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Sample records for affect root colonization

  1. Host-related metabolic cues affect colonization strategies of a root endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Lahrmann, Urs; Ding, Yi; Banhara, Aline; Rath, Magnus; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R.; Döhlemann, Stefanie; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Parniske, Martin; Zuccaro, Alga

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underpinning broad compatibility in root symbiosis are largely unexplored. The generalist root endophyte Piriformospora indica establishes long-lasting interactions with morphologically and biochemically different hosts, stimulating their growth, alleviating salt stress, and inducing local and systemic resistance to pathogens. Cytological studies and global investigations of fungal transcriptional responses to colonization of barley and Arabidopsis at different symbiotic stages identified host-dependent colonization strategies and host-specifically induced effector candidates. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, P. indica establishes and maintains biotrophic nutrition within living epidermal cells, whereas in barley the symbiont undergoes a nutritional switch to saprotrophy that is associated with the production of secondary thinner hyphae in dead cortex cells. Consistent with a diversified trophic behavior and with the occurrence of nitrogen deficiency at the onset of saprotrophy in barley, fungal genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes and nutrient transporters were highly induced in this host but not in Arabidopsis. Silencing of the high-affinity ammonium transporter PiAMT1 gene, whose transcripts are accumulating during nitrogen starvation and in barley, resulted in enhanced colonization of this host, whereas it had no effect on the colonization of Arabidopsis. Increased levels of free amino acids and reduced enzymatic activity for the cell-death marker VPE (vacuolar-processing enzyme) in colonized barley roots coincided with an extended biotrophic lifestyle of P. indica upon silencing of PiAMT1. This suggests that PiAmt1 functions as a nitrogen sensor mediating the signal that triggers the in planta activation of the saprotrophic program. Thus, host-related metabolic cues affect the expression of P. indica’s alternative lifestyles. PMID:23918389

  2. Does Wheat Genetically Modified for Disease Resistance Affect Root-Colonizing Pseudomonads and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi?

    PubMed Central

    Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology. PMID:23372672

  3. Weed control and cover crop management affect mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spore populations in a California vineyard.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Smith, Richard F; Bettiga, Larry

    2005-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi naturally colonize grapevines in California vineyards. Weed control and cover cropping may affect AM fungi directly, through destruction of extraradical hyphae by soil disruption, or indirectly, through effects on populations of mycorrhizal weeds and cover crops. We examined the effects of weed control (cultivation, post-emergence herbicides, pre-emergence herbicides) and cover crops (Secale cereale cv. Merced rye, x Triticosecale cv.Trios 102) on AM fungi in a Central Coast vineyard. Seasonal changes in grapevine mycorrhizal colonization differed among weed control treatments, but did not correspond with seasonal changes in total weed frequency. Differences in grapevine colonization among weed control treatments may be due to differences in mycorrhizal status and/or AM fungal species composition among dominant weed species. Cover crops had no effect on grapevine mycorrhizal colonization, despite higher spring spore populations in cover cropped middles compared to bare middles. Cover crops were mycorrhizal and shared four AM fungal species (Glomus aggregatum, G. etunicatum, G. mosseae, G. scintillans) in common with grapevines. Lack of contact between grapevine roots and cover crop roots may have prevented grapevines from accessing higher spore populations in the middles. PMID:15133724

  4. Bacterial Traits Involved in Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42.

    PubMed

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Budiharjo, Anto; Fan, Ben; Borriss, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    Colonization studies previously performed with a green-fluorescent-protein, GFP, labeled derivative of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 revealed that the bacterium behaved different in colonizing surfaces of plant roots of different species (Fan et al., 2012). In order to extend these studies and to elucidate which genes are crucial for root colonization, we applied targeted mutant strains to Arabidopsis seedlings. The fates of root colonization in mutant strains impaired in synthesis of alternative sigma factors, non-ribosomal synthesis of lipopeptides and polyketides, biofilm formation, swarming motility, and plant growth promoting activity were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whilst the wild-type strain heavily colonized surfaces of root tips and lateral roots, the mutant strains were impaired in their ability to colonize root tips and most of them were unable to colonize lateral roots. Ability to colonize plant roots is not only dependent on the ability to form biofilms or swarming motility. Six mutants, deficient in abrB-, sigH-, sigD-, nrfA-, yusV and RBAM017410, but not affected in biofilm formation, displayed significantly reduced root colonization. The nrfA- and yusV-mutant strains colonized border cells and, partly, root surfaces but did not colonize root tips or lateral roots.

  5. Bacterial Traits Involved in Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42

    PubMed Central

    Dietel, Kristin; Beator, Barbara; Budiharjo, Anto; Fan, Ben; Borriss, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Colonization studies previously performed with a green-fluorescent-protein, GFP, labeled derivative of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 revealed that the bacterium behaved different in colonizing surfaces of plant roots of different species (Fan et al., 2012). In order to extend these studies and to elucidate which genes are crucial for root colonization, we applied targeted mutant strains to Arabidopsis seedlings. The fates of root colonization in mutant strains impaired in synthesis of alternative sigma factors, non-ribosomal synthesis of lipopeptides and polyketides, biofilm formation, swarming motility, and plant growth promoting activity were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whilst the wild-type strain heavily colonized surfaces of root tips and lateral roots, the mutant strains were impaired in their ability to colonize root tips and most of them were unable to colonize lateral roots. Ability to colonize plant roots is not only dependent on the ability to form biofilms or swarming motility. Six mutants, deficient in abrB-, sigH-, sigD-, nrfA-, yusV and RBAM017410, but not affected in biofilm formation, displayed significantly reduced root colonization. The nrfA- and yusV-mutant strains colonized border cells and, partly, root surfaces but did not colonize root tips or lateral roots. PMID:25288929

  6. Piriformospora indica root colonization triggers local and systemic root responses and inhibits secondary colonization of distal roots.

    PubMed

    Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Mueller, Martin J; Waller, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Piriformosporaindica is a basidiomycete fungus colonizing roots of a wide range of higher plants, including crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies have shown that P. indica improves growth, and enhances systemic pathogen resistance in leaves of host plants. To investigate systemic effects within the root system, we established a hydroponic split-root cultivation system for Arabidopsis. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that initial P. indica colonization triggers a local, transient response of several defense-related transcripts, of which some were also induced in shoots and in distal, non-colonized roots of the same plant. Systemic effects on distal roots included the inhibition of secondary P. indica colonization. Faster and stronger induction of defense-related transcripts during secondary inoculation revealed that a P. indica pretreatment triggers root-wide priming of defense responses, which could cause the observed reduction of secondary colonization levels. Secondary P. indica colonization also induced defense responses in distant, already colonized parts of the root. Endophytic fungi therefore trigger a spatially specific response in directly colonized and in systemic root tissues of host plants.

  7. A Root-Colonizing Pseudomonad Lessens Stress Responses in Wheat Imposed by CuO Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Melanie; Adams, Joshua; Yang, Kwang; McManus, Paul; Jacobson, Astrid; Gade, Aniket; McLean, Joan; Britt, David; Anderson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NPs) containing essential metals are being considered in formulations of fertilizers to boost plant nutrition in soils with low metal bioavailability. This paper addresses whether colonization of wheat roots by the bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6), protected roots from the reduced elongation caused by CuO NPs. There was a trend for slightly elongated roots when seedlings with roots colonized by PcO6 were grown with CuO NPs; the density of bacterial cells on the root surface was not altered by the NPs. Accumulations of reactive oxygen species in the plant root cells caused by CuO NPs were little affected by root colonization. However, bacterial colonization did reduce the extent of expression of an array of genes associated with plant responses to stress induced by root exposure to CuO NPs. PcO6 colonization also reduced the levels of two important chelators of Cu ions, citric and malic acids, in the rhizosphere solution; presumably because these acids were used as nutrients for bacterial growth. There was a trend for lower levels of soluble Cu in the rhizosphere solution and reduced Cu loads in the true leaves with PcO6 colonization. These studies indicate that root colonization by bacterial cells modulates plant responses to contact with CuO NPs. PMID:27776146

  8. Factors other than root secreted malic acid that contributes toward Bacillus subtilis FB17 colonization on Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Bais, Harsh P

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Bacillus subtilis FB17 (hereafter FB17) induces resistance against broad pathogen including Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (PstDC3000). The extent of plant protection by FB17 depends on establishment of root colonization followed by biofilm formation. The general convention dictates that beneficial rhizobacterium may suppress the root innate immune system to establish a robust colonization. However, it is still not well understood which genetic targets FB17 affects in plants to facilitate a symbiotic association. Our recent study, involving whole transcriptome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots treated with FB17 post 24 h of treatment showed totally 279 genes that were significantly up- or/ downregulated. Further, we found that the mutants for upregulated and downregulated genes post-FB17 colonization showed a differential phenotype for FB17 root colonization. Interestingly, plants mutated in the FB17-responsive genes showed increased Aluminum activated malate transporter (ALMT1) expression under foliar pathogen PstDC3000, infections, indicating the independent functionality of ALMT1 for bacterial recruitment. Taken together this, present study suggests that the establishment of interaction between the plant host and PGPR is a complex phenomenon which is regulated by multiple genetic components. PMID:24310121

  9. Invertebrate colonization of leaves and roots within sediments of intermittent coastal plain streams across hydrologic phases

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared benthic invertebrate assemblages colonizing three types of buried substrates (leaves, roots and plastic roots) among three intermittent Coastal Plain streams over a one year period. Invertebrate density was significantly lower in root litterbags than in plastic root l...

  10. Differences in AM fungal root colonization between populations of perennial Aster species have genetic reasons.

    PubMed

    Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2008-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis whether differences between plant populations in root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi could be caused by genetic differentiation between populations. In addition, we investigated whether the response to AM fungi differs between plants from different populations and if it is affected by the soil in which the plants are cultivated. We used Aster amellus, which occurs in fragmented dry grasslands, as a model species and we studied six different populations from two regions, which varied in soil nutrient concentration. We found significant differences in the degree of mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots between regions in the field. To test if these differences were due to phenotypic plasticity or had a genetic basis, we performed a greenhouse experiment. The results suggested that Aster amellus is an obligate mycotrophic plant species with a high dependency upon mycorrhiza. Plant biomass was affected only by soil, and not by population or the interaction between the population and the soil. Mycorrhizal colonization was significantly affected by all three factors (soil, population, interaction of soil and population). Plants from the population originating from the soil with lower nutrient availability developed more mycorrhiza even when grown in soil with higher nutrient availability. The correspondence between mycorrhizal colonization of plants in the field and in both soils in the pot experiment suggests that the observed differences in root colonization have a genetic basis.

