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Sample records for affect protein stability

  1. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  2. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved. PMID:26142888

  3. Alterations of Nonconserved Residues Affect Protein Stability and Folding Dynamics through Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Garcìa, Angel E; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-10-15

    Charge-charge interactions play an important role in thermal stability of proteins. We employed an all-atom, native-topology-based model with non-native electrostatics to explore the interplay between folding dynamics and stability of TNfn3 (the third fibronectin type III domain from tenascin-C). Our study elucidates the role of charge-charge interactions in modulating the folding energy landscape. In particular, we found that incorporation of explicit charge-charge interactions in the WT TNfn3 induces energetic frustration due to the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state. Moreover, optimization of the surface charge-charge interactions by altering the evolutionarily nonconserved residues not only increases the thermal stability (in agreement with previous experimental study) but also reduces the formation of residual structure and hence minimizes the energetic frustration along the folding route. We concluded that charge-charge interaction in the rationally designed TNfn3 plays an important role not only in enhancing the stability but also in assisting folding. PMID:26413861

  4. Balancing Protein Stability and Activity in Cancer: A New Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations Affecting CBL Ubiquitin Ligase Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved, depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus providing mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins-may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than random noncancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models, assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  5. The FlgT Protein Is Involved in Aeromonas hydrophila Polar Flagella Stability and Not Affects Anchorage of Lateral Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila sodium-driven polar flagellum has a complex stator-motor. Consist of two sets of redundant and non-exchangeable proteins (PomA/PomB and PomA2/PomB2), which are homologs to other sodium-conducting polar flagellum stator motors; and also two essential proteins (MotX and MotY), that they interact with one of those two redundant pairs of proteins and form the T-ring. In this work, we described an essential protein for polar flagellum stability and rotation which is orthologs to Vibrio spp. FlgT and it is encoded outside of the A. hydrophila polar flagellum regions. The flgT was present in all mesophilic Aeromonas strains tested and also in the non-motile Aeromonas salmonicida. The A. hydrophila ΔflgT mutant is able to assemble the polar flagellum but is more unstable and released into the culture supernatant from the cell upon completion assembly. Presence of FlgT in purified polar hook-basal bodies (HBB) of wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting and electron microscopy observations showed an outer ring of the T-ring (H-ring) which is not present in the ΔflgT mutant. Anchoring and motility of proton-driven lateral flagella was not affected in the ΔflgT mutant and specific antibodies did not detect FlgT in purified lateral HBB of wild type strain. PMID:27507965

  6. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  7. Physical factors affecting the storage stability of freeze-dried interleukin-1 receptor antagonist: glass transition and protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Chang, B S; Beauvais, R M; Dong, A; Carpenter, J F

    1996-07-15

    The effects of glass transition of, and protein conformation in, the dried solid on the storage stability of freeze-dried recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) were examined. Glass transition is a temperature-dependent phenomenon. Amorphous materials become hard and brittle at temperatures below their characteristic glass transition temperatures (Tg) such that diffusion of molecules along the matrix is not sufficient to cause large-scale structural changes. To ascertain the importance of the glass transition in protein storage stability, we compared 10 different lyophilized rhIL-1ra formulations, with Tgs ranging from 20 to 56 degrees C, during several weeks of storage at temperatures above and below the samples' Tgs. Protein degradation, both deamidation and aggregation, was greatly accelerated at temperatures above Tg, but for some formulations also arose below Tg. Thus, storage of dried proteins below the Tg is necessary but not sufficient to ensure long-term stability. To examine the effects of protein structure in the dried solid, we prepared formulations with various sucrose concentrations, all of which had a Tg = 66 +/- 2.5 degrees C. With infrared spectroscopy, we determined that the protein lyophilized with /=5% sucrose, conformational change was inhibited during lyophilization. When stored at 50 degrees C, degradation of the freeze-dried protein varied inversely with sucrose concentration. These results indicate that structural changes arising during the lyophilization process led to damage during subsequent storage, even if the storage temperature was less than the Tg. Together the results of these studies document that to obtain optimum stability of dried rhIL-1ra it was necessary to inhibit conformational change during lyophilization and to store at temperatures below the Tg of the dried formulation. PMID:8660705

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Deletion in Protein Phosphatase 2A That Affects Its Stability and Localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L.; Granas, David M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating. PMID:24086163

  9. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Deller, Marc C.; Kong, Leopold; Rupp, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed. PMID:26841758

  10. Performance of protein stability predictors.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sofia; Vihinen, Mauno

    2010-06-01

    Stability is a fundamental property affecting function, activity, and regulation of biomolecules. Stability changes are often found for mutated proteins involved in diseases. Stability predictors computationally predict protein-stability changes caused by mutations. We performed a systematic analysis of 11 online stability predictors' performances. These predictors are CUPSAT, Dmutant, FoldX, I-Mutant2.0, two versions of I-Mutant3.0 (sequence and structure versions), MultiMutate, MUpro, SCide, Scpred, and SRide. As input, 1,784 single mutations found in 80 proteins were used, and these mutations did not include those used for training. The programs' performances were also assessed according to where the mutations were found in the proteins, that is, in secondary structures and on the surface or in the core of a protein, and according to protein structure type. The extents to which the mutations altered the occupied volumes at the residue sites and the charge interactions were also characterized. The predictions of all programs were in line with the experimental data. I-Mutant3.0 (utilizing structural information), Dmutant, and FoldX were the most reliable predictors. The stability-center predictors performed with similar accuracy. However, at best, the predictions were only moderately accurate ( approximately 60%) and significantly better tools would be needed for routine analysis of mutation effects. PMID:20232415

  11. C-Terminal Helical Domains of Dengue Virus Type 4 E Protein Affect the Expression/Stability of prM Protein and Conformation of prM and E Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Yang; Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Lai, Chih-Yun; Lin, Hong-En; Nerurkar, Vivek R.; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2012-01-01

    Background The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is the major immunogen for dengue vaccine development. At the C-terminus are two α-helices (EH1 and EH2) and two transmembrane domains (ET1 and ET2). After synthesis, E protein forms a heterodimer with the precursor membrane (prM) protein, which has been shown as a chaperone for E protein and could prevent premature fusion of E protein during maturation. Recent reports of enhancement of DENV infectivity by anti-prM monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suggest the presence of prM protein in dengue vaccine is potentially harmful. A better understanding of prM-E interaction and its effect on recognition of E and prM proteins by different antibodies would provide important information for future design of safe and effective subunit dengue vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we examined a series of C-terminal truncation constructs of DENV4 prME, E and prM. In the absence of E protein, prM protein expressed poorly. In the presence of E protein, the expression of prM protein increased in a dose-dependent manner. Radioimmunoprecipitation, sucrose gradient sedimentation and pulse-chase experiments revealed ET1 and EH2 were involved in prM-E interaction and EH2 in maintaining the stability of prM protein. Dot blot assay revealed E protein affected the recognition of prM protein by an anti-prM mAb; truncation of EH2 or EH1 affected the recognition of E protein by several anti-E mAbs, which was further verified by capture ELISA. The E protein ectodomain alone can be recognized well by all anti-E mAbs tested. Conclusions/Significance A C-terminal domain (EH2) of DENV E protein can affect the expression and stability of its chaperone prM protein. These findings not only add to our understanding of the interaction between prM and E proteins, but also suggest the ectodomain of E protein alone could be a potential subunit immunogen without inducing anti-prM response. PMID:23300717

  12. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  13. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  14. Computational approaches for predicting mutant protein stability.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Shweta; Chaudhary, Vigi; Goswami, Girish K; Mathur, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the protein affect not only the structure of protein, but also its function and stability. Prediction of mutant protein stability with accuracy is desired for uncovering the molecular aspects of diseases and design of novel proteins. Many advanced computational approaches have been developed over the years, to predict the stability and function of a mutated protein. These approaches based on structure, sequence features and combined features (both structure and sequence features) provide reasonably accurate estimation of the impact of amino acid substitution on stability and function of protein. Recently, consensus tools have been developed by incorporating many tools together, which provide single window results for comparison purpose. In this review, a useful guide for the selection of tools that can be employed in predicting mutated proteins' stability and disease causing capability is provided. PMID:27160393

  15. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  16. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  17. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stabile in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

  18. COX7A2L Is a Mitochondrial Complex III Binding Protein that Stabilizes the III2+IV Supercomplex without Affecting Respirasome Formation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Rafael; Lobo-Jarne, Teresa; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Bratic, Ana; García-Bartolomé, Alberto; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Cadenas, Susana; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Consuegra, Inés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Ugalde, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes I, III, and IV associate into a variety of supramolecular structures known as supercomplexes and respirasomes. While COX7A2L was originally described as a supercomplex-specific factor responsible for the dynamic association of complex IV into these structures to adapt MRC function to metabolic variations, this role has been disputed. Here, we further examine the functional significance of COX7A2L in the structural organization of the mammalian respiratory chain. As in the mouse, human COX7A2L binds primarily to free mitochondrial complex III and, to a minor extent, to complex IV to specifically promote the stabilization of the III2+IV supercomplex without affecting respirasome formation. Furthermore, COX7A2L does not affect the biogenesis, stabilization, and function of the individual oxidative phosphorylation complexes. These data show that independent regulatory mechanisms for the biogenesis and turnover of different MRC supercomplex structures co-exist. PMID:27545886

  19. Cytosolic Selection Systems To Study Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Mueller-Schickert, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe biosensors that provide readouts for protein stability in the cytosolic compartment of prokaryotes. These biosensors consist of tripartite sandwich fusions that link the in vitro stability or aggregation susceptibility of guest proteins to the in vivo resistance of host cells to the antibiotics kanamycin, spectinomycin, and nourseothricin. These selectable markers confer antibiotic resistance in a wide range of hosts and are easily quantifiable. We show that mutations within guest proteins that affect their stability alter the antibiotic resistances of the cells expressing the biosensors in a manner that is related to the in vitro stabilities of the mutant guest proteins. In addition, we find that polyglutamine tracts of increasing length are associated with an increased tendency to form amyloids in vivo and, in our sandwich fusion system, with decreased resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that our approach allows the in vivo analysis of protein stability in the cytosolic compartment without the need for prior structural and functional knowledge. PMID:25266385

  20. Protein Fibrils Induce Emulsion Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jinfeng; Simon, Joana Ralfas; Venema, Paul; van der Linden, Erik

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of an oil-in-water emulsion was studied in the presence of protein fibrils for a wide range of fibril concentrations by using rheology, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that above a minimum fibril concentration depletion flocculation occurred, leading to oil droplet aggregation and enhanced creaming of the emulsion. Upon further increasing the concentration of the protein fibrils, the emulsions were stabilized. In this stable regime both aggregates of droplets and single droplets are present, and these aggregates are smaller than the aggregates in the flocculated emulsion samples at the lower fibril concentrations. The size of the droplet aggregates in the stabilized emulsions is independent of fibril concentration. In addition, the droplet aggregation was reversible upon dilution both by a pH 2 HCl solution and by a fibril solution at the same concentration. The viscosity of the emulsions containing fibrils was comparable to that of the pure fibril solution. Neither fibril networks nor droplet gel networks were observed in our study. The stabilization mechanism of emulsions containing long protein fibrils at high protein fibril concentrations points toward the mechanism of a kinetic stabilization. PMID:26882086

  1. The role of stabilization centers in protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M Michael; Sávoly, Zoltán; Simon, István

    2016-02-26

    The definition of stabilization centers was introduced almost two decades ago. They are centers of noncovalent long range interaction clusters, believed to have a role in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of proteins by preventing their decay due to their cooperative long range interactions. Here, this hypothesis is investigated from the viewpoint of thermal stability for the first time, using a large protein thermodynamics database. The positions of amino acids belonging to stabilization centers are correlated with available experimental thermodynamic data on protein thermal stability. Our analysis suggests that stabilization centers, especially solvent exposed ones, do contribute to the thermal stabilization of proteins. PMID:26845354

  2. Analysis of SAT Type Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Capsid Proteins and the Identification of Putative Amino Acid Residues Affecting Virus Stability

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Francois F.; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A. P.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces. PMID:23717387

  3. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    PubMed

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces. PMID:23717387

  4. Effects of confinement on protein folding and protein stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, G.; Yuan, J. M.; Vallieres, M.; Dong, H.; Sun, Z.; Wei, Y.; Li, F. Y.; Lin, S. H.

    2003-05-01

    In a cell, proteins exist in crowded environments; these environments influence their stability and dynamics. Similarly, for an enzyme molecule encapsulated in an inorganic cavity as in biosensors or biocatalysts, confinement and even surface effects play important roles in its stability and dynamics. Using a minimalist model (two-dimensional HP lattice model), we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations to study confinement effects on protein stability. We have calculated heat capacity as a function of temperature using the histogram method and results obtained show that confinement tends to stabilize the folded conformations, consistent with experimental results (some reported here) and previous theoretical analyses. Furthermore, for a protein molecule tethered to a solid surface the stabilization effect can be even greater. We have also investigated the effects of confinement on the kinetics of the refolding and unfolding processes as functions of temperature and box size. As expected, unfolding time increases as box size decreases, however, confinement affects folding times in a more complicated way. Our theoretical results agree with our experimentally observed trends that thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase and acid phosphatase, encapsulated in mesoporous silica, increases as the pore size of the silica matrix decreases.

  5. A Missense Mutation in CLIC2 Associated with Intellectual Disability is Predicted by In Silico Modeling to Affect Protein Stability and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Witham, Shawn; Takano, Kyoko; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale next generation resequencing of X chromosome genes identified a missense mutation in the CLIC2 gene on Xq28 in a male with X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) and not found in healthy individuals. At the same time, numerous nsSNPs (nonsynonomous SNP) have been reported in the CLIC2 gene in healthy individuals indicating that the CLIC2 protein can tolerate amino acid substitutions and be fully functional. To test the possibility that p.H101Q is a disease-causing mutation, we performed in silico simulations to calculate the effects of the p.H101Q mutation on CLIC2 stability, dynamics and ionization states while comparing the effects obtained for presumably harmless nsSNPs. It was found that p.H101Q, in contrast with other nsSNPs, (a) lessens the flexibility of the joint loop which is important for the normal function of CLIC2, (b) makes the overall 3D structure of CLIC2 more stable and thus reduces the possibility of the large conformational change expected to occur when CLIC2 moves from a soluble to membrane form and (c) removes the positively charged residue, H101, which may be important for the membrane association of CLIC2. The results of in silico modeling, in conjunction with the polymorphism analysis, suggest that p.H101Q may be a disease-causing mutation, the first one suggested in the CLIC family. PMID:21630357

  6. Contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Lee Fryar, Katrina; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Schell, David; Thurlkill, Richard L; Imura, Satoshi; Scholtz, J Martin; Gajiwala, Ketan; Sevcik, Jozef; Urbanikova, Lubica; Myers, Jeffery K; Takano, Kazufumi; Hebert, Eric J; Shirley, Bret A; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-05-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(ΔG), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A, Y51F, and T95A. The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in all three mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions. (1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. (2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. (5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein. PMID:24591301

  7. Contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Schell, David; Thurlkill, Richard L; Imura, Satoshi; Scholtz, J Martin; Gajiwala, Ketan; Sevcik, Jozef; Urbanikova, Lubica; Myers, Jeffery K; Takano, Kazufumi; Hebert, Eric J; Shirley, Bret A; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(ΔG), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A, Y51F, and T95A. The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in all three mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions. (1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. (2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. (5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein. PMID:24591301

  8. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Nick

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(Δ G), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A (1.1Å), Y51F(1.5Å), and T95A(1.3Å). The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners always form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in the mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions: 1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. 2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. 5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein.

  9. Flavor and stability of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Campbell, R E; Jo, Y; Drake, M A

    2016-06-01

    MPC decreased and furosine concentration increased with storage time and temperature. Solubility of MPC 80 was reduced more than that of MPC 45, but time and temperature adversely affected solubility of both proteins, with storage temperature having the greatest effect. Flavor and shelf stability of milk proteins provide a foundation of knowledge to improve the flavor and shelf-life of milk proteins. PMID:27060829

  10. Electrodynamic pressure modulation of protein stability in cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2013-11-19

    Cosolvents affect structural stability of proteins in aqueous solutions. A clear understanding of the mechanism by which cosolvents impact protein stability is critical to understanding protein folding in a biological milieu. In this study, we investigated the Lifshitz-van der Waals dispersion interaction of seven different solutes with nine globular proteins and report that in an aqueous medium the structure-stabilizing solutes exert a positive electrodynamic pressure, whereas the structure-destabilizing solutes exert a negative electrodynamic pressure on the proteins. The net increase in the thermal denaturation temperature (ΔTd) of a protein in 1 M solution of various solutes was linearly related to the electrodynamic pressure (PvdW) between the solutes and the protein. The slope of the PvdW versus ΔTd plots was protein-dependent. However, we find a positive linear relationship (r(2) = 0.79) between the slope (i.e., d(ΔTd)/dPvdW) and the adiabatic compressibility (βs) of the proteins. Together, these results clearly indicate that the Lifshitz's dispersion forces are inextricably involved in solute-induced stabilization/destabilization of globular proteins. The positive and/or negative electrodynamic pressure generated by the solute-protein interaction across the water medium seems to be the fundamental mechanism by which solutes affect protein stability. This is at variance with the existing preferential hydration concept. The implication of these results is significant in the sense that, in addition to the hydrophobic effect that drives protein folding, the electrodynamic forces between the proteins and solutes in the biological milieu also might play a role in the folding process as well as in the stability of the folded state. PMID:24156352

  11. Monitoring prion protein stability by NMR.

    PubMed

    Julien, Olivier; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), are a group of fatal neurological diseases that affect both humans and animals. At the end of the 20th century, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), better known as mad cow disease, was shown to be transmissible to humans. This resulted in considerable concern for public health and a number of questions for scientists. The first question answered was the possible source of the disease, which appears to be the prion protein (PrP). There are two major forms of this protein: the native, noninfectious form (PrP(C)), and the misfolded infectious form (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) is mainly alpha-helical in structure, whereas PrP(Sc) aggregates into an assembly of beta-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. Since the first solution structure of the noninfectious form of the mouse prion protein, about 30 structures of the globular portion of PrP(C) have been characterized from different organisms. However, only a few minor differences are observed when comparing one PrP(C) structure to another. The key to understanding prion formation may then be not in the structure of PrP(C), but in the mechanism underlying PrP(C) unfolding and then conversion into a misfolded fibril state. To identify the possible region(s) of PrP(C) responsible for initiating the conversion into the amyloid fibril formation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied to characterize the stability and structure of PrP(C) and intermediate states during the conversion from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Subsequently urea was used to induce unfolding, and data analysis revealed region-specific structural stabilities that may bring insights into the mechanisms underlying conversion of protein into an infectious prion. PMID:19697241

  12. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  13. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  14. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Philip D.; Wander, Marc J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  15. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Phillip D; Wander, Marc J

    2014-11-04

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  16. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1996-02-20

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 16 figs.

  17. Stability and Change in Affect among Centenarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter; da Rosa, Grace; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Garasky, Steven; Franke, Warren

    2012-01-01

    Much information is available about physical and functional health among very old adults, but little knowledge exists about the mental health and mental health changes in very late life. This study reports findings concerning positive and negative affect changes among centenarians. Nineteen centenarians from a Midwestern state participated in four…

  18. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  19. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  20. Stabilizing effect of knots on proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics studies within a coarse-grained, structure-based model were used on two similar proteins belonging to the transcarbamylase family to probe the effects of the knot in the native structure of a protein. The first protein, N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase, contains no knot, whereas human ormithine transcarbamylase contains a trefoil knot located deep within the sequence. In addition, we also analyzed a modified transferase with the knot removed by the appropriate change of a knot-making crossing of the protein chain. The studies of thermally and mechanically induced unfolding processes suggest a larger intrinsic stability of the protein with the knot. PMID:19064918

  1. Stabilizing effect of knots on proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sulkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, P; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-12-16

    Molecular dynamics studies within a coarse-grained, structure-based model were used on two similar proteins belonging to the transcarbamylase family to probe the effects of the knot in the native structure of a protein. The first protein, N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase, contains no knot, whereas human ormithine transcarbamylase contains a trefoil knot located deep within the sequence. In addition, we also analyzed a modified transferase with the knot removed by the appropriate change of a knot-making crossing of the protein chain. The studies of thermally and mechanically induced unfolding processes suggest a larger intrinsic stability of the protein with the knot. PMID:19064918

  2. Mouthrinses affect color stability of composite

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshia Rashid; Shori, Deepa Deepak; Shenoi, Pratima Ramakrishna; Ali, Syed Navid; Shetti, Sanjay; Godhane, Alkesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of alcohol and nonalcohol containing mouth rinses on the color stability of a nanofilled resin composite restorative material. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 samples of a nanofilled resin composite material (Tetric N-Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, FL-9494 Schaan/Liechtenstein) were prepared and immersed in distilled water for 24 h. Baseline color values were recorded using Color Spectrophotometer 3600d (Konica Minolta, Japan). Samples were then randomly distributed into six groups: Group I - distilled water (control group), Group II - Listerine, Group III - Eludril, Group IV - Phosflur, Group V - Amflor, and Group VI - Rexidin. The postimmersion color values of the samples were then recorded, respectively. Results: Significant reduction in the mean color value (before and after immersion) was observed in nonalcohol containing mouth rinses (P < 0.001). Conclusion: All mouthrinses tested in the present in-vitro study caused a color shift in the nanofilled resin composite restorative material, but the color shift was dependent on the material and the mouthrinse used. Group VI (Rexidin) showed maximum color change. PMID:27563186

  3. Can Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    In quiescent environments (microgravity, capillary tubes, gels) formation of a depletion zone is to be expected, due either to limited sedimentation, density driven convection or a combination of both. The formation of a depletion zone can: Modify solution supersaturation near crystal; Give rise to impurity partitioning. It is conjectured that both supersaturation and impurity partitioning affect protein crystal quality and size. Further detailed investigations on various proteins are needed to assess above hypothesis.

  4. Protein stability at a carbon nanotube interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Garcia, A. E.

    2011-03-01

    The interactions of proteins with solid surfaces occur in a variety of situations. Motivated by the many nanoengineering applications of protein-carbon nanotube hybrids, we investigate the conformational transitions of hen egg white lysozyme adsorbed on a carbon nanotube. Using a Cα structure-based model and replica exchange molecular dynamics, we show how the folding/unfolding equilibrium of the adsorbed protein varies with the strength of its coupling to the surface. The stability of the native state depends on the balance between the favorable entropy and unfavorable enthalpy change on adsorption. In the case of a weakly attractive surface when the former dominates, the protein is stabilized. In this regime, the protein can fold and unfold while maintaining the same binding fraction. With increasing surface attraction, the unfavorable enthalpic effect dominates, the native state is destabilized, and the protein has to extensively unbind before changing states from unfolded to folded. At the highest surface coupling, the entropic penalty of folding vanishes, and a folding intermediate is strongly stabilized. In this intermediate state, the α-domain of lysozyme is disrupted, while the β-sheet remains fully structured. We rationalize the relative stability of the two domains on the basis of the residue contact order.

  5. Homocysteine thiolactone affects protein ubiquitination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bretes, Ewa; Zimny, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    The formation of homocysteine thiolactone (HcyTl) from homocysteine occurs in all examined so far organisms including bacteria, yeast, and humans. Protein N-homocysteinylation at the ε-amino group of lysine is an adverse result of HcyTl accumulation. Since tagging of proteins by ubiquitination before their proteasomal degradation takes place at the same residue, we wondered how N-homocysteinylation may affect the ubiquitination of proteins. We used different yeast strains carrying mutations in genes involved in the homocysteine metabolism. We found positive correlation between the concentration of endogenous HcyTl and the concentration of ubiquitinated proteins. This suggests that N-homocysteinylation of proteins apparently does not preclude but rather promotes their decomposition. PMID:24051443

  6. Can Solution Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    The formation of large protein crystals of "high quality" is considered a characteristic manifestation of microgravity. The physical processes that predict the formation of large, high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of space are considered rooted in the existence of a "depletion zone" in the vicinity of crystal. Namely, it is considered reasonable that crystal quality suffers in earth-grown crystals as a result of the incorporation of large aggregates, micro-crystals and/or large molecular weight "impurities", processes which are aided by density driven convective flow or mixing at the crystal-liquid interface. Sedimentation and density driven convection produce unfavorable solution conditions in the vicinity of the crystal surface, which promotes rapid crystal growth to the detriment of crystal size and quality. In this effort, we shall further present the hypothesis that the solution supersaturatoin at the crystal surface determines the growth mechanism, or mode, by which protein crystals grow. It is further hypothesized that protein crystal quality is affected by the mechanism or mode of crystal growth. Hence the formation of a depletion zone in microgravity environment is beneficial due to inhibition of impurity incorporatoin as well as preventing a kinetic roughening transition. It should be noted that for many proteins the magnitude of neither protein crystal growth rates nor solution supersaturation are predictors of a kinetic roughening transition. That is, the kinetic roughening transition supersaturation must be dtermined for each individual protein.

  7. Interactions of phospholipase D and cytochrome P450 protein stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2004-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested a relationship between cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A (CYP3A) conformation and the phospholipid composition of the associated membrane. In this study, we utilized a novel microsomal incubation system that mimics many of the characteristics of CYP3A degradation pathway that have been observed in vivo and in cultured cells to study the effects of phospholipid composition on protein stability. We found that addition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) stabilized CYP3A in this system, but that phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) was without effect. Addition of phosphatidic acid also stabilized CYP3A protein in the microsomes. The use of 1,10-phenanthroline (phenanthroline), an inhibitor of PLD activity, decreased CYP3A stability in incubated microsomes. Similarly, 6-h treatment of primary cultures of rat hepatocytes with phenanthroline resulted in nearly complete loss of CYP3A protein. Treatment of rats with nicardipine or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which have been shown to affect CYP3A stability, altered the phospholipid composition of hepatic microsomes. It did not appear, though, that the changes in phospholipid composition that resulted from these in vivo treatments accounted for the change in CYP3A stability observed in hepatic microsomes from these animals.

  8. Protein stability: the value of 'old literature'.

    PubMed

    Franks, Felix

    2002-05-01

    The concepts of protein structure and function have been subjects of intensive study throughout the 20th century; they continue to fascinate present-day scientists. Our understanding received a major boost when it was realised during the 1960s, that the physical properties of water play a major role in determining the stability of native proteins in vitro. This recognition changed the emphasis of physicochemical studies towards 'hydration', i.e. protein-water interactions. A rigorous quantitative description of 'hydration' still escapes us, but several semi-quantitative treatments, some with predictive potential, are now available and can account for the marginal stabilities of native proteins in aqueous solvent environments. This article charts the progress achieved during the latter half of the 20th century, which in present day parlance is termed 'old literature'. The thesis is advanced that the common practice of uncritically equating 'recent literature' with 'progress' is of dubious value. In the general area of in vitro protein stability some recent developments seem questionable and have yet to stand the test of time before their usefulness or validity can be accepted. PMID:12034434

  9. Impact of reconstituted cytosol on protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Mohona; Smith, Austin E.; Pielak, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein stability is usually studied in simple buffered solutions, but most proteins function inside cells, where the heterogeneous and crowded environment presents a complex, nonideal system. Proteins are expected to behave differently under cellular crowding owing to two types of contacts: hard-core repulsions and weak, chemical interactions. The effect of hard-core repulsions is purely entropic, resulting in volume exclusion owing to the mere presence of the crowders. The weak interactions can be repulsive or attractive, thus enhancing or diminishing the excluded volume, respectively. We used a reductionist approach to assess the effects of intracellular crowding. Escherichia coli cytoplasm was dialyzed, lyophilized, and resuspended at two concentrations. NMR-detected amide proton exchange was then used to quantify the stability of the globular protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) in these crowded solutions. The cytosol destabilizes CI2, and the destabilization increases with increasing cytosol concentration. This observation shows that the cytoplasm interacts favorably, but nonspecifically, with CI2, and these interactions overcome the stabilizing hard-core repulsions. The effects of the cytosol are even stronger than those of homogeneous protein crowders, reinforcing the biological significance of weak, nonspecific interactions. PMID:24218610

  10. Temperature compensation via cooperative stability in protein degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanyuan; Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Noman, Nasimul; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Temperature compensation is a notable property of circadian oscillators that indicates the insensitivity of the oscillator system's period to temperature changes; the underlying mechanism, however, is still unclear. We investigated the influence of protein dimerization and cooperative stability in protein degradation on the temperature compensation ability of two oscillators. Here, cooperative stability means that high-order oligomers are more stable than their monomeric counterparts. The period of an oscillator is affected by the parameters of the dynamic system, which in turn are influenced by temperature. We adopted the Repressilator and the Atkinson oscillator to analyze the temperature sensitivity of their periods. Phase sensitivity analysis was employed to evaluate the period variations of different models induced by perturbations to the parameters. Furthermore, we used experimental data provided by other studies to determine the reasonable range of parameter temperature sensitivity. We then applied the linear programming method to the oscillatory systems to analyze the effects of protein dimerization and cooperative stability on the temperature sensitivity of their periods, which reflects the ability of temperature compensation in circadian rhythms. Our study explains the temperature compensation mechanism for circadian clocks. Compared with the no-dimer mathematical model and linear model for protein degradation, our theoretical results show that the nonlinear protein degradation caused by cooperative stability is more beneficial for realizing temperature compensation of the circadian clock.

  11. Plant ecology. Anthropogenic environmental changes affect ecosystem stability via biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Yann; Tilman, David; Isbell, Forest; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Reich, Peter B

    2015-04-17

    Human-driven environmental changes may simultaneously affect the biodiversity, productivity, and stability of Earth's ecosystems, but there is no consensus on the causal relationships linking these variables. Data from 12 multiyear experiments that manipulate important anthropogenic drivers, including plant diversity, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, fire, herbivory, and water, show that each driver influences ecosystem productivity. However, the stability of ecosystem productivity is only changed by those drivers that alter biodiversity, with a given decrease in plant species numbers leading to a quantitatively similar decrease in ecosystem stability regardless of which driver caused the biodiversity loss. These results suggest that changes in biodiversity caused by drivers of environmental change may be a major factor determining how global environmental changes affect ecosystem stability. PMID:25883357

  12. Protein crowding affects hydration structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effect of protein crowding on the structure and dynamics of water was examined from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of a series of protein G and protein G/villin systems at different protein concentrations. Hydration structure was analyzed in terms of radial distribution functions, three-dimensional hydration sites, and preservation of tetrahedral coordination. Analysis of hydration dynamics focused on self-diffusion rates and dielectric constants as a function of crowding. The results show significant changes in both structure and dynamics of water under highly crowded conditions. The structure of water is altered mostly beyond the first solvation shell. Diffusion rates and dielectric constants are significantly reduced following linear trends as a function of crowding reflecting highly constrained water in crowded environments. The reduced dynamics of diffusion is expected to be strongly related to hydrodynamic properties of crowded cellular environments while the reduced dielectric constant under crowded conditions has implications for the stability of biomolecules in crowded environments. The results from this study suggest a prescription for modeling solvation in simulations of cellular environments. PMID:22352398

  13. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; Li, Jack; Reed, Sean A; Xiao, Han; Young, Travis S; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-05-24

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. Here we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a library of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ∼9 °C was identified. This result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes. PMID:27162342

  14. Trehalose glycopolymers as excipients for protein stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Lin, En-Wei; Lau, Uland Y; Hedrick, James L; Bat, Erhan; Maynard, Heather D

    2013-08-12

    Herein, the synthesis of four different trehalose glycopolymers and investigation of their ability to stabilize proteins to heat and lyophilization stress are described. The disaccharide, α,α-trehalose, was modified with a styrenyl acetal, methacrylate acetal, styrenyl ether, or methacrylate moiety resulting in four different monomers. These monomers were then separately polymerized using free radical polymerization with azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator to synthesize the glycopolymers. Horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase were incubated at 70 and 50 °C, respectively, and β-galactosidase was lyophilized multiple times in the presence of various ratios of the polymers or trehalose. The protein activities were subsequently tested and found to be significantly higher when the polymers were present during the stress compared to no additive and to equivalent amounts of trehalose. Different molecular weights (10 kDa, 20 kDa, and 40 kDa) were tested, and all were equivalent in their stabilization ability. However, some subtle differences were observed regarding stabilization ability between the different polymer samples, depending on the stress. Small molecules such as benzyl ether trehalose were not better stabilizers than trehalose, and the trehalose monomer decreased protein activity, suggesting that hydrophobized trehalose was not sufficient and that the polymeric structure was required. In addition, cytotoxicity studies with NIH 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were conducted with polymer concentrations up to 8 mg/mL. The data showed that all four polymers were noncytotoxic for all tested concentrations. The results together suggest that trehalose glycopolymers are promising as additives to protect proteins from a variety of stressors. PMID:23777473

  15. Regulation of TET Protein Stability by Calpains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation at the fifth position of cytosine (5mC) is an important epigenetic modification that affects chromatin structure and gene expression. Recent studies have established a critical function of the Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of proteins in regulating DNA methylation dynamics. Three Tet genes have been identified in mammals, and they all encode for proteins capable of oxidizing 5mC as part of the DNA demethylation process. While regulation of Tet expression at the transcriptional level is well documented, how TET proteins are regulated at post-translational level is poorly understood. In this study, we report that all three TET proteins are direct substrates of calpains, a family of calcium-dependent proteases. Specifically, calpain1 mediates TET1 and TET2 turnover in mouse ES cells, and calpain2 regulates TET3 level during differentiation. This study provides the first evidence that TET proteins are subject to calpain-mediated degradation. PMID:24412366

  16. The structural stability of wild-type horse prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-10-01

    Prion diseases (e.g. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), variant CJD (vCJD), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) and Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cattles) are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches or medications to treat all these prion diseases. Rabbits, dogs, and horses are the only mammalian species reported to be resistant to infection from prion diseases isolated from other species. Recently, the β2-α2 loop has been reported to contribute to their protein structural stabilities. The author has found that rabbit prion protein has a strong salt bridge ASP177-ARG163 (like a taut bow string) keeping this loop linked. This paper confirms that this salt bridge also contributes to the structural stability of horse prion protein. Thus, the region of β2-α2 loop might be a potential drug target region. Besides this very important salt bridge, other four important salt bridges GLU196-ARG156-HIS187, ARG156-ASP202 and GLU211-HIS177 are also found to greatly contribute to the structural stability of horse prion protein. Rich databases of salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts for horse prion protein can be found in this paper. PMID:21875155

  17. Protein stabilization by macromolecular crowding through enthalpy rather than entropy.

    PubMed

    Senske, Michael; Törk, Lisa; Born, Benjamin; Havenith, Martina; Herrmann, Christian; Ebbinghaus, Simon

    2014-06-25

    The interior of the cell is a densely crowded environment in which protein stability is affected differently than in dilute solution. Macromolecular crowding is commonly understood in terms of an entropic volume exclusion effect based on hardcore repulsions among the macromolecules. We studied the thermal unfolding of ubiquitin in the presence of different cosolutes (glucose, dextran, poly(ethylene glycol), KCl, urea). Our results show that for a correct dissection of the cosolute-induced changes of the free energy into its enthalpic and entropic contributions, the temperature dependence of the heat capacity change needs to be explicitly taken into account. In contrast to the prediction by the excluded volume theory, we observed an enthalpic stabilization and an entropic destabilization for glucose, dextran, and poly(ethylene glycol). The enthalpic stabilization mechanism induced by the macromolecular crowder dextran was similar to the enthalpic stabilization mechanism of its monomeric building block glucose. In the case of poly(ethylene glycol), entropy is dominating over enthalpy leading to an overall destabilization. We propose a new model to classify cosolute effects in terms of their enthalpic contributions to protein stability. PMID:24888734

  18. Structural Assessment of the Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions on Protein Stability and Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shaolei; Wang, Liangjiang; Srivastava, Anand K.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    A structure-based approach is described for predicting the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein function. Structures were predicted using a homology modelling method. Folding and binding energy differences between wild-type and mutant structures were computed to quantitatively assess the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein stability and protein–protein interaction, respectively. We demonstrated that pathogenic mutations at the interaction interface could affect binding energy and destabilise protein complex, whereas mutations at the non-interface might reduce folding energy and destabilise monomer structure. The results suggest that the structure-based analysis can provide useful information for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases. PMID:21297231

  19. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  20. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  1. Local Perturbations Do Not Affect Stability of Laboratory Fruitfly Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sutirth; Joshi, Amitabh

    2007-01-01

    Background A large number of theoretical studies predict that the dynamics of spatially structured populations (metapopulations) can be altered by constant perturbations to local population size. However, these studies presume large metapopulations inhabiting noise-free, zero-extinction environments, and their predictions have never been empirically verified. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report an empirical study on the effects of localized perturbations on global dynamics and stability, using fruitfly metapopulations in the laboratory. We find that constant addition of individuals to a particular subpopulation in every generation stabilizes that subpopulation locally, but does not have any detectable effect on the dynamics and stability of the metapopulation. Simulations of our experimental system using a simple but widely applicable model of population dynamics were able to recover the empirical findings, indicating the generality of our results. We then simulated the possible consequences of perturbing more subpopulations, increasing the strength of perturbations, and varying the rate of migration, but found that none of these conditions were expected to alter the outcomes of our experiments. Finally, we show that our main results are robust to the presence of local extinctions in the metapopulation. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows that localized perturbations are unlikely to affect the dynamics of real metapopulations, a finding that has cautionary implications for ecologists and conservation biologists faced with the problem of stabilizing unstable metapopulations in nature. PMID:17311100

  2. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  3. Free-surface stability criterion as affected by velocity distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng-Lung, Chen

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines how the velocity distribution of flow in open channels affects the kinematic and dynamic wave velocities, from which the various forms of the Vedernikov number V can be formulated. When V >1, disturbances created in open-channel flow will amplify in the form of roll waves; when V <1, some (though not all) disturbances will attenuate. A study of the Vedernikov stability criterion reveals that it can be readily deduced within the framework of the kinematic and dynamic wave theories by comparing the kinematic wave velocity to the corresponding dynamic wave velocity. -from Author

  4. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion. PMID:24178297

  5. Sequence-based protein stabilization in the absence of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nikki Y; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Jamaluddin, M Fairuz; Mahmud, S Halimah Binte; Raman, Suresh C; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked N-glycosylation is a common modification of proteins that promotes productive protein folding and increases protein stability. Although N-glycosylation is important for glycoprotein folding, the precise sites of glycosylation are often not conserved between protein homologues. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteins upregulated during sporulation under nutrient deprivation have few N-glycosylation sequons and in their place tend to contain clusters of like-charged amino-acid residues. Incorporation of such sequences complements loss of in vivo protein function in the absence of glycosylation. Targeted point mutation to create such sequence stretches at glycosylation sequons in model glycoproteins increases in vitro protein stability and activity. A dependence on glycosylation for protein stability or activity can therefore be rescued with a small number of local point mutations, providing evolutionary flexibility in the precise location of N-glycans, allowing protein expression under nutrient-limiting conditions, and improving recombinant protein production. PMID:24434425

  6. Denatured state aggregation parameters derived from concentration dependence of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Clarkson, Benjamin R; Siles, Rogelio; Ross, Patrick; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major issue affecting the long-term stability of protein preparations. Proteins exist in equilibrium between the native and denatured or partially denatured conformations. Often denatured or partially denatured conformations are prone to aggregate because they expose to solvent the hydrophobic core of the protein. The aggregation of denatured protein gradually shifts the protein equilibrium toward increasing amounts of denatured and ultimately aggregated protein. Recognizing and quantitating the presence of denatured protein and its aggregation at the earliest possible time will bring enormous benefits to the identification and selection of optimal solvent conditions or the engineering of proteins with the best stability/aggregation profile. In this article, a new approach that allows simultaneous determination of structural stability and the amount of denatured and aggregated protein is presented. This approach is based on the analysis of the concentration dependence of the Gibbs energy (ΔG) of protein stability. It is shown that three important quantities can be evaluated simultaneously: (i) the population of denatured protein, (ii) the population of aggregated protein, and (iii) the fraction of denatured protein that is aggregated. PMID:26239214

  7. Factors affecting hazardous waste solidification/stabilization: a review.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Rachana; Chaudhary, Rubina

    2006-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization is accepted as a well-established disposal technique for hazardous waste. As a result many different types of hazardous wastes are treated with different binders. The S/S products have different property from waste and binders individually. The effectiveness of S/S process is studied by physical, chemical and microstructural methods. This paper summarizes the effect of different waste stream such as heavy metals bearing sludge, filter cake, fly ash, and slag on the properties of cement and other binders. The factors affecting strength development is studied using mix designs, including metal bearing waste alters the hydration and setting time of binders. Pore structure depends on relative quantity of the constituents, cement hydration products and their reaction products with admixtures. Carbonation and additives can lead to strength improvement in waste-binder matrix. PMID:16530943

  8. SPLINTS: small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Park, Eunyoung; Eck, Michael J; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous in biology, and small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors are an important focus in drug discovery. Remarkably little attention has been given to the opposite strategy-stabilization of protein-protein interactions, despite the fact that several well-known therapeutics act through this mechanism. From a structural perspective, we consider representative examples of small molecules that induce or stabilize the association of protein domains to inhibit, or alter, signaling for nuclear hormone, GTPase, kinase, phosphatase, and ubiquitin ligase pathways. These SPLINTS (small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers) drive interactions that are in some cases physiologically relevant, and in others entirely adventitious. The diverse structural mechanisms employed suggest approaches for a broader and systematic search for such compounds in drug discovery. PMID:26829757

  9. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  10. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Cohen, Irit

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases) may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content) tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content. PMID:26114113

  11. Protein thermal stabilization in aqueous solutions of osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Bruździak, Piotr; Panuszko, Aneta; Jourdan, Muriel; Stangret, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Proteins' thermal stabilization is a significant problem in various biomedical, biotechnological, and technological applications. We investigated thermal stability of hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solutions of the following stabilizing osmolytes: Glycine (GLY), N-methylglycine (NMG), N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), N,N,N-trimethylglycine (TMG), and trimethyl-N-oxide (TMAO). Results of CD-UV spectroscopic investigation were compared with FTIR hydration studies' results. Selected osmolytes increased lysozyme's thermal stability in the following order: Gly>NMG>TMAO≈DMG>TMG. Theoretical calculations (DFT) showed clearly that osmolytes' amino group protons and water molecules interacting with them played a distinctive role in protein thermal stabilization. The results brought us a step closer to the exact mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes. PMID:26495438

  12. Cold denaturation as a tool to measure protein stability.

    PubMed

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is an important issue for the interpretation of a wide variety of biological problems but its assessment is at times difficult. The most common parameter employed to describe protein stability is the temperature of melting, at which the populations of folded and unfolded species are identical. This parameter may yield ambiguous results. It would always be preferable to measure the whole stability curve. The calculation of this curve is greatly facilitated whenever it is possible to observe cold denaturation. Using Yfh1, one of the few proteins whose cold denaturation occurs at neutral pH and low ionic strength, we could measure the variation of its full stability curve under several environmental conditions. Here we show the advantages of gauging stability as a function of external variables using stability curves. PMID:26026885

  13. Cold denaturation as a tool to measure protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is an important issue for the interpretation of a wide variety of biological problems but its assessment is at times difficult. The most common parameter employed to describe protein stability is the temperature of melting, at which the populations of folded and unfolded species are identical. This parameter may yield ambiguous results. It would always be preferable to measure the whole stability curve. The calculation of this curve is greatly facilitated whenever it is possible to observe cold denaturation. Using Yfh1, one of the few proteins whose cold denaturation occurs at neutral pH and low ionic strength, we could measure the variation of its full stability curve under several environmental conditions. Here we show the advantages of gauging stability as a function of external variables using stability curves. PMID:26026885

  14. Designing Whey Protein-Polysaccharide Particles for Colloidal Stability.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh; Foegeding, E Allen

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between whey proteins and polysaccharides, in particular the formation of food-grade soluble complexes, are of interest because of potential functional and health benefits. A specific application that has not received much attention is the use of complexes for enhanced colloidal stability of protein sols, such as protein-containing beverages. In beverages, the primary goal is the formation of complexes that remain dispersed after thermal processing and extended storage. This review highlights recent progress in the area of forming whey protein-polysaccharide soluble complexes that would be appropriate for beverage applications. Research in this area indicates that soluble complexes can be formed and stabilized that are reasonably small in size and possess a large surface charge that would predict colloidal stability. Selection of specific proteins and polysaccharides can be tailored to desired conditions. The principal challenges involve overcoming restrictions on protein concentration and ensuring that protein remains bioavailable. PMID:26934171

  15. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute. PMID:26896315

  16. β-lactoglobulin stabilized nanemulsions--Formulation and process factors affecting droplet size and nanoemulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ali; Mekhloufi, Ghozlene; Huang, Nicolas; Agnely, Florence

    2016-03-16

    To avoid the toxicological concerns associated to synthetic surfactants, proteins might be an alternative for the stabilization of pharmaceutical nanoemulsions. The present study investigates the use of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) to stabilize oil in water biocompatible nanoemulsions intended for a pharmaceutical use and prepared by high pressure homogenization (HPH). The effects of composition (nature and weight fraction of oil, β-lg concentration) and of process parameters (pressure and number of cycles) on the droplet size and on the stability of nanoemulsions were thoroughly assessed. The nanoemulsions prepared with β-lg at 1 wt% and with 5 wt% Miglyol 812 (the oil with the lowest viscosity) displayed a relatively small particle size (about 200 nm) and a low polydispersity when a homogenization pressure of 100 MPa was applied for 4 cycles. These nanoemulsions were the most stable formulations over 30 days at least. Emulsification efficiency of β-lg was reduced at higher homogenization pressures (200 MPa and 300 MPa). The effect of HPH process on the interfacial properties of β-lg was evaluated by drop shape analysis. This treatment had an effect neither on the interfacial tension nor on the interfacial dilatational rheology of β-lg at the Miglyol 812/water interface. PMID:26784982

  17. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  18. Mutation analysis of barley malt protein Z4 and protein Z7 on beer foam stability.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Kimura, Tatsuji; Araki, Shigeki; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Masahide; Yamada, Shinji; Shigyou, Tatsuro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-15

    Beer foam stability is an important characteristic. It has been suggested that isoforms of protein Z, that is, protein Z4 and protein Z7, contribute to beer foam stability. We investigated the relationship between beer foam stability and protein Z4 and protein Z7 using their deficient mutants. As a protein Z4-deficient mutant, cv. Pirkka was used. Protein Z7 deficiency was screened in 1564 barley accessions in the world collection of Okayama University, Japan. The barley samples from normal, protein Z4-deficient, protein Z7-deficient, and double-deficient were genotyped in F(2) populations and then pooled based on the DNA marker genotypes of protein Z4 and protein Z7. For a brewing trial, F(5) pooled subpopulations were used. After malting and brewing, the foam stability was determined, and the results showed that the levels of foam stability in the four samples were comparable. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the proteome in these beer samples. The results showed that low molecular weight proteins, including lipid transfer protein (LTP2), in the deficient mutants were higher than those in the normal sample. Our results suggest that the contribution of protein Z4 and protein Z7 to beer foam stability was not greater than that of other beer proteins. PMID:22251057

  19. Direct observation of multimer stabilization in the mechanical unfolding pathway of a protein undergoing oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2015-02-24

    Understanding how protein oligomerization affects the stability of monomers in self-assembled structures is crucial to the development of new protein-based nanomaterials and protein cages for drug delivery. Here, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), protein engineering, and computer simulations to evaluate how dimerization and tetramerization affects the stability of the monomer of Streptavidin, a model homotetrameric protein. The unfolding force directly relates to the folding stability, and we find that monomer of Streptavidin is mechanically stabilized by 40% upon dimerization, and that it is stabilized an additional 24% upon tetramerization. We also find that biotin binding increases stability by another 50% as compared to the apo-tetrameric form. We used the distribution of unfolding forces to extract properties of the underlying energy landscape and found that the distance to the transition state is decreased and the barrier height is increased upon multimerization. Finally, we investigated the origin of the strengthening by ligand binding. We found that, rather than being strengthened through intramolecular contacts, it is strengthened due to the contacts provided by the biotin-binding loop that crosses the interface between the dimers. PMID:25639698

  20. A Protein Aggregation Based Test for Screening of the Agents Affecting Thermostability of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eronina, Tatyana; Borzova, Vera; Maloletkina, Olga; Kleymenov, Sergey; Asryants, Regina; Markossian, Kira; Kurganov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    To search for agents affecting thermal stability of proteins, a test based on the registration of protein aggregation in the regime of heating with a constant rate was used. The initial parts of the dependences of the light scattering intensity (I) on temperature (T) were analyzed using the following empiric equation: I = Kagg(T−T0)2, where Kagg is the parameter characterizing the initial rate of aggregation and T0 is a temperature at which the initial increase in the light scattering intensity is registered. The aggregation data are interpreted in the frame of the model assuming the formation of the start aggregates at the initial stages of the aggregation process. Parameter T0 corresponds to the moment of the origination of the start aggregates. The applicability of the proposed approach was demonstrated on the examples of thermal aggregation of glycogen phosphorylase b from rabbit skeletal muscles and bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase studied in the presence of agents of different chemical nature. The elaborated approach to the study of protein aggregation may be used for rapid identification of small molecules that interact with protein targets. PMID:21760963

  1. Tandem Facial Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Pil Seok; Gotfryd, Kamil; Pacyna, Jennifer; Miercke, Larry J. W.; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Robbins, Rebecca A.; Rana, Rohini R.; Loland, Claus J.; Kobilka, Brian; Stroud, Robert; Byrne, Bernadette; Gether, Ulrik; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new type of synthetic amphiphile that is intended to support biochemical characterization of intrinsic membrane proteins. Members of this new family displayed favorable behavior with four of five membrane proteins tested, and these amphiphiles formed relatively small micelles. PMID:21049926

