression. Hence, the involvement of nuclear grade, TSC1 and HIF-2α in the progression of VHL altered tumors, implies the interplay between pVHL and TSC1.

  10. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  11. Pre-Slaughter Stress Affects Ryanodine Receptor Protein Gene Expression and the Water-Holding Capacity in Fillets of the Nile Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Jorge A. F.; Gasparino, Eliane; Del Vesco, Ana P.; Goes, Marcio D.; Alexandre Filho, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Current study evaluated the effect of pre-slaughter stress on serum cortisol levels, pH, colorimetry, water-holding capacity (WHC) and gene expression of ryanodine receptors (RyR1 and RyR3) in the Nile tilapia. A 3x4 factorial scheme experiment was conducted comprising three densities (100, 200, 400 kg/m³) with four transportation times (60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes).Transportation times alone reduced cortisol levels up to 180 minutes, followed by increased WHC and mRNA expression, RyR1 and RyR3 (200 kg/m³ density). No effect of density x transportation time interacted on the evaluated parameters. Results provided the first evidence that pre-slaughter stress affected ryanodine gene expression receptors and, consequently, the water-holding capacity in tilapia fillets. PMID:26053858

  12. Audio-visual affective expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Thomas S.; Zeng, Zhihong

    2007-11-01

    Automatic affective expression recognition has attracted more and more attention of researchers from different disciplines, which will significantly contribute to a new paradigm for human computer interaction (affect-sensitive interfaces, socially intelligent environments) and advance the research in the affect-related fields including psychology, psychiatry, and education. Multimodal information integration is a process that enables human to assess affective states robustly and flexibly. In order to understand the richness and subtleness of human emotion behavior, the computer should be able to integrate information from multiple sensors. We introduce in this paper our efforts toward machine understanding of audio-visual affective behavior, based on both deliberate and spontaneous displays. Some promising methods are presented to integrate information from both audio and visual modalities. Our experiments show the advantage of audio-visual fusion in affective expression recognition over audio-only or visual-only approaches.

  13. An S18 ribosomal protein gene copy at the Arabidopsis PFL locus affects plant development by its specific expression in meristems.

    PubMed Central

    Van Lijsebettens, M; Vanderhaeghen, R; De Block, M; Bauw, G; Villarroel, R; Van Montagu, M

    1994-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, mutation at PFL causes pointed first leaves, reduced fresh weight and growth retardation. We have cloned the wild-type PFL gene by T-DNA tagging, and demonstrate that it complements the mutant phenotype. PFL codes for ribosomal protein S18, based on the high homology with rat S18 and on purification of S18-equivalent peptides from plant ribosomes. pfl represents the first mutation in eukaryotic S18 proteins or their S13 prokaryotic counterparts, involved in translation initiation. Arabidopsis contains three S18 gene copies dispersed in the genetic map; they are all transcribed and code for completely identical proteins. No transcript is detected from the mutated gene, S18A. The activity of the S18A promoter is restricted to meristems, with a markedly high expression at the embryonic heart stage, and to wounding sites. This means that plants activate an extra copy of this ribosomal protein gene in tissues with cell division activity. We postulate that in meristematic tissues plants use transcriptional control to synthesize extra ribosomes to increase translational efficiency. In analogy with this, an additional, developmentally regulated gene copy might be expected for all ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:7913892

  14. Constitutive expression of two apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) homolog genes of LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 affects flowering time and whole-plant growth in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mimida, Naozumi; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro; Kotoda, Nobuhiro

    2007-09-01

    Fruit trees, such as apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.), are woody perennial plants with a long juvenile phase. The biological analysis for the regulation of flowering time provides insights into the reduction of juvenile phase and the acceleration of breeding in fruit trees. In Arabidopsis, LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1) is involved in epigenetic silencing of the target genes such as flowering genes. We isolated and characterized twin apple LHP1 homolog genes, MdLHP1a and MdLHP1b. These genes may have been generated as a result of ancient genome duplication. Although the putative MdLHP1 proteins showed lower similarity to any other known plant LHP1 homologs, a chromo domain, a chromo shadow domain, and the nuclear localization signal motifs were highly conserved among them. RT-PCR analysis showed that MdLHP1a and MdLHP1b were expressed constantly in developing shoot apices of apple trees throughout the growing season. Constitutive expression of MdLHP1a or MdLHP1b could compensate for the pleiotropic phenotype of lhp1/tfl2 mutant, suggesting that apple LHP1 homolog genes are involved in the regulation of flowering time and whole-plant growth. Based on these results, LHP1 homolog genes might have rapidly evolved among plant species, but the protein functions were conserved, at least between Arabidopsis and apple.

  15. An Inhibitory Motif on the 5’UTR of Several Rotavirus Genome Segments Affects Protein Expression and Reverse Genetics Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Guido; Eichwald, Catherine; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus genome consists of eleven segments of dsRNA, each encoding one single protein. Viral mRNAs contain an open reading frame (ORF) flanked by relatively short untranslated regions (UTRs), whose role in the viral cycle remains elusive. Here we investigated the role of 5’UTRs in T7 polymerase-driven cDNAs expression in uninfected cells. The 5’UTRs of eight genome segments (gs3, gs5-6, gs7-11) of the simian SA11 strain showed a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of viral proteins. Decreased protein expression was due to both compromised transcription and translation and was independent of the ORF and the 3’UTR sequences. Analysis of several mutants of the 21-nucleotide long 5’UTR of gs 11 defined an inhibitory motif (IM) represented by its primary sequence rather than its secondary structure. IM was mapped to the 5’ terminal 6-nucleotide long pyrimidine-rich tract 5’-GGY(U/A)UY-3’. The 5’ terminal position within the mRNA was shown to be essentially required, as inhibitory activity was lost when IM was moved to an internal position. We identified two mutations (insertion of a G upstream the 5’UTR and the U to A mutation of the fifth nucleotide of IM) that render IM non-functional and increase the transcription and translation rate to levels that could considerably improve the efficiency of virus helper-free reverse genetics strategies. PMID:27846320

  16. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular.

  17. Sophorolipid Butyl Ester Diacetate Does Not Affect Macrophage Polarization but Enhances Astrocytic Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression at Micromolar Concentrations in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Alexis M; Gottipati, Manoj K; Totsingan, Filbert; Hanes, Cheryl M; Gross, Richard A; Lennartz, Michelle R; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2017-02-07

    Peritoneal macrophages (PMACs) and spinal cord astrocytes were exposed to varying concentrations of soluble sophorolipid butyl ester diacetate (SLBEDA) in vitro. Macrophages and astrocytes demonstrated no decrease in viability in response to SLBEDA. Studying pro- and anti-inflammatory genes, PMACs did not show a shift toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype. However, at higher concentrations (3 and 30 μM), astrocytes showed an increase in their expression of glial acidic fibrillary protein. This novel category of compounds poses low risk to PMAC and astrocyte viability; however, the effect on PMAC polarization and astrocyte reactivity requires more elucidation.

  18. Arsenic and fluoride co-exposure affects the expression of apoptotic and inflammatory genes and proteins in mononuclear cells from children.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Capetillo, B L; Ortiz-Pérez, M D; Salgado-Bustamante, M; Calderón-Aranda, E; Rodríguez-Pinal, C J; Reynaga-Hernández, E; Corral-Fernández, N E; González-Amaro, R; Portales-Pérez, D P

    2014-02-01

    Humans may be exposed to arsenic (As) and fluoride (F) through water consumption. However, the interaction between these two elements and gene expression in apoptosis or inflammatory processes in children has not been thoroughly investigated. Herein, the expression of cIAP-1, XIAP, TNF-α, ENA-78, survivin, CD25, and CD40 was evaluated by RT-PCR. Additionally, the surface expression of CD25, CD40, and CD40L on peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed by flow cytometry, and TNF-α was measured by Western blotting. This study examined 72 children aged 6-12 years who were chronically exposed to As (154.2μg/L) and F (5.3mg/L) in drinking water and in food cooked with the same water. The urine concentrations of As (6.9-122.4μg/L) were positively correlated with the urine concentrations of F (1.0-8.8mg/L) (r(2)=0.413, p<0.0001). The CD25 gene expression levels and urine concentrations of As and F were negatively correlated, though the CD40 expression levels were negatively correlated only with the As concentration. Age and height influenced the expression of cIAP-1, whereas XIAP expression was correlated only with age. Additionally, there was a lower percentage of CD25- and CD40-positive cells in the group of 6- to 8-year-old children exposed to the highest concentrations of both As and F when compared to the 9- to 12-year-old group (CD25: 0.7±0.8 vs. 1.1±0.9, p<0.0014; CD40: 16.0±7.0 vs. 21.8±5.8, p<0.0003). PHA-stimulated lymphocytes did not show any changes in the induction of CD25, CD69, or CD95. In summary, high concentrations of As and F alter the expression patterns of CD25 and CD40 at both the genetic and protein levels. These changes could decrease immune responses in children exposed to As and F.

  19. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  20. Co-dependence of genotype and dietary protein intake to affect expression on amino acid/peptide transporters in porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, F; Tan, B; Li, Y; Duan, Y; Yin, Y; He, J; Hu, C; Blachier, F; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    A total of 96 barrows (48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs representing fatty genotype, and 48 Landrace pigs representing lean genotype) were randomly assigned to either a low- or adequate-protein treatment diet. The experimental period commenced at 5 weeks of age and extended to the finishing period. After euthanasia, blood and skeletal muscle samples were collected from pigs at the nursery, growing, and finishing phases. Our results indicate that the concentrations of free AAs in the plasma and muscle decreased as the age of the pigs increased. In addition, a strain × growth phase interaction (P < 0.05) was observed for the free AA pool in the plasma and muscle. The low-protein diet upregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for T1R1/T1R3 involved in glutamate binding, but downregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for PAT1, PAT2, and ASCT2, which transport neutral AAs into muscles. Bama mini-pigs had higher (P < 0.05) mRNA levels for LAT1, SNAT2, and EAAC1, but a lower (P < 0.05) mRNA level for PepT1, compared with Landrace pigs. Collectively, our findings indicate that adequate provision of dietary protein plays an important role in regulating profiles of free AA pools and expression of key AA/peptide transporters/transceptors in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner.

  1. The Fusarium verticillioides FUM Gene Cluster Encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 Protein That Affects FUM Gene Expression and Fumonisin Production▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A. E.; Busman, Mark; Proctor, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by some Fusarium species and can contaminate maize or maize products. Ingestion of fumonisins is associated with diseases, including cancer and neural tube defects, in humans and animals. In fungi, genes involved in the synthesis of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites are often located adjacent to each other in gene clusters. Such genes can encode structural enzymes, regulatory proteins, and/or proteins that provide self-protection. The fumonisin biosynthetic gene cluster includes 16 genes, none of which appear to play a role in regulation. In this study, we identified a previously undescribed gene (FUM21) located adjacent to the fumonisin polyketide synthase gene, FUM1. The presence of a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA-binding domain in the predicted protein suggested that FUM21 was involved in transcriptional regulation. FUM21 deletion (Δfum21) mutants produce little to no fumonisin in cracked maize cultures but some FUM1 and FUM8 transcripts in a liquid GYAM medium. Complementation of a Δfum21 mutant with a wild-type copy of the gene restored fumonisin production. Analysis of FUM21 cDNAs identified four alternative splice forms (ASFs), and microarray analysis indicated the ASFs were differentially expressed. Based on these data, we present a model for how FUM21 ASFs may regulate fumonisin biosynthesis. PMID:17483290

  2. Fli-1 transcription factor affects glomerulonephritis development by regulating expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in endothelial cells in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eiji; Karam, Eva; Williams, Sarah; Watson, Dennis K; Gilkeson, Gary; Zhang, Xian K

    2012-12-01

    Expression of transcription factor Fli-1 is implicated in the development of glomerulonephritis. Fli-1 heterozygous knockout (Fli1(+/-)) NZM2410 mice, a murine model of lupus, had significantly improved survival and reduced glomerulonephritis. In this study, we found that infiltrated inflammatory cells were significantly decreased in the kidneys from Fli-1(+/-) NZM2410 mice. The expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) was significantly decreased in kidneys from Fli-1(+/-) NZM2410 mice. The primary endothelial cells isolated from the kidneys of Fli-1(+/-) NZM2410 mice produced significantly less MCP-1. In endothelial cells transfected with specific Fli-1 siRNA the production of MCP-1 was significantly reduced compared to cells transfected with negative control siRNA. By Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we further demonstrated that Fli-1 directly binds to the promoter of the MCP-1 gene. Our data indicate that Fli-1 impacts glomerulonephritis development by regulating expression of inflammatory chemokine MCP-1 and inflammatory cell infiltration in the kidneys in the NZM2410 mice.

  3. Phytochrome B Negatively Affects Cold Tolerance by Regulating OsDREB1 Gene Expression through Phytochrome Interacting Factor-Like Protein OsPIL16 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    He, Yanan; Li, Yaping; Cui, Lixin; Xie, Lixia; Zheng, Chongke; Zhou, Guanhua; Zhou, Jinjun; Xie, Xianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Cross talk between light signaling and cold signaling has been elucidated in the model plant Arabidopsis and tomato, but little is known about their relationship in rice. Here, we report that phytochrome B (phyB) mutants exhibit improved cold tolerance compared with wild type (WT) rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare). The phyB mutants had a lower electrolyte leakage index and malondialdehyde concentration than the WT, suggesting that they had greater cell membrane integrity and less lipid peroxidation. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression levels of dehydration-responsive element binding protein 1 (OsDREB1) family genes, which functions in the cold stress response in rice, were increased in the phyB mutant under normal and cold stress conditions. PIFs are central players in phytochrome-mediated light signaling networks. To explore the relationship between rice PIFs and OsDREB1 gene expression, we produced overexpression lines of rice PIF genes. OsDREB1 family genes were up-regulated in OsPIL16-overexpression lines, which had improved cold tolerance relative to the WT. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-qPCR assay revealed that OsPIL16 can bind to the N-box region of OsDREB1B promoter. Expression pattern analyses revealed that OsPIL16 transcripts were induced by cold stress and was significantly higher in the phyB mutant than in the WT. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsPIL16 can bind to rice PHYB. Based on these results, we propose that phyB deficiency positively regulates OsDREB1 expression through OsPIL16 to enhance cell membrane integrity and to reduce the malondialdehyde concentration, resulting in the improved cold tolerance of the phyB mutants. PMID:28083003

  4. Prolonged Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess Does Not Globally Affect Selenoprotein Gene Expression and/or Protein Production in Various Tissues of Pigs123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoshan; Tang, Jiayong; Li, Ke; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Li, Kui; Lei, Xin Gen

    2012-01-01

    We previously determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or excess on mRNA abundance of 12 selenoprotein genes in pig tissues. In this study, we determined the effect of dietary Se on mRNA levels of the remaining porcine selenoprotein genes along with protein production of 4 selenoproteins (Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels) and body glucose homeostasis. Weanling male pigs (n = 24) were fed a Se-deficient (<0.02 mg Se/kg), basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast (Angel Yeast) for 16 wk. Although mRNA abundance of the 13 selenoproteins in 10 tissues responded to dietary Se in 3 patterns, there was no common regulation for any given gene across all tissues or for any given tissue across all genes. Dietary Se affected (P < 0.05) 2, 3, 3, 5, 6, 7, 7, and 8 selenoprotein genes in muscle, hypothalamus, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, thyroid, and pituitary, respectively. Protein abundance of Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels in 6 tissues was regulated (P < 0.05) by dietary Se concentrations in 3 ways. Compared with those fed 0.3 mg Se/kg, pigs fed 3.0 mg Se/kg became hyperinsulinemic (P < 0.05) and had lower (P < 0.05) tissue levels of serine/threonine protein kinase. In conclusion, dietary Se exerted no global regulation of gene transcripts or protein levels of individual selenoproteins across porcine tissues. Pigs may be a good model for studying mechanisms related to the potential prodiabetic risk of high-Se intake in humans. PMID:22739382

  5. Lack of p53 Affects the Expression of Several Brain Mitochondrial Proteins: Insights from Proteomics into Important Pathways Regulated by p53

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Barone, Eugenio; Cenini, Giovanna; Perluigi, Marzia; Mancuso, Cesare; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; St. Clair, Daret; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 has been described “as the guardian of the genome” for its crucial role in regulating the transcription of numerous genes responsible for cells cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis in response to various stress signals. Although p53 promotes longevity by decreasing the risk of cancer through activation of apoptosis or cellular senescence, several findings suggest that an increase of its activity may have deleterious effects leading to selected aspects of the aging phenotype and neurodegenerative diseases. There is the link between p53 and oxidative stress, the latter a crucial factor that contributes to neurodegenerative processes like Alzheimer disease (AD). In the present study, using a proteomics approach, we analyzed the impact of lack of p53 on the expression of several brain mitochondrial proteins involved in different pathways, and how lack of p53 may present a target to restore neuronal impairments. Our investigation on isolated brain mitochondria from p53(−/−) mice also provides a better understanding of the p53-mitochondria relationship and its involvement in the development of many diseases. PMID:23209608

  6. Palmitic acid increases pro-oxidant adaptor protein p66Shc expression and affects vascularization factors in angiogenic mononuclear cells: Action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Favre, Julie; Yildirim, Cansu; Leyen, Thomas A; Chen, Weena J Y; van Genugten, Renate E; van Golen, Larissa W; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan-Jesus; Musters, Rene; Baggen, Josefien; Fontijn, Ruud; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke; Serné, Erik; Koolwijk, Pieter; Diamant, Michaela; Horrevoets, Anton J G

    2015-12-01

    A defect in neo-vascularization process involving circulating angiogenic mononuclear cells (CACs) dysfunction is associated with diabetes. We showed that oxidative stress was elevated in CACs cultured from blood of individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes. We then assessed the action of palmitic acid (PA), a deregulated and increased NEFA in metabolic disorders, focusing on its oxidant potential. We observed that the phyto-polyphenol resveratrol normalized oxidative stress both in CACs isolated from MetS patients or treated with PA. Resveratrol further decreased the deleterious action of PA on gene expression of vascularization factors (TNFα, VEGF-A, SDF1α, PECAM-1, VEGFR2, Tie2 and CXCR4) and improved CAC motility. Particularly, resveratrol abolished the PA-induced over-expression of the pro-oxidant protein p66Shc. Neither KLF2 nor SIRT1, previously shown in resveratrol and p66Shc action, was directly involved. Silencing p66Shc normalized PA action on VEGF-A and TNFα specifically, without abolishing the PA-induced oxidative stress, which suggests a deleterious role of p66Shc independently of any major modulation of the cellular oxidative status in a high NEFA levels context. Besides showing that resveratrol reverses PA-induced harmful effects on human CAC function, certainly through profound cellular modifications, we establish p66Shc as a major therapeutic target in metabolic disorders, independent from glycemic control.

  7. A functional variant that affects exon-skipping and protein expression of SP140 as genetic mechanism predisposing to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, Fuencisla; Potenciano, Victor; Fedetz, Maria; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Karaky, Mohamad; Barrionuevo, Cristina; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Ruiz-Peña, Juan Luis; García-Sánchez, María Isabel; Lucas, Miguel; Fernández, Óscar; Leyva, Laura; Otaegui, David; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Olascoaga, Javier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Villar, Luisa María; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Malhotra, Sunny; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Arroyo, Rafael; Varadé, Jezabel; Urcelay, Elena; Alcina, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Several variants in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the SP140 locus have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), Crohn's disease (CD) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To determine the causal polymorphism, we have integrated high-density data sets of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), using GEUVADIS RNA sequences and 1000 Genomes genotypes, with MS-risk variants of the high-density Immunochip array performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium (IMSGC). The variants most associated with MS were also correlated with a decreased expression of the full-length RNA isoform of SP140 and an increase of an isoform lacking exon 7. By exon splicing assay, we have demonstrated that the rs28445040 variant was the causal factor for skipping of exon 7. Western blots of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MS patients showed a significant allele-dependent reduction of the SP140 protein expression. To confirm the association of this functional variant with MS and to compare it with the best-associated variant previously reported by GWAS (rs10201872), a case-control study including 4384 MS patients and 3197 controls was performed. Both variants, in strong LD (r(2) = 0.93), were found similarly associated with MS [P-values, odds ratios: 1.9E-9, OR = 1.35 (1.22-1.49) and 4.9E-10, OR = 1.37 (1.24-1.51), respectively]. In conclusion, our data uncover the causal variant for the SP140 locus and the molecular mechanism associated with MS risk. In addition, this study and others previously reported strongly suggest that this functional variant may be shared with other immune-mediated diseases as CD and CLL.

  8. IL36RN Mutations Affect Protein Expression and Function: A Basis for Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Pustular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Marie; Bal, Elodie; Pei, Xue-Yuan; Madrange, Marine; Khelil, Amel; Sahel, Houria; Zenati, Akila; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Boubridaa, Khaled; Chiali, Amel; Smahi, Naima; Otsmane, Farida; Bouajar, Bakar; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Turki, Hamida; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Viguier, Manuelle; Hamel, Yamina; Bachelez, Hervé; Smahi, Asma

    2016-09-01

    Homozygous or compound heterozygous IL36RN gene mutations underlie the pathogenesis of psoriasis-related pustular eruptions including generalized pustular psoriasis, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, and acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption. We identified two unreported IL36RN homozygous mutations (c.41C>A/p.Ser14X and c.420_426del/p.Gly141MetfsX29) in patients with familial generalized pustular psoriasis. We analyzed the impact of a spectrum of IL36RN mutations on IL-36 receptor antagonist protein by using site-directed mutagenesis and expression in HEK293T cells. This enabled us to differentiate null mutations with complete absence of IL-36 receptor antagonist (the two previously unreported mutations, c.80T>C/p.Leu27Pro, c.28C>T/p.Arg10X, c.280G>T/p.Glu94X, c.368C>G/p.Thr123Arg, c.368C>T/p.Thr123Met, and c.227C>T/p.Pro76Leu) from mutations with decreased (c.95A>G/p.His32Arg, c.142C>T/p.Arg48Trp, and c.308C>T/p.Ser113Leu) or unchanged (c.304C>T/p.Arg102Trp and c.104A>G/p.Lys35Arg) protein expression. Functional assays measuring the impact of mutations on the capacity to repress IL-36-dependent activation of the NF-κB pathway showed complete functional impairment for null mutations, whereas partial or no impairment was observed for other mutations considered as hypomorphic. Finally, null mutations were associated with severe clinical phenotypes (generalized pustular psoriasis, acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption), whereas hypomorphic mutations were identified in both localized (palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau) and generalized variants. These results provide a preliminary basis for genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with deficiency of the IL-36Ra (DITRA), and suggest the involvement of other factors in the modulation of clinical expression.

  9. Affective Scaffolds, Expressive Arts, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Some theorists have argued that elements of the surrounding world play a crucial role in sustaining and amplifying both cognition and emotion. Such insights raise an interesting question about the relationship between cognitive and affective scaffolding: in addition to enabling the realization of specific affective states, can an affective niche also enable the realization of certain cognitive capacities? In order to gain a better understanding of this relationship between affective niches and cognition, I will examine the use of expressive arts in the context of psychotherapy and peacebuilding. In these settings, environmental resources and interpersonal scaffolds not only evoke emotion and encourage the adoption of particular bodily affective styles, but also support the development of capacities for self-awareness and interpersonal understanding. These affective scaffolds play a crucial role in therapy and peacebuilding, in fact, insofar as they facilitate the development of self-knowledge, enhance capacities associated with social cognition, and build positive rapport and trust among participants. I will argue that this is because affectivity is linked to the way that subjects frame and attend to their surroundings. Insofar as the regulation and modification of emotion goes hand in hand with opening up new interpretive frames and establishing new habits of mind, the creation of an affective niche can contribute significantly to various modes of cognition. PMID:27014164

  10. Can Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    In quiescent environments (microgravity, capillary tubes, gels) formation of a depletion zone is to be expected, due either to limited sedimentation, density driven convection or a combination of both. The formation of a depletion zone can: Modify solution supersaturation near crystal; Give rise to impurity partitioning. It is conjectured that both supersaturation and impurity partitioning affect protein crystal quality and size. Further detailed investigations on various proteins are needed to assess above hypothesis.

  11. A nuclear-localized protein, KOLD SENSITIV-1, affects the expression of cold-responsive genes during prolonged chilling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Sarah J; Bussell, John D; Nelson, David C; Villadsen, Dorthe; Smith, Steven M

    2011-02-15

    Plants respond to cold by transcriptional and metabolic responses which underlie tolerance and acclimation mechanisms, but details at the molecular level are incomplete. Here we describe KOLD SENSITIV-1 (KOS1), a new gene required for responses to cold. KOS1 protein is predicted to have coiled-coil, Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes and nuclear-targeting domains. GFP-labeled KOS1 localizes to the nucleus. Null mutants could not be isolated but two independent knockdown T-DNA mutants were obtained. Growth and development of kos1 knockdown mutant plants was comparable to wild type when grown at 21°C. However, when grown at 4°C these mutants exhibited accelerated leaf yellowing and smaller rosette size than wild type. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that in the cold kos1 mutants had reduced expression of cold-responsive transcripts COR15A, COR15B, BAM3 and AMY3. Metabolite profiling revealed that ascorbate levels were lower in the mutants in the cold relative to wild type. KOS1 therefore represents a new gene that influences the regulation of transcript and metabolite levels in response to prolonged chilling temperatures.

  12. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  13. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  14. Can Solution Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    The formation of large protein crystals of "high quality" is considered a characteristic manifestation of microgravity. The physical processes that predict the formation of large, high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of space are considered rooted in the existence of a "depletion zone" in the vicinity of crystal. Namely, it is considered reasonable that crystal quality suffers in earth-grown crystals as a result of the incorporation of large aggregates, micro-crystals and/or large molecular weight "impurities", processes which are aided by density driven convective flow or mixing at the crystal-liquid interface. Sedimentation and density driven convection produce unfavorable solution conditions in the vicinity of the crystal surface, which promotes rapid crystal growth to the detriment of crystal size and quality. In this effort, we shall further present the hypothesis that the solution supersaturatoin at the crystal surface determines the growth mechanism, or mode, by which protein crystals grow. It is further hypothesized that protein crystal quality is affected by the mechanism or mode of crystal growth. Hence the formation of a depletion zone in microgravity environment is beneficial due to inhibition of impurity incorporatoin as well as preventing a kinetic roughening transition. It should be noted that for many proteins the magnitude of neither protein crystal growth rates nor solution supersaturation are predictors of a kinetic roughening transition. That is, the kinetic roughening transition supersaturation must be dtermined for each individual protein.

  15. Engineering Genes for Predictable Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon; Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The DNA sequence used to encode a polypeptide can have dramatic effects on its expression. Lack of readily available tools has until recently inhibited meaningful experimental investigation of this phenomenon. Advances in synthetic biology and the application of modern engineering approaches now provide the tools for systematic analysis of the sequence variables affecting heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. We here discuss how these new tools are being applied and how they circumvent the constraints of previous approaches, highlighting some of the surprising and promising results emerging from the developing field of gene engineering. PMID:22425659

  16. Engineering genes for predictable protein expression.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Ness, Jon; Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark

    2012-05-01

    The DNA sequence used to encode a polypeptide can have dramatic effects on its expression. Lack of readily available tools has until recently inhibited meaningful experimental investigation of this phenomenon. Advances in synthetic biology and the application of modern engineering approaches now provide the tools for systematic analysis of the sequence variables affecting heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. We here discuss how these new tools are being applied and how they circumvent the constraints of previous approaches, highlighting some of the surprising and promising results emerging from the developing field of gene engineering.

  17. Lack of the D2 protein in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii psbD mutant affects photosystem II stability and D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jeanne M.; Rahire, Michéle; Malnoë, Pia; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Pierre, Yves; Bennoun, Pierre; Rochaix, Jean-David

    1986-01-01

    D1 and D2, two chloroplast proteins with apparent mol. wt of 32 000-34 000, play an important role in the photosynthetic reactions mediated by the membrane-bound protein complex of photosystem II (PSII). We have isolated and characterized an uniparental, non-photosynthetic mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and show that the mutation is in the chloroplast gene psbD, coding for D2. A 46 bp direct DNA duplication in the coding region of the mutant gene causes a frame-shift which results in a psbD transcript coding for 186 amino acid residues instead of the normal 352. The truncated D2 peptide is never seen, even after pulse-labeling, suggesting that the mutant protein is very unstable. In addition, little or no D1 protein is detected in this mutant although the gene and normal levels of mRNA for D1 are present in mutant cells. All other core PSII proteins are synthesized and inserted into the membrane fraction, but never accumulate. These results suggest that D2 contributes not only to the stabilization of the PSII complex in the membrane, but also may play a specific role in the regulation of the D1 protein, either at the translational or post-translational level. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 6. PMID:16453694

  18. Structural features affecting variant surface glycoprotein expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Böhme, Ulrike; Cross, George A M

    2003-05-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is the most abundant GPI-anchored protein expressed on any cell, and is an essential virulence factor. To determine what structural features affect efficient expression of VSG, we made a series of mutations in two VSGs. Inserting 18 amino acids, between the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, reduced the expression of VSG 221 to about 3% of the wild-type level. When this insertion was combined with deletion of the single carboxy-terminal subdomain, expression was reduced a further three-fold. In VSG 117, which contains two carboxy-terminal subdomains, point mutation of the intervening N-glycosylation site reduced expression about 15-fold. Deleting the most carboxy-terminal subdomain and intervening region, including the N-glycosylation site, reduced expression to 15-20% of wild type VSG, and deletion of both subdomains reduced expression to <1%. Despite their low abundance, all VSG mutants were GPI anchored on the cell surface. Our results suggest that, for a protein to be efficiently displayed on the surface of bloodstream-form T. brucei, it is essential that it contains the conserved structural motifs of a T. brucei VSG. Serum resistance-associated protein (SRA), which confers human infectivity on T. brucei, strongly resembles a VSG deletion mutant. Expression of three epitope-tagged versions of SRA in T. brucei conferred total resistance to human serum. SRA possesses a canonical GPI signal sequence, but we were unable to obtain unequivocal evidence for the presence of a GPI anchor. SRA was not released during osmotic lysis, indicating that it is not GPI anchored on the cell surface.

  19. Marker gene tethering by nucleoporins affects gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Galinha, Carla; Desset, Sophie; Tolmie, Frances; Evans, David; Tatout, Christophe; Graumann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In non-plant systems, chromatin association with the nuclear periphery affects gene expression, where interactions with nuclear envelope proteins can repress and interactions with nucleoporins can enhance transcription. In plants, both hetero- and euchromatin can localize at the nuclear periphery, but the effect of proximity to the nuclear periphery on gene expression remains largely unknown. This study explores the putative function of Seh1 and Nup50a nucleoporins on gene expression by using the Lac Operator / Lac Repressor (LacI-LacO) system adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana. We used LacO fused to the luciferase reporter gene (LacO:Luc) to investigate whether binding of the LacO:Luc transgene to nucleoporin:LacI protein fusions alters luciferase expression. Two separate nucleoporin-LacI-YFP fusions were introduced into single insert, homozygous LacO:Luc Arabidopsis plants. Homozygous plants carrying LacO:Luc and a single insert of either Seh1-LacI-YFP or Nup50a-LacI-YFP were tested for luciferase activity and compared to plants containing LacO:Luc only. Seh1-LacI-YFP increased, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP decreased luciferase activity. Seh1-LacI-YFP accumulated at the nuclear periphery as expected, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP was nucleoplasmic and was not selected for further study. Protein and RNA levels of luciferase were quantified by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. Increased luciferase activity in LacO:Luc+Seh1-LacI-YFP plants was correlated with increased luciferase protein and RNA levels. This change of luciferase expression was abolished by disruption of LacI-LacO binding by treating with IPTG in young seedlings, rosette leaves and inflorescences. This study suggests that association with the nuclear periphery is involved in the regulation of gene expression in plants.

  20. Quantitative expression of candidate genes affecting eggshell color.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chuanwei; Li, Zesheng; Yang, Ning; Ning, Zhonghua

    2014-05-01

    There are three pigments that affect the color of an eggshell: protoporphyrin, biliverdin and biliverdin-zinc chelate. Protoporphyrin is the main pigment in brown and light-brown eggshells, whereas very little protoporphyrin is found in white eggshells. Eggshell protoporphyrin is derived from the heme formation in birds. Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) and ferrochelatase (FECH) represent rate-limiting enzymes for the heme-biosynthetic pathway. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), feline leukemia virus receptor (FLVCR), and heme-responsive gene-1 (HRG1) serve as primary transporters for both protoporphyrinogen and heme. Finally, four organic anion transporting polypeptide family members (including solute carrier organic anion transporter family, SLCO1C1, SLCO1A2, SLCO1B3 and LOC418189) may affect pigment transport within eggshells. Here we measured gene expression levels in key tissues of egg-producing hens. We analyzed three different types of hens that generated distinct eggshell colors: white, pink or brown. Our data revealed three ways in which eggshell color was genetically influenced. First, high-level expression of CPOX generated more protoporphyrinogen and a brown eggshell color. In contrast, high expression of FECH likely converted more protoporphyrinogen into heme, reduced protoporphyrinogen levels within the eggshell and generated a light color. Second, heme transporters also affected eggshell color. High-level expression of BCRP, HRG1 and FLVCR were associated with brown, white and generally lighter eggshell colors, respectively. Finally, protoporphyrin precipitation also affected eggshell color, as high expression of both SLCO1A2 and SLCO1C1 were associated with brown eggshell color. As such, we have identified seven genes in which expression levels in different tissues were associated with eggshell color.

  1. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension.

  2. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:27043552

  3. The method used to culture host cells (Sf9 cells) can affect the qualities of baculovirus budding particles expressing recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tomomi; Nakanishi, Kohei; Mori, Takaaki; Tomita, Masahiro; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    Budded virus (BV) particles of baculovirus (Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcNPV) are harvested from the supernatant of liquid culture of Sf9 host cells by ultracentrifugation. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of BV samples fractionated closely by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, we observed that BVs exhibited different qualities depending on whether they had been harvested from the supernatant from a standing (static), shaking (suspension), or standing/shaking (pre-/post-infection) culture of Sf9 cells. The amount of BV protein apparently increased in the order of standing, standing/shaking, and shaking procedure, and the yield of intact particles showed an opposite trend. TEM observation clearly showed that appropriate fractions of the standing and standing/shaking cultures contained more intact BV particles than those from the shaking culture. These results suggest that the qualities of recombinant BV particles may be related to the culture conditions of the host cells.

  4. Mobile phone radiation might alter protein expression in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Karinen, Anu; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Nylund, Reetta; Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    Background Earlier we have shown that the mobile phone radiation (radiofrequency modulated electromagnetic fields; RF-EMF) alters protein expression in human endothelial cell line. This does not mean that similar response will take place in human body exposed to this radiation. Therefore, in this pilot human volunteer study, using proteomics approach, we have examined whether a local exposure of human skin to RF-EMF will cause changes in protein expression in living people. Results Small area of forearm's skin in 10 female volunteers was exposed to RF-EMF (specific absorption rate SAR = 1.3 W/kg) and punch biopsies were collected from exposed and non-exposed areas of skin. Proteins extracted from biopsies were separated using 2-DE and protein expression changes were analyzed using PDQuest software. Analysis has identified 8 proteins that were statistically significantly affected (Anova and Wilcoxon tests). Two of the proteins were present in all 10 volunteers. This suggests that protein expression in human skin might be affected by the exposure to RF-EMF. The number of affected proteins was similar to the number of affected proteins observed in our earlier in vitro studies. Conclusion This is the first study showing that molecular level changes might take place in human volunteers in response to exposure to RF-EMF. Our study confirms that proteomics screening approach can identify protein targets of RF-EMF in human volunteers. PMID:18267023

  5. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food. PMID:27703199

  6. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-10-05

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food.

  7. Effects of immunosuppressive treatment on protein expression in rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kędzierska, Karolina; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Sindrewicz, Krzysztof; Bober, Joanna; Domański, Leszek; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Maciej; Smektała, Tomasz; Masiuk, Marek; Skrzypczak, Wiesław; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The structural proteins of renal tubular epithelial cells may become a target for the toxic metabolites of immunosuppressants. These metabolites can modify the properties of the proteins, thereby affecting cell function, which is a possible explanation for the mechanism of immunosuppressive agents’ toxicity. In our study, we evaluated the effect of two immunosuppressive strategies on protein expression in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Fragments of the rat kidneys were homogenized after cooling in liquid nitrogen and then dissolved in lysis buffer. The protein concentration in the samples was determined using a protein assay kit, and the proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The obtained gels were then stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and their images were analyzed to evaluate differences in protein expression. Identification of selected proteins was then performed using mass spectrometry. We found that the immunosuppressive drugs used in popular regimens induce a series of changes in protein expression in target organs. The expression of proteins involved in drug, glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was pronounced. However, to a lesser extent, we also observed changes in nuclear, structural, and transport proteins’ synthesis. Very slight differences were observed between the group receiving cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (CMG) and the control group. In contrast, compared to the control group, animals receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (TMG) exhibited higher expression of proteins responsible for renal drug metabolism and lower expression levels of cytoplasmic actin and the major urinary protein. In the TMG group, we observed higher expression of proteins responsible for drug metabolism and a decrease in the expression of respiratory chain enzymes (thioredoxin-2) and markers of distal renal tubular damage (heart fatty acid-binding protein) compared to expression in the CMG

  8. Oxalomalate affects the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Irace, Carlo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Maffettone, Carmen; Rossi, Antonietta; Festa, Michela; Iuvone, Teresa; Santamaria, Rita; Sautebin, Lidia; Carnuccio, Rosa; Colonna, Alfredo

    2007-03-13

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is an homodimeric enzyme which produces large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) in response to inflammatory stimuli. Several factors affect the synthesis and catalytic activity of iNOS. Particularly, dimerization of NOS monomers is promoted by heme, whereas an intracellular depletion of heme and/or L-arginine considerably decreases NOS resistance to proteolysis. In this study, we found that oxalomalate (OMA, oxalomalic acid, alpha-hydroxy-beta-oxalosuccinic acid), an inhibitor of both aconitase and NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, inhibited nitrite production and iNOS protein expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated J774 macrophages, without affecting iNOS mRNA content. Furthermore, injection of OMA precursors to LPS-stimulated rats also decreased nitrite production and iNOS expression in isolated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, alpha-ketoglutarate or succinyl-CoA administration reversed OMA effect on NO production, thus correlating NO biosynthesis with the anabolic capacity of Krebs cycle. When protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide in LPS-activated J774 cells treated with OMA, iNOS protein levels, evaluated by Western blot analysis and (35)S-metabolic labelling, were decreased, suggesting that OMA reduces iNOS biosynthesis and induces an increase in the degradation rate of iNOS protein. Moreover, we showed that OMA inhibits the activity of the iNOS from lung of LPS-treated rats by enzymatic assay. Our results, demonstrating that OMA acts regulating synthesis, catalytic activity and degradation of iNOS, suggest that this compound might have a potential role in reducing the NO overproduction occurring in some pathological conditions.