  11. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, Maria; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Saracchi, Marco; Cortesi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots, and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic. PMID:25705206

  12. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldi, Maria; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Saracchi, Marco; Cortesi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots, and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic. PMID:25705206

  13. Characterization of Root Surface and Endorhizosphere Pseudomonads in Relation to Their Colonization of Roots

    PubMed Central

    van Peer, Ron; Punte, Helma L. M.; de Weger, Letty A.; Schippers, Bob

    1990-01-01

    An extensive colonization of the endorhizosphere by fluorescent pseudomonads was observed in tomato plants grown on artificial substrates. These studies reveal that a significantly higher percentage of pseudomonads obtained from the endorhizosphere (30%) reduced plant growth than those obtained from the root surface (4%). Lipopolysaccharide patterns, cell envelope protein patterns, and other biochemical characteristics indicated that Pseudomonas isolates obtained from the endorhizosphere are distinct from Pseudomonas isolates obtained from the root surface. Isolates from the endorhizosphere especially were able to recolonize the endorhizosphere of both sterile and nonsterile tomato roots. The ability of the endorhizosphere isolates to colonize the endorhizosphere significantly correlated with their agglutination by tomato root agglutinin but did not correlate with chemotaxis to seed exudates of tomato. No correlation between colonization of the endorhizosphere and agglutination by root agglutinin could be demonstrated for the root surface isolates. We propose that agglutination of specific Pseudomonas strains by root agglutinin is of importance in the initial phase of adherence of bacteria to the root surface. Images PMID:16348258

  14. Gibberellin regulates infection and colonization of host roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is established by the entry of AM fungi into the host plant roots and the formation of symbiotic structures called arbuscules. The host plant supplies photosynthetic products to the AM fungi, which in return provide phosphate and other minerals to the host through the arbuscules. Both partners gain great advantages from this symbiotic interaction, and both regulate AM development. Our recent work revealed that gibberellic acids (GAs) are required for AM development in the legume Lotus japonicus. GA signaling interact with symbiosis signaling pathways, directing AM fungal colonization in host roots. Expression analysis showed that genes for GA biosynthesis and metabolism were induced in host roots around AM fungal hyphae, suggesting that the GA signaling changes with both location and time during AM development. The fluctuating GA concentrations sometimes positively and sometimes negatively affect the expression of AM-induced genes that regulate AM fungal infection and colonization. PMID:26024424

  15. Does percent root length colonization and soil hyphal length reflect the extent of colonization for all AMF?

    PubMed

    Hart, Miranda M; Reader, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    Percent root length colonization may not be an appropriate measure of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in all cases. We suggest that AMF will differ in how well percent root length colonization measures the amount of AMF colonization in the root due to differences among AMF in hyphal structure and hyphal aggregation. Although soil hyphal length accounts for hyphal density, we suggest that it does not consider differences in hyphal structure in measurements of external colonization and thus might also misrepresent the true amount of AMF in the soil. To test these suggestions, we measured and compared percent root length colonization and soil hyphal length with root ergosterol and soil ergosterol, respectively, for 21 different species of AMF from three families in a greenhouse experiment. Percent root length colonization predicted intra-radical colonization best for Glomaceae and Acaulosporaceae isolates, while soil hyphal length best represented soil ergosterol for Gigasporaceae isolates. The results show that conventional methods for estimating AMF colonization are not universal for all AMF. Caution is advised when drawing inferences for different groups of AMF.

  16. Enhanced attachment of Bradyrhizobium japonicum to soybean through reduced root colonization of internally seedborne microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, N W; Karr, D B; Kremer, R J; Emerich, D W

    2000-07-01

    Internally seedborne microorganisms are those surviving common surface sterilization procedures. Such microbes often colonize the radicle surface of a germinating soybean (Glycine max) seed, introducing an undefined parameter into studies on attachment and infection by Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Bacterial isolates from surface-sterilized soybean seed, cv. Williams 82 and cv. Maverick, used in our studies, were identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter, Aeromonas sp., Bacillus spp., Chryseomonas luteola, Flavimonas oryzihabitans, and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Growth of these microbes during seed germination was reduced by treating germinating seeds with 500 micrograms/mL penicillin G. The effects of this antibiotic on seedling development and on B. japonicum 2143 attachment, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation are reported here. Penicillin G treatment of seeds did not reduce seed germination or root tip growth, or affect seedling development. No differences in nodulation kinetics, nitrogen fixation onset or rates were observed. However, the number of B. japonicum attached to treated intact seedlings was enhanced 200-325%, demonstrating that other root-colonizing bacteria can interfere with rhizobial attachment. Penicillin G treatment of soybean seedlings can be used to reduce the root colonizing microbes, which introduce an undefined parameter into studies of attachment of B. japonicum to the soybean root, without affecting plant development.

  17. Phylogenetically structured traits in root systems influence arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in woody angiosperms

    DOE PAGES

    Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar J.; Horning, Amber L.; Smemo, Kurt A.; Blackwood, Christopher B.

    2016-02-10

    In this study, there is little quantitative information about the relationship between root traits and the extent of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization. We expected that ancestral species with thick roots will maximize AMF habitat by maintaining similar root traits across root orders (i.e., high root trait integration), whereas more derived species are expected to display a sharp transition from acquisition to structural roots. Moreover, we hypothesized that interspecific morphological differences rather than soil conditions will be the main driver of AMF colonization We analyzed 14 root morphological and chemical traits and AMF colonization rates for the first three rootmore » orders of 34 temperate tree species grown in two common gardens. We also collected associated soil to measure the effect of soil conditions on AMF colonization Results Thick-root magnoliids showed less variation in root traits along root orders than more-derived angiosperm groups. Variation in stele:root diameter ratio was the best indicator of AMF colonization within and across root orders. Root functional traits rather than soil conditions largely explained the variation in AMF colonization among species. In conclusion, not only the traits of first order but the entire structuring of the root system varied among plant lineages, suggesting alternative evolutionary strategies of resource acquisition. Understanding evolutionary pathways in below ground organs could open new avenues to understand tree species influence on soil carbon and nutrient cycling.« less

  18. Ethylene supports colonization of plant roots by the mutualistic fungus Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Khatabi, Behnam; Molitor, Alexandra; Lindermayr, Christian; Pfiffi, Stefanie; Durner, Jörg; von Wettstein, Diter; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schäfer, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The mutualistic basidiomycete Piriformospora indica colonizes roots of mono- and dicotyledonous plants, and thereby improves plant health and yield. Given the capability of P. indica to colonize a broad range of hosts, it must be anticipated that the fungus has evolved efficient strategies to overcome plant immunity and to establish a proper environment for nutrient acquisition and reproduction. Global gene expression studies in barley identified various ethylene synthesis and signaling components that were differentially regulated in P. indica-colonized roots. Based on these findings we examined the impact of ethylene in the symbiotic association. The data presented here suggest that P. indica induces ethylene synthesis in barley and Arabidopsis roots during colonization. Moreover, impaired ethylene signaling resulted in reduced root colonization, Arabidopsis mutants exhibiting constitutive ethylene signaling, -synthesis or ethylene-related defense were hyper-susceptible to P. indica. Our data suggest that ethylene signaling is required for symbiotic root colonization by P. indica.

  19. A novel interaction between plant-beneficial rhizobacteria and roots: colonization induces corn resistance against the root herbivore Diabrotica speciosa.

    PubMed

    Santos, Franciele; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G V; Paré, Paul W; Sanches, Patrícia A; Kamiya, Aline C; Tonelli, Mateus; Nardi, Cristiane; Bento, José Mauricio S

    2014-01-01

    A number of soil-borne microorganisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria, establish mutualistic interactions with plants, which can indirectly affect other organisms. Knowledge of the plant-mediated effects of mutualistic microorganisms is limited to aboveground insects, whereas there is little understanding of what role beneficial soil bacteria may play in plant defense against root herbivory. Here, we establish that colonization by the beneficial rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense affects the host selection and performance of the insect Diabrotica speciosa. Root larvae preferentially orient toward the roots of non-inoculated plants versus inoculated roots and gain less weight when feeding on inoculated plants. As inoculation by A. brasilense induces higher emissions of (E)-β-caryophyllene compared with non-inoculated plants, it is plausible that the non-preference of D. speciosa for inoculated plants is related to this sesquiterpene, which is well known to mediate belowground insect-plant interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a beneficial rhizobacterium inoculant indirectly alters belowground plant-insect interactions. The role of A. brasilense as part of an integrative pest management (IPM) program for the protection of corn against the South American corn rootworm, D. speciosa, is considered.

  20. Molecular diversity and distribution of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal communities colonizing roots of two different winter cover crops in response to their root proliferation.

    PubMed

    Higo, Masao; Isobe, Katsunori; Miyazawa, Yusuke; Matsuda, Yukiya; Drijber, Rhae A; Torigoe, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear understanding of how crop root proliferation affects the distribution of the spore abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the composition of AMF communities in agricultural fields is imperative to identify the potential roles of AMF in winter cover crop rotational systems. Toward this goal, we conducted a field trial using wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) or red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) grown during the winter season. We conducted a molecular analysis to compare the diversity and distribution of AMF communities in roots and spore abundance in soil cropped with wheat and red clover. The AMF spore abundance, AMF root colonization, and abundance of root length were investigated at three different distances from winter crops (0 cm, 7.5 cm, and 15 cm), and differences in these variables were found between the two crops. The distribution of specific AMF communities and variables responded to the two winter cover crops. The majority of Glomerales phylotypes were common to the roots of both winter cover crops, but Gigaspora phylotypes in Gigasporales were found only in red clover roots. These results also demonstrated that the diversity of the AMF colonizing the roots did not significantly change with the three distances from the crop within each rotation but was strongly influenced by the host crop identity. The distribution of specific AMF phylotypes responded to the presence of wheat and red clover roots, indicating that the host crop identity was much more important than the proliferation of crop roots in determining the diversity of the AMF communities.

  1. Molecular diversity and distribution of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal communities colonizing roots of two different winter cover crops in response to their root proliferation.

    PubMed

    Higo, Masao; Isobe, Katsunori; Miyazawa, Yusuke; Matsuda, Yukiya; Drijber, Rhae A; Torigoe, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear understanding of how crop root proliferation affects the distribution of the spore abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the composition of AMF communities in agricultural fields is imperative to identify the potential roles of AMF in winter cover crop rotational systems. Toward this goal, we conducted a field trial using wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) or red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) grown during the winter season. We conducted a molecular analysis to compare the diversity and distribution of AMF communities in roots and spore abundance in soil cropped with wheat and red clover. The AMF spore abundance, AMF root colonization, and abundance of root length were investigated at three different distances from winter crops (0 cm, 7.5 cm, and 15 cm), and differences in these variables were found between the two crops. The distribution of specific AMF communities and variables responded to the two winter cover crops. The majority of Glomerales phylotypes were common to the roots of both winter cover crops, but Gigaspora phylotypes in Gigasporales were found only in red clover roots. These results also demonstrated that the diversity of the AMF colonizing the roots did not significantly change with the three distances from the crop within each rotation but was strongly influenced by the host crop identity. The distribution of specific AMF phylotypes responded to the presence of wheat and red clover roots, indicating that the host crop identity was much more important than the proliferation of crop roots in determining the diversity of the AMF communities. PMID:26832664

  2. Earliest colonization events of Rhizophagus irregularis in rice roots occur preferentially in previously uncolonized cells.

    PubMed

    Kobae, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2014-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form a symbiotic association with several plant species. An arbuscule, a finely branched structure of AM fungi, is formed in root cells and plays essential roles in resource exchange. Because arbuscules are ephemeral, host cells containing collapsed arbuscules can be recolonized, and a wide region of roots can be continuously colonized by AM fungi, suggesting that repetitive recolonization in root cells is required for continuous mycorrhization. However, recolonization frequency has not been quantified because of the lack of appropriate markers for visualization of the cellular processes after arbuscule collapse; therefore, the nature of the colonization sequence remains uncertain. Here we observed that a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) of rice was expressed even in cells with collapsed arbuscules, allowing live imaging coupled with GFP-SCAMP to evaluate the colonization and recolonization sequences. The average lifetime of intact arbuscules was 1-2 d. Cells with collapsed arbuscules were rarely recolonized and formed a new arbuscule during the observation period of 5 d, whereas de novo colonization occurred even in close proximity to cells containing collapsed arbuscules and contributed to the expansion of the colonized region. Colonization spread into an uncolonized region of roots but sparsely into a previously colonized region having no metabolically active arbuscule but several intercellular hyphae. Therefore, we propose that a previously colonized region tends to be intolerant to new colonization in rice roots. Our observations highlight the overlooked negative impact of the degeneration stage of arbuscules in the colonization sequence.