  2. Stabilization of supercooled fluids by thermal hysteresis proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P W; Leader, J P

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that thermal hysteresis proteins found in many cold-hardy, freeze-avoiding arthropods stabilize their supercooled body fluids. We give evidence that fish antifreeze proteins, which also produce thermal hysteresis, bind to and reduce the efficiency of heterogenous nucleation sites, rather than binding to embryonic ice nuclei. We discuss both possible mechanisms for stabilization of supercooled body fluids and also describe a new method for measuring and defining the supercooling point of small volumes of liquid. PMID:7612853

  3. Microscopic insights into the protein-stabilizing effect of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Gai, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely known that trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), an osmolyte used by nature, stabilizes the folded state of proteins, the underlying mechanism of action is not entirely understood. To gain further insight into this important biological phenomenon, we use the C≡N stretching vibration of an unnatural amino acid, p-cyano-phenylalanine, to directly probe how TMAO affects the hydration and conformational dynamics of a model peptide and a small protein. By assessing how the lineshape and spectral diffusion properties of this vibration change with cosolvent conditions, we are able to show that TMAO achieves its protein-stabilizing ability through the combination of (at least) two mechanisms: (i) It decreases the hydrogen bonding ability of water and hence the stability of the unfolded state, and (ii) it acts as a molecular crowder, as suggested by a recent computational study, that can increase the stability of the folded state via the excluded volume effect. PMID:24912147

  4. Microscopic insights into the protein-stabilizing effect of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M; Gai, Feng

    2014-06-10

    Although it is widely known that trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), an osmolyte used by nature, stabilizes the folded state of proteins, the underlying mechanism of action is not entirely understood. To gain further insight into this important biological phenomenon, we use the C≡N stretching vibration of an unnatural amino acid, p-cyano-phenylalanine, to directly probe how TMAO affects the hydration and conformational dynamics of a model peptide and a small protein. By assessing how the lineshape and spectral diffusion properties of this vibration change with cosolvent conditions, we are able to show that TMAO achieves its protein-stabilizing ability through the combination of (at least) two mechanisms: (i) It decreases the hydrogen bonding ability of water and hence the stability of the unfolded state, and (ii) it acts as a molecular crowder, as suggested by a recent computational study, that can increase the stability of the folded state via the excluded volume effect. PMID:24912147

  5. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    PubMed

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:26476082

  6. Effects of Glycosylation on the Stability of Protein Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    SOLÁ, RICARDO J.; GRIEBENOW, KAI

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, protein-based therapeutics have substantially expanded the field of molecular pharmacology due to their outstanding potential for the treatment of disease. Unfortunately, protein pharmaceuticals display a series of intrinsic physical and chemical instability problems during their production, purification, storage, and delivery that can adversely impact their final therapeutic efficacies. This has prompted an intense search for generalized strategies to engineer the long-term stability of proteins during their pharmaceutical employment. Due to the well known effect that glycans have in increasing the overall stability of glycoproteins, rational manipulation of the glycosylation parameters through glycoengineering could become a promising approach to improve both the in vitro and in vivo stability of protein pharmaceuticals. The intent of this review is therefore to further the field of protein glycoengineering by increasing the general understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation improves the molecular stability of protein pharmaceuticals. This is achieved by presenting a survey of the different instabilities displayed by protein pharmaceuticals, by addressing which of these instabilities can be improved by glycosylation, and by discussing the possible mechanisms by which glycans induce these stabilization effects. PMID:18661536

  7. Unexpected effects of macromolecular crowding on protein stability.

    PubMed

    Benton, Laura A; Smith, Austin E; Young, Gregory B; Pielak, Gary J

    2012-12-11

    Most theories about macromolecular crowding focus on two ideas: the macromolecular nature of the crowder and entropy. For proteins, the volume excluded by the crowder favors compact native states over expanded denatured states, enhancing protein stability by decreasing the entropy of unfolding. We tested these ideas with the widely used crowding agent Ficoll-70 and its monomer, sucrose. Contrary to expectations, Ficoll and sucrose have approximately the same stabilizing effect on chymotrypsin inhibitor 2. Furthermore, the stabilization is driven by enthalpy, not entropy. These results point to the need for carefully controlled studies and more sophisticated theories for understanding crowding effects. PMID:23167542

  8. Lower Protein Stability Does Not Necessarily Increase Local Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Levi J; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-17

    Overall protein stability is thought to have an important impact on the millisecond time scale dynamics modulating enzyme function. In order to better understand the effects of overall stability on the substructure dynamics of mitochondrial cytochrome c, we test the effect of a destabilizing L85A mutation on the kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics of the alkaline conformational transition. The alkaline conformational transition replaces the Met80 ligand of the heme with a lysine residue from Ω-loop D, the heme crevice loop, consisting of residues 70-85. Residues 67-87 are the most conserved portion of the sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c, suggesting that this region is of prime importance for function. Mutations to Ω-loop D affect the stability of the heme crevice directly, modulating the pKapp of the alkaline transition. Two variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c, WT*/L85A and WT*/K73H/L85A, were prepared for these studies. Guanidine-HCl unfolding monitored by circular dichroism and pH titrations at 695 nm, respectively, were used to study the thermodynamics of global and local unfolding of these variants. The kinetics of the alkaline transition were measured by pH-jump stopped-flow methods. Gated electron transfer techniques using bis(2,2',2″-terpyridine)cobalt(II) as a reducing reagent were implemented to measure the heme crevice dynamics for the WT*/K73H/L85A variant. Contrary to the expectation that dynamics around the heme crevice would be faster for the less stable WT*/K73H/L85A variant, based on the behavior of psychrophilic versus mesophilic enzymes, they were similar to those for a variant without the L85A mutation. In fact, below pH 7, the dynamics of the WT*/K73H/L85A variant were slower. PMID:27104373

  9. Multiple Post-translational Modifications Affect Heterologous Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Kurotani, Atsushi; Takagi, Tetsuo; Toyama, Mitsutoshi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Fukami, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are required for proper folding of many proteins. The low capacity for PTMs hinders the production of heterologous proteins in the widely used prokaryotic systems of protein synthesis. Until now, a systematic and comprehensive study concerning the specific effects of individual PTMs on heterologous protein synthesis has not been presented. To address this issue, we expressed 1488 human proteins and their domains in a bacterial cell-free system, and we examined the correlation of the expression yields with the presence of multiple PTM sites bioinformatically predicted in these proteins. This approach revealed a number of previously unknown statistically significant correlations. Prediction of some PTMs, such as myristoylation, glycosylation, palmitoylation, and disulfide bond formation, was found to significantly worsen protein amenability to soluble expression. The presence of other PTMs, such as aspartyl hydroxylation, C-terminal amidation, and Tyr sulfation, did not correlate with the yield of heterologous protein expression. Surprisingly, the predicted presence of several PTMs, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and prenylation, was associated with the increased production of properly folded soluble proteins. The plausible rationales for the existence of the observed correlations are presented. Our findings suggest that identification of potential PTMs in polypeptide sequences can be of practical use for predicting expression success and optimizing heterologous protein synthesis. In sum, this study provides the most compelling evidence so far for the role of multiple PTMs in the stability and solubility of heterologously expressed recombinant proteins. PMID:22674579

  10. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  11. Energetics-Based Methods for Protein Folding and Stability Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, M. Ariel; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, a series of energetics-based techniques have been developed for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability. These techniques include Stability of Unpurified Proteins from Rates of amide H/D Exchange (SUPREX), pulse proteolysis, Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX), slow histidine H/D exchange, lysine amidination, and quantitative cysteine reactivity (QCR). The above techniques, which are the subject of this review, all utilize chemical or enzymatic modification reactions to probe the chemical denaturant- or temperature-induced equilibrium unfolding properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. They employ various mass spectrometry-, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-, and optical spectroscopy-based readouts that are particularly advantageous for high-throughput and in some cases multiplexed analyses. This has created the opportunity to use protein folding and stability measurements in new applications such as in high-throughput screening projects to identify novel protein ligands and in mode-of-action studies to identify protein targets of a particular ligand.

  12. Sperm Motility Requires Wnt/GSK3 Stabilization of Proteins.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, Edward M; Ploper, Diego

    2015-11-23

    Inhibition of GSK3 by Wnt signaling stabilizes many cellular proteins, but proof that this effect is independent of β-catenin-mediated transcription is lacking. Koch, Acebron, and colleagues (2015) now demonstrate that transcriptionally silent mammalian sperm require Wnt signaling via exosomes to prevent protein degradation during their lengthy travels through the epididymis. PMID:26609954

  13. Probing protein stabilization by glycerol using electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grandori, R; Matecko, I; Mayr, P; Müller, N

    2001-08-01

    This study shows that electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), combined with a heated turbo ion-spray interface, allows monitoring protein stabilization by glycerol in solution. Measurements obtained with the two proteins lysozyme and cytochrome c are presented. The observed mass-to-charge (m/z) distributions reveal the stabilizing effect of the additive on the protein conformations against temperature and acid-induced unfolding, as well as against denaturation by acetonitrile. The data obtained with lysozyme allow detection of minor conformational changes upon glycerol addition to the native protein, and suggest that the protein structure in the presence of the additive is slightly compressed compared with its state in water. This result corroborates previous evidence obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance. It is also shown that analysis of the m/z distributions obtained by ESI-MS can lead to detection of partially folded and partially populated states in protein samples. PMID:11523091

  14. Predicting stability of Arc repressor mutants with protein stochastic moments.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Uriarte, Eugenio; Ramos de Armas, Ronal

    2005-01-17

    As more and more protein structures are determined and applied to drug manufacture, there is increasing interest in studying their stability. In this study, the stochastic moments ((SR)pi(k)) of 53 Arc repressor mutants were introduced as molecular descriptors modeling protein stability. The Linear Discriminant Analysis model developed correctly classified 43 out of 53, 81.13% of proteins according to their thermal stability. More specifically, the model classified 20/28 (71.4%) proteins with near wild-type stability and 23/25 (92%) proteins with reduced stability. Moreover, validation of the model was carried out by re-substitution procedures (81.0%). In addition, the stochastic moments based model compared favorably with respect to others based on physicochemical and geometric parameters such as D-Fire potential, surface area, volume, partition coefficient, and molar refractivity, which presented less than 77% of accuracy. This result illustrates the possibilities of the stochastic moments' method for the study of bioorganic and medicinal chemistry relevant proteins. PMID:15598555

  15. Dual degradation signals control Gli protein stability and tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Huntzicker, Erik G.; Estay, Ivette S.; Zhen, Hanson; Lokteva, Ludmila A.; Jackson, Peter K.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2006-01-01

    Regulated protein destruction controls many key cellular processes with aberrant regulation increasingly found during carcinogenesis. Gli proteins mediate the transcriptional effects of the Sonic hedgehog pathway, which is implicated in up to 25% of human tumors. Here we show that Gli is rapidly destroyed by the proteasome and that mouse basal cell carcinoma induction correlates with Gli protein accumulation. We identify two independent destruction signals in Gli1, DN and DC, and show that removal of these signals stabilizes Gli1 protein and rapidly accelerates tumor formation in transgenic animals. These data argue that control of Gli protein accumulation underlies tumorigenesis and suggest a new avenue for antitumor therapy. PMID:16421275

  16. Rapid formation of plasma protein corona critically affects nanoparticle pathophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Docter, Dominic; Kuharev, Jörg; Musyanovych, Anna; Fetz, Verena; Hecht, Rouven; Schlenk, Florian; Fischer, Dagmar; Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph; Landfester, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Maskos, Michael; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stauber, Roland H.

    2013-10-01

    In biological fluids, proteins bind to the surface of nanoparticles to form a coating known as the protein corona, which can critically affect the interaction of the nanoparticles with living systems. As physiological systems are highly dynamic, it is important to obtain a time-resolved knowledge of protein-corona formation, development and biological relevancy. Here we show that label-free snapshot proteomics can be used to obtain quantitative time-resolved profiles of human plasma coronas formed on silica and polystyrene nanoparticles of various size and surface functionalization. Complex time- and nanoparticle-specific coronas, which comprise almost 300 different proteins, were found to form rapidly (<0.5 minutes) and, over time, to change significantly in terms of the amount of bound protein, but not in composition. Rapid corona formation is found to affect haemolysis, thrombocyte activation, nanoparticle uptake and endothelial cell death at an early exposure time.

  17. Development of a simple assay system for protein-stabilizing efficiency based on hemoglobin protection against denaturation and measurement of the cooperative effect of mixing protein stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyu; Manabe, Yoshiyuki; Minamoto, Naoya; Saiki, Naoka; Fukase, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    We have elucidated the cooperative stabilization of proteins by sugars, amino acids, and other protein-stabilizing agents using a new and simple assay system. Our system determines the protein-stabilizing ability of various compounds by measuring their ability to protect hemoglobin from denaturation. Hemoglobin denaturation was readily measured by quantitative changes in its ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum. The efficiency of our assay was confirmed using various sugars such as trehalose and sucrose that are known to be good protein stabilizers. We have also found that mixtures of two different types of protein stabilizers resulted in a cooperative stabilizing effect on protein. PMID:27253914

  18. Fluorinated proteins: from design and synthesis to structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E Neil G

    2014-10-21

    Fluorine is all but absent from biology; however, it has proved to be a remarkably useful element with which to modulate the activity of biological molecules and to study their mechanism of action. Our laboratory's interest in incorporating fluorine into proteins was stimulated by the unusual physicochemical properties exhibited by perfluorinated small molecules. These include extreme chemical inertness and thermal stability, properties that have made them valuable as nonstick coatings and fire retardants. Fluorocarbons also exhibit an unusual propensity to phase segregation. This phenomenon, which has been termed the "fluorous effect", has been effectively exploited in organic synthesis to purify compounds from reaction mixtures by extracting fluorocarbon-tagged molecules into fluorocarbon solvents. As biochemists, we were curious to explore whether the unusual physicochemical properties of perfluorocarbons could be engineered into proteins. To do this, we developed a synthesis of a highly fluorinated amino acid, hexafluoroleucine, and designed a model 4-helix bundle protein, α4H, in which the hydrophobic core was packed exclusively with leucine. We then investigated the effects of repacking the hydrophobic core of α4H with various combinations of leucine and hexafluoroleucine. These initial studies demonstrated that fluorination is a general and effective strategy for enhancing the stability of proteins against chemical and thermal denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We had originally envisaged that the "fluorous interactions", postulated from the self-segregating properties of fluorous solvents, might be used to mediate specific protein-protein interactions orthogonal to those of natural proteins. However, various lines of evidence indicate that no special, favorable fluorine-fluorine interactions occur in the core of the fluorinated α4 protein. This makes it unlikely that fluorinated amino acids can be used to direct protein-protein interactions. More

  19. Impact of alcohols on the formation and stability of protein-stabilized nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Herz, Eva; McClements, David Julian; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-11-01

    Nanoemulsions are increasingly being used for encapsulation, protection, and delivery of bioactive lipids, however, their formation from natural emulsifiers is still challenging. We investigated the impact of alcohol on the formation and stability of protein-stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The influence of different alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol) at various concentrations (0-25% w/w) on the formation and stability of emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate, whey protein isolate, and fish gelatin was investigated. The mean particle diameter decreased with increasing alcohol concentrations from 0 to 10%w/w, but extensive droplet aggregation occurred at higher levels. This phenomenon was attributed to enhanced protein-protein interactions between the adsorbed emulsifier molecules in the presence of alcohol leading to droplet flocculation. The smallest droplets (d<100nm) were obtained when 10%w/w 1-butanol was added to sodium caseinate-stabilized nanoemulsions, but relatively small droplets (d<150nm) could also be obtained in the presence of a food-grade alcohol (ethanol). This study demonstrated that alcohol addition might be a useful tool for producing protein-stabilized nanoemulsions suitable for use as delivery systems of lipophilic bioactive agents. PMID:25129338

  20. Reprint of: Impact of alcohols on the formation and stability of protein-stabilized nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Herz, Eva; McClements, David Julian; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-07-01

    Nanoemulsions are increasingly being used for encapsulation, protection, and delivery of bioactive lipids, however, their formation from natural emulsifiers is still challenging. We investigated the impact of alcohol on the formation and stability of protein-stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The influence of different alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol) at various concentrations (0-25% w/w) on the formation and stability of emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate, whey protein isolate, and fish gelatin was investigated. The mean particle diameter decreased with increasing alcohol concentrations from 0 to 10%w/w, but extensive droplet aggregation occurred at higher levels. This phenomenon was attributed to enhanced protein-protein interactions between the adsorbed emulsifier molecules in the presence of alcohol leading to droplet flocculation. The smallest droplets (d<100 nm) were obtained when 10%w/w 1-butanol was added to sodium caseinate-stabilized nanoemulsions, but relatively small droplets (d<150 nm) could also be obtained in the presence of a food-grade alcohol (ethanol). This study demonstrated that alcohol addition might be a useful tool for producing protein-stabilized nanoemulsions suitable for use as delivery systems of lipophilic bioactive agents. PMID:25865241

  1. SRide: a server for identifying stabilizing residues in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M. Michael; Pujadas, Gerard; Tusnády, Gábor E.; Simon, István

    2005-01-01

    Residues expected to play key roles in the stabilization of proteins [stabilizing residues (SRs)] are selected by combining several methods based mainly on the interactions of a given residue with its spatial, rather than its sequential neighborhood and by considering the evolutionary conservation of the residues. A residue is selected as a stabilizing residue if it has high surrounding hydrophobicity, high long-range order, high conservation score and if it belongs to a stabilization center. The definition of all these parameters and the thresholds used to identify the SRs are discussed in detail. The algorithm for identifying SRs was originally developed for TIM-barrel proteins [M. M. Gromiha, G. Pujadas, C. Magyar, S. Selvaraj, and I. Simon (2004), Proteins, 55, 316–329] and is now generalized for all proteins of known 3D structure. SRs could be applied in protein engineering and homology modeling and could also help to explain certain folds with significant stability. The SRide server is located at . PMID:15980477

  2. SRide: a server for identifying stabilizing residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M Michael; Pujadas, Gerard; Tusnády, Gábor E; Simon, István

    2005-07-01

    Residues expected to play key roles in the stabilization of proteins [stabilizing residues (SRs)] are selected by combining several methods based mainly on the interactions of a given residue with its spatial, rather than its sequential neighborhood and by considering the evolutionary conservation of the residues. A residue is selected as a stabilizing residue if it has high surrounding hydrophobicity, high long-range order, high conservation score and if it belongs to a stabilization center. The definition of all these parameters and the thresholds used to identify the SRs are discussed in detail. The algorithm for identifying SRs was originally developed for TIM-barrel proteins [M. M. Gromiha, G. Pujadas, C. Magyar, S. Selvaraj, and I. Simon (2004), Proteins, 55, 316-329] and is now generalized for all proteins of known 3D structure. SRs could be applied in protein engineering and homology modeling and could also help to explain certain folds with significant stability. The SRide server is located at http://sride.enzim.hu. PMID:15980477

  3. Rational stabilization of complex proteins: a divide and combine approach

    PubMed Central

    Lamazares, Emilio; Clemente, Isabel; Bueno, Marta; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the thermostability of proteins is often crucial for their successful use as analytic, synthetic or therapeutic tools. Most rational thermostabilization strategies were developed on small two-state proteins and, unsurprisingly, they tend to fail when applied to the much more abundant, larger, non-fully cooperative proteins. We show that the key to stabilize the latter is to know the regions of lower stability. To prove it, we have engineered apoflavodoxin, a non-fully cooperative protein on which previous thermostabilizing attempts had failed. We use a step-wise combination of structure-based, rationally-designed, stabilizing mutations confined to the less stable structural region, and obtain variants that, according to their van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratios, exhibit fully-cooperative thermal unfolding with a melting temperature of 75°C, 32 degrees above the lower melting temperature of the non-cooperative wild type protein. The ideas introduced here may also be useful for the thermostabilization of complex proteins through formulation or using specific stabilizing ligands (e.g. pharmacological chaperones). PMID:25774740

  4. Effects of sugars on the thermal stability of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2013-06-01

    It is experimentally known that the heat-denaturation temperature of a protein is raised (i.e., its thermal stability is enhanced) by sugar addition. In earlier works, we proposed a physical picture of thermal denaturation of proteins in which the measure of the thermal stability is defined as the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding at 298 K normalized by the number of residues. A multipolar-model water was adopted as the solvent. The polyatomic structures of the folded and unfolded states of a protein were taken into account in the atomic detail. A larger value of the measure implies higher thermal stability. First, we show that the measure remains effective even when the model water is replaced by the hard-sphere solvent whose number density and molecular diameter are set at those of real water. The physical picture is then adapted to the elucidation of the effects of sugar addition on the thermal stability of a protein. The water-sugar solution is modeled as a binary mixture of hard spheres. The thermal stability is determined by a complex interplay of the diameter of sugar molecules dC and the total packing fraction of the solution η: dC is estimated from the volume per molecule in the sugar crystal and η is calculated using the experimental data of the solution density. We find that the protein is more stabilized as the sucrose or glucose concentration becomes higher and the stabilization effect is stronger for sucrose than for glucose. These results are in accord with the experimental observations. Using a radial-symmetric integral equation theory and the morphometric approach, we decompose the change in the measure upon sugar addition into two components originating from the protein-solvent pair and protein-solvent many-body correlations, respectively. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume and solvent-accessible-surface terms. These decompositions give physical insights into the microscopic origin of the thermal-stability

  5. Effects of sugars on the thermal stability of a protein.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2013-06-28

    It is experimentally known that the heat-denaturation temperature of a protein is raised (i.e., its thermal stability is enhanced) by sugar addition. In earlier works, we proposed a physical picture of thermal denaturation of proteins in which the measure of the thermal stability is defined as the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding at 298 K normalized by the number of residues. A multipolar-model water was adopted as the solvent. The polyatomic structures of the folded and unfolded states of a protein were taken into account in the atomic detail. A larger value of the measure implies higher thermal stability. First, we show that the measure remains effective even when the model water is replaced by the hard-sphere solvent whose number density and molecular diameter are set at those of real water. The physical picture is then adapted to the elucidation of the effects of sugar addition on the thermal stability of a protein. The water-sugar solution is modeled as a binary mixture of hard spheres. The thermal stability is determined by a complex interplay of the diameter of sugar molecules dC and the total packing fraction of the solution η: dC is estimated from the volume per molecule in the sugar crystal and η is calculated using the experimental data of the solution density. We find that the protein is more stabilized as the sucrose or glucose concentration becomes higher and the stabilization effect is stronger for sucrose than for glucose. These results are in accord with the experimental observations. Using a radial-symmetric integral equation theory and the morphometric approach, we decompose the change in the measure upon sugar addition into two components originating from the protein-solvent pair and protein-solvent many-body correlations, respectively. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume and solvent-accessible-surface terms. These decompositions give physical insights into the microscopic origin of the thermal-stability

  6. Influence of osmolytes on protein and water structure: a step to understanding the mechanism of protein stabilization.

    PubMed

    Bruździak, Piotr; Panuszko, Aneta; Stangret, Janusz

    2013-10-01

    Results concerning the thermostability of hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solutions with stabilizing osmolytes, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine (Gly), and its N-methyl derivatives, N-methylglycine (NMG), N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), and N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine, TMG), have been presented. The combination of spectroscopic (IR) and calorimetric (DSC) data allowed us to establish a link between osmolytes' influence on water structure and their ability to thermally stabilize protein molecule. Structural and energetic characteristics of stabilizing osmolytes' and lysozyme's hydration water appear to be very similar. The osmolytes increase lysozyme stabilization in the order bulk water < TMAO < TMG < Gly < DMG < NMG, which is consistent with the order corresponding to the value of the most probable oxygen-oxygen distance of water molecules affected by osmolytes in their surrounding. Obtained results verified the hypothesis concerning the role of water molecules in protein stabilization, explained the osmophobic effect, and finally helped to bring us nearer to the exact mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes. PMID:23992436

  7. FACTORS AFFECTING DISINFECTION AND STABILIZATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective disinfection and stabilization of sewage sludge prior to land application is essential to not only protect human health, but also to convince the public of its benefits and safety. A basic understanding of the key factors involved in producing a stable biosolid product ...

  8. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  9. Stability of ALS-related Superoxide Dismutase Protein variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusebrink, Daniel; Plotkin, Steven

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a metal binding, homodimeric protein, whose misfolding is implicated in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Monomerization is believed to be a key step in the propagation of the disease. The dimer stability is often difficult to measure experimentally however, because it is entangled with protein unfolding and metal loss. We thus computationally investigate the dimer stability of mutants of SOD1 known to be associated with ALS. We report on systematic trends in dimer stability, as well as intriguing allosteric communication between mutations and the dimer interface. We study the dimer stabilities in molecular dynamics simulations and obtain the binding free energies of the dimers from pulling essays. Mutations are applied in silicoand we compare the differences of binding free energies compared to the wild type.

  10. Mechanism of protein precipitation and stabilization by co-solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timasheff, Serge N.; Arakawa, Tsutomu

    1988-07-01

    The interactions between proteins and a number of substances which, when present at high concentration, stabilize or precipitate proteins, have been analyzed in terms of the preferential interactions of these co-solvents with proteins. In all cases, stabilization or precipitation was accompanied by preferential exclusion of the co-solvent from the immediate domain of the protein, i.e., preferential hydration of the protein. This means that addition of the co-solvent to the aqueous protein solution increased the chemical potentials of both components. The thermodynamic interaction parameters derived from such data make it possible to calculate the salting out constant, Ks, as well as to construct a phase isotherm for any given solvent mixture which indicates the limiting protein solubility. The salting-out effect can be decomposed into contributions from non-specific preferential exclusion and specific binding of the ligand to the protein, the balance leading to solubilization or precipitation. In reactions, such as denaturation, the effect of co-solvent on the reaction depends on the difference in the preferential interactions of the two end states of the protein. Principal sources of preferential exclusion have been identified as steric exclusion, increase of the surface tension of water by the co-solvent, repulsion by charged loci on the protein and solvophobicity.

  11. A topological and conformational stability alphabet for multipass membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiang; Barth, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Multipass membrane proteins perform critical signal transduction and transport across membranes. How transmembrane helix (TMH) sequences encode the topology and conformational flexibility regulating these functions remains poorly understood. Here we describe a comprehensive analysis of the sequence-structure relationships at multiple interacting TMHs from all membrane proteins with structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We found that membrane proteins can be deconstructed in interacting TMH trimer units, which mostly fold into six distinct structural classes of topologies and conformations. Each class is enriched in recurrent sequence motifs from functionally unrelated proteins, revealing unforeseen consensus and evolutionary conserved networks of stabilizing interhelical contacts. Interacting TMHs' topology and local protein conformational flexibility were remarkably well predicted in a blinded fashion from the identified binding-hotspot motifs. Our results reveal universal sequence-structure principles governing the complex anatomy and plasticity of multipass membrane proteins that may guide de novo structure prediction, design, and studies of folding and dynamics. PMID:26780406

  12. Protein Stability, Folding and Misfolding in Human PGK1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Giovanna; Maggi, Maristella; Pey, Angel L

    2013-01-01

    Conformational diseases are often caused by mutations, altering protein folding and stability in vivo. We review here our recent work on the effects of mutations on the human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (hPGK1), with a particular focus on thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and misfolding. Expression analyses and in vitro biophysical studies indicate that disease-causing mutations enhance protein aggregation propensity. We found a strong correlation among protein aggregation propensity, thermodynamic stability, cooperativity and dynamics. Comparison of folding and unfolding properties with previous reports in PGKs from other species suggests that hPGK1 is very sensitive to mutations leading to enhance protein aggregation through changes in protein folding cooperativity and the structure of the relevant denaturation transition state for aggregation. Overall, we provide a mechanistic framework for protein misfolding of hPGK1, which is insightful to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target native state stability and foldability in hPGK1 deficient patients. PMID:24970202

  13. Storage Stability of Food Protein Hydrolysates-A Review.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qinchun; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Labuza, Theodore P

    2016-05-18

    In recent years, mainly due to the specific health benefits associated with (1) the discovery of bioactive peptides in protein hydrolysates, (2) the reduction of protein allergenicity by protein hydrolysis, and (3) the improved protein digestibility and absorption of protein hydrolysates, the utilization of protein hydrolysates in functional foods and beverages has significantly increased. Although the specific health benefits from different hydrolysates are somewhat proven, the delivery and/or stability of these benefits is debatable during distribution, storage, and consumption. In this review, we discuss (1) the quality changes in different food protein hydrolysates during storage; (2) the resulting changes in the structure and texture of three food matrices, i.e., low moisture foods (LMF, aw < 0.6), intermediate moisture foods (IMF, 0.6 ≤ aw < 0.85), and high moisture foods (HMF, aw ≥ 0.85); and (3) the potential solutions to improve storage stability of food protein hydrolysates. In addition, we note there is a great need for evaluation of biofunction availability of bioactive peptides in food protein hydrolysates during storage. PMID:24915379

  14. Impact of Protein Stability, Cellular Localization, and Abundance on Proteomic Detection of Tumor-Derived Proteins in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Faca, Vitor M.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qing; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mallick, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-derived, circulating proteins are potentially useful as biomarkers for detection of cancer, for monitoring of disease progression, regression and recurrence, and for assessment of therapeutic response. Here we interrogated how a protein's stability, cellular localization, and abundance affect its observability in blood by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. We performed proteomic profiling on tumors and plasma from two different xenograft mouse models. A statistical analysis of this data revealed protein properties indicative of the detection level in plasma. Though 20% of the proteins identified in plasma were tumor-derived, only 5% of the proteins observed in the tumor tissue were found in plasma. Both intracellular and extracellular tumor proteins were observed in plasma; however, after normalizing for tumor abundance, extracellular proteins were seven times more likely to be detected. Although proteins that were more abundant in the tumor were also more likely to be observed in plasma, the relationship was nonlinear: Doubling the spectral count increased detection rate by only 50%. Many secreted proteins, even those with relatively low spectral count, were observed in plasma, but few low abundance intracellular proteins were observed. Proteins predicted to be stable by dipeptide composition were significantly more likely to be identified in plasma than less stable proteins. The number of tryptic peptides in a protein was not significantly related to the chance of a protein being observed in plasma. Quantitative comparison of large versus small tumors revealed that the abundance of proteins in plasma as measured by spectral count was associated with the tumor size, but the relationship was not one-to-one; a 3-fold decrease in tumor size resulted in a 16-fold decrease in protein abundance in plasma. This study provides quantitative support for a tumor-derived marker prioritization strategy that favors secreted and stable proteins over all but the

  15. Impact of protein stability, cellular localization, and abundance on proteomic detection of tumor-derived proteins in plasma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiaojun; Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Zhang, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qing; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B; McIntosh, Martin W; Mallick, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-derived, circulating proteins are potentially useful as biomarkers for detection of cancer, for monitoring of disease progression, regression and recurrence, and for assessment of therapeutic response. Here we interrogated how a protein's stability, cellular localization, and abundance affect its observability in blood by mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. We performed proteomic profiling on tumors and plasma from two different xenograft mouse models. A statistical analysis of this data revealed protein properties indicative of the detection level in plasma. Though 20% of the proteins identified in plasma were tumor-derived, only 5% of the proteins observed in the tumor tissue were found in plasma. Both intracellular and extracellular tumor proteins were observed in plasma; however, after normalizing for tumor abundance, extracellular proteins were seven times more likely to be detected. Although proteins that were more abundant in the tumor were also more likely to be observed in plasma, the relationship was nonlinear: Doubling the spectral count increased detection rate by only 50%. Many secreted proteins, even those with relatively low spectral count, were observed in plasma, but few low abundance intracellular proteins were observed. Proteins predicted to be stable by dipeptide composition were significantly more likely to be identified in plasma than less stable proteins. The number of tryptic peptides in a protein was not significantly related to the chance of a protein being observed in plasma. Quantitative comparison of large versus small tumors revealed that the abundance of proteins in plasma as measured by spectral count was associated with the tumor size, but the relationship was not one-to-one; a 3-fold decrease in tumor size resulted in a 16-fold decrease in protein abundance in plasma. This study provides quantitative support for a tumor-derived marker prioritization strategy that favors secreted and stable proteins over all but the

  16. Development of dextran nanoparticles for stabilizing delicate proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Zhou, Zhihua; Su, Jing; Wei, Liangming; Yuan, Weien; Jin, Tuo

    2013-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems in the development of protein pharmaceuticals is to deal with stabilities of proteins due to its complicated structures. This study aims to develop a novel approach to stabilize and encapsulate proteins into dextran nanoparticles without contacting the interface between the aqueous phase and the organic phase. The bovine serum albumin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), β-galactosidase, and myoglobin were selected as model proteins. The proteins were added into an aqueous solution containing the dextran and polyethylene glycol, and then encapsulated into dextran nanoparticles by aqueous-aqueous freezing-induced phase separation. The encapsulation efficiency and recovery of dextran nanoparticles were determined. The dextran nanoparticles loaded with proteins were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis. The protein aggregation was determined by size-exclusion chromatography-high-performance chromatography, and the bioactivity of proteins recovered during formulation steps was determined. The bioactivity of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and β-galactosidase were examined by the proliferation of TF-1 cell, NSF-60 cell, and ortho-nitrophenyl- β-galactoside assay, respectively. The results of bioactivity recovered show that this novel dextran nanoparticle can preserve the protein's bioactivity during the preparation process. LysoSensor™ Yellow/Blue dextran, a pH-sensitive indicator with fluorescence excited at two channels, was encapsulated into dextran nanoparticles to investigate the ability of dextran nanoparticles to resist the acidic microenvironment (pH < 2.5). The result shows that the dextran nanoparticles attenuate the acidic microenvironment in the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microsphere by means of the dilution effect. These novel dextran nanoparticles provided an appealing approach to stabilize the delicate proteins for

  17. Regulation of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation: the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Stabilizes the Fusion Protein in a Pretriggered State

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Zuhair W.; Gui, Long; DeVito, Ilaria; Jurgens, Eric M.; Lu, Hong; Yokoyama, Christine C.; Palermo, Laura M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA)-neuraminidase protein (HN) of paramyxoviruses carries out three discrete activities, each of which affects the ability of HN to promote viral fusion and entry: receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein. Binding of HN to its sialic acid receptor on a target cell triggers its activation of the fusion protein (F), which then inserts into the target cell and mediates the membrane fusion that initiates infection. We provide new evidence for a fourth function of HN: stabilization of the F protein in its pretriggered state before activation. Influenza virus hemagglutinin protein (uncleaved HA) was used as a nonspecific binding protein to tether F-expressing cells to target cells, and heat was used to activate F, indicating that the prefusion state of F can be triggered to initiate structural rearrangement and fusion by temperature. HN expression along with uncleaved HA and F enhances the F activation if HN is permitted to engage the receptor. However, if HN is prevented from engaging the receptor by the use of a small compound, temperature-induced F activation is curtailed. The results indicate that HN helps stabilize the prefusion state of F, and analysis of a stalk domain mutant HN reveals that the stalk domain of HN mediates the F-stabilization effect. PMID:22993149

  18. The Role of Trehalose for the Stabilization of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Christoffer; Jansson, Helén; Swenson, Jan

    2016-05-26

    Understanding of how the stabilization mechanism of trehalose operates on biological molecules against different types of environmental stress could prove to gain great advancements in many different types of conservation techniques, such as cryopreservation or freeze-drying. Many theories exist that aim to explain why trehalose possesses an extraordinary ability to stabilize biomolecules. However, all of them just explain parts of its mechanism and a comprehensive picture is still lacking. In this study, we have used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and viscometry measurements to determine how the glass transition temperature Tg, the protein denaturation temperature Tden, and the dynamic viscosity depend on both the trehalose and the protein concentration in myoglobin-trehalose-water systems. The aim has been to determine whether these physical properties are related and to gain indirect structural insights from the limits of water crystallization at different concentration ratios. The results show that for systems without partial crystallization of water the addition of protein increases Tg, most likely due to the fact that the protein adsorbs water and thereby reduces the water content in the trehalose-water matrix. Furthermore, these systems are generally decreasing in Tden with an increasing protein concentration, and thereby also an increasing viscosity, showing that the dynamics of the trehalose-water matrix and the stability of the native structure of the protein are not necessarily coupled. We also infer, by analyzing the maximum amount of water for which ice formation is avoided, that the preferential hydration model is consistent with our experimental data. PMID:27135987

  19. How the spatial variation of tree roots affects slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhun; Stokes, A.; Jourdan, C.; Rey, H.; Courbaud, B.; Saint-André, L.

    2010-05-01

    It is now widely recognized that plant roots can reinforce soil against shallow mass movement. Although studies on the interactions between vegetation and slope stability have significantly augmented in recent years, a clear understanding of the spatial dynamics of root reinforcement (through additional cohesion by roots) in subalpine forest is still limited, especially with regard to the roles of different forest management strategies or ecological landscapes. The architecture of root systems is important for soil cohesion, but in reality it is not possible to measure the orientation of each root in a system. Therefore, knowledge on the effect of root orientation and anisotropy on root cohesion on the basis of in situ data is scanty. To determine the effect of root orientation in root cohesion models, we investigated root anisotropy in two mixed, mature, naturally regenerated, subalpine forests of Norway spruce (Picea abies), and Silver fir (Abies alba). Trees were clustered into islands, with open spaces between each group, resulting in strong mosaic heterogeneity within the forest stand. Trenches within and between clusters of trees were dug and root distribution was measured in three dimensions. We then simulated the influence of different values for a root anisotropy correction factor in forests with different ecological structures and soil depths. Using these data, we have carried out simulations of slope stability by calculating the slope factor of safety depending on stand structure. Results should enable us to better estimate the risk of shallow slope failure depending on the type of forest and species.

  20. Mutational effects on stability are largely conserved during protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Ashenberg, Orr; Gong, L Ian; Bloom, Jesse D

    2013-12-24

    Protein stability and folding are the result of cooperative interactions among many residues, yet phylogenetic approaches assume that sites are independent. This discrepancy has engendered concerns about large evolutionary shifts in mutational effects that might confound phylogenetic approaches. Here we experimentally investigate this issue by introducing the same mutations into a set of diverged homologs of the influenza nucleoprotein and measuring the effects on stability. We find that mutational effects on stability are largely conserved across the homologs. We reach qualitatively similar conclusions when we simulate protein evolution with molecular-mechanics force fields. Our results do not mean that proteins evolve without epistasis, which can still arise even when mutational stability effects are conserved. However, our findings indicate that large evolutionary shifts in mutational effects on stability are rare, at least among homologs with similar structures and functions. We suggest that properly describing the clearly observable and highly conserved amino acid preferences at individual sites is likely to be far more important for phylogenetic analyses than accounting for rare shifts in amino acid propensities due to site covariation. PMID:24324165

  1. Some implications of colloid stability theory for protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. C.; De Mattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.; Tiller, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Colloid stability theory has been applied to protein crystallization and predicts a narrow range of conditions under which crystals can be grown without the agglomeration of protein molecules (colloids) in the bulk solution. It also predicts a critical electrolyte concentration above which agglomeration will always occur. Using this theory, the rapid protein agglomeration occurring during Schlieren experiments as well as a terminal crystal size effect in a fixed container were explained. Following this concept, the supposed 'terminal' crystal size has been at least doubled.

  2. Thermal stability and flame resistance of cotton fabrics treated with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Francesca; Carletto, Riccardo Andrea; Alongi, Jenny; Marmo, Luca; Di Blasio, Alessandro; Malucelli, Giulio

    2013-04-15

    It is well described in the literature that whey proteins are able to form coatings, which exhibit high mechanical and oxygen barrier properties, notwithstanding a great water vapour adsorption. These peculiarities have been exploited for applying a novel protein-based finishing treatment to cotton and for assessing the protein effect on the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability and on the flame retardant properties of the cellulosic fabric. Indeed, the deposited whey protein coatings have turned out to significantly affect the thermal degradation of cotton in inert and oxidative atmosphere, and to somehow modify its combustion when a flame has been applied. Furthermore, the influence of the secondary and tertiary structure of these proteins on the morphology of the deposited coating, and thus on the thermal and flame retardant properties of the treated fabrics, has been evaluated by performing a denaturation thermal treatment before the protein application. PMID:23544551

  3. Graph theory and stability analysis of protein complex interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hung; Chen, Teng-Hung; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2016-04-01

    Protein complexes play an essential role in many biological processes. Complexes can interact with other complexes to form protein complex interaction network (PCIN) that involves in important cellular processes. There are relatively few studies on examining the interaction topology among protein complexes; and little is known about the stability of PCIN under perturbations. We employed graph theoretical approach to reveal hidden properties and features of four species PCINs. Two main issues are addressed, (i) the global and local network topological properties, and (ii) the stability of the networks under 12 types of perturbations. According to the topological parameter classification, we identified some critical protein complexes and validated that the topological analysis approach could provide meaningful biological interpretations of the protein complex systems. Through the Kolmogorov-Smimov test, we showed that local topological parameters are good indicators to characterise the structure of PCINs. We further demonstrated the effectiveness of the current approach by performing the scalability and data normalization tests. To measure the robustness of PCINs, we proposed to consider eight topological-based perturbations, which are specifically applicable in scenarios of targeted, sustained attacks. We found that the degree-based, betweenness-based and brokering-coefficient-based perturbations have the largest effect on network stability. PMID:26997661

  4. Designed protein reveals structural determinants of extreme kinetic stability

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Aron; Ma, S. Martha; Xia, Ke; Rafalia, Hitesh; Trainor, Kyle; Colón, Wilfredo; Gosavi, Shachi; Meiering, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The design of stable, functional proteins is difficult. Improved design requires a deeper knowledge of the molecular basis for design outcomes and properties. We previously used a bioinformatics and energy function method to design a symmetric superfold protein composed of repeating structural elements with multivalent carbohydrate-binding function, called ThreeFoil. This and similar methods have produced a notably high yield of stable proteins. Using a battery of experimental and computational analyses we show that despite its small size and lack of disulfide bonds, ThreeFoil has remarkably high kinetic stability and its folding is specifically chaperoned by carbohydrate binding. It is also extremely stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate that the kinetic stability can be predicted and modeled using absolute contact order (ACO) and long-range order (LRO), as well as coarse-grained simulations; the stability arises from a topology that includes many long-range contacts which create a large and highly cooperative energy barrier for unfolding and folding. Extensive data from proteomic screens and other experiments reveal that a high ACO/LRO is a general feature of proteins with strong resistances to denaturation and degradation. These results provide tractable approaches for predicting resistance and designing proteins with sufficient topological complexity and long-range interactions to accommodate destabilizing functional features as well as withstand chemical and proteolytic challenge. PMID:26554002

  5. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants. PMID:27068539

  6. Detergent Stabilized Nanopore Formation Kinetics of an Anthrax Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kelby

    2015-03-01

    This summer research project funded through the Society of Physics Students Internship Program and The National Institute of Standards and Technology focused on optimization of pore formation of Protective Antigen protein secreted by Bacillus Anthraces. This experiment analyzes the use of N-tetradecylphosphocholine (FOS-14 Detergent) to stabilize the water soluble protein, protective antigen protein (PA63) to regulate the kinetics of pore formation in a model bilayer lipid membrane. The FOS-14 Detergent was tested under various conditions to understand its impact on the protein pore formation. The optimization of this channel insertion is critical in preparing samples of oriented for neutron reflectometry that provide new data to increase the understanding of the protein's structure.

  7. [Protein Folding and Stability in the Presence of Osmolytes].

    PubMed

    Fonin, A V; Uversky, V N; Kuznetsova, I M; Turoverov, K K

    2016-01-01

    Osmolytes are molecules with the function among others to align hydrostatic pressure between intracellular and extracellular spaces. Accumulation of osmolytes occurs in the cell in response to stress caused by pressure change, change in temperature, pH, and concentration of inorganic salts. Osmolytes can prevent native proteins denaturation and promote folding of unfolding proteins. Investigation of the osmolytes effect on these processes is essential for understanding the mechanisms of folding and functioning of proteins in vivo. A score of works, devoted to the effect of osmolytes on proteins, are not always consistent with each other. In this review an attempt was made to systemize available array of data on the subject and consider the problem of folding and stability of proteins in solutions in the presence of osmolytes from the single viewpoint. PMID:27192822

  8. Sample Stability and Protein Composition of Saliva: Implications for Its Use as a Diagnostic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Diederik; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; de Vries, Marcel P.; Weening, Desiree; Vonk, Roel J.; Roelofsen, Han

    2008-01-01

    Saliva is an easy accessible plasma ultra-filtrate. Therefore, saliva can be an attractive alternative to blood for measurement of diagnostic protein markers. Our aim was to determine stability and protein composition of saliva. Protein stability at room temperature was examined by incubating fresh whole saliva with and without inhibitors of proteases and bacterial metabolism followed by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI) analyses. Protein composition was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) fractionation of saliva proteins followed by digestion of excised bands and identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results show that rapid protein degradation occurs within 30 minutes after sample collection. Degradation starts already during collection. Protease inhibitors partly prevented degradation while inhibition of bacterial metabolism did not affect degradation. Three stable degradation products of 2937 Da, 3370 Da and 4132 Da were discovered which can be used as markers to monitor sample quality. Saliva proteome analyses revealed 218 proteins of which 84 can also be found in blood plasma. Based on a comparison with seven other proteomics studies on whole saliva we identified 83 new saliva proteins. We conclude that saliva is a promising diagnostic fluid when precautions are taken towards protein breakdown. PMID:19578491

  9. Dynamic Stabilization of Expressed Proteins in Engineered Diatom Biosilica Matrices.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijia; Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Roesijadi, Guritno; Squier, Thomas C

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembly of recombinant proteins within the biosilica of living diatoms represents a means to construct functional materials in a reproducible and scalable manner that will enable applications that harness the inherent specificities of proteins to sense and respond to environmental cues. Here we describe the use of a silaffin-derived lysine-rich 39-amino-acid targeting sequence (Sil3T8) that directs a single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to assemble within the biosilica frustule, resulting in abundance of >200 000 proteins per frustule. Using either a fluorescent ligand bound to the scFv or the intrinsic fluorescence of EGFP, we monitored protein conformational dynamics, accessibility to external quenchers, binding affinity, and conformational stability. Like proteins in solution, proteins within isolated frustules undergo isotropic rotational motion, but with 2-fold increases in rotational correlation times that are indicative of weak macromolecular associations within the biosilica. Solvent accessibilities and high-affinity (pM) binding are comparable to those in solution. In contrast to solution conditions, scFv antibodies within the biosilica matrix retain their binding affinity in the presence of chaotropic agents (i.e., 8 M urea). Together, these results argue that dramatic increases in protein conformational stability within the biosilica matrices arise through molecular crowding, acting to retain native protein folds and associated functionality with the potential to allow the utility of engineered proteins under a range of harsh environmental conditions associated with environmental sensing and industrial catalytic transformations. PMID:27139003

  10. Beyond anchoring: the expanding role of the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Culler, Megan R; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    While work with viral fusion proteins has demonstrated that the transmembrane domain (TMD) can affect protein folding, stability, and membrane fusion promotion, the mechanism(s) remains poorly understood. TMDs could play a role in fusion promotion through direct TMD-TMD interactions, and we have recently shown that isolated TMDs from three paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins interact as trimers using sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analysis (E. C. Smith, et al., submitted for publication). Immediately N-terminal to the TMD is heptad repeat B (HRB), which plays critical roles in fusion. Interestingly, addition of HRB decreased the stability of the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions. This result, combined with previous findings that HRB forms a trimeric coiled coil in the prefusion form of the whole protein though HRB peptides fail to stably associate in isolation, suggests that the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions work in concert with elements in the F ectodomain head to stabilize a weak HRB interaction. Thus, changes in TMD-TMD interactions could be important in regulating F triggering and refolding. Alanine insertions between the TMD and HRB demonstrated that spacing between these two regions is important for protein stability while not affecting TMD-TMD interactions. Additional mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the TMD suggests that β-branched residues within the TMD play a role in membrane fusion, potentially through modulation of TMD-TMD interactions. Our results support a model whereby the C-terminal end of the Hendra virus F TMD is an important regulator of TMD-TMD interactions and show that these interactions help hold HRB in place prior to the triggering of membrane fusion. PMID:22238302

  11. The yeast ubiquitin protease, Ubp3p, promotes protein stability.

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Christine T; Huffaker, Tim C

    2002-01-01

    Stu1p is a microtubule-associated protein required for spindle assembly. In this article we show that the temperature-sensitive stu1-5 allele is synthetically lethal in combination with ubp3, gim1-gim5, and kem1 mutations. The primary focus of this article is on the stu1-5 ubp3 interaction. Ubp3 is a deubiquitination enzyme and a member of a large family of cysteine proteases that cleave ubiquitin moieties from protein substrates. UBP3 is the only one of 16 UBP genes in yeast whose loss is synthetically lethal with stu1-5. Stu1p levels in stu1-5 cells are several-fold lower than the levels in wild-type cells and the stu1-5 temperature sensitivity can be rescued by additional copies of stu1-5. These results indicate that the primary effect of the stu1-5 mutation is to make the protein less stable. The levels of Stu1p are even lower in ubp3Delta stu1-5 cells, suggesting that Ubp3p plays a role in promoting protein stability. We also found that ubp3Delta produces growth defects in combination with mutations in other genes that decrease protein stability. Overall, these data support the idea that Ubp3p has a general role in the reversal of protein ubiquitination. PMID:12454057

  12. Dissecting the Critical Factors for Thermodynamic Stability of Modular Proteins Using Molecular Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Chul; Han, Jieun; Heu, Woosung; Park, Keunwan; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Dongsup; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Repeat proteins have recently attracted much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural and biophysical features. In particular, repeat proteins show high stability against temperature and chaotic agents. Despite many studies, structural features for the stability of repeat proteins remain poorly understood. Here we present an interesting result from in silico analyses pursuing the factors which affect the stability of repeat proteins. Previously developed repebody structure based on variable lymphocytes receptors (VLRs) which consists of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules was used as initial structure for the present study. We constructed extra six repebody structures with varying numbers of repeat modules and those structures were used for molecular dynamics simulations. For the structures, the intramolecular interactions including backbone H-bonds, van der Waals energy, and hydrophobicity were investigated and then the radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, ratio of secondary structure, and hydration free energy were also calculated to find out the relationship between the number of LRR modules and stability of the protein. Our results show that the intramolecular interactions lead to more compact structure and smaller surface area of the repebodies, which are critical for the stability of repeat proteins. The other features were also well compatible with the experimental results. Based on our observations, the repebody-5 was proposed as the best structure from the all repebodies in structure optimization process. The present study successfully demonstrated that our computer-based molecular modeling approach can significantly contribute to the experiment-based protein engineering challenge. PMID:24849801

  13. Stability Affects of Artificial Viscosity in Detonation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2002-06-03

    Accurate multi-dimensional modeling of detonation waves in solid HE materials is a difficult task. To treat applied problems which contain detonation waves one must consider reacting flow with a wide range of length-scales, non-linear equations of state (EOS), and material interfaces at which the detonation wave interacts with other materials. To be useful numerical models of detonation waves must be accurate, stable, and insensitive to details of the modeling such as the mesh spacing, and mesh aspect ratio for multi-dimensional simulations. Studies we have performed show that numerical simulations of detonation waves can be very sensitive to the form of the artificial viscosity term used. The artificial viscosity term is included in our ALE hydrocode to treat shock discontinuities. We show that a monotonic, second order artificial viscosity model derived from an approximate Riemann solver scheme can strongly damp unphysical oscillations in the detonation wave reaction zone, improving the detonation wave boundary wall interaction. These issues are demonstrated in 2D model simulations presented of the 'Bigplate' test. Results using LX-I 7 explosives are compared with numerical simulation results to demonstrate the affects of the artificial viscosity model.