  9. High dietary fat-induced obesity in Wistar rats and type 2 diabetes in nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rats differentially affect retinol binding protein 4 expression and vitamin A metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tomomi; Shichi, Yuta; Sato, Miyuki; Tanioka, Yuri; Furusho, Tadasu; Ota, Toru; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, which is caused mainly by insulin resistance. Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the only specific transport protein for retinol in the serum. RBP4 level is increased in the diabetic state and high-fat condition, indicating that retinol metabolism may be affected under these conditions. However, the precise effect of diabetes and high fat-induced obesity on retinol metabolism is unknown. In this study, we examined differences in retinol metabolite levels in rat models of diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes (Goto-Kakizaki [GK] rat). Four-week-old male Wistar and GK rats were given either a control diet (AIN-93G) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% fat kJ). After 15 weeks of feeding, the RBP4 levels increased by 2-fold in the serum of GK rats but not HFD-fed rats. The hepatic retinol concentration of HFD-fed rats was approximately 50% that of the controls (P < .01). In contrast, the renal retinol concentrations of GK rats increased by 70% (P < .01). However, expression of RARβ in the kidney, which was induced in a retinoic acid-dependent manner, was downregulated by 90% (P < .01) in GK rats. In conclusion, diabetes and obesity affected retinol metabolism differently, and the effects were different in different peripheral tissues. The impact of HFD may be limited to the storage of hepatic vitamin A as retinyl palmitate. In particular, our data indicate that renal retinoic acid production might represent an important target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  11. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  12. Blockage of the Neonatal Leptin Surge Affects the Gene Expression of Growth Factors, Glial Proteins, and Neuropeptides Involved in the Control of Metabolism and Reproduction in Peripubertal Male and Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Mela, Virginia; Díaz, Francisca; Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Vázquez, María Jesús; Gertler, Arieh; Argente, Jesús; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Viveros, María-Paz; Chowen, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Leptin (Lep) is important in the development of neuroendocrine circuits involved in metabolic control. Because both Lep and metabolism influence pubertal development, we hypothesized that early changes in Lep signaling could also modulate hypothalamic (HT) systems involved in reproduction. We previously demonstrated that a single injection of a Lep antagonist (Antag) on postnatal day (PND)9, coincident with the neonatal Lep peak, induced sexually dimorphic modifications in trophic factors and markers of cell turnover and neuronal maturation in the HT on PND13. Here, our aim was to investigate whether the alterations induced by Lep antagonism persist into puberty. Accordingly, male and female rats were treated with a pegylated super Lep Antag from PND5 to PND9 and killed just before the normal appearance of external signs of puberty (PND33 in females and PND43 in males). There was no effect on body weight, but in males food intake increased, subcutaneous adipose tissue decreased and HT neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related peptide mRNA levels were reduced, with no effect in females. In both sexes, the Antag increased HT mRNA levels of the kisspeptin receptor, G protein-coupled recepter 54 (Gpr54). Expression of the Lep receptor, trophic factors, and glial markers were differently affected in the HT of peripubertal males and females. Lep production in adipose tissue was decreased in Antag-treated rats of both sexes, with production of other cytokines being differentially regulated between sexes. In conclusion, in addition to the long-term effects on metabolism, changes in neonatal Lep levels modifies factors involved in reproduction that could possibly affect sexual maturation.

  13. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  14. Regulation of the microRNA 200b (miRNA-200b) by transcriptional regulators PEA3 and ELK-1 protein affects expression of Pin1 protein to control anoikis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xusen; Zhang, Bailin; Gao, Jidong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Zhihua

    2013-11-08

    MicroRNA (miRNA) 200s regulate E-cadherin by directly targeting ZEB1/ZEB2, which are transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin. Decreased expression of E-cadherin results in cancer cells losing interaction with the extracellular matrix and detaching from the primary tumor. Normally, cells will undergo anoikis after losing interaction with the extracellular matrix. Cancer cells must, therefore, possess the ability to resist anoikis during the process of metastasis. Here we show that miRNA-200b regulates anoikis by directly targeting the 3' UTR of Pin1 mRNA and regulating Pin1 expression at the translational level. We found that down-regulation of miRNA-200b promotes cancer cells survival during metastasis, and the homeless state of these cells resulted in decreased expression of miRNA-200b in the MCF-7 cell line. We also found that expression of miRNA-200b is down-regulated in human breast cancer during lymph node metastasis, which has a significant negative correlation with Pin1 expression. Two members of the ETS (E-26) family (PEA3 and ELK-1) regulate the expression of miRNA-200b. PEA3 promotes the expression of miRNA-200b, and ELK-1 is a transcriptional repressor of miRNA-200b. In addition, miRNA-200b regulates the activity of PEA3 and ELK-1 via the Pin1-pERK pathway and forms self-regulated feedback loops. This study characterizes the role of miRNA-200b in the regulation of anoikis and demonstrates the regulation of its own expression in the process of metastasis.

  15. Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated categorical perception (CP) effects for affective facial expressions and linguistic facial expressions from American Sign Language (ASL) for Deaf native signers and hearing non-signers. Facial expressions were presented in isolation (Experiment 1) or in an ASL verb context (Experiment 2). Participants performed ABX…

  16. Amount and source of dietary copper affects small intestine morphology, duodenal lipid peroxidation, hepatic oxidative stress,and mRNA expression of hepatic copper regulatory proteins in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Fry, R S; Ashwell, M S; Lloyd, K E; O'Nan, A T; Flowers, W L; Stewart, K R; Spears, J W

    2012-09-01

    Thirty weanling, crossbred barrows (SUS SCROFA) were used to determine the effects of amount and source of dietary Cu on small intestinal morphology and lipid peroxidation, Cu metabolism, and mRNA expression of proteins involved in hepatic Cu homeostasis. At 21 d of age, pigs were stratified by BW (6.33 ± 0.23 kg) and allocated to 1 of the following dietary treatments: i) control (no supplemental Cu; 6.7 mg Cu/kg), ii) 225 mg supplemental Cu/kg diet from Cu sulfate (CuSO(4)), or iii) 225 mg supplemental Cu/kg diet from tribasic Cu chloride (TBCC). Pigs were housed 2 pigs per pen and were fed a 3-phase diet regimen until d 35 or 36 of the study. During harvest, bile and liver were obtained for mineral analysis, and liver samples were also obtained for analysis of liver glutathione (GSH) and mRNA expression of Cu regulatory proteins. Segments of duodenum, proximal jejunum, and ileum were obtained for mucosal morphology, and duodenal mucosal scrapings were collected from all pigs for analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA). Duodenal villus height was reduced in CuSO(4) pigs compared with control (P = 0.001) and TBCC (P = 0.03) pigs. Villus height in the proximal jejunum of CuSO(4) pigs was reduced (P = 0.03) compared with control pigs, but ileal villus height was not affected (P = 0.82) by treatment. Duodenal MDA concentrations were greater (P = 0.03) in CuSO(4) pigs and tended to be greater (P = 0.10) in pigs supplemented with TBCC compared with control pigs. Liver Cu was greater (P = 0.01) in CuSO(4) vs. control pigs, and tended (P = 0.07) to be greater in TBCC pigs than control pigs. Bile Cu concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) in CuSO(4) and TBCC pigs vs. controls and were also greater (P = 0.04) in TBCC vs. CuSO(4) pigs. Total liver GSH concentrations were less (P = 0.02) in pigs fed diets supplemented with CuSO(4) vs. pigs fed control diets but total liver GSH did not differ (P = 0.11) between control and TBCC pigs. Hepatic mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase assembly

  17. Loss of catabolite repression function of HPr, the phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, affects expression of the cry4A toxin gene in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sharik R; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama

    2002-10-01

    HPr, the phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, mediates catabolite repression of a number of operons in gram-positive bacteria. In order to participate in the regulatory process, HPr is activated by phosphorylation of a conserved serine-46 residue. To study the potential role of HPr in the regulation of Cry4A protoxin synthesis in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, we produced a catabolite repression-negative mutant by replacing the wild-type copy of the ptsH gene with a mutated copy in which the conserved serine residue of HPr was replaced with an alanine. HPr isolated from the mutant strain was not phosphorylated at Ser-45 by HPr kinase, but phosphorylation at His-14 was found to occur normally. The enzyme I and HPr kinase activities of the mutant were not affected. Analysis of the B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis mutant harboring ptsH-S45A in the chromosome showed that cry4A expression was derepressed from the inhibitory effect of glucose. The mutant strain produced both cry4A and sigma(35) gene transcripts 4 h ahead of the parent strain, but there was no effect on sigma(28) synthesis. In wild-type B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cells, cry4A mRNA was observed from 12 h onwards, while in the mutant it appeared at 8 h and was produced for a longer period. The total amount of cry4A transcripts produced by the mutant was higher than by the parent strain. There was a 60 to 70% reduction in the sporulation efficiency of the mutant B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain compared to the wild-type strain.

  18. Language and affective facial expression in children with perinatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Philip T.; Reilly, Judy S.

    2015-01-01

    Children with perinatal stroke (PS) provide a unique opportunity to understand developing brain-behavior relations. Previous research has noted distinctive differences in behavioral sequelae between children with PS and adults with acquired stroke: children fare better, presumably due to the plasticity of the developing brain for adaptive reorganization. Whereas we are beginning to understand language development, we know little about another communicative domain, emotional expression. The current study investigates the use and integration of language and facial expression during an interview. As anticipated, the language performance of the five and six year old PS group is comparable to their typically developing (TD) peers, however, their affective profiles are distinctive: those with right hemisphere injury are less expressive with respect to affective language and affective facial expression than either those with left hemisphere injury or TD group. The two distinctive profiles for language and emotional expression in these children suggest gradients of neuroplasticity in the developing brain. PMID:26117314

  19. Transient Protein Expression by Agroinfiltration in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; McNulty, Alyssa; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Lai, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Current systems of recombinant protein production include bacterial, insect, and mammalian cell culture. However, these platforms are expensive to build and operate at commercial scales and/or have limited abilities to produce complex proteins. In recent years, plant-based expression systems have become top candidates for the production of recombinant proteins as they are highly scalable, robust, safe, and can produce complex proteins due to having a eukaryotic endomembrane system. Newly developed "deconstructed" viral vectors delivered via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agroinfiltration) have enabled robust plant-based production of proteins with a wide range of applications. The leafy Lactuca sativa (lettuce) plant with its strong foundation in agriculture is an excellent host for pharmaceutical protein production. Here, we describe a method for agroinfiltration of lettuce that can rapidly produce high levels of recombinant proteins in a matter of days and has the potential to be scaled up to an agricultural level.

  20. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  1. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  2. Expressive suppression and neural responsiveness to nonverbal affective cues

    PubMed Central

    Petrican, Raluca; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Optimal social functioning occasionally requires concealment of one’s emotions in order to meet one’s immediate goals and environmental demands. However, because emotions serve an important communicative function, their habitual suppression disrupts the flow of social exchanges and, thus, incurs significant interpersonal costs. Evidence is accruing that the disruption in social interactions, linked to habitual expressive suppression use, stems not only from intrapersonal, but also from interpersonal causes, since the suppressors’ restricted affective displays reportedly inhibit their interlocutors’ emotionally expressive behaviors. However, expressive suppression use is not known to lead to clinically significant social impairments. One explanation may be that over the lifespan, individuals who habitually suppress their emotions come to compensate for their interlocutors’ restrained expressive behaviors by developing an increased sensitivity to nonverbal affective cues. To probe this issue, the present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan healthy older women while they viewed silent videos of a male social target displaying nonverbal emotional behavior, together with a brief verbal description of the accompanying context, and then judged the target’s affect. As predicted, perceivers who reported greater habitual use of expressive suppression showed increased neural processing of nonverbal affective cues. This effect appeared to be coordinated in a top-down manner via cognitive control. Greater neural processing of nonverbal cues among perceivers who habitually suppress their emotions was linked to increased ventral striatum activity, suggestive of increased reward value/personal relevance ascribed to emotionally expressive nonverbal behaviors. These findings thus provide neural evidence broadly consistent with the hypothesized link between habitual use of expressive suppression and compensatory development of increased

  3. Altered expression of KLC3 may affect semen parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kargar- Dastjerdy, Pegah; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Salehi, Mansoor; Falahati, Mojtaba; Izadi, Tayebeh; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: KLC3 protein as a member of the kinesin light-chain protein family plays an important role in spermatogenesis, during formation of mitochondrial sheath in the mid piece of the sperm tail. Objective: This study for the first time aims to compare the expression of the KLC3 gene between fertile and infertile individuals. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from 19 fertile individuals who were selected from embryo-donor volunteers and 57 infertile individuals who had abnormal sperm parameters according to world health organization criteria. Sperm parameters using computer assisted sperm analysis and the quantitative KLC3-gene expression using the real-time PCR method were measured. Results: Our results revealed a significant correlations between sperm concentration with relative expression of KLC3 only in infertile groups (r=0.45, p=0.00). A significant correlation was not found between KLC3 expression and sperm motility; however, the relative expression of KLC3 was significantly higher in asthenozoospermic compared to non-asthenozoospermic individuals. Conclusion: Low expression of KLC3 may result in improper function of midpiece, which has important function in sperm motility. The results of this study show that aberrant expression of KLC3 might be associated with phenomena like oligozoospermia and asthenozoospermia. This article is extracted from student’s thesis. PMID:27141544

  4. Twenty Four-Hour Exposure to a 0.12 THz Electromagnetic Field Does Not Affect the Genotoxicity, Morphological Changes, or Expression of Heat Shock Protein in HCE-T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Shimizu, Yoko; Shiina, Takeo; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the cellular effects of terahertz (THz) exposure, human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells derived from human eye were exposed to 0.12 THz radiation at 5 mW/cm2 for 24 h, then the genotoxicity, morphological changes, and heat shock protein (Hsp) expression of the cells were examined. There was no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN) frequency of cells exposed to 0.12 THz radiation compared with sham-exposed controls and incubator controls, whereas the MN frequency of cells treated with bleomycin for 1 h (positive control) did increase significantly. Similarly, there were no significant morphological changes in cells exposed to 0.12 THz radiation compared to sham-exposed controls and incubator controls, and Hsp expression (Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90α) was also not significantly different between the three treatments. These results indicate that exposure to 0.12 THz radiation using the present conditions appears to have no or very little effect on MN formation, morphological changes, and Hsp expression in cells derived from human eye. PMID:27527204

  5. Children's Expression of Negative Affect: Reasons and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeman, Janice; Shipman, Kimberly

    1996-01-01

    Examines the influence of socialization figures (parents, friends), emotion type (anger, sadness, physical pain), age, and gender on 66 second-grade and 71 fifth-grade children's reasons for and methods of affect expression. Found that girls reported using verbal means to communicate emotion, whereas boys cited mildly aggressive methods. (MDM)

  6. Streamlined expressed protein ligation using split inteins.

    PubMed

    Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Liu, Zhihua; Shah, Neel H; Willis, John A; Idoyaga, Juliana; Muir, Tom W

    2013-01-09

    Chemically modified proteins are invaluable tools for studying the molecular details of biological processes, and they also hold great potential as new therapeutic agents. Several methods have been developed for the site-specific modification of proteins, one of the most widely used being expressed protein ligation (EPL) in which a recombinant α-thioester is ligated to an N-terminal Cys-containing peptide. Despite the widespread use of EPL, the generation and isolation of the required recombinant protein α-thioesters remain challenging. We describe here a new method for the preparation and purification of recombinant protein α-thioesters using engineered versions of naturally split DnaE inteins. This family of autoprocessing enzymes is closely related to the inteins currently used for protein α-thioester generation, but they feature faster kinetics and are split into two inactive polypeptides that need to associate to become active. Taking advantage of the strong affinity between the two split intein fragments, we devised a streamlined procedure for the purification and generation of protein α-thioesters from cell lysates and applied this strategy for the semisynthesis of a variety of proteins including an acetylated histone and a site-specifically modified monoclonal antibody.

  7. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) interacting proteins exhibit different expression patterns during development.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, C M; Spatuzza, M; Di Marco, B; Gloria, A; Barrancotto, G; Cupo, A; Musumeci, S A; D'Antoni, S; Bardoni, B; Catania, M V

    2015-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the lack of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein involved in mRNA transport and translation. FMRP is a component of mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and it can interact with a range of proteins either directly or indirectly, as demonstrated by two-hybrid selection and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. Most of FMRP-interacting proteins are RNA-binding proteins such as FXR1P, FXR2P and 82-FIP. Interestingly, FMRP can also interact directly with the cytoplasmic proteins CYFIP1 and CYFIP2, which do not bind RNA and link FMRP to the RhoGTPase pathway. The interaction with these different proteins may modulate the functions of FMRP by influencing its affinity to RNA and by affecting the FMRP ability of cytoskeleton remodeling through Rho/Rac GTPases. To better define the relationship of FMRP with its interacting proteins during brain development, we have analyzed the expression pattern of FMRP and its interacting proteins in the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum at different ages in wild type (WT) mice. FMRP and FXR2P were strongly expressed during the first week and gradually decreased thereafter, more rapidly in the cerebellum than in the cortex. FXR1P was also expressed early and showed a reduction at later stages of development with a similar developmental pattern in these two regions. CYFIP1 was expressed at all ages and peaked in the third post-natal week. In contrast, CYFIP2 and 82-FIP (only in forebrain regions) were moderately expressed at P3 and gradually increased after P7. In general, the expression pattern of each protein was similar in the regions examined, except for 82-FIP, which exhibited a strong expression at P3 and low levels at later developmental stages in the cerebellum. Our data indicate that FMRP and its interacting proteins have distinct developmental patterns of expression and suggest that FMRP may be preferentially associated to certain proteins in

  8. Expression and purification of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Jan; Block, Helena; Maertens, Barbara; Spriestersbach, Anne; Labahn, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of a genome encodes for membrane proteins. They are one of the most important classes of proteins in that they can receive, differentiate, and transmit intra- and intercellular signals. Some examples of classes of membrane proteins include cell-adhesion molecules, translocases, and receptors in signaling pathways. Defects in membrane proteins may be involved in a number of serious disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's) and diabetes. Furthermore, membrane proteins provide natural entry and anchoring points for the molecular agents of infectious diseases. Thus, membrane proteins constitute ~50% of known and novel drug targets. Progress in this area is slowed by the requirement to develop methods and procedures for expression and isolation that are tailored to characteristic properties of membrane proteins. A set of standard protocols for the isolation of the targets in quantities that allow for the characterization of their individual properties for further optimization is required. The standard protocols given below represent a workable starting point. If optimization of yields is desired, a variation of conditions as outlined in the theory section is recommended.

  9. Salicylic acid enhances Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adhesin protein expression.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía P; Barbagelata, María S; Cheung, Ambrose L; Sordelli, Daniel O; Buzzola, Fernanda R

    2011-11-01

    One of the virulence factors required by Staphylococcus aureus at the early stages of infection is Eap, a secreted adhesin that binds many host proteins and is upregulated by the two-component regulatory system saeRS. The S. aureus Newman strain harbors a mutation in saeS that is thought to be responsible for the high level of Eap expression in this strain. This study was designed to ascertain whether salicylic acid (SAL) affects the expression of Eap and the internalization of S. aureus into epithelial cells. The strain Newman treated with SAL exhibited increased levels of eap transcription and protein expression. Furthermore, SAL treatment increased the eap promoter activity. SAL treatment enhanced Eap expression in the Newman and in other S. aureus strains that do not carry the mutation in saeS. Internalization of S. aureus eap and sae mutants into the MAC-T epithelial cells was significantly decreased compared with the wild-type counterparts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a low concentration of SAL increased S. aureus Eap expression possibly due to enhancement of sae. SAL may create the conditions for S. aureus persistence in the host, not only by decreasing the capsular polysaccharide expression as shown before, but also by enhancing Eap expression.

  10. Computational codon optimization of synthetic gene for protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The construction of customized nucleic acid sequences allows us to have greater flexibility in gene design for recombinant protein expression. Among the various parameters considered for such DNA sequence design, individual codon usage (ICU) has been implicated as one of the most crucial factors affecting mRNA translational efficiency. However, previous works have also reported the significant influence of codon pair usage, also known as codon context (CC), on the level of protein expression. Results In this study, we have developed novel computational procedures for evaluating the relative importance of optimizing ICU and CC for enhancing protein expression. By formulating appropriate mathematical expressions to quantify the ICU and CC fitness of a coding sequence, optimization procedures based on genetic algorithm were employed to maximize its ICU and/or CC fitness. Surprisingly, the in silico validation of the resultant optimized DNA sequences for Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests that CC is a more relevant design criterion than the commonly considered ICU. Conclusions The proposed CC optimization framework can complement and enhance the capabilities of current gene design tools, with potential applications to heterologous protein production and even vaccine development in synthetic biotechnology. PMID:23083100

  11. Expression and detection of LINE-1 ORF-encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lixin; LaCava, John; Taylor, Martin S; Boeke, Jef D

    2014-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) elements are endogenous retrotransposons active in mammalian genomes. The L1 RNA is bicistronic, encoding two non-overlapping open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, whose protein products (ORF1p and ORF2p) bind the L1 RNA to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is presumed to be a critical retrotransposition intermediate. However, ORF2p is expressed at a significantly lower level than ORF1p; these differences are thought to be controlled at the level of translation, due to a low frequency ribosome reinitiation mechanism controlling ORF2 expression. As a result, while ORF1p is readily detectable, ORF2p has previously been very challenging to detect in vitro and in vivo. To address this, we recently tested several epitope tags fused to the N- or C-termini of the ORF proteins in an effort to enable robust detection and affinity purification from native (L1RP) and synthetic (ORFeus-Hs) L1 constructs. An analysis of tagged RNPs from both L1RP and ORFeus-Hs showed similar host-cell-derived protein interactors. Our observations also revealed that the tag sequences affected the retrotransposition competency of native and synthetic L1s differently although they encode identical ORF proteins. Unexpectedly, we observed apparently stochastic expression of ORF2p within seemingly homogenous L1-expressing cell populations.

  12. Expression Differentiation Is Constrained to Low-Expression Proteins over Ecological Timescales.

    PubMed

    Margres, Mark J; Wray, Kenneth P; Seavy, Margaret; McGivern, James J; Herrera, Nathanael D; Rokyta, Darin R

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression level is one of the strongest predictors of protein sequence evolutionary rate, with high-expression protein sequences evolving at slower rates than low-expression protein sequences largely because of constraints on protein folding and function. Expression evolutionary rates also have been shown to be negatively correlated with expression level across human and mouse orthologs over relatively long divergence times (i.e., ∼100 million years). Long-term evolutionary patterns, however, often cannot be extrapolated to microevolutionary processes (and vice versa), and whether this relationship holds for traits evolving under directional selection within a single species over ecological timescales (i.e., <5000 years) is unknown and not necessarily expected. Expression is a metabolically costly process, and the expression level of a particular protein is predicted to be a tradeoff between the benefit of its function and the costs of its expression. Selection should drive the expression level of all proteins close to values that maximize fitness, particularly for high-expression proteins because of the increased energetic cost of production. Therefore, stabilizing selection may reduce the amount of standing expression variation for high-expression proteins, and in combination with physiological constraints that may place an upper bound on the range of beneficial expression variation, these constraints could severely limit the availability of beneficial expression variants. To determine whether rapid-expression evolution was restricted to low-expression proteins owing to these constraints on highly expressed proteins over ecological timescales, we compared venom protein expression levels across mainland and island populations for three species of pit vipers. We detected significant differentiation in protein expression levels in two of the three species and found that rapid-expression differentiation was restricted to low-expression proteins. Our

  13. PARP-1 protein expression in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Galia, A.; Calogero, A.E.; Condorelli, R.A.; Fraggetta, F.; La Corte, C.; Ridolfo, F.; Bosco, P.; Castiglione, R.; Salemi, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common type of primary brain tumors in adults is the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (World Health Organization grade IV astrocytoma). It is the most common malignant and aggressive form of glioma and it is among the most lethal ones. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene, located to 1q42, plays an important role for the efficient maintenance of genome integrity. PARP-1 protein is required for the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus. PARP-1 is proteolytically cleaved at the onset of apoptosis by caspase-3. Microarray analysis of PARP-1 gene expression in more than 8000 samples revealed that PARP-1 is more highly expressed in several types of cancer compared with the equivalent normal tissues. Overall, the most differences in PARP-1 gene expression have been observed in breast, ovarian, endometrial, lung, and skin cancers, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in normal brain tissues and primary GBM by immunohistochemistry. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples with GBM, but not in normal neurons from controls (n=4) and GBM patients (n=27). No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. In conclusion, PARP-1 gene is expressed in GBM. This finding may be envisioned as an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this tumor, as well as in many other malignancies. The presence of the protein exclusively at the nucleus further support the function played by this gene in genome integrity maintenance and apoptosis. Finally, PARP-1 staining may be used as GBM cell marker. PMID:22472897

  14. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  15. Caesium-affected gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sahr, Tobias; Voigt, Gabriele; Paretzke, Herwig G; Schramel, Peter; Ernst, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    * Excessive caesium can be toxic to plants. Here we investigated Cs uptake and caesium-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. * Accumulation was measured in plants grown for 5 wk on agar supplemented with nontoxic and up to toxic levels of Cs. Caesium-induced gene expression was studied by suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH) and RT-PCR. * Caesium accumulated in leaf rosettes dependent upon the external concentration in the growth media, whereas the potassium concentration decreased in rosettes. At a concentration of 850 microM, Cs plants showed reduced development, and withered with an increase in concentration to 1 mM Cs. SSH resulted in the isolation of 73 clones that were differentially expressed at a Cs concentration of 150 microM. Most of the genes identified belong to groups of genes encoding proteins in stress defence, detoxification, transport, homeostasis and general metabolism, and proteins controlling transcription and translation. * The present study identified a number of marker genes for Cs in Arabidopsis grown under nontoxic Cs concentrations, indicating that Cs acts as an abiotic stress factor.

  16. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  17. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  18. Tools to cope with difficult-to-express proteins.

    PubMed

    Saccardo, Paolo; Corchero, José Luís; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2016-05-01

    The identification of DNA coding sequences contained in the genome of many organisms coupled to the use of high throughput approaches has fueled the field of recombinant protein production. Apart from basic research interests, the growing relevance of this field is highlighted by the global sales of the top ten biopharmaceuticals on the market, which exceeds the trillion USD in a steady increasing tendency. Therefore, the demand of biological compounds seems to have a long run on the market. One of the most popular expression systems is based on Escherichia coli cells which apart from being cost-effective counts with a large selection of resources. However, a significant percentage of the genes of interest are not efficiently expressed in this system, or the expressed proteins are accumulated within aggregates, degraded or lacking the desired biological activity, being finally discarded. In some instances, expressing the gene in a homologous expression system might alleviate those drawbacks but then the process usually increases in complexity and is not as cost-effective as the prokaryotic systems. An increasing toolbox is available to approach the production and purification of those difficult-to-express proteins, including different expression systems, promoters with different strengths, cultivation media and conditions, solubilization tags and chaperone coexpression, among others. However, in most cases, the process follows a non-integrative trial and error strategy with discrete success. This review is focused on the design of the whole process by using an integrative approach, taken into account the accumulated knowledge of the pivotal factors that affect any of the key processes, in an attempt to rationalize the efforts made in this appealing field.

  19. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-06

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  20. Hypothyroidism affects D2 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-03-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age-matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters.

  1. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm’-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  2. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-05-24

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm'-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment.

  3. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  4. Haemopexin affects iron distribution and ferritin expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Noemi; Tonoli, Elisabetta; Logrand, Federica; Fiorito, Veronica; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Haemopexin (Hx) is an acute phase plasma glycoprotein, mainly produced by the liver and released into plasma where it binds heme with high affinity and delivers it to the liver. This system provides protection against free heme-mediated oxidative stress, limits access by pathogens to heme and contributes to iron homeostasis by recycling heme iron. Hx protein has been found in the sciatic nerve, skeletal muscle, retina, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, a comparative proteomic analysis has shown an increase of Hx in CSF from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, thus suggesting its involvement in heme detoxification in brain. Here, we report that Hx is synthesised in brain by the ventricular ependymal cells. To verify whether Hx is involved in heme scavenging in brain, and consequently, in the control of iron level, iron deposits and ferritin expression were analysed in cerebral regions known for iron accumulation. We show a twofold increase in the number of iron-loaded oligodendrocytes in the basal ganglia and thalamus of Hx-null mice compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, there was no increase in H- and L-ferritin expression in these regions. This condition is common to several human neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in which iron loading is not associated with an adequate increase in ferritin expression. However, a strong reduction in the number of ferritin-positive cells was observed in the cerebral cortex of Hx-null animals. Consistent with increased iron deposits and inadequate ferritin expression, malondialdehyde level and Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase-1 expression were higher in the brain of Hx-null mice than in that of wild-type controls. These data demonstrate that Hx plays an important role in controlling iron distribution within brain, thus suggesting its involvement in iron-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19120692

  5. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  6. Mutations Affecting Expression of the rosy Locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong Sung; Curtis, Daniel; McCarron, Margaret; Love, Carol; Gray, Mark; Bender, Welcome; Chovnick, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a "control element" near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. We have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry+10 underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. We induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study (T. P. Keith et al. 1987), the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH. PMID:3036645

  7. Mutations affecting expression of the rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Curtis, D.; McCarron, M.; Love, C.; Gray, M.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1987-05-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a control element near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. The authors have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry/sup +10/ underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. They induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study, the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH.

  8. Wheat germ systems for cell-free protein expression.

    PubMed

    Harbers, Matthias

    2014-08-25

    Cell-free protein expression plays an important role in biochemical research. However, only recent developments led to new methods to rapidly synthesize preparative amounts of protein that make cell-free protein expression an attractive alternative to cell-based methods. In particular the wheat germ system provides the highest translation efficiency among eukaryotic cell-free protein expression approaches and has a very high success rate for the expression of soluble proteins of good quality. As an open in vitro method, the wheat germ system is a preferable choice for many applications in protein research including options for protein labeling and the expression of difficult-to-express proteins like membrane proteins and multiple protein complexes. Here I describe wheat germ cell-free protein expression systems and give examples how they have been used in genome-wide expression studies, preparation of labeled proteins for structural genomics and protein mass spectroscopy, automated protein synthesis, and screening of enzymatic activities. Future directions for the use of cell-free expression methods are discussed.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi expresses diverse repetitive protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, D F; Kim, K S; Otsu, K; Moser, D R; Yost, W J; Blumin, J H; Donelson, J E; Kirchhoff, L V

    1989-01-01

    We screened a Trypanosoma cruzi cDNA expression library with human and rabbit anti-T. cruzi sera and identified cDNA clones that encode polypeptides containing tandemly arranged repeats which are 6 to 34 amino acids in length. The peptide repeats encoded by these cDNAs varied markedly in sequence, copy number, and location relative to the polyadenylation site of the mRNAs from which they were derived. The repeats were specific for T. cruzi, but in each case the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs and the total number of repeat copies encoded varied considerably among different isolates of the parasite. Expression of the peptide repeats was not stage specific. One of the peptide repeats occurred in a protein with an Mr of greater than 200,000 and one was in a protein of Mr 75,000 to 105,000. The frequent occurrence and diversity of these peptide repeats suggested that they may play a role in the ability of the parasite to evade immune destruction in its invertebrate and mammalian hosts, but the primary roles of these macromolecules may be unrelated to the host-parasite relationship. Images PMID:2659529

  10. Global Deletion of TSPO Does Not Affect the Viability and Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaishan; Yang, Jia; Yang, Qi; Fu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Weiqing; Cui, Lianxian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Translocator Protein (18kDa, TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane transmembrane protein. Its expression is elevated during inflammation and injury. However, the function of TSPO in vivo is still controversial. Here, we constructed a TSPO global knockout (KO) mouse with a Cre-LoxP system that abolished TSPO protein expression in all tissues and showed normal phenotypes in the physiological condition. The birth rates of TSPO heterozygote (Het) x Het or KO x KO breeding were consistent with Mendel’s Law, suggesting a normal viability of TSPO KO mice at birth. RNA-seq analysis showed no significant difference in the gene expression profile of lung tissues from TSPO KO mice compared with wild type mice, including the genes associated with bronchial alveoli immune homeostasis. The alveolar macrophage population was not affected by TSPO deletion in the physiological condition. Our findings contradict the results of Papadopoulos, but confirmed Selvaraj’s findings. This study confirms TSPO deficiency does not affect viability and bronchial alveolar immune homeostasis. PMID:27907096

  11. TITER AND PRODUCT AFFECTS THE DISTRIBUTION OF GENE EXPRESSION AFTER INTRAPUTAMINAL CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Marina E.; Hurley, Samuel A.; Joers, Valerie; Tromp, Do P.M.; Swanson, Christine R.; Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Cummisford, Kyle; Sonnemans, Marc; Hermening, Stephan; Blits, Bas; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of intracerebral gene therapy for brain disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, depends on appropriate distribution of gene expression. Objectives To assess if the distribution of gene expression is affected by vector titer and protein type. Methods Four adult macaque monkeys seronegative for adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5) received in the right and left ventral postcommisural putamen 30μl inoculation of a high or low titer suspension of AAV5 encoding glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Inoculations were performed using convection enhanced delivery and intraoperative MRI (IMRI). Results IMRI confirmed targeting and infusion cloud irradiating from the catheter tip into surrounding area. Postmortem analysis six weeks after surgery revealed GFP and GDNF expression ipsilateral to the injection side that had a titer-dependent distribution. GFP and GDNF expression was also observed in fibers in the Substantia Nigra (SN) pars reticulata (pr), demonstrating anterograde transport. Few GFP-positive neurons were present in the SN pars compacta (pc), possibly by direct retrograde transport of the vector. GDNF was present in many SNpc and SNpr neurons. Conclusions After controlling for target and infusate volume, intracerebral distribution of gene product is affected by vector titer and product biology. PMID:24943657

  12. AP-2α-dependent regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression affects apoptosis in the trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Jia, Liting; Cui, Shihong; Shi, Ying; Chang, Aimin; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Zhan

    2012-12-01

    Enhanced apoptosis of the cytotrophoblast in early pregnancy is associated with a high risk of preeclampsia. We and others have previously reported that the transcriptional factor, activator protein AP-2α, suppressed trophoblast migration and invasion. However, it is not clear whether AP-2α affects apoptosis in trophoblast cells and whether it regulates expression of apoptosis-related factors Bcl-2 and Bax. We analyzed the expression of AP-2α, Bcl-2 and Bax in placental tissues in severe preeclamptic pregnancies and normotensive pregnancies using immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Further, apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric analysis in the human trophoblastic cell line, BeWo cells, in which AP-2α expression was transiently overexpressed or down-regulated by siRNA. There was significantly higher expression of AP-2α and Bax, but lower expression of Bcl-2 in severe preeclampsia placentas as compared to the control placentas. Overexpression of AP-2α in BeWo cells led to an increased rate of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was decreased when AP-2α expression was reduced. Furthermore, overexpression of AP-2α increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 expression, whereas down-regulation of AP-2α expression resulted in a decrease in Bax expression and an increase in Bcl-2 expression. AP-2α regulates expression of Bcl-2 and Bax and apoptosis in BeWo cells. These results suggest that AP-2α-mediated regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax regulation influences apoptosis which in turn leads to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  13. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Seob; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Oh, Jaewon; Jin, Taewon; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Sungha; Lee, Sang-Hak; Chung, Ji Hyung; Kang, Seok-Min

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN.

  14. Manipulation of hemoglobin expression affects Arabidopsis shoot organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Over the past few years non-symbiotic plant hemoglobins have been described in a variety of plant species where they fulfill several functions ranging from detoxification processes to basic aspects of plant growth and post-embryonic development. To date no information is available on the role of hemoglobins during in vitro morphogenesis. Shoot organogenesis was induced in Arabidopsis lines constitutively expressing class 1, 2 and 3 hemoglobins (GLB1, 2 and 3) and lines in which the respective genes were either downregulated by RNAi (GLB1) or knocked out (GLB2 and GLB3). The process was executed by culturing root explants on an initial auxin-rich callus induction medium (CIM) followed by a transfer onto a cytokinin-containing shoot induction medium (SIM). While the repression of GLB2 inhibited organogenesis the over-expression of GLB1 or GLB2 enhanced the number of shoots produced in culture, and altered the transcript levels of genes participating in cytokinin perception and signalling. The up-regulation of GLB1 or GLB2 activated CKI1 and AHK3, genes encoding cytokinin receptors and affected the transcript levels of cytokinin responsive regulators (ARRs). The expression of Type-A ARRs (ARR4, 5, 7, 15, and 16), feed-back repressors of the cytokinin pathway, was repressed in both hemoglobin over-expressors whereas that of several Type-B ARRs (ARR2, 12, and 13), transcription activators of cytokinin-responsive genes, was induced. Such changes enhanced the sensitivity of the root explants to cytokinin allowing the 35S::GLB1 and 35S::GLB2 lines to produce shoots at low cytokinin concentrations which did not promote organogenesis in the WT line. These results show that manipulation of hemoglobin can modify shoot organogenesis in Arabidopsis and possibly in those systems partially or completely unresponsive to applications of exogenous cytokinins.

  15. Molecular weight abnormalities of the CTCF transcription factor: CTCF migrates aberrantly in SDS-PAGE and the size of the expressed protein is affected by the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene.

    PubMed

    Klenova, E M; Nicolas, R H; U, S; Carne, A F; Lee, R E; Lobanenkov, V V; Goodwin, G H

    1997-02-01

    CTCF belongs to the Zn finger transcription factors family and binds to the promoter region of c-myc. CTCF is highly conserved between species, ubiquitous and localised in nuclei. The endogenous CTCF migrates as a 130 kDa (CTCF-130) protein on SDS-PAGE, however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the CTCF cDNA encodes only a 82 kDa protein (CTCF-82). In the present study we investigate this phenomenon and show with mass-spectra analysis that this occurs due to aberrant mobility of the CTCF protein. Another paradox is that our original cDNA, composed of the ORF and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), produces a protein with the apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa (CTCF-70). This paradox has been found to be an effect of the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene resulting in C-terminal truncation of CTCF-130. The potential attenuator has been identified and point-mutated. This restored the electrophoretic mobility of the CTCF protein to 130 kDa. CTCF-70, the aberrantly migrating CTCF N-terminus per se, is also detected in some cell types and therefore may have some biological implications. In particular, CTCF-70 interferes with CTCF-130 normal function, enhancing transactivation induced by CTCF-130 in COS6 cells. The mechanism of CTCF-70 action and other possible functions of CTCF-70 are discussed.