  3. Effect of biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban on the colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Prosser, R S; Lissemore, L; Shahmohamadloo, R S; Sibley, P K

    2015-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a symbiotic relationship with the majority of crop plants. AMF provide plants with nutrients (e.g., P), modulate the effect of metal and pathogen exposure, and increase tolerance to moisture stress. The benefits of AMF to plant growth make them important to the development of sustainable agriculture. The land application of biosolids is becoming an increasingly common practice in sustainable agriculture, as a source of nutrients. However, biosolids have been found to contain numerous pharmaceutical and personal care products including antimicrobial chemicals such as triclosan and triclocarban. The potential risks that these two compounds may pose to plant-AMF interactions are poorly understood. The current study investigated whether biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban affect the colonization of the roots of lettuce and corn plants by AMF. Plants were grown in soil amended with biosolids that contained increasing concentrations of triclosan (0 to 307 μg/g dw) or triclocarban (0 to 304 μg/g dw). A relationship between the concentration of triclosan or triclocarban and colonization of plants roots by AMF was not observed. The presence of biosolids did not have a significant (p>0.05) effect on percent colonization of corn roots but had a significant, positive effect (p<0.05) on lettuce roots. Biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban did not inhibit the colonization of crop plant roots by AMF.

  4. Trichoderma-plant root colonization: escaping early plant defense responses and activation of the antioxidant machinery for saline stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Yariv; Landau, Udi; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Tohge, Takayuki; Takayuki, Tohge; Fernie, Alisdair R; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2013-03-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts which can colonize the apoplast of plant roots. Microarrays analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots inoculated with Trichoderma asperelloides T203, coupled with qPCR analysis of 137 stress responsive genes and transcription factors, revealed wide gene transcript reprogramming, proceeded by a transient repression of the plant immune responses supposedly to allow root colonization. Enhancement in the expression of WRKY18 and WRKY40, which stimulate JA-signaling via suppression of JAZ repressors and negatively regulate the expression of the defense genes FMO1, PAD3 and CYP71A13, was detected in Arabidopsis roots upon Trichoderma colonization. Reduced root colonization was observed in the wrky18/wrky40 double mutant line, while partial phenotypic complementation was achieved by over-expressing WRKY40 in the wrky18 wrky40 background. On the other hand increased colonization rate was found in roots of the FMO1 knockout mutant. Trichoderma spp. stimulate plant growth and resistance to a wide range of adverse environmental conditions. Arabidopsis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants treated with Trichoderma prior to salt stress imposition show significantly improved seed germination. In addition, Trichoderma treatment affects the expression of several genes related to osmo-protection and general oxidative stress in roots of both plants. The MDAR gene coding for monodehydroascorbate reductase is significantly up-regulated and, accordingly, the pool of reduced ascorbic acid was found to be increased in Trichoderma treated plants. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC)-deaminase silenced Trichoderma mutants were less effective in providing tolerance to salt stress, suggesting that Trichoderma, similarly to ACC deaminase producing bacteria, can ameliorate plant growth under conditions of abiotic stress, by lowering ameliorating increases in ethylene levels as well as promoting an elevated antioxidative capacity.

  5. [Species diversity of AMF community colonized in herbages roots in calcareous soil and purple soil].

    PubMed

    Song, Hui-Xing; Zhong, Zhang-Cheng

    2009-08-01

    A total of 17 herbages belonging to 12 families were selected as the host plants of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). They were grown on calcareous soil and purple soil, respectively, and sampled on the 120th day after seedling emergence. The DNA of AMF in the herbages roots was extracted by CTAB method, the partial rDNA sequence encoding ribosomal 28S big unit was amplified with special primers U1/U2 for fungi, and the PCR products were analyzed with PAGE silver staining method. In calcareous soil, 29 AMF bands were found in the roots of the 17 host plant species, and each host plant was colonized by 8.29 AMF bands; while in purple soil, only twenty-four AMF bands were found, with 9.47 bands in each host plant. All the AMF bands included unique bands and common bands. Cluster analysis showed that the AMF colonization in host plant roots was family-specific, and affected by soil factors. The feasibility of applying AMF in ecological restoration of limestone area was also discussed in this paper.

  6. Deficit irrigation promotes arbuscular colonization of fine roots by mycorrhizal fungi in grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) in an arid climate.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, R Paul; Tarara, Julie M; Smithyman, Russell P

    2007-10-01

    Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) is a common practice applied in irrigated vineyards to control canopy growth and improve fruit quality, but little is known of how imposed water deficits may alter root growth and colonization by beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Thus, root growth and mycorrhizal colonization were determined throughout the growing season for 3 years in own-rooted, field-grown, 'Cabernet Sauvignon' grapevines exposed to three RDI treatments. Vines under standard RDI were irrigated at 60 to 70% of full-vine evapotranspiration (FVET) from 2 weeks after fruit set until harvest, a standard commercial practice. Early deficit vines were exposed to a more extreme deficit (30% FVET) during the period from 2 weeks after fruit set until the commencement of ripening (veraison), and thereafter reverted to standard RDI. Late deficit vines were under standard RDI until veraison, then exposed to a more extreme deficit (30% FVET) between veraison and harvest. The production of fine roots was reduced in both the early and late deficit treatments, but the reduction was more consistent in the early deficit vines because the additional deficit was imposed when roots were more rapidly growing. The frequency of arbuscules in fine roots was greater in both of the additional deficit treatments than in the standard RDI, a response that appeared chronic, as the higher frequency of arbuscules was observed throughout the season despite the additional deficits being applied at discrete times. It appears that grapevines compensated for a lower density of fine roots by stimulating arbuscular colonization. Irrigation did not affect yield or quality of grapes, but reduced whole-vine photosynthesis during the additional deficit periods. It appears that high-quality grapes can be produced in this region with less water than that applied under the current RDI practice because the root system of the vine may be more efficient due to greater arbuscular colonization by AMF

  7. Relationship between Rapid, Firm Adhesion and Long-Term Colonization of Roots by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    James, Douglas W.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Steinback, Katherine E.

    1985-01-01

    For rhizobacteria to exert physiological effects on plant growth, the bacteria must first effectively colonize the root surface. To examine the relationship between long-term colonization of root systems and adherence to roots in the short term, a binding assay was developed. Adherence was determined by incubating roots of intact radish seedlings with bacteria, washing and homogenizing the roots, and dilution plating the resulting homogenate. Irreversible binding of bacteria was rapid, reaching half-maximum by 5 min. All of the rhizosphere bacteria tested showed similar, concentration-dependent binding (ranging from 104 to 108 CFU/ml), as well as long-term colonization of radish roots under sterile conditions. Escherichia coli, which is not a root colonizer, showed about 10-fold less binding, but still demonstrated concentration-dependent binding and rapid kinetics of adherence at high concentrations (106 to 108 CFU/ml). The bacteria tested were very different with respect to source or habitat and plant response, yet they showed similar concentration-dependent binding. There was no correlation between the relative hydrophobicities of the cell surfaces of strains and the adherence of the strains to roots. Binding of Pseudomonas fluorescens E6-22 was promoted by divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) at concentrations of 5 to 10 mM, whereas monovalent cations (Na+ and K+) had little effect; electrostatic phenomena may partially explain adherence in the short term, an important prelude to long-term colonization of root surfaces. PMID:16346859

  8. Contrasting the morphology, anatomy and fungal colonization of new pioneer and fibrous roots.

    PubMed

    Zadworny, Marcin; Eissenstat, David M

    2011-04-01

    Not all roots born as first-order branches are the same and this has important consequences for overall function. We hypothesized that, compared with fibrous roots, pioneer roots are built to live longer at the expense of absorptive capacity. We tested this hypothesis by investigating pioneer and fibrous roots in their first 14 d of life in the arbuscular mycorrhizal tree species: Acer negundo, Acer saccharum, Juglans nigra, Liriodendron tulipifera and Populus tremuloides. Root observations were made with root-access boxes that allowed roots to be sampled at known ages in field-grown trees. Compared to fibrous roots, pioneer roots had larger diameter, lower specific root length, greater average length and a lack of mycorrhizal or nonmycorrhizal fungal colonization. Pioneer roots < 14 d old had more layers of hypodermis with a lower percentage of putative passage cells and more protoxylem groups than similar age fibrous roots. Our results suggest that pioneer roots are constructed for defense against biotic and abiotic challenges, exploration of soil distal to the stem, high fibrous root branching and secondary development with high axial hydraulic conductivity at the expense of mycorrhizal colonization and high absorptive capacity for water and nutrients.

  9. Genetic Control of Plant Root Colonization by the Biocontrol agent, Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Benjamin J.; Fletcher, Meghan; Waters, Jordan; Wetmore, Kelly; Blow, Matthew J.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Dangl, Jeffry L.; Visel, Axel

    2015-03-19

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a critical component of plant root ecosystems. PGPR promote plant growth by solubilizing inaccessible minerals, suppressing pathogenic microorganisms in the soil, and directly stimulating growth through hormone synthesis. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-established PGPR isolated from wheat roots that can also colonize the root system of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We have created barcoded transposon insertion mutant libraries suitable for genome-wide transposon-mediated mutagenesis followed by sequencing (TnSeq). These libraries consist of over 105 independent insertions, collectively providing loss-of-function mutants for nearly all genes in the P.fluorescens genome. Each insertion mutant can be unambiguously identified by a randomized 20 nucleotide sequence (barcode) engineered into the transposon sequence. We used these libraries in a gnotobiotic assay to examine the colonization ability of P.fluorescens on A.thaliana roots. Taking advantage of the ability to distinguish individual colonization events using barcode sequences, we assessed the timing and microbial concentration dependence of colonization of the rhizoplane niche. These data provide direct insight into the dynamics of plant root colonization in an in vivo system and define baseline parameters for the systematic identification of the bacterial genes and molecular pathways using TnSeq assays. Having determined parameters that facilitate potential colonization of roots by thousands of independent insertion mutants in a single assay, we are currently establishing a genome-wide functional map of genes required for root colonization in P.fluorescens. Importantly, the approach developed and optimized here for P.fluorescens>A.thaliana colonization will be applicable to a wide range of plant-microbe interactions, including biofuel feedstock plants and microbes known or hypothesized to impact on biofuel-relevant traits including biomass productivity

  10. Tobacco smoking affects bacterial acquisition and colonization in oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Purnima S; Matthews, Chad R; Joshi, Vinayak; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that smoking affects the composition of the disease-associated subgingival biofilm, yet little is known about its effects during the formation of this biofilm. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the contributions of smoking to the composition and proinflammatory characteristics of the biofilm during de novo plaque formation. Marginal and subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from 15 current smokers and from 15 individuals who had never smoked (nonsmokers) following 1, 2, 4, and 7 days of undisturbed plaque formation. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used for bacterial identification, and multiplex bead-based flow cytometry was used to quantify the levels of 27 immune mediators. Smokers demonstrated a highly diverse, relatively unstable initial colonization of both marginal and subgingival biofilms, with lower niche saturation than that seen in nonsmokers. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the genera Fusobacterium, Cardiobacterium, Synergistes, and Selenomonas, as well as respiratory pathogens belonging to the genera Haemophilus and Pseudomonas, colonized the early biofilms of smokers and continued to persist over the observation period, suggesting that smoking favors early acquisition and colonization of pathogens in oral biofilms. Smokers also demonstrated an early proinflammatory response to this colonization, which persisted over 7 days. Further, a positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and commensal bacteria was observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Taken together, the data suggest that smoking influences both the composition of the nascent biofilm and the host response to this colonization.