  14. Stability of Protein-Specific Hydration Shell on Crowding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kingsley, Carolyn N; Sheil, Ryan; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Bierma, Jan C; Roskamp, Kyle W; Khago, Domarin; Martin, Rachel W; Han, Songi

    2016-04-27

    We demonstrate that the effect of protein crowding is critically dependent on the stability of the protein's hydration shell, which can dramatically vary between different proteins. In the human eye lens, γS-crystallin (γS-WT) forms a densely packed transparent hydrogel with a high refractive index, making it an ideal system for studying the effects of protein crowding. A single point mutation generates the cataract-related variant γS-G18V, dramatically altering the optical properties of the eye lens. This system offers an opportunity to explore fundamental questions regarding the effect of protein crowding, using γS-WT and γS-G18V: (i) how do the diffusion dynamics of hydration water change as a function of protein crowding?; and (ii) upon hydrogel formation of γS-WT, has a dynamic transition occurred generating a single population of hydration water, or do populations of bulk and hydration water coexist? Using localized spin probes, we separately probe the local translational diffusivity of both surface hydration and interstitial water of γS-WT and γS-G18V in solution. Surprisingly, we find that under the influence of hydrogel formation at highly crowded γS-WT concentrations up to 500 mg/mL, the protein hydration shell remains remarkably dynamic, slowing by less than a factor of 2, if at all, compared to that in dilute protein solutions of ∼5 mg/mL. Upon self-crowding, the population of this robust surface hydration water increases, while a significant bulk-like water population coexists even at ∼500 mg/mL protein concentrations. In contrast, surface water of γS-G18V irreversibly dehydrates with moderate concentration increases or subtle alterations to the solution conditions, demonstrating that the effect of protein crowding is highly dependent on the stability of the protein-specific hydration shell. The core function of γS-crystallin in the eye lens may be precisely its capacity to preserve a robust hydration shell, whose stability is abolished

  15. Thermal stability of matrix protein from Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Morán, Irene Sánchez; Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Barroso, Isabel Muñoz; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Zhadan, Galina; Gómez, Javier; Shnyrov, Valery L; Villar, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The thermal stability of the matrix protein (M protein) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been investigated using high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at pH 7.4. The thermal folding/unfolding of M protein at this pH value is a reversible process involving a highly cooperative transition between folded and unfolded monomers with a transition temperature (Tm) of 63 °C, an unfolding enthalpy, ΔH(Tm), of 340 kcal mol(-1), and the difference in heat capacity between the native and denatured states of the protein, ΔCp, of 5.1 kcal K(-1) mol(-1). The heat capacity of the native state of the protein is in good agreement with the values calculated using a structure-based parameterization, whereas the calculated values for the hypothetical fully-unfolded state of the protein is higher than those determined experimentally. This difference between the heat capacity of denatured M protein and the heat capacity expected for an unstructured polypeptide of the same sequence, together with the data derived from the heat-induced changes in the steady-state fluorescence of the protein, indicates that the polypeptide chain maintains a significant amount of residual structure after thermal denaturation. PMID:23916643

  16. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G protein-independent effectors upon ligand binding suggesting the existence of multiple ligand-specific active states. These active-state conformations are unstable in the absence of specific cytosolic signaling partners representing new challenges for structural biology. Camelid single chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) show promise for stabilizing active GPCR conformations and as chaperones for crystallogenesis. PMID:21782416

  17. Redox control of iron regulatory protein 2 stability.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Anja; Lee, Julie; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-02-18

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a critical switch for cellular and systemic iron homeostasis. In iron-deficient or hypoxic cells, IRP2 binds to mRNAs containing iron responsive elements (IREs) and regulates their expression. Iron promotes proteasomal degradation of IRP2 via the F-box protein FBXL5. Here, we explored the effects of oxygen and cellular redox status on IRP2 stability. We show that iron-dependent decay of tetracycline-inducible IRP2 proceeds efficiently under mild hypoxic conditions (3% oxygen) but is compromised in severe hypoxia (0.1% oxygen). A treatment of cells with exogenous H(2)O(2) protects IRP2 against iron and increases its IRE-binding activity. IRP2 is also stabilized during menadione-induced oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that the degradation of IRP2 in iron-replete cells is not only oxygen-dependent but also sensitive to redox perturbations. PMID:21281640

  18. Physical and oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with fish protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Pedro J; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-07-15

    The emulsifying and antioxidant properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) for the physical and oxidative stabilization of 5% (by weight) fish oil-in-water emulsions were investigated. Muscle proteins from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) were hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-4-5-6% with subtilisin. Sardine hydrolysates with low DH, 3% and 4%, presented the most effective peptides to physically stabilize emulsions with smaller droplet size. This implied more protein adsorbed at the interface to act as physical barrier against prooxidants. This fact might also be responsible for the higher oxidative stability of these emulsions, as shown by their lowest peroxide value and concentration of volatiles such as 1-penten-3-one and 1-penten-3-ol. Among the hydrolysates prepared from small-spotted catshark only the hydrolysate with DH 3% yielded a physically stable emulsion with low concentration of unsaturated aldehydes. These results show the potential of FPH as alternative protein emulsifiers for the production of oxidatively stable fish oil-in-water emulsions. PMID:26948597

  19. The effects of a protein osmolyte on the stability of the integral membrane protein glycerol facilitator.

    PubMed

    Baturin, Simon; Galka, Jamie J; Piyadasa, Hadeesha; Gajjeraman, S; O'Neil, Joe D

    2014-12-01

    Osmolytes are naturally occurring molecules used by a wide variety of organisms to stabilize proteins under extreme conditions of temperature, salinity, hydrostatic pressure, denaturant concentration, and desiccation. The effects of the osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as well as the influence of detergent head group and acyl chain length on the stability of the Escherichia coli integral membrane protein glycerol facilitator (GF) tetramer to thermal and chemical denaturation by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) are reported. TMAO promotes the association of the normally tetrameric α-helical protein into higher order oligomers in dodecyl-maltoside (DDM), but not in tetradecyl-maltoside (TDM), lyso-lauroylphosphatidyl choline (LLPC), or lyso-myristoylphosphatidyl choline (LMPC), as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS); an octameric complex is particularly stable as indicated by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. TMAO increases the heat stability of the GF tetramer an average of 10 °C in the 4 detergents and also protects the protein from denaturation by SDS. However, it did not promote re-association to the tetramer when added to SDS-dissociated protein. TMAO also promotes the formation of rod-like detergent micelles, and DLS was found to be useful for monitoring the structure of the protein and the redistribution of detergent during thermal dissociation of the protein. The protein is more thermally stable in detergents with the phosphatidylcholine head group (LLPC and LMPC) than in the maltoside detergents. The implications of the results for osmolyte mechanism, membrane protein stability, and protein-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:25387032

  20. Quantitation of protein-protein interactions by thermal stability shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Layton, Curtis J; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-08-01

    Thermal stability shift analysis is a powerful method for examining binding interactions in proteins. We demonstrate that under certain circumstances, protein-protein interactions can be quantitated by monitoring shifts in thermal stability using thermodynamic models and data analysis methods presented in this work. This method relies on the determination of protein stabilities from thermal unfolding experiments using fluorescent dyes such as SYPRO Orange that report on protein denaturation. Data collection is rapid and straightforward using readily available real-time polymerase chain reaction instrumentation. We present an approach for the analysis of the unfolding transitions corresponding to each partner to extract the affinity of the interaction between the proteins. This method does not require the construction of a titration series that brackets the dissociation constant. In thermal shift experiments, protein stability data are obtained at different temperatures according to the affinity- and concentration-dependent shifts in unfolding transition midpoints. Treatment of the temperature dependence of affinity is, therefore, intrinsic to this method and is developed in this study. We used the interaction between maltose-binding protein (MBP) and a thermostable synthetic ankyrin repeat protein (Off7) as an experimental test case because their unfolding transitions overlap minimally. We found that MBP is significantly stabilized by Off7. High experimental throughput is enabled by sample parallelization, and the ability to extract quantitative binding information at a single partner concentration. In a single experiment, we were able to quantify the affinities of a series of alanine mutants, covering a wide range of affinities (∼ 100 nM to ∼ 100 μM). PMID:21674662

  1. Machine learning algorithms for predicting protein folding rates and stability of mutant proteins: comparison with statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2011-09-01

    Machine learning algorithms have wide range of applications in bioinformatics and computational biology such as prediction of protein secondary structures, solvent accessibility, binding site residues in protein complexes, protein folding rates, stability of mutant proteins, and discrimination of proteins based on their structure and function. In this work, we focus on two aspects of predictions: (i) protein folding rates and (ii) stability of proteins upon mutations. We briefly introduce the concepts of protein folding rates and stability along with available databases, features for prediction methods and measures for prediction performance. Subsequently, the development of structure based parameters and their relationship with protein folding rates will be outlined. The structure based parameters are helpful to understand the physical basis for protein folding and stability. Further, basic principles of major machine learning techniques will be mentioned and their applications for predicting protein folding rates and stability of mutant proteins will be illustrated. The machine learning techniques could achieve the highest accuracy of predicting protein folding rates and stability. In essence, statistical methods and machine learning algorithms are complimenting each other for understanding and predicting protein folding rates and the stability of protein mutants. The available online resources on protein folding rates and stability will be listed. PMID:21787301

  2. Protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA): protein degradation meets the CRISPR-Cas9 library.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of protein stability is a fundamental issue for biophysical processes, but there has not previously been a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability. However, as reported in the article entitled "A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A," recently published in Cell Discovery, our team developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Based on our findings, we are confident that this efficient and unbiased screening method at the genome scale will be used by researchers worldwide to identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27357860

  3. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  4. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  5. Liquid drop stability for protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Broom, Beth H.; Snyder, Robert S.; Daniel, Ron

    1987-01-01

    It is possible to grow protein crystals for biomedical research in microgravity by deploying a protein-rich solution from a syringe, forming a drop in which crystallization can occur with the proper degree of supersaturation. Drop stability is critical to the success of this research, due to the large drop sizes which can be achieved in space. In order to determine the type of syringe tips most suitable to support these large drops, tests were performed during brief periods of weightlessness onboard the NASA KC-135 low-gravity simulation aircraft. The drops were analyzed using three simple models in which the samples were approximated by modified pendulum and spring systems. It was concluded that the higher frequency systems were the most stable, indicating that of the syringes utilized, a disk-shaped configuration provided the most stable environment of low-gravity protein crystal growth.

  6. Electrostatic Interactions in the Denatured State Ensemble: Their Effect Upon Protein Folding and Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Satoshi; Horng, Jia-Cherng; Anil, Burcu

    2009-01-01

    It is now recognized that the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins can contain significant amounts of structure, particularly under native conditions. Well-studied examples include small units of hydrogen bonded secondary structure, particularly helices or turns as well hydrophobic clusters. Other types of interactions are less well characterized and it has often been assumed that electrostatic interactions play at most a minor role in the DSE. However, recent studies have shown that both favorable and unfavorable electrostatic interactions can be formed in the DSE. These can include surprisingly specific non-native interactions that can even persist in the transition state for protein folding. DSE electrostatic interactions can be energetically significant and their modulation either by mutation or by varying solution conditions can have a major impact upon protein stability. pH dependent stability studies have shown that electrostatic interactions can contribute up to 4 kcal mol−1 to the stability of the DSE. PMID:17900519

  7. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407

  8. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407

  9. Effect of lead on cytoskeletal protein stability in crucian carp Carassius auratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia; Zhang, Dongyi; Chu, Wuying; Liu, Fang; Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Ruixue; Meng, Tao; Zhang, Jianshe

    2008-11-01

    Inorganic lead (Pb) is one of the most common environmental pollutants. Much evidence indicates that Pb exposure could directly affect fish growth and development. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of Pb on cytoskeletal protein stability at both protein and mRNA level in crucian carp Carassius auratus. Pb(NO3)2 treatment in concentration of 100 μmol/L resulted in decreased expression of both α- and β-tubulin but γ-tubulin as assayed with SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA. In vivo and in vitro analyses on protein expression of tubulins are consistent. The effect of Pb on mRNA expression varied among different tissues. Our results suggest that cytotoxicity of Pb at protein translation level is stronger than at mRNA expression level.

  10. Understanding the role of hydrogen bonds in water dynamics and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Valentino; Iskrov, Svilen; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of cold and pressure denaturation of proteins are a matter of debate, but it is commonly accepted that water plays a fundamental role in the process. It has been proposed that the denaturation process is related to an increase of hydrogen bonds among hydration water molecules. Other theories suggest that the causes of denaturation are the density fluctuations of surface water, or the destabilization of hydrophobic contacts as a consequence of water molecule inclusions inside the protein, especially at high pressures. We review some theories that have been proposed to give insight into this problem, and we describe a coarse-grained model of water that compares well with experiments for proteins' hydration water. We introduce its extension for a homopolymer in contact with the water monolayer and study it by Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to understand how the interplay of water cooperativity and interfacial hydrogen bonds affects protein stability. PMID:23277668

  11. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  12. Heat shock protein 90 stabilizes nucleolin to increase mRNA stability in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-An; Li, Hao-Yi; Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Shu-Hui; Wu, Chin-Jen; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-12-23

    Most studies on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have focused on the involvement of Hsp90 in the interphase, whereas the role of this protein in the nucleus during mitosis remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that the level of the acetylated form of Hsp90 decreased dramatically during mitosis, which indicates more chaperone activity during mitosis. We thus probed proteins that interacted with Hsp90 by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and found that nucleolin was one of those interacting proteins during mitosis. The nucleolin level decreased upon geldanamycin treatment, and Hsp90 maintained the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activity to phosphorylate nucleolin at Thr-641/707. Mutation of Thr-641/707 resulted in the destabilization of nucleolin in mitosis. We globally screened the level of mitotic mRNAs and found that 229 mRNAs decreased during mitosis in the presence of geldanamycin. Furthermore, a bioinformatics tool and an RNA immunoprecipitation assay found that 16 mRNAs, including cadherin and Bcl-xl, were stabilized through the recruitment of nucleolin to the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of those genes. Overall, strong correlations exist between the up-regulation of Hsp90, nucleolin, and the mRNAs related to tumorigenesis of the lung. Our findings thus indicate that nucleolin stabilized by Hsp90 contributes to the lung tumorigenesis by increasing the level of many tumor-related mRNAs during mitosis. PMID:21998300

  13. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  14. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    PubMed

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications. PMID:25172695

  15. Catalytic activities of Werner protein are affected by adduction with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Jolanta; Poznański, Jarosław; Dębski, Janusz; Bukowy, Zuzanna; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Tudek, Barbara; Speina, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde generated during oxidative stress and subsequent peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, Werner protein (WRN) was identified as a novel target for modification by HNE. Werner syndrome arises through mutations in the WRN gene that encodes the RecQ DNA helicase which is critical for maintaining genomic stability. This hereditary disease is associated with chromosomal instability, premature aging and cancer predisposition. WRN appears to participate in the cellular response to oxidative stress and cells devoid of WRN display elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage. We demonstrated that helicase/ATPase and exonuclease activities of HNE-modified WRN protein were inhibited both in vitro and in immunocomplexes purified from the cell extracts. Sites of HNE adduction in human WRN were identified at Lys577, Cys727, His1290, Cys1367, Lys1371 and Lys1389. We applied in silico modeling of the helicase and RQC domains of WRN protein with HNE adducted to Lys577 and Cys727 and provided a potential mechanism of the observed deregulation of the protein catalytic activities. In light of the obtained results, we postulate that HNE adduction to WRN is a post-translational modification, which may affect WRN conformational stability and function, contributing to features and diseases associated with premature senescence. PMID:25170083

  16. SLIRP stabilizes LRPPRC via an RRM-PPR protein interface.

    PubMed

    Spåhr, Henrik; Rozanska, Agata; Li, Xinping; Atanassov, Ilian; Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Rackham, Oliver; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-08-19

    LRPPRC is a protein that has attracted interest both for its role in post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and more recently because numerous mutated variants have been characterized as causing severe infantile mitochondrial neurodegeneration. LRPPRC belongs to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family, originally defined by their RNA binding capacity, and forms a complex with SLIRP that harbours an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain. We show here that LRPPRC displays a broad and strong RNA binding capacity in vitro in contrast to SLIRP that associates only weakly with RNA. The LRPPRC-SLIRP complex comprises a hetero-dimer via interactions by polar amino acids in the single RRM domain of SLIRP and three neighbouring PPR motifs in the second quarter of LRPPRC, which critically contribute to the LRPPRC-SLIRP binding interface to enhance its stability. Unexpectedly, specific amino acids at this interface are located within the PPRs of LRPPRC at positions predicted to interact with RNA and within the RNP1 motif of SLIRP's RRM domain. Our findings thus unexpectedly establish that despite the prediction that these residues in LRPPRC and SLIRP should bind RNA, they are instead used to facilitate protein-protein interactions, enabling the formation of a stable complex between these two proteins. PMID:27353330

  17. Physical stability of proteins in aqueous solution: mechanism and driving forces in nonnative protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eva Y; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2003-09-01

    Irreversible protein aggregation is problematic in the biotechnology industry, where aggregation is encountered throughout the lifetime of a therapeutic protein, including during refolding, purification, sterilization, shipping, and storage processes. The purpose of the current review is to provide a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms by which proteins aggregate and by which varying solution conditions, such as temperature, pH, salt type, salt concentration, cosolutes, preservatives, and surfactants, affect this process. PMID:14567625

  18. Stability and folding of the tumour suppressor protein p16.

    PubMed

    Tang, K S; Guralnick, B J; Wang, W K; Fersht, A R; Itzhaki, L S

    1999-01-29

    The tumour suppressor p16 is a member of the INK4 family of inhibi tors of the cyclin D-dependent kinases, CDK4 and CDK6, that are involved in the key growth control pathway of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The 156 amino acid residue protein is composed of four ankyrin repeats (a helix-turn-helix motif) that stack linearly as two four-helix bundles resulting in a non-globular, elongated molecule. The thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the folding of p16 are unusual. The protein has a very low free energy of unfolding, Delta GH-2O/D-N, of 3.1 kcal mol-1 at 25 degreesC. The rate-determining transition state of folding/unfolding is very compact (89% as compact as the native state). The other unusual feature is the very rapid rate of unfolding in the absence of denaturant of 0.8 s-1 at 25 degreesC. Thus, p16 has both thermodynamic and kinetic instability. These features may be essential for the regulatory function of the INK4 proteins and of other ankyrin-repeat-containing proteins that mediate a wide range of protein-protein interactions. The mechanisms of inactivation of p16 by eight cancer-associated mutations were dissected using a systematic method designed to probe the integrity of the secondary structure and the global fold. The structure and folding of p16 appear to be highly vulnerable to single point mutations, probably as a result of the protein's low stability. This vulnerability provides one explanation for the striking frequency of p16 mutations in tumours and in immortalised cell lines. PMID:9917418

  19. Discovery of Manassantin A Protein Targets Using Large-Scale Protein Folding and Stability Measurements.

    PubMed

    Geer Wallace, M Ariel; Kwon, Do-Yeon; Weitzel, Douglas H; Lee, Chen-Ting; Stephenson, Tesia N; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Mook, Robert A; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2016-08-01

    Manassantin A is a natural product that has been shown to have anticancer activity in cell-based assays, but has a largely unknown mode-of-action. Described here is the use of two different energetics-based approaches to identify protein targets of manassantin A. Using the stability of proteins from rates of oxidation technique with an isobaric mass tagging strategy (iTRAQ-SPROX) and the pulse proteolysis technique with a stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture strategy (SILAC-PP), over 1000 proteins in a MDA-MB-231 cell lysate grown under hypoxic conditions were assayed for manassantin A interactions (both direct and indirect). A total of 28 protein hits were identified with manassantin A-induced thermodynamic stability changes. Two of the protein hits (filamin A and elongation factor 1α) were identified using both experimental approaches. The remaining 26 hit proteins were only assayed in either the iTRAQ-SPROX or the SILAC-PP experiment. The 28 potential protein targets of manassantin A identified here provide new experimental avenues along which to explore the molecular basis of manassantin A's mode of action. The current work also represents the first application iTRAQ-SPROX and SILAC-PP to the large-scale analysis of protein-ligand binding interactions involving a potential anticancer drug with an unknown mode-of-action. PMID:27322910

  20. Regulation of the protein stability of EMT transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, VM; Viñas-Castells, R; García de Herreros, A

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) consists of a rapid change of cell phenotype, characterized by the loss of epithelial characteristics and the acquisition of a more invasive phenotype. Transcription factors regulating EMT (Snail, Twist and Zeb) are extremely labile proteins, rapidly degraded by the proteasome system. In this review we analyze the current mechanisms controlling degradation of EMT transcription factors, focusing on the role of new E3 ubiquitin-ligases involved in EMT. We also summarize the regulation of the stability of these EMT transcription factors, specially observed in different stress conditions, such as hypoxia, chemotherapeutic drugs, oxidative stress or γ-irradiation. PMID:25482633

  1. Protein accumulation and rumen stability of wheat γ-gliadin fusion proteins in tobacco and alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodong; Chi-Ham, Cecilia L; Cohen-Davidyan, Tamar; DeBen, Christopher; Getachow, Girma; DePeters, Edward; Putnam, Daniel; Bennett, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The nutritional value of various crops can be improved by engineering plants to produce high levels of proteins. For example, because methionine deficiency limits the protein quality of Medicago Sativa (alfalfa) forage, producing alfalfa plants that accumulate high levels of a methionine-rich protein could increase the nutritional value of that crop. We used three strategies in designing methionine-rich recombinant proteins that could accumulate to high levels in plants and thereby serve as candidates for improving the protein quality of alfalfa forage. In tobacco, two fusion proteins, γ-gliadin-δ-zein and γ-δ-zein, as well as δ-zein co-expressed with β-zein, all formed protein bodies. However, the γ-gliadin-δ-zein fusion protein accumulated to the highest level, representing up to 1.5% of total soluble protein (TSP) in one transformant. In alfalfa, γ-gliadin-δ-zein accumulated to 0.2% of TSP, and in an in vitro rumen digestion assay, γ-gliadin-δ-zein was more resistant to microbial degradation than Rubisco. Additionally, although it did not form protein bodies, a γ-gliadin-GFP fusion protein accumulated to much higher levels, 7% of TSP, than a recombinant protein comprised of an ER localization signal fused to GFP in tobacco. Based on our results, we conclude that γ-gliadin-δ-zein is a potential candidate protein to use for enhancing methionine levels in plants and for improving rumen stability of forage protein. γ-gliadin fusion proteins may provide a general platform for increasing the accumulation of recombinant proteins in transgenic plants. PMID:25659597

  2. Replacement of Val3 in Human Thymidylate Synthase Affects Its Kinetic Properties and Intracellular Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiao; Gibson, Lydia M.; Bell, Brittnaie J.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Pea, Maria Marjorette O.; Berger, Franklin G.; Berger, Sondra H.; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2010-11-03

    Human and other mammalian thymidylate synthase (TS) enzymes have an N-terminal extension of {approx}27 amino acids that is not present in bacterial TSs. The extension, which is disordered in all reported crystal structures of TSs, has been considered to play a primary role in protein turnover but not in catalytic activity. In mammalian cells, the variant V3A has a half-life similar to that of wild-type human TS (wt hTS) while V3T is much more stable; V3L, V3F, and V3Y have half-lives approximately half of that for wt hTS. Catalytic turnover rates for most Val3 mutants are only slightly diminished, as expected. However, two mutants, V3L and V3F, have strongly compromised dUMP binding, with K{sub m,app} values increased by factors of 47 and 58, respectively. For V3L, this observation can be explained by stabilization of the inactive conformation of the loop of residues 181-197, which prevents substrate binding. In the crystal structure of V3L, electron density corresponding to a leucine residue is present in a position that stabilizes the loop of residues 181-197 in the inactive conformation. Since this density is not observed in other mutants and all other leucine residues are ordered in this structure, it is likely that this density represents Leu3. In the crystal structure of a V3F {center_dot} FdUMP binary complex, the nucleotide is bound in an alternative mode to that proposed for the catalytic complex, indicating that the high K{sub m,app} value is caused not by stabilization of the inactive conformer but by substrate binding in a nonproductive, inhibitory site. These observations show that the N-terminal extension affects the conformational state of the hTS catalytic region. Each of the mechanisms leading to the high K{sub m,app} values can be exploited to facilitate design of compounds acting as allosteric inhibitors of hTS.

  3. Stabilization of collagen through bioconversion: An insight in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Usharani, Nagarajan; Jayakumar, Gladstone Christopher; Kanth, Swarna Vinodh; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava

    2014-08-01

    Collagen is a natural protein, which is used as a vital biomaterial in tissue engineering. The major concern about native collagen is lack of its thermal stability and weak resistance to proteolytic degradation. In this scenario, the crosslinking compounds used for stabilization of collagen are mostly of chemical nature and exhibit toxicity. The enzyme mediated crosslinking of collagen provides a novel alternative, nontoxic method for stabilization. In this study, aldehyde forming enzyme (AFE) is used in the bioconversion of hydroxylmethyl groups of collagen to formyl groups that results in the formation of peptidyl aldehyde. The resulted peptidyl aldehyde interacts with bipolar ions of basic amino acid residues of collagen. Further interaction leads to the formation of conjugated double bonds (aldol condensation involving the aldehyde group of peptidyl aldehyde) within the collagen. The enzyme modified collagen matrices have shown an increase in the denaturation temperature, when compared with native collagen. Enzyme modified collagen membranes exhibit resistance toward collagenolytic activity. Moreover, they exhibited a nontoxic nature. The catalytic activity of AFE on collagen as a substrate establishes an efficient modification, which enhances the structural stability of collagen. This finds new avenues in the context of protein-protein stabilization and discovers paramount application in tissue engineering. PMID:25098180

  4. Protein coronas on gold nanorods passivated with amphiphilic ligands affect cytotoxicity and cellular response to penicillin/streptomycin.

    PubMed

    Kah, James Chen Yong; Grabinski, Christin; Untener, Emily; Garrett, Carol; Chen, John; Zhu, David; Hussain, Saber M; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2014-05-27

    We probe how amphiphilic ligands (ALs) of four different types affect the formation of protein coronas on gold nanorods (NRs) and their impact on cellular response. NRs coated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were ligand exchanged with polyoxyethylene[10]cetyl ether, oligofectamine, and phosphatidylserine (PS). Protein coronas from equine serum (ES) were formed on these NR-ALs, and their colloidal stability, as well as cell uptake, proliferation, oxidative stress, and gene expression, were examined. We find that the protein corona that forms and its colloidal stability are affected by AL type and that the cellular response to these NR-AL-coronas (NR-AL-ES) is both ligand and corona dependent. We also find that the presence of common cell culture supplement penicillin/streptomycin can impact the colloidal stability and cellular response of NR-AL and NR-AL-ES, showing that the cell response is not necessarily inert to pen/strep when in the presence of nanoparticles. Although the protein corona is what the cells see, the underlying surface ligands evidently play an important role in shaping and defining the physical characteristics of the corona, which ultimately impacts the cellular response. Further, the results of this study suggest that the cellular behavior toward NR-AL is mediated by not only the type of AL and the protein corona it forms but also its resulting colloidal stability and interaction with cell culture supplements. PMID:24758495

  5. Membrane bending by protein crowding is affected by protein lateral confinement.

    PubMed

    Derganc, Jure; Čopič, Alenka

    2016-06-01

    Crowding of asymmetrically-distributed membrane proteins has been recently recognized as an important factor in remodeling of biological membranes, for example during transport vesicle formation. In this paper, we theoretically analyze the effect of protein crowding on membrane bending and examine its dependence on protein size, shape, transmembrane asymmetry and lateral confinement. We consider three scenarios of protein lateral organization, which are highly relevant for cellular membranes in general: freely diffusing membrane proteins without lateral confinement, the presence of a diffusion barrier and interactions with a vesicular coat. We show that protein crowding affects vesicle formation even if the proteins are distributed symmetrically across the membrane and that this effect depends significantly on lateral confinement. The largest crowding effect is predicted for the proteins that are confined to the forming vesicle by a diffusion barrier. We calculate the bending properties of a crowded membrane and find that its spontaneous curvature depends primarily on the degree of transmembrane asymmetry, and its effective bending modulus on the type of lateral confinement. Using the example of COPII vesicle formation from the endoplasmic reticulum, we analyze the energetic cost of vesicle formation. The results provide a novel insight into the effects of lateral and transmembrane organization of membrane proteins, and can guide data interpretation and future experimental approaches. PMID:26969088

  6. INTERMEDIATE CLEAVAGE PEPTIDASE55 Modifies Enzyme Amino Termini and Alters Protein Stability in Arabidopsis Mitochondria1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaobai; Nelson, Clark J.; Li, Lei; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Ströher, Elke; Petereit, Jakob; Millar, A. Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Precursor proteins containing mitochondrial peptide signals are cleaved after import by a mitochondrial processing peptidase. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens), INTERMEDIATE CLEAVAGE PEPTIDASE55 (ICP55) plays a role in stabilizing mitochondrial proteins by the removal of single amino acids from mitochondrial processing peptidase-processed proteins. We have investigated the role of a metallopeptidase (At1g09300) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that has sequence similarity to yeast ICP55. We identified this protein in mitochondria by mass spectrometry and have studied its function in a transfer DNA insertion line (icp55). Monitoring of amino-terminal peptides showed that Arabidopsis ICP55 was responsible for the removal of single amino acids, and its action explained the −3 arginine processing motif of a number of mitochondrial proteins. ICP55 also removed single amino acids from mitochondrial proteins known to be cleaved at nonconserved arginine sites, a subset of mitochondrial proteins specific to plants. Faster mitochondrial protein degradation rates not only for ICP55 cleaved protein but also for some non-ICP55 cleaved proteins were observed in Arabidopsis mitochondrial samples isolated from icp55 than from the wild type, indicating that a complicated protease degradation network has been affected. The lower protein stability of isolated mitochondria and the lack of processing of target proteins in icp55 were complemented by transformation with the full-length ICP55. Analysis of in vitro degradation rates and protein turnover rates in vivo of specific proteins indicated that serine hydroxymethyltransferase was affected in icp55. The maturation of serine hydroxymethyltransferase by ICP55 is unusual, as it involves breaking an amino-terminal diserine that is not known as an ICP55 substrate in other organisms and that is typically considered a sequence that stabilizes rather than destabilizes a protein. PMID:25862457

  7. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP15 regulates human papillomavirus type 16 E6 protein stability.

    PubMed

    Vos, Robin M; Altreuter, Jennifer; White, Elizabeth A; Howley, Peter M

    2009-09-01

    Proteomic identification of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6-interacting proteins revealed several proteins involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In addition to the well-characterized E6AP ubiquitin-protein ligase, a second HECT domain protein (HERC2) and a deubiquitylating enzyme (USP15) were identified by tandem affinity purification of HPV16 E6-associated proteins. This study focuses on the functional consequences of the interaction of E6 with USP15. Overexpression of USP15 resulted in increased levels of the E6 protein, and the small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of USP15 decreased E6 protein levels. These results implicate USP15 directly in the regulation of E6 protein stability and suggest that ubiquitylated E6 could be a substrate for USP15 ubiquitin peptidase activity. It remains possible that E6 could affect the activity of USP15 on specific cellular substrates, a hypothesis that can be tested as more is learned about the substrates and pathways controlled by USP15. PMID:19553310

  8. Gene stability in mammalian cells and protein consistency.

    PubMed

    Berthold, W

    1994-01-01

    The safety of a patient who is the recipient of protein drugs has to be assured. A "wrong" protein is thought to represent a great risk. The philosophy of testing strategies related to gene stability with product safety will be discussed in the light of experimental data available today. Although all mammalian cell lines used in the production of biologicals including recombinant DNA-derived lines have been produced from individual clones (functional monoclonality) they have been found to be heterogenous with regard to the genomic content (number of chromosomes, characteristics of identifiable chromosomes and position and number of integrated recombinant sequences). The verification of the presence of correct gene in a production cell line constitutes a well accepted and useful test, especially if derived by "population sequencing". A batch not related repeated confirmation of this fact cannot lead to any additional assurance for the correctness of all proteins constituting a given product beyond the level provided by cheminal testing. In contrast to this obvious and unavoidable heterogeneity in cellular genomes, the coding regions of genes have not been shown to change. Evidence is available to demonstrate the consistency of protein products originating from recombinant (and hybridoma) cell lines, e.g. more than 500,000 patients have received and tolerated rtPA well. PMID:7883100

  9. Identification of Stabilizing Mutations in an H5 Hemagglutinin Influenza Virus Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Anthony; Imai, Masaki; Hatta, Masato; McBride, Ryan; Imai, Hirotaka; Taft, Andrew; Zhong, Gongxun; Watanabe, Tokiko; Suzuki, Yasuo; Neumann, Gabriele; Paulson, James C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to circulate in poultry in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Recently, outbreaks of novel reassortant H5 viruses have also occurred in North America. Although the number of human infections with highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses continues to rise, these viruses remain unable to efficiently transmit between humans. However, we and others have identified H5 viruses capable of respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. Two experimentally introduced mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding domain conferred binding to human-type receptors but reduced HA stability. Compensatory mutations in HA (acquired during virus replication in ferrets) were essential to restore HA stability. These stabilizing mutations in HA also affected the pH at which HA undergoes an irreversible switch to its fusogenic form in host endosomes, a crucial step for virus infectivity. To identify additional stabilizing mutations in an H5 HA, we subjected a virus library possessing random mutations in the ectodomain of an H5 HA (altered to bind human-type receptors) to three rounds of treatment at 50°C. We isolated several mutants that maintained their human-type receptor-binding preference but acquired an appreciable increase in heat stability and underwent membrane fusion at a lower pH; collectively, these properties may aid H5 virus respiratory droplet transmission in mammals. IMPORTANCE We have identified mutations in HA that increase its heat stability and affect the pH that triggers an irreversible conformational change (a prerequisite for virus infectivity). These mutations were identified in the genetic background of an H5 HA protein that was mutated to bind to human cells. The ability to bind to human-type receptors, together with physical stability and an altered pH threshold for HA conformational change, may facilitate avian influenza virus transmission via respiratory droplets in

  10. Conformational Stability and Pathogenic Misfolding of the Integral Membrane Protein PMP22.

    PubMed

    Schlebach, Jonathan P; Narayan, Malathi; Alford, Catherine; Mittendorf, Kathleen F; Carter, Bruce D; Li, Jun; Sanders, Charles R

    2015-07-15

    Despite broad biochemical relevance, our understanding of the physiochemical reactions that limit the assembly and cellular trafficking of integral membrane proteins remains superficial. In this work, we report the first experimental assessment of the relationship between the conformational stability of a eukaryotic membrane protein and the degree to which it is retained by cellular quality control in the secretory pathway. We quantitatively assessed both the conformational equilibrium and cellular trafficking of 12 variants of the α-helical membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), the intracellular misfolding of which is known to cause peripheral neuropathies associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). We show that the extent to which these mutations influence the energetics of Zn(II)-mediated PMP22 folding is proportional to the observed reduction in cellular trafficking efficiency. Strikingly, quantitative analyses also reveal that the reduction of motor nerve conduction velocities in affected patients is proportional to the extent of the mutagenic destabilization. This finding provides compelling evidence that the effects of these mutations on the energetics of PMP22 folding lie at the heart of the molecular basis of CMT. These findings highlight conformational stability as a key factor governing membrane protein biogenesis and suggest novel therapeutic strategies for CMT. PMID:26102530

  11. Cementing proteins provide extra mechanical stabilization to viral cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Lambert, S.; Nakatani-Webster, E.; Catalano, C. E.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    The study of virus shell stability is key not only for gaining insights into viral biological cycles but also for using viral capsids in materials science. The strength of viral particles depends profoundly on their structural changes occurring during maturation, whose final step often requires the specific binding of ‘decoration’ proteins (such as gpD in bacteriophage lambda) to the viral shell. Here we characterize the mechanical stability of gpD-free and gpD-decorated bacteriophage lambda capsids. The incorporation of gpD into the lambda shell imparts a major mechanical reinforcement that resists punctual deformations. We further interrogate lambda particle stability with molecular fatigue experiments that resemble the sub-lethal Brownian collisions of virus shells with macromolecules in crowded environments. Decorated particles are especially robust against collisions of a few kBT (where kB is the Boltzmann’s constant and T is the temperature ~300 K), which approximate those anticipated from molecular insults in the environment.

  12. Enhancing protein stability by adsorption onto raftlike lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Litt, Jeffrey; Padala, Chakradhar; Asuri, Prashanth; Vutukuru, Srinavya; Athmakuri, Krishna; Kumar, Sanat; Dordick, Jonathan; Kane, Ravi S

    2009-05-27

    We demonstrate that the stability of adsorbed proteins can be enhanced by controlling the heterogeneity of the surfaceby creating raftlike domains in a soft liposomal membrane. Recent work has shown that enzymes adsorbed onto highly curved nanoscale supports can be more stable than those adsorbed on flat surfaces with nominally the same chemical structure. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in lateral interenzyme interactions on a curved surface. Exploiting this idea, we asked if adsorbing enzymes onto "patchy" surfaces composed of adsorbing and nonadsorbing regions can be used to reduce lateral interactions even on relatively flat surfaces. We demonstrate that creating domains on which an enzyme can adsorb enhances the stability of that enzyme under denaturing conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the size of these domains has a considerable effect on the degree of stability imparted by adsorption. Such biomimetic raft-inspired systems may find use in applications ranging from biorecognition to the design of novel strategies for the separation of biomolecules and controlling the interaction of multicomponent membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:19385631

  13. Cementing proteins provide extra mechanical stabilization to viral cages.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Lambert, S; Nakatani-Webster, E; Catalano, C E; de Pablo, P J

    2014-01-01

    The study of virus shell stability is key not only for gaining insights into viral biological cycles but also for using viral capsids in materials science. The strength of viral particles depends profoundly on their structural changes occurring during maturation, whose final step often requires the specific binding of 'decoration' proteins (such as gpD in bacteriophage lambda) to the viral shell. Here we characterize the mechanical stability of gpD-free and gpD-decorated bacteriophage lambda capsids. The incorporation of gpD into the lambda shell imparts a major mechanical reinforcement that resists punctual deformations. We further interrogate lambda particle stability with molecular fatigue experiments that resemble the sub-lethal Brownian collisions of virus shells with macromolecules in crowded environments. Decorated particles are especially robust against collisions of a few kBT (where kB is the Boltzmann's constant and T is the temperature ~300 K), which approximate those anticipated from molecular insults in the environment. PMID:25072871

  14. The interplay between protein stability and dynamics in conformational diseases: the case of hPGK1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Conformational diseases often show defective protein folding efficiency in vivo upon mutation, affecting protein properties such as thermodynamic stability and folding/unfolding/misfolding kinetics as well as the interactions of the protein with the protein homeostasis network. Human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (hPGK1) deficiency is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations in hPGK1 that lead to loss-of-function. This disease offers an excellent opportunity to explore the complex relationships between protein stability and dynamics because of the different unfolding mechanisms displayed towards chemical and thermal denaturation. This work explores these relationships using two thermostable mutants (p.E252A and p.T378P) causing hPGK1 deficiency and WT hPGK1 using proteolysis and chemical denaturation. p.T378P is degraded ~30-fold faster at low protease concentrations (here, the proteolysis step is rate-limiting) and ~3-fold faster at high protease concentrations (where unfolding kinetics is rate-limiting) than WT and p.E252A, indicating that p.T378P is thermodynamically and kinetically destabilized. Urea denaturation studies support the decrease in thermodynamic stability and folding cooperativity for p.T378P, as well as changes in folding/unfolding kinetics. The present study reveals changes in the folding landscape of hPGK1 upon mutation that may affect protein folding efficiency and stability in vivo, also suggesting that native state stabilizers and protein homeostasis modulators may help to correct folding defects in hPGK1 deficiency. Moreover, detailed kinetic proteolysis studies are shown to be powerful and simple tools to provide deep insight into mutational effects on protein folding and stability in conformational diseases. PMID:23911916

  15. Protein stability induced by ligand binding correlates with changes in protein flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Celej, María Soledad; Montich, Guillermo G.; Fidelio, Gerardo D.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between ligands and proteins usually induces changes in protein thermal stability with modifications in the midpoint denaturation temperature, enthalpy of unfolding, and heat capacity. These modifications are due to the coupling of unfolding with binding equilibrium. Furthermore, they can be attained by changes in protein structure and conformational flexibility induced by ligand interaction. To study these effects we have used bovine serum albumin (BSA) interacting with three different anilinonaphthalene sulfonate derivatives (ANS). These ligands have different effects on protein stability, conformation, and dynamics. Protein stability was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy, whereas conformational changes were detected by circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopy including kinetics of hydrogen/deuterium exchange. The order of calorimetric midpoint of denaturation was: 1,8-ANS-BSA > 2,6-ANS-BSA > free BSA >> (nondetected) bis-ANS-BSA. Both 1,8-ANS and 2,6-ANS did not substantially modify the secondary structure of BSA, whereas bis-ANS induced a distorted α-helix conformation with an increase of disordered structure. Protein flexibility followed the order: 1,8-ANS-BSA < 2,6-ANS-BSA < free BSA << bis-ANS-BSA, indicating a clear correlation between stability and conformational flexibility. The structure induced by an excess of bis-ANS to BSA is compatible with a molten globule-like state. Within the context of the binding landscape model, we have distinguished five conformers (identified by subscript): BSA1,8-ANS, BSA2,6-ANS, BSAfree, BSAbis-ANS, and BSAunfolded among the large number of possible states of the conformational dynamic ensemble. The relative population of each distinguishable conformer depends on the type and concentration of ligand and the temperature of the system. PMID:12824495

  16. The unfolded protein response affects readthrough of premature termination codons

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yifat S; McClure, Michelle L; Rowe, Steven M; Sorscher, Eric J; Bester, Assaf C; Manor, Miriam; Kerem, Eitan; Rivlin, Joseph; Zahdeh, Fouad; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar; Kerem, Batsheva

    2014-01-01

    One-third of monogenic inherited diseases result from premature termination codons (PTCs). Readthrough of in-frame PTCs enables synthesis of full-length functional proteins. However, extended variability in the response to readthrough treatment is found among patients, which correlates with the level of nonsense transcripts. Here, we aimed to reveal cellular pathways affecting this inter-patient variability. We show that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) governs the response to readthrough treatment by regulating the levels of transcripts carrying PTCs. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed substantial differences in UPR activation between patients carrying PTCs, correlating with their response. We further found a significant inverse correlation between the UPR and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), suggesting a feedback loop between these homeostatic pathways. We uncovered and characterized the mechanism underlying this NMD-UPR feedback loop, which augments both UPR activation and NMD attenuation. Importantly, this feedback loop enhances the response to readthrough treatment, highlighting its clinical importance. Altogether, our study demonstrates the importance of the UPR and its regulatory network for genetic diseases caused by PTCs and for cell homeostasis under normal conditions. PMID:24705877

  17. Solubilizing and Stabilizing Proteins in Anhydrous Ionic Liquids through Formation of Protein-Polymer Surfactant Nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Brogan, Alex P S; Hallett, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Nonaqueous biocatalysis is rapidly becoming a desirable tool for chemical and fuel synthesis in both the laboratory and industry. Similarly, ionic liquids are increasingly popular anhydrous reaction media for a number of industrial processes. Consequently, the use of enzymes in ionic liquids as efficient, environment-friendly, commercial biocatalysts is highly attractive. However, issues surrounding the poor solubility and low stability of enzymes in truly anhydrous media remain a significant challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that engineering the surface of a protein to yield protein-polymer surfactant nanoconstructs allows for dissolution of dry protein into dry ionic liquids. Using myoglobin as a model protein, we show that this method can deliver protein molecules with near native structure into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic anhydrous ionic liquids. Remarkably, using temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure half-denaturation temperatures, our results show that protein stability increases by 55 °C in the ionic liquid as compared to aqueous solution, pushing the solution thermal denaturation beyond the boiling point of water. Therefore, the work presented herein could provide a platform for the realization of biocatalysis at high temperatures or in anhydrous solvent systems. PMID:26976718

  18. Excluded volume effects upon protein stability in covalently crosslinked proteins with variable linker lengths†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Ho; Stites, Wesley E.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the effects of molecular crowding and excluded volume upon protein stability a series of crosslinking reagents have been used with nine different single cysteine mutants of staphylococcal nuclease to make covalently linked dimers. These crosslinkers ranged in length from 10.5 Å to 21.3 Å, compelling separations which would normally be found only in the most concentrated protein solutions. The stabilities of the dimeric proteins and monomeric controls were determined by guanidine hydrochloride and thermal denaturation. Dimers with short linkers tend to show pronounced three state denaturation behavior, as opposed to the two state behavior of the monomeric controls. Increasing linker length leads to less pronounced three state behavior. The three state behavior is interpreted in a three state model where crosslinked native protein dimer, N-N, interconverts in a two state transition with a dimer where one protein subunit is denatured, N-D. The remaining native protein in turn can denature in another two state transition to a state, D-D, where both tethered proteins are denatured. Three state behavior is best explained by excluded volume effects in the denatured state. For many dimers, linkers longer than 17 Å removed most three state character. This sets a limit on the flexibility and size of the denatured state. Notably, in contradiction to theoretical predictions, these crosslinked dimers were not stabilized. The failure of these predictions is possibly due to neglect of the alteration in hydrophobic exposure that accompanies any significant reduction in the conformational space of the denatured state. PMID:18656955

  19. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  20. Variation in Biofilm Stability with Decreasing pH Affects Porous Medium Hydraulic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Santillan, E. F.; McGrath, L. K.; Altman, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Changes to microbial communities caused by subsurface CO2 injection may have many consequences, including possible impacts to CO2 transport. We used column experiments to examine how decreasing pH, a geochemical change associated with CO2 injection, will affect biofilm stability and ultimately the hydraulic properties of porous media. Columns consisted of 1 mm2 square capillary tubes filled with 105-150 µm diameter glass beads. Artificial groundwater medium containing 1 mM glucose was pumped through the columns at a rate of 0.01 mL/min (q = 14.4 m/day; Re = 0.03). Columns were inoculated with 3 × 10^8 CFU (avg.) of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a model biofilm former, transformed with a green fluorescent protein. Biomass distribution and transport was examined using scanning laser confocal microscopy and effluent plating. Variation in the bulk hydraulic properties of the columns was measured using manometers. In an initial experiment, biofilm growth was allowed to occur for seven days in medium with pH 7.3. Within this period, cells uniformly coated bead surfaces, effluent cell numbers stabilized at 1 × 10^9 CFU/mL, and hydraulic conductivity (K) decreased 77%. Next, medium with pH 4 was introduced. As a result, biomass within the reactor redistributed from bead surfaces to pores, effluent cell numbers decreased to 3 × 10^5 CFU/mL, and K decreased even further (>94% reduction). This decreased K was maintained until the experiment was terminated, seven days after introducing low pH medium. These results suggest that changes in biomass distribution as a result of decreased pH may initially limit transport of solubility-trapped CO2 following CO2 injection. Experiments in progress and planned will test this result in more detail and over longer periods of time. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office