  16. Molecular weight abnormalities of the CTCF transcription factor: CTCF migrates aberrantly in SDS-PAGE and the size of the expressed protein is affected by the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Klenova, E M; Nicolas, R H; U, S; Carne, A F; Lee, R E; Lobanenkov, V V; Goodwin, G H

    1997-01-01

    CTCF belongs to the Zn finger transcription factors family and binds to the promoter region of c-myc. CTCF is highly conserved between species, ubiquitous and localised in nuclei. The endogenous CTCF migrates as a 130 kDa (CTCF-130) protein on SDS-PAGE, however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the CTCF cDNA encodes only a 82 kDa protein (CTCF-82). In the present study we investigate this phenomenon and show with mass-spectra analysis that this occurs due to aberrant mobility of the CTCF protein. Another paradox is that our original cDNA, composed of the ORF and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), produces a protein with the apparent molecular weight of 70 kDa (CTCF-70). This paradox has been found to be an effect of the UTRs and sequences within the coding region of the CTCF gene resulting in C-terminal truncation of CTCF-130. The potential attenuator has been identified and point-mutated. This restored the electrophoretic mobility of the CTCF protein to 130 kDa. CTCF-70, the aberrantly migrating CTCF N-terminus per se, is also detected in some cell types and therefore may have some biological implications. In particular, CTCF-70 interferes with CTCF-130 normal function, enhancing transactivation induced by CTCF-130 in COS6 cells. The mechanism of CTCF-70 action and other possible functions of CTCF-70 are discussed. PMID:9016583

  17. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfie, Martin; Tu, Yuan; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ward, William W.; Prasher, Douglas C.

    1994-02-01

    A complementary DNA for the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) produces a fluorescent product when expressed in prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) or eukaryotic (Caenorhabditis elegans) cells. Because exogenous substrates and cofactors are not required for this fluorescence, GFP expression can be used to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living organisms.

  18. Lumenal protein within secretory granules affects fusion pore expansion.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Anantharam, Arun; Bittner, Mary A; Axelrod, Daniel; Holz, Ronald W

    2014-07-01

    It is often assumed that upon fusion of the secretory granule membrane with the plasma membrane, lumenal contents are rapidly discharged and dispersed into the extracellular medium. Although this is the case for low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters and some proteins, there are numerous examples of the dispersal of a protein being delayed for many seconds after fusion. We have investigated the role of fusion-pore expansion in determining the contrasting discharge rates of fluorescent-tagged neuropeptide-Y (NPY) (within 200 ms) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (over many seconds) in adrenal chromaffin cells. The endogenous proteins are expressed in separate chromaffin cell subpopulations. Fusion pore expansion was measured by two independent methods, orientation of a fluorescent probe within the plasma membrane using polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and amperometry of released catecholamine. Together, they probe the continuum of the fusion-pore duration, from milliseconds to many seconds after fusion. Polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that 71% of the fusion events of tPA-cer-containing granules maintained curvature for >10 s, with approximately half of the structures likely connected to the plasma membrane by a short narrow neck. Such events were not commonly observed upon fusion of NPY-cer-containing granules. Amperometry revealed that the expression of tPA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) prolonged the duration of the prespike foot ∼2.5-fold compared to NPY-GFP-expressing cells and nontransfected cells, indicating that expansion of the initial fusion pore in tPA granules was delayed. The t1/2 of the main catecholamine spike was also increased, consistent with a prolonged delay of fusion-pore expansion. tPA added extracellularly bound to the lumenal surface of fused granules. We propose that tPA within the granule lumen controls its own discharge. Its intrinsic biochemistry determines not only

  19. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  20. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens.

  1. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  2. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  3. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  4. Expression and the antigenicity of recombinant coat proteins of tungro viruses expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yee, Siew Fung; Chu, Chia Huay; Poili, Evenni; Sum, Magdline Sia Henry

    2017-02-01

    Rice tungro disease (RTD) is a recurring disease affecting rice farming especially in the South and Southeast Asia. The disease is commonly diagnosed by visual observation of the symptoms on diseased plants in paddy fields and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, visual observation is unreliable and PCR can be costly. High-throughput as well as relatively cheap detection methods are important for RTD management for screening large number of samples. Due to this, detection by serological assays such as immunoblotting assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay are preferred. However, these serological assays are limited by lack of continuous supply of antibodies as reagents due to the difficulty in preparing sufficient purified virions as antigens. This study aimed to generate and evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant coat proteins of Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) as alternative antigens to generate antibodies. The genes encoding the coat proteins of both viruses, RTBV (CP), and RTSV (CP1, CP2 and CP3) were cloned and expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. All of the recombinant fusion proteins, with the exception of the recombinant fusion protein of the CP2 of RTSV, were reactive against our in-house anti-tungro rabbit serum. In conclusion, our study showed the potential use of the recombinant fusion coat proteins of the tungro viruses as alternative antigens for production of antibodies for diagnostic purposes.

  5. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-01

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1^E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein's flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1^E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1^E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1^E4, these kinases regulate one of

  6. Special AT-rich Binding Protein-2 (SATB2) Differentially Affects Disease-causing p63 Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jacky; Grant, R. Ian; Kaplan, David R.; Irwin, Meredith S.

    2011-01-01

    p63, a p53 family member, is critical for proper skin and limb development and directly regulates gene expression in the ectoderm. Mice lacking p63 exhibit skin and craniofacial defects including cleft palate. In humans p63 mutations are associated with several distinct developmental syndromes. p63 sterile-α-motif domain, AEC (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting)-associated mutations are associated with a high prevalence of orofacial clefting disorders, which are less common in EEC (ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting) patients with DNA binding domain p63 mutations. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations differentially influence p63 function remain unclear, and interactions with other proteins implicated in craniofacial development have not been identified. Here, we show that AEC p63 mutations affect the ability of the p63 protein to interact with special AT-rich binding protein-2 (SATB2), which has recently also been implicated in the development of cleft palate. p63 and SATB2 are co-expressed early in development in the ectoderm of the first and second branchial arches, two essential sites where signaling is required for craniofacial patterning. SATB2 attenuates p63-mediated gene expression of perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22), a critical downstream target gene during development, and specifically decreases p63 perp promoter binding. Interestingly, AEC but not EEC p63 mutations affect the ability of p63 to interact with SATB2 and the inhibitory effects of SATB2 on p63 transactivation of perp are most pronounced for AEC-associated p63 mutations. Our findings reveal a novel gain-of-function property of AEC-causing p63 mutations and identify SATB2 as the first p63 binding partner that differentially influences AEC and EEC p63 mutant proteins. PMID:21965674

  7. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  8. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel protein expression?

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Förste, Nora; Wittstock, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine (HC) or acetylcysteine (ACC) affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated HC levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared with control subjects. We further observed that administration of HC or ACC significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared with control conditions. We, therefore, hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans.

  9. Human SUMO fusion systems enhance protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Haolong; Guan, Wei; Ling, Haili; Wang, Zhiyong; Mu, Tianyang; Shuler, Franklin D; Fang, Xuexun

    2010-10-01

    A major challenge associated with recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is generation of large quantities of soluble, functional protein. Yeast SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), has been shown to enhance heterologous protein expression and solubility as fusion tag, however, the effects of human SUMOs on protein expression have not been investigated. Here we describe the use of human SUMO1 and SUMO2 as a useful gene fusion technology. Human SUMO1 and SUMO2 fusion expression vectors were constructed and tested in His-tag and ubiquitin fusion expression systems. Two difficult-to-express model proteins, matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP13) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) were fused to the C-terminus of the human SUMO1 and SUMO2 expression vectors. These constructs were expressed in E. coli and evaluation of MMP13 and eGFP expression and solubility was conducted. We found that both SUMO1 and SUMO2 had the ability to enhance the solubility of MMP13 and eGFP, with the SUMO2 tag having a more significant effect. Since fusion tags produce varying quantities of soluble proteins, we assessed the effect of SUMO2 coupled with ubiquitin (Ub). SUMO2-ubiquitin and ubiquitin-SUMO2 fusion expression plasmids were constructed with eGFP as a passenger protein. Following expression in E. coli, both plasmids could improve eGFP expression and solubility similar to the SUMO2 fusion and better than the ubiquitin fusion. The sequential order of SUMO2 and ubiquitin had little effect on expression and solubility of eGFP. Purification of eGFP from the gene fusion product, SUMO2-ubiquitin-eGFP, involved cleavage by a deubiquitinase (Usp2-cc) and Ni-Sepharose column chromatography. The eGFP protein was purified to high homogeneity. In summary, human SUMO1 and SUMO2 are useful gene fusion technologies enhancing the expression, solubility and purification of model heterologous proteins.

  10. Plant Protein and Animal Proteins: Do They Differentially Affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk?12

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-01-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat. PMID:26567196

  11. Plant protein and animal proteins: do they differentially affect cardiovascular disease risk?

    PubMed

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-11-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat.

  12. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-11-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  13. A Link Between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMP) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels widely vary and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  14. Do Non-Collagenous Proteins Affect Skeletal Mechanical Properties?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stacyann; Poundarik, Atharva A.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical behavior of bone is attributed to its complex nanocomposite structure that, in addition to mineral and collagen, comprises a variety of non-collagenous matrix proteins or NCPs. Traditionally, NCPs have been studied as signaling molecules in biological processes including bone formation, resorption and turnover. Limited attention has been given to their role in determining the mechanical properties of bone. Recent studies have highlighted that NCPs can indeed be lost or modified with aging, diseases and drug therapies. Homozygous and heterozygous mice models of key NCP provide a useful approach to determine the impact of NCPs on bone morphology as well as matrix quality, and to carry out detailed mechanical analysis for elucidating the pathway by which NCPs can affect the mechanical properties of bone. In this article, we present a systematic analysis of a large cohort of NCPs on bone’s structural and material hierarchy, and identify three principal pathways by which they determine bone’s mechanical properties. These pathways include alterations of bone morphological parameters crucial for bone’s structural competency, bone quality changes in key matrix parameters (mineral and collagen), and a direct role as load bearing structural proteins. PMID:26048282

  15. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Cohen, Irit

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases) may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content) tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content. PMID:26114113

  16. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Salih, Bilal; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Cohen, Irit; Bolshoy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases) may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content) tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content.

  17. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation.

  18. Regulatory network controlling extracellular proteins in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora: FlhDC, the master regulator of flagellar genes, activates rsmB regulatory RNA production by affecting gacA and hexA (lrhA) expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yaya; Chatterjee, Asita; Yang, Hailian; Chatterjee, Arun K

    2008-07-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora produces an array of extracellular proteins (i.e., exoproteins), including plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and Harpin, an effector responsible for eliciting hypersensitive reaction. Exoprotein genes are coregulated by the quorum-sensing signal, N-acyl homoserine lactone, plant signals, an assortment of transcriptional factors/regulators (GacS/A, ExpR1, ExpR2, KdgR, RpoS, HexA, and RsmC) and posttranscriptional regulators (RsmA, rsmB RNA). rsmB RNA production is positively regulated by GacS/A, a two-component system, and negatively regulated by HexA (PecT in Erwinia chrysanthemi; LrhA [LysR homolog A] in Escherichia coli) and RsmC, a putative transcriptional adaptor. While free RsmA, an RNA-binding protein, promotes decay of mRNAs of exoprotein genes, binding of RsmA with rsmB RNA neutralizes the RsmA effect. In the course of studies of GacA regulation, we discovered that a locus bearing strong homology to the flhDC operon of E. coli also controls extracellular enzyme production. A transposon insertion FlhDC(-) mutant produces very low levels of pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase, protease, and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora Harpin (Harpin(Ecc)) and is severely attenuated in its plant virulence. The production of these exoproteins is restored in the mutant carrying an FlhDC(+) plasmid. Sequence analysis and transcript assays disclosed that the flhD operon of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, like those of other enterobacteria, consists of flhD and flhC. Complementation analysis revealed that the regulatory effect requires functions of both flhD and flhC products. The data presented here show that FlhDC positively regulates gacA, rsmC, and fliA and negatively regulates hexA (lrhA). Evidence shows that FlhDC controls extracellular protein production through cumulative effects on hexA and gacA. Reduced levels of GacA and elevated levels of HexA in the FlhDC(-) mutant are responsible for the inhibition of rsmB RNA

  19. Expression, Solubilization, and Purification of Bacterial Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Constance J

    2016-02-02

    Bacterial integral membrane proteins play many important roles, including sensing changes in the environment, transporting molecules into and out of the cell, and in the case of commensal or pathogenic bacteria, interacting with the host organism. Working with membrane proteins in the lab can be more challenging than working with soluble proteins because of difficulties in their recombinant expression and purification. This protocol describes a standard method to express, solubilize, and purify bacterial integral membrane proteins. The recombinant protein of interest with a 6His affinity tag is expressed in E. coli. After harvesting the cultures and isolating cellular membranes, mild detergents are used to solubilize the membrane proteins. Protein-detergent complexes are then purified using IMAC column chromatography. Support protocols are included to help select a detergent for protein solubilization and for use of gel filtration chromatography for further purification.

  20. Transforming Lepidopteran Insect Cells for Improved Protein Processing and Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lepidopteran insect cells used with the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) are capable of synthesizing and accurately processing foreign proteins. However, proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected cells often fail to be completely processed, or are not processed in a manner that meet...

  1. In vivo treatments with fulvestrant and anastrozole differentially affect gene expression in the rat efferent ductules.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Gisele Renata Oliveira; Yasuhara, Fabiana; Siu, Erica Rosanna; Fernandes, Sheilla Alessandra Ferreira; Avellar, Maria Christina Werneck; Lazari, Maria Fatima Magalhaes; Porto, Catarina Segreti

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen plays a key role in maintaining the morphology and function of the efferent ductules. We previously demonstrated that the antiestrogen fulvestrant markedly affected gene expression in the rat efferent ductules. The mechanism of fulvestrant action to modulate gene expression may involve not only the blockade of ESR1 and ESR2 estrogen receptors, but also the activation of ESR1 and ESR2 when the receptors are tethered to AP-1 or SP1 transcription factors, or the activation of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1. We therefore compared the effects of two strategies to interfere with estrogen action in the rat efferent ductules: treatment with fulvestrant or with the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole. Whereas fulvestrant markedly increased Mmp7 and Spp1, and reduced Nptx1 mRNA levels, no changes were observed with anastrozole. Fulvestrant caused changes in epithelial morphology that were not seen with anastrozole. Fulvestrant shifted MMP7 immunolocalization in the epithelial cells from the supranuclear to the apical region; this effect was less pronounced with anastrozole. In vitro studies of (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that protein release was increased, whereas tissue protein content in the efferent ductules of fulvestrant-treated rats was decreased. Although fulvestrant markedly affected gene expression, no changes were observed on AP-1 and SP1 DNA-binding activity. The blockade of ESRs seems to be the major reason explaining the differences between both treatments. At least some of the effects of fulvestrant appear to result from compensatory mechanisms activated by the dramatic changes caused by ESR1 blockade.

  2. Cell-free protein synthesis as a promising expression system for recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xumeng; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has major advantages over traditional cell-based methods in the capability of high-throughput protein synthesis and special protein production. During recent decades, CFPS has become an alternative protein production platform for both fundamental and applied purposes. Using Renilla luciferase as model protein, we describe a typical process of CFPS in wheat germ extract system, including wheat germ extract preparation, expression vector construction, in vitro protein synthesis (transcription/translation), and target protein assay.

  3. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Affected by Promoter Hypermethylation Induces Aberrant Gli2 Expression in Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Li; Chang, Shao-Yan; Shangguan, Shao-Fang; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Li-Hua; Zou, Ji-Zhen; Xiao, Ping; Li, Rui; Bao, Yi-Hua; Qiu, Z-Y; Zhang, Ting

    2016-10-01

    GLI2 is a key mediator of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway and plays an important role in neural tube development during vertebrate embryogenesis; however, the role of gli2 in human folate-related neural tube defects remains unclear. In this study, we compared methylation status and polymorphisms of gli2 between spina bifida patients and a control group to explore the underlying mechanisms related to folate deficiency in spina bifida. No single nucleotide polymorphism was found to be significantly different between the two groups, although gli2 methylation levels were significantly increased in spina bifida samples, accompanied by aberrant GLI2 expression. Moreover, a prominent negative correlation was found between the folate level in brain tissue and the gli2 methylation status (r = -0.41, P = 0.014), and gli2 hypermethylation increased the risk of spina bifida with an odds ratio of 12.45 (95 % confidence interval: 2.71-57.22, P = 0.001). In addition, we established a cell model to illustrate the effect of gli2 expression and the accessibility of chromatin affected by methylation. High gli2 and gli1 mRNA expression was detected in 5-Aza-treated cells, while gli2 hypermethylation resulted in chromatin inaccessibility and a reduced association with nuclear proteins containing transcriptional factors. More meaningful to the pathway, the effect gene of the Shh pathway, gli1, was found to have a reduced level of expression along with a decreased expression of gli2 in our cell model. Aberrant high methylation resulted in the low expression of gli2 in spina bifida, which was affected by the change in chromatin status and the capacity of transcription factor binding.

  4. Fasting and sampling time affect liver gene expression of high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2010-05-01

    Several physiological and biological variables are known to affect peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α-dependent signaling pathway and plasma biochemical profiles. However, less is known about the effect of these variables on high-fat diet-fed mice. In a 5-week study, C57BL/6 mice were divided into control (C) and high-fat diet-fed (H) groups, whereby before dissection, each group was subdivided into non-fasted (nC and nH) and a 15-h fasted mice (fC and fH) killed in the early light cycle, and a 15-h fasted mice (eC and eH) killed in the late phase of the light cycle. Liver and blood from the vena cava were collected. Non-fasted nC and nH mice have a marginal difference in their body weight gain, whereas significant differences were found for fasted mice. In nH mice, PPAR-α, acyl-CoA oxidase and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein expressions were significantly elevated, in contrast to fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl CoA-desaturase (SCD)-1, and elongase (ELOVL)-6 expressions. Fasn was profoundly induced in fH mice, while decreased sterol regulatory-binding protein-1 and SCD-1 were found only in eH mice. Different from the gene expression profiles, plasma total cholesterol level of the eH mice was higher than controls, whereas nH mice have increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids. Only glucose level of the fH mice was higher than that observed for controls. Results showed that fasting and sampling time have significantly affected liver gene expression and plasma biochemical indices of the high-fat diet-treated mice. An overlook in these aspects can cause serious discrepancies in the experimental data and their interpretations.

  5. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B; Patel, Trushar R; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems.

  6. Cell-free expression of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Erika; Proverbio, Davide; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free expression has emerged as a new standard for the production of membrane proteins. The reduction of expression complexity in cell-free systems eliminates central bottlenecks and allows the reliable and efficient synthesis of many different types of membrane proteins. Furthermore, the open accessibility of cell-free reactions enables the co-translational solubilization of cell-free expressed membrane proteins in a large variety of supplied additives. Hydrophobic environments can therefore be adjusted according to the requirements of individual membrane protein targets. We present different approaches for the preparative scale cell-free production of G-protein-coupled receptors using the extracts of Escherichia coli cells. We exemplify expression conditions implementing detergents, nanodiscs, or liposomes. The generated protein samples could be directly used for further functional characterization.

  7. Functions of BET proteins in erythroid gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stonestrom, Aaron J; Hsu, Sarah C; Jahn, Kristen S; Huang, Peng; Keller, Cheryl A; Giardine, Belinda M; Kadauke, Stephan; Campbell, Amy E; Evans, Perry; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2015-04-30

    Inhibitors of bromodomain and extraterminal motif proteins (BETs) are being evaluated for the treatment of cancer and other diseases, yet much remains to be learned about how BET proteins function during normal physiology. We used genomic and genetic approaches to examine BET function in a hematopoietic maturation system driven by GATA1, an acetylated transcription factor previously shown to interact with BETs. We found that BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 were variably recruited to GATA1-regulated genes, with BRD3 binding the greatest number of GATA1-occupied sites. Pharmacologic BET inhibition impaired GATA1-mediated transcriptional activation, but not repression, genome-wide. Mechanistically, BETs promoted chromatin occupancy of GATA1 and subsequently supported transcriptional activation. Using a combination of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genomic engineering and shRNA approaches, we observed that depletion of either BRD2 or BRD4 alone blunted erythroid gene activation. Surprisingly, depletion of BRD3 only affected erythroid transcription in the context of BRD2 deficiency. Consistent with functional overlap among BET proteins, forced BRD3 expression substantially rescued defects caused by BRD2 deficiency. These results suggest that pharmacologic BET inhibition should be interpreted in the context of distinct steps in transcriptional activation and overlapping functions among BET family members.

  8. A toolkit for graded expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Giehler, Susanne; Mayr, Georg W

    2012-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-like proteins of different colors are important tools in cell biology. In many studies, the intracellular targeting of proteins has been determined by transiently expressing GFP fusion proteins and analyzing their intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. In most vectors, expression of GFP is driven by the enhancer/promoter cassette of the immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). This cassette generates high levels of protein expression in most mammalian cell lines. Unfortunately, these nonphysiologically high protein levels have been repeatedly reported to artificially alter the intracellular targeting of proteins fused to GFP. To cope with this problem, we generated a multitude of attenuated GFP expression vectors by modifying the hCMV enhancer/promoter cassette. These modified vectors were transiently expressed, and the expression levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to another protein were determined by fluorescence microscopy and/or Western blotting. As shown in this study, we were able to (i) clearly reduce the expression of EGFP alone and (ii) reduce expression of an EYFP fusion protein down to the level of the endogenous protein, both in a graded manner.

  9. Effect of thermal stress on protein expression in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk.

    PubMed

    González-Riopedre, M; Novás, A; Dobaño, E; Ramos-Martínez, J I; Barcia, R

    2007-07-01

    The exposure of organisms to stressing agents may affect the level and pattern of protein expression. Certain proteins with an important role in protein homeostasis and in the tolerance to stress, known as stress proteins, are especially affected. Different tissues and cells show a range of sensitivities to stress, depending on the habitat to which organisms have adapted. The response of different tissues and cells from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk. to heat shock has been studied in this work using different exposure times and temperatures. During the assays, protein expression was observed to vary depending on the tissue studied, the temperature or the exposure time used. But maybe the most prominent thing is the different response obtained from the cultured haemocytes and those freshly obtained from stressed mussels, which makes us think that the extraction procedure is the main cause of the response of non-cultured cells, although the haemolymph may contain components that modulate haemocyte response.

  10. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  11. Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array: A Just-In-Time Multiplexed Protein Expression and Purification Platform

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally. PMID:21943897

  12. Nucleic acid programmable protein array a just-in-time multiplexed protein expression and purification platform.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally.

  13. Stochasticity in the Expression of LamB and its Affect on λ phage Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Emily; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2006-03-01

    λ phage binds to E. Coli's lamB protein and injects its DNA into the cell. The phage quickly replicates and after a latent period the bacteria bursts, emitting mature phages. We developed a mathematical model based on the known physical events that occur when a λ phage infects an E.Coli cell. The results of these models predict that the bacteria and phage populations become extinct unless the parameters of the model are very finely tuned, which is untrue in the nature. The lamB protein is part of the maltose regulon and can be repressed to minimal levels when grown in the absence of inducer. Therefore, a cell that is not expressing any lamB protein at that moment is resistant against phage infection. We studied the dynamic relationship between λ phage and E. Coli when the concentration of phage greatly outnumbers the concentration of bacteria. We study how the stochasticity of the expression of lamB affects the percentage of cells that the λ phage infects. We show that even in the case when the maltose regulon is fully induced a percentage of cells continue to persist against phage infection.

  14. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  15. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  16. Efficient expression of acetylcholine-binding protein from Aplysia californica in Bac-to-Bac system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Meng, Hailing; Bing, Hui; Zhangsun, Dongting; Luo, Sulan

    2014-01-01

    The Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system can efficiently produce recombinant proteins, but the system may have to be optimized to achieve high-level expression for different candidate proteins. We reported here the efficient expression of acetylcholine-binding proteins from sea hares Aplysia californica (Ac-AChBP) and a convenient method to monitor protein expression level in this expression system. Three key factors affecting expression of Ac-AChBP were optimized for maximizing the yield, which included the cell density, volume of the infecting baculovirus inoculums, and the culturing time of postinfection. We have found it to reach a high yield of ∼5 mg/L, which needs 55 h incubation after infection at the cell density of 2 × 10(6) cells/mL with an inoculum volume ratio of 1 : 100. The optimized expression system in this study was also applied for expressing another protein Ls-AChBP from Lymnaea stagnalis successfully. Therefore, this established method is helpful to produce high yields of AChBP proteins for X-ray crystallographic structural and functional studies.

  17. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  18. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  19. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  20. Nanog RNA-binding proteins YBX1 and ILF3 affect pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuanliang; Xue, Yan; Yang, Guanheng; Yin, Shang; Shi, Wansheng; Cheng, Yan; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Fan, Shuyue; Zhang, Huijun; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Nanog is a well-known transcription factor that plays a fundamental role in stem cell self-renewal and the maintenance of their pluripotent cell identity. There remains a large data gap with respect to the spectrum of the key pluripotency transcription factors' interaction partners. Limited information is available concerning Nanog-associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the intrinsic protein-RNA interactions characteristic of the regulatory activities of Nanog. Herein, we used an improved affinity protocol to purify Nanog-interacting RBPs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and 49 RBPs of Nanog were identified. Among them, the interaction of YBX1 and ILF3 with Nanog mRNA was further confirmed by in vitro assays, such as Western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), and ex vivo methods, such as immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), MS2 in vivo biotin-tagged RNA affinity purification (MS2-BioTRAP). Interestingly, RNAi studies revealed that YBX1 and ILF3 positively affected the expression of Nanog and other pluripotency-related genes. Particularly, downregulation of YBX1 or ILF3 resulted in high expression of mesoderm markers. Thus, a reduction in the expression of YBX1 and ILF3 controls the expression of pluripotency-related genes in ESCs, suggesting their roles in further regulation of the pluripotent state of ESCs.

  1. Perceptual, Categorical, and Affective Processing of Ambiguous Smiling Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Fernandez-Martin, Andres; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Why is a face with a smile but non-happy eyes likely to be interpreted as happy? We used blended expressions in which a smiling mouth was incongruent with the eyes (e.g., angry eyes), as well as genuine expressions with congruent eyes and mouth (e.g., both happy or angry). Tasks involved detection of a smiling mouth (perceptual), categorization of…

  2. Evolution, diversification, and expression of KNOX proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Lang, Tiange; Samuelsson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    The KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) transcription factors play a pivotal role in leaf and meristem development. The majority of these proteins are characterized by the KNOX1, KNOX2, ELK, and homeobox domains whereas the proteins of the KNATM family contain only the KNOX domains. We carried out an extensive inventory of these proteins and here report on a total of 394 KNOX proteins from 48 species. The land plant proteins fall into two classes (I and II) as previously shown where the class I family seems to be most closely related to the green algae homologs. The KNATM proteins are restricted to Eudicots and some species have multiple paralogs of this protein. Certain plants are characterized by a significant increase in the number of KNOX paralogs; one example is Glycine max. Through the analysis of public gene expression data we show that the class II proteins of this plant have a relatively broad expression specificity as compared to class I proteins, consistent with previous studies of other plants. In G. max, class I protein are mainly distributed in axis tissues and KNATM paralogs are overall poorly expressed; highest expression is in the early plumular axis. Overall, analysis of gene expression in G. max demonstrates clearly that the expansion in gene number is associated with functional diversification. PMID:26557129

  3. Endometriosis Located Proximal to or Remote From the Uterus Differentially Affects Uterine Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Hanyia; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Krikun, Graciela; Taylor, Hugh S

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms that lead to the altered uterine gene expression in women with endometriosis are poorly understood. Are these changes in gene expression mediated by proximity to endometriotic lesions or is endometriosis a systemic disease where the effect is independent of proximity to the uterus? To answer this question, we created endometriosis in a murine model either in the peritoneal cavity (proximal) or at a subcutaneous remote site (distal). The expression of several genes that are involved in endometrial receptivity (homeobox A10 [Hoxa10], homeobox A11 [Hoxa11], insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 [Igfbp1], Kruppel-like factor 9 [Klf9], and progesterone receptor [Pgr]) was measured in the eutopic endometrium of mice transplanted with either proximal or distal endometriosis lesions. Decreased expression of Hoxa10, Igfbp1, Klf9, and total Pgr genes was observed in the eutopic endometrium of mice with peritoneal endometriosis. In the mice with distal lesions, overall expression of these genes was not as severely affected, however, Igfbp1 expression was similarly decreased and the effect on Pgr was more pronounced. Endometriosis does have a systemic effect that varies with distance to the end organ. However, even remote disease selectively and profoundly alters the expression of genes such as Pgr. This is the first controlled experiment demonstrating that endometriosis is not simply a local peritoneal disease. Selective alteration of genes critical for endometrial receptivity and endometriosis propagation may be systemic. Similarly, systemic effects of endometriosis on other organs may also be responsible for the widespread manifestations of the disease.

  4. Statistical approaches to maximize recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: a general review.

    PubMed

    Papaneophytou, Christos P; Kontopidis, George

    2014-02-01

    The supply of many valuable proteins that have potential clinical or industrial use is often limited by their low natural availability. With the modern advances in genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, the number of proteins being produced using recombinant techniques is exponentially increasing and seems to guarantee an unlimited supply of recombinant proteins. The demand of recombinant proteins has increased as more applications in several fields become a commercial reality. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, producing soluble proteins in E. coli is still a major bottleneck for structural biology projects. One of the most challenging steps in any structural biology project is predicting which protein or protein fragment will express solubly and purify for crystallographic studies. The production of soluble and active proteins is influenced by several factors including expression host, fusion tag, induction temperature and time. Statistical designed experiments are gaining success in the production of recombinant protein because they provide information on variable interactions that escape the "one-factor-at-a-time" method. Here, we review the most important factors affecting the production of recombinant proteins in a soluble form. Moreover, we provide information about how the statistical design experiments can increase protein yield and purity as well as find conditions for crystal growth.

  5. The Enfacement Illusion Is Not Affected by Negative Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Brianna; Cardini, Flavia; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Bertini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Enfacement is an illusion wherein synchronous visual and tactile inputs update the mental representation of one’s own face to assimilate another person’s face. Emotional facial expressions, serving as communicative signals, may influence enfacement by increasing the observer’s motivation to understand the mental state of the expresser. Fearful expressions, in particular, might increase enfacement because they are valuable for adaptive behavior and more strongly represented in somatosensory cortex than other emotions. In the present study, a face was seen being touched at the same time as the participant’s own face. This face was either neutral, fearful, or angry. Anger was chosen as an emotional control condition for fear because it is similarly negative but induces less somatosensory resonance, and requires additional knowledge (i.e., contextual information and social contingencies) to effectively guide behavior. We hypothesized that seeing a fearful face (but not an angry one) would increase enfacement because of greater somatosensory resonance. Surprisingly, neither fearful nor angry expressions modulated the degree of enfacement relative to neutral expressions. Synchronous interpersonal visuo-tactile stimulation led to assimilation of the other’s face, but this assimilation was not modulated by facial expression processing. This finding suggests that dynamic, multisensory processes of self-face identification operate independently of facial expression processing. PMID:26291532

  6. The Enfacement Illusion Is Not Affected by Negative Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Beck, Brianna; Cardini, Flavia; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Bertini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Enfacement is an illusion wherein synchronous visual and tactile inputs update the mental representation of one's own face to assimilate another person's face. Emotional facial expressions, serving as communicative signals, may influence enfacement by increasing the observer's motivation to understand the mental state of the expresser. Fearful expressions, in particular, might increase enfacement because they are valuable for adaptive behavior and more strongly represented in somatosensory cortex than other emotions. In the present study, a face was seen being touched at the same time as the participant's own face. This face was either neutral, fearful, or angry. Anger was chosen as an emotional control condition for fear because it is similarly negative but induces less somatosensory resonance, and requires additional knowledge (i.e., contextual information and social contingencies) to effectively guide behavior. We hypothesized that seeing a fearful face (but not an angry one) would increase enfacement because of greater somatosensory resonance. Surprisingly, neither fearful nor angry expressions modulated the degree of enfacement relative to neutral expressions. Synchronous interpersonal visuo-tactile stimulation led to assimilation of the other's face, but this assimilation was not modulated by facial expression processing. This finding suggests that dynamic, multisensory processes of self-face identification operate independently of facial expression processing.

  7. CXCR4 expression affects overall survival of HCC patients whereas CXCR7 expression does not.

    PubMed

    Neve Polimeno, Maria; Ierano, Caterina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Simona Losito, Nunzia; Napolitano, Maria; Portella, Luigi; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Maria Trotta, Anna; Curley, Steven; Costantini, Susan; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Izzo, Francesco; Scala, Stefania

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous disease with a poor prognosis and limited markers for predicting patient survival. Because chemokines and chemokine receptors play numerous and integral roles in HCC disease progression, the CXCR4-CXCL12-CXCR7 axis was studied in HCC patients. CXCR4 and CXCR7 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 86 HCC patients (training cohort) and validated in 42 unrelated HCC patients (validation cohort). CXCR4 levels were low in 22.1% of patients, intermediate in 30.2%, and high in 47.7%, whereas CXCR7 levels were low in 9.3% of patients, intermediate in 44.2% and high in 46.5% of the patients in the training cohort. When correlated to patient outcome, only CXCR4 affected overall survival (P=0.03). CXCR4-CXCL12-CXCR7 mRNA levels were examined in 33/86 patients. Interestingly, the common CXCR4-CXCR7 ligand CXCL12 was expressed at significantly lower levels in tumor tissues compared to adjacent normal liver (P=0.032). The expression and function of CXCR4 and CXCR7 was also analyzed in several human HCC cell lines. CXCR4 was expressed in Huh7, Hep3B, SNU398, SNU449 and SNU475 cells, whereas CXCR7 was expressed in HepG2, Huh7, SNU449 and SNU475 cells. Huh7, SNU449 and SNU475 cells migrated toward CXCL12, and this migration was inhibited by AMD3100/anti-CXCR4 and by CCX771/anti-CXCR7. Moreover, SNU449 and Huh7 cells exhibited matrix invasion in the presence of CXCL12 and CXCL11, a ligand exclusive to CXCR7. In conclusion, CXCR4 affects the prognosis of HCC patients but CXCR7 does not. Therefore, the CXCR4-CXCL12-CXCR7 axis plays a role in the interaction of HCC with the surrounding normal tissue and represents a suitable therapeutic target.

  8. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  9. [Gene expression of Interleukin 1 in vitamin A and proteins deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Alvarez, Vivian; Hernández Triana, Manuel; Abreu Peñate, Mario; de las Cagigas Reig, Ada; Tam Hurtado, Miguel; Reboso Pérez, José; Noa Puig, Miriam; Arias Verdé, José; Fernández Carriera, Rebeca; González Calderín, Soraya; Sigarroa González, Antonio

    2002-03-01

    The influence of low levels of protein and vitamin A on indicators of the immune response was assayed in rats. The levels of protein and vitamin A intake of the Cuban population affected by epidemic neuropathy in 1993 was reproduced in 4 diets: control, protein deficiency (DP), vitamin A deficiency (DA), protein and vitamin A deficiency (DAP). The Peyer's patches evaluated the Interleukin 1 expression gene and was related with corporal weight, food intake, serum protein, vitamin A, immunology indicators and histology evaluation (spleen, thymus and liver). Protein deficiency generated a significant decrease of the expression gene of Interleukin 1. Atrophy signs in lymphoid tissues and morphologic changes in the liver were associated with the dietary protein utilization. Protein and vitamin A deficiency generated significant stimulation of the Interleukin 1 expression gene with increase of the level of the inflammatory state indicators as serum alpha protein, total complement and neutrophils. This stimulation could be generated by a deficient retinol mobilization to tissues. These results support the hypothesis of the function of cytokines as mediators of subclinical symptoms of the immune system during the nutritional affectations.

  10. Evolutionary Divergence of Gene and Protein Expression in the Brains of Humans and Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Bauernfeind, Amy L.; Soderblom, Erik J.; Turner, Meredith E.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Ely, John J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Wray, Gregory A.; Babbitt, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Although transcriptomic profiling has become the standard approach for exploring molecular differences in the primate brain, very little is known about how the expression levels of gene transcripts relate to downstream protein abundance. Moreover, it is unknown whether the relationship changes depending on the brain region or species under investigation. We performed high-throughput transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) and proteomic (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) analyses on two regions of the human and chimpanzee brain: The anterior cingulate cortex and caudate nucleus. In both brain regions, we found a lower correlation between mRNA and protein expression levels in humans and chimpanzees than has been reported for other tissues and cell types, suggesting that the brain may engage extensive tissue-specific regulation affecting protein abundance. In both species, only a few categories of biological function exhibited strong correlations between mRNA and protein expression levels. These categories included oxidative metabolism and protein synthesis and modification, indicating that the expression levels of mRNA transcripts supporting these biological functions are more predictive of protein expression compared with other functional categories. More generally, however, the two measures of molecular expression provided strikingly divergent perspectives into differential expression between human and chimpanzee brains: mRNA comparisons revealed significant differences in neuronal communication, ion transport, and regulatory processes, whereas protein comparisons indicated differences in perception and cognition, metabolic processes, and organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results highlight the importance of examining protein expression in evolutionary analyses and call for a more thorough understanding of tissue-specific protein expression levels. PMID:26163674

  11. Evolutionary Divergence of Gene and Protein Expression in the Brains of Humans and Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Soderblom, Erik J; Turner, Meredith E; Moseley, M Arthur; Ely, John J; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Wray, Gregory A; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2015-07-10

    Although transcriptomic profiling has become the standard approach for exploring molecular differences in the primate brain, very little is known about how the expression levels of gene transcripts relate to downstream protein abundance. Moreover, it is unknown whether the relationship changes depending on the brain region or species under investigation. We performed high-throughput transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) and proteomic (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) analyses on two regions of the human and chimpanzee brain: The anterior cingulate cortex and caudate nucleus. In both brain regions, we found a lower correlation between mRNA and protein expression levels in humans and chimpanzees than has been reported for other tissues and cell types, suggesting that the brain may engage extensive tissue-specific regulation affecting protein abundance. In both species, only a few categories of biological function exhibited strong correlations between mRNA and protein expression levels. These categories included oxidative metabolism and protein synthesis and modification, indicating that the expression levels of mRNA transcripts supporting these biological functions are more predictive of protein expression compared with other functional categories. More generally, however, the two measures of molecular expression provided strikingly divergent perspectives into differential expression between human and chimpanzee brains: mRNA comparisons revealed significant differences in neuronal communication, ion transport, and regulatory processes, whereas protein comparisons indicated differences in perception and cognition, metabolic processes, and organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results highlight the importance of examining protein expression in evolutionary analyses and call for a more thorough understanding of tissue-specific protein expression levels.