  11. Root colonization of maize and lettuce by bioluminescent Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli.

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, R; Antoun, H; Kloepper, J W; Beauchamp, C J

    1996-01-01

    Two strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli and three other plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were examined for the potential of maize and lettuce root colonization. All of these strains were selected in vitro for their phosphate-solubilizing abilities. Maize and lettuce seeds were treated with derivatives of all strains marked with lux genes for bioluminescence and resistance to kanamycin and rifampin prior to planting in nonsterile Promix and natural soil. The introduced bacterial strains were quantified on roots by dilution plating on antibiotic media together with observation of bioluminescence. Rhizobia were superior colonizers compared with other tested bacteria; rhizobial root populations averaged log 4.1 CFU/g (fresh weight) on maize roots 4 weeks after seeding and log 3.7 CFU/g (fresh weight) on lettuce roots 5 weeks after seeding. The average populations of the recovered PGPR strains were log 3.5 and log 3.0 CFU/g (fresh weight) on maize and lettuce roots, respectively. One of the three PGPR was not recovered later than the first week after seeding in Promix. Bioluminescence also permitted visualization of in situ root colonization in rhizoboxes and demonstrated the efficiency of rhizobial strains to colonize and survive on maize and lettuce roots. PMID:8702269

  12. Organic acids from root exudates of banana help root colonization of PGPR strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Qiwei; Raza, Waseem; Li, Rong; Vivanco, Jorge M; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    The successful colonization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the rhizosphere is an initial and compulsory step in the protection of plants from soil-borne pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the role of root exudates in the colonization of PGPR. Banana root exudates were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) which revealed exudates contained several organic acids (OAs) including oxalic, malic and fumaric acid. The chemotactic response and biofilm formation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 were investigated in response to OA's found in banana root exudates. Furthermore, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in biofilm formation, yqxM and epsD, were evaluated in response to OAs via quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results suggested that root exudates containing the OAs both induced the chemotaxis and biofilm formation in NJN-6. In fact, the strongest chemotactic and biofilm response was found when 50 μM of OAs were applied. More specifically, malic acid showed the greatest chemotactic response whereas fumaric acid significantly induced biofilm formation by a 20.7-27.3% increase and therefore biofilm formation genes expression. The results showed banana root exudates, in particular the OAs released, play a crucial role in attracting and initiating PGPR colonization on the host roots.

  13. Organic acids from root exudates of banana help root colonization of PGPR strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Qiwei; Raza, Waseem; Li, Rong; Vivanco, Jorge M; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    The successful colonization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the rhizosphere is an initial and compulsory step in the protection of plants from soil-borne pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the role of root exudates in the colonization of PGPR. Banana root exudates were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) which revealed exudates contained several organic acids (OAs) including oxalic, malic and fumaric acid. The chemotactic response and biofilm formation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 were investigated in response to OA's found in banana root exudates. Furthermore, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in biofilm formation, yqxM and epsD, were evaluated in response to OAs via quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results suggested that root exudates containing the OAs both induced the chemotaxis and biofilm formation in NJN-6. In fact, the strongest chemotactic and biofilm response was found when 50 μM of OAs were applied. More specifically, malic acid showed the greatest chemotactic response whereas fumaric acid significantly induced biofilm formation by a 20.7-27.3% increase and therefore biofilm formation genes expression. The results showed banana root exudates, in particular the OAs released, play a crucial role in attracting and initiating PGPR colonization on the host roots. PMID:26299781

  14. Organic acids from root exudates of banana help root colonization of PGPR strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Qiwei; Raza, Waseem; Li, Rong; Vivanco, Jorge M.; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    The successful colonization of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the rhizosphere is an initial and compulsory step in the protection of plants from soil-borne pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the role of root exudates in the colonization of PGPR. Banana root exudates were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) which revealed exudates contained several organic acids (OAs) including oxalic, malic and fumaric acid. The chemotactic response and biofilm formation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6 were investigated in response to OA’s found in banana root exudates. Furthermore, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in biofilm formation, yqxM and epsD, were evaluated in response to OAs via quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results suggested that root exudates containing the OAs both induced the chemotaxis and biofilm formation in NJN-6. In fact, the strongest chemotactic and biofilm response was found when 50 μM of OAs were applied. More specifically, malic acid showed the greatest chemotactic response whereas fumaric acid significantly induced biofilm formation by a 20.7–27.3% increase and therefore biofilm formation genes expression. The results showed banana root exudates, in particular the OAs released, play a crucial role in attracting and initiating PGPR colonization on the host roots. PMID:26299781

  15. Beneficial Microbes Affect Endogenous Mechanisms Controlling Root Development.

    PubMed

    Verbon, Eline H; Liberman, Louisa M

    2016-03-01

    Plants have incredible developmental plasticity, enabling them to respond to a wide range of environmental conditions. Among these conditions is the presence of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the soil. Recent studies show that PGPR affect Arabidopsis thaliana root growth and development by modulating cell division and differentiation in the primary root and influencing lateral root development. These effects lead to dramatic changes in root system architecture that significantly impact aboveground plant growth. Thus, PGPR may promote shoot growth via their effect on root developmental programs. This review focuses on contextualizing root developmental changes elicited by PGPR in light of our understanding of plant-microbe interactions and root developmental biology.

  16. Microscopic and transcriptome analyses of early colonization of tomato roots by Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Mariola R; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Benítez, Tahía; Sousa, Sonia; Rey, Manuel; Llobell, Antonio; Delgado-Jarana, Jesús

    2007-03-01

    The capacity of the fungus Trichoderma harzianum CECT 2413 to colonize roots and stimulate plant growth was analyzed. Tobacco seedlings (Nicotiana benthamiana) transferred to Petri dishes inoculated with T. harzianum conidia showed increased plant fresh weight (140%) and foliar area (300%), as well as the proliferation of secondary roots (300%) and true leaves (140%). The interaction between strain CECT 2413 and the tomato-root system was also studied during the early stages of root colonization by the fungus. When T. harzianum conidia were inoculated into the liquid medium of hydroponically grown tomato plants (Lycopersicum esculentum), profuse adhesion of hyphae to the plant roots as well as colonization of the root epidermis and cortex were observed. Confocal microscopy of a T. harzianum transformant that expressed the green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed intercellular hyphal growth and the formation of plant-induced papilla-like hyphal tips. Analysis of the T. harzianum-tomato interaction in soil indicated that the contact between T. harzianum and the roots persisted over a long period of time. This interaction was characterized by the presence of yeast-like cells, a novel and previously undescribed developmental change. To study the molecular mechanism underlying fungal ability to colonize the tomato-root system, the T. harzianum transcriptome was analyzed during the early stages of the plant-fungus interaction. The expression of fungal genes related to redox reactions, lipid metabolism, detoxification, and sugar or amino-acid transport increased when T. harzianum colonized tomato roots. These observations are similar to those regarding the interactions of mycorrhiza and pathogenic fungi with plants.

  17. PLANT MICROBIOME. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root microbiome by specific bacterial taxa.

    PubMed

    Lebeis, Sarah L; Paredes, Sur Herrera; Lundberg, Derek S; Breakfield, Natalie; Gehring, Jase; McDonald, Meredith; Malfatti, Stephanie; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Jones, Corbin D; Tringe, Susannah G; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2015-08-21

    Immune systems distinguish "self" from "nonself" to maintain homeostasis and must differentially gate access to allow colonization by potentially beneficial, nonpathogenic microbes. Plant roots grow within extremely diverse soil microbial communities but assemble a taxonomically limited root-associated microbiome. We grew isogenic Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered immune systems in a wild soil and also in recolonization experiments with a synthetic bacterial community. We established that biosynthesis of, and signaling dependent on, the foliar defense phytohormone salicylic acid is required to assemble a normal root microbiome. Salicylic acid modulates colonization of the root by specific bacterial families. Thus, plant immune signaling drives selection from the available microbial communities to sculpt the root microbiome.

  18. How up- or downslope anchoring affects root reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Cohen, Denis; Niedda, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Root reinforcement is important for slope stability. In addition to the important contribution of roots to shear strength along the slip surface, root networks are also recognized to impart stabilization through lateral (parallel to slope) redistribution of forces under tension. The most common method to measure lateral root reinforcement is a pullout test where one root or a bundle of root is pulled out of the soil matrix. This condition represents the case where roots within the mass of a landslide slip out from the upper stable part of the slope. There is also, however, the situation where roots anchored in the upper stable part of the slope slip out from the sliding mass. In the latter it is difficult to quantify root reinforcement and no study has discussed this mechanism. We carried out a new series of laboratory and field experiments using Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) roots to quantify how up- or downslope anchoring affects root reinforcement. In addition, we carried out new field pullout tests on coarse roots (larger that 2 mm in diameter, up to 47 mm). Then, considering the state-of-the-art of root reinforcement modeling (the Root Bundle Model), we integrated results from our measurements into the model to verify the magnitude of this effect on overall root reinforcement at the stand scale. Results indicate that the ratio between pullout force and force transferred to the root during soil slip ranges between 0.5 and 1. This indicates that measured pullout force always overestimate the contribution of lateral slipping out roots in situations where the soil slide from anchored roots. This is general the case for root with diameter up to 3-4 mm. Root-size distribution is also a key factor influencing root reinforcement at the forest-stand scale. As most coarse roots break along tension cracks while fine roots slip out, the effect discussed in this study on root reinforcement modeling is negligible when coarse-root diameter classes are represented. Our

  19. Indole derivative production by the root endophyte Piriformospora indica is not required for growth promotion but for biotrophic colonization of barley roots.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Magdalena; Voll, Lars M; Ding, Yi; Hofmann, Jörg; Sharma, Monica; Zuccaro, Alga

    2012-10-01

    Beneficial effects elicited by the root endophyte Piriformospora indica are widely known, but the mechanism by which these are achieved is still unclear. It is proposed that phytohormones produced by the fungal symbiont play a crucial role in the interaction with the plant roots. Biochemical analyses of the underlying biosynthetic pathways for auxin production have shown that, on tryptophan feeding, P. indica can produce the phytohormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-lactate (ILA) through the intermediate indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA). Time course transcriptional analyses after exposure to tryptophan designated the piTam1 gene as a key player. A green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter study and transcriptional analysis of colonized barley roots showed that piTam1 is induced during the biotrophic phase. Piriformospora indica strains in which the piTam1 gene was silenced via an RNA interference (RNAi) approach were compromised in IAA and ILA production and displayed reduced colonization of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots in the biotrophic phase, but the elicitation of growth promotion was not affected compared with the wild-type situation. Our results suggest that IAA is involved in the establishment of biotrophy in P. indica-barley symbiosis and might represent a compatibility factor in this system.