  1. Diabetes may affect intracranial aneurysm stabilization in older patients: Analysis based on intraoperative findings

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jihye; Shin, Yong Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Only a small proportion of aneurysms progress to rupture. Previous studies have focused on predicting the rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms. Atherosclerotic aneurysm wall appears resistant to rupture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and morphological factors affecting atherosclerosis of an aneurysm and identify the parameters that predict aneurysm stabilization. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 253 consecutive patients with 291 unruptured aneurysms who underwent clipping surgery in a single institution between January 2012 and October 2013. Aneurysms were categorized based on intraoperative video findings and assessed morphologic and demographic data. Aneurysms which had the atherosclerotic wall without any super thin and transparent portion were defined as stabilized group and the others as a not-stabilized group. Results: Of the 207 aneurysms, 176 (85.0%) were assigned to the not-stabilized group and 31 (15.0%) to the stabilized group. The relative proportion of stabilized aneurysms increased significantly as the age increased (P < 0.001). Univariate logistic analysis showed that age ≥65 years (P < 0.001), hypertension (P = 0.012), diabetes (P = 0.007), and height ≥3 mm (P = 0.007) were correlated with stabilized aneurysms. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that age ≥65 years (P = 0.009) and hypertension (P = 0.041) were strongly correlated with stable aneurysms. In older patients (≥65 years of age), multivariate logistic regression revealed that only diabetes was associated with stabilized aneurysms (P = 0.027). Conclusions: In patients ≥65 years of age, diabetes mellitus may highly predict the stabilized aneurysms. These results provide useful information in determining treatment and follow-up strategies, especially in older patients. PMID:27313965

  2. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  3. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative…

  4. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Stability of Protein Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Rovers, Tijs A M; Sala, Guido; van der Linden, Erik; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2016-01-13

    Protein microbubbles are air bubbles with a network of interacting proteins at the air-water interface. Protein microbubbles are commonly used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic research. They have also recently gained interest in the research area of food as they can be used as structural elements to control texture, allowing for the manufacture of healthier foods with increased consumer perception. For the application of microbubbles in the food industry, it is important to gain insights into their stability under food processing conditions. In this study, we tested the stability of protein microbubbles against heating and pressurization. Microbubbles could be heated to 50 °C for 2 min or pressurized to 100 kPa overpressure for 15 s without significantly affecting their stability. At higher pressures and temperatures, the microbubbles became unstable and buckled. Buckling was observed above a critical pressure and was influenced by the shell modulus. The addition of cross-linkers like glutaraldehyde and tannic acid resulted in microbubbles that were stable against all tested temperatures and overpressures, more specifically, up to 120 °C and 470 kPa, respectively. We found a relation between the storage temperatures of microbubble dispersions (4, 10, 15, and 21 °C) and a decrease in the number of microbubbles with the highest decrease at the highest storage temperature. The average rupture time of microbubbles stored at different storage temperatures followed an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy for rupture of the shell of approximately 27 kT. This strength ensures applicability of microbubbles in food processes only at moderate temperatures and storage for a moderate period of time. After the proteins in the shell are cross-linked, the microbubbles can withstand pressures and temperatures that are representative of food processes. PMID:26619225

  5. Phosphorylation in protein-protein binding: effect on stability and function

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Post-translational modifications offer a dynamic way to regulate protein activity, subcellular localization and stability. Here we estimate the effect of phosphorylation on protein binding and function for different types of complexes from human proteome. We find that phosphorylation sites have a tendency to be located on binding interfaces in heterooligomeric and weak transient homooligomeric complexes. The analysis of molecular mechanisms of phosphorylation shows that phosphorylation may modulate the strength of interactions directly on interfaces and binding hotspots have a tendency to be phosphorylated in heterooligomers. Although majority of phosphosites do not show significant estimated stability differences upon attaching the phosphate groups, for about one third of all complexes it causes relatively large changes in binding energy. We discuss the cases where phosphorylation mediates the complex formation and regulates the function. We show that phosphorylation sites are not only more likely to be evolutionary conserved than surface residues but even more so than other interfacial residues. PMID:22153503

  6. Characterisation of protein stability in rod-insert vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Pattani, Aditya; Lowry, Deborah; Curran, Rhonda M; McGrath, Stephanie; Kett, Vicky L; Andrews, Gavin P; Malcolm, R Karl

    2012-07-01

    A major goal in vaccine development is elimination of the 'cold chain', the transport and storage system for maintenance and distribution of the vaccine product. This is particularly pertinent to liquid formulation of vaccines. We have previously described the rod-insert vaginal ring (RiR) device, comprising an elastomeric body into which are inserted lyophilised, rod-shaped, solid drug dosage forms, and having potential for sustained mucosal delivery of biomacromolecules, such as HIV envelope protein-based vaccine candidates. Given the solid, lyophilised nature of these insert dosage forms, we hypothesised that antigen stability may be significantly increased compared with more conventional solubilised vaginal gel format. In this study, we prepared and tested vaginal ring devices fitted with lyophilised rod inserts containing the model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). Both the RiRs and the gels that were freeze-dried to prepare the inserts were evaluated for BSA stability using PAGE, turbidimetry, microbial load, MALDI-TOF and qualitative precipitate solubility measurements. When stored at 4 °C, but not when stored at 40 °C/75% RH, the RiR formulation offered protection against structural and conformational changes to BSA. The insert also retained matrix integrity and release characteristics. The results demonstrate that lypophilised gels can provide relative protection against degradation at lower temperatures compared to semi-solid gels. The major mechanism of degradation at 40 °C/75% RH was shown to be protein aggregation. Finally, in a preliminary study, we found that addition of trehalose to the formulation significantly reduces the rate of BSA degradation compared to the original formulation when stored at 40 °C/75% RH. Establishing the mechanism of degradation, and finding that degradation is decelerated in the presence of trehalose, will help inform further development of RiRs specifically and polymer based freeze-dried systems in general. PMID

  7. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection. PMID:26781650

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch controls the protein stability of p63

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Mario; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Neale, Michael; Candi, Eleonora; Salomoni, Paolo; Knight, Richard A.; Croce, Carlo M.; Melino, Gerry

    2006-01-01

    p63, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors, plays an important role in epithelial development, regulating both cell cycle and apoptosis. Even though p63 activity is regulated mainly at the posttranslational level, the control of p63 protein stability is far from being fully understood. Here, we show that the Hect (homologous to the E6-associated protein C terminus)-containing Nedd4-like ubiquitin protein ligase Itch binds, ubiquitylates, and promotes the degradation of p63. The physical interaction occurs at the border between the PY and the SAM (sterile α motif) domains; a single Y504F mutation significantly affects p63 degradation. Itch and p63 are coexpressed in the epidermis and in primary keratinocytes where Itch controls the p63 protein steady-state level. Accordingly, p63 protein levels are significantly increased in Itch knockout keratinocytes. These data suggest that Itch has a fundamental role in the mechanism that controls endogenous p63 protein levels and therefore contributes to regulation of p63 in physiological conditions. PMID:16908849

  9. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27388036

  10. Osmolytes stabilize ribonuclease S by stabilizing its fragments S protein and S peptide to compact folding-competent states.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhi, G S; Varadarajan, R

    2001-08-01

    Osmolytes stabilize proteins to thermal and chemical denaturation. We have studied the effects of the osmolytes sarcosine, betaine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and taurine on the structure and stability of the protein.peptide complex RNase S using x-ray crystallography and titration calorimetry, respectively. The largest degree of stabilization is achieved with 6 m sarcosine, which increases the denaturation temperatures of RNase S and S pro by 24.6 and 17.4 degrees C, respectively, at pH 5 and protects both proteins against tryptic cleavage. Four crystal structures of RNase S in the presence of different osmolytes do not offer any evidence for osmolyte binding to the folded state of the protein or any perturbation in the water structure surrounding the protein. The degree of stabilization in 6 m sarcosine increases with temperature, ranging from -0.52 kcal mol(-1) at 20 degrees C to -5.4 kcal mol(-1) at 60 degrees C. The data support the thesis that osmolytes that stabilize proteins, do so by perturbing unfolded states, which change conformation to a compact, folding competent state in the presence of osmolyte. The increased stabilization thus results from a decrease in conformational entropy of the unfolded state. PMID:11373282

  11. A STRIPAK component Strip regulates neuronal morphogenesis by affecting microtubule stability

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Chisako; Okumura, Misako; Umehara, Tomoki; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    During neural development, regulation of microtubule stability is essential for proper morphogenesis of neurons. Recently, the striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex was revealed to be involved in diverse cellular processes. However, there is little evidence that STRIPAK components regulate microtubule dynamics, especially in vivo. Here, we show that one of the core STRIPAK components, Strip, is required for microtubule organization during neuronal morphogenesis. Knockdown of Strip causes a decrease in the level of acetylated α-tubulin in Drosophila S2 cells, suggesting that Strip influences the stability of microtubules. We also found that Strip physically and genetically interacts with tubulin folding cofactor D (TBCD), an essential regulator of α- and β-tubulin heterodimers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the genetic interaction between strip and Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam), a cell surface molecule that is known to work with TBCD. Thus, we propose that Strip regulates neuronal morphogenesis by affecting microtubule stability. PMID:26644129

  12. Host alkaloids differentially affect developmental stability and wing vein canalization in cactophilic Drosophila buzzatii.

    PubMed

    Padró, J; Carreira, V; Corio, C; Hasson, E; Soto, I M

    2014-12-01

    Host shifts cause drastic consequences on fitness in cactophilic species of Drosophila. It has been argued that changes in the nutritional values accompanying host shifts may elicit these fitness responses, but they may also reflect the presence of potentially toxic secondary compounds that affect resource quality. Recent studies reported that alkaloids extracted from the columnar cactus Trichocereus terscheckii are toxic for the developing larvae of Drosophila buzzatii. In this study, we tested the effect of artificial diets including increasing doses of host alkaloids on developmental stability and wing morphology in D. buzzatii. We found that alkaloids disrupt normal wing venation patterning and affect viability, wing size and fluctuating asymmetry, suggesting the involvement of stress-response mechanisms. Theoretical implications are discussed in the context of developmental stability, stress, fitness and their relationship with robustness, canalization and phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25366093

  13. Effect of cosolvent on protein stability: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Chalikian, Tigran V

    2014-12-14

    We developed a statistical thermodynamic algorithm for analyzing solvent-induced folding/unfolding transitions of proteins. The energetics of protein transitions is governed by the interplay between the cavity formation contribution and the term reflecting direct solute-cosolvent interactions. The latter is viewed as an exchange reaction in which the binding of a cosolvent to a solute is accompanied by release of waters of hydration to the bulk. Our model clearly differentiates between the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric interactions of solvent or co-solvent molecules with a solute. We analyzed the urea- and glycine betaine (GB)-induced conformational transitions of model proteins of varying size which are geometrically approximated by a sphere in their native state and a spherocylinder in their unfolded state. The free energy of cavity formation and its changes accompanying protein transitions were computed based on the concepts of scaled particle theory. The free energy of direct solute-cosolvent interactions were analyzed using empirical parameters previously determined for urea and GB interactions with low molecular weight model compounds. Our computations correctly capture the mode of action of urea and GB and yield realistic numbers for (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P which are related to the m-values of protein denaturation. Urea is characterized by negative values of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P within the entire range of urea concentrations analyzed. At concentrations below ∼1 M, GB exhibits positive values of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P which turn positive at higher GB concentrations. The balance between the thermodynamic contributions of cavity formation and direct solute-cosolvent interactions that, ultimately, defines the mode of cosolvent action is extremely subtle. A 20% increase or decrease in the equilibrium constant for solute-cosolvent binding may change the sign of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P thereby altering the mode of cosolvent action (stabilizing to destabilizing or

  14. Effect of cosolvent on protein stability: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalikian, Tigran V.

    2014-12-01

    We developed a statistical thermodynamic algorithm for analyzing solvent-induced folding/unfolding transitions of proteins. The energetics of protein transitions is governed by the interplay between the cavity formation contribution and the term reflecting direct solute-cosolvent interactions. The latter is viewed as an exchange reaction in which the binding of a cosolvent to a solute is accompanied by release of waters of hydration to the bulk. Our model clearly differentiates between the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric interactions of solvent or co-solvent molecules with a solute. We analyzed the urea- and glycine betaine (GB)-induced conformational transitions of model proteins of varying size which are geometrically approximated by a sphere in their native state and a spherocylinder in their unfolded state. The free energy of cavity formation and its changes accompanying protein transitions were computed based on the concepts of scaled particle theory. The free energy of direct solute-cosolvent interactions were analyzed using empirical parameters previously determined for urea and GB interactions with low molecular weight model compounds. Our computations correctly capture the mode of action of urea and GB and yield realistic numbers for (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P which are related to the m-values of protein denaturation. Urea is characterized by negative values of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P within the entire range of urea concentrations analyzed. At concentrations below ˜1 M, GB exhibits positive values of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P which turn positive at higher GB concentrations. The balance between the thermodynamic contributions of cavity formation and direct solute-cosolvent interactions that, ultimately, defines the mode of cosolvent action is extremely subtle. A 20% increase or decrease in the equilibrium constant for solute-cosolvent binding may change the sign of (∂ΔG°/∂a3)T,P thereby altering the mode of cosolvent action (stabilizing to destabilizing or vice

  15. Effect of cosolvent on protein stability: A theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chalikian, Tigran V.

    2014-12-14

    We developed a statistical thermodynamic algorithm for analyzing solvent-induced folding/unfolding transitions of proteins. The energetics of protein transitions is governed by the interplay between the cavity formation contribution and the term reflecting direct solute-cosolvent interactions. The latter is viewed as an exchange reaction in which the binding of a cosolvent to a solute is accompanied by release of waters of hydration to the bulk. Our model clearly differentiates between the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric interactions of solvent or co-solvent molecules with a solute. We analyzed the urea- and glycine betaine (GB)-induced conformational transitions of model proteins of varying size which are geometrically approximated by a sphere in their native state and a spherocylinder in their unfolded state. The free energy of cavity formation and its changes accompanying protein transitions were computed based on the concepts of scaled particle theory. The free energy of direct solute-cosolvent interactions were analyzed using empirical parameters previously determined for urea and GB interactions with low molecular weight model compounds. Our computations correctly capture the mode of action of urea and GB and yield realistic numbers for (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} which are related to the m-values of protein denaturation. Urea is characterized by negative values of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} within the entire range of urea concentrations analyzed. At concentrations below ∼1 M, GB exhibits positive values of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} which turn positive at higher GB concentrations. The balance between the thermodynamic contributions of cavity formation and direct solute-cosolvent interactions that, ultimately, defines the mode of cosolvent action is extremely subtle. A 20% increase or decrease in the equilibrium constant for solute-cosolvent binding may change the sign of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} thereby altering the mode of

  16. Protein Stability and Dynamics Modulation: The Case of Human Frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mariana; Salvay, Andres G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN) depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR) of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90–195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90–195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90–195 and hFXN90–210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function. PMID:23049850

  17. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Affects Global Protein Synthesis in Dividing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement—a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  18. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  19. Stability and Immunogenicity of Hypoallergenic Peanut Protein-Polyphenol Complexes During In Vitro Pepsin Digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allergenic peanut proteins are relatively resistant to digestion, and if digested, metabolized peptides tend to remain large and immunoreactive, triggering allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this study, the stability of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes was evaluated d...

  20. Stability and Immunogenicity of Hypoallergenic Peanut Protein-Polyphenol Complexes during In Vitro Pepsin Diges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allergenic peanut proteins are relatively resistant to digestion, and if digested, metabolized peptides tend to remain large and immunoreactive, triggering allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this study, the stability of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes was evaluated d...

  1. Gemini surfactants affect the structure, stability, and activity of ribonuclease Sa.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Laurents, Douglas V

    2014-09-11

    Gemini surfactants have important advantages, e.g., low micromolar CMCs and slow millisecond monomer ↔ micelle kinetics, for membrane mimetics and for delivering nucleic acids for gene therapy or RNA silencing. However, as a prerequisite, it is important to characterize interactions occurring between Gemini surfactants and proteins. Here NMR and CD spectroscopies are employed to investigate the interactions of cationic Gemini surfactants with RNase Sa, a negatively charged ribonuclease. We find that RNase Sa binds Gemini surfactant monomers and micelles at pH values above 4 to form aggregates. Below pH 4, where the protein is positively charged, these aggregates dissolve and interactions are undetectable. Thermal denaturation experiments show that surfactant lowers RNase Sa's conformational stability, suggesting that surfactant binds the protein's denatured state preferentially. Finally, Gemini surfactants were found to bind RNA, leading to the formation of large complexes. Interestingly, Gemini surfactant binding did not prevent RNase Sa from cleaving RNA. PMID:25133582

  2. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M.; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. Spy is unlike the structure of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors. PMID:21317898

  3. Sequence determinants of thermodynamic stability in a WW domain—An all-β-sheet protein

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; Dendle, Maria; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2009-01-01

    The stabilities of 66 sequence variants of the human Pin1 WW domain have been determined by equilibrium thermal denaturation experiments. All 34 residues composing the hPin1 WW three-stranded β-sheet structure could be replaced one at a time with at least one different natural or non-natural amino acid residue without leading to an unfolded protein. Alanine substitutions at only four positions within the hPin1 WW domain lead to a partially or completely unfolded protein—in the absence of a physiological ligand. The side chains of these four residues form a conserved, partially solvent-inaccessible, continuous hydrophobic minicore comprising the N- and C-termini. Ala mutations at five other residues, three of which constitute the ligand binding patch on the concave side of the β-sheet, significantly destabilize the hPin1 WW domain without leading to an unfolded protein. The remaining mutations affect protein stability only slightly, suggesting that only a small subset of side chain interactions within the hPin1 WW domain are mandatory for acquiring and maintaining a stable, cooperatively folded β-sheet structure. PMID:19565466

  4. Protein dynamics, thermal stability, and free-energy landscapes: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Cotesta, Simona; Di Iorio, Ernesto E

    2003-10-01

    Proteins have a complex free-energy landscape because of their rich topology and the nature of their nonbonded interaction potential. This has important consequences because the roughness of the landscape affects the ease with which a chain folds and also determines the dynamic behavior of the folded structure, thus influencing its functional and stability properties. A detailed description of the free-energy landscape is therefore of paramount importance for a quantitative understanding of the relationships between structure, dynamics, stability, and functional behavior of proteins. The free-energy landscape of a protein is a high-dimensional hypersurface, difficult to rationalize. Therefore, achieving its detailed graphical representation in a way that goes beyond the familiar funnel-like free-energy model is still a big challenge. We describe here an approach based on global structural parameters that allows a two-dimensional representation of the free-energy landscape from simulated atomic trajectories. As shown in this and in the accompanying article, our representation of the landscape, combined with other conformational analyses, provides valuable information on its roughness and on how atomic trajectories evolve with time. PMID:14507727

  5. Salting the Charged Surface: pH and Salt Dependence of Protein G B1 Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Stina; Xue, Wei-Feng; Szczepankiewicz, Olga; Bauer, Mikael C.; Nilsson, Hanna; Linse, Sara

    2006-01-01

    This study shows significant effects of protein surface charges on stability and these effects are not eliminated by salt screening. The stability for a variant of protein G B1 domain was studied in the pH-range of 1.5–11 at low, 0.15 M, and 2 M salt. The variant has three mutations, T2Q, N8D, and N37D, to guarantee an intact covalent chain at all pH values. The stability of the protein shows distinct pH dependence with the highest stability close to the isoelectric point. The stability is pH-dependent at all three NaCl concentrations, indicating that interactions involving charged residues are important at all three conditions. We find that 2 M salt stabilizes the protein at low pH (protein net charge is +6 and total number of charges is 6) but not at high pH (net charge is ≤−6 and total number of charges is ≥18). Furthermore, 0.15 M salt slightly decreases the stability of the protein over the pH range. The results show that a net charge of the protein is destabilizing and indicate that proteins contain charges for reasons other than improved stability. Salt seems to reduce the electrostatic contributions to stability under conditions with few total charges, but cannot eliminate electrostatic effects in highly charged systems. PMID:16443658

  6. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  7. Active Site Inhibitors Protect Protein Kinase C from Dephosphorylation and Stabilize Its Mature Form*

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Christine M.; Antal, Corina E.; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T.; Adams, Ryan A.; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2011-01-01

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C. PMID:21715334

  8. Coq7p relevant residues for protein activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cleverson; Ferreira-Júnior, José Ribamar; Paulela, Janaina A; Bleicher, Lucas; Demasi, Marilene; Barros, Mario H

    2015-12-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is an isoprenylated benzoquinone electron carrier required for electronic transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, shuttling electrons from complexes I and II to complex III. Q synthesis requires proteins termed Coq (Coq1-Coq11). Coq7p is part of the multimeric complex involved in Q synthesis catalyzing the hydroxylation of demethoxy-Q6 (DMQ6), the last monooxygenase step in Q synthesis with a catalytic center containing a carboxylate-bridged di-iron at the active site of the enzyme. Here we indicate a group of Coq7p residues that modulate protein activity: D53, R57, V111 and S114. R57, V111 and S114 are very conserved residues; V111 and S114 are present in separated communities of amino acid correlation analysis. The coq7 double mutant V111G/S114A and S114E show respiratory deficiency at non permissive temperature, DMQ6 accumulation and lower content of Q6. Therefore we conclude that phosphomimetic S114E inhibit Coq7p activity, and propose that S114 phosphorylation is required to move a non-structured loop of 25 amino acids between helix 2 and 3, and that affects the di-iron coordination in Coq7p catalytic center. PMID:26497406

  9. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  10. Another Role of Proline: Stabilization Interactions in Proteins and Protein Complexes Concerning Proline and Tryptophane

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannova, Lada; Riley, Kevin E.; Berka, Karel; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrasek, Jiri

    2008-09-11

    Proline–tryptophan complexes derived from experimental structures are investigated by quantum chemical procedures known to properly describe the London dispersion energy. We study two geometrical arrangements: the “L-shaped”, stabilized by an H-bond, and the “stacked-like”, where the two residues are in parallel orientation without any H-bond. Interestingly, the interaction energies in both cases are comparable and very large (~7 kcal mol⁻¹). The strength of stabilization in the stacked arrangement is rather surprising considering the fact that only one partner has an aromatic character. The interaction energy decomposition using the SAPT method further demonstrates the very important role of dispersion energy in such arrangement. To elucidate the structural features responsible for this unexpectedly large stabilization we examined the role of the nitrogen heteroatom and the importance of the cyclicity of the proline residue. We show that the electrostatic interaction due to the presence of the dipole, caused by the nitrogen heteroatom, contributes largely to the strength of the interaction. Nevertheless, the cyclic arrangement of proline, which allows for the largest amount of dispersive contact with the aromatic partner, also has a notable-effect. Geometry optimizations carried out for the “stackedlike” complexes show that the arrangements derived from protein structure are close to their gas phase optimum geometry, suggesting that the environment has only a minor effect on the geometry of the interaction. We conclude that the strength of proline non-covalent interactions, combined with this residue’s rigidity, might be the explanation for its prominent role in protein stabilization and recognition processes.

  11. Protocols for Studying Protein Stability in an Arabidopsis Protoplast Transient Expression System.

    PubMed

    Planchais, Séverine; Camborde, Laurent; Jupin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability influences many aspects of biology, and measuring their stability in vivo can provide important insights into biological systems.This chapter describes in details two methods to assess the stability of a specific protein based on its transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts. First, a pulse-chase assay based on radioactive metabolic labeling of cellular proteins, followed by immunoprecipitation of the protein of interest. The decrease in radioactive signal is monitored over time and can be used to determine the protein's half-life.Alternatively, we also present a nonradioactive assay based on the use of reporter proteins, whose ratio can be quantified. This assay can be used to determine the relative stability of a protein of interest under specific conditions. PMID:27424754

  12. TACC3 protein regulates microtubule nucleation by affecting γ-tubulin ring complexes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Puja; Thomas, Geethu Emily; Gireesh, Koyikulangara K; Manna, Tapas K

    2014-11-14

    Centrosome-mediated microtubule nucleation is essential for spindle assembly during mitosis. Although γ-tubulin complexes have primarily been implicated in the nucleation process, details of the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that a member of the human transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) protein family, TACC3, plays a critical role in microtubule nucleation at the centrosome. In mitotic cells, TACC3 knockdown substantially affected the assembly of microtubules in the astral region and impaired microtubule nucleation at the centrosomes. The TACC3 depletion-induced mitotic phenotype was rescued by expression of the TACC3 C terminus predominantly consisting of the TACC domain, suggesting that the TACC domain plays an important role in microtubule assembly. Consistently, experiments with the recombinant TACC domain of TACC3 demonstrated that this domain possesses intrinsic microtubule nucleating activity. Co-immunoprecipitation and sedimentation experiments revealed that TACC3 mediates interactions with proteins of both the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC) and the γ-tubulin small complex (γ-TuSC). Interestingly, TACC3 depletion resulted in reduced levels of γ-TuRC and increased levels of γ-TuSC, indicating that the assembly of γ-TuRC from γ-TuSC requires TACC3. Detailed analyses suggested that TACC3 facilitates the association of γ-TuSC-specific proteins with the proteins known to be involved in the assembly of γ-TuRC. Consistent with such a role for TACC3, the suppression of TACC3 disrupted localization of γ-TuRC proteins to the centrosome. Our findings reveal that TACC3 is involved in the regulation of microtubule nucleation at the centrosome and functions in the stabilization of the γ-tubulin ring complex assembly. PMID:25246530

  13. Stability of mRNA/DNA and DNA/DNA Duplexes Affects mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kraeva, Rayna I.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Roguev, Assen; Ivanova, Anna; Nedelcheva-Veleva, Marina N.; Stoynov, Stoyno S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, due to their structural and chemical properties, can form double-stranded secondary structures that assist the transfer of genetic information and can modulate gene expression. However, the nucleotide sequence alone is insufficient in explaining phenomena like intron-exon recognition during RNA processing. This raises the question whether nucleic acids are endowed with other attributes that can contribute to their biological functions. In this work, we present a calculation of thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes across the genomes of four species in the genus Saccharomyces by nearest-neighbor method. The results show that coding regions are more thermodynamically stable than introns, 3′-untranslated regions and intergenic sequences. Furthermore, open reading frames have more stable sense mRNA/DNA duplexes than the potential antisense duplexes, a property that can aid gene discovery. The lower stability of the DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes of 3′-untranslated regions and the higher stability of genes correlates with increased mRNA level. These results suggest that the thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes affects mRNA transcription. PMID:17356699

  14. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  15. Residue Asn277 Affects the Stability and Substrate Specificity of the SMG1 Lipase from Malassezia globosa

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Dongming; Wang, Qian; Xu, Jinxin; Zhou, Pengfei; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability and substrate specificity are important characteristics of enzymes for industrial application, which can be improved by protein engineering. SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase (MDL) that shows activity toward mono- and diacylglycerols, but no activity toward triacylglycerols. SMG1 lipase is considered a potential biocatalyst applied in oil/fat modification and its crystal structure revealed that an interesting residue-Asn277 may contribute to stabilize loop 273–278 and the 3104 helix which are important to enzyme characterization. In this study, to explore its role in affecting the stability and catalytic activity, mutagenesis of N277 with Asp (D), Val (V), Leu (L) and Phe (F) was conducted. Circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis and half-life measurement showed that the N277D mutant has better thermostability. The melting temperature and half-life of the N277D mutant were 56.6 °C and 187 min, respectively, while that was 54.6 °C and 121 min for SMG1 wild type (WT). Biochemical characterization of SMG1 mutants were carried out to test whether catalytic properties were affected by mutagenesis. N277D had similar enzymatic properties as SMG1 WT, but N277F showed a different substrate selectivity profile as compared to other SMG1 mutants. Analysis of the SMG1 3D model suggested that N277D formed a salt bridge via its negative charged carboxyl group with a positively charged guanidino group of R227, which might contribute to confer N277D higher temperature stability. These findings not only provide some clues to understand the molecular basis of the lipase structure/function relationship but also lay the framework for engineering suitable MDL lipases for industrial applications. PMID:25837472

  16. Using state diagrams for predicting colloidal stability of whey protein beverages.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty B; Ward, Loren; Foegeding, E Allen

    2015-05-01

    A method for evaluating aspects of colloidal stability of whey protein beverages after thermal treatment was established. Three state diagrams for beverages (pH 3-7) were developed representing protein solubility, turbidity, and macroscopic state after two ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) treatments. Key transitions of stability in the state diagrams were explored using electrophoresis and chromatography to determine aggregation propensities of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and glycomacropeptide. The state diagrams present an overlapping view of high colloidal stability at pH 3 accompanied by high solubility of individual whey proteins. At pH 5, beverages were characterized by poor solubility, high turbidity, and aggregation/gelation of whey proteins with the exception of glycomacropeptide. Stability increased at pH 6, due to increased solubility of α-lactalbumin. The results indicate that combinations of state diagrams can be used to identify key regions of stability for whey protein containing beverages. PMID:25880701

  17. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization improves oxidative stability and interfacial properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Avila, C; Trujillo, A J

    2016-10-15

    Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (100-300MPa) has great potential for technological, microbiological and nutritional aspects of fluid processing. Its effect on the oxidative stability and interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4% (w/v) of soy protein isolate and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) were studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (15MPa). Emulsions were characterized by particle size, emulsifying activity index, surface protein concentration at the interface and by transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were evaluated in emulsions upon storage. Emulsions with 20% oil treated at 100 and 200MPa exhibited the most oxidative stability due to higher amount of oil and protein surface load at the interface. This manuscript addresses the improvement in oxidative stability in emulsions treated by UHPH when compared to conventional emulsions. PMID:27173541

  18. Impact of bentonite additions during vinification on protein stability and volatile compounds of Albariño wines.

    PubMed

    Lira, Eugenio; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Salazar, Fernando N; Orriols, Ignacio; Fornos, Daniel; López, Francisco

    2015-03-25

    Today, bentonite continues to be one of the most used products to remove proteins in white wines in order to avoid their precipitation in bottles. However, excessive use of bentonite has negative effects on the aroma of final wine, so the optimization of the dose and the time of its application are important for winemakers. This paper analyzes how applying an equal dose of bentonite at different stages (must clarification; beginning, middle, and end of fermentation) affects the macromolecular profile, protein stability, physical-chemical characteristics and aromatic profile of the wine obtained. The results showed the addition during fermentation (especially in the middle and at the end) reduced the total dose required for protein stabilization of Albariño wines and maintained the sensory characteristics of this variety. PMID:25751284

  19. Absolute Hydration Free Energies of Blocked Amino Acids: Implications for Protein Solvation and Stability

    PubMed Central

    König, Gerhard; Bruckner, Stefan; Boresch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Most proteins perform their function in aqueous solution. The interactions with water determine the stability of proteins and the desolvation costs of ligand binding or membrane insertion. However, because of experimental restrictions, absolute solvation free energies of proteins or amino acids are not available. Instead, solvation free energies are estimated based on side chain analog data. This approach implies that the contributions to free energy differences are additive, and it has often been employed for estimating folding or binding free energies. However, it is not clear how much the additivity assumption affects the reliability of the resulting data. Here, we use molecular dynamics–based free energy simulations to calculate absolute hydration free energies for 15 N-acetyl-methylamide amino acids with neutral side chains. By comparing our results with solvation free energies for side chain analogs, we demonstrate that estimates of solvation free energies of full amino acids based on group-additive methods are systematically too negative and completely overestimate the hydrophobicity of glycine. The largest deviation of additive protocols using side chain analog data was 6.7 kcal/mol; on average, the deviation was 4 kcal/mol. We briefly discuss a simple way to alleviate the errors incurred by using side chain analog data and point out the implications of our findings for the field of biophysics and implicit solvent models. To support our results and conclusions, we calculate relative protein stabilities for selected point mutations, yielding a root-mean-square deviation from experimental results of 0.8 kcal/mol. PMID:23442867

  20. Stabilization of Kv1.5 channel protein by the inotropic agent olprinone.

    PubMed

    Endo, Ryo; Kurata, Yasutaka; Notsu, Tomomi; Li, Peili; Morikawa, Kumi; Kondo, Takehito; Ogura, Kazuyoshi; Miake, Junichiro; Yoshida, Akio; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Higaki, Katsumi; Kuwabara, Masanari; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2015-10-15

    Olprinone is an inotropic agent that inhibits phosphodiesterase (PDE) III and causes vasodilation. Olprinone has been shown to be less proarrhythmic and possibly affect expression of functional Kv1.5 channels that confer the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier K+ channel current (IKur) responsible for action potential repolarization. To reveal involvement of Kv1.5 channels in the less arrhythmic effect of olprinone, we examined effects of the agent on the stability of Kv1.5 channel proteins expressed in COS7 cells. Olprinone at 30-1000 nM increased the protein level of Kv1.5 channels in a concentration-dependent manner. Chase experiments showed that olprinone delayed degradation of Kv1.5 channels. Olprinone increased the immunofluorescent signal of Kv1.5 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus as well as on the cell surface. Kv1.5-mediated membrane currents, measured as 4-aminopyridine-sensitive currents, were increased by olprinone without changes in their activation kinetics. A protein transporter inhibitor, colchicine, abolished the olprinone-induced increase of Kv.1.5-mediated currents. The action of olprinone was inhibited by 4-aminopyridine, and was not mimicked by the application of 8-Bromo-cAMP. Taken together, we conclude that olprinone stabilizes Kv1.5 proteins at the ER through an action as a chemical chaperone, and thereby increases the density of Kv1.5 channels on the cell membrane. The enhancement of Kv1.5 currents could underlie less arrhythmogenicity of olprinone. PMID:26368666

  1. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  2. Coordination contributions to protein stability in metal-substituted carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Lisi, George P; Hughes, Russell P; Wilcox, Dean E

    2016-09-01

    Contributions of the active site metal to the stability of carbonic anhydrase (CA) were quantified by differential scanning calorimetry and complementary unfolding measurements of CA substituted with Co(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Mn(2+). The metal ions stabilize the protein to different extent, with the highest stability provided by the native Zn(2+). This additional stability does not correlate with the enthalpy of the three metal-imidazole (His) bonds at the active site or other properties of the metal ions (charge density, hydration enthalpy). However, DFT calculations reveal an energetic penalty associated with metal coordination at the active site, and the magnitude of this penalty correlates inversely with metal contributions to the stability of the protein. While the affinity of CA for metal ions generally reflects the Irving-Williams series, the additional thermal stability provided by metal ions is modulated by the rigid His3 coordination that is imposed at the protein site. PMID:27350155

  3. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  4. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  5. Protein composition affects variation in coagulation properties of buffalo milk.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Gervaso, M; Rostellato, R; Coletta, A; Carnier, P

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects exerted by the content of casein and whey protein fractions on variation of pH, rennet-coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time (K20), and curd firmness of Mediterranean buffalo individual milk. Measures of milk protein composition and assessment of genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 were obtained by reversed-phase HPLC analysis of 621 individual milk samples. Increased content of αS1-casein (CN) was associated with delayed coagulation onset and increased K20, whereas average pH, RCT, and K20 decreased when β-CN content increased. Milk with low κ-CN content exhibited low pH and RCT relative to milk with high content of κ-CN. Increased content of glycosylated κ-CN was associated with unfavorable effects on RCT. Effects of milk protein composition on curd firmness were less important than those on pH, RCT, and K20. Likely, this occurred as a consequence of the very short RCT of buffalo milk, which guaranteed a complete strengthening of the curd even in the restricted 31 min time of analysis of coagulation properties and for samples initially showing soft curds. Effects of CSN1S1-CSN3 genotypes on coagulation properties were not to be entirely ascribed to existing variation in milk protein composition associated with polymorphisms at CSN1S1 and CSN3 genes. Although the role of detailed milk protein composition in variation of cheese yield needs to be further investigated, findings of this study suggest that modification of the relative content of specific CN fractions can relevantly influence the behavior of buffalo milk during processing. PMID:23684020

  6. Measuring the interaction of urea and protein stabilizing osmolytes with the nonpolar surface of hydroxypropyl cellulose†

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher; Rau, Donald C.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of urea and several naturally occurring protein stabilizing osmolytes, glycerol, sorbitol, glycine betaine, trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), and proline, with condensed arrays of a hydrophobically modified polysaccharide, hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC), has been inferred from the effect of these solutes on the forces acting between HPC polymers. Urea interacts only very weakly. The protein stabilizing osmolytes are strongly excluded. The observed energies indicate that the exclusion of the protein stabilizing osmolytes from protein hydrophobic side chains would add significantly to protein stability. The temperature dependence of exclusion indicates a significant enthalpy contribution to the interaction energy in contrast to expectations from ‘molecular crowding’ theories based on steric repulsion. The dependence of exclusion on the distance between HPC polymers rather indicates that perturbations of water structuring or hydration forces underlie exclusion. PMID:18512956

  7. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  8. Biochemical characterization of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase variants reveals differences in protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Makena, Anne; Brem, Jürgen; Pfeffer, Inga; Geffen, Rebecca E. J.; Wilkins, Sarah E.; Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Flashman, Emily; Phee, Lynette M.; Wareham, David W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-based resistance is a threat to the use of most β-lactam antibiotics. Multiple variants of the New Delhi MBL (NDM) have recently been reported. Previous reports indicate that the substitutions affect NDM activity despite being located outside the active site. This study compares the biochemical properties of seven clinically reported NDM variants. Methods NDM variants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis; recombinant proteins were purified to near homogeneity. Thermal stability and secondary structures of the variants were investigated using differential scanning fluorimetry and circular dichroism; kinetic parameters and MIC values were investigated for representative carbapenem, cephalosporin and penicillin substrates. Results The substitutions did not affect the overall folds of the NDM variants, within limits of detection; however, differences in thermal stabilities were observed. NDM-8 was the most stable variant with a melting temperature of 72°C compared with 60°C for NDM-1. In contrast to some previous studies, kcat/KM values were similar for carbapenem and penicillin substrates for NDM variants, but differences in kinetics were observed for cephalosporin substrates. Apparent substrate inhibition was observed with nitrocefin for variants containing the M154L substitution. In all cases, cefoxitin and ceftazidime were poorly hydrolysed with kcat/KM values <1 s−1 μM−1. Conclusions These results do not define major differences in the catalytic efficiencies of the studied NDM variants and carbapenem or penicillin substrates. Differences in the kinetics of cephalosporin hydrolysis were observed. The results do reveal that the clinically observed substitutions can make substantial differences in thermodynamic stability, suggesting that this may be a factor in MBL evolution. PMID:25324420

  9. Candidate genes that affect aging through protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Argon, Yair; Gidalevitz, Tali

    2015-01-01

    Because aging is a multifactorial, pleiotropic process where many interacting mechanisms contribute to the organismal decline, the candidate gene approach rarely provides a clear message. This chapter discusses some of the inherent complexity, focusing on aspects that impinge upon protein homeostasis and maintain a healthy proteome. We discuss candidate genes that operate in these pathways, and compare their actions in invertebrates, mice and humans. We highlight several themes that emerge from recent research—the interconnections of pathways that regulate aging, the pleiotropic effects of mutations and other manipulations of the candidate proteins and the tissue specificity in these pleiotropic outcomes. This body of knowledge highlights the need for multiple specific readouts of manipulating longevity genes, beyond measuring lifespan, as well as the need to understand the integrated picture, beyond examining the immediate outputs of individual longevity pathways. PMID:25916585

  10. Protein sources for finishing calves as affected by management system.

    PubMed

    Sindt, M H; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Vieselmeyer, B A

    1993-03-01

    Two beef production systems were evaluated in conjunction with an evaluation of escape protein sources for finishing calves. Two hundred forty crossbred steers and 80 crossbred heifer calves (BW = 267 +/- 2 kg) were split into two groups: 1) control, finished (207 d) after a 3-wk feedlot adjustment period and 2) grazing cornstalks for 74 d after a 3-wk feedlot adjustment period, then finished (164 d). Finishing treatments were sources and proportions of supplemental CP: 1) urea 100%; 2) soybean meal (SBM) 100%; 3) blood meal (BM) 50%, urea 50%; 4) feather meal (FTH) 50%, urea 50%; 5) SBM 50%, FTH 25%, urea 25%; 6) SBM 25%, FTH 38%, urea 37%; 7) FTH 25%, BM 25%, urea 50%, and 8) FTH 38%, BM 13%, urea 50%. Treatments 1 to 8 were fed in dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets. Treatments 9 and 10 were supplement Treatments 1 and 7 fed in diets based on high-moisture corn. Calves finished after a 74-d period of grazing cornstalks consumed more feed (P < .01) and gained faster (P < .01) but were less efficient (P < .05) than calves finished directly after weaning. Although not statistically different, calves finished after grazing cornstalks and supplemented with natural protein in the feedlot were 7% more efficient than calves supplemented with urea alone. Efficiency of calves finished directly after weaning was similar for calves supplemented with natural protein or urea alone. Supplementing SBM/FTH/urea or BM/FTH/urea improved feed efficiency compared with supplementing FTH/urea alone. These data suggest that allowing calves to graze cornstalks before finishing is a possible management option, but this system may require more metabolizable protein in the finishing diet to maximize feed efficiency if the calves are expressing compensatory growth. PMID:8463161

  11. Marginal B-6 intake affects protein synthesis in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Young, L.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1986-03-05

    The role of vitamin B-6 in amino acid metabolism suggests that inadequate B-6 intake may impair protein synthesis. To test this hypothesis, 30 male rats (initially 227 g) were fed AIN76A diets that contained control, marginal or devoid levels of B-6 (5.8, 1.2 or 0.1 mg B-6/kg diet, by analysis) ad libitum for 9 weeks. Protein synthesis rates (PSRs) were measured in liver, kidney and calf muscle using a flooding dose of /sup 3/H-phenylalanine. Marginal and control groups ate and gained weight at similar rates. The marginal diet did not elevate xanthurenic acid (XA) excretion following a tryptophan load. However, marginal B-6 intake did depress liver PSR by 29% (2182 vs 1549 mg/day, P<.05), liver wet weight by 15% (19.0 vs 16.1 g, P<.05) and muscle PSR by 23% (3.0 vs 2.3%/day, P<.10). Unexpectedly, marginal B-6 intake increased PSR in kidney 47% (90 vs 132 mg/day, P<.05). The devoid diet, which increased XA excretion following a tryptophan load by more than 3-fold, depressed PSRs 56% in liver and 31% in muscle. However, the devoid diet decreased food intake by 40% (25.0 vs 15.0 g/day); therefore effects of devoid B-6 intake on PSRs may have been confounded by deficits in protein-energy intake in devoid vs control groups. These data demonstrate that marginal B-6 intake alters protein synthesis in tissues of the rat.

  12. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability.

    PubMed

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-21

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device. PMID:27064353

  13. Binding of Gq protein stabilizes the activated state of the muscarinic receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) induces various cellular responses through interactions with G proteins. The key trigger of GPCR activation is agonist binding. It is reportedly known that the agonist-bound active conformation of the GPCRs, such as the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 1 (M(1)R), can be affected by the coupling of G proteins and by depolarization of the membrane potential. Here we aimed at investigating their effects on the structural rearrangements of the M(1)Rs between the active and quiescent states, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. For this purpose, fluorescent M(1)R constructs that maintained intact activation of the Gq pathway and interaction with Gq were used. We captured the agonist-induced conformational changes of the M(1)R as the FRET decreases and found that the FRET decreases were enhanced by co-expression of the Gq subunits. In addition, co-expression of the Gq subunits decelerated the recovery of the declined FRET upon removal of the agonists, which was slower than the dissociation of the Gq subunits from the receptor. These results suggested that Gq binding stabilizes the agonist-induced activated conformation of the M(1)R. We also found that depolarization of the membrane potential slightly but significantly enhanced the agonist-induced FRET decrease, by accelerating the agonist-induced conformational changes. Thus, structural rearrangement analyses by FRET revealed that Gq coupling stabilizes the active conformation of the M(1)R and also suggested that depolarization accelerates the transition from quiescent to activation conformation. PMID:23085334

  14. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J.; Rogala, Kacper B.; Deane, Charlotte M.; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers [1, 2]. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions [3, 4]. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies [5], but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs. PMID:26096973

  15. Unraveling protein stabilization mechanisms: vitrification and water replacement in a glass transition temperature controlled system.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, N; Stankovic, M; de Waard, H; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the two main mechanisms used to explain the stabilization of proteins by sugar glasses during drying and subsequent storage: the vitrification and the water replacement theory. Although in literature protein stability is often attributed to either vitrification or water replacement, both mechanisms could play a role and they should be considered simultaneously. A model protein, alkaline phosphatase, was incorporated in either inulin or trehalose by spray drying. To study the storage stability at different glass transition temperatures, a buffer which acts as a plasticizer, ammediol, was incorporated in the sugar glasses. At low glass transition temperatures (<50°C), the enzymatic activity of the protein strongly decreased during storage at 60°C. Protein stability increased when the glass transition temperature was raised considerably above the storage temperature. This increased stability could be attributed to vitrification. A further increase of the glass transition temperature did not further improve stability. In conclusion, vitrification plays a dominant role in stabilization at glass transition temperatures up to 10 to 20°C above storage temperature, depending on whether trehalose or inulin is used. On the other hand, the water replacement mechanism predominantly determines stability at higher glass transition temperatures. PMID:23360765

  16. Identification of VPS13C as a Galectin-12-Binding Protein That Regulates Galectin-12 Protein Stability and Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ri-Yao; Xue, Huiting; Yu, Lan; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Monaco, Anthony P.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-12, a member of the galectin family of β-galactoside-binding animal lectins, is preferentially expressed in adipocytes and required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. This protein was recently found to regulate lipolysis, whole body adiposity, and glucose homeostasis in vivo. Here we identify VPS13C, a member of the VPS13 family of vacuolar protein sorting-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, as a major galectin-12-binding protein. VPS13C is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation, and is required for galectin-12 protein stability. Knockdown of Vps13c markedly reduces the steady-state levels of galectin-12 by promoting its degradation through primarily the lysosomal pathway, and impairs adipocyte differentiation. Our studies also suggest that VPS13C may have a broader role in protein quality control. The regulation of galectin-12 stability by VPS13C could potentially be exploited for therapeutic intervention of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:27073999

  17. PsbI affects the stability, function, and phosphorylation patterns of photosystem II assemblies in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Schwenkert, Serena; Umate, Pavan; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Volz, Stefanie; Mlçochová, Lada; Zoryan, Mikael; Eichacker, Lutz A; Ohad, Itzhak; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Meurer, Jörg

    2006-11-10

    Photosystem II (PSII) core complexes consist of CP47, CP43, D1, D2 proteins and of several low molecular weight integral membrane polypeptides, such as the chloroplast-encoded PsbE, PsbF, and PsbI proteins. To elucidate the function of PsbI in the photosynthetic process as well as in the biogenesis of PSII in higher plants, we generated homoplastomic knock-out plants by replacing most of the tobacco psbI gene with a spectinomycin resistance cartridge. Mutant plants are photoautotrophically viable under green house conditions but sensitive to high light irradiation. Antenna proteins of PSII accumulate to normal amounts, but levels of the PSII core complex are reduced by 50%. Bioenergetic and fluorescence studies uncovered that PsbI is required for the stability but not for the assembly of dimeric PSII and supercomplexes consisting of PSII and the outer antenna (PSII-LHCII). Thermoluminescence emission bands indicate that the presence of PsbI is required for assembly of a fully functional Q(A) binding site. We show that phosphorylation of the reaction center proteins D1 and D2 is light and redox-regulated in the wild type, but phosphorylation is abolished in the mutant, presumably due to structural alterations of PSII when PsbI is deficient. Unlike wild type, phosphorylation of LHCII is strongly increased in the dark due to accumulation of reduced plastoquinone, whereas even upon state II light phosphorylation is decreased in delta psbI. These data attest that phosphorylation of D1/D2, CP43, and LHCII is regulated differently. PMID:16920705

  18. Zwitterionic gel encapsulation promotes protein stability, enhances pharmacokinetics, and reduces immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Fang; Tsao, Caroline; Liu, Sijun; Jain, Priyesh; Sinclair, Andrew; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Bai, Tao; Wu, Kan; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-09-29

    Advances in protein therapy are hindered by the poor stability, inadequate pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, and immunogenicity of many therapeutic proteins. Polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) is the most successful strategy to date to overcome these shortcomings, and more than 10 PEGylated proteins have been brought to market. However, anti-PEG antibodies induced by treatment raise serious concerns about the future of PEGylated therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a zwitterionic polymer network encapsulation technology that effectively enhances protein stability and PK while mitigating the immune response. Uricase modified with a comprehensive zwitterionic polycarboxybetaine (PCB) network exhibited exceptional stability and a greatly prolonged circulation half-life. More importantly, the PK behavior was unchanged, and neither anti-uricase nor anti-PCB antibodies were detected after three weekly injections in a rat model. This technology is applicable to a variety of proteins and unlocks the possibility of adopting highly immunogenic proteins for therapeutic or protective applications. PMID:26371311

  19. Zwitterionic gel encapsulation promotes protein stability, enhances pharmacokinetics, and reduces immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Fang; Tsao, Caroline; Liu, Sijun; Jain, Priyesh; Sinclair, Andrew; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Bai, Tao; Wu, Kan; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in protein therapy are hindered by the poor stability, inadequate pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, and immunogenicity of many therapeutic proteins. Polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) is the most successful strategy to date to overcome these shortcomings, and more than 10 PEGylated proteins have been brought to market. However, anti-PEG antibodies induced by treatment raise serious concerns about the future of PEGylated therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a zwitterionic polymer network encapsulation technology that effectively enhances protein stability and PK while mitigating the immune response. Uricase modified with a comprehensive zwitterionic polycarboxybetaine (PCB) network exhibited exceptional stability and a greatly prolonged circulation half-life. More importantly, the PK behavior was unchanged, and neither anti-uricase nor anti-PCB antibodies were detected after three weekly injections in a rat model. This technology is applicable to a variety of proteins and unlocks the possibility of adopting highly immunogenic proteins for therapeutic or protective applications. PMID:26371311

  20. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  1. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  2. Uridine Affects Liver Protein Glycosylation, Insulin Signaling, and Heme Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Urasaki, Yasuyo; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Le, Thuc T.