  12. Silver nanoparticles administered to chicken affect VEGFA and FGF2 gene expression in breast muscle and heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotowy, Anna; Sawosz, Ewa; Pineda, Lane; Sawosz, Filip; Grodzik, Marta; Chwalibog, André

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of colloidal silver (AgNano) can influence gene expression. Concerning trials of AgNano application in poultry nutrition, it is useful to reveal whether they affect the expression of genes crucial for bird development. AgNano were administered to broiler chickens as a water solution in two concentrations (10 and 20 ppm). After dissection of the birds, breast muscles and hearts were collected. Gene expression of FGF2 and VEGFA on the mRNA and protein levels were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. The results for gene expression in the breast muscle revealed changes on the mRNA level ( FGF2 was up-regulated, P < 0.05) but not on the protein level. In the heart, 20 ppm of silver nanoparticles in drinking water increased the expression of VEGFA ( P < 0.05), at the same time decreasing FGF2 expression both on the transcriptional and translational levels. Changes in the expression of these genes may lead to histological changes, but this needs to be proven using histological and immunohistochemical examination of tissues. In general, we showed that AgNano application in poultry feeding influences the expression of FGF2 and VEGFA genes on the mRNA and protein levels in growing chicken.

  13. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  14. Draxin, an axon guidance protein, affects chick trunk neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuhong; Naser, Iftekhar B; Islam, Shahidul M; Zhang, Sanbing; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Chen, Sandy; Shinmyo, Yohei; Kawakami, Minoru; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    The neural crest is a multipotent population of migratory cells that arises in the central nervous system and subsequently migrates along defined stereotypic pathways. In the present work, we analyzed the role of a repulsive axon guidance protein, draxin, in the migration of neural crest cells. Draxin is expressed in the roof plate of the chick trunk spinal cord and around the early migration pathway of neural crest cells. Draxin modulates chick neural crest cell migration in vitro by reducing the polarization of these cells. When exposed to draxin, the velocity of migrating neural crest cells was reduced, and the cells changed direction so frequently that the net migration distance was also reduced. Overexpression of draxin also caused some early migrating neural crest cells to change direction to the dorsolateral pathway in the chick trunk region, presumably due to draxin's inhibitory activity. These results demonstrate that draxin, an axon guidance protein, can also affect trunk neural crest migration in the chick embryo.

  15. Suppression of lipin-1 expression increases monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayasu; Oka, Kazuya; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 affects lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 depletion using siRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes increased MCP-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 is involved in adipose inflammation. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays a crucial role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. Expression of adipose lipin-1 is reduced in obesity, and metabolic syndrome. However, the significance of this reduction remains unclear. This study investigated if and how reduced lipin-1 expression affected metabolism. We assessed mRNA expression levels of various genes related to adipocyte metabolism in lipin-1-depleted 3T3-L1 adipocytes by introducing its specific small interfering RNA. In lipin-1-depleted adipocytes, mRNA and protein expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly increased, although the other genes tested were not altered. The conditioned media from the cells promoted monocyte chemotaxis. The increase in MCP-1 expression was prevented by treatment with quinazoline or salicylate, inhibitors of nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation. Because MCP-1 is related to adipose inflammation and systemic insulin resistance, these results suggest that a reduction in adipose lipin-1 in obesity may exacerbate adipose inflammation and metabolism.

  16. Changes in brain protein expression are linked to magnesium restriction-induced depression-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Nigel; Li, Lin; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Yang, Jae-Won; Sartori, Simone B; Lubec, Gert; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    There is evidence to suggest that low levels of magnesium (Mg) are associated with affective disorders, however, causality and central neurobiological mechanisms of this link are largely unproven. We have recently shown that mice fed a low Mg-containing diet (10% of daily requirement) display enhanced depression-like behavior sensitive to chronic antidepressant treatment. The aim of the present study was to utilize this model to gain insight into underlying mechanisms by quantifying amygdala/hypothalamus protein expression using gel-based proteomics and correlating changes in protein expression with changes in depression-like behavior. Mice fed Mg-restricted diet displayed reduced brain Mg tissue levels and altered expression of four proteins, N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1), manganese-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and voltage-dependent anion channel 1. The observed alterations in protein expression may indicate increased nitric oxide production, increased anti-oxidant response to increased oxidative stress and potential alteration in energy metabolism. Aberrant expressions of DDAH1, MnSOD and GDH1 were normalized by chronic paroxetine treatment which also normalized the enhanced depression-like behavior, strengthening the link between the changes in these proteins and depression-like behavior. Collectively, these findings provide first evidence of low magnesium-induced alteration in brain protein levels and biochemical pathways, contributing to central dysregulation in affective disorders.

  17. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  20. Perinatal exposure to diesel exhaust affects gene expression in mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Tsukue, Naomi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kumamoto, Takayuki; Takano, Hirohisa; Takeda, Ken

    2009-11-01

    Many environmental toxins alter reproductive function and affect the central nervous system (CNS). Gonadal steroid hormones cause differentiation of neurons and affect brain function and behavior during the perinatal period, and the CNS is thought to be particularly susceptible to toxic insult during this period. It was, therefore, hypothesized that inhalation of diesel exhaust (DE) during the fetal or suckling period would disrupt the sexual differentiation of brain function in mice, and the effects of exposure to DE during the perinatal period on sexual differentiation related gene expression of the brain were investigated. In the fetal period exposure group, pregnant ICR mice were exposed to DE from 1.5 days post-coitum (dpc) until 16 dpc. In the neonatal period exposure group, dams and their offspring were exposed to DE from the day of birth [postnatal day (PND)-0] until PND-16. Then, the cerebrums of males and females at PND-2, -5, and -16 from both groups were analyzed for expression level of mRNA encoding stress-related proteins [cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)] and steroid hormone receptors [estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), estrogen receptor beta (ER beta), androgen receptor (AR)]. Expression levels of ER alpha and ER beta mRNA were increased in the cerebrum of newborns in the DE exposure groups as well as mRNA for CYP1A1 and HO-1. Results indicate that perinatal exposure to DE during the critical period of sexual differentiation of the brain may affect endocrine function.

  1. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    adaptation to protein folding stress. In summary, BiFC analysis enables detection of protein interactions within minutes after complex formation in living cells, but does not allow detection of complex dissociation. Conditional BiFC complex formation depends on the folding efficiencies of fluorescent protein fragments and can be affected by the cellular protein folding environment. PMID:19733184

  2. Plectin isoform 1-dependent nuclear docking of desmin networks affects myonuclear architecture and expression of mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Staszewska, Ilona; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin is a highly versatile cytoskeletal protein that acts as a mechanical linker between intermediate filament (IF) networks and various cellular structures. The protein is crucial for myofiber integrity. Its deficiency leads to severe pathological changes in skeletal muscle fibers of patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). Skeletal muscle fibers express four major isoforms of plectin which are distinguished solely by alternative, relatively short, first exon-encoded N-terminal sequences. Each one of these isoforms is localized to a different subcellular compartment and plays a specific role in maintaining integrity and proper function(s) of myofibers. The unique role of individual isoforms is supported by distinct phenotypes of isoform-specific knockout mice and recently discovered mutations in first coding exons of plectin that lead to distinct, tissue-specific, pathological abnormalities in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of plectin isoform 1 (P1) in myofibers of mice leads to alterations of nuclear morphology, similar to those observed in various forms of MD. We show that P1-mediated targeting of desmin IFs to myonuclei is essential for maintenance of their typically spheroidal architecture as well as their proper positioning and movement along the myofiber. Furthermore, we show that P1 deficiency affects chromatin modifications and the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions, including signaling pathways mediating mechanotransduction. Mechanistically, P1 is shown to specifically interact with the myonuclear membrane-associated (BAR domain-containing) protein endophilin B. Our results open a new perspective on cytoskeleton-nuclear crosstalk via specific cytolinker proteins. PMID:26487297

  3. Environmental enrichment lessens cognitive decline in APP23 mice without affecting brain sirtuin expression.

    PubMed

    Polito, Letizia; Chierchia, Armando; Tunesi, Marta; Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin; Albani, Diego; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a non-pharmacological intervention reported to counteract pathological signs in models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We developed EE protocols in APP23 mice and evaluated how they influenced cognitive decline and brain amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. We also investigated the involvement of sirtuins (SIRTs) as a possible molecular mediator of EE, by assessing hippocampal and cortical mRNA and protein levels of the SIRT family members (SIRT1 to SIRT7). APP23 transgenic mice were moved to EE cages (TG-EEs) starting from 3 months of age. TG-EEs were compared to transgenic mice housed in standard cages (TG-SHs) and to wild-type littermates in the two housing conditions (WT-EEs and WT-SHs). At 7 months of age, all mice were tested for behavioral performance with Morris Water Maze (MWM) and visual novel Object Recognition Test (vORT). After a month, a group underwent biochemical analyses, while another group continued in the EE environment till 18 months of age, when Aβ plaque load was assessed. At 7 months, TG-SHs had impaired behavioral performance in MWM and vORT. In contrast, TG-EE mice had restored behavioral performance. At 8 months, EE did not affect AβPP expression or processing, Aβ40/42, pGlu-Aβ3-40/3-42, or Aβ oligomer level. The expression of two Aβ degrading enzymes (insulin degrading enzyme and neprilysin) was not modulated by EE. Brain sirtuin mRNA and protein levels were unchanged, while brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased after EE. Aβ deposition was attenuated in 18-month-old TG-EE mice, without apparent reduction of neuroinflammatory signs. We suggest that EE had a beneficial effect on cognitive performance and lessened long-term Aβ accumulation, but brain sirtuin expression was not modulated when cognitive impairment was restored.

  4. Golgi Anti-apoptotic Proteins Are Highly Conserved Ion Channels That Affect Apoptosis and Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guia; Saraiva, Nuno; Parsons, Maddy; Byrne, Bernadette; Prole, David L.; Taylor, Colin W.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Golgi anti-apoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are multitransmembrane proteins that are expressed in the Golgi apparatus and are able to homo-oligomerize. They are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and are present in some prokaryotes and orthopoxviruses. Within eukaryotes, GAAPs regulate the Ca2+ content of intracellular stores, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell adhesion and migration. Data presented here demonstrate that purified viral GAAPs (vGAAPs) and human Bax inhibitor 1 form ion channels and that vGAAP from camelpox virus is selective for cations. Mutagenesis of vGAAP, including some residues conserved in the recently solved structure of a related bacterial protein, BsYetJ, altered the conductance (E207Q and D219N) and ion selectivity (E207Q) of the channel. Mutation of residue Glu-207 or -178 reduced the effects of GAAP on cell migration and adhesion without affecting protection from apoptosis. In contrast, mutation of Asp-219 abrogated the anti-apoptotic activity of GAAP but not its effects on cell migration and adhesion. These results demonstrate that GAAPs are ion channels and define residues that contribute to the ion-conducting pore and affect apoptosis, cell adhesion, and migration independently. PMID:25713081

  5. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  6. Differentially expressed proteins of soybean (Glycine max) pulvinus in light and dark conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean leaves (Glycine max) both track and avoid the sun through turgor changes of the pulvinus tissue at the base of leaves. Pulvinar response is known to be affected by both diurnally varying environmental factors and circadian patterns. Differential expression of the proteins between light and d...

  7. 5´-UTR introns enhance protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hoshida, Hisashi; Kondo, Masaki; Kobayashi, Takafumi; Yarimizu, Tohru; Akada, Rinji

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most suitable microorganisms for recombinant protein production. To enhance protein production, various expression systems have been intensively studied. However, the effect of introns on protein expression has not been examined deeply in S. cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the effect of some introns on protein expression. RPS25A, RPS26A, and RPS26B contain single introns within the 5´-untranslated regions (5´-UTRs), and RPS24A has an intron just downstream of the initiation codon. Expression activity of the promoter regions containing introns (intron promoters) were analyzed by luciferase reporter assays. These intron promoters showed higher expression than the TDH3 promoter (TDH3p), which is one of the strongest promoters in S. cerevisiae. Deletion of the introns from these promoters decreased luciferase expression, indicating that introns have a role in enhancing protein expression. To develop artificial strong intron promoters, several chimeric promoters were constructed using the TDH3p and the RPS25A intron promoter. A construct containing the entire TDH3p followed by the RPS25A intron showed about 50-fold higher expression than the TDH3p alone. Inducible expressions driven by the GAL10 promoter and the CUP1 promoter were also enhanced by the RPS25A intron. However, enhancement of mRNA accumulation by the TDH3p and the GAL10 promoter with the RPS25A intron was lower than the effect on luciferase activity, suggesting that the intron affects post-transcriptionally. The chimeric promoter, TDH3p-RPS25A-intron, enhanced expressions of some, but not all proteins examined, indicating that 5'-UTR introns increase production of a certain type of recombinant proteins in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis: variable phenotypic expression in three affected sisters from Mexican ancestry.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, María E; Hunziker, Walter; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2015-02-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive renal disease caused by mutations in genes for the tight junction transmembrane proteins Claudin-16 (CLDN16) and Claudin-19 (CLDN19). We present the first case report of a Mexican family with three affected sisters carrying a p.Gly20Asp mutation in CLDN19 whose heterozygous mother showed evident hypercalciuria and normal low magnesemia without any other clinical, laboratory, and radiological symptoms of renal disease making of her an unsuitable donor. The affected sisters showed variable phenotypic expression including age of first symptoms, renal urinary tract infections, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and eye symptoms consisting in retinochoroiditis, strabismus, macular scars, bilateral anisocoria, and severe myopia and astigmatism. End stage renal disease due to renal failure needed kidney transplantation in the three of them. Interesting findings were a heterozygous mother with asymptomatic hypercalciuria warning on the need of carefully explore clinical, laboratory, kidney ultrasonograpy, and mutation status in first degree asymptomatic relatives to avoid inappropriate kidney donors; an evident variable phenotypic expression among patients; the identification of a mutation almost confined to Spanish cases and a 3.5 Mb block of genomic homozygosis strongly suggesting a common remote parental ancestor for the gene mutation reported.

  9. A Protein Aggregation Based Test for Screening of the Agents Affecting Thermostability of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eronina, Tatyana; Borzova, Vera; Maloletkina, Olga; Kleymenov, Sergey; Asryants, Regina; Markossian, Kira; Kurganov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    To search for agents affecting thermal stability of proteins, a test based on the registration of protein aggregation in the regime of heating with a constant rate was used. The initial parts of the dependences of the light scattering intensity (I) on temperature (T) were analyzed using the following empiric equation: I = Kagg(T−T0)2, where Kagg is the parameter characterizing the initial rate of aggregation and T0 is a temperature at which the initial increase in the light scattering intensity is registered. The aggregation data are interpreted in the frame of the model assuming the formation of the start aggregates at the initial stages of the aggregation process. Parameter T0 corresponds to the moment of the origination of the start aggregates. The applicability of the proposed approach was demonstrated on the examples of thermal aggregation of glycogen phosphorylase b from rabbit skeletal muscles and bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase studied in the presence of agents of different chemical nature. The elaborated approach to the study of protein aggregation may be used for rapid identification of small molecules that interact with protein targets. PMID:21760963

  10. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  11. Polycomb Protein OsFIE2 Affects Plant Height and Grain Yield in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhonghua; Jiao, Guiai; Tang, Shaoqing; Luo, Ju; Hu, Peisong

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have been shown to affect growth and development in plants. To further elucidate their role in these processes in rice, we isolated and characterized a rice mutant which exhibits dwarfism, reduced seed setting rate, defective floral organ, and small grains. Map-based cloning revealed that abnormal phenotypes were attributed to a mutation of the Fertilization Independent Endosperm 2 (OsFIE2) protein, which belongs to the PcG protein family. So we named the mutant as osfie2-1. Histological analysis revealed that the number of longitudinal cells in the internodes decreased in osfie2-1, and that lateral cell layer of the internodes was markedly thinner than wild-type. In addition, compared to wild-type, the number of large and small vascular bundles decreased in osfie2-1, as well as cell number and cell size in spikelet hulls. OsFIE2 is expressed in most tissues and the coded protein localizes in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that OsFIE2 interacts with OsiEZ1 which encodes an enhancer of zeste protein previously identified as a histone methylation enzyme. RNA sequencing-based transcriptome profiling and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that some homeotic genes and genes involved in endosperm starch synthesis, cell division/expansion and hormone synthesis and signaling are differentially expressed between osfie2-1 and wild-type. In addition, the contents of IAA, GA3, ABA, JA and SA in osfie2-1 are significantly different from those in wild-type. Taken together, these results indicate that OsFIE2 plays an important role in the regulation of plant height and grain yield in rice. PMID:27764161

  12. Proteins and an Inflammatory Network Expressed in Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Fang, Changming; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Niemeyer, Christina C.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is crucial to homeostasis of normal intestinal epithelia because it suppresses the β-catenin/TCF pathway. Consequently, loss or mutation of the APC gene causes colorectal tumors in humans and mice. Here, we describe our use of Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to compare protein expression in colon tumors to that of adjacent healthy colon tissue from ApcMin/+ mice. Twenty-seven proteins were found to be up-regulated in colon tumors and twenty-five down-regulated. As an extension of the proteomic analysis, the differentially expressed proteins were used as “seeds” to search for co-expressed genes. This approach revealed a co-expression network of 45 genes that is up-regulated in colon tumors. Members of the network include the antibacterial peptide cathelicidin (CAMP), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-8, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM1). The co-expression network is associated with innate immunity and inflammation, and there is significant concordance between its connectivity in humans versus mice (Friedman: p value = 0.0056). This study provides new insights into the proteins and networks that are likely to drive the onset and progression of colon cancer. PMID:21366352

  13. Isotopic labeling of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) heterologously expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Yuan, Yiyuan; Miyagi, Masaru; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structural determination and dynamic characterization of membrane proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require their isotopic labeling. Although a number of labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins have been successfully expressed in bacteria, they lack posttranslational modifications and usually need to be refolded from inclusion bodies. This shortcoming of bacterial expression systems is particularly detrimental for the functional expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of drug targets, due to their inherent instability. In this work we show that proteins expressed by a eukaryotic organism can be isotopically labeled and produced with a quality and quantity suitable for NMR characterization. Using our previously described expression system in Caenorhabditis elegans, we showed the feasibility of labeling proteins produced by these worms with 15N,13C by providing them with isotopically labeled bacteria. 2H labeling also was achieved by growing C. elegans in presence of 70% heavy water. Bovine rhodopsin, simultaneously expressed in muscular and neuronal worm tissues, was employed as the ‘test’ GPCR to demonstrate the viability of this approach. Although the worms’ cell cycle was slightly affected by the presence of heavy isotopes, the final protein yield and quality was appropriate for NMR structural characterization. PMID:25461480

  14. Tumor redox metabolism correlation with the expression level of red fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Wang, Anle; Lin, Qiaoya; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    The redox metabolism is variable and complicated with the progress of tumor development. Whether the tumor redox state will affect the exogenous gene expression or not, are still not clear now . To investigate the relationship between tumor endogenous redox state and the exogenous gene expression level, a far red fluorescent protein fRFP was used to monitor tumor cells proliferation and as an exogenous protein expression in tumors. NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and Fp (flavin protein) are two important coenzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain, which can be as a standard representation for redox metabolism state. Three tumor subcutaneous models (melanoma, human pancreatic carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma) were used to observe their redox state and protein expression by our home-made redox scanner. The results showed that the distribution of fRFP fluorescent protein expression in the inner tumor regions are heterogeneous, and the fluorescent intensity of fRFP and the fluorescent intensity of NADH have high correlation. In addition, we also found the linear coefficient in three tumors are different, the value of coefficient is (R2 = 0.966 and R2 = 0.943) in melanoma, (R2 = 0.701 and R2 = 0.942) in human pancreatic carcinoma, and (R2 = 0.994) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, respectively. From these results, we consider that the exogenous protein expression of fRFP in tumor had some relationship with the tumor redox state of NADH.

  15. Bt proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab do not affect cotton aphid Aphis gossypii and ladybeetle Propylea japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Cui, Jin-Jie; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-02-01

    Plant varieties expressing the Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) insecticidal proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab have potential commercialization prospects in China. However, their potential effects on non-target arthropods (NTAs) remain uncharacterized. The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii is a worldwide pest that damages various important crops. The ladybeetle Propylea japonica is a common and abundant natural enemy in many cropping systems in East Asia. In the present study, the effects of Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins on A. gossypii and P. japonica were assessed from three aspects. First, neither of the Cry proteins affected the growth or developmental characteristics of the two test insects. Second, the expression levels of the detoxification-related genes of the two test insects did not change significantly in either Cry protein treatment. Third, neither of the Cry proteins had a favourable effect on the expression of genes associated with the amino acid metabolism of A. gossypii and the nutrition utilization of P. japonica. In conclusion, the Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins do not appear to affect the cotton aphid A. gossypii or the ladybeetle P. japonica.

  16. Bt proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab do not affect cotton aphid Aphis gossypii and ladybeetle Propylea japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Cui, Jin-Jie; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Plant varieties expressing the Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) insecticidal proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab have potential commercialization prospects in China. However, their potential effects on non-target arthropods (NTAs) remain uncharacterized. The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii is a worldwide pest that damages various important crops. The ladybeetle Propylea japonica is a common and abundant natural enemy in many cropping systems in East Asia. In the present study, the effects of Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins on A. gossypii and P. japonica were assessed from three aspects. First, neither of the Cry proteins affected the growth or developmental characteristics of the two test insects. Second, the expression levels of the detoxification-related genes of the two test insects did not change significantly in either Cry protein treatment. Third, neither of the Cry proteins had a favourable effect on the expression of genes associated with the amino acid metabolism of A. gossypii and the nutrition utilization of P. japonica. In conclusion, the Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins do not appear to affect the cotton aphid A. gossypii or the ladybeetle P. japonica. PMID:26829252

  17. Encoding Conditions Affect Recognition of Vocally Expressed Emotions Across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jürgens, Rebecca; Drolet, Matthis; Pirow, Ralph; Scheiner, Elisabeth; Fischer, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of emotions in humans is considered to be largely universal, cultural effects contribute to both emotion expression and recognition. To disentangle the interplay between these factors, play-acted and authentic (non-instructed) vocal expressions of emotions were used, on the assumption that cultural effects may contribute differentially to the recognition of staged and spontaneous emotions. Speech tokens depicting four emotions (anger, sadness, joy, fear) were obtained from German radio archives and re-enacted by professional actors, and presented to 120 participants from Germany, Romania, and Indonesia. Participants in all three countries were poor at distinguishing between play-acted and spontaneous emotional utterances (58.73% correct on average with only marginal cultural differences). Nevertheless, authenticity influenced emotion recognition: across cultures, anger was recognized more accurately when play-acted (z = 15.06, p < 0.001) and sadness when authentic (z = 6.63, p < 0.001), replicating previous findings from German populations. German subjects revealed a slight advantage in recognizing emotions, indicating a moderate in-group advantage. There was no difference between Romanian and Indonesian subjects in the overall emotion recognition. Differential cultural effects became particularly apparent in terms of differential biases in emotion attribution. While all participants labeled play-acted expressions as anger more frequently than expected, German participants exhibited a further bias toward choosing anger for spontaneous stimuli. In contrast to the German sample, Romanian and Indonesian participants were biased toward choosing sadness. These results support the view that emotion recognition rests on a complex interaction of human universals and cultural specificities. Whether and in which way the observed biases are linked to cultural differences in self-construal remains an issue for further investigation. PMID

  18. How optimization of potential functions affects protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Hao, M H; Scheraga, H A

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between the optimization of the potential function and the foldability of theoretical protein models is studied based on investigations of a 27-mer cubic-lattice protein model and a more realistic lattice model for the protein crambin. In both the simple and the more complicated systems, optimization of the energy parameters achieves significant improvements in the statistical-mechanical characteristics of the systems and leads to foldable protein models in simulation experiments. The foldability of the protein models is characterized by their statistical-mechanical properties--e.g., by the density of states and by Monte Carlo folding simulations of the models. With optimized energy parameters, a high level of consistency exists among different interactions in the native structures of the protein models, as revealed by a correlation function between the optimized energy parameters and the native structure of the model proteins. The results of this work are relevant to the design of a general potential function for folding proteins by theoretical simulations. PMID:8643516

  19. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  20. Performance benchmarking of four cell-free protein expression systems.

    PubMed

    Gagoski, Dejan; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Mureev, Sergey; Kunert, Anne; Johnston, Wayne; Gambin, Yann; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-02-01

    Over the last half century, a range of cell-free protein expression systems based on pro- and eukaryotic organisms have been developed and have found a range of applications, from structural biology to directed protein evolution. While it is generally accepted that significant differences in performance among systems exist, there is a paucity of systematic experimental studies supporting this notion. Here, we took advantage of the species-independent translation initiation sequence to express and characterize 87 N-terminally GFP-tagged human cytosolic proteins of different sizes in E. coli, wheat germ (WGE), HeLa, and Leishmania-based (LTE) cell-free systems. Using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis, we assessed the expression yields, the fraction of full-length translation product, and aggregation propensity for each of these systems. Our results demonstrate that the E. coli system has the highest expression yields. However, we observe that high expression levels are accompanied by production of truncated species-particularly pronounced in the case of proteins larger than 70 kDa. Furthermore, proteins produced in the E. coli system display high aggregation propensity, with only 10% of tested proteins being produced in predominantly monodispersed form. The WGE system was the most productive among eukaryotic systems tested. Finally, HeLa and LTE show comparable protein yields that are considerably lower than the ones achieved in the E. coli and WGE systems. The protein products produced in the HeLa system display slightly higher integrity, whereas the LTE-produced proteins have the lowest aggregation propensity among the systems analyzed. The high quality of HeLa- and LTE-produced proteins enable their analysis without purification and make them suitable for analysis of multi-domain eukaryotic proteins.

  1. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  2. The Induced Affect Response: 10-Week-Old Infants' Responses to Three Emotion Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Jeannette M.; Lelwica, Mary

    1987-01-01

    When mothers of 12 infants 10 weeks of age displayed noncontingent, practiced facial and vocal expressions of joy, anger, and sadness, infants responded differently to each expression. Infants' matching responses to maternal affects were only part of complex but predictable behavioral patterns that indicate meaningful affect states and possibly…

  3. Experimenter Affective Expression and Gaze Following in 7-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flom, Ross; Pick, Anne D.

    2005-01-01

    The study of gaze following in infants younger than 12 months of age has emphasized the effects of gesture, type of target, and its position or placement. This experiment extends this literature by examining the effects of adults' affective expression on 7-month-olds' gaze following. The effects of 3 affective expressions--happy, sad, and…

  4. Extracellular Stiffness Modulates the Expression of Functional Proteins and Growth Factors in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lívia; Fuhrmann, Gregor; Juenet, Maya; Amdursky, Nadav; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Campagnolo, Paola; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-08-13

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is of vital importance during the early stages of bone healing. Extracellular stiffness plays an important role in regulating endothelial cell behavior and angiogenesis, but how this mechanical cue affects proliferation kinetics, gene regulation, and the expression of proteins implicated in angiogenesis and bone regeneration remains unclear. Using collagen-coated polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are exposed to an environment that mimics the elastic properties of collagenous bone, and cellular proliferation and gene and protein expressions are assessed. The proliferation and gene expression of HUVECs are not differentially affected by culture on 3 or 30 kPa PAAm hydrogels, henceforth referred to as low and high stiffness gels, respectively. Although the proliferation and gene transcript levels remain unchanged, significant differences are found in the expressions of functional proteins and growth factors implicated both in the angiogenic and osteogenic processes. The down-regulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 protein with concomitant over-expression of caveolin-1, wingless-type 2, bone morphogenic protein 2, and basic fibroblast growth factor on the high stiffness PAAm hydrogel suggests that rigidity has a pro-angiogenic effect with inherent benefits for bone regeneration.

  5. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1) affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL) gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Klotho (KL), originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp) as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G) in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1), which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP). Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1. PMID:27478698

  6. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  7. Patterns of fluorescent protein expression in Scleractinian corals.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Kao, Hung-Teh; Janoschka, Stephen; Tsai, Julia; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2008-10-01

    Biofluorescence exists in only a few classes of organisms, with Anthozoa possessing the majority of species known to express fluorescent proteins. Most species within the Anthozoan subgroup Scleractinia (reef-building corals) not only express green fluorescent proteins, they also localize the proteins in distinct anatomical patterns.We examined the distribution of biofluorescence in 33 coral species, representing 8 families, from study sites on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. For 28 of these species, we report the presence of biofluorescence for the first time. The dominant fluorescent emissions observed were green (480-520 nm) and red (580-600 nm). Fluorescent proteins were expressed in three distinct patterns (highlighted, uniform, and complementary) among specific anatomical structures of corals across a variety of families. We report no significant overlap between the distribution of fluorescent proteins and the distribution of zooxanthellae. Analysis of the patterns of fluorescent protein distribution provides evidence that the scheme in which fluorescent proteins are distributed among the anatomical structures of corals is nonrandom. This targeted expression of fluorescent proteins in corals produces contrast and may function as a signaling mechanism to organisms with sensitivity to specific wavelengths of light.

  8. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  9. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-04-23

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic {beta}-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  10. Dimerization between aequorea fluorescent proteins does not affect interaction between tagged estrogen receptors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Eric M; Guerbadot, Martin; Schaufele, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) detection of protein interaction in living cells is commonly measured following the expression of interacting proteins genetically fused to the cyan (CFP) and yellow (YFP) derivatives of the Aequorea victoria fluorescent protein (FP). These FPs can dimerize at mM concentrations, which may introduce artifacts into the measurement of interaction between proteins that are fused with the FPs. Here, FRET analysis of the interaction between estrogen receptors (alpha isoform, ERalpha) labeled with "wild-type" CFP and YFP is compared with that of ERalpha labeled with "monomeric" A206K mutants of CFP and YFP. The intracellular equilibrium dissociation constant for the hormone-induced ERalpha-ERalpha interaction is similar for ERalpha labeled with wild-type or monomeric FPs. However, the measurement of energy transfer measured for ERalpha-ERalpha interaction in each cell is less consistent with the monomeric FPs. Thus, dimerization of the FPs does not affect the kinetics of ERalpha-ERalpha interaction but, when brought close together via ERalpha-ERalpha interaction, FP dimerization modestly improves FRET measurement.

  11. Fasting and leptin modulate adipose and muscle uncoupling protein: divergent effects between messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, W I; Fink, B D; Donohoue, P A

    1999-04-01

    Leptin is believed to act through hypothalamic centers to decrease appetite and increase energy utilization, in part through enhanced thermogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of fasting for 2 days and exogenous s.c. leptin, 200 microg every 8 h for 2 days, on the regulation of uncoupling protein (UCP) subtypes in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gastrocnemius muscle. Northern blot analysis (UCP-1) and ribonuclease protection (UCP-2 and 3) were used for quantitative messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis, and specific antibodies were used to measure UCP-1 and UCP-3 total protein expression. Leptin, compared with vehicle, did not alter BAT UCP-1 or UCP-3 mRNA or protein expression when administered to normal ad libitum fed rats. Fasting significantly decreased BAT UCP-1 and UCP-3 mRNA expression, to 31% and 30% of ad libitum fed controls, respectively, effects which were prevented by administration of leptin to fasted rats. Fasting also significantly decreased BAT UCP-1 protein expression, to 67% of control; however, that effect was not prevented by leptin treatment. Fasting also decreased BAT UCP-3 protein, to 85% of control, an effect that was not statistically significant. Fasting, with or without leptin administration, did not affect BAT UCP-2 mRNA; however, leptin administration to ad libitum fed rats significantly increased BAT UCP-2 mRNA, to 138% of control. Fasting significantly enhanced gastrocnemius muscle UCP-3 mRNA (411% of control) and protein expression (168% of control), whereas leptin administration to fasted rats did not alter either of these effects. In summary, UCP subtype mRNA and protein are regulated in tissue- and subtype-specific fashion by leptin and food restriction. Under certain conditions, the effects of these perturbations on UCP mRNA and protein are discordant.

  12. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  13. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  14. A Statistical Study on Oscillatory Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiwei

    Motivated by the experiments on the dynamics of a common network motif, p53 and Mdm2 feedback loop, by Lahav et al. [Nat. Genet 36, 147(2004)] in individual cells and Lev Bar-or et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 11250(2000)] at the population of cells, we propose a statistical signal-response model with aiming to describe the different oscillatory behaviors for the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins both in individual and in population of cells in a unified way. At the cellular level, the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins are described by a group of nonlinear dynamical equations where the damage-derived signal is assumed to have the form with abrupt transition (”on” leftrightarrow ”off”) as soon as signal strength passes forth and back across a threshold. Each cell responses to the damage with different time duration within which the oscillations persist. For the case of population of cells, the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins will be the population average of the individual cells, which results damped oscillations, due to the averaging over the cell population with the different response time.

  15. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  16. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  17. Expression of rabies virus G protein in carrots (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Olivera-Flores, Maria Teresa; Gomez-Lim, Miguel

    2009-12-01

    Antigens derived from various pathogens can readily be synthesized at high levels in plants in their authentic forms. Such antigens administered orally can induce an immune response and, in some cases, result in protection against a subsequent challenge. We here report the expression of rabies virus G protein into carrots. The G gene was subcloned into the pUCpSSrabG vector and then used to transform carrot embryogenic cells by particle bombardment. The carrot cells were selected in liquid medium, a method previously unreported. The presence of the transgene was verified by PCR, and by RT-PCR. By western blot, G protein transgene was identified in 93.3% of adult carrot roots. The G protein was quantified by densitometric analysis (range 0.4-1.2%). The expressed protein was antigenic in mice. This confirms that the carrot is an adequate system for antigen expression.

  18. Vectors for the expression of tagged proteins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Parker, L; Gross, S; Alphey, L

    2001-12-01

    Regulated expression systems have been extremely useful in developmental studies, allowing the expression of specific proteins in defined spatial and temporal patterns. If these proteins are fused to an appropriate molecular tag, then they can be purified or visualized without the need to raise specific antibodies. If the tag is inherently fluorescent, then the proteins can even be visualized directly, in living tissue. We have constructed a series of P element-based transformation vectors for the most widely used expression system in Drosophila, GAL4/UAS. These vectors provide a series of useful tags for antibody detection, protein purification, and/or direct visualization, together with a convenient multiple cloning site into which the cDNA of interest can be inserted.

  19. Protein differential expression induced by endocrine disrupting compounds in a terrestrial isopod.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Marco F L; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Samyn, Bart; Timperman, Isaak; van Beeumen, Jozef; Correia, António; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have been studied due to their impact on human health and increasing awareness of their impact on wildlife species. Studies concerning the organ-specific molecular effects of EDC in invertebrates are important to understand the mechanisms of action of this class of toxicants but are scarce in the literature. We have used a dose/response approach to unravel the protein expression in different organs of isopods exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) and vinclozolin (Vz) and assess their potential use as surrogate species. Male isopods were exposed to a range of Vz or of BPA concentrations. After animal dissection, proteins were extracted from gut, hepatopancreas and testes. Protein profiles were analysed by electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI mass spectrometry. EDCs affected proteins involved in the energy metabolism (arginine kinase), proteins of the heat shock protein family (Hsp70 and GRP78) and most likely microtubule dynamics (tubulin). Different proteins expressed at different concentrations in different organs are indicative of the organ-specific effects of BPA and Vz. Additionally, several proteins were up-regulated at lower but not higher BPA or Vz concentrations, bringing new data to the non-monotonic response curve controversy. Furthermore, our findings suggest that some common responses to EDCs in both vertebrates and invertebrates may exist.

  20. Sleep deprivation affects inflammatory marker expression in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has been shown to increase inflammatory markers in rat sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Inflammation is a condition associated with pathologies such as obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated changes in the pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in different depots of white adipose tissue in rats. We also assessed lipid profiles and serum levels of corticosterone, leptin, and adiponectin after 96 hours of sleep deprivation. Methods The study consisted of two groups: a control (C) group and a paradoxical sleep deprivation by 96 h (PSD) group. Ten rats were randomly assigned to either the control group (C) or the PSD. Mesenteric (MEAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissue, liver and serum were collected following completion of the PSD protocol. Levels of interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analysed in MEAT and RPAT, and leptin, adiponectin, glucose, corticosterone and lipid profile levels were analysed in serum. Results IL-6 levels were elevated in RPAT but remained unchanged in MEAT after PSD. IL-10 protein concentration was not altered in either depot, and TNF-α levels decreased in MEAT. Glucose, triglycerides (TG), VLDL and leptin decreased in serum after 96 hours of PSD; adiponectin was not altered and corticosterone was increased. Conclusion PSD decreased fat mass and may modulate the cytokine content in different depots of adipose tissue. The inflammatory response was diminished in both depots of adipose tissue, with increased IL-6 levels in RPAT and decreased TNF-α protein concentrations in MEAT and increased levels of corticosterone in serum. PMID:21034496

  1. Protein kinase Cmu plays an essential role in hypertonicity-induced heat shock protein 70 expression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Sook; Lee, Jae Seon; Huang, Tai Qin; Seo, Jeong Sun

    2008-12-31

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), which evidences important functions as a molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic molecule, is substantially induced in cells exposed to a variety of stresses, including hypertonic stress, heavy metals, heat shock, and oxidative stress, and prevents cellular damage under these conditions. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of HSP70 in response to hypertonicity has been characterized to a far lesser extent. In this study, we have investigated the cellular signaling pathway of HSP70 induction under hypertonic conditions. Initially, we applied a variety of kinase inhibitors to NIH3T3 cells that had been exposed to hypertonicity. The induction of HSP70 was suppressed specifically by treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (Gö6976 and GF109203X). As hypertonicity dramatically increased the phosphorylation of PKCmu, we then evaluated the role of PKCmu in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression and cell viability. The depletion of PKCmu with siRNA or the inhibition of PKCmu activity with inhibitors resulted in a reduction in HSP70 induction and cell viability. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), a transcription factor for hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression, was translocated rapidly into the nucleus and was modified gradually in the nucleus under hypertonic conditions. When we administered treatment with PKC inhibitors, the mobility shift of TonEBP was affected in the nucleus. However, PKCmu evidenced no subcellular co-localization with TonEBP during hypertonic exposure. From our results, we have concluded that PKCmu performs a critical function in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 induction, and finally cellular protection, via the indirect regulation of TonEBP modification.