  20. Root Exudate-Induced Alterations in Bacillus cereus Cell Wall Contribute to Root Colonization and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Swarnalee; Rani, T. Swaroopa; Podile, Appa Rao

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs). We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430). There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE), compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE). In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2), in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion. PMID:24205213

  1. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  2. ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dimkpa, Christian O; Hansen, Trevor; Stewart, Jacob; McLean, Joan E; Britt, David W; Anderson, Anne J

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated into commercial products are reactive on plants. Here, the influence of a root-associated bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6) on the responses of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to commercial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was examined. ZnO NPs (250-1000 mg Zn/kg) significantly (p = 0.05) impacted root elongation after 7 days; only at 1000 mg/kg was shoot growth significantly inhibited. Zn solubilized from ZnO NPs correlated with root growth inhibition (r(2 )= 0.8709); solubility of Fe (r(2 )= 0.916) and Mn (r(2 )= 0.997), and shoot accumulation of Zn (r(2 )= 0.9095), Fe (r(2 )= 0.9422) and Mn (r(2 )= 0.789). Root ferric reductase activity diminished 31% in NP-exposed plants. Amendments with Zn ions at 6 mg/kg, corresponding to Zn solubilized from the NPs, did not replicate the responses, suggesting a nano-specific contribution of the ZnO. Neither NPs (500 mg Zn/kg) nor Zn ions affected root colonization by PcO6. Siderophore production by PcO6 increased 17% by exposure to NPs and 11% with Zn ions (18 mg/kg). PcO6 restored plant ferric reduction under NP exposure, but decreased uptake of Zn and Fe, 58 and 18%, respectively, suggesting soil bacteria could reduce plant accumulation of metals under toxic exposure levels, while negatively affecting uptake of essential elements. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that growth and balance of essential metals in bean exposed to ZnO NPs were influenced by the NPs and bacterial colonization of NP-exposed roots, indicating subtle effects of NPs in plant nutrition. PMID:24713073

  3. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake. PMID:25944927

  4. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake.

  5. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J.; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with 33P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake. PMID:25944927

  6. TasHyd1, a new hydrophobin gene from the biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum, is involved in plant root colonization.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Ada; Chet, Ilan

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY A hydrophobin-like clone (TasHyd1) was isolated during a PCR differential mRNA display analysis conducted on Trichoderma asperellum mycelia interacting with plant roots. The open reading frame encodes a 145-amino-acid protein showing similarity to Pbhyd1, a Class I hydrophobin from the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. TasHyd1 expression was detected in planta up to 5 days after Trichoderma root inoculation. TasHyd1 is constitutively expressed at low levels in mycelia in young cultures but gene expression is not detected in sporulating hyphae or in non-germinating spores. Carbon limitation stimulates expression of TasHyd1 whereas nitrogen or phosphate starvation down-regulate expression. TasHyd1 fused to an HA tag was over-expressed in Trichoderma and the protein was detected with an anti-HA antibody in the trifluoroacetic-acid-soluble fraction of mycelial cell walls. Over-expressor mutants were not affected in their mycoparasitic activity when tested in vitro against the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and retained root colonization capacity comparable with that of the wild-type. TasHyd1 deletion mutants had no significant reduction in in vitro mycoparasitic activity but were altered in their wettability and were severely impaired in root attachment and colonization. These phenotypes were recovered by complementation of TasHyd1, indicating that the protein is a new hydrophobin that contributes to Trichoderma interaction with the plant. PMID:20507444

  7. Plant Hormones: How They Affect Root Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Diana Hereda

    This science study aid, produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, includes a series of plant rooting activities for secondary science classes. The material in the pamphlet is written for students and includes background information on plant hormones, a vocabulary list, and five learning activities. Objectives, needed materials, and…

  8. Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae endophytically colonize cassava roots following soil drench inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Melinda; Gómez-Jiménez, María I.; Ortiz, Viviana; Vega, Fernando E.; Kramer, Matthew; Parsa, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the fungal entomopathogens Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae to determine if endophytic colonization could be achieved in cassava. An inoculation method based on drenching the soil around cassava stem cuttings using conidial suspensions resulted in endophytic colonization of cassava roots by both entomopathogens, though neither was found in the leaves or stems of the treated cassava plants. Both fungal entomopathogens were detected more often in the proximal end of the root than in the distal end. Colonization levels of B. bassiana were higher when plants were sampled at 7–9 days post-inoculation (84%) compared to 47–49 days post-inoculation (40%). In contrast, the colonization levels of M. anisopliae remained constant from 7–9 days post-inoculation (80%) to 47–49 days post-inoculation (80%), which suggests M. anisopliae is better able to persist in the soil, or as an endophyte in cassava roots over time. Differences in colonization success and plant growth were found among the fungal entomopathogen treatments. PMID:27103778

  9. Enzymatic activities and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in a soil root zone under heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Gucwa-Przepióra, Ewa; Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Fojcik, Barbara; Chmura, Damian

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the present field study were to examine the soil enzyme activities in the soil root zones of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in different heavy metal contaminated stands. Moreover, the investigations concerned the intensity of root endophytic colonization and metal bioaccumulation in roots and shoots. The investigated Plantago species exhibited an excluder strategy, accumulating higher metal content in the roots than in the shoots. The heavy metal accumulation levels found in the two plantain species in this study were comparable to other plants suggested as phytostabilizers; therefore, the selected Plantago species may be applied in the phytostabilization of heavy metal contaminated areas. The lower level of soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) as well as the higher bioavailability of metals in the root zone soil of the two plantain species were found in an area affected by smelting activity, where organic matter content in the soil was also the smallest. Mycorrhizal colonization on both species in the contaminated area was similar to colonization in non-contaminated stands. However, the lowest arbuscule occurrence and an absence of dark septate endophytes were found in the area affected by the smelting activity. It corresponded with the lowest plant cover observed in this stand. The assessment of enzyme activity, mycorrhizal colonization, and the chemical and physical properties of soils proved to be sensitive to differences between sites and between Plantago species.

  10. Enzymatic activities and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in a soil root zone under heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Gucwa-Przepióra, Ewa; Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Fojcik, Barbara; Chmura, Damian

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the present field study were to examine the soil enzyme activities in the soil root zones of Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major in different heavy metal contaminated stands. Moreover, the investigations concerned the intensity of root endophytic colonization and metal bioaccumulation in roots and shoots. The investigated Plantago species exhibited an excluder strategy, accumulating higher metal content in the roots than in the shoots. The heavy metal accumulation levels found in the two plantain species in this study were comparable to other plants suggested as phytostabilizers; therefore, the selected Plantago species may be applied in the phytostabilization of heavy metal contaminated areas. The lower level of soil enzymes (dehydrogenase, urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) as well as the higher bioavailability of metals in the root zone soil of the two plantain species were found in an area affected by smelting activity, where organic matter content in the soil was also the smallest. Mycorrhizal colonization on both species in the contaminated area was similar to colonization in non-contaminated stands. However, the lowest arbuscule occurrence and an absence of dark septate endophytes were found in the area affected by the smelting activity. It corresponded with the lowest plant cover observed in this stand. The assessment of enzyme activity, mycorrhizal colonization, and the chemical and physical properties of soils proved to be sensitive to differences between sites and between Plantago species. PMID:26531716

  11. Strain-specific colonization pattern of Rhizoctonia antagonists in the root system of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Fatehi, Jamshid; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To develop effective biocontrol strategies, basic knowledge of plant growth promotion (PGP) and root colonization by antagonists is essential. The survival and colonization patterns of five different biocontrol agents against Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB in the rhizosphere of greenhouse-grown sugar beet plants were analysed in single and combined treatments. The study included bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Pseudomonas trivialis RE(*) 1-1-14, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18) as well as fungi (Trichoderma gamsii AT1-2-4, Trichoderma velutinum G1/8). Microscopic analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed different colonization patterns for each DsRed2/green fluorescent protein-labelled strain. Bacteria and T. velutinum G1/8 colonized the root surface and the endorhiza in single and co-culture, while for T. gamsii AT1-2-4, only the transfer of spores was observed. Whereas Pseudomonas strains formed large microcolonies consisting of hundreds of cells, S. plymuthica was arranged in small endophytic clusters or clouds around the entire root system. In co-culture, each strain showed its typical pattern and occupied specific niches on the root, without clear evidence of morphological interactions. PGP was only observed for four strains with rhizosphere competence and not for T. gamsii AT1-2-4. The results provide useful information on which combination of strains to test in larger biocontrol experiments directed to applications.

  12. Relationship between genotype and soil environment during colonization of poplar roots by mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Karliński, Leszek; Rudawska, Maria; Kieliszewska-Rokicka, Barbara; Leski, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Poplars are among the few tree genera that can develop both ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and arbuscular (AM) associations; however, variable ratios of ECM/AM in dual mycorrhizal colonizations were observed in the roots of a variety of poplar species and hybrids. The objective of our study was to analyze the effect of internal and external factors on growth and dual AM and ECM colonization of poplar roots in three 12-15-year-old common gardens in Poland. We also analyzed the abundance of nonmycorrhizal fungal endophytes in the poplar roots. The Populus clones comprised black poplars (Populus deltoides and P. deltoides x Populus nigra), balsam poplars (Populus maximowiczii x Populus trichocarpa), and a hybrid of black and balsam poplars (P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa). Of the three sites that we studied, one was located in the vicinity of a copper smelter, where soil was contaminated with copper and lead. Poplar root tip abundance, mycorrhizal colonization, and soil fungi biomass were lower at this heavily polluted site. The total mycorrhizal colonization and the ratio of ECM and AM colonization differed among the study sites and according to soil depth. The influence of Populus genotype was significantly pronounced only within the individual study sites. The contribution of nonmycorrhizal fungal endophytes differed among the poplar clones and was higher at the polluted site than at the sites free of pollution. Our results indicate that poplar fine root abundance and AM and ECM symbiosis are influenced by environmental conditions. Further studies of different site conditions are required to characterize the utility of poplars for purposes such as the phytoremediation of polluted sites. PMID:19921284

  13. Relationship between genotype and soil environment during colonization of poplar roots by mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Karliński, Leszek; Rudawska, Maria; Kieliszewska-Rokicka, Barbara; Leski, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Poplars are among the few tree genera that can develop both ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and arbuscular (AM) associations; however, variable ratios of ECM/AM in dual mycorrhizal colonizations were observed in the roots of a variety of poplar species and hybrids. The objective of our study was to analyze the effect of internal and external factors on growth and dual AM and ECM colonization of poplar roots in three 12-15-year-old common gardens in Poland. We also analyzed the abundance of nonmycorrhizal fungal endophytes in the poplar roots. The Populus clones comprised black poplars (Populus deltoides and P. deltoides x Populus nigra), balsam poplars (Populus maximowiczii x Populus trichocarpa), and a hybrid of black and balsam poplars (P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa). Of the three sites that we studied, one was located in the vicinity of a copper smelter, where soil was contaminated with copper and lead. Poplar root tip abundance, mycorrhizal colonization, and soil fungi biomass were lower at this heavily polluted site. The total mycorrhizal colonization and the ratio of ECM and AM colonization differed among the study sites and according to soil depth. The influence of Populus genotype was significantly pronounced only within the individual study sites. The contribution of nonmycorrhizal fungal endophytes differed among the poplar clones and was higher at the polluted site than at the sites free of pollution. Our results indicate that poplar fine root abundance and AM and ECM symbiosis are influenced by environmental conditions. Further studies of different site conditions are required to characterize the utility of poplars for purposes such as the phytoremediation of polluted sites.

  14. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species.

  15. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species. PMID:26861480

  16. Influence of soil organic matter decomposition on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in terms of asymbiotic hyphal growth and root colonization.