    2014-01-01

    Purines and pyrimidines are complementary bases of the genetic code. The roles of purines and their derivatives in cellular signal transduction and energy metabolism are well-known. In contrast, the roles of pyrimidines and their derivatives in cellular function remain poorly understood. In this study, the roles of uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, in liver metabolism are examined in mice. We report that short-term uridine administration in C57BL/6J mice increases liver protein glycosylation profiles, reduces phosphorylation level of insulin signaling proteins, and activates the HRI-eIF-2α-ATF4 heme-deficiency stress response pathway. Short-term uridine administration is also associated with reduced liver hemin level and reduced ability for insulin-stimulated blood glucose removal during an insulin tolerance test. Some of the short-term effects of exogenous uridine in C57BL/6J mice are conserved in transgenic UPase1−/− mice with long-term elevation of endogenous uridine level. UPase1−/− mice exhibit activation of the liver HRI-eIF-2α-ATF4 heme-deficiency stress response pathway. UPase1−/− mice also exhibit impaired ability for insulin-stimulated blood glucose removal. However, other short-term effects of exogenous uridine in C57BL/6J mice are not conserved in UPase1−/− mice. UPase1−/− mice exhibit normal phosphorylation level of liver insulin signaling proteins and increased liver hemin concentration compared to untreated control C57BL/6J mice. Contrasting short-term and long-term consequences of uridine on liver metabolism suggest that uridine exerts transient effects and elicits adaptive responses. Taken together, our data support potential roles of pyrimidines and their derivatives in the regulation of liver metabolism. PMID:24918436

  3. Repeat-protein folding: new insights into origins of cooperativity, stability, and topology

    PubMed Central

    Kloss, Ellen; Courtemanche, Naomi; Barrick, Doug

    2008-01-01

    Although our understanding of globular protein folding continues to advance, the irregular tertiary structures and high cooperativity of globular proteins complicates energetic dissection. Recently, proteins with regular, repetitive tertiary structures have been identified that sidestep limitations imposed by globular protein architecture. Here we review recent studies of repeat-protein folding. These studies uniquely advance our understanding of both the energetics and kinetics of protein folding. Equilibrium studies provide detailed maps of local stabilities, access to energy landscapes, insights into cooperativity, determination of nearest-neighbor interaction parameters using statistical thermodynamics, relationships between consensus sequences and repeat-protein stability. Kinetic studies provide insight into the influence of short-range topology on folding rates, the degree to which folding proceeds by parallel (versus localized) pathways, and the factors that select among multiple potential pathways. The recent application of force spectroscopy to repeat-protein unfolding is providing a unique route to test and extend many of these findings. PMID:17963718

  4. Protein structure, stability and folding in the cell -- in silico biophysical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2010-03-01

    How the crowded environment inside a cell affects the structural conformation of a protein with aspherical shape is a vital question because the geometry of proteins and protein-protein complexes are far from globules in vivo. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a spherical protein (i.e. apoflavodoxin), a football-shaped protein (i.e., Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) and a dumbbell-shaped protein (i.e. calmodulin) under crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein folding dynamics as well as an overall protein shape associated with changes in secondary structures. Our work demonstrates the malleability of ``native'' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo.

  5. Protein Structure and Stability in Neat Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihari, Malvika; Russell, Thomas P.; Hoagland, David A.

    2010-03-01

    Ionic liquid (IL) as a medium for room temperature preservation of biomacromolecules has been proposed, and to investigate the possibility, we studied physicochemical and enzymatic properties of several proteins in the neat hydrophilic IL, ethylmethyl imidazolium ethyl sulfate [EMIM][EtSO4]. Molecular dissolution of α-chymotypsin, cytochrome-c and other proteins could be achieved with moderate heating (60C). Dynamic light scattering and dilute solution viscometry typically reveal protein size slightly larger than in buffer, suggesting different solvation or protein unfolding. Spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, fluorescence, FTIR, CD) show largely unchanged secondary structure but significantly changed tertiary structure. IL-dissolved cytochrome-c has heightened peroxidase activity, supporting the same conclusions. Transfer of dissolved protein from IL to buffer and ensuing alterations to protein conformation/activity will be discussed.

  6. Radiation Power Affected by Current and Wall Radius in Water Cooled Vortex Wall-stabilized Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwao, Toru; Nakamura, Takaya; Yanagi, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    The arc lighting to obtain the environment to evacuate, save the life, keep the safety and be comfortable are focus on. The lack of radiation intensity and color rendering is problem because of inappropriate energy balance. Some researchers have researched the arc lamp mixed with metal vapor for improvement of color rendering spectrum. The metal vapor can emit the high intense radiation. In addition, the radiation is derived from the high temperature medium. Because the arc temperature can be controlled by current and arc radius, the radiation can be controlled by the current and arc radius. This research elucidates the radiation power affected by the current and wall radius in wall-stabilized arc of water-cooled vortex type. As a result, the radiation power increases with increasing the square of current / square of wall radius because of the temperature distribution which is derived from the current density at the simulation.

  7. Harvest date affects aronia juice polyphenols, sugars, and antioxidant activity, but not anthocyanin stability.

    PubMed

    Bolling, Bradley W; Taheri, Rod; Pei, Ruisong; Kranz, Sarah; Yu, Mo; Durocher, Shelley N; Brand, Mark H

    2015-11-15

    The goal of this work was to characterize how the date of harvest of 'Viking' aronia berry impacts juice pigmentation, sugars, and antioxidant activity. Aronia juice anthocyanins doubled at the fifth week of the harvest, and then decreased. Juice hydroxycinnamic acids decreased 33% from the first week, while proanthocyanidins increased 64%. Juice fructose and glucose plateaued at the fourth week, but sorbitol increased 40% to the seventh harvest week. Aronia juice pigment density increased due to anthocyanin concentration, and polyphenol copigmentation did not significantly affect juice pigmentation. Anthocyanin stability at pH 4.5 was similar between weeks. However, addition of quercetin, sorbitol, and chlorogenic acid to aronia anthocyanins inhibited pH-induced loss of color. Sorbitol and citric acid may be partially responsible for weekly variation in antioxidant activity, as addition of these agents inhibited DPPH scavenging 13-30%. Thus, aronia polyphenol and non-polyphenol components contribute to its colorant and antioxidant functionality. PMID:25977015

  8. Heterozygous screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies dosage-sensitive genes that affect chromosome stability.

    PubMed

    Strome, Erin D; Wu, Xiaowei; Kimmel, Marek; Plon, Sharon E

    2008-03-01

    Current techniques for identifying mutations that convey a small increased cancer risk or those that modify cancer risk in carriers of highly penetrant mutations are limited by the statistical power of epidemiologic studies, which require screening of large populations and candidate genes. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that mediate genomic stability, we performed a genomewide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterozygous mutations that increase chromosome instability in a checkpoint-deficient diploid strain. We used two genome stability assays sensitive enough to detect the impact of heterozygous mutations and identified 172 heterozygous gene disruptions that affected chromosome fragment (CF) loss, 45% of which also conferred modest but statistically significant instability of endogenous chromosomes. Analysis of heterozygous deletion of 65 of these genes demonstrated that the majority increased genomic instability in both checkpoint-deficient and wild-type backgrounds. Strains heterozygous for COMA kinetochore complex genes were particularly unstable. Over 50% of the genes identified in this screen have putative human homologs, including CHEK2, ERCC4, and TOPBP1, which are already associated with inherited cancer susceptibility. These findings encourage the incorporation of this orthologous gene list into cancer epidemiology studies and suggest further analysis of heterozygous phenotypes in yeast as models of human disease resulting from haplo-insufficiency. PMID:18245329

  9. Plant species richness and functional traits affect community stability after a flood event.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Felícia M; Wright, Alexandra J; Eisenhauer, Nico; Ebeling, Anne; Roscher, Christiane; Wagg, Cameron; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Pillar, Valério D

    2016-05-19

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events. It is therefore of major importance to identify the community attributes that confer stability in ecological communities during such events. In June 2013, a flood event affected a plant diversity experiment in Central Europe (Jena, Germany). We assessed the effects of plant species richness, functional diversity, flooding intensity and community means of functional traits on different measures of stability (resistance, resilience and raw biomass changes from pre-flood conditions). Surprisingly, plant species richness reduced community resistance in response to the flood. This was mostly because more diverse communities grew more immediately following the flood. Raw biomass increased over the previous year; this resulted in decreased absolute value measures of resistance. There was no clear response pattern for resilience. We found that functional traits drove these changes in raw biomass: communities with a high proportion of late-season, short-statured plants with dense, shallow roots and small leaves grew more following the flood. Late-growing species probably avoided the flood, whereas greater root length density might have allowed species to better access soil resources brought from the flood, thus growing more in the aftermath. We conclude that resource inputs following mild floods may favour the importance of traits related to resource acquisition and be less associated with flooding tolerance. PMID:27114578

  10. Nectar vs. pollen loading affects the tradeoff between flight stability and maneuverability in bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, Andrew M; Ravi, Sridhar; Combes, Stacey A

    2015-08-18

    Bumblebee foragers spend a significant portion of their lives transporting nectar and pollen, often carrying loads equivalent to more than half their body mass. Whereas nectar is stored in the abdomen near the bee's center of mass, pollen is carried on the hind legs, farther from the center of mass. We examine how load position changes the rotational moment of inertia in bumblebees and whether this affects their flight maneuverability and/or stability. We applied simulated pollen or nectar loads of equal mass to Bombus impatiens bumblebees and examined flight performance in a wind tunnel under three conditions: flight in unsteady flow, tracking an oscillating flower in smooth flow, and flower tracking in unsteady flow. Using an inertial model, we estimated that carrying a load on the legs rather than in the abdomen increases a bee's moment of inertia about the roll and yaw axes but not the pitch axis. Consistent with these predictions, we found that bees carrying a load on their legs displayed slower rotations about their roll and yaw axes, regardless of whether these rotations were driven by external perturbations or self-initiated steering maneuvers. This allowed pollen-loaded bees to maintain a more stable body orientation and higher median flight speed in unsteady flow but reduced their performance when tracking a moving flower, supporting the concept of a tradeoff between stability and maneuverability. These results demonstrate that the types of resources collected by bees affect their flight performance and energetics and suggest that wind conditions may influence resource selection. PMID:26240364

  11. Nectar vs. pollen loading affects the tradeoff between flight stability and maneuverability in bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Mountcastle, Andrew M.; Combes, Stacey A.

    2015-01-01

    Bumblebee foragers spend a significant portion of their lives transporting nectar and pollen, often carrying loads equivalent to more than half their body mass. Whereas nectar is stored in the abdomen near the bee’s center of mass, pollen is carried on the hind legs, farther from the center of mass. We examine how load position changes the rotational moment of inertia in bumblebees and whether this affects their flight maneuverability and/or stability. We applied simulated pollen or nectar loads of equal mass to Bombus impatiens bumblebees and examined flight performance in a wind tunnel under three conditions: flight in unsteady flow, tracking an oscillating flower in smooth flow, and flower tracking in unsteady flow. Using an inertial model, we estimated that carrying a load on the legs rather than in the abdomen increases a bee’s moment of inertia about the roll and yaw axes but not the pitch axis. Consistent with these predictions, we found that bees carrying a load on their legs displayed slower rotations about their roll and yaw axes, regardless of whether these rotations were driven by external perturbations or self-initiated steering maneuvers. This allowed pollen-loaded bees to maintain a more stable body orientation and higher median flight speed in unsteady flow but reduced their performance when tracking a moving flower, supporting the concept of a tradeoff between stability and maneuverability. These results demonstrate that the types of resources collected by bees affect their flight performance and energetics and suggest that wind conditions may influence resource selection. PMID:26240364

  12. Beta-turn propensities as paradigms for the analysis of structural motifs to engineer protein stability.

    PubMed Central

    Ohage, E. C.; Graml, W.; Walter, M. M.; Steinbacher, S.; Steipe, B.

    1997-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of a protein provides an experimental metric for the relationship of protein sequence and native structure. We have investigated an approach based on an analysis of the structural database for stability engineering of an immunoglobulin variable domain. The most frequently occurring residues in specific positions of beta-turn motifs were predicted to increase the folding stability of mutants that were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. Even in positions in which different residues are conserved in immunoglobulin sequences, the predictions were confirmed. Frequently, mutants with increased beta-turn propensities display increased folding cooperativities, suggesting pronounced effects on the unfolded state independent of the expected effect on conformational entropy. We conclude that structural motifs with predominantly local interactions can serve as templates with which patterns of sequence preferences can be extracted from the database of protein structures. Such preferences can predict the stability effects of mutations for protein engineering and design. PMID:9007995

  13. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  14. Contribution of Charged Groups to the Enthalpic Stabilization of the Folded States of Globular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use the results from all atom MD simulations of proteins and peptides to assess individual contribution of charged atomic groups to the enthalpic stability of the native state of globular proteins and investigate how the distribution of charged atomic groups in terms of solvent accessibility relates to protein enthalpic stability. The contributions of charged groups is calculated using a comparison of nonbonded interaction energy terms from equilibrium simulations of charged amino acid dipeptides in water (the “unfolded state”) and charged amino acids in globular proteins (the “folded state”). Contrary to expectation, the analysis shows that many buried, charged atomic groups contribute favorably to protein enthalpic stability. The strongest enthalpic contributions favoring the folded state come from the carboxylate (COO−) groups of either Glu or Asp. The contributions from Arg guanidinium groups are generally somewhat stabilizing, while NH3+ groups from Lys contribute little toward stabilizing the folded state. The average enthalpic gain due to the transfer of a methyl group in an apolar amino acid from solution to the protein interior is described for comparison. Notably, charged groups that are less exposed to solvent contribute more favorably to protein native-state enthalpic stability than charged groups that are solvent exposed. While solvent reorganization/release has favorable contributions to folding for all charged atomic groups, the variation in folded state stability among proteins comes mainly from the change in the nonbonded interaction energy of charged groups between the unfolded and folded states. A key outcome is that the calculated enthalpic stabilization is found to be inversely proportional to the excess charge density on the surface, in support of an hypothesis proposed previously. PMID:18303881

  15. Clinical application for the preservation of phospho-proteins through in-situ tissue stabilization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein biomarkers will play a pivotal role in the future of personalized medicine for both diagnosis and treatment decision-making. While the results of several pre-clinical and small-scale clinical studies have demonstrated the value of protein biomarkers, there have been significant challenges to translating these findings into routine clinical care. Challenges to the use of protein biomarkers include inter-sample variability introduced by differences in post-collection handling and ex vivo degradation of proteins and protein modifications. Results In this report, we re-create laboratory and clinical scenarios for sample collection and test the utility of a new tissue stabilization technique in preserving proteins and protein modifications. In the laboratory setting, tissue stabilization with the Denator Stabilizor T1 resulted in a significantly higher yield of phospho-protein when compared to standard snap freeze preservation. Furthermore, in a clinical scenario, tissue stabilization at collection resulted in a higher yield of total phospho-protein, total phospho-tyrosine, pErkT202/Y204 and pAktS473 when compared to standard methods. Tissue stabilization did not have a significant effect on other post-translational modifications such as acetylation and glycosylation, which are more stable ex-vivo. Tissue stabilization did decrease total RNA quantity and quality. Conclusion Stabilization at the time of collection offers the potential to better preserve tissue protein and protein modification levels, as well as reduce the variability related to tissue processing delays that are often associated with clinical samples. PMID:21092202

  16. Spectrofluorimetric methods of stability-indicating assay of certain drugs affecting the cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, B. A.; Mohamed, M. F.; Youssef, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    Two stability-indicating spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed for the determination of ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil, drugs affecting the cardiovascular system, and validated in the presence of their degradation products. The first method, for ezetimibe, is based on an oxidative coupling reaction of ezetimibe with 3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-one hydrazone hydrochloride in the presence of cerium (IV) ammonium sulfate in an acidic medium. The quenching effect of ezetimibe on the fluorescence of excess cerous ions is measured at the emission wavelength, λem, of 345 nm with the excitation wavelength, λex, of 296 nm. Factors affecting the reaction were carefully studied and optimized. The second method, for olmesartan medoxomil, is based on measuring the native fluorescence intensity of olmesartan medoxomil in methanol at λem = 360 nm with λex = 286 nm. Regression plots revealed good linear relationships in the assay limits of 10-120 and 8-112 g/ml for ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil, respectively. The validity of the methods was assessed according to the United States Pharmacopeya guidelines. Statistical analysis of the results exposed good Student's t-test and F-ratio values. The introduced methods were successfully applied to the analysis of ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil in drug substances and drug products as well as in the presence of their degradation products.

  17. Two-Photon Fluorescence Anisotropy Imaging to Elucidate the Dynamics and the Stability of Immobilized Proteins.

    PubMed

    Orrego, Alejandro H; García, Carolina; Mancheño, José M; Guisán, Jose M; Lillo, M Pilar; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-01-28

    Time/spatial-resolved fluorescence determines anisotropy values of supported-fluorescent proteins through different immobilization chemistries, evidencing some of the molecular mechanisms that drive the stabilization of proteins at the interfaces with solid surfaces. Fluorescence anisotropy imaging provides a normalized protein mobility parameter that serves as a guide to study the effect of different immobilization parameters (length and flexibility of the spacer arm and multivalency of the protein-support interaction) on the final stability of the supported proteins. Proteins in a more constrained environment correspond to the most thermostable ones, as was shown by thermal inactivation studies. This work contributes to explain the experimental evidence found with conventional methods based on observable measurements; thus this advanced characterization technique provides reliable molecular information about the immobilized proteins with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. Such information has been very useful for fabricating highly stable heterogeneous biocatalysts with high interest in industrial developments. PMID:26716569

  18. Principles and equations for measuring and interpreting protein stability: From monomer to tetramer.

    PubMed

    Bedouelle, Hugues

    2016-02-01

    The ability to measure the thermodynamic stability of proteins with precision is important for both academic and applied research. Such measurements rely on mathematical models of the protein denaturation profile, i.e. the relation between a global protein signal, corresponding to the folding states in equilibrium, and the variable value of a denaturing agent, either heat or a chemical molecule, e.g. urea or guanidinium hydrochloride. In turn, such models rely on a handful of physical laws: the laws of mass action and conservation, the law that relates the protein signal and concentration, and the one that relates stability and denaturant value. So far, equations have been derived mainly for the denaturation profiles of homomeric proteins. Here, we review the underlying basic physical laws and show in detail how to derive model equations for the unfolding equilibria of homomeric or heteromeric proteins up to trimers and potentially tetramers, with or without folding intermediates, and give full demonstrations. We show that such equations cannot be derived for pentamers or higher oligomers except in special degenerate cases. We expand the method to signals that do not correspond to extensive protein properties. We review and expand methods for uncovering hidden intermediates of unfolding. Finally, we review methods for comparing and interpreting the thermodynamic parameters that derive from stability measurements for cognate wild-type and mutant proteins. This work should provide a robust theoretical basis for measuring the stability of complex proteins. PMID:26607240

  19. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  20. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 A), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 A. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions. PMID:20550422

  1. Correlations between internal mobility and stability of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, K; Wagner, G; Richarz, R; Braun, W

    1980-10-01

    The recent work is surveyed which leads to the suggestions that the conformation of globular proteins in solution corresponds to a dynamic ensemble of rapidly interconverting spatial structures, that clusters of hydrophobic amino acid side chains have an important role in the architecture of protein molecules, and that mechanistic aspects of protein denaturation can be correlated with internal mobility seen in the native conformation. These conclusions resulted originally from high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of aromatic ring mobility, exchange of interior amide protons and thermal denaturation of the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and a group of related proteins. Various new approaches to further characterize proteins in solution have now been taken and preliminary data are presented. These include computer graphics to outline hydrophobic clusters in globular protein structures, high resolution 1H-NMR experiments at variable hydrostatic pressure and 13C-NMR relaxation measurements. At the present early stage of these new investigations it appears that the hydrophobic cluster model for globular proteins is compatible with the data obtained. PMID:7248460

  2. The Critical Role of N- and C-Terminal Contact in Protein Stability and Folding of a Family 10 Xylanase under Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Amit; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna; Ghosh, Amit; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Reddy, Vanga S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stabilization strategies adopted by proteins under extreme conditions are very complex and involve various kinds of interactions. Recent studies have shown that a large proportion of proteins have their N- and C-terminal elements in close contact and suggested they play a role in protein folding and stability. However, the biological significance of this contact remains elusive. Methodology In the present study, we investigate the role of N- and C-terminal residue interaction using a family 10 xylanase (BSX) with a TIM-barrel structure that shows stability under high temperature, alkali pH, and protease and SDS treatment. Based on crystal structure, an aromatic cluster was identified that involves Phe4, Trp6 and Tyr343 holding the N- and C-terminus together; this is a unique and important feature of this protein that might be crucial for folding and stability under poly-extreme conditions. Conclusion A series of mutants was created to disrupt this aromatic cluster formation and study the loss of stability and function under given conditions. While the deletions of Phe4 resulted in loss of stability, removal of Trp6 and Tyr343 affected in vivo folding and activity. Alanine substitution with Phe4, Trp6 and Tyr343 drastically decreased stability under all parameters studied. Importantly, substitution of Phe4 with Trp increased stability in SDS treatment. Mass spectrometry results of limited proteolysis further demonstrated that the Arg344 residue is highly susceptible to trypsin digestion in sensitive mutants such as ΔF4, W6A and Y343A, suggesting again that disruption of the Phe4-Trp6-Tyr343 (F-W-Y) cluster destabilizes the N- and C-terminal interaction. Our results underscore the importance of N- and C-terminal contact through aromatic interactions in protein folding and stability under extreme conditions, and these results may be useful to improve the stability of other proteins under suboptimal conditions. PMID:20596542

  3. Rigidity versus flexibility: the dilemma of understanding protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Karshikoff, Andrey; Nilsson, Lennart; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2015-10-01

    The role of fluctuations in protein thermostability has recently received considerable attention. In the current literature a dualistic picture can be found: thermostability seems to be associated with enhanced rigidity of the protein scaffold in parallel with the reduction of flexible parts of the structure. In contradiction to such arguments it has been shown by experimental studies and computer simulation that thermal tolerance of a protein is not necessarily correlated with the suppression of internal fluctuations and mobility. Both concepts, rigidity and flexibility, are derived from mechanical engineering and represent temporally insensitive features describing static properties, neglecting that relative motion at certain time scales is possible in structurally stable regions of a protein. This suggests that a strict separation of rigid and flexible parts of a protein molecule does not describe the reality correctly. In this work the concepts of mobility/flexibility versus rigidity will be critically reconsidered by taking into account molecular dynamics calculations of heat capacity and conformational entropy, salt bridge networks, electrostatic interactions in folded and unfolded states, and the emerging picture of protein thermostability in view of recently developed network theories. Last, but not least, the influence of high temperature on the active site and activity of enzymes will be considered. PMID:26074325

  4. Effect of Oxygen-containing Functional Groups on Protein Stability in Ionic Liquid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Megan B.; Holbrey, John D.; Spear, Scott K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Rogers, Robin D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) to provide an environment of increased stability for biomolecules has been studied. Serum albumin is an inexpensive, widely available protein that contributes to the overall colloid osmotic blood pressure within the vascular system. Albumin is used in the present study as a marker of biomolecular stability in the presence of various ILs in a range of concentrations. The incorporation of hydroxyl functionality into the methylimidazolium-based cation leads to increased protein stability detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroic (CD) spectrometry.

  5. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  6. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides.

    PubMed

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-03-15

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  7. Stabilizing and destabilizing protein surfactant-based foams in the presence of a chemical surfactant: Effect of adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huazhen; Le Brun, Anton P; Agyei, Dominic; Shen, Wei; Middelberg, Anton P J; He, Lizhong

    2016-01-15

    Stimuli-responsive protein surfactants promise alternative foaming materials that can be made from renewable sources. However, the cost of protein surfactants is still higher than their chemical counterparts. In order to reduce the required amount of protein surfactant for foaming, we investigated the foaming and adsorption properties of the protein surfactant, DAMP4, with addition of low concentrations of the chemical surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The results show that the small addition of SDS can enhance foaming functions of DAMP4 at a lowered protein concentration. Dynamic surface tension measurements suggest that there is a synergy between DAMP4 and SDS which enhances adsorption kinetics of DAMP4 at the initial stage of adsorption (first 60s), which in turn stabilizes protein foams. Further interfacial properties were revealed by X-ray reflectometry measurements, showing that there is a re-arrangement of adsorbed protein-surfactant layer over a long period of 1h. Importantly, the foaming switchability of DAMP4 by metal ions is not affected by the presence of SDS, and foams can be switched off by the addition of zinc ions at permissive pH. This work provides fundamental knowledge to guide formulation using a mixture of protein and chemical surfactants towards a high performance of foaming at a low cost. PMID:26433478

  8. Analysis of soybean root proteins affected by gibberellic acid treatment under flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myeong Won; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Flooding is a serious abiotic stress for soybean because it restricts growth and reduces grain yields. To investigate the effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on soybean under flooding stress, root proteins were analyzed using a gel-free proteomic technique. Proteins were extracted from the roots of 4-days-old soybean seedlings exposed to flooding stress in the presence and absence of exogenous GA3 for 2 days. A total of 307, 324, and 250 proteins were identified from untreated, and flooding-treated soybean seedlings without or with GA3, respectively. Secondary metabolism- and cell-related proteins, and proteins involved in protein degradation/synthesis were decreased by flooding stress; however, the levels of these proteins were restored by GA3 supplementation under flooding. Fermentation- and cell wall-related proteins were not affected by GA3 supplementation. Furthermore, putative GA-responsive proteins, which were identified by the presence of a GA-responsive element in the promoter region, were less abundant by flooding stress; however, these proteins were more abundant by GA3 supplementation under flooding. Taken together, these results suggest that GA3 affects the abundance of proteins involved in secondary metabolism, cell cycle, and protein degradation/synthesis in soybeans under flooding stress. PMID:24702262

  9. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    PubMed

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative-ISIR-005-that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. PMID:26644359

  10. “DNA Binding Region” of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress. PMID:26884712

  11. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  12. Cloning and mutational analysis of the gamma gene from Azotobacter vinelandii defines a new family of proteins capable of metallocluster binding and protein stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Luis M; Rangaraj, Priya; Homer, Mary J; Roberts, Gary P; Ludden, Paul W

    2002-04-19

    Dinitrogenase is a heterotetrameric (alpha(2)beta(2)) enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium and contains the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) at its active site. Certain Azotobacter vinelandii mutant strains unable to synthesize FeMo-co accumulate an apo form of dinitrogenase (lacking FeMo-co), with a subunit composition alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2), which can be activated in vitro by the addition of FeMo-co. The gamma protein is able to bind FeMo-co or apodinitrogenase independently, leading to the suggestion that it facilitates FeMo-co insertion into the apoenzyme. In this work, the non-nif gene encoding the gamma subunit (nafY) has been cloned, sequenced, and found to encode a NifY-like protein. This finding, together with a wealth of knowledge on the biochemistry of proteins involved in FeMo-co and FeV-co biosyntheses, allows us to define a new family of iron and molybdenum (or vanadium) cluster-binding proteins that includes NifY, NifX, VnfX, and now gamma. In vitro FeMo-co insertion experiments presented in this work demonstrate that gamma stabilizes apodinitrogenase in the conformation required to be fully activable by the cofactor. Supporting this conclusion, we show that strains containing mutations in both nafY and nifX are severely affected in diazotrophic growth and extractable dinitrogenase activity when cultured under conditions that are likely to occur in natural environments. This finding reveals the physiological importance of the apodinitrogenase-stabilizing role of which both proteins are capable. The relationship between the metal cluster binding capabilities of this new family of proteins and the ability of some of them to stabilize an apoenzyme is still an open matter. PMID:11823455

  13. Mathematics, thermodynamics, and modeling to address ten common misconceptions about protein structure, folding, and stability.

    PubMed

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative phenomena in undergraduate classes. In the process of learning about these topics, students often form incorrect ideas. For example, by learning about protein folding in the context of protein synthesis, students may come to an incorrect conclusion that once synthesized on the ribosome, a protein spends its entire cellular life time in its fully folded native confirmation. This is clearly not true; proteins are dynamic structures that undergo both local fluctuations and global unfolding events. To prevent and address such misconceptions, basic concepts of protein science can be introduced in the context of simple mathematical models and hands-on explorations of publicly available data sets. Ten common misconceptions about proteins are presented, along with suggestions for using equations, models, sequence, structure, and thermodynamic data to help students gain a deeper understanding of basic concepts relating to protein structure, folding, and stability. PMID:20810950

  14. Mode of heparin attachment to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite affects its interaction with bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Goonasekera, Chandhi S; Jack, Kevin S; Bhakta, Gajadhar; Rai, Bina; Luong-Van, Emma; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon M; Cooper-White, Justin J; Grøndahl, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Heparin has a high affinity for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), which is a key growth factor in bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate how the rate of release of BMP-2 was affected when adsorbed to nanosized hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles functionalized with heparin by different methods. Heparin was attached to the surface of HAP, either via adsorption or covalent coupling, via a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) layer. The chemical composition of the particles was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elemental microanalysis, revealing that the heparin grafting densities achieved were dependent on the curing temperature used in the fabrication of APTES-modified HAP. Comparable amounts of heparin were attached via both covalent coupling and adsorption to the APTES-modified particles, but characterization of the particle surfaces by zeta potential and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements indicated that the conformation of the heparin on the surface was dependent on the method of attachment, which in turn affected the stability of heparin on the surface. The release of BMP-2 from the particles after 7 days in phosphate-buffered saline found that 31% of the loaded BMP-2 was released from the APTES-modified particles with heparin covalently attached, compared to 16% from the APTES-modified particles with the heparin adsorbed. Moreover, when heparin was adsorbed onto pure HAP, it was found that the BMP-2 released after 7 days was 5% (similar to that from unmodified HAP). This illustrates that by altering the mode of attachment of heparin to HAP the release profile and total release of BMP-2 can be manipulated. Importantly, the BMP-2 released from all the heparin particle types was found by the SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation assay to be biologically active. PMID:26474791

  15. Insight into factors affecting the presence, degree, and temporal stability of fluorescence intensification on ZnO nanorod ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Jiang, Ruibin; Coia, Heidi; Choi, Daniel S.; Alabanza, Anginelle; Chang, Jae Young; Wang, Jianfang; Hahm, Jong-In

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a combined experimental and simulation study identifying the key physical and optical parameters affecting the presence and degree of fluorescence intensification measured on zinc oxide nanorod (ZnO NR) ends. Previously, we reported on the highly localized, intensified, and prolonged fluorescence signal measured on the NR ends, termed fluorescence intensification on NR ends (FINE). As a step towards understanding the mechanism of FINE, the present study aims to provide insight into the unique optical phenomenon of FINE through experimental and simulation approaches and to elucidate the key factors affecting the occurrence, degree, and temporal stability of FINE. Specifically, we examined the effect of the length, width, and growth orientation of single ZnO NRs on the NR-enhanced biomolecular emission profile after decorating the NR surfaces with different amounts and types of fluorophore-coupled protein molecules. We quantitatively and qualitatively profiled the biomolecular fluorescence signal from individual ZnO NRs as a function of both position along the NR long axis and time. Regardless of the physical dimensions and growth orientations of the NRs, we confirmed the presence of FINE in all ZnO NRs tested by using a range of protein concentrations. We also showed that the manifestation of FINE is not dependent on the spectroscopic signatures of the fluorophores employed. We further observed that the degree of FINE is dependent on the length of the NR with longer NRs showing increased levels of FINE. We also demonstrated that vertically oriented NRs exhibit much stronger fluorescence intensity at the NR ends and a higher level of FINE than the laterally oriented NRs. Additionally, we employed finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods to understand the experimental outcomes and to promote our understanding of the mechanism of FINE. Particularly, we utilized the electrodynamic simulations to examine both near-field and far-field emission

  16. Investigating the linkage between disease-causing amino acid variants and their effect on protein stability and binding.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunhui; Alexov, Emil

    2016-02-01

    Single amino acid variations (SAV) occurring in human population result in natural differences between individuals or cause diseases. It is well understood that the molecular effect of SAV can be manifested as changes of the wild type characteristics of the corresponding protein, among which are the protein stability and protein interactions. Typically the effect of SAV on protein stability and interactions was assessed via the changes of the wild type folding and binding free energies. However, in terms of SAV affecting protein functionally and disease susceptibility, one wants to know to what extend the wild type function is perturbed by the SAV. Here it is demonstrated that relative, rather than the absolute, change of the folding and binding free energy serves as a good indicator for SAV association with disease. Using HumVar as a source for disease-causing SAV and experimentally determined free energy changes from ProTherm and SKEMPI databases, correlation coefficients (CC) between the disease index (Pd) and relative folding (Ppr,f) and binding (Ppr,b) probability indexes, respectively, was achieved. The obtained CCs demonstrated the applicability of the proposed approach and it served as good indicator for SAV association with disease. PMID:26650512

  17. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  18. Molecular insights into the stabilization of protein-protein interactions with small molecule: The FKBP12-rapamycin-FRB case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, Shilpi; Pieraccini, Stefano; De Gonda, Riccardo; Conti, Simone; Sironi, Maurizio

    2013-11-01

    Targetting protein-protein interactions is a challenging task in drug discovery process. Despite the challenges, several studies provided evidences for the development of small molecules modulating protein-protein interactions. Here we consider a typical case of protein-protein interaction stabilization: the complex between FKBP12 and FRB with rapamycin. We have analyzed the stability of the complex and characterized its interactions at the atomic level by performing free energy calculations and computational alanine scanning. It is shown that rapamycin stabilizes the complex by acting as a bridge between the two proteins; and the complex is stable only in the presence of rapamycin.

  19. Characterization of milk proteins-lutein complexes and the impact on lutein chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the interaction of WPI (whey protein isolate) and SC (sodium caseinate) with hydrophobic lutein was investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) as well as fluorescence. The effects on lutein's chemical stability were also examined. The decrease of turbidity of lutein suggested that lutein's aqueous solubility was improved after binding with milk proteins. CD analysis indicated lutein had little impact on the secondary structures of both proteins. Different preparation methods have significant impacts on the binding constant. Fluorescence results indicated that WPI and SC interact with lutein by hydrophobic contacts. Milk proteins have protective effects on lutein against oxidation and decomposition, and SC showed better capability in protecting lutein from oxidation than WPI during 16 days storage. The lutein's chemical stability was increased with increasing of proteins concentration. The results indicated that milk proteins may act as effective carriers for lipophilic nutraceuticals. PMID:26830565

  20. Identifying Protein Stabilizing Ligands Using GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Subhashchandra; Haque, Inamul; Degner, Nick; Kornilayev, Boris; Bomhoff, Gregory; Hodges, Jacob; Khorassani, Ara-Azad; Katayama, Hiroo; Morris, Jill; Kelly, Jeffery; Seed, John; Fisher, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past five years, it has become increasingly apparent to researchers that the initial promise and excitement of using gene replacement therapies to ameliorate folding diseases are still far from being broadly or easily applicable. Because a large number of human diseases are protein folding diseases (~30 to 50%), many researchers now realize that more directed approaches to target and reverse the fundamental misfolding reactions preceding disease are highly feasible and offer the potential of developing more targeted drug therapies. This is also true with a large number of so called “orphan protein folding diseases”. The development of a broad-based general screening array method using the chaperonin as a detection platform will enable us to screen large chemical combinatorial libraries for specific ligands against the elusive transient, primary reactions that often lead to protein misfolding. This development will provide a highly desirable tool for the pharmaceutical, academic and medical professions. PMID:19802819

  1. A Genomewide RNAi Screen for Genes That Affect the Stability, Distribution and Function of P Granules in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Updike, Dustin L.; Strome, Susan

    2009-01-01

    P granules are non-membrane-bound organelles found in the germ-line cytoplasm throughout Caenorhabditis elegans development. Like their “germ granule” counterparts in other animals, P granules are thought to act as determinants of the identity and special properties of germ cells, properties that include the unique ability to give rise to all tissues of future generations of an organism. Therefore, understanding how P granules work is critical to understanding how cellular immortality and totipotency are retained, gained, and lost. Here we report on a genomewide RNAi screen in C. elegans, which identified 173 genes that affect the stability, localization, and function of P granules. Many of these genes fall into specific classes with shared P-granule phenotypes, allowing us to better understand how cellular processes such as protein degradation, translation, splicing, nuclear transport, and mRNA homeostasis converge on P-granule assembly and function. One of the more striking phenotypes is caused by the depletion of CSR-1, an Argonaute associated with an endogenous siRNA pathway that functions in the germ line. We show that CSR-1 and two other endo-siRNA pathway members, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase EGO-1 and the helicase DRH-3, act to antagonize RNA and P-granule accumulation in the germ line. Our findings strengthen the emerging view that germ granules are involved in numerous aspects of RNA metabolism, including an endo-siRNA pathway in germ cells. PMID:19805813

  2. Nanocomplexation between curcumin and soy protein isolate: influence on curcumin stability/bioaccessibility and in vitro protein digestibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei-Ping; Li, Bian-Sheng; Tang, Chuan-He

    2015-04-01

    The complexation of nanoparticles in unheated and heated (at 75-95°) soy protein isolate (SPI) with curcumin and the effects on curcumin stability/bioaccessibility and in vitro protein digestibility were investigated. The nanoparticles did not display noticeable changes in size and morphology upon nanocomplexation with curcumin, except their surface hydrophobicity. The encapsulation efficiency of curcumin progressively decreased with increasing initial curcumin concentration in the dispersion, while the load amount linearly increased. The solubility of curcumin in water was enhanced by the complexation above 98000-fold (vs free curcumin in water). The formation of the nanocomplexes considerably improved the storage stability of curcumin. In vitro simulated digestion experiments indicated that the complexation also improved the bioaccessibility of curcumin; the bioaccessibility was greatly impaired by hydrolysis-induced protein aggregation. Addtionally, the nanocomplexation significantly improved the in vitro protein digestibility of both unheated and heated SPI. PMID:25779681

  3. Novel microscale approaches for easy, rapid determination of protein stability in academic and commercial settings

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Crispin G.; Wanner, Randy; Johnson, Christopher M.; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Winter, Gerhard; Duhr, Stefan; Baaske, Philipp; Ferguson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Chemical denaturant titrations can be used to accurately determine protein stability. However, data acquisition is typically labour intensive, has low throughput and is difficult to automate. These factors, combined with high protein consumption, have limited the adoption of chemical denaturant titrations in commercial settings. Thermal denaturation assays can be automated, sometimes with very high throughput. However, thermal denaturation assays are incompatible with proteins that aggregate at high temperatures and large extrapolation of stability parameters to physiological temperatures can introduce significant uncertainties. We used capillary-based instruments to measure chemical denaturant titrations by intrinsic fluorescence and microscale thermophoresis. This allowed higher throughput, consumed several hundred-fold less protein than conventional, cuvette-based methods yet maintained the high quality of the conventional approaches. We also established efficient strategies for automated, direct determination of protein stability at a range of temperatures via chemical denaturation, which has utility for characterising stability for proteins that are difficult to purify in high yield. This approach may also have merit for proteins that irreversibly denature or aggregate in classical thermal denaturation assays. We also developed procedures for affinity ranking of protein–ligand interactions from ligand-induced changes in chemical denaturation data, and proved the principle for this by correctly ranking the affinity of previously unreported peptide–PDZ domain interactions. The increased throughput, automation and low protein consumption of protein stability determinations afforded by using capillary-based methods to measure denaturant titrations, can help to revolutionise protein research. We believe that the strategies reported are likely to find wide applications in academia, biotherapeutic formulation and drug discovery programmes. PMID:25262836

  4. Concentration-dependent changes in apparent diffusion coefficients as indicator for colloidal stability of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Katharina Christin; Göbel, Mathias; Schwab, Marie-Luise; Schermeyer, Marie-Therese; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-10

    The colloidal stability of a protein solution during downstream processing, formulation, and storage is a key issue for the biopharmaceutical production process. Thus, knowledge about colloidal solution characteristics, such as the tendency to form aggregates or high viscosity, at various processing conditions is of interest. This work correlates changes in the apparent diffusion coefficient as a parameter of protein interactions with observed protein aggregation and dynamic viscosity of the respective protein samples. For this purpose, the diffusion coefficient, the protein phase behavior, and the dynamic viscosity in various systems containing the model proteins α-lactalbumin, lysozyme, and glucose oxidase were studied. Each of these experiments revealed a wide range of variations in protein interactions depending on protein type, protein concentration, pH, and the NaCl concentration. All these variations showed to be mirrored by changes in the apparent diffusion coefficient in the respective samples. Whereas stable samples with relatively low viscosity showed an almost linear dependence, the deviation from the concentration-dependent linearity indicated both an increase in the sample viscosity and probability of protein aggregation. This deviation of the apparent diffusion coefficient from concentration-dependent linearity was independent of protein type and solution properties for this study. Thus, this single parameter shows the potential to act as a prognostic tool for colloidal stability of protein solutions. PMID:27421911

  5. Evolutionary Dynamics on Protein Bi-stability Landscapes can Potentially Resolve Adaptive Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Sikosek, Tobias; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Chan, Hue Sun

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that some proteins exist in two alternative native-state conformations. It has been proposed that such bi-stable proteins can potentially function as evolutionary bridges at the interface between two neutral networks of protein sequences that fold uniquely into the two different native conformations. Under adaptive conflict scenarios, bi-stable proteins may be of particular advantage if they simultaneously provide two beneficial biological functions. However, computational models that simulate protein structure evolution do not yet recognize the importance of bi-stability. Here we use a biophysical model to analyze sequence space to identify bi-stable or multi-stable proteins with two or more equally stable native-state structures. The inclusion of such proteins enhances phenotype connectivity between neutral networks in sequence space. Consideration of the sequence space neighborhood of bridge proteins revealed that bi-stability decreases gradually with each mutation that takes the sequence further away from an exactly bi-stable protein. With relaxed selection pressures, we found that bi-stable proteins in our model are highly successful under simulated adaptive conflict. Inspired by these model predictions, we developed a method to identify real proteins in the PDB with bridge-like properties, and have verified a clear bi-stability gradient for a series of mutants studied by Alexander et al. (Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 2009, 106:21149–21154) that connect two sequences that fold uniquely into two different native structures via a bridge-like intermediate mutant sequence. Based on these findings, new testable predictions for future studies on protein bi-stability and evolution are discussed. PMID:23028272

  6. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Hamada, Mayako; Sato, Nobuko; Toramoto, Iyo

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP) targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs). Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA), with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance. PMID:26562023

  7. Chaperonin-Based Biolayer Interferometry To Assess the Kinetic Stability of Metastable, Aggregation-Prone Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lea, Wendy A; O'Neil, Pierce T; Machen, Alexandra J; Naik, Subhashchandra; Chaudhri, Tapan; McGinn-Straub, Wesley; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew T; Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R; Khar, Karen R; Karanicolas, John; Fisher, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    Stabilizing the folded state of metastable and/or aggregation-prone proteins through exogenous ligand binding is an appealing strategy for decreasing disease pathologies caused by protein folding defects or deleterious kinetic transitions. Current methods of examining binding of a ligand to these marginally stable native states are limited because protein aggregation typically interferes with analysis. Here, we describe a rapid method for assessing the kinetic stability of folded proteins and monitoring the effects of ligand stabilization for both intrinsically stable proteins (monomers, oligomers, and multidomain proteins) and metastable proteins (e.g., low Tm) that uses a new GroEL chaperonin-based biolayer interferometry (BLI) denaturant pulse platform. A kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm is generated by exposing a target protein, immobilized on a BLI biosensor, to increasing denaturant concentrations (urea or GuHCl) in a pulsatile manner to induce partial or complete unfolding of the attached protein population. Following the rapid removal of the denaturant, the extent of hydrophobic unfolded/partially folded species that remains is detected by an increased level of GroEL binding. Because this kinetic denaturant pulse is brief, the amplitude of binding of GroEL to the immobilized protein depends on the duration of the exposure to the denaturant, the concentration of the denaturant, wash times, and the underlying protein unfolding-refolding kinetics; fixing all other parameters and plotting the GroEL binding amplitude versus denaturant pulse concentration result in a kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm. When folding osmolytes or stabilizing ligands are added to the immobilized target proteins before and during the denaturant pulse, the diminished population of unfolded/partially folded protein manifests as a decreased level of GroEL binding and/or a marked shift in these kinetically controlled denaturation profiles to higher denaturant

  8. Mechanical stability of multidomain proteins and novel mechanical clamps.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-06-01

    We estimate the size of mechanostability for 318 multidomain proteins which are single-chain and contain up to 1021 amino acids. We predict existence of novel types of mechanical clamps in which interdomain contacts play an essential role. Mechanical clamps are structural regions which are the primary source of a protein's resistance to pulling. Among these clamps there is one that opposes tensile stress due to two domains swinging apart. This movement strains and then ruptures the contacts that hold the two domains together. Another clamp also involves tensile stress but it originates from an immobilization of a structural region by a surrounding knot-loop (without involving any disulfide bonds). Still another mechanism involves shear between helical regions belonging to two domains. We also consider the amyloid-prone cystatin C which provides an example of a two-chain 3D domain-swapped protein. We predict that this protein should withstand remarkably large stress, perhaps of order 800 pN, when inducing a shearing strain. The survey is generated through molecular dynamics simulations performed within a structure-based coarse grained model. PMID:21465555

  9. The ubiquitin–protein ligase Itch regulates p73 stability

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Mario; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Munarriz, Eliana; Green, Douglas R; Liu, Yun-Cai; Vousden, Karen H; Cesareni, Gianni; Melino, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    p73, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors, is upregulated in response to DNA damage, inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Besides indications that this p73 response is post-transcriptional, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms of p73 protein degradation. Ubiquitination and proteasomal-dependent degradation of p53 are regulated by its transcriptional target MDM2. However, unlike p53, p73 binds to, but is not degraded by, MDM2. Here we describe the binding of p73 to Itch, a Hect ubiquitin–protein ligase. Itch selectively binds and ubiquitinates p73 but not p53; this results in the rapid proteasome-dependent degradation of p73. Upon DNA damage Itch itself is downregulated, allowing p73 protein levels to rise and thus interfere with p73 function. In conclusion, we have identified a key mechanism in the control of p73 protein levels both in normal as well as in stress conditions. PMID:15678106

  10. Stability and Control Harmony in Approach and Landing. [analysis of factors affecting flight characteristics at low airspeeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. B.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the factors which affect stability and control harmony in approach and landing is made to obtain a clearer understanding of the proper relationship, the trade-offs involved, and to show how limits in stability and control harmony are established for advanced aircraft. Factors which influence stability and control harmony include the longitudinal short period response of the aircraft and the level of several pitch control characteristics including control power, control sensitivity, and control feel. At low stability levels for advanced aircraft, less conventional control techniques such as DLC are needed to improve harmony and some form of stability augmentation must be provided to improve precession of flight path control and reduce pilot work load.