  2. Microfluidic chips for protein differential expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Dawoud, Abdulilah A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-04-01

    Biomarker discovery and screening using novel proteomic technologies is an area that is attracting increased attention in the biomedical community. Early detection of abnormal physiological conditions will be highly beneficial for diagnosing various diseases and increasing survivability rates. Clearly, progress in this area will depend on the development of fast, reliable, and highly sensitive and specific sample bioanalysis methods. Microfluidics has emerged as a technology that could become essential in proteomics research as it enables the integration of all sample preparation, separation, and detection steps, with the added benefit of enhanced sample throughput. The combination of these advantages with the sensitivity and capability of MS detection to deliver precise structural information makes microfluidics-MS a very competitive technology for biomarker discovery. The integration of LC microchip devices with MS detection, and specifically their applicability to biomarker screening applications in MCF-7 breast cancer cellular extracts is reported in this manuscript. Loading approximately 0.1-1 microg of crude protein extract tryptic digest on the chip has typically resulted in the reliable identification of approximately 40-100 proteins. The potential of an LC-ESI-MS chip for comparative proteomic analysis of isotopically labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cell extracts is explored for the first time.

  3. Differential protein expression in Phalaenopsis under low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu-Yun; Liang, Fang; Jiang, Su-Hua; Wan, Mo-Fei; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Xian-Yun; Cui, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A comparative proteomic analysis was carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of responses to cold stress in Phalaenopsis after treated by low temperature (13/8 °C day/night) for 15 days. Differentially expressed proteins were examined using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Among 85 differentially expressed proteins, 73 distinct proteins were identified. Comparative analysis revealed that the identified proteins mainly participate in photosynthesis, protein synthesis, folding and degradation, respiration, defense response, amino acid metabolism, energy pathway, cytoskeleton, transcription regulation, signal transduction, and seed storage protein, while the functional classification of the remaining four proteins was not determined. These data suggested that the proteins might work cooperatively to establish a new homeostasis under cold stress; 37 % of the identified cold-responsive proteins were associated with various aspects of chloroplast physiology, and 56 % of them were predicted to be located in the chloroplasts, implying that the cold stress tolerance of Phalaenopsis was achieved, at least partly, by regulation of chloroplast function. Moreover, the protein destination control, which was mediated by chaperones and proteases, plays an important role in tolerance to cold stress.

  4. Global Analysis of Protein Expression of Inner Ear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Hickox, Ann E; Wong, Ann C Y; Pak, Kwang; Strojny, Chelsee; Ramirez, Miguel; Yates, John R; Ryan, Allen F; Savas, Jeffrey N

    2017-02-01

    The mammalian inner ear (IE) subserves auditory and vestibular sensations via highly specialized cells and proteins. Sensory receptor hair cells (HCs) are necessary for transducing mechanical inputs and stimulating sensory neurons by using a host of known and as yet unknown protein machinery. To understand the protein composition of these unique postmitotic cells, in which irreversible protein degradation or damage can lead to impaired hearing and balance, we analyzed IE samples by tandem mass spectrometry to generate an unbiased, shotgun-proteomics view of protein identities and abundances. By using Pou4f3/eGFP-transgenic mice in which HCs express GFP driven by Pou4f3, we FACS purified a population of HCs to analyze and compare the HC proteome with other IE subproteomes from sensory epithelia and whole IE. We show that the mammalian HC proteome comprises hundreds of uniquely or highly expressed proteins. Our global proteomic analysis of purified HCs extends the existing HC transcriptome, revealing previously undetected gene products and isoform-specific protein expression. Comparison of our proteomic data with mouse and human databases of genetic auditory/vestibular impairments confirms the critical role of the HC proteome for normal IE function, providing a cell-specific pool of candidates for novel, important HC genes. Several proteins identified exclusively in HCs by proteomics and verified by immunohistochemistry map to human genetic deafness loci, potentially representing new deafness genes.

  5. Prolonged morphine administration alters protein expression in the rat myocardium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Morphine is used in clinical practice as a highly effective painkiller as well as the drug of choice for treatment of certain heart diseases. However, there is lack of information about its effect on protein expression in the heart. Therefore, here we aimed to identify the presumed alterations in rat myocardial protein levels after prolonged morphine treatment. Methods Morphine was administered to adult male Wistar rats in high doses (10 mg/kg per day) for 10 days. Proteins from the plasma membrane- and mitochondria-enriched fractions or cytosolic proteins isolated from left ventricles were run on 2D gel electrophoresis, scanned and quantified with specific software to reveal differentially expressed proteins. Results Nine proteins were found to show markedly altered expression levels in samples from morphine-treaded rats and these proteins were identified by mass spectrometric analysis. They belong to different cell pathways including signaling, cytoprotective, and structural elements. Conclusions The present identification of several important myocardial proteins altered by prolonged morphine treatment points to global effects of this drug on heart tissue. These findings represent an initial step toward a more complex view on the action of morphine on the heart. PMID:22129148

  6. Myotonic dystrophy CTG expansion affects synaptic vesicle proteins, neurotransmission and mouse behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Sicot, Géraldine; Huguet, Aline; Luilier, Sabrina; Steidl, Esther; Saenger, Stefanie; Marciniak, Elodie; Obriot, Hélène; Chevarin, Caroline; Nicole, Annie; Revillod, Lucile; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takashi; Matsuura, Tohru; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Swanson, Maurice S.; Trovero, Fabrice; Buisson, Bruno; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hamon, Michel; Humez, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume; Metzger, Friedrich; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is a complex multisystemic inherited disorder, which displays multiple debilitating neurological manifestations. Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in skeletal muscle and heart, the pathways affected in the central nervous system are largely unknown. To address this question, we studied the only transgenic mouse line expressing CTG trinucleotide repeats in the central nervous system. These mice recreate molecular features of RNA toxicity, such as RNA foci accumulation and missplicing. They exhibit relevant behavioural and cognitive phenotypes, deficits in short-term synaptic plasticity, as well as changes in neurochemical levels. In the search for disease intermediates affected by disease mutation, a global proteomics approach revealed RAB3A upregulation and synapsin I hyperphosphorylation in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, transfected cells and post-mortem brains of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. These protein defects were associated with electrophysiological and behavioural deficits in mice and altered spontaneous neurosecretion in cell culture. Taking advantage of a relevant transgenic mouse of a complex human disease, we found a novel connection between physiological phenotypes and synaptic protein dysregulation, indicative of synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain pathology. PMID:23404338

  7. Myotonic dystrophy CTG expansion affects synaptic vesicle proteins, neurotransmission and mouse behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Sicot, Géraldine; Huguet, Aline; Luilier, Sabrina; Steidl, Esther; Saenger, Stefanie; Marciniak, Elodie; Obriot, Hélène; Chevarin, Caroline; Nicole, Annie; Revillod, Lucile; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takashi; Matsuura, Tohru; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Swanson, Maurice S; Trovero, Fabrice; Buisson, Bruno; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hamon, Michel; Humez, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume; Metzger, Friedrich; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève; Gomes-Pereira, Mário

    2013-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is a complex multisystemic inherited disorder, which displays multiple debilitating neurological manifestations. Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in skeletal muscle and heart, the pathways affected in the central nervous system are largely unknown. To address this question, we studied the only transgenic mouse line expressing CTG trinucleotide repeats in the central nervous system. These mice recreate molecular features of RNA toxicity, such as RNA foci accumulation and missplicing. They exhibit relevant behavioural and cognitive phenotypes, deficits in short-term synaptic plasticity, as well as changes in neurochemical levels. In the search for disease intermediates affected by disease mutation, a global proteomics approach revealed RAB3A upregulation and synapsin I hyperphosphorylation in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, transfected cells and post-mortem brains of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. These protein defects were associated with electrophysiological and behavioural deficits in mice and altered spontaneous neurosecretion in cell culture. Taking advantage of a relevant transgenic mouse of a complex human disease, we found a novel connection between physiological phenotypes and synaptic protein dysregulation, indicative of synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain pathology.

  8. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells.

  9. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  10. Induction of protein expression within Escherichia coli vector for entry into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Lee, Choon-Weng; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2014-02-01

    Direct protein delivery into the cytosol of mammalian cells by invasive Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial vector will bypass the need to achieve nuclear entry and transcription of DNA, a major hurdle that is known to seriously limit gene transfer. The bacterial vector is induced to express the protein during its growth phase, before presentation for entry into mammalian cells and release of its content into the cellular environment. For this class of vector, crossing the plasma membrane becomes the primary step that determines the success of protein delivery. Yet, how the mechanics of protein expression within the vector affect its entry into the host is poorly understood. We found the vector's effectiveness to enter HeLa cells diminished together with its viability when phage N15 protelomerase (TelN) expression was induced continuously in the invasive E. coli despite producing an abundant amount of functional protein. By comparison, shorter induction, even as little as 3 hr, produced sufficient amounts of functional TelN and showed more effective invasion of HeLa cells, comparable to that of uninduced invasive E. coli. These results demonstrate that brief induction of protein expression during vector growth is essential for optimal entry into mammalian cells, an important step for achieving bacteria-mediated protein delivery.

  11. Modulation of GLO1 Expression Affects Malignant Properties of Cells.

    PubMed

    Hutschenreuther, Antje; Bigl, Marina; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Debebe, Tewodros; Gaunitz, Frank; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-12-18

    The energy metabolism of most tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) characterized by an increased glycolytic flux that is accompanied by the increased formation of the cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Consequently, the rate of detoxification of this reactive glycolytic byproduct needs to be increased in order to prevent deleterious effects to the cells. This is brought about by an increased expression of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) that is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MGO-detoxifying glyoxalase system. Here, we overexpressed GLO1 in HEK 293 cells and silenced it in MCF-7 cells using shRNA. Tumor-related properties of wild type and transformed cells were compared and key glycolytic enzyme activities assessed. Furthermore, the cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions to analyze the impact on cell proliferation and enzyme activities. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of GLO1 in the cancer cells significantly reduced tumor-associated properties such as migration and proliferation, whereas no functional alterations where found by overexpression of GLO1 in HEK 293 cells. In contrast, hypoxia caused inhibition of cell growth of all cells except of those overexpressing GLO1. Altogether, we conclude that GLO1 on one hand is crucial to maintaining tumor characteristics of malignant cells, and, on the other hand, supports malignant transformation of cells in a hypoxic environment when overexpressed.

  12. Modulation of GLO1 Expression Affects Malignant Properties of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutschenreuther, Antje; Bigl, Marina; Hemdan, Nasr Y. A.; Debebe, Tewodros; Gaunitz, Frank; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of most tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) characterized by an increased glycolytic flux that is accompanied by the increased formation of the cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Consequently, the rate of detoxification of this reactive glycolytic byproduct needs to be increased in order to prevent deleterious effects to the cells. This is brought about by an increased expression of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) that is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MGO-detoxifying glyoxalase system. Here, we overexpressed GLO1 in HEK 293 cells and silenced it in MCF-7 cells using shRNA. Tumor-related properties of wild type and transformed cells were compared and key glycolytic enzyme activities assessed. Furthermore, the cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions to analyze the impact on cell proliferation and enzyme activities. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of GLO1 in the cancer cells significantly reduced tumor-associated properties such as migration and proliferation, whereas no functional alterations where found by overexpression of GLO1 in HEK 293 cells. In contrast, hypoxia caused inhibition of cell growth of all cells except of those overexpressing GLO1. Altogether, we conclude that GLO1 on one hand is crucial to maintaining tumor characteristics of malignant cells, and, on the other hand, supports malignant transformation of cells in a hypoxic environment when overexpressed. PMID:27999356

  13. Hypoxia Affects Neprilysin Expression Through Caspase Activation and an APP Intracellular Domain-dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kerridge, Caroline; Kozlova, Daria I.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    While gene mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the presenilins lead to an accumulation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain causing neurodegeneration and familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), over 95% of all AD cases are sporadic. Despite the pathologies being indistinguishable, relatively little is known about the mechanisms affecting generation of Aβ in the sporadic cases. Vascular disorders such as ischaemia and stroke are well established risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases and systemic hypoxic episodes have been shown to increase Aβ production and accumulation. We have previously shown that hypoxia causes a significant decrease in the expression of the major Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) which might deregulate Aβ clearance. Aβ itself is derived from the transmembrane APP along with several other biologically active metabolites including the C-terminal fragment (CTF) termed the APP intracellular domain (AICD), which regulates the expression of NEP and some other genes in neuronal cells. Here we show that in hypoxia there is a significantly increased expression of caspase-3, 8, and 9 in human neuroblastoma NB7 cells, which can degrade AICD. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we have revealed that there was also a reduction of AICD bound to the NEP promoter region which underlies the decreased expression and activity of the enzyme under hypoxic conditions. Incubation of the cells with a caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK could rescue the effect of hypoxia on NEP activity protecting the levels of AICD capable of binding the NEP promoter. These data suggest that activation of caspases might play an important role in regulation of NEP levels in the brain under pathological conditions such as hypoxia and ischaemia leading to a deficit of Aβ clearance and increasing the risk of development of AD. PMID:26617481

  14. Serum heat inactivation affects protein corona composition and nanoparticle uptake.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Anna; Campbell, Abigail; Monopoli, Marco P; Lynch, Iseult; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticles are of an appropriate size to interact with cells, and are likely to use a range of cellular machinery for internalisation and trafficking to various sub-cellular compartments. It is now understood that once in contact with biological fluids, the nanoparticle surface gets covered by a highly specific layer of proteins, forming the nanoparticle protein corona. This protein layer is stable for times longer than the typical time scale of nanoparticle import, and thus can impact on particle uptake and trafficking inside the cells. In this work, the effect of the corona composition on nanoparticle uptake has been investigated, by studying the impact of serum heat inactivation and complement depletion on the load of nanoparticles accumulated inside the cell. For the same material and nanoparticle size, cellular uptake was found to be significantly different when the nanoparticles were dispersed in medium where the serum was heat inactivated or not heat inactivated, even for non-specialized cells, suggesting that different sera can lead to different nanoparticle doses. The fact that uptake was correlated with the amount of protein bound into the nanoparticle corona suggests the need for commonly agreed dispersion protocols for in vitro nanoparticle-cell studies.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Molaei, Mahsa; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of DNA (MMR) proteins, including hMLH1 and hMSH2, in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-infected gastritis. METHODS: Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study. During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain) and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2. RESULTS: The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14 ± 7.32% in H pylori-negative patients, while it was 73.34 ± 10.10% in H pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16 ± 8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24 ± 8.71% in H pylori-positive patients; P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system. PMID:19034977

  16. Recent patents on alphavirus protein expression and vector production.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Alejandro; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Quetglas, Jose I; Bezunartea, Jaione; Casales, Erkuden; Smerdou, Cristian

    2011-12-01

    Alphaviruses contain a single-strand RNA genome that can be modified to express heterologous genes at high levels. Alphavirus vectors can be packaged within viral particles (VPs) or used as DNA/RNA layered systems. The broad tropism and high expression levels of alphavirus vectors have made them very attractive for applications like recombinant protein expression, vaccination or gene therapy. Expression mediated by alphavirus vectors is generally transient due to induction of apoptosis. However, during the last years several non-cytopathic mutations have been identified within the replicase sequence of different alphaviruses, allowing prolonged protein expression in culture cells. Some of these mutants, which have been patented, have allowed the generation of stable cell lines able to express recombinant proteins for extended periods of time in a constitutive or inducible manner. Production of alphavirus VPs usually requires cotransfection of cells with vector and helper RNAs providing viral structural proteins in trans. During this process full-length wild type (wt) genomes can be generated through recombination between different RNAs. Several new strategies to reduce wt virus generation during packaging, optimize VP production, increase packaging capacity, and provide VPs with specific targeting have been recently patented. Finally, hybrid vectors between alphavirus and other types of viruses have led to a number of patents with applications in vaccination, cancer therapy or retrovirus production.

  17. Sucrose Sensitivity of Honey Bees Is Differently Affected by Dietary Protein and a Neonicotinoid Pesticide

    PubMed Central

    Démares, Fabien J.; Crous, Kendall L.; Pirk, Christian W. W.; Nicolson, Susan W.; Human, Hannelie

    2016-01-01

    Over a decade, declines in honey bee colonies have raised worldwide concerns. Several potentially contributing factors have been investigated, e.g. parasites, diseases, and pesticides. Neonicotinoid pesticides have received much attention due to their intensive use in crop protection, and their adverse effects on many levels of honey bee physiology led the European Union to ban these compounds. Due to their neuronal target, a receptor expressed throughout the insect nervous system, studies have focused mainly on neuroscience and behaviour. Through the Geometric Framework of nutrition, we investigated effects of the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on survival, food consumption and sucrose sensitivity of honey bees (Apis mellifera). Thiamethoxam did not affect protein and carbohydrate intake, but decreased responses to high concentrations of sucrose. Interestingly, when bees ate fixed unbalanced diets, dietary protein facilitated better sucrose detection. Both thiamethoxam and dietary protein influenced survival. These findings suggest that, in the presence of a pesticide and unbalanced food, honey bee health may be severely challenged. Consequences for foraging efficiency and colony activity, cornerstones of honey bee health, are also discussed. PMID:27272274

  18. Sucrose Sensitivity of Honey Bees Is Differently Affected by Dietary Protein and a Neonicotinoid Pesticide.

    PubMed

    Démares, Fabien J; Crous, Kendall L; Pirk, Christian W W; Nicolson, Susan W; Human, Hannelie

    2016-01-01

    Over a decade, declines in honey bee colonies have raised worldwide concerns. Several potentially contributing factors have been investigated, e.g. parasites, diseases, and pesticides. Neonicotinoid pesticides have received much attention due to their intensive use in crop protection, and their adverse effects on many levels of honey bee physiology led the European Union to ban these compounds. Due to their neuronal target, a receptor expressed throughout the insect nervous system, studies have focused mainly on neuroscience and behaviour. Through the Geometric Framework of nutrition, we investigated effects of the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam on survival, food consumption and sucrose sensitivity of honey bees (Apis mellifera). Thiamethoxam did not affect protein and carbohydrate intake, but decreased responses to high concentrations of sucrose. Interestingly, when bees ate fixed unbalanced diets, dietary protein facilitated better sucrose detection. Both thiamethoxam and dietary protein influenced survival. These findings suggest that, in the presence of a pesticide and unbalanced food, honey bee health may be severely challenged. Consequences for foraging efficiency and colony activity, cornerstones of honey bee health, are also discussed.

  19. Cell Cycle Programs of Gene Expression Control Morphogenetic Protein Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Matthew; Yang, Melody C.; Mischke, Michelle; Chant, John

    2000-01-01

    Genomic studies in yeast have revealed that one eighth of genes are cell cycle regulated in their expression. Almost without exception, the significance of cell cycle periodic gene expression has not been tested. Given that many such genes are critical to cellular morphogenesis, we wanted to examine the importance of periodic gene expression to this process. The expression profiles of two genes required for the axial pattern of cell division, BUD3 and BUD10/AXL2/SRO4, are strongly cell cycle regulated. BUD3 is expressed close to the onset of mitosis. BUD10 is expressed in late G1. Through promotor-swap experiments, the expression profile of each gene was altered and the consequences examined. We found that an S/G2 pulse of BUD3 expression controls the timing of Bud3p localization, but that this timing is not critical to Bud3p function. In contrast, a G1 pulse of BUD10 expression plays a direct role in Bud10p localization and function. Bud10p, a membrane protein, relies on the polarized secretory machinery specific to G1 to be delivered to its proper location. Such a secretion-based targeting mechanism for membrane proteins provides cells with flexibility in remodeling their architecture or evolving new forms. PMID:11134078

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway.

  1. Expression and biochemical characterization of recombinant human epididymis protein 4.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ling; Liu, Yunhui; Zhen, Shuai; Wan, Deyou; Cao, Jiyue; Gao, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Whey acidic proteins (WAP) belong to a large gene family of antibacterial peptides that perform critical immune system functions. The function of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), a 124-amino acid long polypeptide that has two whey acidic protein four-disulfide core (WFDC) domains, is not well studied. Here, a fusion gene encoding the HE4 protein fused to an IgG1 Fc domain was constructed. The recombinant HE4 protein was expressed as a secretory protein in Pichia pastoris and mammalian HEK293-F cells and was subsequently purified. Our data suggested that the HE4 protein produced by these two expression systems bound to both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, but demonstrated slightly inhibitory activity towards the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, HE4 exhibited proteinase inhibitory activity towards trypsin, elastase, matrix metallopeptidase 9, and the secretory proteinases from Bacillus subtilis. The effects of glycosylation on the biochemical characterization of HE4 were also investigated. LC-ESI-MS glycosylation analysis showed that the high-mannose glycosylated form of HE4 expressed by P. pastoris has lower biological activity when compared to its complex-glycosylated form produced from HEK293-F cells. The implications of this are discussed, which may be provide theoretical basis for its important role in the development of cancer and innate immune system.

  2. Protein Co-Expression Network Analysis (ProCoNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, David L.; Baratt, Arie; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Smith, Richard D.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Katze, Michael G.; Mcweeney, Shannon K.

    2013-06-01

    Biological networks are important for elucidating disease etiology due to their ability to model complex high dimensional data and biological systems. Proteomics provides a critical data source for such models, but currently lacks robust de novo methods for network construction, which could bring important insights in systems biology. We have evaluated the construction of network models using methods derived from weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). We show that approximately scale-free peptide networks, composed of statistically significant modules, are feasible and biologically meaningful using two mouse lung experiments and one human plasma experiment. Within each network, peptides derived from the same protein are shown to have a statistically higher topological overlap and concordance in abundance, which is potentially important for inferring protein abundance. The module representatives, called eigenpeptides, correlate significantly with biological phenotypes. Furthermore, within modules, we find significant enrichment for biological function and known interactions (gene ontology and protein-protein interactions). Biological networks are important tools in the analysis of complex systems. In this paper we evaluate the application of weighted co-expression network analysis to quantitative proteomics data. Protein co-expression networks allow novel approaches for biological interpretation, quality control, inference of protein abundance, a framework for potentially resolving degenerate peptide-protein mappings, and a biomarker signature discovery.

  3. Thyroid-Related Protein Expression in the Human Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Do Joon; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Radioiodine whole body scan (WBS), related to sodium iodide symporter (NIS) function, is widely used to detect recurrence/metastasis in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer. However, the normal thymic uptake of radioiodine has occasionally been observed in young patients. We evaluated the expression of thyroid-related genes and proteins in the human thymus. Thymic tissues were obtained from 22 patients with thyroid cancer patients of all ages. The expression of NIS, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), thyroperoxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) was investigated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. NIS and TSHR were expressed in 18 (81.8%) and 19 samples (86.4%), respectively, whereas TPO was expressed in five samples (22.7%). Three thyroid-related proteins were localized to Hassall's corpuscles and thymocytes. In contrast, Tg was detected in a single patient (4.5%) localized to vascular endothelial cells. The expression of thyroid-related proteins was not increased in young thymic tissues compared to that in old thymic tissues. In conclusion, the expression of NIS and TSHR was detected in the majority of normal thymus samples, whereas that of TPO was detected less frequently, and that of Tg was detected rarely. The increased thymic uptake of radioiodine in young patients is not due to the increased expression of NIS. PMID:28386277

  4. Microparticulation of whey protein: related factors affecting the solubility.

    PubMed

    Lieske, B; Konrad, G

    1994-10-01

    Solubility of Simplesse 100, the only whey-based fat substitute, was found to be good, considering the fact that technology for preparation of Simplesse 100 is a sequence of thermal steps. To characterize this phenomen, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-100, Sephacryl S-1000 and SDS-PAGE were used, supported by high-speed separation, UV studies and analytical procedures. Results show that the unusual solubility characteristic of microparticulated whey protein is related to two molecular effects: (1) optimal defolding of protein molecules and (2) stabilization of the defolded status by carbohydrate. Both effects were considered to favour non-covalent bonds, which contribute to the outstanding physico-functional and nutritive properties of microparticles.

  5. Reduction in energy efficiency induced by expression of the uncoupling protein, UCP1, in mouse liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, Pedro; Milagro, Fermín I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2006-04-01

    Uncoupling Protein 1 (UCP1) is an inner mitochondrial membrane protein, uniquely expressed in brown adipocytes, which uncouples the mitochondrial respiration impairing ATP production and energy efficiency. The aim of the present study was to express UCP1 in liver mitochondria using a non-viral system in order to affect energy utilization. The effect of ectopic protein expression on liver energy metabolism, which was evaluated 42 h after DNA transfer, showed that mitochondria expressing UCP1 presented decreased ATP production, lasted more time in membrane potential state 3, and consumed more molecular oxygen to produce the same amount of ATP than the control group. In summary, the successful functionality of the mitochondrial protein, UCP1, after hydrodynamic delivery is a novel and significant finding. This approach could be useful to ectopically express mitochondrial proteins and, in this particular case, to manage metabolic disorders related to energy efficiency and expenditure, such as obesity.

  6. Yeast mutants affecting possible quality control of plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Kane, T; Tipper, C; Spatrick, P; Jenness, D D

    1999-05-01

    Mutations gef1, stp22, STP26, and STP27 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified as suppressors of the temperature-sensitive alpha-factor receptor (mutation ste2-3) and arginine permease (mutation can1(ts)). These suppressors inhibited the elimination of misfolded receptors (synthesized at 34 degrees C) as well as damaged surface receptors (shifted from 22 to 34 degrees C). The stp22 mutation (allelic to vps23 [M. Babst and S. Emr, personal communication] and the STP26 mutation also caused missorting of carboxypeptidase Y, and ste2-3 was suppressed by mutations vps1, vps8, vps10, and vps28 but not by mutation vps3. In the stp22 mutant, both the mutant and the wild-type receptors (tagged with green fluorescent protein [GFP]) accumulated within an endosome-like compartment and were excluded from the vacuole. GFP-tagged Stp22p also accumulated in this compartment. Upon reaching the vacuole, cytoplasmic domains of both mutant and wild-type receptors appeared within the vacuolar lumen. Stp22p and Gef1p are similar to tumor susceptibility protein TSG101 and voltage-gated chloride channel, respectively. These results identify potential elements of plasma membrane quality control and indicate that cytoplasmic domains of membrane proteins are translocated into the vacuolar lumen.

  7. GILT expression in B cells diminishes cathepsin S steady-state protein expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    Phipps-Yonas, Hannah; Semik, Vikki; Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2013-01-01

    MHC class II-restricted Ag processing requires protein degradation in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) facilitates Ag processing by reducing protein disulfide bonds in this compartment. Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin S (CatS) contains disulfide bonds and mediates essential steps in MHC class II-restricted processing, including proteolysis of large polypeptides and cleavage of the invariant chain. We sought to determine whether GILT’s reductase activity regulates CatS expression and function. Confocal microscopy confirmed that GILT and CatS colocalized within lysosomes of B cells. GILT expression posttranscriptionally decreased the steady-state protein expression of CatS in primary B cells and B-cell lines. GILT did not substantially alter the expression of other lysosomal proteins, including H2-M, H2-O, or CatL. GILT’s reductase active site was necessary for diminished CatS protein levels, and GILT expression decreased the half-life of CatS, suggesting that GILT-mediated reduction of protein disulfide bonds enhances CatS degradation. GILT expression decreased the proteolysis of a CatS selective substrate. This study illustrates a physiologic mechanism that regulates CatS and has implications for fine tuning MHC class II-restricted Ag processing and for the development of CatS inhibitors, which are under investigation for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23012103

  8. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  9. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment.

  10. Increased functional protein expression using nucleotide sequence features enriched in highly expressed genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Horstick, Eric J; Jordan, Diana C; Bergeron, Sadie A; Tabor, Kathryn M; Serpe, Mihaela; Feldman, Benjamin; Burgess, Harold A

    2015-04-20

    Many genetic manipulations are limited by difficulty in obtaining adequate levels of protein expression. Bioinformatic and experimental studies have identified nucleotide sequence features that may increase expression, however it is difficult to assess the relative influence of these features. Zebrafish embryos are rapidly injected with calibrated doses of mRNA, enabling the effects of multiple sequence changes to be compared in vivo. Using RNAseq and microarray data, we identified a set of genes that are highly expressed in zebrafish embryos and systematically analyzed for enrichment of sequence features correlated with levels of protein expression. We then tested enriched features by embryo microinjection and functional tests of multiple protein reporters. Codon selection, releasing factor recognition sequence and specific introns and 3' untranslated regions each increased protein expression between 1.5- and 3-fold. These results suggested principles for increasing protein yield in zebrafish through biomolecular engineering. We implemented these principles for rational gene design in software for codon selection (CodonZ) and plasmid vectors incorporating the most active non-coding elements. Rational gene design thus significantly boosts expression in zebrafish, and a similar approach will likely elevate expression in other animal models.

  11. GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored protein expression in PMM2-CDG patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in PMM2 impair phosphomannomutase-2 activity and cause the most frequent congenital disorder of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG. Mannose-1-phosphate, that is deficient in this disorder, is also implicated in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors. Objective To evaluate whether GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored proteins are defective in PMM2-CDG patients. Methods The expression of GPI-anchor and seven GPI-anchored proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry in different cell types from twelve PMM2-CDG patients. Additionally, neutrophil CD16 and plasma hepatic proteins were studied by Western blot. Transferrin glycoforms were evaluated by HPLC. Results Patients and controls had similar surface expression of GPI-anchor and most GPI-anchored proteins. Nevertheless, patients displayed a significantly diminished binding of two anti-CD16 antibodies (3G8 and KD1) to neutrophils and also of anti-CD14 (61D3) to monocytes. Interestingly, CD16 immunostaining and asialotransferrin levels significantly correlated with patients’ age. Analysis by flow cytometry of CD14 with MΦP9, and CD16 expression in neutrophils by Western blot using H-80 ruled out deficiencies of these antigens. Conclusions PMM2 mutations do not impair GPI-anchor or GPI-anchored protein expression. However, the glycosylation anomalies caused by PMM2 mutations might affect the immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies and lead to incorrect conclusions about the expression of different proteins, including GPI-anchored proteins. Neutrophils and monocytes are sensitive to PMM2 mutations, leading to abnormal glycosylation in immune receptors, which might potentially affect their affinity to their ligands, and contribute to infection. This study also confirms less severe hypoglycosylation defects in older PMM2-CDG patients. PMID:24139637

  12. SPINK 1 Protein Expression and Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Richard; Pettersson, Andreas; Hendrickson, Whitney K.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Finn, Stephen; Kunz, Lauren; Judson, Gregory L.; Lis, Rosina; Bailey, Dyane; Fiore, Christopher; Nuttall, Elizabeth; Martin, Neil E.; Stack, Edward; Penney, Kathryn L.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Sinnott, Jennifer; Sweeney, Christopher; Sesso, Howard D.; Fall, Katja; Giovannucci, Edward; Kantoff, Philip; Stampfer, Meir; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose SPINK1 over-expression has been described in prostate cancer and is linked with poor prognosis in many cancers. The objective of this study was to characterize the association between SPINK1 over-expression and prostate cancer specific survival. Experimental Design The study included 879 participants in the US Physicians’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow–Up Study, diagnosed with prostate cancer (1983 – 2004) and treated by radical prostatectomy. Protein tumor expression of SPINK1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on tumor tissue microarrays. Results 74/879 (8%) prostate cancer tumors were SPINK1 positive. Immunohistochemical data was available for PTEN, p-Akt, pS6, stathmin, androgen receptor (AR) and ERG (as a measure of the TMPRSS2:ERG translocation). Compared to SPINK1 negative tumors, SPINK1 positive tumors showed higher PTEN and stathmin expression, and lower expression of AR (p<0.01). SPINK1 over-expression was seen in 47 of 427 (11%) ERG negative samples and in 19 of 427 (4%) ERG positive cases (p=0.0003). We found no significant associations between SPINK1 status and Gleason grade or tumor stage. There was no association between SPINK1 expression and biochemical recurrence (p=0.56). Moreover, there was no association between SPINK1 expression and prostate cancer mortality (there were 75 lethal cases of prostate cancer during a mean of 13.5 years follow-up [HR 0.71 (95% confidence interval 0.29–1.76)]). Conclusions Our results suggest that SPINK1 protein expression may not be a predictor of recurrence or lethal prostate cancer amongst men treated by radical prostatectomy. SPINK1 and ERG protein expression do not appear to be entirely mutually exclusive, as some previous studies have suggested. PMID:24687926

  13. Protein Expression of Proteasome Subunits in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Madeline R; Rubio, Maria D; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is a major regulator of protein processing, trafficking, and degradation. While protein ubiquitination is utilized for many cellular processes, one major function of this system is to target proteins to the proteasome for degradation. In schizophrenia, studies have found UPS transcript abnormalities in both blood and brain, and we have previously reported decreased protein expression of ubiquitin-associated proteins in brain. To test whether the proteasome is similarly dysregulated, we measured the protein expression of proteasome catalytic subunits as well as essential subunits from proteasome regulatory complexes in 14 pair-matched schizophrenia and comparison subjects in superior temporal cortex. We found decreased expression of Rpt1, Rpt3, and Rpt6, subunits of the 19S regulatory particle essential for ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the proteasome. Additionally, the α subunit of the 11S αβ regulatory particle, which enhances proteasomal degradation of small peptides and unfolded proteins, was also decreased. Haloperidol-treated rats did not have altered expression of these subunits, suggesting the changes we observed in schizophrenia are likely not due to chronic antipsychotic treatment. Interestingly, expression of the catalytic subunits of both the standard and immunoproteasome were unchanged, suggesting the abnormalities we observed may be specific to the complexed state of the proteasome. Aging has significant effects on the proteasome, and several subunits (20S β2, Rpn10, Rpn13, 11Sβ, and 11Sγ) were significantly correlated with subject age. These data provide further evidence of dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in schizophrenia, and suggest that altered proteasome activity may be associated with the pathophysiology of this illness. PMID:26202105

  14. Enhancement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate physiological responses to a diverse array of stimuli and are the molecular targets for numerous therapeutic drugs. GPCRs primarily signal from the plasma membrane, but when expressed in heterologous cells many GPCRs exhibit poor trafficking to the cell surface. Multiple approaches have been taken to enhance GPCR surface expression in heterologous cells, including addition/deletion of receptor sequences, co-expression with interacting proteins, and treatment with pharmacological chaperones. In addition to allowing for enhanced surface expression of certain GPCRs in heterologous cells, these approaches have also shed light on the control of GPCR trafficking in vivo and in some cases have led to new therapeutic approaches for treating human diseases that result from defects in GPCR trafficking. PMID:19679364

  15. Expression, delivery and function of insecticidal proteins expressed by recombinant baculoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal po...

  16. p53 and MDM2 protein expression in actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia.

  17. Patterns of soybean proline-rich protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R E; Nagao, R T; Key, J L

    1992-01-01

    The expression patterns of three members of a gene family that encodes proline-rich proteins in soybean (SbPRPs) were examined using in situ hybridization experiments. In most instances, the expression of SbPRP genes was intense in a limited number of cell types of a particular organ. SbPRP1 RNA was localized in several cell types of soybean hypocotyls, including cells within the phloem and xylem. SbPRP1 expression increased within epidermal cells in the elongating and mature regions of the hypocotyl; expression was detected also in lignified cells surrounding the hilum of mature seeds. SbPRP2 RNA was present in cortical cells and in the vascular tissue of the hypocotyl, especially cells of the phloem. This gene was expressed also in the inner integuments of the mature seed coat. SbPRP3 RNA was localized specifically to the endodermoid layer of cells surrounding the stele in the elongating region of the hypocotyl, as well as in the epidermal cells of leaves and cotyledons. These data show that members of this gene family exhibit cell-specific expression. The members of the SbPRP gene family are expressed in different types of cells and in some cell types that also express the glycine-rich protein or hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein classes of genes. PMID:1525563

  18. Fluoride at non-toxic dose affects odontoblast gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wurtz, Tilmann; Houari, Sophia; Mauro, Nicole; MacDougall, Mary; Peters, Heiko; Berdal, Ariane

    2008-07-10

    Elevated fluoride intake may lead to local tissue disturbances, known as fluorosis. Towards an understanding of this effect, fluoride-induced molecular responses were analyzed in MO6-G3 cultured odontoblasts cells. NaF at 1mM changed expression of genes implicated in tissue formation and growth, without affecting cell proliferation or inducing stress factor RNAs. Up to 1mM NaF, DNA accumulation was not inhibited, whereas at 3mM, cells detached from their support and did not proliferate. Intracellular structures, characterized by EM, were normal up to 1mM, but at 3mM, necrotic features were evident. No sign of apoptotic transformation appeared at any NaF concentration. Fluoride-sensitive genes were identified by microarray analysis; expression levels of selected RNAs were determined by conventional and real-time RT-PCR. At 1mM fluoride, RNAs encoding the extracellular matrix proteins asporin and fibromodulin, and the cell membrane associated proteins periostin and IMT2A were 10-fold reduced. RNA coding for signaling factor TNF-receptor 9 was diminished to one-third, whereas that for the chemokine Scya-5 was enhanced 2.5-fold. These RNAs are present in vivo in tooth forming cells. This was demonstrated by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR on RNA from dissected tissue samples; for the presence and functioning of fibromodulin in dentin matrix, a more comprehensive study has earlier been performed by others [Goldberg, M., Septier, D., Oldberg, A., Young, M.F., Ameye, L.G., 2006. Fibromodulin deficient mice display impaired collagen fibrillogenesis in predentin as well as altered dentin mineralization and enamel formation. J. Histochem. Cytochem. 54, 525-537]. Expression of most other RNA species, in particular of stress factor coding RNAs, was not altered. It was concluded that fluoride could influence the transcription pattern without inducing cell stress or apoptosis. In odontoblasts in vivo, aberrant expression of these fluoride-sensitive genes may impair the

  19. AB223. Expression of tight junction proteins in rat vagina

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Chung, Ho Suck; Ahn, Kyu Youn; Park, Kwangsung

    2014-01-01

    Aim Tight junction plays a role in apical cell-to-cell adhesion and epithelial polarity. In this study, we investigated the expression of tight junction proteins, such as Claudin-1, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, junction adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, and occludin in rat vagina. Methods Female Sprague-dawley rats (230-240 g, n=20) were divided into two groups: control (n=10) and bilateral ovariectomy (n=10). The expression and cellular localization of claudin-1, ZO-1, JAM-A, and occludin were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results Immunolabeling of ZO-1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the vagina. Claudin-1, JAM-A, and occludin were expressed in the epithelium of the vagina. The immunoreactivity and protein expression of claudin-1 was significantly decreased in the ovariectomy group compared with the control group. Conclusions Our results suggest that tight junction proteins may have an important role in the vagina. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of each tight junction protein on vaginal lubrication.