    PubMed

    Gryndler, Milan; Hrselová, Hana; Cajthaml, Tomás; Havránková, Marie; Rezácová, Veronika; Gryndlerová, Hana; Larsen, John

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic matter is known to influence arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, but limited information is available on the chemical components in the organic matter causing these effects. We studied the influence of decomposing organic matter (pure cellulose and alfalfa shoot and root material) on AM fungi after 30, 100, and 300 days of decomposition in nonsterile soil with and without addition of mineral N and P. Decomposing organic matter affected maize root length colonized by the AM fungus Glomus claroideum in a similar manner as other plant growth parameters. Colonized root length was slightly increased by both nitrogen and phosphorus application and plant materials, but not by application of cellulose. In vitro hyphal growth of Glomus intraradices was increased by soil extracts from the treatments with all types of organic materials independently of mineral N and P application. Pyrolysis of soil samples from the different decomposition treatments revealed in total 266 recognizable organic compounds and in vitro hyphal growth of G. intraradices in soil extract positively correlated with 33 of these compounds. The strongest correlation was found with 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid methyl ester. This compound is a typical product of pyrolysis of phenolic compounds produced by angiosperm woody plants, but in our experiment, it was produced mainly from cellulose by some components of the soil microflora. In conclusion, our results indicate that mycelia of AM fungi are influenced by organic matter decomposition both via compounds released during the decomposition process and also by secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms involved in organic matter decomposition.

  17. Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase of Root-Colonizing Saprophytic Fluorescent Pseudomonads †

    PubMed Central

    Katsuwon, Jirasak; Anderson, Anne J.

    1990-01-01

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. Increased specific activities of catalase but not superoxide dismutase were observed during growth of these bacteria on components washed from root surfaces. The specific activities of both enzymes were also regulated during contact of these bacteria with intact bean roots. Increased superoxide dismutase and decreased catalase activities were observed rapidly, by 10 min upon inoculation of cells onto intact bean roots. Catalase specific activity increased with time to peak at 12 h before declining. By 48 h, the cells displayed this low catalase but maintained high superoxide dismutase specific activities. Catalase with a low specific activity and a high superoxide dismutase activity also were present in extracts of cells obtained from 7-day-old roots colonized from inoculum applied to seed. This specific activity of superoxide dismutase of root-contacted cells was about fourfold-higher in comparison to cells grown on rich medium, whereas the specific activity for catalase was reduced about fivefold. A single catalase isozyme, isozyme A, and one isozyme of superoxide dismutase, isozyme 1, were detected during growth of the bacteria on root surface components and during exposure of cells to intact bean roots for 1 h. An additional catalase, isozyme B, was detected from bacteria after exposure to the intact bean roots for 12 h. Catalase isozyme A and superoxide dismutase isozyme 1 were located in the cytoplasm and catalase band B was located in the membrane of P. putida. Images PMID:16348360

  18. Wheat root colonization and nitrogenase activity by Azospirillum isolates from crop plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chungwoo; Kecskés, Mihály L; Deaker, Rosalind J; Gilchrist, Kate; New, Peter B; Kennedy, Ivan R; Kim, Seunghwan; Sa, Tongmin

    2005-11-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of different crops of Korea. A total of 16 isolates were selected and characterized. Thirteen of the isolates produced characteristics similar to those of the reference strains of Azospirillum, and the remaining 3 isolates were found to be Enterobacter spp. The isolates could be categorized into 3 groups based on their ARDRA patterns, and the first 2 groups comprised Azospirillum brasilense and Azospirillum lipoferum. The acetylene reduction activity (ARA) of these isolates was determined for free cultures and in association with wheat roots. There was no correlation between pure culture and plant-associated nitrogenase activity of the different strains. The isolates that showed higher nitrogenase activities in association with wheat roots in each group were selected and sequenced. Isolates of Azospirillum brasilense CW301, Azospirillum brasilense CW903, and Azospirillum lipoferum CW1503 were selected to study colonization in association with wheat roots. We observed higher expression of beta-galactosidase activity in A. brasilense strains than in A. lipoferum strains, which could be attributed to their higher population in association with wheat roots. All strains tested colonized and exhibited the strongest beta-galactosidase activity at the sites of lateral roots emergence.

  19. Effect of IAA on in vitro growth and colonization of Nostoc in plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Anwar; Shah, Syed T.; Rahman, Hazir; Irshad, Muhammad; Iqbal, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Nostoc is widely known for its ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen and the establishment of symbiotic relationship with a wide range of plants from various taxonomic groups. Several strains of Nostoc produce phytohormones that promote growth of its plant partners. Nostoc OS-1 was therefore selected for study because of the presence of putative ipdC gene that encodes a key enzyme to produce Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The results indicated that both cellular and released IAA was found high with increasing incubation time and reached to a peak value (i.e., 21 pmol mg-1ch-a) on the third week as determined by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Also the Nostoc OS-1 strain efficiently colonized the roots and promoted the growth of rice as well as wheat under axenic conditions and induced ipdC gene that suggested the possible involvement of IAA in these phenotypes. To confirm the impact of IAA on root colonization efficiency and plant promoting phenotypes of Nostoc OS-1, an ipdC knockout mutant was generated by homologous recombinant method. The amount of releasing IAA, in vitro growth, root colonization, and plant promoting efficiency of the ipdC knockout mutant was observed significantly lower than wild type strain under axenic conditions. Importantly, these phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels when the ipdC knockout mutant was complemented with wild type ipdC gene. These results together suggested that ipdC and/or synthesized IAA of Nostoc OS-1 is required for its efficient root colonization and plant promoting activity. PMID:25699072

  20. Evidence of Differences between the Communities of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Colonizing Galls and Roots of Prunus persica Infected by the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita▿

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Lozano, Zenaida; Roldán, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play important roles as plant protection agents, reducing or suppressing nematode colonization. However, it has never been investigated whether the galls produced in roots by nematode infection are colonized by AMF. This study tested whether galls produced by Meloidogyne incognita infection in Prunus persica roots are colonized by AMF. We also determined the changes in AMF composition and biodiversity mediated by infection with this root-knot nematode. DNA from galls and roots of plants infected by M. incognita and from roots of noninfected plants was extracted, amplified, cloned, and sequenced using AMF-specific primers. Phylogenetic analysis using the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) data set revealed 22 different AMF sequence types (17 Glomus sequence types, 3 Paraglomus sequence types, 1 Scutellospora sequence type, and 1 Acaulospora sequence type). The highest AMF diversity was found in uninfected roots, followed by infected roots and galls. This study indicates that the galls produced in P. persica roots due to infection with M. incognita were colonized extensively by a community of AMF, belonging to the families Paraglomeraceae and Glomeraceae, that was different from the community detected in roots. Although the function of the AMF in the galls is still unknown, we hypothesize that they act as protection agents against opportunistic pathogens. PMID:21984233

  1. Survival trade-offs in plant roots during colonization by closely related beneficial and pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Kracher, Barbara; Hiruma, Kei; Münch, Philipp C; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Thon, Michael R; Weimann, Aaron; Damm, Ulrike; Dallery, Jean-Félix; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Lespinet, Olivier; Sacristán, Soledad; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Kemen, Eric; McHardy, Alice C; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; O'Connell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The sessile nature of plants forced them to evolve mechanisms to prioritize their responses to simultaneous stresses, including colonization by microbes or nutrient starvation. Here, we compare the genomes of a beneficial root endophyte, Colletotrichum tofieldiae and its pathogenic relative C. incanum, and examine the transcriptomes of both fungi and their plant host Arabidopsis during phosphate starvation. Although the two species diverged only 8.8 million years ago and have similar gene arsenals, we identify genomic signatures indicative of an evolutionary transition from pathogenic to beneficial lifestyles, including a narrowed repertoire of secreted effector proteins, expanded families of chitin-binding and secondary metabolism-related proteins, and limited activation of pathogenicity-related genes in planta. We show that beneficial responses are prioritized in C. tofieldiae-colonized roots under phosphate-deficient conditions, whereas defense responses are activated under phosphate-sufficient conditions. These immune responses are retained in phosphate-starved roots colonized by pathogenic C. incanum, illustrating the ability of plants to maximize survival in response to conflicting stresses. PMID:27150427

  2. Surfactin variants mediate species-specific biofilm formation and root colonization in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Aleti, Gajender; Lehner, Sylvia; Bacher, Markus; Compant, Stéphane; Nikolic, Branislav; Plesko, Maja; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Sessitsch, Angela; Brader, Günter

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (cLP) and especially surfactins produced by Bacillus spp. trigger biofilm formation and root colonization and are crucial for biocontrol activity and systemic resistance in plants. Bacillus atrophaeus 176s isolated from the moss Tortella tortuosa produces the cLP fengycins, iturins and surfactins, possesses antifungal activities and can protect tomato, lettuce and sugar beet against Rhizoctonia solani infection. In B. atrophaeus we identified for the first time the variant surfactin C, which differs from surfactin A produced by B. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens by an isoleucine instead of a leucine at position 7 of the lipopeptide backbone. The analysis of the complete surfactin gene clusters revealed that the dissimilarity is encoded in the adenylation domain of srfC and show that surfactin variations are distributed in a species-specific manner in bacilli. We demonstrate that the surfactin A and C with subtle structural differences have varying signal strengths on biofilm formation and root colonization and act specifically on the respective producing strain. This became evident as biofilm formation and root colonization but not swarming motility in surfactin biosynthesis mutants was restored differentially in the presence of exogenously supplemented cognate and non-cognate surfactin variants. PMID:27306252

  3. Survival trade-offs in plant roots during colonization by closely related beneficial and pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Kracher, Barbara; Hiruma, Kei; Münch, Philipp C.; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Thon, Michael R.; Weimann, Aaron; Damm, Ulrike; Dallery, Jean-Félix; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Lespinet, Olivier; Sacristán, Soledad; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Kemen, Eric; McHardy, Alice C.; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; O'Connell, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The sessile nature of plants forced them to evolve mechanisms to prioritize their responses to simultaneous stresses, including colonization by microbes or nutrient starvation. Here, we compare the genomes of a beneficial root endophyte, Colletotrichum tofieldiae and its pathogenic relative C. incanum, and examine the transcriptomes of both fungi and their plant host Arabidopsis during phosphate starvation. Although the two species diverged only 8.8 million years ago and have similar gene arsenals, we identify genomic signatures indicative of an evolutionary transition from pathogenic to beneficial lifestyles, including a narrowed repertoire of secreted effector proteins, expanded families of chitin-binding and secondary metabolism-related proteins, and limited activation of pathogenicity-related genes in planta. We show that beneficial responses are prioritized in C. tofieldiae-colonized roots under phosphate-deficient conditions, whereas defense responses are activated under phosphate-sufficient conditions. These immune responses are retained in phosphate-starved roots colonized by pathogenic C. incanum, illustrating the ability of plants to maximize survival in response to conflicting stresses. PMID:27150427

  4. Effect of Population Dynamics of Pseudomonas cepacia and Paecilomyces lilacinus on Colonization of Polyfoam Rooting Cubes by Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, D. Kelly; Benson, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Suspensions of Pseudomonas cepacia (strain 5.5B) and Paecilomyces lilacinus (isolate 6.2F) were applied to polyfoam rooting cubes for control of stem rot of poinsettia caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The populations of antagonists and colonization of rooting cubes by R. solani were monitored during a 3-week period. Colonization of cubes by R. solani was reduced in cubes treated with P. cepacia, but the population of P. cepacia decreased by as much as 97% during the test period. Increased colonization by R. solani was correlated with a decline in population of P. cepacia. P. lilacinus was more persistent than P. cepacia in cubes, with only a 21% reduction observed during the 3-week period. Colonization of the P. lilacinus-treated cubes by R. solani was significantly less than colonization of infested controls. No correlation existed between population of P. lilacinus and colonization of cubes by R. solani. PMID:16349353

  5. Tree species richness affecting fine root biomass in European forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finér, Leena; Domisch, Timo; Vesterdal, Lars; Dawud, Seid M.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Fine roots are an important factor in the forest carbon cycle, contributing significantly to below-ground biomass and soil carbon storage. Therefore it is essential to understand the role of the forest structure, indicated by tree species diversity in controlling below-ground biomass and managing the carbon pools of forest soils. We studied how tree species richness would affect fine root biomass and its distribution in the soil profile and biomass above- and below-ground allocation patterns of different tree species. Our main hypothesis was that increasing tree species richness would lead to below-ground niche differentiation and more efficient soil exploitation by the roots, resulting in a higher fine root biomass in the soil. We sampled fine roots of trees and understorey vegetation in six European forest types in Finland, Poland, Germany, Romania, Italy and Spain, representing boreal, temperate and Mediterranean forests, established within the FunDivEUROPE project for studying the effects of tree species diversity on forest functioning. After determining fine root biomasses, we identified the percentages of different tree species in the fine root samples using the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) method. Opposite to our hypothesis we did not find any general positive relationship between tree species richness and fine root biomass. A weak positive response found in Italy and Spain seemed to be related to dry environmental conditions during Mediterranean summers. At the Polish site where we could sample deeper soil layers (down to 40 cm), we found more tree fine roots in the deeper layers under species-rich forests, as compared to the monocultures, indicating the ability of trees to explore more resources and to increase soil carbon stocks. Tree species richness did not affect biomass allocation patterns between above- and below-ground parts of the trees.