  11. Impact of pH on molecular structure and surface properties of lentil legumin-like protein and its application as foam stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Jarpa-Parra, M; Bamdad, F; Tian, Z; Zeng, Hongbo; Temelli, Feral; Chen, L

    2015-08-01

    The capacity of a protein to form and stabilize foams and emulsions depends on its structural characteristics and its physicochemical properties. The structural properties of lentil legumin-like protein including molecular weight, hydrodynamic size, surface charge and hydrophobicity, and conformation were studied in relation to its air-water interfacial behaviors. Kinetics study suggested that the foaming stability was closely related to the surface conformation of the protein that strongly affected adsorption and re-organization of the protein layer at the air-water interface. Foams prepared at neutral pH showed dense and strong networks at the interface, where combination of the α-helix secondary structure, medium hydrodynamic molecular size, and balance between solubility/hydrophobicity all contributed to the formation of such strong protein network at the interface. At pH 5.0, the protein formed a dense and thick network composed of randomly aggregated protein particles at the air-water interface. Whereas at pH 3.0, the unordered structure increased intra-protein flexibility producing a less compact and relaxed interface that reduces elasticity modulus with time and reduced foam resistance against collapse. This research revealed that lentil legumin-like protein could form long-life foams at mild acidic and neutral pH. The potential for use of lentil protein as a novel foaming plant-based stabilizer is demonstrated in food and non-food applications where stable, long-life foams are required. PMID:26005930

  12. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis. PMID:27281343

  13. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis. PMID:27281343

  14. Prediction of salt effects on protein phase behavior by HIC retention and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Kai; Großhans, Steffen; Schütz, Juliane; Suhm, Susanna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry it is mandatory to know and ensure the correct protein phase state as a critical quality attribute in every process step. Unwanted protein precipitation or crystallization can lead to column, pipe or filter blocking. In formulation, the formation of aggregates can even be lethal when injected into the patient. The typical methodology to illustrate protein phase states is the generation of protein phase diagrams. Commonly, protein phase behavior is shown in dependence of protein and precipitant concentration. Despite using high-throughput methods for the generation of phase diagrams, the time necessary to reach equilibrium is the bottleneck. Faster methods to predict protein phase behavior are desirable. In this study, hydrophobic interaction chromatography retention times were correlated to crystal size and form. High-throughput thermal stability measurements (melting and aggregation temperatures), using an Optim(®)2 system, were successfully correlated to glucose isomerase stability. By using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and thermal stability determinations, glucose isomerase conformational and colloidal stability were successfully predicted for different salts in a specific pH range. PMID:27268946

  15. Factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide; fenoterol hydrobromide pressurized-metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ninbovorl, Jenjira; Sawatdee, Somchai; Srichana, Teerapol

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide and fenoterol hydrobromide in a pressurized-metered dose inhaler (pMDI). A factorial design was applied to investigate the effects of three parameters (propellant, water, and ethanol) on the performance of 27 designed formulations of a solution-based pMDI. The formulations that contained a hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant lower than 72% v/v and an ethanol concentration higher than 27% v/v remained as clear solutions. Nine formulations that contained the HFA propellant higher than 74% v/v precipitated. The results indicated that it was not only the HFA propellant content of the formulations that was related to the formulation instability but also ethanol content. Only six formulations from the 18 formulations, that did not precipitate, produced drug contents that were within the acceptable range (80-120%). These six formulations generated aerosols with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of approximately 2 μm with a fine particle fraction (FPF; particle size, <6.4 μm) between 45% and 52%. The MMAD and FPF did not change significantly after 6 months of storage (P > 0.05). PMID:23975571

  16. Arch coordination does not affect the stability in class III orthognathic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Ok; Ryu, Dong-Mok; Lee, Deok-Won; Jung, Jae Hoon

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the arch coordination manifested by preorthodontics had an effect on the short-term stability after orthognathic surgery by evaluating the B point, menton, overjet, and overbite. The subjects were 10 healthy adult female and male Koreans (mean age, 24.9 years) with insufficient arch coordination and 10 healthy adult female and male Koreans (mean age, 22 years) with sufficient arch coordination. All subjects had sagittal split ramus osteotomy with 1-piece maxillary Le Fort I surgery with/without genioplasty done from the same practitioner at Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong from 2009 to 2011. All arch widths of the maxilla and mandible were measured. Cephalometric tracings of the subjects were made of the presurgical and postsurgical period with a follow-up at 3 months. Relapse was measured according to cephalometric tracing changes using the V-ceph Cephalometric Analysis Software version 5.5(Osstem, Seoul, South Korea). Insufficient arch coordination did not definitively affect the overall treatment outcome. There was significant difference in the horizontal dimensions of the mandible (vertical plane to point B, overjet) in the study group. The study group showed instability in orthodontic factors, whereas skeletal factors were stable. Vertical dimensions (horizontal plane to point B, horizontal plane to menton, overbite) were not statistically significant. PMID:24220471

  17. Influence of Miscibility of Protein-Sugar Lyophilizates on Their Storage Stability.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Maarten A; Nethercott, Matthew J; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees; Frijlink, Henderik W; Munson, Eric J; Pikal, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    For sugars to act as successful stabilizers of proteins during lyophilization and subsequent storage, they need to have several characteristics. One of them is that they need to be able to form interactions with the protein and for that miscibility is essential. To evaluate the influence of protein-sugar miscibility on protein storage stability, model protein IgG was lyophilized in the presence of various sugars of different molecular weight. By comparing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy relaxation times of both protein and sugar on two different timescales, i.e., (1)H T1 and (1)H T1ρ, miscibility of the two components was established on a 2-5- and a 20-50-nm length scale, respectively, and related to protein storage stability. Smaller sugars showed better miscibility with IgG, and the tendency of IgG to aggregate during storage was lower for smaller sugars. The largest sugar performed worst and was phase separated on both length scales. Additionally, shorter protein (1)H T1 relaxation times correlated with higher aggregation rates during storage. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay showed overlapping effects of aggregation and chemical degradation and did not correspond as well with the miscibility. Because of the small scale at which miscibility was determined (2-5 nm) and the size of the protein domains (∼2.5 × 2.5 × 5 nm), the miscibility data give an indirect measure of interaction between protein and sugar. This reduced interaction could be the result of steric hindrance, providing a possible explanation as to why smaller sugars show better miscibility and storage stability with the protein. PMID:27301753

  18. Identification of Destabilizing and Stabilizing Mutations of Ste2p, a G Protein Coupled Receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Jeffrey; Danial, Shairy Azmy; Connelly, Sara M.; Naider, Fred; Dumont, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of mutations affecting the stabilities of transmembrane proteins is useful for enhancing the suitability of proteins for structural characterization and for identification of determinants of membrane protein stability. We have pursued a strategy for identification of stabilized variants of the yeast α-factor receptor Ste2p. Because it was not possible to screen directly for mutations providing thermal stabilization, we first isolated a battery of destabilized temperature sensitive variants, based on loss of signaling function and decreased binding of fluorescent ligand, then screened for intragenic second-site suppressors of these phenotypes. The initial screens recovered singly and multiply substituted mutations conferring temperature sensitivity throughout the predicted transmembrane helices of the receptor. All of the singly-substituted variants exhibit decreases in cell-surface expression. We then screened randomly mutagenized libraries of clones expressing temperature sensitive variants for second-site suppressors that restore elevated levels of binding sites for fluorescent ligand. To determine whether any of these were global suppressors, and thus likely stabilizing mutations, they were combined with different temperature sensitive mutations. Eight of the suppressors exhibited the ability to reverse the defect in ligand binding of multiple temperature sensitive mutations. Combining certain of the suppressors into a single allele resulted in greater levels of suppression than was seen with either suppressor alone. Solubilized receptors containing suppressor mutations in the absence of temperature sensitive mutations exhibit a reduced tendency to aggregate during immobilization on an affinity matrix. Several of the suppressors also exhibit allele-specific behavior indicative of specific intramolecular interactions in the receptor. PMID:25647246

  19. In vivo protein stabilization based on fragment complementation and a split GFP system

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Stina; Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Szczepankiewicz, Olga; Frohm, Birgitta; Linse, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Protein stabilization was achieved through in vivo screening based on the thermodynamic linkage between protein folding and fragment complementation. The split GFP system was found suitable to derive protein variants with enhanced stability due to the correlation between effects of mutations on the stability of the intact chain and the effects of the same mutations on the affinity between fragments of the chain. PGB1 mutants with higher affinity between fragments 1 to 40 and 41 to 56 were obtained by in vivo screening of a library of the 1 to 40 fragments against wild-type 41 to 56 fragments. Colonies were ranked based on the intensity of green fluorescence emerging from assembly and folding of the fused GFP fragments. The DNA from the brightest fluorescent colonies was sequenced, and intact mutant PGB1s corresponding to the top three sequences were expressed, purified, and analyzed for stability toward thermal denaturation. The protein sequence derived from the top fluorescent colony was found to yield a 12 °C increase in the thermal denaturation midpoint and a free energy of stabilization of -8.7 kJ/mol at 25 °C. The stability rank order of the three mutant proteins follows the fluorescence rank order in the split GFP system. The variants are stabilized through increased hydrophobic effect, which raises the free energy of the unfolded more than the folded state; as well as substitutions, which lower the free energy of the folded more than the unfolded state; optimized van der Waals interactions; helix stabilization; improved hydrogen bonding network; and reduced electrostatic repulsion in the folded state. PMID:21041669

  20. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  1. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  2. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P.; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  3. Biophysical stability of hyFc fusion protein with regards to buffers and various excipients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Yeul; Kim, Nam Ah; Lim, Dae Gon; Eun, Chang-yong; Choi, Donghoon; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A novel non-cytolytic hybrid Fc (hyFc) with an intact Ig structure without any mutation in the hyFc region, was developed to construct a long-acting agonistic protein. The stability of interleukin-7 (IL-7) fused with the hyFc (GXN-04) was evaluated to develop early formulations. Various biophysical methods were utilized and three different buffer systems with various pH ranges were investigated including histidine-acetate, sodium citrate, and tris buffers. Various excipients were incorporated into the systems to obtain optimum protein stability. Two evident thermal transitions were observed with the unfolding of IL-7 and hyFc. The Tm and ΔH increased with pH, suggesting increased conformational stability. Increased Z-average size with PDI and decreased zeta potential with pH increase, with the exception of tris buffer, showed aggregation issues. Moreover, tris buffer at higher pH showed aggregation peaks from DLS. Non-ionic surfactants were effective against agitation by outcompeting protein molecules for hydrophobic surfaces. Sucrose and sorbitol accelerated protein aggregation during agitation, but exhibited a protective effect against oxidation, with preferential exclusion favoring the compact states of GXN-04. The stability of GXN-04 was varied by basal buffers and excipients, hence the buffers and excipients need to be evaluated carefully to achieve the maximum stability of proteins. PMID:26851357

  4. Preparation of iron bound succinylated milk protein concentrate and evaluation of its stability.

    PubMed

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Bajaj, Rajesh Kumar; Tomar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Major problems associated with the fortification of soluble iron salts include chemical reactivity and incompatibility with other components. Milk protein concentrate (MPC) are able to bind significant amount of iron due to the presence of both casein and whey protein. MPC in its native state possess very poor solubility, therefore, succinylated derivatives of MPC (succ. MPC) were also used for the preparation of protein-iron complex. Preparation of the complex involved centrifugation (to remove insoluble iron), ultrafiltration (to remove unbound iron) and lyophilisation (to attain in dry form). Iron binding ability of MPC enhanced significantly (P<0.05) upon succinylation. Stability of bound iron from both varieties of complexes was monitored under different conditions encountered during processing. Higher stability (P<0.05) of bound iron was observed in succ. MPC-iron complex than native protein complex. This method could be adopted for the production of stable iron enriched protein, an organic iron source. PMID:26593557

  5. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  6. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  7. Using tryptophan fluorescence to measure the stability of membrane proteins folded in liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, C. Preston; Fleming, Karen G.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the thermodynamic stability of folded membrane proteins require methods for monitoring their conformation that are free of experimental artifacts. For tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments with membrane proteins folded into liposomes, there are two significant sources of artifacts: the first is light scattering by the liposomes; the second is the nonlinear relationship of some tryptophan spectral parameters with changes in protein conformation. Both of these sources of error can interfere with the method of determining the reversible equilibrium thermodynamic stability of proteins using titrations of chemical denaturants. Here, we present methods to manage light scattering by liposomes for tryptophan emission experiments and to properly monitor tryptophan spectra as a function of protein conformation. Our methods are tailored to the titrations of membrane proteins using common chemical denaturants. One of our recommendations is to collect and analyze the right-angle light scattering peak that occurs around the excitation wave- length in a fluorescence experiment. Another recommendation is to use only those tryptophan spectral parameters that are linearly proportional to the protein conformational population. We show that other commonly used spectral commonly used parameters lead to errors in protein stability measurements. PMID:21333792

  8. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue; Niu, Li; Chi, Qijin

    2015-11-18

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimensional (2D) material for nanomedicine, but its stability in biological environments is limited. Systematic probing on the binding of proteins to CCG is currently lacking. Herein, we report a comprehensive study on the interactions between blood proteins and stabilized CCG (sCCG). CCG nanosheets are functionalized by monolayers of perylene leading to significant improvement in their resistance to electrolyte salts and long-term stability, but retain their core structural characteristics. Five types of model human blood proteins including human fibrinogen, γ-globulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), insulin, and histone are tested. The main driving forces for blood protein binding involve the π-π interacations between the π-plane of sCCG and surface aromatic amonic acid (sAA) residues of proteins. Several key binding parameters including the binding amount, Hill coefficient, and binding constant are determined. Through a detailed analysis of key controlling factors, we conclude that the protein binding to sCCG is determined mainly by the protein size, the number, and the density of the sAA. PMID:26413807

  9. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Schöttler, S; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K; Mailänder, V

    2016-03-14

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake. PMID:26804616

  10. Effect of xanthan/enzyme-modified guar gum mixtures on the stability of whey protein isolate stabilized fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Chityala, Pavan Kumar; Khouryieh, Hanna; Williams, Kevin; Conte, Eric

    2016-12-01

    The effect of xanthan gum (XG) and enzyme-modified guar (EMG) gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of 2wt% whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20%v/v fish oil was investigated. EMG was obtained by hydrolyzing native guar gum using α-galactosidase enzyme. At higher gum concentrations (0.2 and 0.3wt%), the viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/EMG gum mixtures was significantly higher (P<0.05) of all emulsions. Increasing concentrations (0-0.3wt%) of XG/EMG gum mixtures did not affect the droplet size of emulsions. Microstructure images revealed decreased flocculation at higher concentrations. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation measurements indicated a slower rate of oxidation in emulsions containing XG/EMG gum mixtures, compared to XG, guar (GG), and XG/GG gum mixtures. These results indicate that XG/EMG gum mixtures can be used in O/W emulsions to increase physical and oxidative stabilities of polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods. PMID:27374540

  11. Contribution of polar groups in the interior of a protein to the conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Takano, K; Yamagata, Y; Yutani, K

    2001-04-17

    It has been generally believed that polar residues are usually located on the surface of protein structures. However, there are many polar groups in the interior of the structures in reality. To evaluate the contribution of such buried polar groups to the conformational stability of a protein, nonpolar to polar mutations (L8T, A9S, A32S, I56T, I59T, I59S, A92S, V93T, A96S, V99T, and V100T) in the interior of a human lysozyme were examined. The thermodynamic parameters for denaturation were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter, and the crystal structures were analyzed by X-ray crystallography. If a polar group had a heavy energy cost to be buried, a mutant protein would be remarkably destabilized. However, the stability (Delta G) of the Ala to Ser and Val to Thr mutant human lysozymes was comparable to that of the wild-type protein, suggesting a low-energy penalty of buried polar groups. The structural analysis showed that all polar side chains introduced in the mutant proteins were able to find their hydrogen bond partners, which are ubiquitous in protein structures. The empirical structure-based calculation of stability change (Delta Delta G) [Takano et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12698--12708] revealed that the mutant proteins decreased the hydrophobic effect contributing to the stability (Delta G(HP)), but this destabilization was recovered by the hydrogen bonds newly introduced. The present study shows the favorable contribution of polar groups with hydrogen bonds in the interior of protein molecules to the conformational stability. PMID:11294653

  12. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  13. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  14. Factors affecting the stability and conformation of Locusta migratoria apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Weers, P M; Kay, C M; Oikawa, K; Wientzek, M; Van der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O

    1994-03-29

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, represents the only full-length apolipoprotein whose three-dimensional structure has been solved. In the present study, spectroscopic methods have been employed to investigate the effects of deglycosylation (via endoglycosidase F treatment) and complexation with lipid on the stability and conformation of this protein. Addition of isolated lipid-free apoLp-III to sonicated vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) resulted in the formation of relatively uniform disklike complexes with an average Strokes diameter of 13.5 nm. Flotation equilibrium experiments conducted in the analytical ultracentrifuge revealed a particle molecular mass of 588 500 Da. Chemical cross-linking and compositional analysis of apoLp-III.DMPC complexes indicated five apoLp-III molecules per disk and an overall DMPC:apoLp-III molar ratio of 122:1. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of apoLp-III samples suggested a loss of alpha-helical structure upon deglycosylation, while complexation with DMPC did not significantly alter the helix content (estimated to be > 75%). Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the apoLp-III tryptophan fluorescence emission maximum was blue-shifted from 347 to 332 and 321 nm upon deglycosylation and complexation with DMPC, respectively. In quenching experiments with native apoLp-III, tryptophan residues were shielded from the positively charged quencher, CsCl. Increased exposure to KI, CsCl, and acrylamide was observed upon deglycosylation, whereas complexation with DMPC yielded lower Ksv values for KI and acrylamide and an increased value for CsCl versus native lipid-free apoLp-III. In guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies monitored by CD or fluorescence, native, lipid-free apoLp-III displayed a denaturation midpoint of 0.60 M, and delta GDH2O = 5.37 kcal/mol was calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8142360

  15. Feeding modality affects muscle protein deposition by influencing protein synthesis, but not degradation in muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs can serve as dual-use models for nutrition research in animal agriculture and biomedical fields. To determine how feeding modality by either intermittent bolus or continuous schedule affects protein anabolism and catabolism, neonatal pigs (n = 6/group, 9-d-old) were overnight fasted (F...

  16. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  17. High-throughput thermal scanning for protein stability: making a good technique more robust.

    PubMed

    Seabrook, Shane A; Newman, Janet

    2013-08-12

    We present a high-throughput approach to help define experimental formulations that enhance protein stability, which is based on differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). The method involves defining the thermal stability of a protein against a screen of 13 buffer systems, systematically sampling pH from 5.0 to 9.0 at high and low salt concentrations, using both redundancy and extensive controls to make the method robust. The screen allows rapid determination of a suitable base formulation for protein samples, and is particularly useful for difficult samples: those that are rapidly degraded or cannot be sufficiently concentrated for downstream analyses. Data obtained from three samples in this assay illustrate the vastly different values for thermal stability that can be obtained from different formulations. This approach is simple to interpret and reliable enough that it has been implemented as a service through the Collaborative Crystallisation Centre (C3). PMID:23710551

  18. Coassembly of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Proteins into Nanotubes with Uniform Length and Improved Physical Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Eiben, Sabine; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Using tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins (TMVcp) from both sources of the plant and bacterial expression systems as building blocks, we demonstrate here a coassembly strategy of TMV nanotubes in the presence of RNA. Specifically, plant-expressed cp (cpp) efficiently dominates the genomic RNA encapsidation to determine the length of assembled TMV nanotubes, whereas the incorporated Escherichia coli-expressed cp (cpec) improves the physical stability of TMV nanotubes by introducing disulfide bonds between the interfaces of subunits. We expect this coassembly strategy can be expanded to other virus nanomaterials to obtain desired properties based on rationally designed protein-RNA and protein-protein interfacial interactions. PMID:27188634

  19. Metabolic rate, latitude and thermal stability of roosts, but not phylogeny, affect rewarming rates of bats.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Allyson K; Webber, Quinn M R; Baloun, Dylan E; McGuire, Liam P; Muise, Kristina A; Coté, Damien; Tinkler, Samantha; Willis, Craig K R

    2016-10-01

    Torpor is an adaptation that allows many endotherms to save energy by abandoning the energetic cost of maintaining elevated body temperatures. Although torpor reduces energy consumption, the metabolic heat production required to arouse from torpor is energetically expensive and can impact the overall cost of torpor. The rate at which rewarming occurs can impact the cost of arousal, therefore, factors influencing rewarming rates of heterothermic endotherms could have influenced the evolution of rewarming rates and overall energetic costs of arousal from torpor. Bats are a useful taxon for studies of ecological and behavioral correlates of rewarming rate because of the widespread expression of heterothermy and ecological diversity across the >1200 known species. We used a comparative analysis of 45 bat species to test the hypothesis that ecological, behavioral, and physiological factors affect rewarming rates. We used basal metabolic rate (BMR) as an index of thermogenic capacity, and local climate (i.e., latitude of geographic range), roost stability and maximum colony size as ecological and behavioral predictors of rewarming rate. After controlling for phylogeny, high BMR was associated with rapid rewarming while species that live at higher absolute latitudes and in less thermally stable roosts also rewarmed most rapidly. These patterns suggests that some bat species rely on passive rewarming and social thermoregulation to reduce costs of rewarming, while others might rely on thermogenic capacity to maintain rapid rewarming rates in order to reduce energetic costs of arousal. Our results highlight species-specific traits associated with maintaining positive energy balance in a wide range of climates, while also providing insight into possible mechanisms underlying the evolution of heterothermy in endotherms. PMID:27317837

  20. Beta-Barrel Scaffold of Fluorescent Proteins: Folding, Stability and Role in Chromophore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the current view of the interaction between the β-barrel scaffold of fluorescent proteins and their unique chromophore located in the internal helix. The chromophore originates from the polypeptide chain and its properties are influenced by the surrounding protein matrix of the β-barrel. On the other hand, it appears that a chromophore tightens the β-barrel scaffold and plays a crucial role in its stability. Furthermore, the presence of a mature chromophore causes hysteresis of protein unfolding and refolding. We survey studies measuring protein unfolding and refolding using traditional methods as well as new approaches, such as mechanical unfolding and reassembly of truncated fluorescent proteins. We also analyze models of fluorescent protein unfolding and refolding obtained through different approaches, and compare the results of protein folding in vitro to co-translational folding of a newly synthesized polypeptide chain. PMID:23351712

  1. Insights into stabilization of a viral protein cage in templating complex nanoarchitectures: roles of disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Chen, Huiling; Ma, Lingzhi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Meng, Chun; Zhang, Xian-En; Wang, Qiangbin

    2014-02-12

    As a typical protein nanostructure, virus-based nanoparticle (VNP) of simian virus 40 (SV40), which is composed of pentamers of the major capsid protein of SV40 (VP1), has been successfully employed in guiding the assembly of different nanoparticles (NPs) into predesigned nanostructures with considerable stability. However, the stabilization mechanism of SV40 VNP remains unclear. Here, the importance of inter-pentamer disulfide bonds between cysteines in the stabilization of quantum dot (QD)-containing VNPs (VNP-QDs) is comprehensively investigated by constructing a series of VP1 mutants of cysteine to serine. Although the presence of a QD core can greatly enhance the assembly and stability of SV40 VNPs, disulfide bonds are vital to stability of VNP-QDs. Cysteine at position 9 (C9) and C104 contribute most of the disulfide bonds and play essential roles in determining the stability of SV40 VNPs as templates to guide assembly of complex nanoarchitectures. These results provide insightful clues to understanding the robustness of SV40 VNPs in organizing suprastructures of inorganic NPs. It is expected that these findings will help guide the future design and construction of protein-based functional nanostructures. PMID:24014233

  2. Arginine Depletion by Arginine Deiminase Does Not Affect Whole Protein Metabolism or Muscle Fractional Protein Synthesis Rate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C.; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  3. Boosting protein stability with the computational design of β-sheet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo Nam; Jacobs, Timothy M; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-03-01

    β-sheets often have one face packed against the core of the protein and the other facing solvent. Mutational studies have indicated that the solvent-facing residues can contribute significantly to protein stability, and that the preferred amino acid at each sequence position is dependent on the precise structure of the protein backbone and the identity of the neighboring amino acids. This suggests that the most advantageous methods for designing β-sheet surfaces will be approaches that take into account the multiple energetic factors at play including side chain rotamer preferences, van der Waals forces, electrostatics, and desolvation effects. Here, we show that the protein design software Rosetta, which models these energetic factors, can be used to dramatically increase protein stability by optimizing interactions on the surfaces of small β-sheet proteins. Two design variants of the β-sandwich protein from tenascin were made with 7 and 14 mutations respectively on its β-sheet surfaces. These changes raised the thermal midpoint for unfolding from 45°C to 64°C and 74°C. Additionally, we tested an empirical approach based on increasing the number of potential salt bridges on the surfaces of the β-sheets. This was not a robust strategy for increasing stability, as three of the four variants tested were unfolded. PMID:26701383

  4. Stabilization of tubulin mRNA by inhibition of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Z Y; Brandhorst, B P

    1988-01-01

    An increased level of unpolymerized tubulin caused by depolymerization of microtubules in sea urchin larvae resulted in a rapid loss of tubulin mRNA, which was prevented by nearly complete inhibition of protein synthesis. Results of an RNA run-on assay indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis does not alter tubulin gene transcription. Analysis of the decay of tubulin mRNA in embryos in which RNA synthesis was inhibited by actinomycin D indicated that inhibition of protein synthesis prevents the destabilization of tubulin mRNA. The effect was similar whether mRNA was maintained on polysomes in the presence of emetine or anisomycin or displaced from the polysomes in the presence of puromycin or pactamycin; thus, the stabilization of tubulin mRNA is not dependent on the state of the polysomes after inhibition of protein synthesis. Even after tubulin mRNA declined to a low level after depolymerization of microtubules, it could be rescued by treatment of embryos with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Tubulin mRNA could be induced to accumulate prematurely in gastrulae but not in plutei if protein synthesis was inhibited, an observation that is indicative of the importance of the autogenous regulation of tubulin mRNA stability during embryogenesis. Possible explanations for the role of protein synthesis in the control of mRNA stability are discussed. Images PMID:3211150

  5. Stability of silk and collagen protein materials in space.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Raja, Waseem K; An, Bo; Tokareva, Olena; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and silk materials, in neat forms and as silica composites, were flown for 18 months on the International Space Station [Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)-6] to assess the impact of space radiation on structure and function. As natural biomaterials, the impact of the space environment on films of these proteins was investigated to understand fundamental changes in structure and function related to the future utility in materials and medicine in space environments. About 15% of the film surfaces were etched by heavy ionizing particles such as atomic oxygen, the major component of the low-Earth orbit space environment. Unexpectedly, more than 80% of the silk and collagen materials were chemically crosslinked by space radiation. These findings are critical for designing next-generation biocompatible materials for contact with living systems in space environments, where the effects of heavy ionizing particles and other cosmic radiation need to be considered. PMID:24305951

  6. Stability of Silk and Collagen Protein Materials in Space

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Raja, Waseem K.; An, Bo; Tokareva, Olena; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and silk materials, in neat forms and as silica composites, were flown for 18 months on the International Space Station [Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE)-6] to assess the impact of space radiation on structure and function. As natural biomaterials, the impact of the space environment on films of these proteins was investigated to understand fundamental changes in structure and function related to the future utility in materials and medicine in space environments. About 15% of the film surfaces were etched by heavy ionizing particles such as atomic oxygen, the major component of the low-Earth orbit space environment. Unexpectedly, more than 80% of the silk and collagen materials were chemically crosslinked by space radiation. These findings are critical for designing next-generation biocompatible materials for contact with living systems in space environments, where the effects of heavy ionizing particles and other cosmic radiation need to be considered. PMID:24305951

  7. Heat Shock Protein 70.1 (Hsp70.1) Affects Neuronal Cell Fate by Regulating Lysosomal Acid Sphingomyelinase*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hong; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Yamashima, Tetsumori

    2014-01-01

    The inducible expression of heat shock protein 70.1 (Hsp70.1) plays cytoprotective roles in its molecular chaperone function. Binding of Hsp70 to an endolysosomal phospholipid, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), has been recently shown to stabilize lysosomal membranes by enhancing acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity in cancer cells. Using the monkey experimental paradigm, we have reported that calpain-mediated cleavage of oxidized Hsp70.1 causes neurodegeneration in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1), whereas expression of Hsp70.1 in the motor cortex without calpain activation contributes to neuroprotection. However, the molecular mechanisms of the lysosomal destabilization/stabilization determining neuronal cell fate have not been elucidated. To elucidate whether regulation of lysosomal ASM could affect the neuronal fate, we analyzed Hsp70.1-BMP binding and ASM activity by comparing the motor cortex and the CA1. We show that Hsp70.1 being localized at the lysosomal membrane, lysosomal lipid BMP levels, and the lipid binding domain of Hsp70.1 are crucial for Hsp70.1-BMP binding. In the postischemic motor cortex, Hsp70.1 being localized at the lysosomal membrane could bind to BMP without calpain activation and decreased BMP levels, resulting in increasing ASM activity and lysosomal stability. However, in the postischemic CA1, calpain activation and a concomitant decrease in the lysosomal membrane localization of Hsp70.1 and BMP levels may diminish Hsp70.1-BMP binding, resulting in decreased ASM activity and lysosomal rupture with leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol. A TUNEL assay revealed the differential neuronal vulnerability between the CA1 and the motor cortex. These results suggest that regulation of ASM activation in vivo by Hsp70.1-BMP affects lysosomal stability and neuronal survival or death after ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25074941

  8. Subcellular modulation of protein VlsE stability and folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tai, Jonathan; Dave, Kapil; Hahn, Vincent; Guzman, Irisbel; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The interior of a cell interacts differently with proteins than a dilute buffer because of a wide variety of macromolecules, chaperones, and osmolytes that crowd and interact with polypeptide chains. We compare folding of fluorescent constructs of protein VlsE among three environments inside cells. The nucleus increases the stability of VlsE relative to the cytoplasm, but slows down folding kinetics. VlsE is also more stable in the endoplasmic reticulum, but unlike PGK, tends to aggregate there. Although fluorescent-tagged VlsE and PGK show opposite stability trends from in vitro to the cytoplasm, their trends from cytoplasm to nucleus are similar. PMID:27129718

  9. A protein's conformational stability is an immunologically dominant factor: evidence that free-energy barriers for protein unfolding limit the immunogenicity of foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Nagatomo, Satoko; Oda, Kenji; So, Takanori; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi

    2010-10-01

    Foreign protein Ags are incorporated into APCs and then degraded by endosomal proteases. The peptides are then mounted on MHC II molecules on the surfaces of APCs. The T cell-triggering response and, therefore, the immune response, were suggested to be governed by the degree of conformational stability of the foreign protein Ags. However, there is little evidence that a protein's conformational stability is an immunologically dominant factor. In this study, we show that a protein has a threshold of conformational stability to prevent the immunogenicity of foreign proteins. Inverse and linear correlations were found between the amount of IgG production against lysozymes and the free-energy change for the unfolding of lysozymes, based on the correlation between the free-energy changes of the protein unfolding and the amount of IgG production against lysozymes with different stabilities in mice using hen egg white lysozyme derivatives and mutant mouse lysozymes, in which the sequence between 107 and 116 is replaced with that of hen egg white lysozyme, which can produce autoantibodies in mice. Interestingly, the thresholds of free-energy changes for both lysozymes to prevent their immunogenicity were almost identical (21-23 kcal/mol). To confirm the results, we also showed that the cross-linking of Phl p 7, in which intact Phl p 7 has stability greater than ∼20 kcal/mol under physiological conditions, induced minimal IgG production in mice, whereas intact Phl p 7 was antigenic. From the above results, we suggest that protein conformational stability was an immunologically dominant factor. PMID:20817878

  10. In vivo architectonic stability of fully de novo designed protein-only nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Tatkiewicz, Witold; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; Álamo, Patricia; Xu, Zhikun; Casanova, Isolda; Corchero, José Luis; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Cedano, Juan; Daura, Xavier; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramón

    2014-05-27

    The fully de novo design of protein building blocks for self-assembling as functional nanoparticles is a challenging task in emerging nanomedicines, which urgently demand novel, versatile, and biologically safe vehicles for imaging, drug delivery, and gene therapy. While the use of viruses and virus-like particles is limited by severe constraints, the generation of protein-only nanocarriers is progressively reachable by the engineering of protein-protein interactions, resulting in self-assembling functional building blocks. In particular, end-terminal cationic peptides drive the organization of structurally diverse protein species as regular nanosized oligomers, offering promise in the rational engineering of protein self-assembling. However, the in vivo stability of these constructs, being a critical issue for their medical applicability, needs to be assessed. We have explored here if the cross-molecular contacts between protein monomers, generated by end-terminal cationic peptides and oligohistidine tags, are stable enough for the resulting nanoparticles to overcome biological barriers in assembled form. The analyses of renal clearance and biodistribution of several tagged modular proteins reveal long-term architectonic stability, allowing systemic circulation and tissue targeting in form of nanoparticulate material. This observation fully supports the value of the engineered of protein building blocks addressed to the biofabrication of smart, robust, and multifunctional nanoparticles with medical applicability that mimic structure and functional capabilities of viral capsids. PMID:24708510

  11. Intra-protein hydrogen bonding is dynamically stabilized by electronic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Li L.; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Qing G.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2009-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out to study dynamical stability of intra-protein hydrogen bonds based on two set of atomic charges, the standard AMBER charge and the polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The latter is derived from quantum mechanical calculation for protein in solution using a recently developed molecular fractionation with conjugate caps-Poisson-Boltzmann (MFCC-PB) approach and therefore includes electronic polarization effect of the protein at native structure. MD simulations are performed for a number of benchmark proteins containing helix and/or beta sheet secondary structures. The computational result shows that occupancy percentage of hydrogen bonds averaged over simulation time, as well as the number of hydrogen bonds as a function of simulation time, is consistently higher under PPC than AMBER charge. In particular, some intra-protein hydrogen bonds are found broken during MD simulation using AMBER charge but they are stable using PPC. The breaking of some intra-protein hydrogen bonds in AMBER simulation is responsible for deformation or denaturing of some local structures of proteins during MD simulation. The current study provides strong evidence that hydrogen bonding is dynamically more stable using PPC than AMBER charge, highlighting the stabilizing effect of electronic polarization on protein structure.

  12. Benchmarking membrane protein detergent stability for improving throughput of high-resolution X-ray structures.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Yo; Newstead, Simon; Hu, Nien-Jen; Alguel, Yilmaz; Nji, Emmanuel; Beis, Konstantinos; Yashiro, Shoko; Lee, Chiara; Leung, James; Cameron, Alexander D; Byrne, Bernadette; Iwata, So; Drew, David

    2011-01-12

    Obtaining well-ordered crystals is a major hurdle to X-ray structure determination of membrane proteins. To facilitate crystal optimization, we investigated the detergent stability of 24 eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane proteins, predominantly transporters, using a fluorescent-based unfolding assay. We have benchmarked the stability required for crystallization in small micelle detergents, as they are statistically more likely to lead to high-resolution structures. Using this information, we have been able to obtain well-diffracting crystals for a number of sodium and proton-dependent transporters. By including in the analysis seven membrane proteins for which structures are already known, AmtB, GlpG, Mhp1, GlpT, EmrD, NhaA, and LacY, it was further possible to demonstrate an overall trend between protein stability and structural resolution. We suggest that by monitoring membrane protein stability with reference to the benchmarks described here, greater efforts can be placed on constructs and conditions more likely to yield high-resolution structures. PMID:21220112

  13. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  14. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  15. Soil-Structural Stability as Affected by Clay Mineralogy, Soil Texture and Polyacrylamide Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-structural stability (expressed in terms of aggregate stability and pore size distribution) depends on (i) soil inherent properties, (ii) extrinsic condition prevailing in the soil that may vary temporally and spatially, and (iii) addition of soil amendments. Different soil management practices...

  16. SOIL AGGREGATE STABILITY AS AFFECTED BY LONG-TERM TILLAGE AND CLAY TYPE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil aggregate stability and dispersivity depend on clay mineralogy. However, little is known about the effect of soil mineralogy on soil crustability for long-term cultivated soil. The effect of long-term tillage on aggregate stability was the objective of our study. More than 20 soil samples chara...

  17. Are herbage yield and yield stability affected by plant species diversity in sown pasture mixtures?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A tenet of plant biodiversity theory in grasslands is that increased diversity contributes to the stability of ecosystems. In managed grasslands, such as pastures, greater stability of herbage production as a result of increased plant species diversity would be beneficial. In this study, I combined ...

  18. New index for the stability of a type I collagen affected by hydrophobic environment.

    PubMed

    Nezu, Takashi; Morikawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kaori; Saitoh, Setsuo; Taira, Masayuki; Terada, Yoshihiro; Araki, Yoshima

    2007-05-01

    Effects of hydrophobic environment adjusted by various alcohols on the structural stability of calfskin collagen (CSC) were studied to elucidate the nature of collagen-monomer interaction in adhesion. The stability of CSC in aqueous alcohol solutions was represented by its denaturation temperature, Td, measured by DSC. The hydrophobicity of the alcohol solutions was quantified with their specific dielectric constants, epsilon(r), calculated from their concentrations. The effect of each alcohol to stabilize or destabilize CSC was evaluated by the initial slope of each Td vs. epsilon(r) plot, denoted as -(dTd/d epsilon(r))ini and termed as stabilization power. Results showed that a hydrophobic environment with a smaller epsilon(r) lowered the stabilization power. Stabilization power ranged from -3 (strong destabilization) for phenol (epsilon(r) =12) to +0.3 (weak stabilization) for glycerol (epsilon(r)=47). In view of the encouraging results obtained in this study, the new index was therefore helpful in predicting the effects of new dental materials of known epsilon(r) values on the stability of dentinal collagen. PMID:17694747

  19. Gel-free proteomic analysis of soybean root proteins affected by calcium under flooding stress

    PubMed Central

    Oh, MyeongWon; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Soybean is sensitive to flooding stress and exhibits reduced growth under flooding conditions. To better understand the flooding-responsive mechanisms of soybean, the effect of exogenous calcium on flooding-stressed soybeans was analyzed using proteomic technique. An increase in exogenous calcium levels enhanced soybean root elongation and suppressed the cell death of root tip under flooding stress. Proteins were extracted from the roots of 4-day-old soybean seedlings exposed to flooding stress without or with calcium for 2 days and analyzed using gel-free proteomic technique. Proteins involved in protein degradation/synthesis/posttranslational modification, hormone/cell wall metabolisms, and DNA synthesis were decreased by flooding stress; however, their reductions were recovered by calcium treatment. Development, lipid metabolism, and signaling-related proteins were increased in soybean roots when calcium was supplied under flooding stress. Fermentation and glycolysis-related proteins were increased in response to flooding; however, these proteins were not affected by calcium supplementation. Furthermore, urease and copper chaperone proteins exhibited similar profiles in 4-day-old untreated soybeans and 4-day-old soybeans exposed to flooding for 2 days in the presence of calcium. These results suggest that calcium might affect the cell wall/hormone metabolisms, protein degradation/synthesis, and DNA synthesis in soybean roots under flooding stress. PMID:25368623

  20. Preferential interactions between protein and arginine: effects of arginine on tertiary conformational and colloidal stability of protein solution.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lili; Chen, Yan; Liao, Jie; Zheng, Xianxian; Yin, Zongning

    2015-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the preferential binding behavior of arginine to protein as well as the impact of arginine on the conformational and colloidal stability of protein solution. Physical stabilities of model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA), were investigated by fluorescence-based and dynamic light scattering techniques in the absence and presence of arginine. We investigated the interactions between arginine and tryptophan or tyrosine residues by conducting solubility and fluorescence studies of two amino acid derivatives, N-acetyl-l-tryptophanamide (NATA) and N-acetyl-l-tyrosinamide (NAYA), in arginine solutions. The result showed that arginine preferentially bond to the aromatic amino acids of proteins mainly through hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals' forces, while the binding constant K of arginine with BSA and OVA at 298K was 41.92 and 5.77L/mol, respectively. The fluorescence quenching, the decreased fluorescence lifetime and the red-shifted ANS peak position revealed that arginine perturbed the local environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. We also found the attenuated electrostatic repulsion among BSA and OVA molecules after adding arginine. These findings provided strong evidence that arginine possessed negative effects on tertiary conformational and colloidal stability of BSA and OVA during the preferential binding process. PMID:25529432

  1. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-05-01

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  2. A WD-repeat protein stabilizes ORC binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhen; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Geng, Yijie; Zheng, Ruiping; Chakraborty, Arindam; Freeman, Brian; Wang, Fei; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2010-10-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC) plays critical roles in the initiation of DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. In metazoans, ORC associates with origin DNA during G1 and with heterochromatin in postreplicated cells. However, what regulates the binding of ORC to chromatin is not understood. We have identified a highly conserved, leucine-rich repeats and WD40 repeat domain-containing protein 1 (LRWD1) or ORC-associated (ORCA) in human cells that interacts with ORC and modulates chromatin association of ORC. ORCA colocalizes with ORC and shows similar cell-cycle dynamics. We demonstrate that ORCA efficiently recruits ORC to chromatin. Depletion of ORCA in human primary cells and embryonic stem cells results in loss of ORC association to chromatin, concomitant reduction of MCM binding, and a subsequent accumulation in G1 phase. Our results suggest ORCA-mediated association of ORC to chromatin is critical to initiate preRC assembly in G1 and chromatin organization in post-G1 cells. PMID:20932478

  3. Effect of Hofmeister anions and protein concentration on the activity and stability of some immobilized made-independent dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Bovara, R.; Pasta, P.; Cremonesi, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of several factors on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, both free and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, was investigated. Enzymes were immobilized under different conditions including various degrees of matrix activation, variable amounts of protein, in the presence, or in the absence of, additives (coenzymes, dithiothreitol, salts). Activity recovery was in general satisfactorily high with 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, low with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and markedly linked to the concentration of immobilized protein with alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case the advantageous stabilizing effect of high enzyme concentrations was notably diminished by the paralled decrease of the effectiveness factor. The effect of high concentrations of anions of the Hofmeister series was examined. It was found that 1M phosphate and 0.5M sulfate dramatically stabilize both free and immobilized enzymes against inactivation by temperature and urea. Km values of apolar substrates were considerably lowered by the two anions while Km values of polar substrates were not affected. In some cases Vmax values also were influenced by high concentrations of these anions. The present results appear of interest particularly in view of enzyme utilization for analytical as well as for preparative purposes. (Refs. 13).

  4. Protection of mice against pandemic H1N1 influenza virus challenge after immunization with baculovirus-expressed stabilizing peptide fusion hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eunji; Cho, Yonggeun; Choi, Jung-Ah; Choi, YoungJoo; Park, Pil-Gu; Park, Eunsun; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Hyeja; Kim, Jongsun; Lee, Jae Myun; Song, Manki

    2015-02-01

    Current influenza vaccines are produced in embryonated chicken eggs. However, egg-based vaccines have various problems. To address these problems, recombinant protein vaccines have been developed as new vaccine candidates. Unfortunately, recombinant proteins frequently encounter aggregation and low stability during their biogenesis. It has been previously demonstrated that recombinantly expressed proteins can be greatly stabilized with high solubility by fusing stabilizing peptide (SP) derived from the C-terminal acidic tail of human synuclein (ATS). To investigate whether SP fusion proteins can induce protective immunity in mice, we produced influenza HA and SP fusion protein using a baculovirus expression system. In in vitro tests, SP-fused recombinant HA1 (SP-rHA1) was shown to be more stable than recombinant HA1 (rHA1). Mice were immunized intramuscularly with baculovirus-expressed rHA1 protein or SP-rHA1 protein (2 μg/mouse) formulated with aluminum hydroxide. Antibody responses were determined by ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition assay. We observed that SP-rHA1 immunization elicited HA-specific antibody responses that were comparable to rHA1 immunization. These results indicate that fusion of SP to rHA1 does not negatively affect the immunogenicity of the vaccine candidate. Therefore, it is possible to apply SP fusion technology to develop stable recombinant protein vaccines with high solubility. PMID:25394603

  5. Immobilization of the N-terminal helix stabilizes prefusion paramyxovirus fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, Albert S; Poor, Taylor A; Abriata, Luciano A; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Lamb, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family. PIV5 fusion and entry are mediated by the coordinated action of the receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), and the fusion protein (F). Upon triggering by HN, F undergoes an irreversible ATP- and pH-independent conformational change, going down an energy gradient from a metastable prefusion state to a highly stable postfusion state. Previous studies have highlighted key conformational changes in the F-protein refolding pathway, but a detailed understanding of prefusion F-protein metastability remains elusive. Here, using two previously described F-protein mutations (S443D or P22L), we examine the capacity to modulate PIV5 F stability and the mechanisms by which these point mutants act. The S443D mutation destabilizes prefusion F proteins by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the base of the F-protein globular head. The introduction of a P22L mutation robustly rescues destabilized F proteins through a local hydrophobic interaction between the N-terminal helix and a hydrophobic pocket. Prefusion stabilization conferred by a P22L-homologous mutation is demonstrated in the F protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus of a different genus, suggesting a conserved stabilizing structural element within the paramyxovirus family. Taken together, the available data suggest that movement of the N-terminal helix is a necessary early step for paramyxovirus F-protein refolding and presents a novel target for structure-based drug design. PMID:27335462

  6. Soluble expression and stability enhancement of transcription factors using 30Kc19 cell-penetrating protein.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jina; Park, Hee Ho; Park, Ju Hyun; Lee, Hong Jai; Rhee, Won Jong; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Transcription factors have been studied as an important drug candidate. Ever since the successful generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), there has been tremendous interest in reprogramming transcription factors. Because of the safety risks involved in a virus-based approach, many researchers have been trying to deliver transcription factors using nonintegrating materials. Thus, delivery of transcription factors produced as recombinant proteins in E. coli was proposed as an alternative method. However, the low level of soluble expression and instability of such recombinant proteins are potential barriers. We engineered a Bombyx mori 30Kc19 protein as a fusion partner for transcription factors to overcome those problems. We have previously reported that 30Kc19 protein can be produced as a soluble form in E. coli and has a cell-penetrating property and a protein-stabilizing effect. Transcription factors fused with 30Kc19 (Oct4-30Kc19, Sox2-30Kc19, c-Myc-30Kc19, L-Myc-30Kc19, and Klf4-30Kc19) were produced as recombinant proteins. Interestingly, Oct4 and L-Myc were expressed as a soluble form by conjugating with 30Kc19 protein, whereas Oct4 alone and L-Myc alone aggregated. The 30Kc19 protein also enhanced the stability of transcription factors both in vitro and in cells. In addition, 30Kc19-conjugated transcription factors showed rapid delivery into cells and transcriptional activity significantly increased. Overall, 30Kc19 protein conjugation simultaneously enhanced soluble expression, stability, and transcriptional activity of transcription factors. We propose that the conjugation with 30Kc19 protein is a novel approach to solve the technical bottleneck of gene regulation using transcription factors. PMID:26668030

  7. Changes in the physical properties, solubility, and heat stability of milk protein concentrates prepared from partially acidified milk.

    PubMed

    Eshpari, H; Tong, P S; Corredig, M

    2014-12-01

    A limiting factor in using milk protein concentrates (MPC) as a high-quality protein source for different food applications is their poor reconstitutability. Solubilization of colloidal calcium phosphate (CCP) from casein micelles during membrane filtration (e.g., through acidification) may affect the structural organization of these protein particles and consequently the rehydration and functional properties of the resulting MPC powder. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acidification of milk by glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) before ultrafiltration (UF) on the composition, physical properties, solubility, and thermal stability (after reconstitution) of MPC powders. The MPC samples were manufactured in duplicate, either by UF (65% protein, MPC65) or by UF followed by diafiltration (80% protein, MPC80), using pasteurized skim milk, at either the native milk pH (~pH 6.6) or at pH 6.0 after addition of GDL, followed by spray drying. Samples of different treatments were reconstituted at 5% (wt/wt) protein to compare their solubility and thermal stability. Powders were tested in duplicate for basic composition, calcium content, reconstitutability, particle size, particle density, and microstructure. Acidification of milk did not have any significant effect on the proximate composition, particle size, particle density, or surface morphology of the MPC powders; however, the total calcium content of MPC80 decreased significantly with acidification (from 1.84 ± 0.03 to 1.59 ± 0.03 g/100 g of powder). Calcium-depleted MPC80 powders were also more soluble than the control powders. Diafiltered dispersions were significantly less heat stable (at 120°C) than UF samples when dissolved at 5% solids. The present work contributes to a better understanding of the differences in MPC commonly observed during processing. PMID:25459904

  8. Feeding dried distillers grains with solubles affects composition but not oxidative stability of milk.

    PubMed

    Testroet, E D; Li, G; Beitz, D C; Clark, S

    2015-05-01

    Feeding lactating dairy cows dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) increases the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids in the milk from those cows, potentially leading to increased susceptibility to development of off-flavors. Feeding DDGS has been loosely implicated to be a cause of development of spontaneous oxidative off-flavor in milk. We hypothesized that increased feeding of DDGS would accelerate development of off-flavors and that fortification with vitamin E (0.06% wt/wt) or C (0.06% wt/wt) would prevent spontaneous oxidative off-flavors. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of feeding DDGS to lactating dairy cows on several parameters of milk quality as determined by both chemical and sensory evaluations. Twenty-four healthy mid-lactation Holstein dairy cows were fed total mixed rations containing DDGS (0, 10, or 25% dry matter). Cows were blocked by parity and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (12 cows each). Each group received all 3 treatments in a 3-period Youden square design so that each cow served as her own control. Samples of milk from individual cows for proximate analysis and pooled milk for pasteurization and sensory analysis were collected on d 14, 21, and 28 of each experimental period. Pooled milk was assayed for peroxides and free fatty acids and evaluated by a trained sensory panel for the presence of 7 off-flavors common to milk on d 1, 3, and 7. Feeding 25% DDGS caused a significant decrease in daily milk yield. Increased dietary inclusion of DDGS also caused a concomitant decrease in percentage of milk fat and an increase in percentages of both solids nonfat and protein. Milk peroxides and free fatty acids were almost all below the detection limit, and the few exceptions were not found in replicated analyses. Sensory analysis revealed off-flavors only in milk from cows fed 0% DDGS when that milk was stored for 7d and when milk from cows fed 25% DDGS was fortified with 0.06% (wt/wt) vitamin C. Those few

  9. Placental Alpha Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein (AHSP) and recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Emanuelli, Monica; Cecati, Monia; Sartini, Davide; Stortoni, Piergiorgio; Corradetti, Alessandra; Giannubilo, Stefano R.; Turi, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    AHSP inhibits cellular production of the reactive oxygen species. Reduced AHSP indicates reduced protection against oxidative stressors. Our objective was to investigate AHSP levels in recurrent miscarriage (RM). Trophoblast was collected from women of 10 weeks gestation: voluntary abortion controls (VA, n = 10); spontaneous first miscarriage with subsequent normal pregnancy (SMSN, n = 15) or with subsequent miscarriage (SMSM, n = 5); RM previously investigated (RMPS, n = 5) or not previously investigated (RM, n = 5). AHSP mRNA and protein were determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot, respectively. One-way ANOVA was performed to assess statistical significance (p < 0.05). ahsp mRNA levels were maximally reduced in RM and RMPS (8.0 × 10−6 ± 1.3 and 8.1 × 10−6 ± 0.7, respectively) compared with SMSN and VA (16.1 × 10−6 ± 2.3 and 26.1 × 10−6 ± 2.7, respectively). SMSM showed levels significantly reduced as well (9.0 × 10−6 ± 2.3). In RM, a reduced defense from oxidative stressors is evident at first miscarriage, identifying women at high risk for subsequent eventful pregnancy. Reduced AHSP may identify women at risk of experiencing further miscarriages. PMID:18704762

  10. Protein conformational stability in the hydrofluoroalkane propellants tetrafluoroethane and heptafluoropropane analysed by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, E A; Forbes, R T; Williams, A C; Oliver, M J; McKenzie, L; Purewal, T S

    1999-09-10

    Due to the inherent structural instability of proteins, development of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) free metered dose inhalers (MDIs) containing these biomolecules is beset with numerous challenges. In assessing the conformation of proteins in any medium, both secondary and tertiary structures need to be elucidated. This study uses Fourier transform (FT-) Raman spectroscopy to probe protein conformational stability in hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants. Assignments of molecular modes for lysozyme as a solid and in aqueous solution, and for the first time, HFAs tetrafluoroethane (HFA 134a) and heptafluoropropane (HFA 227) are given. The Raman spectra provided molecular structural information on the peptide backbone, disulfide bonds and C-C stretching vibrations of hen egg lysozyme, enabling the secondary conformation of protein in HFA propellants to be determined; structural integrity of this robust model protein was maintained in both propellants. These results demonstrate that FT-Raman may be a useful tool for the optimisation of protein MDI formulations. PMID:10469921

  11. Protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran. 1. Physical processing and enzyme treatments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanhu; Hettiarachchy, Navam S; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2002-12-01

    Physical processing with or without enzyme treatments on protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran (HDRB) was evaluated. Freeze-thaw, sonication, high-speed blending, and high-pressure methods extracted 12%, 15%, 16%, and 11% protein, respectively. Sonication (0-100%, 750 W), followed by amylase and combined amylase and protease treatments, extracted 25.6-33.9% and 54.0-57.8% protein, respectively. Blending followed by amylase and protease treatment extracted 5.0% more protein than the nonblended enzymatic treatments. High-pressure treatments, 0-800 MPa, with water or amylase-protease combinations, extracted 10.5-11.1% or 61.8-66.6% protein, respectively. These results suggest that physical processing in combination with enzyme treatments can be effective in extracting protein from HDRB. PMID:12452673

  12. Can Specific Protein-Lipid Interactions Stabilize an Active State of the Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor?