  20. The relation of expression recognition and affective experience in facial expression processing: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangheng; Lu, Shenglan

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship of expression recognition and affective experience during facial expression processing by event-related potentials (ERP). Facial expressions used in the present study can be divided into three categories: positive (happy), neutral (neutral), and negative (angry). Participants were asked to finish two kinds of facial recognition tasks: one was easy, and the other was difficult. In the easy task, significant main effects were found for different valence conditions, meaning that emotions were evoked effectively when participants recognized the expressions in facial expression processing. However, no difference was found in the difficult task, meaning that even if participants had identified the expressions correctly, no relevant emotion was evoked during the process. The findings suggest that emotional experience was not simultaneous with expression identification in facial expression processing, and the affective experience process could be suppressed in challenging cognitive tasks. The results indicate that we should pay attention to the level of cognitive load when using facial expressions as emotion-eliciting materials in emotion studies; otherwise, the emotion may not be evoked effectively. PMID:22110330

  1. Diagnosis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease by analysis of SLAM-associated protein expression.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K C; Cranston, T; Jones, A; Davies, E G; Goldblatt, D; Thrasher, A; Kinnon, C; Nichols, K E; Gaspar, H B

    2000-06-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immunodeficiency in which affected boys show abnormal responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection. The gene defective in XLP has been identified and designated SH2D1A and encodes a protein termed SLAM-associated protein (SAP). Mutation analysis in individuals with typical XLP presentations and family histories has only detected abnormalities in approximately 60% of patients. Thus, genetic analysis alone cannot confirm a diagnosis of XLP We have developed a SAP expression assay that can be used as a diagnostic indicator of XLP We show that SAP is constitutively expressed in normal individuals, in patients with severe sepsis and in patients with other primary immunodeficiencies. In six XLP patients, four with classical and two with atypical presentations, SAP expression was absent. In the latter two, who were previously assigned as having common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the diagnosis of XLP was initially made using the protein expression assay. In two further patients in whom no mutation could be detected by genetic analysis, lack of SAP expression strongly suggests that these individuals have XLP. We therefore suggest that XLP should be suspected in certain boys previously diagnosed as having CVID and recommend that patients are investigated both by genetic analysis of SH2D1A and by expression of SAP protein.

  2. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Rodríguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, José; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Suárez-Franco, José Luis; Chavarría, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramírez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  3. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  4. Rapid simulated gastric fluid digestion of in-seed/grain proteins expressed in genetically engineered crops.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Barry W; Embrey, Shawna K; Herman, Rod A

    2016-11-01

    The speed of simulated gastric digestion of proteins expressed in genetically engineered (GE) crops is commonly used to inform the allergenicity risk assessment. However, persistence of purified proteins in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) is poorly correlated with the allergenic status of proteins. It has been proposed that the plant or food matrix may affect the digestion of proteins and should be considered in interpreting digestion results. Here the SGF digestion of several GE proteins both as purified preparations and in soybean, corn, and cotton seed/grain extracts (in-matrix) are compared. Cry1F, Cry1Ac, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT), aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-1 (AAD-1), aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-12 (AAD-12), and double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) were all found to rapidly digest both as purified protein preparations and in seed/grain extracts from GE crops expressing these proteins. Based on these results, purified protein from microbial sources is a suitable surrogate for proteins in-matrix when conducting SGF digestion studies.

  5. The putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 controls cellulase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Karimi, Razieh Aghcheh; Phatale, Pallavi A; Linke, Rita; Hartl, Lukas; Sauer, Dominik G; Smith, Kristina M; Baker, Scott E; Freitag, Michael; Kubicek, Christian P

    2012-06-01

    Trichoderma reesei is an industrial producer of enzymes that degrade lignocellulosic polysaccharides to soluble monomers, which can be fermented to biofuels. Here we show that the expression of genes for lignocellulose degradation are controlled by the orthologous T. reesei protein methyltransferase LAE1. In a lae1 deletion mutant we observed a complete loss of expression of all seven cellulases, auxiliary factors for cellulose degradation, β-glucosidases and xylanases were no longer expressed. Conversely, enhanced expression of lae1 resulted in significantly increased cellulase gene transcription. Lae1-modulated cellulase gene expression was dependent on the function of the general cellulase regulator XYR1, but also xyr1 expression was LAE1-dependent. LAE1 was also essential for conidiation of T. reesei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing ('ChIP-seq') showed that lae1 expression was not obviously correlated with H3K4 di- or trimethylation (indicative of active transcription) or H3K9 trimethylation (typical for heterochromatin regions) in CAZyme coding regions, suggesting that LAE1 does not affect CAZyme gene expression by directly modulating H3K4 or H3K9 methylation. Our data demonstrate that the putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 is essential for cellulase gene expression in T. reesei through mechanisms that remain to be identified.

  6. Expression of dengue virus NS3 protein in Drosophila alters its susceptibility to infection

    PubMed Central

    Querenet, Matthieu; Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Mollereau, Bertrand; Davoust, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    We developed a Drosophila model in which the dengue virus NS3 protein is expressed in a tissue specific and inducible manner. Dengue virus NS3 is a multifunctional protein playing a major role during viral replication. Both protease and helicase domains of NS3 are interacting with human and insect host proteins including innate immune components of the host machinery. We characterized the NS3 transgenic flies showing that NS3 expression did not affect fly development. To further study the links between NS3 and the innate immune response, we challenge the flies with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Interestingly, the Drosophila transgenic flies expressing NS3 were more susceptible to bacterial infections than control flies. However ubiquitous or immune-specific NS3 expression affected neither the life span nor the response to a non-infectious stress of the flies. In conclusion, we generated a new in vivo system to study the functional impact of DENV NS3 protein on the innate immune response. PMID:26267447

  7. Expression and Regulation of PIWIL-Proteins and PIWI-Interacting RNAs in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pleštilová, Lenka; Neidhart, Michel; Russo, Giancarlo; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Ospelt, Caroline; Ciurea, Adrian; Kolling, Christoph; Gay, Renate E.; Michel, Beat A.; Vencovský, Jiří; Gay, Steffen; Jüngel, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective The PIWIL (P-element induced wimpy testis like protein) subfamily of argonaute proteins is essential for Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) biogenesis and their function to silence transposons during germ-line development. Here we explored their presence and regulation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The expression of PIWIL genes in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) synovial tissues and synovial fibroblasts (SF) was analysed by Real-time PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot. The expression of piRNAs was quantified by next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS). The regulation of PIWI/piRNAs, proliferation and methylation of LINE-1 after silencing of PIWIL genes were studied. Results PIWIL2 and 4 mRNA were similarly expressed in synovial tissues and SF from RA and OA patients. However, on the protein level only PIWIL4 was strongly expressed in SF. Using NGS up to 300 piRNAs were identified in all SF without significant differences in expression levels between RA and OASF. Of interest, the analysis of the co-expression of the detected piRNAs revealed a less tightly regulated pattern of piRNA-823, -4153 and -16659 expression in RASF. In RASF and OASF, stimulation with TNFα+IL1β/TLR-ligands further significantly increased the expression levels of PIWIL2 and 4 mRNA and piRNA-16659 was significantly (4-fold) induced upon Poly(I:C) stimulation. Silencing of PIWIL2/4 neither affect LINE-1 methylation/expression nor proliferation of RASF. Conclusion We detected a new class of small regulatory RNAs (piRNAs) and their specific binding partners (PIWIL2/4) in synovial fibroblasts. The differential regulation of co-expression of piRNAs in RASF and the induction of piRNA/Piwi-proteins by innate immune stimulators suggest a role in inflammatory processes. PMID:27893851

  8. Regulation of protein translation and c-Jun expression by prostate tumor overexpressed 1.

    PubMed

    Marqués, N; Sesé, M; Cánovas, V; Valente, F; Bermudo, R; de Torres, I; Fernández, Y; Abasolo, I; Fernández, P L; Contreras, H; Castellón, E; Celià-Terrassa, T; Méndez, R; Ramón Y Cajal, S; Thomson, T M; Paciucci, R

    2014-02-27

    Prostate tumor overexpressed-1 (PTOV1), a modulator of the Mediator transcriptional regulatory complex, is expressed at high levels in prostate cancer and other neoplasias in association with a more aggressive disease. Here we show that PTOV1 interacts directly with receptor of activated protein C kinase 1 (RACK1), a regulator of protein kinase C and Jun signaling and also a component of the 40S ribosome. Consistent with this interaction, PTOV1 was associated with ribosomes and its overexpression promoted global protein synthesis in prostate cancer cells and COS-7 fibroblasts in a mTORC1-dependent manner. Transfection of ectopic PTOV1 enhanced the expression of c-Jun protein without affecting the levels of c-Jun or RACK1 mRNA. Conversely, knockdown of PTOV1 caused significant declines in global protein synthesis and c-Jun protein levels. High levels of PTOV1 stimulated the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, which required c-Jun, whereas knockdown of PTOV1 strongly inhibited the tumorigenic and metastatic potentials of PC-3 prostate cancer cells. In human prostate cancer samples, the expression of high levels of PTOV1 in primary and metastatic tumors was significantly associated with increased nuclear localization of active c-Jun. These results unveil new functions of PTOV1 in the regulation of protein translation and in the progression of prostate cancer to an invasive and metastatic disease.

  9. Neurotoxic protein expression reveals connections between the circadian clock and mating behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kadener, Sebastian; Villella, Adriana; Kula, Elzbieta; Palm, Kristyna; Pyza, Elzbieta; Botas, Juan; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Rosbash, Michael

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the functions of circadian neurons, we added two strategies to the standard Drosophila behavioral genetics repertoire. The first was to express a polyglutamine-expanded neurotoxic protein (MJDtr78Q; MJD, Machado–Joseph disease) in the major timeless (tim)-expressing cells of the adult brain. These Tim-MJD flies were viable, in contrast to the use of cell-death gene expression for tim neuron inactivation. Moreover, they were more arrhythmic than flies expressing other neurotoxins and had low but detectable tim mRNA levels. The second extended standard microarray technology from fly heads to dissected fly brains. By combining the two approaches, we identified a population of Tim-MJD-affected mRNAs. Some had been previously identified as sex-specific and relevant to courtship, including mRNAs localized to brain-proximal fat-body tissue and brain courtship centers. Finally, we found a decrease in the number of neurons that expressed male-specific forms of the fruitless protein in the laterodorsal region of the brain. The decrease was not a consequence of toxic protein expression within these specialized cells but a likely effect of communication with neighboring TIM-expressing neurons. The data suggest a functional interaction between adjacent circadian and mating circuits within the fly brain, as well as an interaction between circadian circuits and brain-proximal fat body. PMID:16938865

  10. Fe-S Proteins that Regulate Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mettert, Erin L.; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster containing proteins that regulate gene expression are present in most organisms. The innate chemistry of their Fe-S cofactors makes these regulatory proteins ideal for sensing environmental signals, such as gases (e.g. O2 and NO), levels of Fe and Fe-S clusters, reactive oxygen species, and redox cycling compounds, to subsequently mediate an adaptive response. Here we review the recent findings that have provided invaluable insight into the mechanism and function of these highly significant Fe-S regulatory proteins. PMID:25450978

  11. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  12. The effects of exposure to dynamic expressions of affect on 5-month-olds' memory.

    PubMed

    Flom, Ross; Janis, Rebecca B; Garcia, Darren J; Kirwan, C Brock

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the behavioral effects of adults' communicated affect on 5-month-olds' visual recognition memory. Five-month-olds were exposed to a dynamic and bimodal happy, angry, or neutral affective (face-voice) expression while familiarized to a novel geometric image. After familiarization to the geometric image and exposure to the affective expression, 5-month-olds received either a 5-min or 1-day retention interval. Following the 5-min retention interval, infants exposed to the happy affective expressions showed a reliable preference for a novel geometric image compared to the recently familiarized image. Infants exposed to the neutral or angry affective expression failed to show a reliable preference following a 5-min delay. Following the 1-day retention interval, however, infants exposed to the neutral expression showed a reliable preference for the novel geometric image. These results are the first to demonstrate that 5-month-olds' visual recognition memory is affected by the presentation of affective information at the time of encoding.

  13. Expression of Aequorea green fluorescent protein in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Cheng, C L

    1995-08-07

    The coding region of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria has been fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and introduced into maize leaf protoplasts. Transient expression of GFP was observed. In addition, the coding region of GFP was fused to an Arabidopsis heat shock promoter and co-transformed with another construct in which GFP has been replaced with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). The heat-induced expression of GFP in maize protoplasts parallels that of CAT. While GFP was expressed in both dark-grown and green maize leaf protoplasts, no green fluorescence was observed in similarly transformed Arabidopsis protoplasts.

  14. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  15. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems. PMID:26733922

  16. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  17. Perceiving emotions in neutral faces: expression processing is biased by affective person knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Rabovsky, Milena; Abdel Rahman, Rasha

    2015-01-01

    According to a widely held view, basic emotions such as happiness or anger are reflected in facial expressions that are invariant and uniquely defined by specific facial muscle movements. Accordingly, expression perception should not be vulnerable to influences outside the face. Here, we test this assumption by manipulating the emotional valence of biographical knowledge associated with individual persons. Faces of well-known and initially unfamiliar persons displaying neutral expressions were associated with socially relevant negative, positive or comparatively neutral biographical information. The expressions of faces associated with negative information were classified as more negative than faces associated with neutral information. Event-related brain potential modulations in the early posterior negativity, a component taken to reflect early sensory processing of affective stimuli such as emotional facial expressions, suggest that negative affective knowledge can bias the perception of faces with neutral expressions toward subjectively displaying negative emotions. PMID:24948155

  18. Facial Expression of Affect in Children with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, L.; Moss, J.; Jutley, J.; Cornish, K.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) have been reported to show comparatively high levels of flat and negative affect but there have been no empirical evaluations. In this study, we use an objective measure of facial expression to compare affect in CdLS with that seen in Cri du Chat syndrome (CDC) and a group of…

  19. Cementum attachment protein/protein-tyrosine phosphotase-like member A is not expressed in teeth.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Beyeler, Michael; Lang, Niklaus P; Trueb, Beat

    2009-02-01

    Cementum is a highly specialized connective tissue that covers tooth roots. The only cementum-specific protein described to date is the cementum attachment protein (CAP). A putative sequence for CAP was established from a cDNA clone isolated from a human cementifying fibroma cDNA library. This sequence overlaps with a phosphatase-like protein in muscle termed the protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like member A (PTPLA). To clarify the nature of CAP/PTPLA, we cloned the homologous rat protein and determined its sequence. The rat protein shared 94% sequence identity with the human protein. On Northern blots containing RNA from various rat tissues of different developmental stages, the cDNA hybridized to an mRNA expressed in heart and skeletal muscle but not in teeth. These results were confirmed by real-time PCR. Thus, the sequence deposited in public databanks under the name 'cementum attachment protein' does not represent genuine CAP.

  20. Selection of soluble protein expression constructs: the experimental determination of protein domain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Proteins can contain multiple domains each of which is capable of possessing a separate independent function and three-dimensional structure. It is often useful to clone and express individual protein domains to study their biochemical properties and for structure determination. However, the annotated domain boundaries in databases such as Pfam or SMART are not always accurate. The present review summarizes various strategies for the experimental determination of protein domain boundaries.

  1. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  2. Expression Trend of Selected Ribosomal Protein Genes in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang-Ru; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Ling, Teck-Yee; Tiong, Thung-Sing; Subramaniam, Selva Kumar; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ribosomal proteins are traditionally associated with protein biosynthesis until recent studies that implicated their extraribosomal functions in human diseases and cancers. Our previous studies using GeneFishing™ DEG method and microarray revealed underexpression of three ribosomal protein genes, RPS26, RPS27, and RPL32 in cancer of the nasopharynx. Herein, we investigated the expression pattern and nucleotide sequence integrity of these genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma to further delineate their involvement in tumourigenesis. The relationship of expression level with clinicopathologic factors was also statistically studied. Methods: Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed on nasopharyngeal carcinoma and their paired normal tissues. Expression and sequence of these three genes were analysed. Results: All three ribosomal protein genes showed no significant difference in transcript expressions and no association could be established with clinicopathologic factors studied. No nucleotide aberrancy was detected in the coding regions of these genes. Conclusion: There is no early evidence to substantiate possible involvement of RPS26, RPS27, and RPL32 genes in NPC tumourigenesis. PMID:23613646

  3. Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins: Choosing the Appropriate Host

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Conclusions/Significance Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. PMID:22216205

  4. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Amy; Lovell, Scott; Lorimer, Don; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Wallace, Ellen; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Archer, Kimberly; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-12-01

    With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38{alpha}), viral polymerase (HCV NS5B), and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ) were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  5. Optimization of Translation Profiles Enhances Protein Expression and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5’-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein. PMID:25965266

  6. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  7. A characterization of structural proteins expressed by Bombyx mori bidensovirus.

    PubMed

    Lü, Peng; Xing, Yali; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Yanhua; Pan, Ye; Chen, Kangmin; Zhu, Feifei; Zhou, Yajing; Chen, Keping; Yao, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Bombyx mori bidensiovirus (BmBDV) is a species of Bidensovirus that has been was placed into a new genus within the new family Bidnaviridae by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. BmBDV causes fatal flacherie disease in silkworms, which causes large losses to the sericulture industry. BmBDV contains two sets of complementary linear single-stranded DNAs of approximately 6.5kb (viral DNA 1, VD1) and 6.0kb (viral DNA 2, VD2). VD1 and VD2 are encapsidated in separate icosahedral non-enveloped capsids, which are similar in size and shape. However, the strategies used to express BmBDV structural proteins remains unclear. In this work, a total of six structural proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and shown to be encoded by the BmBDV VP gene via mass spectrometry. The transmission electron microscopy results showed that co-expression of the BmBDV VP and SP structural proteins in Spodoptera frugiperda sf9 cells resulted in the formation of 22-24nm virus-like particles. Furthermore, a mutation of the major structural protein-encoding VP gene, in which the second in-frame ATG codon was mutated to GCG, abrogated the production of several structural proteins, indicating that this strategy of expressing BmBDV VP is dependent on a leaky scanning translation mechanism.

  8. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  9. RNA-Seq reveals 10 novel promising candidate genes affecting milk protein concentration in the Chinese Holstein population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong; Cai, Wentao; Zhou, Chenghao; Yin, Hongwei; Zhang, Ziqi; Loor, Juan J.; Sun, Dongxiao; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Paired-end RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to explore the bovine transcriptome from the mammary tissue of 12 Chinese Holstein cows with 6 extremely high and 6 low phenotypic values for milk protein percentage. We defined the differentially expressed transcripts between the two comparison groups, extremely high and low milk protein percentage during the peak lactation (HP vs LP) and during the non-lactating period (HD vs LD), respectively. Within the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), we detected 157 at peak lactation and 497 in the non-lactating period with a highly significant correlation with milk protein concentration. Integrated interpretation of differential gene expression indicated that SERPINA1, CLU, CNTFR, ERBB2, NEDD4L, ANG, GALE, HSPA8, LPAR6 and CD14 are the most promising candidate genes affecting milk protein concentration. Similarly, LTF, FCGR3A, MEGF10, RRM2 and UBE2C are the most promising candidates that in the non-lactating period could help the mammary tissue prevent issues with inflammation and udder disorders. Putative genes will be valuable resources for designing better breeding strategies to optimize the content of milk protein and also to provide new insights into regulation of lactogenesis. PMID:27254118

  10. Expression of glutamine metabolism-related proteins in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the expression of glutamine metabolism-related protein in tumor and stromal compartments among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. Results GLS1 and GDH expression in tumor and stromal compartments were the highest in AC than in other subtypes. Tumoral ASCT2 expression was higher in MC but lower in FC (p < 0.001). In PTC, tumoral GLS1 and tumoral GDH expression was higher in the conventional type than in the follicular variant (p = 0.043 and 0.001, respectively), and in PTC with BRAF V600E mutation than in PTC without BRAF V600E mutation (p<0.001). Stromal GDH positivity was the independent factor associated with short overall survival (hazard ratio: 21.48, 95% confidence interval: 2.178-211.8, p = 0.009). Methods We performed tissue microarrays with 557 thyroid cancer cases (papillary thyroid carcinoma [PTC]: 344, follicular carcinoma [FC]: 112, medullary carcinoma [MC]: 70, poorly differentiated carcinoma [PDC]: 23, and anaplastic carcinoma [AC]: 8) and 152 follicular adenoma (FA) cases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of glutaminolysis-related proteins (glutaminase 1 [GLS1], glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH], and amino acid transporter-2 [ASCT-2]). Conclusion Glutamine metabolism-related protein expression differed among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. PMID:27447554

  11. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  12. Transient expression and cellular localization of recombinant proteins in cultured insect cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for production of recombinant proteins, interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and for the determination of biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for ...

  13. Dark proteins: effect of inclusion body formation on quantification of protein expression.

    PubMed

    Iafolla, Marco A J; Mazumder, Mostafizur; Sardana, Vandit; Velauthapillai, Tharsan; Pannu, Karanbir; McMillen, David R

    2008-09-01

    Plasmid-borne gene expression systems have found wide application in the emerging fields of systems biology and synthetic biology, where plasmids are used to implement simple network architectures, either to test systems biology hypotheses about issues such as gene expression noise or as a means of exerting artificial control over a cell's dynamics. In both these cases, fluorescent proteins are commonly applied as a means of monitoring the expression of genes in the living cell, and efforts have been made to quantify protein expression levels through fluorescence intensity calibration and by monitoring the partitioning of proteins among the two daughter cells after division; such quantification is important in formulating the predictive models desired in systems and synthetic biology research. A potential pitfall of using plasmid-based gene expression systems is that the high protein levels associated with expression from plasmids can lead to the formation of inclusion bodies, insoluble aggregates of misfolded, nonfunctional proteins that will not generate fluorescence output; proteins caught in these inclusion bodies are thus "dark" to fluorescence-based detection methods. If significant numbers of proteins are incorporated into inclusion bodies rather than becoming biologically active, quantitative results obtained by fluorescent measurements will be skewed; we investigate this phenomenon here. We have created two plasmid constructs with differing average copy numbers, both incorporating an unregulated promoter (P(LtetO-1) in the absence of TetR) expressing the GFP derivative enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and inserted them into Escherichia coli bacterial cells (a common model organism for work on the dynamics of prokaryotic gene expression). We extracted the inclusion bodies, denatured them, and refolded them to render them active, obtaining a measurement of the average number of EGFP per cell locked into these aggregates; at the same time, we used

  14. Easy mammalian expression and crystallography of maltose-binding protein-fused human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bokhove, Marcel; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Saito, Takako; Dioguardi, Elisa; Gegenschatz-Schmid, Katharina; Nishimura, Kaoru; Raj, Isha; de Sanctis, Daniele; Han, Ling; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy to obtain milligrams of highly post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins, transiently expressed in mammalian cells as rigid or cleavable fusions with a mammalianized version of bacterial maltose-binding protein (mMBP). This variant was engineered to combine mutations that enhance MBP solubility and affinity purification, as well as provide crystal-packing interactions for increased crystallizability. Using this cell type-independent approach, we could increase the expression of secreted and intracellular human proteins up to 200-fold. By molecular replacement with MBP, we readily determined five novel high-resolution structures of rigid fusions of targets that otherwise defied crystallization. PMID:26850170

  15. Effects of the oestrogen receptor antagonist Fulvestrant on expression of genes that affect organization of the epididymal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M F N; Fernandes, S A F; Nascimento, A R; Siu, E R; Hess, R A; Oliveira, C A; Porto, C S; Lazari, M F M

    2014-07-01

    The role of oestrogens in epididymal function is still unclear. Knockout of the oestrogen receptor ESR1 (Esr1(-/-) ) or treatment with the anti-oestrogen Fulvestrant affect epididymal milieu and sperm motility. We investigated the effect of in vivo treatment of rats with Fulvestrant on: (i) expression of genes that may be important for the architecture and function of the epididymal epithelium: prominins 1 and 2, metalloproteinase 7, claudin 7, beta-catenin and cadherin 13, and (ii) levels of oestradiol and testosterone, and expression of oestrogen and androgen receptors, in the initial segment (IS), caput, corpus and cauda epididymis. Fulvestrant (i) reduced gene expression of prominin 1 (variant 1) in the caput, reduced prominin 1 protein content in the caput epididymis and in the efferent ductules, and increased the localization of prominin 1 in microvilli of the caput and corpus; (ii) reduced gene expression of prominin 2 in the corpus and cauda epididymis; (iii) increased the metalloproteinase 7 content in the apical region of principal cells from IS/caput; (iv) reduced in the corpus epididymis, but increased in the efferent ductules, the cadherin 13 mRNA level; (v) reduced testosterone but increased oestradiol levels in the corpus and cauda; (vi) increased the androgen receptor protein content in all regions of the epididymis, and the oestrogen receptor GPER in the corpus and cauda epididymis. In conclusion, treatment with Fulvestrant induced regional-specific changes in hormonal and steroid receptor content, and affected expression of proteins important for epithelial organization and absorption/secretion. The mechanisms of oestrogen action may differ among epididymal regions, which may contribute to determine region-specific sperm functions.

  16. Membrane protein assembly: two cytoplasmic phosphorylated serine sites of Vpu from HIV-1 affect oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Pei; Lin, Meng-Han; Chan, Ya-Ting; Chen, Li-Chyong; Ma, Che; Fischer, Wolfgang B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral protein U (Vpu) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a short integral membrane protein which is known to self-assemble within the lipid membrane and associate with host factors during the HIV-1 infectivity cycle. In this study, full-length Vpu (M group) from clone NL4-3 was over-expressed in human cells and purified in an oligomeric state. Various single and double mutations were constructed on its phosphorylation sites to mimic different degrees of phosphorylation. Size exclusion chromatography of wild-type Vpu and mutants indicated that the smallest assembly unit of Vpu was a dimer and over time Vpu formed higher oligomers. The rate of oligomerization increased when (i) the degree of phosphorylation at serines 52 and 56 was decreased and (ii) when the ionic strength was increased indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of Vpu affects oligomerization. Coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulations with models of wild-type and mutant Vpu in a hydrated lipid bilayer supported the experimental data in demonstrating that, in addition to a previously known role in downregulation of host factors, the phosphorylation sites of Vpu also modulate oligomerization. PMID:27353136

  17. Spironolactone Regulates HCN Protein Expression Through Micro-RNA-1 in Rats With Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua-Dong; Xia, Shuang; Zha, Cheng-Qin; Deng, Song-Bai; Du, Jian-Lin; She, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that aldosterone blockers reduced the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which spironolactone, a classic aldosterone blocker, regulates hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) protein expression in ischemic rat myocardium after MI. Eighteen rats surviving 24 hours after MI were randomly assigned into 3 groups: MI, spironolactone, and spironolactone + antagomir-1. Six sham-operated rats had a suture loosely tied around the left coronary artery, without ligation. The border zone of the myocardial infarct was collected from each rat at 1 week after MI. HCN2 and HCN4 protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level were measured in addition to miRNA-1 levels. Spironolactone significantly increased miRNA-1 levels and downregulated HCN2 and HCN4 protein and mRNA levels. miRNA-1 suppression with antagomir-1 increased HCN2 and HCN4 protein levels; however, HCN2 and HCN4 mRNA levels were not affected. These results suggested that spironolactone could increase miRNA-1 expression in ischemic rat myocardium after MI and that the upregulation of miRNA-1 expression partially contributed to the posttranscriptional repression of HCN protein expression, which may contribute to the effect of spironolactone to reduce the incidence of MI-associated ventricular arrhythmias.

  18. Gene expression and protein length influence codon usage and rates of sequence evolution in Populus tremula.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2007-03-01

    Codon bias is generally thought to be determined by a balance between mutation, genetic drift, and natural selection on translational efficiency. However, natural selection on codon usage is considered to be a weak evolutionary force and selection on codon usage is expected to be strongest in species with large effective population sizes. In this paper, I study associations between codon usage, gene expression, and molecular evolution at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites in the long-lived, woody perennial plant Populus tremula (Salicaceae). Using expression data for 558 genes derived from expressed sequence tags (EST) libraries from 19 different tissues and developmental stages, I study how gene expression levels within single tissues as well as across tissues affect codon usage and rates sequence evolution at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. I show that gene expression have direct effects on both codon usage and the level of selective constraint of proteins in P. tremula, although in different ways. Codon usage genes is primarily determined by how highly expressed a genes is, whereas rates of sequence evolution are primarily determined by how widely expressed genes are. In addition to the effects of gene expression, protein length appear to be an important factor influencing virtually all aspects of molecular evolution in P. tremula.

  19. Retinol status and expression of retinol-related proteins in methionine-choline deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Koh, Maki; Inoue, Akiko; Kishi, Kanta; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Retinol and its derivative, retinoic acid, have pleiotropic functions including vision, immunity, hematopoiesis, reproduction, cell differentiation/growth, and development. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common diseases in developed countries and encompasses a broad spectrum of forms, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis, which develops further to cirrhosis. Retinol status has an important role in liver homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retinol status and expression of retinol-related proteins, including enzymes and binding proteins, in methionine-choline deficient (MCD) rats as a model of NAFLD. We examined retinol levels in the plasma and liver and gene expression for β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), lecithIn: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), ALDH1A2, and cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)-I in MCD rats. The plasma retinol levels in MCD rats were lower than those in the controls, whereas hepatic retinol levels in MCD rats were higher. BCMO expression in the intestine and liver in MCD rats was lower, whereas that in the testes and the kidneys was higher than in control rats. Expression of LRAT, CRBP-I, ALDH1A1, and ALDH1A2 in the liver of MCD rats was also higher. Altered expression of retinol-related proteins may affect retinol status in NAFLD.

  20. Effects of aspirin on expression of iron transport and storage proteins in BV-2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan Xin; Du, Fang; Jiang, Li Rong; Gong, Jing; Zhou, Yu-Fu; Luo, Qian Qian; Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2015-12-01

    In the light of recent studies, we hypothesized that aspirin might have the functions to regulate the expression of iron transport proteins and then affect cellular iron levels. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of aspirin on expression of iron uptake protein transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), iron release protein ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) and iron storage protein ferritin using Western blot analysis and on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-αlpha, interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-10 and hepcidin using quantitative real-time PCR in BV-2 microglial cells treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We found that aspirin significantly down-regulated TfR1, while also up-regulated Fpn1 and ferritin expressions in BV-2 microglial cells in vitro. We also showed that TfR1 and Fpn1 expressions were significantly higher, while ferritin contents, IL-6, TNF-alpha and hepcidin mRNA levels were lower in cells treated with aspirin plus LPS than those in cells treated with LPS only. We concluded that aspirin has a negative effect on cell iron contents under 'normal' conditions and could partly reverse LPS-induced-disruption in cell iron balance under in vitro inflammatory conditions. Our findings also suggested that hepcidin might play a dominant role in the control of TfR1 expression by aspirin in the cells treated with LPS.

  1. Overexpression of a stress-responsive U-box protein gene VaPUB affects the accumulation of resistance related proteins in Vitis vinifera 'Thompson Seedless'.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Li; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Many U-box proteins have been identified and characterized as important factors against environmental stresses such as chilling, heat, salinity and pathogen attack in plant. Our previous research reported the cloning of a novel U-box protein gene VaPUB from Vitis amurensis 'Zuoshanyi' grape and suggested a function of it in related to cold stress in the model plant Arabidopsis system. In this study, the role of VaPUB in response to biotic and abiotic stress was further analyzed in the homologous grapevine system by studying the transcript regulation and the protein accumulation in VaPUB transgenic vines. The expression analysis assay shown that VaPUB was significantly up-regulated 6 h after cold treatment and as early as 2 h post inoculation with Plasmopara viticola, a pathogen causing downy mildew disease in grapevine. Over-expressing VaPUB in V. Vinifera 'Thompson Seedless' affected the microstructure of leaves. The proteome assay shown that the accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein PR10 and many proteins involved in carbon and energy metabolism, oxidation reaction and protein metabolism were significantly altered in transgenic vines. In comparison with wild type plants, the expression level of PR10 family genes was significantly decreased in VaPUB transgenic vines under P. viticola treatment or cold stress. Results from this study showed that the U-box protein gene PUB quickly responded to both biotic stress and abiotic stress and significantly influenced the accumulation of resistance related proteins in grapevine.

  2. Grape seed extract inhibits VEGF expression via reducing HIF-1α protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Keqiang; Chen, Shiuan; Wen, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) is a widely consumed dietary supplement that has antitumor activity. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effect of GSE on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the mechanism underlying this action. We found that GSE inhibited VEGF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in U251 human glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. GSE inhibited transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene through reducing protein but not mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α. The inhibitory effect of GSE on HIF-1α expression was mainly through inhibiting HIF-1α protein synthesis rather than promoting protein degradation. Consistent with this result, GSE-suppressed phosphorylation of several important components involved in HIF-1α protein synthesis, such as Akt, S6 kinase and S6 protein. Furthermore, in the MDA-MB-231 tumor, we found that GSE treatment inhibited the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of S6 kinase without altering the subcellular localization of HIF-1α, correlating with reduced vessel density and tumor size. Depletion of polyphenol with polyvinylpyrrolidone abolished the inhibitory activity of GSE, suggesting a water-soluble fraction of polyphenol in GSE is responsible for the inhibitory activity. Taken together, our results indicate that GSE inhibits VEGF expression by reducing HIF-1α protein synthesis through blocking Akt activation. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of anticancer activity of GSE and reveals a novel molecular mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic action of GSE. PMID:19131542

  3. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  4. Morphine Withdrawal Modifies Prion Protein Expression in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Garofalo, Tina; Candelise, Niccolò; Caruso, Alessandra; Sorice, Maurizio; Scaccianoce, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus is a vulnerable brain structure susceptible to damage during aging and chronic stress. Repeated exposure to opioids may alter the brain so that it functions normally when the drugs are present, thus, a prolonged withdrawal might lead to homeostatic changes headed for the restoration of the physiological state. Abuse of morphine may lead to Reacting Oxygen Species-induced neurodegeneration and apoptosis. It has been proposed that during morphine withdrawal, stress responses might be responsible, at least in part, for long-term changes of hippocampal plasticity. Since prion protein is involved in both, Reacting Oxygen Species mediated stress responses and synaptic plasticity, in this work we investigate the effect of opiate withdrawal in rats after morphine treatment. We hypothesize that stressful stimuli induced by opiate withdrawal, and the subsequent long-term homeostatic changes in hippocampal plasticity, might modulate the Prion protein expression. Our results indicate that abstinence from the opiate induced a time-dependent and region-specific modification in Prion protein content, indeed during morphine withdrawal a selective unbalance of hippocampal Prion Protein is observable. Moreover, Prion protein overexpression in hippocampal tissue seems to generate a dimeric structure of Prion protein and α-cleavage at the hydrophobic domain. Stress factors or toxic insults can induce cytosolic dimerization of Prion Protein through the hydrophobic domain, which in turn, it stimulates the α-cleavage and the production of neuroprotective Prion protein fragments. We speculate that this might be the mechanism by which stressful stimuli induced by opiate withdrawal and the subsequent long-term homeostatic changes in hippocampal plasticity, modulate the expression and the dynamics of Prion protein. PMID:28081197

  5. Expression and Localization of Plant Protein Disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B. S.; Subramaniam, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a putative protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and an antiserum was raised against the expressed PDI-active protein. The antiserum recognized a protein of approximately 60 kD in extracts from alfalfa, soybean, and tobacco roots and stems. Levels of this protein remained relatively constant on exposure of alfalfa cell suspension cultures to the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, whereas a slightly lower molecular mass form, also detected by the antiserum, was induced by this treatment. A lower molecular mass form of PDI was also observed in roots of alfalfa seedlings during the first 5 weeks after germination. PDI levels increased in developing soybean seeds up to 17 d after fertilization and then declined. Tissue print immunoblots revealed highest levels of PDI protein in the cambial tissues of soybean stems and petioles and in epidermal, subepidermal, cortical, and pith tissues of stems of alfalfa and tobacco. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the localization of PDI to the endoplasmic reticulum in soybean root nodules. PMID:12231974

  6. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hostettler, Lola; Grundy, Laura; Käser-Pébernard, Stéphanie; Wicky, Chantal; Schafer, William R.; Glauser, Dominique A.

    2017-01-01

    The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression. PMID:28108553

  7. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  8. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase in Pfiesteria piscicida and its growth rate-related expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Senjie; Zhang, Huan

    2003-01-01

    A full-length cDNA (1,434 bp) of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), a key molecule of a signal transduction cascade, was isolated from the estuarine heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. This cDNA (Ppmapk1) encoded a protein (PpMAPK1) of 428 amino acid residues that shared about 30 to 40% amino acid similarity with MAPKs in other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PpMAPK1 was tightly clustered with MAPK3 in protozoans. Using reverse transcription-PCR, expression of this gene was evaluated for P. piscicida cultures grown under different conditions. While salinity shock, heat shock, starvation, and a subsequent encounter with prey did not appear to affect expression of this gene, Ppmapk1 expression level was correlated with growth rate, suggesting involvement of this gene in the regulation of cell proliferation in the organism.