  6. Mycorrhizal fungi affect root stele tissue in grasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R. M.; Hetrick, B. A. D.; Wilson, G. W. T.; Environmental Research; Northern Iowa Univ.; Kansas State Univ.

    1997-01-01

    Although arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was initially believed to have little or no impact on root morphology, we now recognize that subtle changes do occur and that these changes may be of considerable consequence to host growth and nutrition, as well as functional growth strategy. In examining the stele and root diameters of C3 and C4 grasses, C4 grasses were demonstrated to have a significantly larger proportion of their fibrous roots occupied by stele tissue than do C3 grasses. In fact, functional growth strategy (C3 versus C4) was observed to be a relatively good predictor of stele area. Mycorrhizal fungi also influenced the amount of stele tissue, but the effect was not the same for both C3 and C4 grasses. The stele area of all C4 grasses except for Sorghastrum nutans was greater in the presence of mycorrhizal colonization. Among the C3 grasses, only Bromus inermis showed a significant increase, although Elymus cinereus and Lolium perenne displayed significant decreases in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Changes in the stele area of the plant species were closely related to their responsiveness to mycorrhizal symbiosis and might in part explain both beneficial and detrimental responses of plants to mycorrhizae. An increase in stele circumference induced by mycorrhizae would allow for greater uptake and passage of water and nutrients to the vascular cylinder, and growth depressions could be a direct outcome of reduced stele circumference. Thus, differences in stele circumference represent a possible mechanism for mycorrhizal impacts on host plants. These findings indicate that structural differences among grasses are related to different functional capabilities and further emphasize the need for better integration of comparative anatomy and morphology procedures in the study of mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  7. Role of swollenin, an expansin-like protein from Trichoderma, in plant root colonization.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Yariv; Briff, Eden; Viterbo, Ada; Chet, Ilan

    2008-06-01

    Swollenin, a protein first characterized in the saprophytic fungus Trichoderma reesei, contains an N-terminal carbohydrate-binding module family 1 domain (CBD) with cellulose-binding function and a C-terminal expansin-like domain. This protein was identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry among many other cellulolytic proteins secreted in the coculture hydroponics medium of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings and Trichoderma asperellum, a well-known biocontrol agent and inducer of plant defense responses. The swollenin gene was isolated and its coding region was overexpressed in the same strain under the control of the constitutive pki1 promoter. Trichoderma transformants showed a remarkably increased ability to colonize cucumber roots within 6 h after inoculation. On the other hand, overexpressors of a truncated swollenin sequence bearing a 36-amino acid deletion of the CBD did not differ from the wild type, showing in vivo that this domain is necessary for full protein activity. Root colonization rates were reduced in transformants silenced in swollenin gene expression. A synthetic 36-mer swollenin CBD peptide was shown to be capable of stimulating local defense responses in cucumber roots and leaves and to afford local protection toward Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv lachrymans infection. This indicates that the CBD domain might be recognized by the plant as a microbe-associated molecular pattern in the Trichoderma-plant interaction.

  8. Root-Zone Glyphosate Exposure Adversely Affects Two Ditch Species

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lyndsay E.; Koontz, Melissa B.; Pezeshki, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate, one of the most applied herbicides globally, has been extensively studied for its effects on non-target organisms. In the field, following precipitation, glyphosate runs off into agricultural ditches where it infiltrates into the soil and thus may encounter the roots of vegetation. These edge-of-field ditches share many characteristics with wetlands, including the ability to reduce loads of anthropogenic chemicals through uptake, transformation, and retention. Different species within the ditches may have a differential sensitivity to exposure of the root zone to glyphosate, contributing to patterns of abundance of ruderal species. The present laboratory experiment investigated whether two species commonly found in agricultural ditches in southcentral United States were affected by root zone glyphosate in a dose-dependent manner, with the objective of identifying a sublethal concentration threshold. The root zone of individuals of Polygonum hydropiperoides and Panicum hemitomon were exposed to four concentrations of glyphosate. Leaf chlorophyll content was measured, and the ratio of aboveground biomass to belowground biomass and survival were quantified. The findings from this study showed that root zone glyphosate exposure negatively affected both species including dose-dependent reductions in chlorophyll content. P. hydropiperdoides showed the greatest negative response, with decreased belowground biomass allocation and total mortality at the highest concentrations tested. PMID:24833234

  9. Nitrate Assimilation Contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum Root Attachment, Stem Colonization, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dalsing, Beth L.

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, an economically important plant pathogen, must attach, grow, and produce virulence factors to colonize plant xylem vessels and cause disease. Little is known about the bacterial metabolism that drives these processes. Nitrate is present in both tomato xylem fluid and agricultural soils, and the bacterium's gene expression profile suggests that it assimilates nitrate during pathogenesis. A nasA mutant, which lacks the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of R. solanacearum's sole assimilatory nitrate reductase, did not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. This nasA mutant exhibited reduced virulence and delayed stem colonization after soil soak inoculation of tomato plants. The nasA virulence defect was more severe following a period of soil survival between hosts. Unexpectedly, once bacteria reached xylem tissue, nitrate assimilation was dispensable for growth, virulence, and competitive fitness. However, nasA-dependent nitrate assimilation was required for normal production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), a major virulence factor. Quantitative analyses revealed that EPS production was significantly influenced by nitrate assimilation when nitrate was not required for growth. The plant colonization delay of the nasA mutant was externally complemented by coinoculation with wild-type bacteria but not by coinoculation with an EPS-deficient epsB mutant. The nasA mutant and epsB mutant did not attach to tomato roots as well as wild-type strain UW551. However, adding either wild-type cells or cell-free EPS improved the root attachment of these mutants. These data collectively suggest that nitrate assimilation promotes R. solanacearum virulence by enhancing root attachment, the initial stage of infection, possibly by modulating EPS production. PMID:24363343

  10. Nitrate assimilation contributes to Ralstonia solanacearum root attachment, stem colonization, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Dalsing, Beth L; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, an economically important plant pathogen, must attach, grow, and produce virulence factors to colonize plant xylem vessels and cause disease. Little is known about the bacterial metabolism that drives these processes. Nitrate is present in both tomato xylem fluid and agricultural soils, and the bacterium's gene expression profile suggests that it assimilates nitrate during pathogenesis. A nasA mutant, which lacks the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of R. solanacearum's sole assimilatory nitrate reductase, did not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. This nasA mutant exhibited reduced virulence and delayed stem colonization after soil soak inoculation of tomato plants. The nasA virulence defect was more severe following a period of soil survival between hosts. Unexpectedly, once bacteria reached xylem tissue, nitrate assimilation was dispensable for growth, virulence, and competitive fitness. However, nasA-dependent nitrate assimilation was required for normal production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), a major virulence factor. Quantitative analyses revealed that EPS production was significantly influenced by nitrate assimilation when nitrate was not required for growth. The plant colonization delay of the nasA mutant was externally complemented by coinoculation with wild-type bacteria but not by coinoculation with an EPS-deficient epsB mutant. The nasA mutant and epsB mutant did not attach to tomato roots as well as wild-type strain UW551. However, adding either wild-type cells or cell-free EPS improved the root attachment of these mutants. These data collectively suggest that nitrate assimilation promotes R. solanacearum virulence by enhancing root attachment, the initial stage of infection, possibly by modulating EPS production.

  11. Yersinia enterocolitica Affects Intestinal Barrier Function in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hering, Nina A; Fromm, Anja; Kikhney, Judith; Lee, In-Fah M; Moter, Annette; Schulzke, Jörg D; Bücker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica causes acute diarrhea in early childhood. A mouse infection model presents new findings on pathological mechanisms in the colon. Symptoms involve diarrhea with watery feces and weight loss that have their functional correlates in decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein permeability. Y. enterocolitica was present within the murine mucosa of both ileum and colon. Here, the bacterial insult was of focal nature and led to changes in tight junction protein expression and architecture. These findings are in concordance with observations from former cell culture studies and suggest a leak flux mechanism of diarrhea.

  12. Mutations Affecting Hyphal Colonization and Pyoverdine Production in Pseudomonads Antagonistic toward Phytophthora parasitica.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Menge, J A; Cooksey, D A

    1994-02-01

    In previous studies, Pseudomonas putida 06909 and Pseudomonas fluorescens 09906 suppressed populations of Phytophthora parasitica in the citrus rhizosphere, suggesting that these bacteria may be useful in biological control of citrus root rot. In this study we investigated the mechanisms of antagonism between the bacteria and the fungus. Both bacteria colonized Phytophthora hyphae and inhibited the fungus on agar media. A hyphal column assay was developed to measure the colonization of bacteria on fungal hyphae and to enrich for colonization-deficient mutants. In this way we identified Tn5 mutants of each pseudomonad that were not able to colonize the hyphae and inhibit fungal growth in vitro. Colonization-deficient mutants were nonmotile and lacked flagella. Survival of nonmotile mutants in a citrus soil was similar to survival of a random Tn5 mutant over a 52-day period. Additional screening of random Tn5 mutants of both pseudomonads for loss of fungal inhibition in vitro yielded two distinct types of mutants. Mutants of the first type were deficient in production of pyoverdines and in inhibition of the fungus in vitro, although they still colonized fungal hyphae. Mutants of the second type lacked flagella and were not able to colonize the hyphae or inhibit fungal growth. No role was found for antibiotic production by the two bacteria in the inhibition of the fungus. Our results suggest that both hyphal colonization and pyoverdine production are important in the inhibition of Phytophthora parasitica by P. fluorescens and P. putida in vitro. PMID:16349177

  13. Growth Promotion-Related miRNAs in Oncidium Orchid Roots Colonized by the Endophytic Fungus Piriformospora indica

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuling; Chen, Peng-Jen; Xu, Xuming; Oelmüller, Ralf; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2014-01-01