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Herce, Henry D; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2015-10-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors are eukaryotic membrane proteins with broad biological and pharmacological relevance. Like all membrane-embedded proteins, their location and orientation are influenced by lipids, which can also impact protein function via specific interactions. Extensive simulations totaling 0.25 ms reveal a process in which phospholipids from the membrane's cytosolic leaflet enter the empty G-protein binding site of an activated β2 adrenergic receptor and form salt-bridge interactions that inhibit ionic lock formation and prolong active-state residency. Simulations of the receptor embedded in an anionic membrane show increased lipid binding, providing a molecular mechanism for the experimental observation that anionic lipids can enhance receptor activity. Conservation of the arginine component of the ionic lock among Rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that intracellular lipid ingression between receptor helices H6 and H7 may be a general mechanism for active-state stabilization. PMID:26488656

  13. Dissimilar stability of proteins in graphene bilayer: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tiedong; Kiong Chan, Kwok; Su, Haibin; Zhang, Dawei

    2013-02-01

    In order to study protein stability on graphene surface and in a confined space simultaneously, two parallel graphene single layers were built and two structurally dissimilar protein molecules were placed in between. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed a significant denaturing effect of graphene layers on GA module, a 3-α helices bundle protein, while another α/β structure protein, protein G, kept its NMR structure intact throughout all simulations. Such extremely different denaturation behaviours of the proteins offer a good chance to investigate the mechanism of graphene toxicity. Further analysis showed Van der Waals interaction could be the main cause of the denaturing effect. Although the solvation effect can contribute, its contribution is not comparable with the Van der Waals interaction.

  14. Nanoporous microbead supported bilayers: stability, physical characterization, and incorporation of functional transmembrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, James A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, Susan Marie; Cox, Jason M.; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Barrick, Todd A.; Flores, Adrean

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of functional transmembrane proteins into supported bilayer-based biomimetic systems presents a significant challenge for biophysics. Among the various methods for producing supported bilayers, liposomal fusion offers a versatile method for the introduction of membrane proteins into supported bilayers on a variety of substrates. In this study, the properties of protein containing unilamellar phosphocholine lipid bilayers on nanoporous silica microspheres are investigated. The effects of the silica substrate, pore structure, and the substrate curvature on the stability of the membrane and the functionality of the membrane protein are determined. Supported bilayers on porous silica microspheres show a significant increase in surface area on surfaces with structures in excess of 10 nm as well as an overall decrease in stability resulting from increasing pore size and curvature. Comparison of the liposomal and detergent-mediated introduction of purified bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and the human type 3 serotonin receptor (5HT3R) are investigated focusing on the resulting protein function, diffusion, orientation, and incorporation efficiency. In both cases, functional proteins are observed; however, the reconstitution efficiency and orientation selectivity are significantly enhanced through detergent-mediated protein reconstitution. The results of these experiments provide a basis for bulk ionic and fluorescent dye-based compartmentalization assays as well as single-molecule optical and single-channel electrochemical interrogation of transmembrane proteins in a biomimetic platform.

  15. Lysine acetylation stabilizes SP2 protein in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Sheng, Qing; Jiang, Caiying; Chen, Qin; Lv, Zhengbing; Yao, Juming; Nie, Zuoming

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a vital post-translational modification that plays an important role in many cellular processes in organisms. In the present study, the nutrient storage proteins in hemolymph were first found to be highly acetylated-particularly SP2 protein, which contains 20 potential Kac sites. Further results confirmed that lysine acetylation could stabilize and up-regulate the protein level of anti-apoptosis protein SP2, thereby improving the survival of H2O2-treated BmN cells and suppressing the apoptosis induced by H2O2. The potential mechanism involved in the inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation by crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination. Our results showed that the increase in the acetylation level by TSA could decrease the ubiquitination and improve the protein level of SP2, indicating that lysine acetylation could influence the SP2 protein level through competition between ubiquitination and the suppression of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby stabilizing the protein. SP2 is a major nutrient storage protein from hemolymph for amino acid storage and utilization. The crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination of SP2 might imply an important role of lysine acetylation for nutrient storage and utilization in silkworm. PMID:27374983

  16. Phosphoprotein Stability in Clinical Tissue and Its Relevance for Reverse Phase Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Virginia; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance A.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated proteins reflect the activity of specific cell signaling nodes in biological kinase protein networks. Cell signaling pathways can be either activated or deactivated depending on the phosphorylation state of the constituent proteins. The state of these kinase pathways reflects the in vivo activity of the cells and tissue at any given point in time. As such, cell signaling pathway information can be extrapolated to infer which phosphorylated proteins/pathways are driving an individual tumor’s growth. Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays (RPMA) are a sensitive and precise platform that can be applied to the quantitative measurement of hundreds of phosphorylated signal proteins from a small sample of tissue. Pre-analytical variability originating from tissue procurement and preservation may cause significant variability and bias in downstream molecular analysis. Depending on the ex vivo delay time in tissue processing, and the manner of tissue handling, protein biomarkers such as signal pathway phosphoproteins will be elevated or suppressed in a manner that does not represent the biomarker levels at the time of excision. Consequently, assessment of the state of these kinase networks requires stabilization, or preservation, of the phosphoproteins immediately post tissue procurement. We have employed reverse phase protein microarray analysis of phosphoproteins to study the factors influencing stability of phosphoproteins in tissue following procurement. Based on this analysis we have established tissue procurement guidelines for clinical research with an emphasis on quantifying phosphoproteins by RPMA. PMID:21901591

  17. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. PMID:26188516

  18. The role of residue stability in transient protein-protein interactions involved in enzymatic phosphate hydrolysis. A computational study.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Jaume; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Khan, Abdul Kareem; Johnston, Michael A; Corbí, Carles; Gómez, Alex; Rovira, Xavier; Teyra, Joan; Villà-Freixa, Jordi

    2006-04-01

    Finding why protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are so specific can provide a valuable tool in a variety of fields. Statistical surveys of so-called transient complexes (like those relevant for signal transduction mechanisms) have shown a tendency of polar residues to participate in the interaction region. Following this scheme, residues in the unbound partners have to compete between interacting with water or interacting with other residues of the protein. On the other hand, several works have shown that the notion of active site electrostatic preorganization can be used to interpret the high efficiency in enzyme reactions. This preorganization can be related to the instability of the residues important for catalysis. In some enzymes, in addition, conformational changes upon binding to other proteins lead to an increase in the activity of the enzymatic partner. In this article the linear response approximation version of the semimacroscopic protein dipoles Langevin dipoles (PDLD/S-LRA) model is used to evaluate the stability of several residues in two phosphate hydrolysis enzymes upon complexation with their activating partners. In particular, the residues relevant for PPI and for phosphate hydrolysis in the CDK2/Cyclin A and Ras/GAP complexes are analyzed. We find that the evaluation of the stability of residues in these systems can be used to identify not only active site regions but it can also be used as a guide to locate "hot spots" for PPIs. We also show that conformational changes play a major role in positioning interfacing residues in a proper "energetic" orientation, ready to interact with the residues in the partner protein surface. Thus, we extend the preorganization theory to PPIs, extrapolating the results we obtained from the above-mentioned complexes to a more general case. We conclude that the correlation between stability of a residue in the surface and the likelihood that it participates in the interaction can be a general fact for transient

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins Whose Expression Is Similarly Affected by Culture Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Scholl-Meeker, Dorothy

    2001-01-01

    Previously, we had demonstrated the upregulation in the expression of several proteins, including the lipoproteins OspC and P35, of Borrelia burgdorferi in the stationary growth phase. Since the expression of OspC is also known to be affected by culture temperature and pH, we examined the effects of both variables on the expression of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins. Our study revealed that the expression of each of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins, P35 included, was also influenced by culture temperature; these proteins were selectively expressed at 34°C but not at 24°C. Significantly, the expression of a majority of these proteins was also affected by culture pH, since they were abundantly expressed at pH 7.0 (resembling the tick midgut pH of 6.8 during feeding) but only sparsely at pH 8.0 (a condition closer to that of the unfed tick midgut pH of 7.4). We propose that this group of B. burgdorferi proteins, which in culture is selectively expressed under conditions of 34°C and pH 7.0, may be induced in the tick midgut during the feeding event. Furthermore, the differential and coordinate expression of these proteins under different environmental conditions suggests that the encoding genes may be coregulated. PMID:11254645

  20. Evidence that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in tropical reef corals.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Peter J; Wall, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    Early life stages of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum were used to test the hypothesis that the depression of dark respiration in coral recruits by high pCO2 is caused by perturbed protein metabolism. First, the contribution of protein anabolism to respiratory costs under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the aerobic respiration of S. caliendrum recruits with and without the protein synthesis inhibitor emetine following 1 to 4 days at 45 Pa versus 77 Pa pCO2. Second, protein catabolism under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the flux of ammonium (NH4 (+)) from juvenile colonies of S. caliendrum incubated in darkness at 47 Pa and 90 Pa pCO2. Two days after settlement, respiration of recruits was affected by an interaction between emetine and pCO2, with emetine reducing respiration 63% at 45 Pa pCO2 and 27% at 77 Pa pCO2. The interaction disappeared 5 days after settlement, when respiration was reduced 27% by emetine under both pCO2 conditions. These findings suggest that protein anabolism accounted for a large proportion of metabolic costs in coral recruits and was affected by high pCO2, with consequences detected in aerobic respiration. Juvenile S. caliendrum showed net uptake of NH4 (+) at 45 Pa pCO2 but net release of NH4 (+) at 90 Pa pCO2, indicating that protein catabolism, NH4 (+) recycling, or both were affected by high pCO2. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in corals. PMID:25216504

  1. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. - Highlights: • KCTD5 nuclear translocation depends upon M phase and protein oligomerization. • Identification of MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193 as KCTD5 interaction partners. • Formation of trimeric complexes of KCTD5/cullin3 with MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193B. • KCTD5 is not involved in polyubiquitylation of MCM7 replication factor. • The KCTD5/cullin3 complex stabilizes ZNF711 transcription factor.

  2. Testing the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area solvent model for protein stability, ligand binding, and protein design

    PubMed Central

    am Busch, Marcel Schmidt; Lopes, Anne; Amara, Najette; Bathelt, Christine; Simonson, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein structure prediction and computational protein design require efficient yet sufficiently accurate descriptions of aqueous solvent. We continue to evaluate the performance of the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area (CASA) implicit solvent model, in combination with the Charmm19 molecular mechanics force field. We test a set of model parameters optimized earlier, and we also carry out a new optimization in this work, using as a target a set of experimental stability changes for single point mutations of various proteins and peptides. The optimization procedure is general, and could be used with other force fields. The computation of stability changes requires a model for the unfolded state of the protein. In our approach, this state is represented by tripeptide structures of the sequence Ala-X-Ala for each amino acid type X. We followed an iterative optimization scheme which, at each cycle, optimizes the solvation parameters and a set of tripeptide structures for the unfolded state. This protocol uses a set of 140 experimental stability mutations and a large set of tripeptide conformations to find the best tripeptide structures and solvation parameters. Results Using the optimized parameters, we obtain a mean unsigned error of 2.28 kcal/mol for the stability mutations. The performance of the CASA model is assessed by two further applications: (i) calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities and (ii) computational protein design. For these two applications, the previous parameters and the ones optimized here give a similar performance. For ligand binding, we obtain reasonable agreement with a set of 55 experimental mutation data, with a mean unsigned error of 1.76 kcal/mol with the new parameters and 1.47 kcal/mol with the earlier ones. We show that the optimized CASA model is not inferior to the Generalized Born/Surface Area (GB/SA) model for the prediction of these binding affinities. Likewise, the new parameters perform well for the design of 8

  3. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Souza, Ana O; Gaspari, Priscyla M; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis-isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle-were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  4. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L.; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G.; Souza, Ana O.; Gaspari, Priscyla M.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis—isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle—were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  5. Improved mutation tagging with gene identifiers applied to membrane protein stability prediction

    PubMed Central

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Plake, Conrad; Schroeder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background The automated retrieval and integration of information about protein point mutations in combination with structure, domain and interaction data from literature and databases promises to be a valuable approach to study structure-function relationships in biomedical data sets. Results We developed a rule- and regular expression-based protein point mutation retrieval pipeline for PubMed abstracts, which shows an F-measure of 87% for the mutation retrieval task on a benchmark dataset. In order to link mutations to their proteins, we utilize a named entity recognition algorithm for the identification of gene names co-occurring in the abstract, and establish links based on sequence checks. Vice versa, we could show that gene recognition improved from 77% to 91% F-measure when considering mutation information given in the text. To demonstrate practical relevance, we utilize mutation information from text to evaluate a novel solvation energy based model for the prediction of stabilizing regions in membrane proteins. For five G protein-coupled receptors we identified 35 relevant single mutations and associated phenotypes, of which none had been annotated in the UniProt or PDB database. In 71% reported phenotypes were in compliance with the model predictions, supporting a relation between mutations and stability issues in membrane proteins. Conclusion We present a reliable approach for the retrieval of protein mutations from PubMed abstracts for any set of genes or proteins of interest. We further demonstrate how amino acid substitution information from text can be utilized for protein structure stability studies on the basis of a novel energy model. PMID:19758467

  6. Semiautomated Sample Preparation for Protein Stability and Formulation Screening via Buffer Exchange.

    PubMed

    Ying, William; Levons, Jaquan K; Carney, Andrea; Gandhi, Rajesh; Vydra, Vicky; Rubin, A Erik

    2016-06-01

    A novel semiautomated buffer exchange process workflow was developed to enable efficient early protein formulation screening. An antibody fragment protein, BMSdab, was used to demonstrate the workflow. The process afforded 60% to 80% cycle time and scientist time savings and significant material efficiencies. These efficiencies ultimately facilitated execution of this stability work earlier in the drug development process, allowing this tool to inform the developability of potential candidates for development from a formulation perspective. To overcome the key technical challenges, the protein solution was buffer-exchanged by centrifuge filtration into formulations for stability screening in a 96-well plate with an ultrafiltration membrane, leveraging automated liquid handling and acoustic volume measurements to allow several cycles of exchanges. The formulations were transferred into a vacuum manifold and sterile filtered into a rack holding 96 glass vials. The vials were sealed with a capmat of individual caps and placed in stability stations. Stability of the samples prepared by this process and by the standard process was demonstrated to be comparable. This process enabled screening a number of formulations of a protein at an early pharmaceutical development stage with a short sample preparation time. PMID:25969451

  7. Kinetics of α-Globin Binding to α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein (AHSP) Indicate Preferential Stabilization of Hemichrome Folding Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Todd L.; Khandros, Eugene; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Olson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Human α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a conserved mammalian erythroid protein that facilitates the production of Hemoglobin A by stabilizing free α-globin. AHSP rapidly binds to ferrous α with association (k′AHSP) and dissociation (kAHSP) rate constants of ≈10 μm−1 s−1 and 0.2 s−1, respectively, at pH 7.4 at 22 °C. A small slow phase was observed when AHSP binds to excess ferrous αCO. This slow phase appears to be due to cis to trans prolyl isomerization of the Asp29-Pro30 peptide bond in wild-type AHSP because it was absent when αCO was mixed with P30A and P30W AHSP, which are fixed in the trans conformation. This slow phase was also absent when met(Fe3+)-α reacted with wild-type AHSP, suggesting that met-α is capable of rapidly binding to either Pro30 conformer. Both wild-type and Pro30-substituted AHSPs drive the formation of a met-α hemichrome conformation following binding to either met- or oxy(Fe2+)-α. The dissociation rate of the met-α·AHSP complex (kAHSP ≈ 0.002 s−1) is ∼100-fold slower than that for ferrous α·AHSP complexes, resulting in a much higher affinity of AHSP for met-α. Thus, in vivo, AHSP acts as a molecular chaperone by rapidly binding and stabilizing met-α hemichrome folding intermediates. The low rate of met-α dissociation also allows AHSP to have a quality control function by kinetically trapping ferric α and preventing its incorporation into less stable mixed valence Hemoglobin A tetramers. Reduction of AHSP-bound met-α allows more rapid release to β subunits to form stable fully, reduced hemoglobin dimers and tetramers. PMID:22298770

  8. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIMEL

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y; Schoell, MC; Freeman, RS

    2009-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIMEL and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation induced death compared to the same cells stably expressing the wild type VHL protein (pVHL). Re-introducing pVHL into VHL-null cells increased the half-life of BIMEL protein without affecting its mRNA expression, and over-expressing pVHL inhibited BIMEL polyubiquitination. Suppressing pVHL expression with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in BIMEL protein and a corresponding decrease in the sensitivity of RCC cells to apoptotic stimuli. Directly inhibiting BIMEL expression in pVHL-expressing RCC cells caused a similar decrease in cell death. These results demonstrate that pVHL acts to promote BIMEL protein stability in RCC cells, and that destabilization of BIMEL in the absence of pVHL contributes to the increased resistance of VHL-null RCC cells to certain apoptotic stimuli. PMID:19305426

  9. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIM(EL).

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Schoell, M C; Freeman, R S

    2009-04-23

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIM(EL) and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation-induced death compared to the same cells stably expressing the wild-type VHL protein (pVHL). Reintroducing pVHL into VHL-null cells increased the half-life of BIM(EL) protein without affecting its mRNA expression, and overexpressing pVHL inhibited BIM(EL) polyubiquitination. Suppressing pVHL expression with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in BIM(EL) protein and a corresponding decrease in the sensitivity of RCC cells to apoptotic stimuli. Directly inhibiting BIM(EL) expression in pVHL-expressing RCC cells caused a similar decrease in cell death. These results demonstrate that pVHL acts to promote BIM(EL) protein stability in RCC cells, and that destabilization of BIM(EL) in the absence of pVHL contributes to the increased resistance of VHL-null RCC cells to certain apoptotic stimuli. PMID:19305426

  10. Stability of Magnetically-Suppressed Solutal Convection In Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of convection during the crystallization of proteins is not very well understood. In a gravitational field, convection is caused by crystal sedimentation and by solutal buoyancy induced flow and these can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments and show solutal convection can be stabilized if the surrounding fluid has larger magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic field has a specific structure. Discussion on the application of the technique to protein crystallization is also provided.

  11. Probing the determinants of protein stability: comparison of class A beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhove, M; Houba, S; b1motte-Brasseur, J; Frère, J M

    1995-01-01

    Five class A beta-lactamases produced by various mesophilic bacterial species have been compared. Although closely related in primary and overall structures, these enzymes exhibit very different stabilities. In order to investigate the factors responsible for these differences, several features deduced from the amino acid composition and three-dimensional structures were studied for the five proteins. This analysis revealed that higher stability appeared to correlate with increased numbers of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and of salt bridges. By contrast, the global hydrophobicity of the protein seemed to play a relatively minor role. A strongly unfavourable balance between charged residues and the presence of a cis-peptide bond preceding a non-proline residue might also contribute to the particularly low stability of two of the enzymes. PMID:8948443

  12. Protein/Polysaccharide Electrostatic Complexes and Their Applications in Stabilizing Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ai, Wenjia; Fang, Yapeng; Xiang, Shengping; Yao, Xiaolin; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O

    2015-01-01

    Consumers are becoming increasingly fastidious in demanding food products with improved quality and functionality. This largely relies on rational design of food structures. As the two key food ingredients, protein and polysaccharides play important roles in food structuring. The combination of protein and polysaccharide provides rich opportunities for food structure and function designs through molecular interaction and assembly. This paper provides a brief review on the formation and characterization of protein/polysaccharide electrostatic complexes and their applications in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions, particularly those containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26598842

  13. Emotional modulation of control dilemmas: the role of positive affect, reward, and dopamine in cognitive stability and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Goschke, Thomas; Bolte, Annette

    2014-09-01

    Goal-directed action in changing environments requires a dynamic balance between complementary control modes, which serve antagonistic adaptive functions (e.g., to shield goals from competing responses and distracting information vs. to flexibly switch between goals and behavioral dispositions in response to significant changes). Too rigid goal shielding promotes stability but incurs a cost in terms of perseveration and reduced flexibility, whereas too weak goal shielding promotes flexibility but incurs a cost in terms of increased distractibility. While research on cognitive control has long been conducted relatively independently from the study of emotion and motivation, it is becoming increasingly clear that positive affect and reward play a central role in modulating cognitive control. In particular, evidence from the past decade suggests that positive affect not only influences the contents of cognitive processes, but also modulates the balance between complementary modes of cognitive control. In this article we review studies from the past decade that examined effects of induced positive affect on the balance between cognitive stability and flexibility with a focus on set switching and working memory maintenance and updating. Moreover, we review recent evidence indicating that task-irrelevant positive affect and performance-contingent rewards exert different and sometimes opposite effects on cognitive control modes, suggesting dissociations between emotional and motivational effects of positive affect. Finally, we critically review evidence for the popular hypothesis that effects of positive affect may be mediated by dopaminergic modulations of neural processing in prefrontal and striatal brain circuits, and we refine this "dopamine hypothesis of positive affect" by specifying distinct mechanisms by which dopamine may mediate effects of positive affect and reward on cognitive control. We conclude with a discussion of limitations of current research, point to

  14. Stabilizing Additives Added during Cell Lysis Aid in the Solubilization of Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leibly, David J.; Nguyen, Trang Nhu; Kao, Louis T.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2012-01-01

    Insoluble recombinant proteins are a major issue for both structural genomics and enzymology research. Greater than 30% of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) appear to be insoluble. The prevailing view is that insolubly expressed proteins cannot be easily solubilized, and are usually sequestered into inclusion bodies. However, we hypothesize that small molecules added during the cell lysis stage can yield soluble protein from insoluble protein previously screened without additives or ligands. We present a novel screening method that utilized 144 additive conditions to increase the solubility of recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. These selected additives are natural ligands, detergents, salts, buffers, and chemicals that have been shown to increase the stability of proteins in vivo. We present the methods used for this additive solubility screen and detailed results for 41 potential drug target recombinant proteins from infectious organisms. Increased solubility was observed for 80% of the recombinant proteins during the primary and secondary screening of lysis with the additives; that is 33 of 41 target proteins had increased solubility compared with no additive controls. Eleven additives (trehalose, glycine betaine, mannitol, L-Arginine, potassium citrate, CuCl2, proline, xylitol, NDSB 201, CTAB and K2PO4) solubilized more than one of the 41 proteins; these additives can be easily screened to increase protein solubility. Large-scale purifications were attempted for 15 of the proteins using the additives identified and eight (40%) were prepared for crystallization trials during the first purification attempt. Thus, this protocol allowed us to recover about a third of seemingly insoluble proteins for crystallography and structure determination. If recombinant proteins are required in smaller quantities or less purity, the final success rate may be even higher. PMID:23285060

  15. Influence of pea protein aggregates on the structure and stability of pea protein/soybean polysaccharide complex emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Baoru; Zhang, Rujing; Yao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry have been hampered by their precipitation in acidic solution. In this study, pea protein isolate (PPI) with poor dispersibility in acidic solution was used to form complexes with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS), and the effects of PPI aggregates on the structure and stability of PPI/SSPS complex emulsions were investigated. Under acidic conditions, high pressure homogenization disrupts the PPI aggregates and the electrostatic attraction between PPI and SSPS facilitates the formation of dispersible PPI/SSPS complexes. The PPI/SSPS complex emulsions prepared from the PPI containing aggregates prove to possess similar droplet structure and similar stability compared with the PPI/SSPS emulsions produced from the PPI in which the aggregates have been previously removed by centrifugation. The oil droplets are protected by PPI/SSPS complex interfacial films and SSPS surfaces. The emulsions show long-term stability against pH and NaCl concentration changes. This study demonstrates that PPI aggregates can also be used to produce stable complex emulsions, which may promote the applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry. PMID:25803397

  16. Quantifying the kinetic stability of hyperstable proteins via time-dependent SDS trapping.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Zhang, Songjie; Bathrick, Brendan; Liu, Shuangqi; Garcia, Yeidaliz; Colón, Wilfredo

    2012-01-10

    Globular proteins are usually in equilibrium with unfolded conformations, whereas kinetically stable proteins (KSPs) are conformationally trapped by their high unfolding transition state energy. Kinetic stability (KS) could allow proteins to maintain their activity under harsh conditions, increase a protein's half-life, or protect against misfolding-aggregation. Here we show the development of a simple method for quantifying a protein's KS that involves incubating a protein in SDS at high temperature as a function of time, running the unheated samples on SDS-PAGE, and quantifying the bands to determine the time-dependent loss of a protein's SDS resistance. Six diverse proteins, including two monomer, two dimers, and two tetramers, were studied by this method, and the kinetics of the loss of SDS resistance correlated linearly with their unfolding rate determined by circular dichroism. These results imply that the mechanism by which SDS denatures proteins involves conformational trapping, with a trapping rate that is determined and limited by the rate of protein unfolding. We applied the SDS trapping of proteins (S-TraP) method to superoxide dismutase (SOD) and transthyretin (TTR), which are highly KSPs with native unfolding rates that are difficult to measure by conventional spectroscopic methods. A combination of S-TraP experiments between 75 and 90 °C combined with Eyring plot analysis yielded an unfolding half-life of 70 ± 37 and 18 ± 6 days at 37 °C for SOD and TTR, respectively. The S-TraP method shown here is extremely accessible, sample-efficient, cost-effective, compatible with impure or complex samples, and will be useful for exploring the biological and pathological roles of kinetic stability. PMID:22106876

  17. Rational stabilization of the C-LytA affinity tag by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Maestro, Beatriz; Mollá-Morales, Almudena; Sanz, Jesús M

    2008-12-01

    The C-LytA protein constitutes the choline-binding module of the LytA amidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Owing to its affinity for choline and analogs, it is regularly used as an affinity tag for the purification of proteins in a single chromatographic step. In an attempt to build a robust variant against thermal denaturation, we have engineered several salt bridges on the protein surface. All the stabilizing mutations were pooled in a single variant, C-LytAm7, which contained seven changes: Y25K, F27K, M33E, N51K, S52K, T85K and T108K. The mutant displays a 7 degrees C thermal stabilization compared with the wild-type form, together with a complete reversibility upon heating and a higher kinetic stability. Moreover, the accumulation of intermediates in the unfolding of C-LytA is virtually abolished for C-LytAm7. The differences in stability become more evident when the proteins are bound to a DEAE-cellulose affinity column, as most of wild-type C-LytA is denatured at approximately 65 degrees C, whereas C-LytAm7 may stand temperatures up to 90 degrees C. Finally, the change in the isoelectric point of C-LytAm7 enhances its solubility at acidic pHs. Therefore, C-LytAm7 behaves as an improved affinity tag and supports the engineering of surface salt bridges as an effective approach for protein stabilization. PMID:18840883

  18. Biocompatible ionic liquids: a new approach for stabilizing proteins in liquid formulation.

    PubMed

    Vrikkis, Regina M; Fraser, Kevin J; Fujita, Kyoko; Macfarlane, Douglas R; Elliott, Gloria D

    2009-07-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have shown excellent promise as both solutes and solvents for stabilizing proteins at room temperature. Because many modern drugs are protein-based, these stabilizing characteristics have great potential to provide advances in the field of liquid formulation of therapeutic proteins. However, before these developments can be translated into clinical solutions it is essential to establish data related to the biocompatibility of these ILs. The current work investigates the cytotoxicity of several ILs that were rationally synthesized from natural biomolecules and compounds that have already been approved as excipients for drug formulations. The effect of choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp), choline saccharinate, and 1-butyl 3-methyl imidazolium lactate (bmim lactate) on the metabolic activity of a mouse macrophage cell line (J774) was assessed using the reduction in resazurin as an indicator of activity and, by extension, viability. Two formulations of lysozyme (10 mg/ml and 100 mg/ml) in 80 wt % choline dhp (aq) were prepared and the proteins were evaluated for structural stability immediately following formulation and again at 1 month. Equivalent formulations in 0.1 M Na acetate aqueous buffer were evaluated as controls. A differential scanning microcalorimeter (DSC) was used to evaluate the structural stability on the basis of the unfolding temperature and the enthalpy of unfolding, and a micrococcus lysodiekticus activity test was used to evaluate functional activity. All compounds were found to be relatively benign, with toxicity increasing in the order choline dhpprotein stabilization characteristics can be rationally designed into ionic liquids. PMID:19640150

  19. Modification of the Sweetness and Stability of Sweet-Tasting Protein Monellin by Gene Mutation and Protein Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiulei; Li, Lei; Yang, Liu; Liu, Tianming; Cai, Chenggu; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Natural sweet protein monellin has a high sweetness and low calorie, suggesting its potential in food applications. However, due to its low heat and acid resistance, the application of monellin is limited. In this study, we show that the thermostability of monellin can be improved with no sweetness decrease by means of sequence, structure analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We analyzed residues located in the α-helix as well as an ionizable residue C41. Of the mutants investigated, the effects of E23A and C41A mutants were most remarkable. The former displayed significantly improved thermal stability, while its sweetness was not changed. The mutated protein was stable after 30 min incubation at 85°C. The latter showed increased sweetness and slight improvement of thermostability. Furthermore, we found that most mutants enhancing the thermostability of the protein were distributed at the two ends of α-helix. Molecular biophysics analysis revealed that the state of buried ionizable residues may account for the modulated properties of mutated proteins. Our results prove that the properties of sweet protein monellin can be modified by means of bioinformatics analysis, gene manipulation, and protein modification, highlighting the possibility of designing novel effective sweet proteins based on structure-function relationships. PMID:26881217

  20. Cigarette smoke affects posttranslational modifications and inhibits capacitation-induced changes in human sperm proteins.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Vibha; Marmor, Hannah; Chernyak, Sholom; Goldstein, Marc; Feliciano, Miriam; Vigodner, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Sperm are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications of proteins. Massive phosphorylation on tyrosine residue is required for sperm capacitation. Sumoylation has also been recently implicated in spermatogenesis and sperm functions. Cigarette smoke is known to cause oxidative stress in different tissues, and several studies suggest that it causes oxidative stress in sperm. Whether tobacco affects posttranslational modifications in human sperm is currently unknown. In this study, we show that a short exposure of human sperm to physiological concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) causes the partial de-sumoylation of many sperm proteins. Furthermore, the presence of a low concentration of CSE in the human tubal fluid during an induction of in vitro capacitation inhibits the capacitation-associated increase in protein phosphorylation. Collectively, changes in posttranslational modifications may be one of the mechanisms through which exposure to tobacco can negatively affect sperm functions and cause fertility problems. PMID:24345728

  1. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  2. On the Efficiency of NHS Ester Cross-Linkers for Stabilizing Integral Membrane Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fan; Gerber, Sabina; Korkhov, Volodymyr M.; Mireku, Samantha; Bucher, Monika; Locher, Kaspar P.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-03-01

    We have previously presented a straightforward approach based on high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) to study membrane proteins. In addition, the stoichiometry of integral membrane protein complexes could be determined by MALDI-MS, following chemical cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. However, glutaraldehyde polymerizes in solution and reacts nonspecifically with various functional groups of proteins, limiting its usefulness for structural studies of protein complexes. Here, we investigated the capability of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters, which react much more specifically, to cross-link membrane protein complexes such as PglK and BtuC2D2. We present clear evidence that NHS esters are capable of stabilizing membrane protein complexes in situ, in the presence of detergents such as DDM, C12E8, and LDAO. The stabilization efficiency strongly depends on the membrane protein structure (i.e, the number of primary amine groups and the distances between primary amines). A minimum number of primary amine groups is required, and the distances between primary amines govern whether a cross-linker with a specific spacer arm length is able to bridge two amine groups.

  3. Global stability of protein folding from an empirical free energy function.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Paz, Waldo; García, Yamila; Salgado, Jesús

    2013-03-21

    The principles governing protein folding stand as one of the biggest challenges of Biophysics. Modeling the global stability of proteins and predicting their tertiary structure are hard tasks, due in part to the variety and large number of forces involved and the difficulties to describe them with sufficient accuracy. We have developed a fast, physics-based empirical potential, intended to be used in global structure prediction methods. This model considers four main contributions: Two entropic factors, the hydrophobic effect and configurational entropy, and two terms resulting from a decomposition of close-packing interactions, namely the balance of the dispersive interactions of folded and unfolded states and electrostatic interactions between residues. The parameters of the model were fixed from a protein data set whose unfolding free energy has been measured at the "standard" experimental conditions proposed by Maxwell et al. (2005) and a large data set of 1151 monomeric proteins obtained from the PDB. A blind test with proteins taken from ProTherm database, at similar experimental conditions, was carried out. We found a good correlation with the test data set, proving the effectiveness of our model for predicting protein folding free energies in considered standard conditions. Such a prediction compares favorably against estimations made with FoldX's function and the force field GROMOS96. This model constitutes a valuable tool for the fast evaluation of protein structure stability in 3D structure prediction methods. PMID:23313334

  4. Effect of Hofmeister ions on protein thermal stability: roles of ion hydration and peptide groups?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Erik; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-11-01

    We have systematically explored the Hofmeister effects of cations and anions (0.3-1.75 M range) for acidic Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin (net charge -19, pH 7) and basic horse heart cytochrome c (net charge +17, pH 4.5). The Hofmeister effect of the ions on protein thermal stability was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[ion] (T trs; thermal midpoint). We show that dT trs/d[ion] correlates with ion partition coefficients between surface and bulk water and ion surface tension effects: this suggests direct interactions between ions and proteins. Surprisingly, the stability effects of the different ions on the two model proteins are similar, implying a major role of the peptide backbone, instead of charged groups, in mediation of the interactions. Upon assessing chemical/physical properties of the ions responsible for the Hofmeister effects on protein stability, ion charge density was identified as most important. Taken together, our study suggests key roles for ion hydration and the peptide group in facilitating interactions between Hofmeister ions and proteins. PMID:18782555

  5. Polymer-based protein engineering can rationally tune enzyme activity, pH-dependence, and stability.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hironobu; Cummings, Chad S; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2013-06-10

    The attachment of inert polymers, such as polyethylene glycol, to proteins has driven the emergence of a multibillion dollar biotechnology industry. In all cases, proteins have been stabilized or altered by covalently coupling the pre-existing polymer to the surface of the protein. This approach is inherently limited by a lack of exquisite control of polymer architecture, site and density of attachment. Using a novel water-soluble atom transfer radical polymerization initiator, we have grown temperature- and pH-responsive polymers from the surface of a model protein, the enzyme chymotrypsin. Poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) changes in conformation with altered temperature and pH. Growing the polymer from the surface of chymotrypsin we were able to demonstrate that changes in temperature or pH can change predictably the conformation of the polymer surrounding the enzyme, which in turn enabled the rational tailoring of enzyme activity and stability. Using what we now term "Polymer-Based Protein Engineering", we have increased the activity and stability of chymotrypsin by an order of magnitude at pHs where the enzyme is usually inactive or unstable. PMID:23600667

  6. An amphipathic polypeptide derived from poly-γ-glutamic acid for the stabilization of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Gu; Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Park, Dongkook; Oh, Jihye; Yoon, Sung-Ho; Lee, Cheng-Kang; Sung, Moon-Hee; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in the extraction of membrane proteins from cell membrane and their solubilization in native conformations have hindered their structural and biochemical analysis. To overcome these difficulties, an amphipathic polypeptide was synthesized by the conjugation of octyl and glucosyl groups to the carboxyl groups of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA). This polymer, called amphipathic PGA (APG), self-assembles as mono-disperse oligomers consisted of 4–5 monomers. APG shows significantly low value of critical micelle concentration and stabilization activity toward membrane proteins. Most of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-solubilized membrane proteins from Escherichia coli remain soluble state in the presence of APG even after the removal of SDS. In addition, APG stabilizes purified 7 transmembrane proteins such as bacteriorhodopsin and human endothelin receptor Type A (ETA) in their active conformations. Furthermore, ETA in complex with APG is readily inserted into liposomes without disrupting the integrity of liposomes. These properties of APG can be applied to overcome the difficulties in the stabilization and reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:25283538

  7. Honey-Induced Protein Stabilization as Studied by Fluorescein Isothiocyanate Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Tayyab, Saad

    2013-01-01

    Protein stabilizing potential of honey was studied on a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), using extrinsic fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as the probe. BSA was labelled with FITC using chemical coupling, and urea and thermal denaturation studies were performed on FITC-labelled BSA (FITC-BSA) both in the absence and presence of 10% and 20% (w/v) honey using FITC fluorescence at 522 nm upon excitation at 495 nm. There was an increase in the FITC fluorescence intensity upon increasing urea concentration or temperature, suggesting protein denaturation. The results from urea and thermal denaturation studies showed increased stability of protein in the presence of honey as reflected from the shift in the transition curve along with the start point and the midpoint of the transition towards higher urea concentration/temperature. Furthermore, the increase in ΔGDH2O and ΔGD25°C in presence of honey also suggested protein stabilization. PMID:24222758

  8. Redox-dependent stability, protonation, and reactivity of cysteine-bound heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Fangfang; Lisi, George P.; Collins, Daniel P.; Dawson, John H.; Pletneva, Ekaterina V.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine-bound hemes are key components of many enzymes and biological sensors. Protonation (deprotonation) of the Cys ligand often accompanies redox transformations of these centers. To characterize these phenomena, we have engineered a series of Thr78Cys/Lys79Gly/Met80X mutants of yeast cytochrome c (cyt c) in which Cys78 becomes one of the axial ligands to the heme. At neutral pH, the protonation state of the coordinated Cys differs for the ferric and ferrous heme species, with Cys binding as a thiolate and a thiol, respectively. Analysis of redox-dependent stability and alkaline transitions of these model proteins, as well as comparisons to Cys binding studies with the minimalist heme peptide microperoxidase-8, demonstrate that the protein scaffold and solvent interactions play important roles in stabilizing a particular Cys–heme coordination. The increased stability of ferric thiolate compared with ferrous thiol arises mainly from entropic factors. This robust cyt c model system provides access to all four forms of Cys-bound heme, including the ferric thiol. Protein motions control the rates of heme redox reactions, and these effects are amplified at low pH, where the proteins are less stable. Thermodynamic signatures and redox reactivity of the model Cys-bound hemes highlight the critical role of the protein scaffold and its dynamics in modulating redox-linked transitions between thiols and thiolates. PMID:24398520

  9. Nitrogen Assimilation and Protein Synthesis in Wheat Seedlings as Affected by Mineral Nutrition. II. Micronutrients 1

    PubMed Central

    Harper, James E.; Paulsen, Gary M.

    1969-01-01

    Activity of nitrate reductase from Triticum aestivum L. seedlings was decreased by deficiencies of molybdenum, zinc, and chlorine. Nitrate accumulated in molybdenum-deficient seedlings, declined in zinc-deficient seedlings, and was unaffected by the other micronutrient treatments. Glutamic acid dehydrogenase activity was decreased by deficiency of molybdenum, the only nutrient that affected the enzyme. Glutamine synthetase activity was decreased only by copper deficiency, and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase was not affected by any micronutrient deficiencies. Incorporation of 14C-leucine into protein by wheat seedlings was increased by molybdenum deficiency, apparently because of decreased inhibition from endogenous amino acids, and was decreased by copper deficiency. Protein content was not affected significantly by the micronutrient treatments. PMID:16657114

  10. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies showed that CBP KIX mutation affects the stability of CBP:c-Myb complex.

    PubMed

    Odoux, Anne; Jindal, Darren; Tamas, Tamara C; Lim, Benjamin W H; Pollard, Drake; Xu, Wu

    2016-06-01

    The coactivators CBP (CREBBP) and its paralog p300 (EP300), two conserved multi-domain proteins in eukaryotic organisms, regulate gene expression in part by binding DNA-binding transcription factors. It was previously reported that the CBP/p300 KIX domain mutant (Y650A, A654Q, and Y658A) altered both c-Myb-dependent gene activation and repression, and that mice with these three point mutations had reduced numbers of platelets, B cells, T cells, and red blood cells. Here, our transient transfection assays demonstrated that mouse embryonic fibroblast cells containing the same mutations in the KIX domain and without a wild-type allele of either CBP or p300, showed decreased c-Myb-mediated transcription. Dr. Wright's group solved a 3-D structure of the mouse CBP:c-Myb complex using NMR. To take advantage of the experimental structure and function data and improved theoretical calculation methods, we performed MD simulations of CBP KIX, CBP KIX with the mutations, and c-Myb, as well as binding energy analysis for both the wild-type and mutant complexes. The binding between CBP and c-Myb is mainly mediated by a shallow hydrophobic groove in the center where the side-chain of Leu302 of c-Myb plays an essential role and two salt bridges at the two ends. We found that the KIX mutations slightly decreased stability of the CBP:c-Myb complex as demonstrated by higher binding energy calculated using either MM/PBSA or MM/GBSA methods. More specifically, the KIX mutations affected the two salt bridges between CBP and c-Myb (CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306; CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294). Our studies also revealed differing dynamics of the hydrogen bonds between CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306 and between CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294 caused by the CBP KIX mutations. In the wild-type CBP:c-Myb complex, both of the hydrogen bonds stayed relatively stable. In contrast, in the mutant CBP:c-Myb complex, hydrogen bonds between R646 and E306 showed an increasing trend followed by a decreasing trend, and hydrogen

  11. Impact of the nanoparticle-protein corona on colloidal stability and protein structure.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Julia S; Malissek, Marcelina; Simon, Sonja; Knauer, Shirley K; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H; Peukert, Wolfgang; Treuel, Lennart

    2012-06-26

    In biological fluids, proteins may associate with nanoparticles (NPs), leading to the formation of a so-called "protein corona" largely defining the biological identity of the particle. Here, we present a novel approach to assess apparent binding affinities for the adsorption/desorption of proteins to silver NPs based on the impact of the corona formation on the agglomeration kinetics of the colloid. Affinities derived from circular dichroism measurements complement these results, simultaneously elucidating structural changes in the adsorbed protein. Employing human serum albumin as a model, apparent affinities in the nanomolar regime resulted from both approaches. Collectively, our findings now allow discrimination between the formation of protein mono- and multilayers on NP surfaces. PMID:22524519

  12. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  13. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Oh, Jong-Suk

    2012-12-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  14. Dimeric peptides with three different linkers self-assemble with phospholipids to form peptide nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andreas N; Sørensen, Kasper K; Johansen, Nicolai T; Martel, Anne; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Jensen, Knud J; Arleth, Lise; Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    2016-07-01

    Three dimers of the amphipathic α-helical peptide 18A have been synthesized with different interhelical linkers inserted between the two copies of 18A. The dimeric peptides were denoted 'beltides' where Beltide-1 refers to the 18A-dimer without a linker, Beltide-2 is the 18A-dimer with proline (Pro) as a linker and Beltide-3 is the 18A-dimer linked by two glycines (Gly-Gly). The self-assembly of the beltides with the phospholipid DMPC was studied with and without the incorporated membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) through a combination of coarse-grained MD simulations, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle scattering (SAS), static light scattering (SLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For all three beltides, MD and combined small-angle X-ray and -neutron scattering were consistent with a disc structure composed by a phospholipid bilayer surrounded by a belt of peptides and with a total disc diameter of approximately 10 nm. CD confirmed that all three beltides were α-helical in the free form and with DMPC. However, as shown by SEC the different interhelical linkers clearly led to different properties of the beltides. Beltide-3, with the Gly-Gly linker, was very adaptable such that peptide nanodiscs could be formed for a broad range of different peptide to lipid stoichiometries and therefore also possible disc-sizes. On the other hand, both Beltide-2 with the Pro linker and Beltide-1 without a linker were less adaptable and would only form discs of certain peptide to lipid stoichiometries. SLS revealed that the structural stability of the formed peptide nanodiscs was also highly affected by the linkers and it was found that Beltide-1 gave more stable discs than the other two beltides. With respect to membrane protein stabilization, each of the three beltides in combination with DMPC stabilizes the seven-helix transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin significantly better than the detergent octyl glucoside, but no

  15. An ensemble of specifically targeted proteins stabilizes cortical microtubules in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; He, Yudou; Benmerzouga, Imaan; Sullivan, William J.; Morrissette, Naomi S.; Murray, John M.; Hu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Although all microtubules within a single cell are polymerized from virtually identical subunits, different microtubule populations carry out specialized and diverse functions, including directional transport, force generation, and cellular morphogenesis. Functional differentiation requires specific targeting of associated proteins to subsets or even subregions of these polymers. The cytoskeleton of Toxoplasma gondii, an important human parasite, contains at least five distinct tubulin-based structures. In this work, we define the differential localization of proteins along the cortical microtubules of T. gondii, established during daughter biogenesis and regulated by protein expression and exchange. These proteins distinguish cortical from mitotic spindle microtubules, even though the assembly of these subsets is contemporaneous during cell division. Finally, proteins associated with cortical microtubules collectively protect the stability of the polymers with a remarkable degree of functional redundancy. PMID:26680740

  16. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the protein structure and thermal stability of Sauvignon blanc wine.