  10. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro, M; García-Olmedo, F; Diaz, I

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1' or 35S promoter was not similarly affected, thus excluding a redox modulation of transcription as the mechanism of NPTII activation by dithiothreitol. Western-blot analyses showed an increase in the amount of protein in response to dithiothreitol, whereas neither the steady-state level of NPTII mRNA nor the specific activity of the purified enzyme was affected. The same type of modulation was observed for transiently expressed beta-glucuronidase (nine cysteines) produced from a fusion with the 35S promoter, with or without a signal peptide. Limitation of cotranslational and/or early posttranslational steps by excessively oxidizing sulfhydryl/disulfide redox potentials is postulated to explain the low net accumulation of cysteine-rich proteins of bacterial origin (i.e., NPTII and beta-glucuronidase) when expressed in plant protoplasts, and the marked increase in such proteins in response to externally added dithiothreitol. Images PMID:8171004

  11. Endometrial inflammation and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins induced by Mycoplasma bovis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengyao; Wang, Guoqing; Lv, Tingting; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Xie, Guanghong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Rongfeng

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma bovis infection can cause endometrial inflammation leading to infertility and involuntary culling in dairy cows. Because extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins affect the adherence of mycoplasma to eukaryotic cell surface, they may play a role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial inflammatory response and ECM protein expression induced by M bovis. Endometrial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and mRNA and protein expression of collagen IV (CL-IV), fibronectin (FN), and laminin (LN) were evaluated 10, 20, and 30 days after M bovis intrauterine infusion in breed cows 18 days postpartum. The presence of the bacteria in the uterus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Endometrial TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in the treatment group were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 20 and 30 days after infusion. Endometrial CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression increased (P < 0.01) 20 days after infusion in all groups. However, the increase was more pronounced in the treatment group and reactive expressions were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 10, 20, and 30 days after infusion. In conclusion, M bovis triggered endometrial inflammatory response and increased CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression. The abnormal expression of ECM these proteins may promote the pathogenic effects of M bovis that lead to endometrial tissue damage and infertility.

  12. Protein Expression Profiling of Giant Cell Tumors of Bone Treated with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kenta; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Kohsaka, Shinji; Akaike, Keisuke; Tanabe, Yu; Kubota, Daisuke; Ishii, Midori; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Okubo, Taketo; Takagi, Tatsuya; Yao, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are locally aggressive osteolytic bone tumors. Recently, some clinical trials have shown that denosumab is a novel and effective therapeutic option for aggressive and recurrent GCTB. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of denosumab. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed using GCTB samples which were taken before and after denosumab treatment. Each expression profile was analyzed using the software program to further understand the affected biological network. One of identified proteins was further evaluated by gelatin zymography and an immunohistochemical analysis. We identified 13 consistently upregulated proteins and 19 consistently downregulated proteins in the pre- and post-denosumab samples. Using these profiles, the software program identified molecular interactions between the differentially expressed proteins that were indirectly involved in the RANK/RANKL pathway and in several non-canonical subpathways including the Matrix metalloproteinase pathway. The data analysis also suggested that the identified proteins play a critical functional role in the osteolytic process of GCTB. Among the most downregulated proteins, the activity of MMP-9 was significantly decreased in the denosumab-treated samples, although the residual stromal cells were found to express MMP-9 by an immunohistochemical analysis. The expression level of MMP-9 in the primary GCTB samples was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors, including patient outcomes. Although the replacement of tumors by fibro-osseous tissue or the diminishment of osteoclast-like giant cells have been shown as therapeutic effects of denosumab, the residual tumor after denosumab treatment, which is composed of only stromal cells, might be capable of causing bone destruction; thus the therapeutic application of denosumab would be still necessary for these lesions. We believe that the protein expression

  13. Expression of low molecular weight proteins in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, N; Abid, R; Qureshi, A W; Basheer, T

    2012-06-01

    The current study is conducted to observe the differences in the level of low molecular weight proteins in the sera of patients with leukaemia in comparison to healthy subjects (control group). The sera of patients with leukaemia showed 15 peaks in the densitometric curve in comparison to the seven peaks of the controls. The peaks in the experimental samples that coincide with those in the control were of 134.14, 113.15, 76.06, 63.25, 48.07, 22.85 and 16.47 kDa molecular weights, respectively. Most of the new peaks appeared between the proteins of molecular weight 36-29 kDa in the experimental groups. Mean density of the 134.14 kDa protein band showed an increase in the protein in experimental groups I and II only whereas 113.15 and 22.85 kDa protein were increased in all experimental groups of patients with leukaemia. The expression of 76.06 and 63.25 kDa protein fraction was downregulated in the patients with leukaemia. A decline in the level of the protein of 48.07 kDa was observed in patients with leukaemia except in group I. Unlike the other protein fractions, the level of the protein of 16.47 kDa was significantly (p < 0.05) increased with a maximum density in group II. Intergroup experimental) comparison revealed an increasing pattern of 95.44 and 89.21 kDa with maximum level in group III sera. However the protein fractions of 38.07 and 34.94 kDa varied in the serum with maximum density in Group IV Protein fractions of 32.92 and 31.24 kDa were expressed in all age groups of patients with leukaemia with a maximum density in group III whereas the percentage densities of 14.42 and 13.56 kDa protein were quite different. This preliminary study will provide a basis to study the role of different proteins in patients with leukaemia.

  14. CP27 affects viability, proliferation, attachment and gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Luan, X; Diekwisch, T G H

    2002-08-01

    CP27 is a gene that has been cloned from an E11 early embryonic library and has been suggested to mediate early organogenesis (Diekwisch et al., 1999, Gene 235, 19). We have hypothesized that CP27 exhibits its effects on organogenesis by affecting individual cell function. Based on the CP27 expression pattern we have selected the CP27 expressing embryonic fibroblast cell line BALB/c 3T3 to determine the effects of CP27 on cell function. CP27 loss of function strategies were performed by adding 5, 12.5 or 25 micro g/ml anti-CP27 antibody to cultured BALB/c 3T3 cells and comparing the results to controls in which identical concentrations of rabbit serum were added to the culture medium. Other controls included an antibody against another extracellular matrix protein amelogenin (negative control) and anti-CP27 antibodies directed against other areas of the CP27 molecule (positive control). Following cell culture, cell viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell shape, cellular attachment and fibronectin matrix production were assayed using MTT colourimetric assay, BrdU staining, morphometry, immunostaining and western blot analysis. Block of CP27 function using an antibody strategy resulted in the following significant changes: (i) reduced viability, (ii) increased number of apoptotic cells, (iii) reduced proliferation, (iv) alterations in cell shape, (v) loss of attachment, and (vi) reduction in fibronectin matrix production. There was also a redistribution in fibronectin matrix organization demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that CP27 plays an important role in the maintance of normal cell function and that CP27 block leads to significant changes in cellular behaviour.

  15. Expression and serological reactivity of hemorrhagic enteritis virus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Lobová, Dana; Celer, Vladimír

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to express the recombinant hexon protein of the hemorrhagic enteritis virus, to establish the diagnostic value of this protein for serological detection of antibodies in turkey serum samples and to assess seroprevalence of the infection in the Czech Republic. The N' terminal part of the hexon protein was expressed in a bacterial expression system and used as an antigen in an ELISA test for the detection of hemorrhagic enteritis virus specific antibodies in turkey sera. Validation of the test was performed by comparison with a commercially available ELISA test. Serological reactivity was assessed on a panel of 126 turkey sera by a newly developed ELISA test. Serum samples were taken from turkey farms with the history of hemorrhagic enteritis virus infection, from farms with animals free of infection, and from turkey farms following vaccination. Both ELISA kits gave identical results (100 %) with the tested sera. ELISA based on the recombinant hexon protein thus proved useful and cheaper for detection of antibodies in turkey flocks infected with the hemorrhagic enteritis virus.

  16. Prion protein expression in bovine podocytes and extraglomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Amselgruber, W M; Steffl, M; Didier, A; Märtlbauer, E; Pfaff, E; Büttner, M

    2006-06-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(c)) is thought to be a substrate for an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(sc)). One emerging hypothesis is that the proposed conversion phenomenon takes place at the site at which the infectious agent meets PrP(c). PrP(c) is abundant in the central nervous system, but little is known about the cell-type-specific distribution of PrP(c) in non-neuronal tissues of cattle. We have studied whether PrP(c), a protein found predominantly in neurons, also exists in bovine podocytes, since neurons and podocytes share a large number of similarities. We have therefore examined the expression of PrP(c) by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. Immunostained serial sections and specific antibodies against PrP(c) have revealed that PrP(c) is selectively localized in podocytes and is particularly strongly expressed in extraglomerular mesangial cells but not in endothelial or intraglomerular mesangial cells. The selective expression of PrP(c) in podocytes is of special importance, as it suggests that these cells represent possible targets for peripheral infection with prions and demonstrates that PrP(c) can be added to the list of neuronal factors expressed in mammalian podocytes.

  17. Altered expression of the bZIP transcription factor DRINK ME affects growth and reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; Chávez Montes, Ricardo A; Silvestre-Vañó, Marina; Herrera-Ubaldo, Humberto; Greco, Raffaella; Pablo-Villa, Jeanneth; Galliani, Bianca M; Diaz-Ramirez, David; Weemen, Mieke; Boutilier, Kim; Pereira, Andy; Colombo, Lucia; Madueño, Francisco; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe an uncharacterized gene that negatively influences Arabidopsis growth and reproductive development. DRINK ME (DKM; bZIP30) is a member of the bZIP transcription factor family, and is expressed in meristematic tissues such as the inflorescence meristem (IM), floral meristem (FM), and carpel margin meristem (CMM). Altered DKM expression affects meristematic tissues and reproductive organ development, including the gynoecium, which is the female reproductive structure and is determinant for fertility and sexual reproduction. A microarray analysis indicates that DKM overexpression affects the expression of cell cycle, cell wall, organ initiation, cell elongation, hormone homeostasis, and meristem activity genes. Furthermore, DKM can interact in yeast and in planta with proteins involved in shoot apical meristem maintenance such as WUSCHEL, KNAT1/BP, KNAT2 and JAIBA, and with proteins involved in medial tissue development in the gynoecium such as HECATE, BELL1 and NGATHA1. Taken together, our results highlight the relevance of DKM as a negative modulator of Arabidopsis growth and reproductive development.

  18. Induced autoimmunity against gonadal proteins affects gonadal development in juvenile zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Presslauer, Christopher; Nagasawa, Kazue; Dahle, Dalia; Babiak, Joanna; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Babiak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    A method to mitigate or possibly eliminate reproduction in farmed fish is highly demanded. The existing approaches have certain applicative limitations. So far, no immunization strategies affecting gonadal development in juvenile animals have been developed. We hypothesized that autoimmune mechanisms, occurring spontaneously in a number of diseases, could be induced by targeted immunization. We have asked whether the immunization against specific targets in a juvenile zebrafish gonad will produce an autoimmune response, and, consequently, disturbance in gonadal development. Gonadal soma-derived factor (Gsdf), growth differentiation factor (Gdf9), and lymphocyte antigen 75 (Cd205/Ly75), all essential for early gonad development, were targeted with 5 immunization tests. Zebrafish (n = 329) were injected at 6 weeks post fertilization, a booster injection was applied 15 days later, and fish were sampled at 30 days. We localized transcripts encoding targeted proteins by in situ hybridization, quantified expression of immune-, apoptosis-, and gonad-related genes with quantitative real-time PCR, and performed gonadal histology and whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Bcl2-interacting-killer (Bik) pro-apoptotic protein. The treatments resulted in an autoimmune reaction, gonad developmental retardation, intensive apoptosis, cell atresia, and disturbed transcript production. Testes were remarkably underdeveloped after anti-Gsdf treatments. Anti-Gdf9 treatments promoted apoptosis in testes and abnormal development of ovaries. Anti-Cd205 treatment stimulated a strong immune response in both sexes, resulting in oocyte atresia and strong apoptosis in supporting somatic cells. The effect of immunization was FSH-independent. Furthermore, immunization against germ cell proteins disturbed somatic supporting cell development. This is the first report to demonstrate that targeted autoimmunity can disturb gonadal development in a juvenile fish. It shows a straightforward potential

  19. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Expression of Neuregulin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatiana; Washington, Kareem; Rotimi, Jamie; Kumari, Namita; Smith, Kahli A.; Niu, Xiaomei; Jerebtsova, Marina; Nekhai, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a cellular serine/threonine phosphatase, is targeted to cellular promoters by its major regulatory subunits, PP1 nuclear targeting subunit, nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) and RepoMan. PP1 is also targeted to RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) by NIPP1 where it can dephosphorylate RNAPII and cycle-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9). Here, we show that treatment of cells with a small molecule activator of PP1 increases the abundance of a neuregulin-1 (NRG-1)-derived peptide. NRG-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the cells stably or transiently expressing mutant NIPP1 (mNIPP1) that does not bind PP1, but not in the cells expressing NIPP1. Expression of mNIPP1 also activated the NRG-1 promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Analysis of extracts from mNIPP1 expressing cells by glycerol gradient centrifugation showed a redistribution of PP1 and CDK9 between large and small molecular weight complexes, and increased CDK9 Thr-186 phosphorylation. This correlated with the increased CDK9 activity. Further, RNAPII co-precipitated with mNIPP1, and phosphorylation of RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD) Ser-2 residues was greater in cells expressing mNIPP1. In mNIPP1 expressing cells, okadaic acid, a cell-permeable inhibitor of PP1, did not increase Ser-2 CTD phosphorylation inhibited by flavopiridol, in contrast to the NIPP1 expressing cells, suggesting that PP1 was no longer involved in RNAPII dephosphorylation. Finally, media conditioned with mNIPP1 cells induced the proliferation of wild type 84-31 cells, consistent with a role of neuregulin-1 as a growth promoting factor. Our study indicates that deregulation of PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme activates NRG-1 expression through RNAPII and CDK9 phosphorylation in a NF-κB dependent manner. PMID:27918433

  20. Universal and culture-specific factors in the recognition and performance of musical affect expressions.

    PubMed

    Laukka, Petri; Eerola, Tuomas; Thingujam, Nutankumar S; Yamasaki, Teruo; Beller, Grégory

    2013-06-01

    We present a cross-cultural study on the performance and perception of affective expression in music. Professional bowed-string musicians from different musical traditions (Swedish folk music, Hindustani classical music, Japanese traditional music, and Western classical music) were instructed to perform short pieces of music to convey 11 emotions and related states to listeners. All musical stimuli were judged by Swedish, Indian, and Japanese participants in a balanced design, and a variety of acoustic and musical cues were extracted. Results first showed that the musicians' expressive intentions could be recognized with accuracy above chance both within and across musical cultures, but communication was, in general, more accurate for culturally familiar versus unfamiliar music, and for basic emotions versus nonbasic affective states. We further used a lens-model approach to describe the relations between the strategies that musicians use to convey various expressions and listeners' perceptions of the affective content of the music. Many acoustic and musical cues were similarly correlated with both the musicians' expressive intentions and the listeners' affective judgments across musical cultures, but the match between musicians' and listeners' uses of cues was better in within-cultural versus cross-cultural conditions. We conclude that affective expression in music may depend on a combination of universal and culture-specific factors.

  1. From specificity to sensitivity: affective states modulate visual working memory for emotional expressive faces

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Thomas; Sachse, Pierre; Furtner, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that visual working memory (VWM) preferentially remembers angry looking faces. However, the meaning of facial actions is construed in relation to context. To date, there are no studies investigating the role of perceiver-based context when processing emotional cues in VWM. To explore the influence of affective context on VWM for faces, we conducted two experiments using both a VWM task for emotionally expressive faces and a mood induction procedure. Affective context was manipulated by unpleasant (Experiment 1) and pleasant (Experiment 2) IAPS pictures in order to induce an affect high in motivational intensity (defensive or appetitive, respectively) compared to a low arousal control condition. Results indicated specifically increased sensitivity of VWM for angry looking faces in the neutral condition. Enhanced VWM for angry faces was prevented by inducing affects of high motivational intensity. In both experiments, affective states led to a switch from specific enhancement of angry expressions in VWM to an equally sensitive representation of all emotional expressions. Our findings demonstrate that emotional expressions are of different behavioral relevance for the receiver depending on the affective context, supporting a functional organization of VWM along with flexible resource allocation. In VWM, stimulus processing adjusts to situational requirements and transitions from a specifically prioritizing default mode in predictable environments to a sensitive, hypervigilant mode in exposure to emotional events. PMID:26379609

  2. Tissue-Specific Protein Expression in Plant Mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, C. A.; Hanson, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Although the physiological role of plant mitochondria is thought to vary in different tissues at progressive stages of development, there has been little documentation that the complement of mitochondrial proteins is altered in different plant organs. Because the phenomenon of cytoplasmic male sterility suggests an unusual function for mitochondria in floral buds, we examined the tissue-specific expression of mitochondrial proteins in petunia buds at several stages of development, using both fertile and cytoplasmic male sterile plants. On tissue prints of cryostat-sectioned buds, antibodies recognizing subunit A of the mitochondrial ATPase (ATPA) localized very differently from antibodies recognizing subunit II of the cytochrome oxidase (COXII), which indicated that mitochondria in the same tissue could differentially express mitochondrially encoded proteins. The petunia cytoplasmic male sterility-associated fused (pcf) gene encodes a protein that colocalized with ATPA and the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOA) in sporogenous tissues, where little COXII protein was found. These overlapping and differential localization patterns may provide clues to the molecular mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility. PMID:12244222

  3. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  4. Eosinophil granule proteins expressed in ocular cicatricial pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Heiligenhaus, A.; Schaller, J.; Mauss, S.; Engelbrecht, S.; Dutt, J.; Foster, C; Steuhl, K.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Blister formation and tissue damage in bullous pemphigoid have been attributed to the release of eosinophil granule proteins—namely, to eosinophil derived cationic protein (ECP) and major basic protein (MBP). In the present investigation these eosinophil granule proteins were studied in the conjunctiva of patients with ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP).
METHODS—Conjunctival biopsy specimens obtained from patients with subacute (n=8) or chronic conjunctival disease (n=13) were analysed histologically and immunohistochemically using antibodies directed against EG1 (stored and secreted ECP), EG2 (secreted ECP), MBP, CD45 (common leucocyte antigen), CD3 (pan T cell marker), and HLA-DR (class II antigen).
RESULTS—Subepithelial mononuclear cells, mast cells, and neutrophils were detected in all specimens. The number of mononuclear cells, neutrophils, CD45+ cells, CD3+ cells, and the HLA-DR expression were significantly higher in the subacute than in the chronic disease group. Some eosinophils were found in specimens from five of eight patients with subacute OCP, but in none of the patients with chronic disease. The eosinophil granule proteins (ECP and MBP) were found in the epithelium and substantia propria in patients with subacute conjunctivitis.
CONCLUSIONS—Subepithelial cell infiltration in the conjunctiva greatly differs between subacute and chronic ocular cicatricial pemphigoid specimens. The findings suggest that eosinophil granule proteins may participate in tissue damage in acute phase of inflammation in OCP.

 Keywords: ocular cicatricial pemphigoid; conjunctivitis; eosinophil derived cationic protein; major basic protein PMID:9602632

  5. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P<0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P<0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P<0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression.

  6. Somatostatin regulates tight junction proteins expression in colitis mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Xu, Hua; Tao, Liping; Lu, Jing; Cai, Lin; Wang, Chunhui

    2014-01-01

    Tight junction plays a critical role in intestinal defence. The alteration and perturbation of tight junction proteins could induce intestine barrier damage, and lead to the malabsorption of electrolytes and water. Previous studies had showed that colonic infection and inflammation could lead to the alteration of tight junction function, and somatostatin could protect intestinal epithelia. Thus, this study could explore that whether somatostatin could regulate tight junction in colitis mice. Colitis mice with diarrhea were induced by Citrobacter rodentium (CR) and Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). In CR infected model, cladudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); after octreotide treatment, claudin-1 and claudin-3 expression significantly increased compared with untreated CR infected mice (P < 0.05). In DSS colitis model, occludin and claudin-3 expression significantly decreased compared with the control mice (P < 0.05); and octreotide treatment could only significantly upregulate claudin-3 expression compared with untreated DSS colitis mice (P < 0.05). To testify our results in vivo, we repeated the models in caco-2 cells by exposed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. Coli) and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The results in vitro were consistent with in vivo study. The results suggested that somatostatin play a role in intestinal barrier protection by modulating tight junction proteins expression. PMID:24966923

  7. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  8. Stepwise optimization of a low-temperature Bacillus subtilis expression system for "difficult to express" proteins.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Norma; Homuth, Georg; Schweder, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the overproduction of "difficult to express" proteins, a low-temperature expression system for Bacillus subtilis based on the cold-inducible promoter of the desaturase-encoding des gene was constructed. Selected regulatory DNA sequence elements from B. subtilis genes known to be cold-inducible were fused to different model genes. It could be demonstrated that these regulatory elements are able to mediate increased heterologous gene expression, either by improved translation efficiency or by higher messenger RNA (mRNA) stability. In case of a cold-adapted β-galactosidase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAE79A serving as the model, significantly higher expression was achieved by fusing its coding sequence to the so-called "downstream box" sequence of cspB encoding the major B. subtilis cold-shock protein. The combination of this fusion with a cspB 5'-UTR stem-loop structure resulted in further enhancement of the β-galactosidase expression. In addition, integration of the transcription terminator of the B. subtilis cold-inducible bkd operon downstream of the target genes caused a higher mRNA stability and enabled thus a further significant increase in expression. Finally, the fully optimized expression system was validated by overproducing a B. subtilis xylanase as well as an α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the latter known for tending to form inclusion bodies. These analyses verified the applicability of the engineered expression system for extracellular and intracellular protein synthesis in B. subtilis, thereby confirming the suitability of this host organism for the overproduction of critical, poorly soluble proteins.

  9. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins in Gossypium thurberi inoculated with cotton Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fu'an; Fang, Weiping; Xie, Deyi; Zhao, Yuanming; Tang, Zhongjie; Li, Wu; Nie, Lihong; Lv, Shuping

    2012-04-01

    Thurber's cotton (Gossypium thurberi) is the wild relative of cultivated cotton. It is highly resistant to cotton Verticillium wilt, a disease that significantly affects cotton yield and quality. To reveal the mechanism of disease resistance in G. thurberi and to clone resistance-related genes, we used two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) to identify differentially expressed proteins in Thurber's cotton after inoculation with Verticillium dahliae. A total of 57 different protein spots were upregulated, including 52 known proteins representing 11% of the total protein spots. These proteins are involved in resistance to stress and disease, transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, protein processing and degradation, photosynthesis, production capacity, basic metabolism, and other processes. In addition, five disease resistance proteins showed intense upregulation, indicating that resistance genes (R genes) may play a critical role in resistance to Verticillium wilt in Thurber's cotton. Our results suggest that disease and stress resistance are the combined effects of multiple co-expressed genes. This provides a basis for further, detailed investigation into the mechanisms underlying Verticillium wilt resistance of G. thurberi and for cloning essential genes into cotton cultivars to produce Verticillium wilt resistant plants.

  10. BMP-7 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IS DOWNREGULATED IN HUMAN DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ivanac-Janković, Renata; Ćorić, Marijana; Furić-Čunko, Vesna; Lovičić, Vesna; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar

    2015-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is expressed in all parts of the normal kidney parenchyma, being highest in the epithelium of proximal tubules. It protects kidney against acute and chronic injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease, and is characterized by decreased expression of BMP-7. The aim of our study was to analyze whether the expression of BMP-7 is significantly changed in advanced stages of human diabetic nephropathy. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of BMP-7 was performed on archival material of 30 patients that underwent renal biopsy and had confirmed diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Results showed that BMP-7 was differently expressed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of proximal tubules and podocytes among all stages of diabetic nephropathy. At early stages of diabetic nephropathy, BMP-7 was strongly positive in proximal tubules and podocytes, while low expression was recorded in the majority of samples at advanced stages. In conclusion, increased expression of BMP-7 at initial stages of diabetic nephropathy with subsequent decrease at advanced stage highlights the role of BMP-7 in the protection of kidney structure and function. Further investigations should be focused on disturbances of BMP-7 receptors and signaling pathways in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Epithelial membrane protein 1 expression in ovarian serous tumors.

    PubMed

    Demirag, Guzin Gonullu; Kefeli, Mehmet; Kemal, Yasemin; Yucel, Idris

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the clinical significance of epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1) expression in ovarian serous tumors. A total of 84 cases of ovarian serous tumor (50 patients with malignant ovarian serous tumors and 34 patients with borderline and benign serous tumors) were retrospectively analyzed. Differences in the expression levels of EMP1 between the malignant and non-malignant tumor groups were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, the association between EMP1 expression and prognostic factors in malignant ovarian serous tumors was investigated. The expression levels of EMP1 were significantly reduced in all the 50 malignant ovarian serous tumors, compared with the 34 non-malignant ovarian serous tumors (P<0.000). Reduced expression of EMP1 was correlated with high grade (P=0.009) and stage (P<0.000) of malignant tumors. EMP1 expression was not observed to be correlated with any other investigated parameters, including surgery, type of operation and chemotherapy response (P>0.005). These results indicated that EMP1 may have a significant role as a negative regulator in ovarian serous tumors, and reduced EMP1 expression in serous tumors may be associated with increased disease severity.

  12. Generation of transgenic dogs that conditionally express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Kim, Teoan; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Ko, Chemyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-06-01

    We report the creation of a transgenic dog that conditionally expresses eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) under the regulation of doxycycline. Briefly, fetal fibroblasts infected with a Tet-on eGFP vector were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Subsequently reconstructed oocytes were transferred to recipients. Three clones having transgenes were born and one dog was alive. The dog showed all features of inducible expression of eGFP upon doxycycline administration, and successful breeding resulted in eGFP-positive puppies, confirming stable insertion of the transgene into the genome. This inducible dog model will be useful for a variety of medical research studies.

  13. Classification of complex information: inference of co-occurring affective states from their expressions in speech.

    PubMed

    Sobol-Shikler, Tal; Robinson, Peter

    2010-07-01

    We present a classification algorithm for inferring affective states (emotions, mental states, attitudes, and the like) from their nonverbal expressions in speech. It is based on the observations that affective states can occur simultaneously and different sets of vocal features, such as intonation and speech rate, distinguish between nonverbal expressions of different affective states. The input to the inference system was a large set of vocal features and metrics that were extracted from each utterance. The classification algorithm conducted independent pairwise comparisons between nine affective-state groups. The classifier used various subsets of metrics of the vocal features and various classification algorithms for different pairs of affective-state groups. Average classification accuracy of the 36 pairwise machines was 75 percent, using 10-fold cross validation. The comparison results were consolidated into a single ranked list of the nine affective-state groups. This list was the output of the system and represented the inferred combination of co-occurring affective states for the analyzed utterance. The inference accuracy of the combined machine was 83 percent. The system automatically characterized over 500 affective state concepts from the Mind Reading database. The inference of co-occurring affective states was validated by comparing the inferred combinations to the lexical definitions of the labels of the analyzed sentences. The distinguishing capabilities of the system were comparable to human performance.

  14. Effects of Fluoride on Expression of P450, CREM and ACT Proteins in Rat Testes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhai; Zhu, Yuchen; Liang, Chen; Qie, Mingli; Niu, Ruiyan; Sun, Zilong; Wang, Jinming; Wang, Jundong

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride (F) is an essential trace element that humans and animals ingest from water, air, and fluoride-containing products; however, excessive fluoride absorption can damage a variety of organs and tissues, including the male reproductive system. Our previous studies found that fluoride exposure lowered sperm quality and interfered with spermatogenesis; however, the exact mechanism remained unclear. Proteins cytochrome P450 (P450), cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activator of CREM in testis (ACT) play the key roles in spermatogenesis and sperm motility. To investigate whether fluoride affects the expression of P450, CREM, and ACT, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine expression levels of these proteins in testes of rats administered 100 mg NaF/L for 2 weeks via drinking water. The results showed that P450 expression was decreased while CREM and ACT expression was increased in the fluoride group, compared to the control. These data suggest that fluoride can impair male reproduction by affecting expression of P450, CREM, and ACT in the testes.

  15. Differential Expression of In Vivo and In Vitro Protein Profile of Outer Membrane of Acidovorax avenae Subsp. avenae

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hui; Li, Bin; Jabeen, Amara; Li, Liping; Liu, He; Kube, Michael; Xie, Guanlin; Wang, Yanli; Sun, Guochang

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane (OM) proteins play a significant role in bacterial pathogenesis. In this work, we examined and compared the expression of the OM proteins of the rice pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1, a Gram-negative bacterium, both in an in vitro culture medium and in vivo rice plants. Global proteomic profiling of A. avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1 comparing in vivo and in vitro conditions revealed the differential expression of proteins affecting the survival and pathogenicity of the rice pathogen in host plants. The shotgun proteomics analysis of OM proteins resulted in the identification of 97 proteins in vitro and 62 proteins in vivo by mass spectrometry. Among these OM proteins, there is a high number of porins, TonB-dependent receptors, lipoproteins of the NodT family, ABC transporters, flagellins, and proteins of unknown function expressed under both conditions. However, the major proteins such as phospholipase and OmpA domain containing proteins were expressed in vitro, while the proteins such as the surface anchored protein F, ATP-dependent Clp protease, OmpA and MotB domain containing proteins were expressed in vivo. This may indicate that these in vivo OM proteins have roles in the pathogenicity of A. avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-1. In addition, the LC-MS/MS identification of OmpA and MotB validated the in silico prediction of the existance of Type VI secretion system core components. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal the in vitro and in vivo protein profiles, in combination with LC-MS/MS mass spectra, in silico OM proteome and in silico genome wide analysis, of pathogenicity or plant host required proteins of a plant pathogenic bacterium. PMID:23166741

  16. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Kosinová, Lucie; Cahová, Monika; Fábryová, Eva; Týcová, Irena; Koblas, Tomáš; Leontovyč, Ivan; Saudek, František; Kříž, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3) in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0-120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48-120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information from 48 hrs onwards.

  17. HMGB4 is expressed by neuronal cells and affects the expression of genes involved in neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rouhiainen, Ari; Zhao, Xiang; Vanttola, Päivi; Qian, Kui; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Gransalke, Kathleen; Grönholm, Mikaela; Unni, Emmanual; Meistrich, Marvin; Tian, Li; Auvinen, Petri; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    HMGB4 is a new member in the family of HMGB proteins that has been characterized in sperm cells, but little is known about its functions in somatic cells. Here we show that HMGB4 and the highly similar rat Transition Protein 4 (HMGB4L1) are expressed in neuronal cells. Both proteins had slow mobility in nucleus of living NIH-3T3 cells. They interacted with histones and their differential expression in transformed cells of the nervous system altered the post-translational modification statuses of histones in vitro. Overexpression of HMGB4 in HEK 293T cells made cells more susceptible to cell death induced by topoisomerase inhibitors in an oncology drug screening array and altered variant composition of histone H3. HMGB4 regulated over 800 genes in HEK 293T cells with a p-value ≤0.013 (n = 3) in a microarray analysis and displayed strongest association with adhesion and histone H2A –processes. In neuronal and transformed cells HMGB4 regulated the expression of an oligodendrocyte marker gene PPP1R14a and other neuronal differentiation marker genes. In conclusion, our data suggests that HMGB4 is a factor that regulates chromatin and expression of neuronal differentiation markers. PMID:27608812

  18. Protein expression in Vibrio parahaemolyticus 690 subjected to sublethal heat and ethanol shock treatments.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Ho, Wei-Li; Yu, Roch-Chui; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2008-11-01

    Cells of Vibrio parahaemolyticus 690 were subjected either to heat shock at 42 degrees C for 45 min or to ethanol shock in the presence of 5% ethanol for 60 min. The protein profiles of the unstressed and stressed V. parahaemolyticus cells were compared. Additionally, the induction of DnaK- and GroEL-like proteins in the unstressed and stressed cells of V. parahaemolyticus was also examined. Analysis with one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that three proteins with molecular masses of 93, 77, and 58 kDa were induced by both heat shock and ethanol shock. The protein patterns revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis were more detailed than those revealed by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE. It was found that heat shock and ethanol shock affected the expression of a total of 28 proteins. Among them, four proteins with molecular masses of 94, 32.1, 26.7, and 25.7 kDa were enhanced by both heat shock and ethanol shock. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis showed the presence of a GroEL-like protein with a molecular mass of 61 kDa in the test organism, with the heat-shocked and ethanol-shocked cells producing a GroEL-like protein in a larger quantity than the unstressed cells. However, DnaK-like protein was not detectable in either the unstressed or the stressed cells.

  19. Interspecies systems biology uncovers metabolites affecting C. elegans gene expression and life history traits.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Ritter, Ashlyn D; Yilmaz, L Safak; Rosebrock, Adam P; Caudy, Amy A; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2014-02-13

    Diet greatly influences gene expression and physiology. In mammals, elucidating the effects and mechanisms of individual nutrients is challenging due to the complexity of both the animal and its diet. Here, we used an interspecies systems biology approach with Caenorhabditis elegans and two of its bacterial diets, Escherichia coli and Comamonas aquatica, to identify metabolites that affect the animal's gene expression and physiology. We identify vitamin B12 as the major dilutable metabolite provided by Comamonas aq. that regulates gene expression, accelerates development, and reduces fertility but does not affect lifespan. We find that vitamin B12 has a dual role in the animal: it affects development and fertility via the methionine/S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) cycle and breaks down the short-chain fatty acid propionic acid, preventing its toxic buildup. Our interspecies systems biology approach provides a paradigm for understanding complex interactions between diet and physiology.

  20. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  1. Autophagy and lysosomal related protein expression patterns in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Mitrakas, Achileas; Kalamida, Dimitra; Zois, Christos E; Haider, Syed; Piperidou, Charitomeni; Pappa, Aglaia; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; Koukourakis, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells are resistant to apoptotic stimuli with autophagic death prevailing under cytotoxic stress. Autophagy interfering agents may represent a new strategy to test in combination with chemo-radiation. We investigated the patterns of expression of autophagy related proteins (LC3A, LC3B, p62, Beclin 1, ULK1 and ULK2) in a series of patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Experiments with glioblastoma cell lines (T98 and U87) were also performed to assess autophagic response under conditions simulating the adverse intratumoral environment. Glioblastomas showed cytoplasmic overexpression of autophagic proteins in a varying extent, so that cases could be grouped into low and high expression groups. 10/23, 5/23, 13/23, 5/23, 8/23 and 9/23 cases examined showed extensive expression of LC3A, LC3B, Beclin 1, Ulk 1, Ulk 2 and p62, respectively. Lysosomal markers Cathepsin D and LAMP2a, as well as the lyososomal biogenesis transcription factor TFEB were frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas (10/23, 11/23, and 10/23 cases, respectively). TFEB was directly linked with PTEN, Cathepsin D, HIF1α, LC3B, Beclin 1 and p62 expression. PTEN was also significantly related with LC3B but not LC3A expression, in both immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Confocal microscopy in T98 and U87 cell lines showed distinct identity of LC3A and LC3B autophagosomes. The previously reported stone-like structure (SLS) pattern of LC3 expression was related with prognosis. SLS were inducible in glioblastoma cell lines under exposure to acidic conditions and 2DG mediated glucose antagonism. The present study provides the basis for autophagic characterization of human glioblastoma for further translational studies and targeted therapy trials.

  2. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  3. Simulated microgravity affects semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase expression in recombinant Escherichia coli by HPLC-ESI-QQQ analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqian; Lai, Chengjun; Duan, Jinyan; Guan, Ningxin; Ullah, Kaleem; Deng, Yulin

    2012-05-01

    Simulated microgravity has been reported to affect the gene, protein expression, and its function in the cells. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO; E.C.1.4.3.6.) is widely distributed in vascular cells, smooth muscle cells, and adipocytes. It is noteworthy whether the expression of SSAO is affected under simulated microgravity or not. In this study, an SSAO-transformed Escherichia coli BL21 was constructed firstly. Then, a sensitive, selective, and accurate method based on high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization triple quadrupole (HPLC-ESI-QQQ) was developed to determine the amount of SSAO in the E. coli BL21. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 5.0 and 10 fmol, respectively. Finally, SSAO expression in the recombinant E. coli BL21 was evaluated with various gravity and temperature conditions by HPLC-ESI-QQQ analysis. It is interesting that the tendency in the alteration of SSAO under simulated microgravity showed temperature difference. At 18 °C, the amount of SSAO in the inclusion bodies and soluble fractions under the simulated microgravity increased by 83% and 116%, respectively, compared with normal gravity. However, the decrease by 38% and 49% in the inclusion bodies and soluble fractions under the simulated microgravity was observed at 37 °C. Results obtained here indicate that the SSAO expression under simulated microgravity is dramatically sensitive to the temperature. On the other hand, a novel bioreactor from this study may also be useful for the recombinant protein expression in the field of gene engineering.

  4. Disposable bioreactors for inoculum production and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Regine; Löffelholz, Christian; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Disposable bioreactors have been increasingly implemented over the past ten years. This relates to both R & D and commercial manufacture, in particular, in animal cell-based processes. Among the numerous disposable bioreactors which are available today, wave-mixed bag bioreactors and stirred bioreactors are predominant. Whereas wave-mixed bag bioreactors represent the system of choice for inoculum production, stirred systems are often preferred for protein expression. For this reason, the authors present protocols instructing the reader how to use the wave-mixed BIOSTAT CultiBag RM 20 L for inoculum production and the stirred UniVessel SU 2 L for recombinant protein production at benchtop scale. All methods described are based on a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension cell line expressing the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP).

  5. Ribozymes, riboswitches and beyond: regulation of gene expression without proteins

    PubMed Central

    Serganov, Alexander; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Although various functions of RNA are carried out in conjunction with proteins, some catalytic RNAs, or ribozymes, which contribute to a range of cellular processes, require little or no assistance from proteins. Furthermore, the discovery of metabolite-sensing riboswitches and other types of RNA sensors has revealed RNA-based mechanisms that cells use to regulate gene expression in response to internal and external changes. Structural studies have shown how these RNAs can carry out a range of functions. In addition, the contribution of ribozymes and riboswitches to gene expression is being revealed as far more widespread than was previously appreciated. These findings have implications for understanding how cellular functions might have evolved from RNA-based origins. PMID:17846637

  6. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  7. Effect of Butyrate on Collagen Expression, Cell Viability, Cell Cycle Progression and Related Proteins Expression of MG-63 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Ling; Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Tang, Chia-Mei; Wang, Tong-Mei; Liu, Hsin-Cheng; Liao, Ming-Wei; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Chan, Chiu-Po; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Aims Butyric acid is one major metabolic product generated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria of periodontal and root canal infection. Butyric acid affects the activity of periodontal cells such as osteoblasts. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of butyrate on MG-63 osteoblasts. Methods MG-63 cells were exposed to butyrate and cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and cell cycle-related proteins were measured by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. Cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Results Exposure to butyrate suppressed cell proliferation, and induced G2/M (8 and 16 mM) cell cycle arrest of MG-63 cells. Some cell apoptosis was noted. The mRNA expression of cdc2 and cyclin-B1 decreased after exposure to butyrate. The protein expression of type I collagen, cdc2 and cyclin B1 were decreased, whereas the expression of p21, p27 and p57 was stimulated. Under the treatment of butyrate, ROS production in MG-63 cells markedly increased. Conclusions The secretion of butyric acid by periodontal and root canal microorganisms may inhibit bone cell growth and matrix turnover. This is possibly due to induction of cell cycle arrest and ROS generation and inhibition of collagen expression. These results suggest the involvement of butyric acid in the pathogenesis of periodontal and periapical tissue destruction by impairing bone healing responses. PMID:27893752

  8. Peripheral lipopolysaccharide administration transiently affects expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, corticotropin and proopiomelanocortin in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Schnydrig, Sabine; Korner, Lukas; Landweer, Svenja; Ernst, Beat; Walker, Gaby; Otten, Uwe; Kunz, Dieter

    2007-12-11

    Peripheral inflammation induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause functional impairments in the brain affecting memory and learning. One of mechanisms may be the interference with neurotrophin (NT) expression and function. In the current study we administered a single, high dose of LPS (3mg/kg, i.p.) into mice and investigated changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression within 1-6 days after LPS injection. Crude synaptosomes were isolated from brain tissue and subjected to Western-blot analyses. We found transient reductions in synaptosomal proBDNF- and BDNF protein expression, with a maximal decrease at day 3 as compared to saline injected controls. The time course of reduction of BDNF mRNA in whole brain extracts parallels the decrease in protein levels in synaptosomes. LPS effects in the central nervous system (CNS) are known to crucially involve the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We analysed the time course of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)- and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expression. As observed for BDNF-, CRH- and POMC mRNA levels are also significantly reduced on day 3 indicating a comparable time course. These results suggest that peripheral inflammation causes a reduction of trophic supply in the brain, including BDNF at synaptic sites. The mechanisms involved could be a negative feedback of the activated HPA axis.