    PubMed

    Tabilo-Munizaga, Gipsy; Gordon, Trudy Ann; Villalobos-Carvajal, Ricardo; Moreno-Osorio, Luis; Salazar, Fernando N; Pérez-Won, Mario; Acuña, Sergio

    2014-07-15

    Protein haze development in bottled white wines is attributed to the slow denaturation of unstable proteins, which results in their aggregation and flocculation. These protein fractions can be removed by using bentonite; however, a disadvantage of this technique is its cost. The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on wine stability were studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments were performed to analyse the secondary structure of protein, thermal stability was evaluated with differential scanning calorimetry, while a heat test was performed to determine wine protein thermal stability. The results confirmed that high pressure treatments modified the α-helical and β-sheet structures of wine proteins. Throughout the 60 days storage period the α-helix structure in HHP samples decreased. Structural changes by HHP (450 MPa for 3 and 5 min) improve thermal stability of wine proteins and thus delay haze formation in wine during storage. PMID:24594177

  17. Wnt Pathway Stabilizes MeCP2 Protein to Repress PPAR-γ in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Soo-Mi; Chi, Feng; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Lai, Keane; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    PPAR-γ is essential for differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and its loss due to epigenetic repression by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) causes HSC myofibroblastic activation mediated in part via Wnt pathway, the key cellular event in liver fibrosis. Decreased miR-132 was previously proposed to promote MeCP2 protein translation for Ppar-γ repression in activated HSC (aHSC). The present study aimed to test this notion and to better understand the mechanisms of MeCP2 upregulation in aHSC. MeCP2 protein is increased on day 3 to 7 as HSC become activated in primary culture on plastic, but this is accompanied by increased but not reduced miR-132 or miR-212 which is also expected to target MeCP2 due to its similar sequence with miR-132. The levels of these mRNAs are decreased 40~50% in aHSCs isolated from experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis but increased 6-8 fold in aHSC from hepatotoxic liver fibrosis in rats. Suppression of either or both of miR132 and miR212 with specific anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (anti-oligo), does not affect MeCP2 protein levels in aHSCs. The Wnt antagonist FJ9 which inhibits HSC activation, increases miR-132/miR-212, reduces MeCP2 and its enrichment at 5' Ppar-γ promoter, and restores Ppar-γ expression but the anti-oligo do not prevent Ppar-γ upregulation. The pan-NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) also reduces both MeCP2 and stabilized non-(S33/S37/Thr41)-phospho β-catenin and reverts aHSC to quiescent cells but do not affect miR-132/miR-212 levels. Wnt antagonism with FJ9 increases MeCP2 protein degradation in cultured HSC, and FJ9-mediated loss of MeCP2 is rescued by leupeptin but not by proteasome and lysozome inhibitors. In conclusion, canonical Wnt pathway increases MeCP2 protein due to protein stability which in turn represses Ppar-γ and activates HSC. PMID:27214381

  18. Wnt Pathway Stabilizes MeCP2 Protein to Repress PPAR-γ in Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Soo-Mi; Chi, Feng; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Lai, Keane; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    PPAR-γ is essential for differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and its loss due to epigenetic repression by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) causes HSC myofibroblastic activation mediated in part via Wnt pathway, the key cellular event in liver fibrosis. Decreased miR-132 was previously proposed to promote MeCP2 protein translation for Ppar-γ repression in activated HSC (aHSC). The present study aimed to test this notion and to better understand the mechanisms of MeCP2 upregulation in aHSC. MeCP2 protein is increased on day 3 to 7 as HSC become activated in primary culture on plastic, but this is accompanied by increased but not reduced miR-132 or miR-212 which is also expected to target MeCP2 due to its similar sequence with miR-132. The levels of these mRNAs are decreased 40~50% in aHSCs isolated from experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis but increased 6–8 fold in aHSC from hepatotoxic liver fibrosis in rats. Suppression of either or both of miR132 and miR212 with specific anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (anti-oligo), does not affect MeCP2 protein levels in aHSCs. The Wnt antagonist FJ9 which inhibits HSC activation, increases miR-132/miR-212, reduces MeCP2 and its enrichment at 5’ Ppar-γ promoter, and restores Ppar-γ expression but the anti-oligo do not prevent Ppar-γ upregulation. The pan-NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) also reduces both MeCP2 and stabilized non-(S33/S37/Thr41)-phospho β-catenin and reverts aHSC to quiescent cells but do not affect miR-132/miR-212 levels. Wnt antagonism with FJ9 increases MeCP2 protein degradation in cultured HSC, and FJ9-mediated loss of MeCP2 is rescued by leupeptin but not by proteasome and lysozome inhibitors. In conclusion, canonical Wnt pathway increases MeCP2 protein due to protein stability which in turn represses Ppar-γ and activates HSC. PMID:27214381

  19. Dietary protein level affects iridescent coloration in Anna's hummingbirds, Calypte anna

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Melissa G.; Roudybush, Thomas E.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Many animal displays involve colorful ornamental traits that signal an individual's quality as a mate or rival. Brilliant iridescent ornaments are common, but little is currently known about their production cost and signaling value. One potential cost of colorful ornaments is the acquisition of limited dietary resources that may be involved, directly or indirectly, in their production. Protein, the primary component of bird feathers and of many nanostructural components of iridescent traits, is naturally restricted in hummingbird diets (comprised mostly of sugars), suggesting that iridescent coloration may be especially challenging to produce in these animals. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of dietary protein availability during molt on iridescent color expression in male Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna). We fed captive birds either a 6% (high) or a 3% (low) protein diet and stimulated molt by plucking half the gorget and crown ornaments on each bird as well as the non-ornamental iridescent green tail feathers. We found that birds receiving more protein grew significantly more colorful crown feathers (higher red chroma and redder hue) than those fed the low-protein diet. Diet did not affect gorget coloration, but regrowth of feathers in captivity affected both gorget and crown coloration. Additionally, birds on the high-protein diet grew yellower (higher hue) green tail feathers than birds on the low-protein diet. These results indicate that iridescent ornamental feathers are sensitive to diet quality and may serve as honest signals of nutrition to mates or rivals. Further, because both ornamental and non-ornamental iridescent coloration were affected by conditions during their growth, iridescent color in these birds appears to be generally condition dependent. PMID:22837446

  20. Dietary protein level affects iridescent coloration in Anna's hummingbirds, Calypte anna.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Melissa G; Roudybush, Thomas E; McGraw, Kevin J

    2012-08-15

    Many animal displays involve colorful ornamental traits that signal an individual's quality as a mate or rival. Brilliant iridescent ornaments are common, but little is currently known about their production cost and signaling value. One potential cost of colorful ornaments is the acquisition of limited dietary resources that may be involved, directly or indirectly, in their production. Protein, the primary component of bird feathers and of many nanostructural components of iridescent traits, is naturally restricted in hummingbird diets (comprised mostly of sugars), suggesting that iridescent coloration may be especially challenging to produce in these animals. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of dietary protein availability during molt on iridescent color expression in male Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna). We fed captive birds either a 6% (high) or a 3% (low) protein diet and stimulated molt by plucking half the gorget and crown ornaments on each bird as well as the non-ornamental iridescent green tail feathers. We found that birds receiving more protein grew significantly more colorful crown feathers (higher red chroma and redder hue) than those fed the low-protein diet. Diet did not affect gorget coloration, but regrowth of feathers in captivity affected both gorget and crown coloration. Additionally, birds on the high-protein diet grew yellower (higher hue) green tail feathers than birds on the low-protein diet. These results indicate that iridescent ornamental feathers are sensitive to diet quality and may serve as honest signals of nutrition to mates or rivals. Further, because both ornamental and non-ornamental iridescent coloration were affected by conditions during their growth, iridescent color in these birds appears to be generally condition dependent. PMID:22837446

  1. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-21

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. Furthermore, these results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  2. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-21

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. Furthermore, these results could serve asmore » guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.« less

  3. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  4. Type of packaging affects the colour stability of vitamin E enriched beef.

    PubMed

    Nassu, Renata T; Uttaro, Bethany; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Zawadski, Sophie; Juárez, Manuel; Dugan, Michael E R

    2012-12-01

    Colour stability is a very important parameter for meat retail display, as appearance of the product is the deciding factor for consumers at time of purchase. This study investigated the possibility of extending appearance shelf-life through the combined use of packaging method (overwrapping - OVER, modified atmosphere - MAP, vacuum skin packaging - VSP and a combination of modified atmosphere and vacuum skin packaging - MAPVSP) and antioxidants (vitamin E enriched beef). Retail attributes (appearance, lean colour, % surface discolouration), as well as colour space analysis of images for red, green and blue parameters were measured over 18days. MAPVSP provided the most desirable retail appearance during the first 4days of retail display, while VSP-HB had the best colour stability. Overall, packaging type was more influential than α-tocopherol levels on meat colour stability, although α-tocopherol levels (>4μgg(-1) meat) had a protective effect when using high oxygen packaging methods. PMID:22953936

  5. A Varp-Binding Protein, RACK1, Regulates Dendrite Outgrowth through Stabilization of Varp Protein in Mouse Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Marubashi, Soujiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    Varp (VPS9-ankyrin repeat protein) in melanocytes is thought to function as a key player in the pigmentation of mammals. Varp regulates two different melanocyte functions: (i) transport of melanogenic enzymes to melanosomes by functioning as a Rab32/38 effector and (ii) promotion of dendrite outgrowth by functioning as a Rab21-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The Varp protein level has recently been shown to be negatively regulated by proteasomal degradation through interaction of the ankyrin repeat 2 (ANKR2) domain of Varp with Rab40C. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Varp escapes from Rab40C and retains its own expression level remain completely unknown. Here, we identified RACK1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) as a Varp-ANKR2 binding partner and investigated its involvement in Varp stabilization in mouse melanocytes. The results showed that knockdown of endogenous RACK1 in melanocytes caused dramatic reduction of the Varp protein level and inhibition of dendrite outgrowth, and intriguingly, overexpression of RACK1 inhibited the interaction between Varp and Rab40C and counteracted the negative effect of Rab40C on dendrite outgrowth. These findings indicated that RACK1 competes with Rab40C for binding to the ANKR2 domain of Varp and regulates dendrite outgrowth through stabilization of Varp in mouse melanocytes. PMID:27066885

  6. On the physics of thermal-stability changes upon mutations of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shota; Oshima, Hiraku; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    It is of great interest from both scientific and practical viewpoints to theoretically predict the thermal-stability changes upon mutations of a protein. However, such a prediction is an intricate task. Up to now, significantly many approaches for the prediction have been reported in the literature. They always include parameters which are adjusted so that the prediction results can be best fitted to the experimental data for a sufficiently large set of proteins and mutations. The inclusion is necessitated to achieve satisfactorily high prediction performance. A problem is that the resulting values of the parameters are often physically meaningless, and the physicochemical factors governing the thermal-stability changes upon mutations are rather ambiguous. Here, we develop a new measure of the thermal stability. Protein folding is accompanied by a large gain of water entropy (the entropic excluded-volume (EV) effect), loss of protein conformational entropy, and increase in enthalpy. The enthalpy increase originates primarily from the following: The energy increase due to the break of protein-water hydrogen bonds (HBs) upon folding cannot completely be cancelled out by the energy decrease brought by the formation of protein intramolecular HBs. We develop the measure on the basis of only these three factors and apply it to the prediction of the thermal-stability changes upon mutations. As a consequence, an approach toward the prediction is obtained. It is distinguished from the previously reported approaches in the following respects: The parameters adjusted in the manner mentioned above are not employed at all, and the entropic EV effect, which is ascribed to the translational displacement of water molecules coexisting with the protein in the system, is fully taken into account using a molecular model for water. Our approach is compared with one of the most popular approaches, FOLD-X, in terms of the prediction performance not only for single mutations but also for

  7. Influence of the molecular weight of carboxymethylcellulose on properties and stability of whey protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Huan, Yan; Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2016-05-01

    The influence of the molecular weight (Mw; 270, 750, and 2,500 kDa) and concentration of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the stability and properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions were assessed by measuring ζ-potential, droplet size, apparent viscosity, protein surface coverage, and creaming stability. Emulsions were prepared to contain 5% oil, 0.5% WPI, and 0 to 0.5% CMC at pH 7. After emulsification, pH was adjusted to 5.2. In the absence of CMC, the WPI-stabilized emulsion was unstable to droplet flocculation and coalescence due to the relatively low droplet charge. Emulsions stabilized by mixed WPI-CMC had improved surface properties as well as reduced droplet flocculation, as indicated by increased negative charges and protein surface coverage as well as smaller droplet size. Increased viscosity due to nonadsorbed CMC also contributed to increased stability at high CMC concentration. The high-Mw CMC was more effective in enhancing surface properties and providing better stability against creaming compared with lower-Mw CMC. Maximum stability was achieved with mixed WPI-CMC stabilized emulsion containing 0.08% CMC 2,500 kDa. PMID:26947286

  8. Stability of Intercellular Exchange of Biochemical Substances Affected by Variability of Environmental Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Budinčević, Mirko; Balaž, Igor; Mihailović, Anja

    Communication between cells is realized by exchange of biochemical substances. Due to internal organization of living systems and variability of external parameters, the exchange is heavily influenced by perturbations of various parameters at almost all stages of the process. Since communication is one of essential processes for functioning of living systems it is of interest to investigate conditions for its stability. Using previously developed simplified model of bacterial communication in a form of coupled difference logistic equations we investigate stability of exchange of signaling molecules under variability of internal and external parameters.

  9. Quality of casein based Mozzarella cheese analogue as affected by stabilizer blends.

    PubMed

    Jana, A H; Patel, H G; Suneeta, Pinto; Prajapati, J P

    2010-03-01

    Suitability of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG), carrageenan (CAR)-LBG, and XG-CAR in 1:1 proportion at 0.42% in the formulation was assessed in the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese analogue. The stabilizer blends did not significantly influence the composition, texture profile, organoleptic, baking qualities and pizza-related characteristics of cheese analogues. Considering the influence of stabilizer blend on the sensory quality of analogue and sensory rating of pizza pie, XG-LBG blend (1:1) was preferred over XG-CAR and CAR-LBG. PMID:23572632

  10. Stability of major allergen tropomyosin and other food proteins of mud crab (Scylla serrata) by in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stability in simulated gastric fluid is regarded as an important parameter for the estimation of food allergenicity. In this study, the digestive stability of allergenic protein tropomyosin (TM) and other food proteins from mud crab in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), and simulated intestinal fluid (S...

  11. Estimating conformation content of a protein using citrate-stabilized Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Jashmini; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2010-08-01

    Herein we report the use of the optical properties of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for estimation of native or denatured conformation content in a mixture of a protein in solution. The UV-vis extinction spectrum of citrate-stabilized Au NPs is known to broaden differently in the presence of native and denatured states of α-amylase, bovine serum albumin (BSA) or amyloglucosidase (AMG). On the other hand, herein we show that when a mixture of native and denatured protein was present in the medium, the broadening of the spectrum differed for different fractional content of the conformations. Also, the total area under the extinction spectrum varied linearly with the change in the mole fraction content of a state and for a constant total protein concentration. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements revealed different levels of agglomeration for different fractional contents of the native or denatured state of a protein. In addition, time-dependent denaturation of a protein could be followed using the present method. The rate constants calculated for denaturation indicated a possible fast change in conformation of a protein before complete thermal denaturation. The observations have been explained based on the changes in extinction coefficient (thereby oscillator strength) upon interaction of citrate-stabilized NPs with proteins being in different states and levels of agglomeration.Herein we report the use of the optical properties of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for estimation of native or denatured conformation content in a mixture of a protein in solution. The UV-vis extinction spectrum of citrate-stabilized Au NPs is known to broaden differently in the presence of native and denatured states of α-amylase, bovine serum albumin (BSA) or amyloglucosidase (AMG). On the other hand, herein we show that when a mixture of native and denatured protein was present in the medium, the broadening of the spectrum differed for

  12. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates apoptosis by stabilizing the BH3-only protein Bim.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; Weston, Ross; Anderton, Holly; Ninnis, Robert; Goel, Pranay; Coley, Andrew; Huang, David C S; Wu, Li; Strasser, Andreas; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2011-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl2 homology domain 3(BH3)-only protein Bim is controlled by stringent post-translational regulation, predominantly through alterations in phosphorylation status. To identify new kinases involved in its regulation, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using a non-spliceable variant of the predominant isoform--Bim(EL)--as the bait and identified the regulatory subunit of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A--PRKAR1A--as an interacting partner. We also show that protein kinase A (PKA) is a Bim(EL) isoform-specific kinase that promotes its stabilization. Inhibition of PKA or mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site within Bim(EL) resulted in its accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation. These results might have implications for human diseases that are characterized by abnormally increased PKA activity, such as the Carney complex and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:21151042

  13. Effects of rice bran protein hydrolysates on the physicochemical stability of oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Cheetangdee, Nopparat

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of proteins from rice bran was studied, comparing alkaline- and carbohydrase-aided extraction. It was found that protein extractability could be effectively improved using carbohydrases (Viscozyme L and α-amylase), especially when mechanical force was incorporated. Then, rice bran protein hydrolysates (RBPH) were prepared at various degrees of hydrolysis (DH), and employed to stabilize soybean O/W emulsion. Improved colloidal stability of the emulsions could be achieved using RBPH, especially at higher DH level, as indicated by an increase in the emulsifying activity index and better long-term dispersibility. The present work novelty suggested the efficiency of RBPH to improve oxidative stability of the emulsions. The most potent antioxidant activity was exhibited by RBPH with DH of 6.4 and 7.6%. With their efficiency to promote physicochemical stability of the emulsions, RBPH might be potently employed as a natural additive in emulsified food products, which is significant to value addition of rice bran for further industrial application. PMID:25391683

  14. Molecular Dynamics Driven Design of pH-Stabilized Mutants of MNEI, a Sweet Protein

    PubMed Central

    Picone, Delia

    2016-01-01

    MNEI is a single chain derivative of monellin, a plant protein that can interact with the human sweet taste receptor, being therefore perceived as sweet. This unusual physiological activity makes MNEI a potential template for the design of new sugar replacers for the food and beverage industry. Unfortunately, applications of MNEI have been so far limited by its intrinsic sensitivity to some pH and temperature conditions, which could occur in industrial processes. Changes in physical parameters can, in fact, lead to irreversible protein denaturation, as well as aggregation and precipitation. It has been previously shown that the correlation between pH and stability in MNEI derives from the presence of a single glutamic residue in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. We have used molecular dynamics to study the consequences, at the atomic level, of the protonation state of such residue and have identified the network of intramolecular interactions responsible for MNEI stability at acidic pH. Based on this information, we have designed a pH-independent, stabilized mutant of MNEI and confirmed its increased stability by both molecular modeling and experimental techniques. PMID:27340829

  15. SUMF1 mutations affecting stability and activity of formylglycine generating enzyme predict clinical outcome in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Ennemann, Eva Charlotte; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Chakrapani, Anupam; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Moser, Hugo; Steinmann, Beat; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is caused by mutations in the sulfatase-modifying factor 1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE post translationally activates all newly synthesized sulfatases by generating the catalytic residue formylglycine. Impaired FGE function leads to reduced sulfatase activities. Patients display combined clinical symptoms of single sulfatase deficiencies. For ten MSD patients, we determined the clinical phenotype, FGE expression, localization and stability, as well as residual FGE and sulfatase activities. A neonatal, very severe clinical phenotype resulted from a combination of two nonsense mutations leading to almost fully abrogated FGE activity, highly unstable FGE protein and nearly undetectable sulfatase activities. A late infantile mild phenotype resulted from FGE G263V leading to unstable protein but high residual FGE activity. Other missense mutations resulted in a late infantile severe phenotype because of unstable protein with low residual FGE activity. Patients with identical mutations displayed comparable clinical phenotypes. These data confirm the hypothesis that the phenotypic outcome in MSD depends on both residual FGE activity as well as protein stability. Predicting the clinical course in case of molecularly characterized mutations seems feasible, which will be helpful for genetic counseling and developing therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancement of FGE. PMID:21224894

  16. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  17. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  18. Conformational stability of HPr: the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Scholtz, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    The conformational stability of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) from Bacillus subtilis has been determined using a combination of thermal unfolding and solvent denaturation experiments. The urea-induced denaturation of HPr was monitored spectroscopically at fixed temperatures and thermal unfolding was performed in the presence of fixed concentrations of urea. These data were analyzed in several different ways to afford a measure of the cardinal parameters (delta Hg, Tg, delta Sg, and delta Cp) that describe the thermodynamics of folding for HPr. The method of Pace and Laurents (Pace CN, Laurents DV, 1989, Biochemistry 28:2520-2525) was used to estimate delta Cp as was a global analysis of the thermal- and urea-induced unfolding data. Each method used to analyze the data gives a similar value for delta Cp (1,170 +/- 50 cal mol-1K-1). Despite the high melting temperature for HPr (Tg = 73.5 degrees C), the maximum stability of the protein, which occurs at 26 degrees C, is quite modest (delta Gs = 4.2 kcal mol-1). In the presence of moderate concentrations of urea, HPr exhibits cold denaturation, and thus a complete stability curve for HPr, including a measure of delta Cp, can be achieved using the method of Chen and Schellman (Chen B, Schellman JA, 1989, Biochemistry 28:685-691). A comparison of the different methods for the analysis of solvent denaturation curves is provided and the effects of urea on the thermal stability of this small globular protein are discussed. The methods presented will be of general utility in the characterization of the stability curve for many small proteins. PMID:7773175

  19. Nitrogen transformation and nitrous oxide emissions affected by biochar amendment and fertilizer stabilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar as a soil amendment and the use of fertilizer stabilizers (N transformation inhibitors) have been shown to reduce N2O emissions, but the mechanisms or processes involved are not well understood. The objective of this research was to investigate N transformation processes and the relationship...

  20. Temporal stability of soil water contents as affected by weather patterns: a simulation study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) is a natural phenomenon that recently attracts attention and finds multiple applications. Large variations in the interannual and interseasonal TS SWC have been encountered among locations studied by various authors. The objective of this work was ...

  1. Organic Matter and Water Stability of Field Aggregates Affected by Tillage in South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased tillage intensity has been associated with declines in soil organic matter (SOM). A case study was conducted (2001-2004) on adjacent farms (both in a two-year crop rotation) in eastern South Dakota to quantify tillage effects on components of SOM and soil aggregate stability. One farm used...

  2. Factors Affecting the Stability of Biodiesel Sold in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R. L.; Ratcliff, M.; Moens, L.; Lawrence, R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a survey of biodiesel quality and stability in the United States, 27 biodiesel (B100) samples were collected from blenders and distributor nationwide. For this sample set, 85% met all of the requirements of the industry standard for biodiesel, ASTM D6751.

  3. Temporal stability of soil water content as affected by climate: a simulation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) is a natural phenomenon that recently attracts attention and finds multiple applications. Weather and climate are usually mentioned as a factor of TS SWC, but its effect is far from clear. The objective of this work was to use soil water modeling to ...

  4. AN EVALUATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF HEAVY METAL SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/stabilization (SIS) of hazardous waste involves mixing the waste with a binder material to enhance the physical properties of the waste and to immobilize contaminants that may be detrimental to the environment. Many hazardous wastes contain materials that are know...

  5. How can climate, soil, and monitoring schedule affect temporal stability of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability (TS) of soil water content (SWC) reflects the spatio-temporal organization of soil water. The TS SWC was originally recognized as a phenomenon that can be used to provide temporal average SWC of an area of interest from observations at a representative location(s). Currently appli...

  6. Stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates affected by application of apatite, lime, and charcoal.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongbiao; Ma, Kaiqiang; Fan, Yuchao; Peng, Xinhua; Mao, Jingdong; Zhou, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhongbin; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Only a few studies have been reported on the stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates after soil treatments to reduce the availability of heavy metals. In this study, apatite (22.3 t ha(-1)), lime (4.45 t ha(-1)), and charcoal (66.8 t ha(-1)) were applied to a heavy metal-contaminated soil for 4 years. The stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates were investigated by dry and wet sieving. No significant change in the dry mean weight diameter was observed in any treatments. Compared with the control, three-amendment treatments significantly increased the wet mean weight diameter, but only charcoal treatment significantly increased the wet aggregate stability. The soil treatments increased the content of soil organic carbon, and the fraction 0.25-2 mm contained the highest content of soil organic carbon. Amendments' application slightly increased soil total Cu and Cd, but decreased the concentrations of CaCl2 -extractable Cu and Cd except for the fraction <0.053 mm. The fractions >2 and 0.25-2 mm contained the highest concentrations of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd, accounted for about 74.5-86.8 % of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd in soil. The results indicated that amendments' application increased the wet soil aggregate stability and decreased the available Cu and Cd. The distribution of available heavy metals in wet soil aggregates was not controlled by soil aggregate stability, but possibly by soil organic carbon. PMID:26893180

  7. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  8. Recombinant Protein-Stabilized Monodisperse Microbubbles with Tunable Size Using a Valve-Based Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles are used as contrast enhancing agents in ultrasound sonography and more recently have shown great potential as theranostic agents that enable both diagnostics and therapy. Conventional production methods lead to highly polydisperse microbubbles, which compromise the effectiveness of ultrasound imaging and therapy. Stabilizing microbubbles with surfactant molecules that can impart functionality and properties that are desirable for specific applications would enhance the utility of microbubbles. Here we generate monodisperse microbubbles with a large potential for functionalization by combining a microfluidic method and recombinant protein technology. Our microfluidic device uses an air-actuated membrane valve that enables production of monodisperse microbubbles with narrow size distribution. The size of microbubbles can be precisely tuned by dynamically changing the dimension of the channel using the valve. The microbubbles are stabilized by an amphiphilic protein, oleosin, which provides versatility in controlling the functionalization of microbubbles through recombinant biotechnology. We show that it is critical to control the composition of the stabilizing agents to enable formation of highly stable and monodisperse microbubbles that are echogenic under ultrasound insonation. Our protein-shelled microbubbles based on the combination of microfluidic generation and recombinant protein technology provide a promising platform for ultrasound-related applications. PMID:25265041

  9. Protein stabilizer, NDSB-195, enhances the dynamics of the β4 -α2 loop of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haimei; Hosoda, Kazuo; Ishii, Takeshi; Arai, Ryo; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Terawaki, Shin-Ichi; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    Non-detergent sulfobetaines (NDSBs) are a new group of small, synthetic protein stabilizers, which have advantages over classical compatible osmolytes, such as polyol, amines, and amino acids: they do not increase solution viscosity, unlike polyols, and they are zwitterionic at all pH ranges, unlike amines and amino acids. NDSBs also facilitate the crystallization and refolding of proteins. The mechanism whereby NDSBs exhibit such activities, however, remains elusive. To gain insight into this mechanism, we studied, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the effects of dimethylethylammonium propane sulfonate (NDSB-195) on the dynamics of ubiquitin, on which a wealth of information has been accumulated. By analyzing the line width of amide proton resonances and the transverse relaxation rates of nitrogen atoms, we found that NDSB-195 enhances the microsecond-millisecond dynamics of a β4 -α2 loop of ubiquitin. Although those compounds that enhance protein dynamics are generally considered to destabilize protein molecules, NDSB-195 enhanced the stability of ubiquitin against guanidium chloride denaturation. Thus, the simultaneous enhancement of stability and flexibility by a single compound can be attained. PMID:26856691

  10. Higher endogenous methionine in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds affects the composition of storage proteins and lipids.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hagai; Pajak, Agnieszka; Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Amir, Rachel; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies demonstrate that exogenous application of the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine into cultured soybean cotyledons and seedlings reduces the level of methionine-poor storage proteins and elevates those that are methionine-rich. However, the effect of higher endogenous methionine in seeds on the composition of storage products in vivo is not studied yet. We have recently produced transgenic Arabidopsis seeds having significantly higher levels of methionine. In the present work we used these seeds as a model system and profiled them for changes in the abundances of 12S-globulins and 2S-albumins, the two major groups of storage proteins, using 2D-gels and MALDI-MS detection. The findings suggest that higher methionine affects from a certain threshold the accumulation of several subunits of 12S-globulins and 2S-albumins, regardless of their methionine contents, resulting in higher total protein contents. The mRNA abundances of most of the genes encoding these proteins were either correlated or not correlated with the abundances of these proteins, implying that methionine may regulate storage proteins at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The elevations in total protein contents resulted in reduction of total lipids and altered the fatty acid composition. Altogether, the data provide new insights into the regulatory roles of elevated methionine levels on seed composition. PMID:26888094

  11. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  12. Protein adsorption at the electrified air-water interface: implications on foam stability.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Rumpel, Armin; Walter, Johannes; Dombrowski, Jannika; Kulozik, Ulrich; Braunschweig, Björn; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-22

    The surface chemistry of ions, water molecules, and proteins as well as their ability to form stable networks in foams can influence and control macroscopic properties such as taste and texture of dairy products considerably. Despite the significant relevance of protein adsorption at liquid interfaces, a molecular level understanding on the arrangement of proteins at interfaces and their interactions has been elusive. Therefore, we have addressed the adsorption of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the air-water interface with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry. SFG provides specific information on the composition and average orientation of molecules at interfaces, while complementary information on the thickness of the adsorbed layer can be obtained with ellipsometry. Adsorption of charged BSA proteins at the water surface leads to an electrified interface, pH dependent charging, and electric field-induced polar ordering of interfacial H(2)O and BSA. Varying the bulk pH of protein solutions changes the intensities of the protein related vibrational bands substantially, while dramatic changes in vibrational bands of interfacial H(2)O are simultaneously observed. These observations have allowed us to determine the isoelectric point of BSA directly at the electrolyte-air interface for the first time. BSA covered air-water interfaces with a pH near the isoelectric point form an amorphous network of possibly agglomerated BSA proteins. Finally, we provide a direct correlation of the molecular structure of BSA interfaces with foam stability and new information on the link between microscopic properties of BSA at water surfaces and macroscopic properties such as the stability of protein foams. PMID:22530646

  13. Regulation of FSP27 protein stability by AMPK and HSC70.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Heckmann, Bradlee L; Xie, Xitao; Saarinen, Alicia M; Liu, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) plays a pivotal role in controlling the formation of large lipid droplet and energy metabolism. The cellular levels of FSP27 are tightly regulated through the proteasomal ubiquitin-mediated degradation. However, the upstream signals that trigger FSP27 degradation and the underlying mechanism(s) have yet to be identified. Here we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation by AICAR (5-amino-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide) or phenformin induced the ubiquitination of FSP27 and promoted its degradation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The levels of FSP27 protein could be maintained by either knocking down AMPKα1 or blocking proteasomal pathway. Moreover, AICAR treatment induced multilocularization of LDs in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, reminiscent of the morphological changes in cells depleted of FSP27. Furthermore, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis identified heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) as a novel binding protein of FSP27. The specific interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of both ectopically expressed and endogenous proteins. Importantly, knockdown of HSC70 by small interference RNA resulted in increased half-life of FSP27 in cells treated with a protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) or AICAR. However, silencing of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (COOH terminus of HSC70-interacting protein) failed to alter the stability of FSP27 protein under both conditions. Taken together, our data indicate that AMPK is a negative regulator of FSP27 stability through the proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process. Promotion of FSP27 degradation may be an important factor responsible for the beneficial effect of AMPK activators on energy metabolism. PMID:25315694

  14. Regulation of FSP27 protein stability by AMPK and HSC70

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Heckmann, Bradlee L.; Xie, Xitao; Saarinen, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) plays a pivotal role in controlling the formation of large lipid droplet and energy metabolism. The cellular levels of FSP27 are tightly regulated through the proteasomal ubiquitin-mediated degradation. However, the upstream signals that trigger FSP27 degradation and the underlying mechanism(s) have yet to be identified. Here we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation by AICAR (5-amino-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide) or phenformin induced the ubiquitination of FSP27 and promoted its degradation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The levels of FSP27 protein could be maintained by either knocking down AMPKα1 or blocking proteasomal pathway. Moreover, AICAR treatment induced multilocularization of LDs in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, reminiscent of the morphological changes in cells depleted of FSP27. Furthermore, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis identified heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) as a novel binding protein of FSP27. The specific interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of both ectopically expressed and endogenous proteins. Importantly, knockdown of HSC70 by small interference RNA resulted in increased half-life of FSP27 in cells treated with a protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) or AICAR. However, silencing of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (COOH terminus of HSC70-interacting protein) failed to alter the stability of FSP27 protein under both conditions. Taken together, our data indicate that AMPK is a negative regulator of FSP27 stability through the proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process. Promotion of FSP27 degradation may be an important factor responsible for the beneficial effect of AMPK activators on energy metabolism. PMID:25315694

  15. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  16. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  17. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream as affected by ice structuring proteins from winter wheat grass.

    PubMed

    Regand, A; Goff, H D

    2006-01-01

    Ice recrystallization in quiescently frozen sucrose solutions that contained some of the ingredients commonly found in ice cream and in ice cream manufactured under commercial conditions, with or without ice structuring proteins (ISP) from cold-acclimated winter wheat grass extract (AWWE), was assessed by bright field microscopy. In sucrose solutions, critical differences in moisture content, viscosity, ionic strength, and other properties derived from the presence of other ingredients (skim milk powder, corn syrup solids, locust bean gum) caused a reduction in ice crystal growth. Significant ISP activity in retarding ice crystal growth was observed in all solutions (44% for the most complex mix) containing 0.13% total protein from AWWE. In heat-shocked ice cream, ice recrystallization rates were significantly reduced 40 and 46% with the addition of 0.0025 and 0.0037% total protein from AWWE. The ISP activity in ice cream was not hindered by its inclusion in mix prior to pasteurization. A synergistic effect between ISP and stabilizer was observed, as ISP activity was reduced in the absence of stabilizer in ice cream formulations. A remarkably smoother texture for ice creams containing ISP after heat-shock storage was evident by sensory evaluation. The efficiency of ISP from AWWE in controlling ice crystal growth in ice cream has been demonstrated. PMID:16357267

  18. Protein corona composition of gold nanoparticles/nanorods affects amyloid beta fibrillation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Zohreh; Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ghavami, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades, nanoparticles (NPs) were recognized as one of the most promising tools for inhibiting the progress of the disease by controlling the fibrillation kinetic process; for instance, gold NPs have a strong capability to inhibit Aβ fibrillations. It is now well understood that a layer of biomolecules would cover the surface of NPs (so called ``protein corona'') upon the interaction of NPs with protein sources. Due to the fact that the biological species (e.g., cells and amyloidal proteins) ``see'' the protein corona coated NPs rather than the pristine coated particles, one should monitor the fibrillation process of amyloidal proteins in the presence of corona coated NPs (and not pristine coated ones). Therefore, the previously obtained data on NPs effects on the fibrillation process should be modified to achieve a more reliable and predictable in vivo results. Herein, we probed the effects of various gold NPs (with different sizes and shapes) on the fibrillation process of Aβ in the presence and absence of protein sources (i.e., serum and plasma). We found that the protein corona formed a shell at the surface of gold NPs, regardless of their size and shape, reducing the access of Aβ to the gold inhibitory surface and, therefore, affecting the rate of Aβ fibril formation. More specifically, the anti-fibrillation potencies of various corona coated gold NPs were strongly dependent on the protein source and their concentrations (10% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vitro milieu) and 100% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vivo milieu)).Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades

  19. Brd4-mediated nuclear retention of the papillomavirus E2 protein contributes to its stabilization in host cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Qing; Diaz, Jason; You, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Papillomavirus E2 is a multifunctional viral protein that regulates many aspects of the viral life cycle including viral episome maintenance, transcriptional activation, and repression. E2 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 has been implicated in the stabilization of the E2 protein. E2 normally shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In this study, we demonstrate that E2 ubiquitylation mostly occurs in the cytoplasm. We also find that the interaction with Brd4 promotes nuclear retention of papillomavirus E2 proteins and contributes to their stabilization in the nucleus. Compared to wild type E2 proteins, nuclear-localization-defective mutants are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway; however, co-expression of Brd4 redirects these mutants into the nucleus and significantly increases their stability. We further demonstrate that tethering E2 proteins to chromatin as either double-bromodomain fusion proteins or histone 2B (H2B) fusion proteins significantly stabilizes the E2 proteins. Our studies suggest that chromatin recruitment of the E2 protein via interaction with Brd4 prevents E2 ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm, leading to its stabilization in the nucleus. These studies bring new insights for understanding Brd4-mediated E2 stabilization, and provide an additional mechanism by which the chromatin-associated Brd4 regulates E2 functions. PMID:24448221

  20. Water Collective Dynamics in Whole Photosynthetic Green Algae as Affected by Protein Single Mutation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Daniela; Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya D; Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; De Francesco, Alessio; Campi, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    In the context of the importance of water molecules for protein function/dynamics relationship, the role of water collective dynamics in Chlamydomonas green algae carrying both native and mutated photosynthetic proteins has been investigated by neutron Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Results show that single point genetic mutation may notably affect collective density fluctuations in hydrating water providing important insight on the transmission of information possibly correlated to biological functionality. In particular, we highlight that the damping factor of the excitations is larger in the native compared to the mutant algae as a signature of a different plasticity and structure of the hydrogen bond network. PMID:27300078

  1. On the pH-optimum of activity and stability of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Kemper; Alexov, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Biological macromolecules evolved to perform their function in specific cellular environment (subcellular compartments or tissues); therefore, they should be adapted to the biophysical characteristics of the corresponding environment, one of them being the characteristic pH. Many macromolecular properties are pH dependent, such as activity and stability. However, only activity is biologically important, while stability may not be crucial for the corresponding reaction. Here we show that the pH-optimum of activity (the pH of maximal activity) is correlated with the pH-optimum of stability (the pH of maximal stability) on a set of 310 proteins with available experimental data. We speculate that such a correlation is needed to allow the corresponding macromolecules to tolerate small pH fluctuations that are inevitable with cellular function. Our findings rationalize the efforts of correlating the pH of maximal stability and the characteristic pH of subcellular compartments, since only pH of activity is subject of evolutionary pressure. In addition, our analysis confirmed the previous observation that pH-optimum of activity and stability are not correlated with the isoelectric point, pI, or with the optimal temperature. PMID:20589630

  2. Conformational changes of α-lactalbumin adsorbed at oil-water interfaces: interplay between protein structure and emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jiali; Hoffmann, Søren V; Day, Li; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Augustin, Mary Ann; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Wooster, Tim J

    2012-02-01

    the electrostatic repulsion and the lack of covalent disulfide interchange reactions. This study reports new information on the secondary and tertiary structural changes of α-La upon adsorption to oil-water interfaces. It also presents new results on the physical stability of α-La stabilized emulsions during heating and at moderate ionic strength (120 mM NaCl). The results broaden our understanding of the factors controlling protein structural change at emulsion interfaces and how this affects emulsion stability. PMID:22201548

  3. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level. PMID:26091838

  4. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  5. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  6. Landfast ice affects the stability of the Arctic halocline: Evidence from a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkin, Polona; Losch, Martin; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    Landfast ice covers large surface areas of the winter Siberian Seas. The immobile landfast ice cover inhibits divergent and convergent motion, hence dynamical sea ice growth and redistribution, decouples winter river plumes in coastal seas from the atmosphere, and positions polynyas at the landfast ice edge offshore. In spite of the potentially large effects, state-of-the-art numerical models usually do not represent landfast ice in its correct extent. A simple parametrization of landfast ice based on bathymetry and internal sea ice strength is introduced and its effects on the simulated Arctic Ocean are demonstrated. The simulations suggest that the Siberian landfast ice impacts the Arctic halocline stability through enhanced brine production in polynyas located closer to the shelf break and by redirecting river water to the Canadian Basin. These processes strengthen the halocline in the Canadian Basin, but erode its stability in the Makarov and Eurasian Basins.

  7. Stabilization of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by a 21 000-dalton hepatic microsomal protein.

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, A; Burchell, B; Monaco, M; Walls, H E; Arion, W J

    1985-01-01

    Hepatic microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase activity was rendered extremely unstable by a variety of techniques: (a) incubation at pH 5.0; (b) extraction of the microsomal fraction in the presence of 1% Lubrol; (c) various purification procedures. These techniques all result in the removal of a 21 kDa polypeptide from the fraction containing glucose-6-phosphatase activity. The 21 kDa protein was purified to apparent homogeneity by solubilization in the detergent Lubrol 12A-9 and chromatography on Fractogel TSK DEAE-650(S) and centrifugation at 105 000 g. The 21 kDa protein stabilizes glucose-6-phosphatase activity, whereas other purified hepatic microsomal proteins do not. The 21 kDa protein appears to be a potential regulator of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2996501

  8. Factors affecting stepladder stability during a lateral weight transfer: a study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Shiang; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2005-09-01

    A fall from a stepladder is often initiated by a loss of lateral stability. An inverted pendulum model of the human, validated by experiment, was used to determine the feasible range of whole-body center of mass (COM) states for which weight can be transferred laterally on a ladder tread without a ladder rail losing contact with the ground ("no lift-off" stability region). The results show that the size of the feasible no lift-off region was inversely proportional to the height of the tread above the ground, the distance of the stance foot from the ipsilateral rail, and lateral ground inclination angle. For given initial COM kinematics on a tread height equal to 40% human body height, a stance-foot location equal to one-eighth tread width and a 3.5 degrees ground inclination had approximately equivalent effects on the no lift-off region size. Ladder stability was three times more sensitive to tread height than to foot location. Laterally-exerted impulsive hand-tool forces should generally be limited to 8% body weight. These findings can lead to improved ladder designs and safety instructions for stepladder users. PMID:15970205

  9. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-05-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems.

  10. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using (13)C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  11. Stabilization/solidification of heavy metals in sludge ceramsite and leachability affected by oxide substances.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoren; Zou, Jinlong; Li, Guibai

    2009-08-01

    To investigate stabilization of heavy metals in ceramsite made from wastewater treatment sludge (WWTS) and drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS), leaching tests were conducted to find out the effect of SiO2:Al2O3, acidic oxides (SiO2 and Al2O3), Fe2O3: CaO:MgO, and basic oxides (Fe2O3, CaO, and MgO) on the binding ability of heavy metals. Results show that as ratios of SiO2: Al2O3 decrease, leaching contents of Cu and Pb increase, while leaching contents of Cd and Cr first decrease and then increase; under the variation of Fe2O3:CaO:MgO (Fe2O3 contents decrease), leaching contents of Cd, Cu, and Pb increase, while leaching contents of Cr decrease. Acidic and basic oxide leaching results show that higher contents of Al2O3, Fe2O3, and MgO are advantageous to improve the stability of heavy metals, while the binding capacity for Cd, Cu, and Pb is significantly reduced at higher contents of SiO2 and CaO. The solidifying efficiencies of heavy metals are improved by crystallization, and the main compounds in ceramsite are crocoite, chrome oxide, cadmium silicate, and copper oxide. These results can be considered as a basic understanding for new technologies of stabilization of heavy metals in heavily polluted WWTS. PMID:19731695

  12. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  13. Protein level affects the relative lysine requirement of growing rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fry.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Noelie; Govaerts, Bernadette; Abboudi, Tarik; Detavernier, Christel; De Saeger, Sarah; Larondelle, Yvan; Rollin, Xavier

    2009-07-01

    The effect of two digestible protein levels (310 and 469 g/kg DM) on the relative lysine (Lys; g Lys/kg DM or g Lys/100 g protein) and the absolute Lys (g Lys intake/kg 0.75 per d) requirements was studied in rainbow trout fry using a dose-response trial. At each protein level, sixteen isoenergetic (22-23 MJ digestible energy/kg DM) diets were tested, involving a full range (2-70 g/kg DM) of sixteen Lys levels. Each diet was given to one group of sixty rainbow trout fry (mean initial body weight 0.78 g) reared at 15 degrees C for 31 feeding d. The Lys requirements were estimated based on the relationships between weight, protein, and Lys gains (g/kg 0.75 per d) and Lys concentration (g/kg DM or g/100 g protein) or Lys intake (g/kg 0.75 per d), using the broken-line model (BLM) and the non-linear four-parameter saturation kinetics model (SKM-4). Both the model and the response criterion chosen markedly impacted the relative Lys requirement. The relative Lys requirement for Lys gain of rainbow trout estimated with the BLM (and SKM-4 at 90 % of the maximum response) increased from 16.8 (19.6) g/kg DM at a low protein level to 23.4 (24.5) g/kg DM at a high protein level. However, the dietary protein content affected neither the absolute Lys requirement nor the relative Lys requirement expressed as g Lys/100 g protein nor the Lys requirement for maintenance (21 mg Lys/kg 0.75 per d). PMID:19138439

  14. Chemical and physical stability of protein and gum arabic-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions containing limonene.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, D; Cercaci, L; Alamed, J; McClements, D J; Decker, E A

    2008-04-01

    An important flavor component of citrus oils is limonene. Since limonene is lipid soluble, it is often added to foods as an oil-in-water emulsion. However, limonene-containing oil-in-water emulsions are susceptible to both physical instability and oxidative degradation, leading to loss of aroma and formation of off-flavors. Proteins have been found to produce both oxidatively and physically stable emulsions containing triacylglycerols. The objective of this research was to determine if whey protein isolate (WPI) could protect limonene in oil-in-water emulsion droplets more effectively than gum arabic (GA). Limonene degradation and formation of the limonene oxidation products, limonene oxide and carvone, were less in the WPI- than GA-stabilized emulsions at both pHs 3.0 and 7.0. These data suggest that WPI was able to inhibit the oxidative deterioration of limonene in oil-in-water emulsions. The ability of WPI to decrease oxidative reactions could be due to the formation of a cationic emulsion droplet interface at pH 3.0, which can repel prooxidative metals, and/or the ability of amino acids in WPI to scavenge free radical and chelate prooxidative metals. PMID:18387094

  15. How Does Functional Soccer Training on Uneven Ground Affect Dynamic Stability of Lower Limbs in Young Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Plenzler, Marcin; Mrozińska, Natalia; Mierzwińska, Anna; Korbolewska, Olga; Mejnartowicz, Daria; Popieluch, Marcin; Śmigielski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    the supporting limb after the preparatory period, during which a stability and proprioception training was completed. The significance of these results is even greater when the parallel substantial increase of the physical body height of these young players is taken into account (the taller the player is, the harder it is for him to keep the balance). The players’ tests results are, also, statistically lower than the control group’s data. That, in turn, means that the players had better stability in comparison to the control group. This co-dependence regarding the overall stability was mainly affected by the A/P stability indexes taken in a sagittal plane. Also, no new injuries were recorded within the young players group. Conclusion: 1. The exercised functional training significantly improved stability results of the supporting limb among the young players. 2. The results encourage to continue the study, and, in the later stage, check whether there is an actual relationship between the dynamic stability results and sports achievements combined with the frequency of injuries.

  16. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets. PMID:21976047

  17. Amaranth proteins foaming properties: Film rheology and foam stability - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Bolontrade, Agustín J; Scilingo, Adriana A; Añón, María C

    2016-05-01

    In this work the influence of pH and ionic strength on the stability of foams prepared with amaranth protein isolate was analyzed. The behaviour observed was related to the physico-chemical and structural changes undergone by amaranth protein as a result of those treatments. The results obtained show that foams prepared at acidic pH were more stable than the corresponding to alkaline pH. At pH 2.0 the foams presented higher times and more volumes of drainage. This behaviour is consistent with the characteristics of the interfacial film, which showed a higher viscoelasticity and a greater flexibility at acidic pH than alkaline pH value, which in turn increased by increasing the concentration of proteins in the foaming solution. It is also important to note that the presence of insoluble protein is not necessarily detrimental to the properties of the foam. Detected changes in the characteristics of the interfacial film as in the foam stability have been attributed to the increased unfolding, greater flexibility and net charge of amaranth proteins at acidic conditions. PMID:25497160

  18. Specific cation adsorption on protein-covered particles and its influence on colloidal stability.

    PubMed

    Molina-Bolívar, J A.; Galisteo-González, F; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2001-07-01

    Protein coated particles present an anomalous colloidal stability at high ionic strength when the classical theory (DLVO) predicts aggregation. This observed deviation from DLVO behaviour appears for electrolyte concentrations above some critical bulk value. As we have suggested in previous publications the existence of an additional short-range repulsive 'hydration force' due to specific hydrated cation adsorption could explain this anomalous stability. The overlap of the hydration layers when two particles approach should provoke this repulsive force. New evidence of this mechanism has been observed when electrophoretic mobilities of protein-carrying latex particles were measured at various concentrations of sodium and calcium chloride. In the latter case a sign reversal of zeta-potential was found, probably due to the specific adsorption of Ca(2+) ions on protein molecules. The adsorption increases with the medium pH. These results have been analyzed following the treatment proposed by Ohshima and co-workers for large charged colloidal particles coated with a layer of protein. This study shows an increase in the positive fixed-charge density on the protein caused by the adsorption of cations. PMID:11377942

  19. Elongator Protein 3 (Elp3) stabilizes Snail1 and regulates neural crest migration in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangcai; Li, Jiejing; Zeng, Wanli; Li, Chaocui; Mao, Bingyu

    2016-01-01

    Elongator protein 3 (Elp3) is the enzymatic unit of the elongator protein complex, a histone acetyltransferase complex involved in transcriptional elongation. It has long been shown to play an important role in cell migration; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we showed that Elp3 is expressed in pre-migratory and migrating neural crest cells in Xenopus embryos, and knockdown of Elp3 inhibited neural crest cell migration. Interestingly, Elp3 binds Snail1 through its zinc-finger domain and inhibits its ubiquitination by β-Trcp without interfering with the Snail1/Trcp interaction. We showed evidence that Elp3-mediated stabilization of Snail1 was likely involved in the activation of N-cadherin in neural crest cells to regulate their migratory ability. Our findings provide a new mechanism for the function of Elp3 in cell migration through stabilizing Snail1, a master regulator of cell motility. PMID:27189455

  20. Blocking and detection chemistries affect antibody performance on reverse phase protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Ambroz, Kristi L H; Zhang, Yonghong; Schutz-Geschwender, Amy; Olive, D Michael

    2008-06-01

    Antibody specificity is critical for RP protein arrays (RPA). The effects of blocking and detection chemistries on antibody specificity were evaluated for Western blots and RPA. Blocking buffers significantly affected nonspecific banding on Western blots, with corresponding effects on arrays. Tyramide signal amplification (TSA) increased both specific and nonspecific signals on Westerns and arrays, masking the expected gradations in signal intensity. These results suggest that consistent blocking and detection conditions should be used for antibody validation and subsequent RPA experiments. PMID:18563731

  1. Process conditions affect starch structure and its interactions with proteins in rice pasta.

    PubMed

    Barbiroli, Alberto; Bonomi, Francesco; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina; Iametti, Stefania; Pagani, Maria Ambrogina; Marti, Alessandra

    2013-02-15

    Structural changes of starch and proteins in rice pasta were investigated as a function of raw-materials and pasta-making conditions, and their impact on cooking behaviour and glycaemic index was assessed. Rice pasta was prepared from untreated or parboiled rice flour by conventional extrusion or by extrusion-cooking. Starch structure was studied by assessing starch accessibility to specific enzymes (α-amylase and pullulanase), and by evaluating the molecular properties of fragments from enzymatic action. Protein solubility in presence/absence of chaotropes and accessibility of protein cysteine thiols allowed to evaluate the intensity and nature of inter-protein interactions. Parboiling stiffens the protein network in rice flour and makes starch more accessible to hydrolysis. Pasta-making induced further changes in the starch structure, that were most evident in pasta made from untreated rice and were mainly related to the amylopectin fraction. Thus, the interplay among structural modifications on starch and/or proteins affects the features of products. PMID:23399230

  2. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  3. Quantification of quaternary structure stability in aggregation-prone proteins under physiological conditions: the transthyretin case.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lei Z; Reixach, Natàlia

    2014-10-21

    The quaternary structure stability of proteins is typically studied under conditions that accelerate their aggregation/unfolding processes on convenient laboratory time scales. Such conditions include high temperature or pressure, chaotrope-mediated unfolding, or low or high pH. These approaches have the limitation of being nonphysiological and that the concentration of the protein in solution is changing as the reactions proceed. We describe a methodology to define the quaternary structure stability of the amyloidogenic homotetrameric protein transthyretin (TTR) under physiological conditions. This methodology expands from a described approach based on the measurement of the rate of subunit exchange of TTR with a tandem flag-tagged (FT₂) TTR counterpart. We demonstrate that subunit exchange of TTR with FT₂·TTR can be analyzed and quantified using a semi-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique. In addition, we biophysically characterized two FT₂·TTR variants derived from wild-type and the