  9. Hippocampal expression of the calcium sensor protein visinin-like protein-1 in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Braunewell, Karl-Heinz; Spilker, Christina; Danos, Peter; Baumann, Bruno; Funke, Sieglinde; Diekmann, Silvia; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2002-03-25

    Hippocampal cytoarchitectural abnormalities may be part of the cerebral substrate of schizophrenia. Amongst the chemical components being abnormal in brains of schizophrenics are altered calcium concentrations and reduced expression of the neurotrophin receptor, trkB. We studied by immunohistochemical methods the distribution of visinin-like protein-1 (VILIP-1), which is a calcium sensor protein and at the same time a trkB mRNA binding protein, in hippocampi of nine schizophrenic patients and nine matched control subjects. In normal hippocampi VILIP-1 immunoreactivity was found in multiple pyramidal cells and interneurons. A portion of VILIP-1 immunoreactive interneurons co-express calretinin (60%) and parvalbumin (<10%). In schizophrenics fewer pyramidal cells but more interneurons were immunostained. Our data point to an involvement of the protein in the altered hippocampal circuitry in schizophrenia.

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on the expressed proteins in the foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, Karine; Dang Vu, Khanh; Shareck, François; Lacroix, Monique

    2012-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis method with UV detection was developed to analyze protein composition of the foodborne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Bacterial samples containing 109 CFU/ml, obtained after two cycles of incubations of 24 h, were gamma irradiated at different doses of 1.2, 3.5 and 2.9 kGy to respectively create damage cells, to kill cells and to provoke viable but non cultivable cells (VBNC). It was observed that an irradiation at a sensitive dose of 1.2 kGy caused a significantly increase in the protein with molecular weight (MW) of 17.7 kDa (from 0.61% to 1.2%). This treatment also caused decreases in the expressed proteins with the MWs of 16.3 kDa (from 6.2% to 5.3%) and of 23.4 kDa (from 4.0% to 2.30%). Irradiation at a VBCN dose of 2.9 kGy caused increases in expressed proteins with the MWs of 17.7 kDa (from 0.61% to 3.43%), 18.7 kDa (from 1.04% to 4.30%), 19.5 kDa (from 0.71% to 2.30%), 21.1 kDa (from 1.20% to 3.80%). Moreover, this treatment (2.9 kGy) also caused significantly decreases (P≤0.05) in the expressed proteins with the MW of 30.7 kDa (from 8.6% to 5.15%), 36.3 kDa (from 3.1% to 2.7%) and 40.5 kDa (from 11.3% to 8.5%). Finally, for the irradiation at a lethal dose of 3.5 kGy, it can be found that the expressed proteins with the MW of 17.7 kDa, 18.7 kDa and 19.5 kDa were increased less than that of expressed proteins at the VCNC dose (2.9 kGy) and these might be the very important proteins which are responsible for the survival of the S. aureus. Further, there were also the decreases in expressed proteins with the MW of 30.7 kDa, 36.3 kDa and 75.1 kDa at this dose of treatment (3.5 kGy) which can be expected that these proteins are seriously affected at high dose of γ-irradiation treatment.

  11. Sprouty4 mRNA variants and protein expressions in breast and lung-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Doriguzzi, Angelina; Salhi, Jihen; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Sprouty proteins are modulators of mitogen-induced signalling processes and are therefore hypothesized to affect malignant diseases. As a member of the Sprouty family, Sprouty4 has been previously shown to function as a tumour suppressor in lung and breast cancer. The present study analysed the expression of two known Sprouty4 splice variants in cells established from malignant and normal lung and breast tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. The results indicated that the expression of the two messenger RNA (mRNA) variants was reduced in the cells derived from malignant tissue in comparison to the normal counterparts. Although the expression of the two splice variants were associated in both tissue types, on average, the relative expression of the longer variant was slightly increased in malignant cells compared with normal tissues. Notably, the protein levels reflected the expression observed at the mRNA level only in breast-derived cells. Contrarily, with regards to the measured mRNA levels, Sprouty4 protein was disproportional augmented in lung cells known to harbour the mutated K-Ras gene. PMID:27895786

  12. The class I protein AtTCP15 modulates plant development through a pathway that overlaps with the one affected by CIN-like TCP proteins.

    PubMed

    Uberti-Manassero, Nora G; Lucero, Leandro E; Viola, Ivana L; Vegetti, Abelardo C; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2012-01-01

    The function of the class I TCP transcription factor TCP15 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been studied through the analysis of plants that express a fusion of this protein to the EAR repressor domain. Constitutive expression of TCP15-EAR produces growth arrest at the seedling stage, before leaf emergence. Expression of the repressor fusion from the AtTCP15 promoter produces small plants with leaves whose margins progressively curve upwards, starting from the basal part of the lamina. Leaves contain smaller and less differentiated cells, both on the adaxial and abaxial sides. The abaxial domain is relatively enlarged, with disorganized cells separated by empty spaces. TCP15-EAR also affects the growth of leaf petioles, flower pedicels, and anther filaments. Flowers show reduced elongation of the three outer whorls and altered gynoecia with irregular carpel surfaces and enlarged repla. Ectopic stigma-like structures develop from medial and basal parts of the replum. TCP15-EAR produces an increase in expression of the boundary-specific genes LOB, CUC1, and CUC2. Changes in CUC1 and CUC2 expression can be explained by the existence of lower levels of miR164 in leaves and the repression of IAA3/SHY2 and the SAUR-like gene At1g29460 in leaves and flowers. TCP15 binds to the promoter regions of IAA3/SHY2 and At1g29460, suggesting that these genes may be direct targets of the transcription factor. The results indicate that TCP15 regulates the expression of boundary-specific genes through a pathway that affects auxin homeostasis and partially overlaps with the one modulated by class II CIN-like TCP proteins.

  13. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert S; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C; Campbell, Peter C; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P; Wood, Craig C

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia.

  14. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert S.; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C.; Campbell, Peter C.; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P.; Wood, Craig C.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia. PMID:28316608

  15. Isotopomer distributions in amino acids from a highly expressed protein as a proxy for those from total protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Afshan; Shaikh, Afshan S.; Tang, Yinjie; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D.

    2008-06-27

    {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis provides valuable information about bacterial physiology. Though many biological processes rely on the synergistic functions of microbial communities, study of individual organisms in a mixed culture using existing flux analysis methods is difficult. Isotopomer-based flux analysis typically relies on hydrolyzed amino acids from a homogeneous biomass. Thus metabolic flux analysis of a given organism in a mixed culture requires its separation from the mixed culture. Swift and efficient cell separation is difficult and a major hurdle for isotopomer-based flux analysis of mixed cultures. Here we demonstrate the use of a single highly-expressed protein to analyze the isotopomer distribution of amino acids from one organism. Using the model organism E. coli expressing a plasmid-borne, his-tagged Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), we show that induction of GFP does not affect E. coli growth kinetics or the isotopomer distribution in nine key metabolites. Further, the isotopomer labeling patterns of amino acids derived from purified GFP and total cell protein are indistinguishable, indicating that amino acids from a purified protein can be used to infer metabolic fluxes of targeted organisms in a mixed culture. This study provides the foundation to extend isotopomer-based flux analysis to study metabolism of individual strains in microbial communities.

  16. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  17. Characterization of Soybean Storage and Allergen Proteins Affected by Environmental and Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry; Khan, Farooq; Song, Qijian; Lakshman, Sukla; Cregan, Perry; Scott, Roy; Shipe, Emerson; Garrett, Wesley

    2016-02-17

    There is limited information on the influence of genetic and environmental variability on soybean protein composition. This study aimed to determine the role of genotype (G), environments (E), and the interrelationship of genotype and environment (G×E) on soybean seed protein. Three sets of nine soybean genotypes were grown in replicated trials at Maryland, South Carolina, and South Dakota. At each location, the nine genotypes were grown with two planting/sowing dates. We applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to study the variability of soybean storage and allergen proteins. Statistical analysis of 47 storage and 8 allergen proteins, in terms of differentially expressed protein spots significant at the p<0.005 level, was performed. We found more spots that showed statistically significant differences in expression among E compared to G and G×E interaction.

  18. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears.

  19. Phylogeny and expression of carbonic anhydrase-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are found in many organisms, in which they contribute to several important biological processes. The vertebrate α-CA family consists of 16 subfamilies, three of which (VIII, X and XI) consist of acatalytic proteins. These are named carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs), and their inactivity is due to absence of one or more Zn-binding histidine residues. In this study, we analyzed and evaluated the distribution of genes encoding CARPs in different organisms using bioinformatic methods, and studied their expression in mouse tissues using immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. Results We collected 84 sequences, of which 22 came from novel or improved gene models which we created from genome data. The distribution of CARP VIII covers vertebrates and deuterostomes, and CARP X appears to be universal in the animal kingdom. CA10-like genes have had a separate history of duplications in the tetrapod and fish lineages. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that duplication of CA10 into CA11 has occurred only in tetrapods (found in mammals, frogs, and lizards), whereas an independent duplication of CA10 was found in fishes. We suggest the name CA10b for the second fish isoform. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a high expression level of CARP VIII in the mouse cerebellum, cerebrum, and also moderate expression in the lung, liver, salivary gland, and stomach. These results also demonstrated low expression in the colon, kidney, and Langerhans islets. CARP X was moderately expressed in the cerebral capillaries and the lung and very weakly in the stomach and heart. Positive signals for CARP XI were observed in the cerebellum, cerebrum, liver, stomach, small intestine, colon, kidney, and testis. In addition, the results of real-time quantitative PCR confirmed a wide distribution for the Car8 and Car11 mRNAs, whereas the expression of the Car10 mRNA was restricted to the frontal cortex, parietal cortex, cerebellum, midbrain

  20. Oxidative stress affects FET proteins localization and alternative pre-mRNA processing in cellular models of ALS.

    PubMed

    Svetoni, Francesca; Caporossi, Daniela; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2014-10-01

    FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15 are members of the FET family of DNA and RNA binding proteins, involved in multiple steps of DNA and RNA processing and implicated in the regulation of gene expression and cell-signaling. All members of the FET family contribute to human pathologies, as they are involved in sarcoma translocations and neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in FUS/TLS, in EWSR1 and in TAF15 genescause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal human neurodegenerative disease that affects primarily motor neurons and is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons and degradation of the neuromuscular junctions.ALS-associated FET mutations cause FET protein relocalization into cytoplasmic aggregates, thus impairing their normal function. Protein aggregation has been suggested as a co-opting factor during the disease pathogenesis. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of FET proteins contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may alter RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. Interestingly, oxidative stress, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, triggers the accumulation of mutant FUS in cytoplasmic stress granules where it binds and sequester wild-type FUS.In order to evaluate the role of FET proteins in ALS and their involvement in the response to oxidative stress, we have developed cellular models of ALS expressing ALS-related FET mutants in neuroblastoma cell lines. Upon treatment with sodium arsenite, cells were analysed by immunofluorescence to monitor the localization of wild-type and mutated FET proteins. Furthermore, we have characterized signal transduction pathways and cell survival upon oxidative stress in our cellular models of ALS. Interestingly, we found that EWS mutant proteins display a different localization from FUS mutants and neither wild-type nor mutated EWS protein translocate into stress granules upon oxidative stress treatment. Collectively, our data provide a new link between the oxidative stress

  1. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2α, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2α, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  2. Matrix Gla Protein expression pattern in the early avian embryo.

    PubMed

    Correia, Elizabeth; Conceição, Natércia; Cancela, M Leonor; Belo, José A

    2016-01-01

    MGP (Matrix Gla Protein) is an extracellular matrix vitamin K dependent protein previously identified as a physiological inhibitor of calcification and shown to be well conserved among vertebrates during evolution. MGP is involved in other mechanisms such as TGF-β and BMP activity, and a proposed modulator of cell-matrix interactions. MGP is expressed early in vertebrate development although its role has not been clarified. Previous work in the chicken embryo found MGP localization predominantly in the aorta and aortic valve base, but no data is available earlier in development. Here we examined MGP expression pattern using whole-mount in situ hybridization and histological sectioning during the initial stages of chick development. MGP was first detected at HH10 in the head and in the forming dorsal aorta. At the moment of the onset of blood circulation, MGP was expressed additionally in the venous plexus which will remodel into the vitelline arteries. By E2.25, it is clear that the vitelline arteries are MGP positive. MGP expression progresses centrifugally throughout the area vasculosa of the yolk sac. Between stages HH17 and HH19 MGP is seen in the dorsal aorta, heart, notochord, nephric duct, roof plate, vitelline arteries and in the yolk sac, beneath main arterial branches and in the vicinity of several vessels and venules. MGP expression persists in these areas at least until E4.5. These data suggest that MGP expression could be associated with cell migration and differentiation and to the onset of angiogenesis in the developing chick embryo. This data has biomedical relevance by pointing to the potential use of chick embryo explants to study molecules involved in artery calcification.

  3. A baculovirus-mediated strategy for full-length plant virus coat protein expression and purification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Garlic production is severely affected by virus infection, causing a decrease in productivity and quality. There are no virus-free cultivars and garlic-infecting viruses are difficult to purify, which make specific antibody production very laborious. Since high quality antisera against plant viruses are important tools for serological detection, we have developed a method to express and purify full-length plant virus coat proteins using baculovirus expression system and insects as bioreactors. Results In this work, we have fused the full-length coat protein (cp) gene from the Garlic Mite-borne Filamentous Virus (GarMbFV) to the 3′-end of the Polyhedrin (polh) gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). The recombinant baculovirus was amplified in insect cell culture and the virus was used to infect Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. Thus, the recombinant fused protein was easily purified from insect cadavers using sucrose gradient centrifugation and analyzed by Western Blotting. Interestingly, amorphous crystals were produced in the cytoplasm of cells infected with the recombinant virus containing the chimeric-protein gene but not in cells infected with the wild type and recombinant virus containing the hexa histidine tagged Polh. Moreover, the chimeric protein was used to immunize rats and generate antibodies against the target protein. The antiserum produced was able to detect plants infected with GarMbFV, which had been initially confirmed by RT-PCR. Conclusions The expression of a plant virus full-length coat protein fused to the baculovirus Polyhedrin in recombinant baculovirus-infected insects was shown to produce high amounts of the recombinant protein which was easily purified and efficiently used to generate specific antibodies. Therefore, this strategy can potentially be used for the development of plant virus diagnostic kits for those viruses that are difficult to purify, are present in low titers or are

  4. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  5. Histone modifying proteins Gcn5 and Hda1 affect flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during high-gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, Judith; Brandt, Anders

    2010-02-01

    The performance of yeast is often limited by the constantly changing environmental conditions present during high-gravity fermentation. Poor yeast performance contributes to incomplete and slow utilization of the main fermentable sugars which can lead to flavour problems in beer production. The expression of the FLO and MAL genes, which are important for the performance of yeast during industrial fermentations, is affected by complex proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS) resulting in the induction of flocculation and improved maltose fermentation capacity during the early stages of high-gravity fermentation. In this study, we investigated a possible role for other histone modifying proteins. To this end, we tested a number of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases and we report that flocculation is induced in absence of the histone deacetylase Hda1 or the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 during high-gravity fermentation. The absence of Gcn5 protein also improved utilization of high concentrations of maltose. Deletion of SIR2 encoding the HDA of the silent informator regulator complex, did not affect flocculation under high-gravity fermentation conditions. Despite the obvious roles for Hda1 and Gcn5 in flocculation, this work indicates that COMPASS mediated silencing is the most important amongst the histone modifying components to control the expression of the FLO genes during high-gravity fermentation.

  6. Coffee induces breast cancer resistance protein expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Marina; Umezawa, Kazuo; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Coffee is a beverage that is consumed world-wide on a daily basis and is known to induce a series of metabolic and pharmacological effects, especially in the digestive tract. However, little is known concerning the effects of coffee on transporters in the gastrointestinal tract. To elucidate the effect of coffee on intestinal transporters, we investigated its effect on expression of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in a human colorectal cancer cell line, Caco-2. Coffee induced BCRP gene expression in Caco-2 cells in a coffee-dose dependent manner. Coffee treatment of Caco-2 cells also increased the level of BCRP protein, which corresponded to induction of gene expression, and also increased cellular efflux activity, as judged by Hoechst33342 accumulation. None of the major constituents of coffee tested could induce BCRP gene expression. The constituent of coffee that mediated this induction was extractable with ethyl acetate and was produced during the roasting process. Dehydromethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, inhibited coffee-mediated induction of BCRP gene expression, suggesting involvement of NF-κB in this induction. Our data suggest that daily consumption of coffee might induce BCRP expression in the gastrointestinal tract and may affect the bioavailability of BCRP substrates.

  7. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano C; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS.

  8. Salinity-induced changes in protein expression in the halophytic plant Nitraria sphaerocarpa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Cheng, Tielong; Wang, Pengkai; Liu, Weidong; Xiao, Jiao; Yang, Yunqiang; Hu, Xiangyang; Jiang, Zeping; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2012-09-18

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress that inhibits plant growth and development. Plants have evolved complex adaptive mechanisms that respond to salinity stress. However, an understanding of how plants respond to salinity stress is far from being complete. In particular, how plants survive salinity stress via alterations to their intercellular metabolic networks and defense systems is largely unknown. To delineate the responses of Nitraria sphaerocarpa cell suspensions to salinity, changes in their protein expression patterns were characterized by a comparative proteomic approach. Cells that had been treated with 150 mM NaCl for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 days developed several stress-related phenotypes, including those affecting morphology and biochemical activities. Of ~1100 proteins detected in 2-DE gel patterns, 130 proteins showed differences in abundance with more than 1.5-fold when cells were stressed by salinity. All but one of these proteins was identified by MS and database searching. The 129 spots contained 111 different proteins, including those involved in signal transduction, cell rescue/defense, cytoskeleton and cell cycle, protein folding and assembly, which were the most significantly affected. Taken together, our results provide a foundation to understand the mechanism of salinity response.

  9. Expression of the human blood coagulation protein factor XIIIa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: dependence of the expression levels from host-vector systems and medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Bröker, M; Bäuml, O; Göttig, A; Ochs, J; Bodenbenner, M; Amann, E

    1991-03-01

    The human blood coagulation protein Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae employing Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vectors based on a 2-mu plasmid. Several factors affecting high production yield of recombinant FXIIIa were analysed. The use of the regulatable GAL-CYC1 hybrid promoter resulted in higher FXIIIa expression when compared with the constitutive ADCI promoter. Screening for suitable yeast strains for expression of FXIIIa under the transcriptional control of the GAL-CYC1 hybrid promoter revealed a broad spectrum of productivity. No obvious correlation between the expression rate and the genetic markers of the strains could be identified. The medium composition markedly influenced the FXIIIa expression rates. The expression of FXIIIa was strictly regulated by the carbon source. Glucose as the only sugar and energy source repressed the synthesis of FXIIIa, whereas addition of galactose induced FXIIIa expression. Special feeding schemes resulted in a productivity of up to 100 mg FXIIIa/l in shake flasks.

  10. A Highly Conserved Residue in HIV-1 Nef Alpha Helix 2 Modulates Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron L.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Coutu, Mathieu; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; Arts, Eric J.; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extensive genetic diversity is a defining characteristic of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and poses a significant barrier to the development of an effective vaccine. To better understand the impact of this genetic diversity on the HIV-1 pathogenic factor Nef, we compiled a panel of reference strains from the NIH Los Alamos HIV Database. Initial sequence analysis identified point mutations at Nef residues 13, 84, and 92 in subtype C reference strain C.BR92025 from Brazil. Functional analysis revealed impaired major histocompatibility complex class I and CD4 downregulation of strain C.BR92025 Nef, which corresponded to decreased protein expression. Metabolic labeling demonstrated that strain C.BR92025 Nef has a greater rate of protein turnover than subtype B reference strain B.JRFL that, on the basis of mutational analysis, is related to Nef residue A84. An alanine-to-valine substitution at position 84, located in alpha helix 2 of Nef, was sufficient to alter the rate of turnover of an otherwise highly expressed Nef protein. In conclusion, these findings highlight HIV-1 Nef residue A84 as a major determinant of protein expression that may offer an additional avenue to disrupt or mediate the effects of this key HIV-1 pathogenic factor. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Nef protein has been established as a key pathogenic determinant of HIV/AIDS, but there is little knowledge of how the extensive genetic diversity of HIV-1 affects Nef function. Upon compiling a set of subtype-specific reference strains, we identified a subtype C reference strain, C.BR92025, that contained natural polymorphisms at otherwise highly conserved residues 13, 84, and 92. Interestingly, strain C.BR92025 Nef displayed impaired Nef function and had decreased protein expression. We have demonstrated that strain C.BR92025 Nef has a higher rate of protein turnover than highly expressed Nef proteins and that this higher rate of protein turnover is due to an alanine-to-valine substitution

  11. DNA demethylation induced by 5-azacytidine does not affect fragile X expression.

    PubMed Central

    Glover, T W; Coyle-Morris, J; Pearce-Birge, L; Berger, C; Gemmill, R M

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the role of DNA demethylation in fragile X expression. Fragile X positive lymphoblastoid cells were treated with 5-azacytidine and harvested for analysis of fragile X expression both directly following treatment and after a recovery period in the absence of the drug. The effectiveness of 5-azacytidine treatment in inducing DNA demethylation was concurrently monitored by analysis of methylation changes at random autosomal loci in isolated DNA from treated cells. Under conditions where 5-azacytidine was found to inhibit fragile X expression, no DNA demethylation was observed. At the time when demethylation did occur, fragile X expression was not affected. These results strongly indicate that DNA demethylation is not involved in fragile X expression. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2420174

  12. The Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set: validity and reliability from untrained adults.

    PubMed

    LoBue, Vanessa; Thrasher, Cat

    2014-01-01

    Emotional development is one of the largest and most productive areas of psychological research. For decades, researchers have been fascinated by how humans respond to, detect, and interpret emotional facial expressions. Much of the research in this area has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing various facial expressions. Here we introduce a new stimulus set of emotional facial expressions into the domain of research on emotional development-The Child Affective Facial Expression set (CAFE). The CAFE set features photographs of a racially and ethnically diverse group of 2- to 8-year-old children posing for six emotional facial expressions-angry, fearful, sad, happy, surprised, and disgusted-and a neutral face. In the current work, we describe the set and report validity and reliability data on the set from 100 untrained adult participants.

  13. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments.

  14. Structure and Expression of a Novel Compact Myelin Protein - Small VCP-Interacting Protein (SVIP)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiawen; Peng, Dungeng; Voehler, Markus; Sanders, Charles R.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) was initially identified as one of many cofactors regulating the valosin containing protein (VCP), an AAA+ ATPase involved in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD). Our previous study showed that SVIP is expressed exclusively in the nervous system. In the present study, SVIP and VCP were seen to be co-localized in neuronal cell bodies. Interestingly, we also observed that SVIP co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin, where VCP was absent. Furthermore, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic measurements, we determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). However, upon binding to the surface of membranes containing a net negative charge, the helical content of SVIP increases dramatically. These findings provide structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes. PMID:24055875

  15. Feeding modality affects muscle protein deposition by influencing protein synthesis, but not degradation in muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs can serve as dual-use models for nutrition research in animal agriculture and biomedical fields. To determine how feeding modality by either intermittent bolus or continuous schedule affects protein anabolism and catabolism, neonatal pigs (n = 6/group, 9-d-old) were overnight fasted (F...

  16. Protein body formation in stable transgenic tobacco expressing elastin-like polypeptide and hydrophobin fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants are recognized as an efficient and inexpensive system to produce valuable recombinant proteins. Two different strategies have been commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants: transient expression mediated by Agrobacterium; or stable transformation of the plant genome. However, the use of plants as bioreactors still faces two main limitations: low accumulation levels of some recombinant proteins and lack of efficient purification methods. Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), hydrophobin I (HFBI) and Zera® are three fusion partners found to increase the accumulation levels of recombinant proteins and induce the formation of protein bodies (PBs) in leaves when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transient expression assays. In this study the effects of ELP and HFBI fusion tags on recombinant protein accumulation levels and PB formation was examined in stable transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. Results The accumulation of recombinant protein and PB formation was evaluated in two cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to ELP or HFBI, both targeted and retrieved to the ER. The ELP and HFBI tags increased the accumulation of the recombinant protein and induced the formation of PBs in leaves of stable transgenic plants from both cultivars. Furthermore, these tags induced the formation of PBs in a concentration-dependent manner, where a specific level of recombinant protein accumulation was required for PBs to appear. Moreover, agro-infiltration of plants accumulating low levels of recombinant protein with p19, a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), increased accumulation levels in four independent transgenic lines, suggesting that PTGS might have caused the low accumulation levels in these plants. Conclusion The use of ELP and HFBI tags as fusion partners in stable transgenic plants of tobacco is feasible and promising. In a constitutive environment, these tags

  17. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  18. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  19. Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

  20. Happy babies, chatty toddlers: infant positive affect facilitates early expressive, but not receptive language.

    PubMed

    Laake, Lauren M; Bridgett, David J

    2014-02-01

    Eighty-three mother-infant dyads participated in this study. Positive affect (PA) broadly, along with fine-grained aspects of PA, was measured at 10 months of age. Language was measured at 14 months. Infant PA predicted expressive, but not receptive, language. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Temperature stress affects the expression of immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) is affected by a fungal disease called chalkbrood. In several species of bees, chalkbrood is more likely to occur in larvae kept at 25-30 C than at 35 C. We found that both high and low temperature stress increased the expression of immune response g...

  2. How Does Natural Environment Affect American and Japanese Ways of Expressing Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    An essay compares Japanese and American language, reflecting on the fundamental culture-based differences between methods of communication in Japan and the United States. Japanese and Americans have different systems of logic and thought, attitudes, and ways of expressing themselves, all of which are affected by their respective background…

  3. Ecotype dependent expression and alternative splicing of epithiospecifier protein (ESP) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kissen, R; Hyldbakk, E; Wang, C-W V; Sørmo, C G; Rossiter, J T; Bones, A M

    2012-03-01

    Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) is responsible for diverting glucosinolate hydrolysis from the generation of isothiocyanates to that of epithionitriles or nitriles, and thereby negatively affects the ability of the plant to defend itself against certain insects. Despite this important role of ESP, little is known about its expression in plant tissues and the regulation thereof. We therefore investigated ESP expression by qPCR and Western blot in different organs during the growth cycle of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Mt-0. Besides the fact that ESP transcript and protein levels were revealed to be much higher in Mt-0 than in Col-0 in all cases, our qPCR results also indicated that ESP expression is regulated differently in the two A. thaliana ecotypes. No ESP protein was detected by Western blot in any organ or developmental stage for Col-0. During the assays an alternative splice variant of ESP was identified in Col-0, but not Mt-0, leading to a mis-spliced transcript which could explain the low expression levels of ESP in the former ecotype. Analysis of genomic sequences containing the ESP splice sites, of ESP protein level and ESP activity from seven A. thaliana ecotypes showed a positive correlation between the presence of a non-canonical 5' splice site for ESP and the absence of detectable ESP protein levels and ESP activity. When analysing the expression of both transcript variants in Col-0 after treatment with methyl jasmonate, a condition known to "induce ESP", it was indeed the alternative splice variant that was preferentially induced.

  4. The expression of cytoskeleton regulatory protein Mena in colorectal lesions.

    PubMed

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, I; Prantner, I; Ember, I; Pávai, Z; Mezei, T

    2008-01-01

    The actin regulatory proteins Ena/VASP (Enabled/Vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein) family is involved in the control of cell motility and adhesion. They are important in the actin-dependent processes where dynamic actin reorganization it is necessary. The deregulation of actin cycle could have an important role in the cells' malignant transformation, tumor invasion or metastasis. Recently studies revealed that the human orthologue of murine Mena is modulated during the breast carcinogenesis. In our study, we tried to observe the immunohistochemical expression of mammalian Ena (Mena) in the colorectal polyps and carcinomas. We analyzed 10 adenomatous polyps (five with dysplasia) and 36 adenocarcinomas. We used the indirect immunoperoxidase staining. BD Biosciences have provided the Mena antibody. We observed that Mena was not expressed in the normal colorectal mucosa neither in polyps without dysplasia, but its expression was very high in polyps with high dysplasia. In colorectal carcinomas, Mena marked the tumoral cells in 80% of cases. In 25% of positive cases, the intensity was 3+, in 60% 2+ and in the other 15% 1+. The Mena intensity was higher in the microsatellite stable tumors (MSS) and was correlated with vascular invasion, with intensity of angiogenesis marked with CD31 and CD105 and with c-erbB-2 and p53 expression. This is the first study in the literature about Mena expression in colorectal lesions.

  5. Expression of proteins and protein kinase activity during germination of aerial spores of Streptomyces granaticolor.

    PubMed

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Bezousková, Silvia; Benada, Oldrich; Kofronová, Olga

    2002-11-29

    Dormant aerial spores of Streptomyces granaticolor contain pre-existing pool of mRNA and active ribosomes for rapid translation of proteins required for earlier steps of germination. Activated spores were labeled for 30 min with [35S]methionine/cysteine in the presence or absence of rifamycin (400 microg/ml) and resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis. About 320 proteins were synthesized during the first 30 min of cultivation at the beginning of swelling, before the first DNA replication. Results from nine different experiments performed in the presence of rifamycin revealed 15 protein spots. Transition from dormant spores to swollen spores is not affected by the presence of rifamycin but further development of spores is stopped. To support existence of pre-existing pool of mRNA in spores, cell-free extract of spores (S30 fraction) was used for in vitro protein synthesis. These results indicate that RNA of spores possesses mRNA functionally competent and provides templates for protein synthesis. Cell-free extracts isolated from spores, activated spores, and during spore germination were further examined for in vitro protein phosphorylation. The analyses show that preparation from dormant spores catalyzes phosphorylation of only seven proteins. In the absence of phosphatase inhibitors, several proteins were partially dephosphorylated. The activation of spores leads to a reduction in phosphorylation activity. Results from in vitro phosphorylation reaction indicate that during germination phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of proteins is a complex function of developmental changes.

  6. Protein expression in salivary glands of rats with streptozotocin diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mednieks, Maija I; Szczepanski, Andrew; Clark, Brett; Hand, Arthur R

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a widespread disease with high morbidity and health care costs. An experimental animal model was employed, using morphological and biochemical methods, to investigate the effects of DM on the expression and compartmentation of salivary gland proteins. The distribution of proline-rich proteins (PRP), submandibular mucin (Muc10) and the regulatory (RI and RII) subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase type I and type II was determined in the parotid and submandibular (SMG) glands of rats treated with streptozotocin. Quantitative immunocytochemistry of secretory granules in diabetic glands revealed decreases of 30% for PRP in both the parotid and SMG, and a 40% decrease in Muc10 in the SMG. Immunogold labelling showed that RII decreased in nuclei and the cytoplasm in diabetic acinar cells while labelling of secretory granules was similar in control and diabetic parotid. Electrophoresis and Western blotting of tissue extracts of two secretory proteins showed that the response to DM and insulin treatment was gland specific: PRP showed little change in the SMG, but decreased in the parotid in DM and was partially restored after insulin treatment. Photoaffinity labelling showed only RI present in the SMG and mainly RII in the parotid. The results of this and previous studies demonstrating highly specific changes in salivary protein expression indicate that the oral environment is significantly altered by DM, and that oral tissues and their function can be compromised. These findings may provide a basis for future studies to develop tests using saliva for diabetic status or progression in humans. PMID:19659899

  7. Task difficulty and response complexity modulate affective priming by emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Federica; Campoy, Guillermo; Castillo, Alejandro; Inuggi, Alberto; Fuentes, Luis J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we used an affective priming task to address the issue of whether the processing of emotional facial expressions occurs automatically independent of attention or attentional resources. Participants had to attend to the emotion expression of the prime face, or to a nonemotional feature of the prime face, the glasses. When participants attended to glasses (emotion unattended), they had to report whether the face wore glasses or not (the glasses easy condition) or whether the glasses were rounded or squared (the shape difficult condition). Affective priming, measured on valence decisions on target words, was mainly defined as interference from incongruent rather than facilitation from congruent trials. Significant priming effects were observed just in the emotion and glasses tasks but not in the shape task. When the key-response mapping increased in complexity, taxing working memory load, affective priming effects were reduced equally for the three types of tasks. Thus, attentional load and working memory load affected additively to the observed reduction in affective priming. These results cast some doubts on the automaticity of processing emotional facial expressions.

  8. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to understand intracellular regulatory mechanisms in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which are either common to many autoimmune diseases or specific to some of them. We incorporated large-scale data such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression and demographical information of hundreds of patients and healthy subjects, related to six autoimmune diseases with available large-scale gene expression measurements: multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). These data were analyzed concurrently by statistical and systems biology approaches tailored for this purpose. We found that chemokines such as CXCL1-3, 5, 6 and the interleukin (IL) IL8 tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In addition, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL3, interferon-γ (IFNG), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene physically interact with significantly many genes that tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In general, similar cellular processes tend to be differentially expressed in PBMC in the analyzed autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the cellular processes related to cell proliferation (for example, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, nuclear factor-κB, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, stress-activated protein kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase), inflammatory response (for example, interleukins IL2 and IL6, the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the B-cell receptor), general signaling cascades (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and TRK) and apoptosis are activated in most of the analyzed autoimmune diseases. However, our results suggest that in each of the analyzed diseases, apoptosis and chemotaxis are activated via

  9. Prion protein expression regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Alberto; Pericuesta, Eva; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso

    2011-04-04

    Cellular prion protein (PRNP) is a glycoprotein involved in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Although the physiological function of PRNP is largely unknown, its key role in prion infection has been extensively documented. This study examines the functionality of PRNP during the course of embryoid body (EB) differentiation in mouse Prnp-null (KO) and WT embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. The first feature observed was a new population of EBs that only appeared in the KO line after 5 days of differentiation. These EBs were characterized by their expression of several primordial germ cell (PGC) markers until Day 13. In a comparative mRNA expression analysis of genes playing an important developmental role during ESC differentiation to EBs, Prnp was found to participate in the transcription of a key pluripotency marker such as Nanog. A clear switching off of this gene on Day 5 was observed in the KO line as opposed to the WT line, in which maximum Prnp and Nanog mRNA levels appeared at this time. Using a specific antibody against PRNP to block PRNP pathways, reduced Nanog expression was confirmed in the WT line. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of ITGB5 (integrin αvβ5) in the KO line rescued the low expression of Nanog on Day 5, suggesting the regulation of Nanog transcription by Prnp via this Itgb5. mRNA expression analysis of the PRNP-related proteins PRND (Doppel) and SPRN (Shadoo), whose PRNP function is known to be redundant, revealed their incapacity to compensate for the absence of PRNP during early ESC differentiation. Our findings provide strong evidence for a relationship between Prnp and several key pluripotency genes and attribute Prnp a crucial role in regulating self-renewal/differentiation status of ESC, confirming the participation of PRNP during early embryogenesis.

  10. Genetic variants affecting human TRPA1 or TRPM8 structure can be classified in vitro as 'well expressed', 'poorly expressed' or 'salvageable'.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kevin; Sadofsky, Laura Rachel; Morice, Alyn Hugh

    2015-09-01

    Multiple mis-sense variants of TRPA1 (transient receptor potential A1) and TRPM8 (transient receptor potential M8) are recorded in the human genome single nt polymorphism (SNP) database, but their potential impact on channel signalling in patho-physiology is not fully explored. Variants, mostly quite rare in the general human population, alter sites in different structural domains of these homo-tetrameric ion channel proteins. The effects of individual SNPs affecting the large cytoplasmic N-terminal domain have not been completely documented for TRPM8 or TRPA1. We examined the Ca(2+) signalling properties of a short-list of eight variants affecting the N-terminal domain by individual expression in human embryonic kidney HEK293 or neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines (four SNP variants for TRPM8: G150R, K423N, R475C, R485W and four for TRPA1: Y69C, A366D, E477K, D573A). These were compared with TRPA1 SNP variants affecting intracellular loops located beyond the N-terminal domain and associated with gain of function (such as increased sensitivity to agonists: TRPA1 R797T and N855S). A substitution in TRPA1 (Y69C) exhibited high expression/sensitivity to agonists (high iCa(2+)max (maximum level of intracellular calcium ion), similar to R797T, but less sensitive than N855S), whereas each of the other non-conservative substitutions exhibited poor signalling response (low iCa(2+)max). Responses from these poorly expressed variants could be salvaged, to different extents, by pre-treating cells with the Src (Src protein) family inhibitor protein kinase inhibitor PP2 (PP2: 4-Amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(t-butyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine, 4-Amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine), or with micromolar Zn(2+). The TRPA1 variants and several experimental mutants (TRPA1 Y97F, Y226F and YY654-655FF) expressed poorly in SH-SY5Y compared with HEK293 cells. More in-depth studies are needed to identify SNP variants eliciting gain of function in these TRP

  11. Heat shock protein 70-hom gene polymorphism and protein expression in multiple sclerosis.