    Piriformospora indica, an endophytic fungus of Sebacinales, colonizes the roots of a wide range of host plants and establishes various benefits for the plants. In this work, we describe miRNAs which are upregulated in Oncidium orchid roots after colonization by the fungus. Growth promotion and vigorous root development were observed in Oncidium hybrid orchid, while seedlings were colonized by P. indica. We performed a genome-wide expression profiling of small RNAs in Oncidium orchid roots either colonized or not-colonized by P. indica. After sequencing, 24,570,250 and 24744,141 clean reads were obtained from two libraries. 13,736 from 17,036,953 unique sequences showed homology to either 86 miRNA families described in 41 plant species, or to 46 potential novel miRNAs, or to 51 corresponding miRNA precursors. The predicted target genes of these miRNAs are mainly involved in auxin signal perception and transduction, transcription, development and plant defense. The expression analysis of miRNAs and target genes demonstrated the regulatory functions they may participate in. This study revealed that growth stimulation of the Oncidium orchid after colonization by P. indica includes an intricate network of miRNAs and their targets. The symbiotic function of P. indica on Oncidium orchid resembles previous findings on Chinese cabbage. This is the first study on growth regulation and development of Oncidium orchid by miRNAs induced by the symbiotic fungus P. indica. PMID:24409313

  14. Growth promotion-related miRNAs in Oncidium orchid roots colonized by the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Shen, Chin-Hui; Lin, Yuling; Chen, Peng-Jen; Xu, Xuming; Oelmüller, Ralf; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2014-01-01

    Piriformospora indica, an endophytic fungus of Sebacinales, colonizes the roots of a wide range of host plants and establishes various benefits for the plants. In this work, we describe miRNAs which are upregulated in Oncidium orchid roots after colonization by the fungus. Growth promotion and vigorous root development were observed in Oncidium hybrid orchid, while seedlings were colonized by P. indica. We performed a genome-wide expression profiling of small RNAs in Oncidium orchid roots either colonized or not-colonized by P. indica. After sequencing, 24,570,250 and 24744,141 clean reads were obtained from two libraries. 13,736 from 17,036,953 unique sequences showed homology to either 86 miRNA families described in 41 plant species, or to 46 potential novel miRNAs, or to 51 corresponding miRNA precursors. The predicted target genes of these miRNAs are mainly involved in auxin signal perception and transduction, transcription, development and plant defense. The expression analysis of miRNAs and target genes demonstrated the regulatory functions they may participate in. This study revealed that growth stimulation of the Oncidium orchid after colonization by P. indica includes an intricate network of miRNAs and their targets. The symbiotic function of P. indica on Oncidium orchid resembles previous findings on Chinese cabbage. This is the first study on growth regulation and development of Oncidium orchid by miRNAs induced by the symbiotic fungus P. indica.

  15. Endo- and ectomycorrhizas in Quercus agrifolia Nee. (Fagaceae): patterns of root colonization and effects on seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Egerton-Warburton, L; Allen, M F

    2001-12-01

    We documented the patterns of root occupancy by Glomalean and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in Quercus agrifolia, and host plant responses to inoculation with each mycorrhizal type alone or in combination. Glomalean hyphae, coils and vesicles, and EM root tips were recorded. Colonization patterns conformed to a succession from Glomalean and EM fungi in 1-year-old seedlings to predominantly EM in saplings (>11 years old); both mycorrhizal types were rarely detected within the same root segment. Inoculation of Q. agrifolia seedlings with EM or Glomalean fungi (AM) alone or in combination (EM+AM) altered the cost:benefit relationship of mycorrhizas to the host plant. Seedling survival, plant biomass, foliar nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) status were greatest in EM- or AM-only inoculated seedlings. Seedlings inoculated with both mycorrhizal types (AM+EM) exhibited the lowest survival rates, biomass, foliar N, and P levels. Roots of these plants were highly colonized by both EM (38% root length colonized) and Glomalean fungi (34%). Because these levels of colonization were similar to those detected in 1-year-old field seedlings, the presence of both mycorrhizal types may be a carbon cost and, in turn, less beneficial to oaks during establishment in the field. However, the shift to EM colonization in older plants suggests that mycorrhizal effects may become positive with time. PMID:24549348

  16. Interspecific metabolic diversity of root-colonizing endophytic fungi revealed by enzyme activity tests.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Dániel G; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-12-01

    Although dark septate endophytes (DSE) represent a worldwide dispersed form group of root-colonizing endophytic fungi, our knowledge on their role in ecosystem functioning is far limited. In this study, we aimed to test if functional diversity exists among DSE fungi representing different lineages of root endophytic fungal community of semiarid sandy grasslands. To address this question and to gain general information on function of DSE fungi, we adopted api-ZYM and BioLog FF assays to study those non-sporulating filamentous fungi and characterized the metabolic activity of 15 different DSE species. Although there were striking differences among the species, all of the substrates tested were utilized by the DSE fungi. When endophytes characteristic to grasses and non-grass host plants were separately considered, we found that the whole substrate repertoire was used by both groups. This might illustrate the complementary functional diversity of the communities root endophytic plant-associated fungi. The broad spectra of substrates utilized by these root endophytes illustrate the functional importance of their diversity, which can play role not only in nutrient mobilization and uptake of plants from with nutrient poor soils, but also in general plant performance and ecosystem functioning. PMID:27604257

  17. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of Herbaspirillum seropedicae colonizing wheat (Triticum aestivum) roots.

    PubMed

    Pankievicz, V C S; Camilios-Neto, D; Bonato, P; Balsanelli, E; Tadra-Sfeir, M Z; Faoro, H; Chubatsu, L S; Donatti, L; Wajnberg, G; Passetti, F; Monteiro, R A; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M

    2016-04-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is a diazotrophic and endophytic bacterium that associates with economically important grasses promoting plant growth and increasing productivity. To identify genes related to bacterial ability to colonize plants, wheat seedlings growing hydroponically in Hoagland's medium were inoculated with H. seropedicae and incubated for 3 days. Total mRNA from the bacteria present in the root surface and in the plant medium were purified, depleted from rRNA and used for RNA-seq profiling. RT-qPCR analyses were conducted to confirm regulation of selected genes. Comparison of RNA profile of root attached and planktonic bacteria revealed extensive metabolic adaptations to the epiphytic life style. These adaptations include expression of specific adhesins and cell wall re-modeling to attach to the root. Additionally, the metabolism was adapted to the microxic environment and nitrogen-fixation genes were expressed. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthesis was activated, and PHB granules were stored as observed by microscopy. Genes related to plant growth promotion, such as auxin production were expressed. Many ABC transporter genes were regulated in the bacteria attached to the roots. The results provide new insights into the adaptation of H. seropedicae to the interaction with the plant. PMID:26801330

  18. Interspecific metabolic diversity of root-colonizing endophytic fungi revealed by enzyme activity tests.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Dániel G; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-12-01

    Although dark septate endophytes (DSE) represent a worldwide dispersed form group of root-colonizing endophytic fungi, our knowledge on their role in ecosystem functioning is far limited. In this study, we aimed to test if functional diversity exists among DSE fungi representing different lineages of root endophytic fungal community of semiarid sandy grasslands. To address this question and to gain general information on function of DSE fungi, we adopted api-ZYM and BioLog FF assays to study those non-sporulating filamentous fungi and characterized the metabolic activity of 15 different DSE species. Although there were striking differences among the species, all of the substrates tested were utilized by the DSE fungi. When endophytes characteristic to grasses and non-grass host plants were separately considered, we found that the whole substrate repertoire was used by both groups. This might illustrate the complementary functional diversity of the communities root endophytic plant-associated fungi. The broad spectra of substrates utilized by these root endophytes illustrate the functional importance of their diversity, which can play role not only in nutrient mobilization and uptake of plants from with nutrient poor soils, but also in general plant performance and ecosystem functioning.

  19. A method to quantify infection and colonization of holm oak (Quercus ilex) roots by Phytophthora cinnamomi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. is an important root rot pathogen widely distributed in the north hemisphere, with a large host range. Among others diseases, it is known to be a principal factor in the decline of holm oak and cork oak, the most important tree species in the “dehesa” ecosystem of south-western Spain. Previously, the focus of studies on P. cinnamomi and holm oak have been on molecular tools for identification, functional responses of the host, together with other physiological and morphological host variables. However, a microscopic index to describe the degree of infection and colonization in the plant tissues has not yet been developed. A colonization or infection index would be a useful tool for studies that examine differences between individuals subjected to different treatments or to individuals belonging to different breeding accessions, together with their specific responses to the pathogen. This work presents a methodology based on the capture and digital treatment of microscopic images, using simple and accessible software, together with a range of variables that quantify the infection and colonization process. PMID:22974221

  20. A method to quantify infection and colonization of holm oak (Quercus ilex) roots by Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Gómez, Francisco J; Sánchez-Cuesta, Rafael; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M; Pérez-de-Luque, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. is an important root rot pathogen widely distributed in the north hemisphere, with a large host range. Among others diseases, it is known to be a principal factor in the decline of holm oak and cork oak, the most important tree species in the "dehesa" ecosystem of south-western Spain. Previously, the focus of studies on P. cinnamomi and holm oak have been on molecular tools for identification, functional responses of the host, together with other physiological and morphological host variables. However, a microscopic index to describe the degree of infection and colonization in the plant tissues has not yet been developed. A colonization or infection index would be a useful tool for studies that examine differences between individuals subjected to different treatments or to individuals belonging to different breeding accessions, together with their specific responses to the pathogen. This work presents a methodology based on the capture and digital treatment of microscopic images, using simple and accessible software, together with a range of variables that quantify the infection and colonization process.

  1. Constitutive overexpression of the sucrose transporter SoSUT1 in potato plants increases arbuscular mycorrhiza fungal root colonization under high, but not under low, soil phosphorus availability.

    PubMed

    Gabriel-Neumann, Elke; Neumann, Günter; Leggewie, Georg; George, Eckhard

    2011-06-15

    The sucrose transporter SUT1 functions in phloem loading of photoassimilates in solanaceous plant species. In the present study, wildtype and transgenic potato plants with either constitutive overexpression or antisense inhibition of SUT1 were grown under high or low phosphorus (P) fertilization levels in the presence or absence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. At a low soil P fertilization level, the extent of AM fungal root colonization was not different among the genotypes. In all plants, the AM symbiosis contributed significantly to P uptake under these conditions. In response to a high soil P fertilization level, all genotypes showed a decrease in AM fungal root colonization, indicating that the expression level of SUT1 does not constitute a major mechanism of control over AM development in response to the soil P availability. However, plants with overexpression of SUT1 showed a higher extent of AM fungal root colonization compared with the other genotypes when the soil P availability was high. Whether an increased symbiotic C supply, alterations in the phytohormonal balance, or a decreased synthesis of antimicrobial compounds was the major cause for this effect requires further investigation. In plants with impaired phloem loading, a low C status of plant sink tissues did apparently not negatively affect plant C supply to the AM symbiosis. It is possible that, at least during vegetative and early generative growth, source rather than sink tissues exert control over amounts of C supplied to AM fungi.

  2. Constitutive overexpression of the sucrose transporter SoSUT1 in potato plants increases arbuscular mycorrhiza fungal root colonization under high, but not under low, soil phosphorus availability.

    PubMed

    Gabriel-Neumann, Elke; Neumann, Günter; Leggewie, Georg; George, Eckhard

    2011-06-15

    The sucrose transporter SUT1 functions in phloem loading of photoassimilates in solanaceous plant species. In the present study, wildtype and transgenic potato plants with either constitutive overexpression or antisense inhibition of SUT1 were grown under high or low phosphorus (P) fertilization levels in the presence or absence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. At a low soil P fertilization level, the extent of AM fungal root colonization was not different among the genotypes. In all plants, the AM symbiosis contributed significantly to P uptake under these conditions. In response to a high soil P fertilization level, all genotypes showed a decrease in AM fungal root colonization, indicating that the expression level of SUT1 does not constitute a major mechanism of control over AM development in response to the soil P availability. However, plants with overexpression of SUT1 showed a higher extent of AM fungal root colonization compared with the other genotypes when the soil P availability was high. Whether an increased symbiotic C supply, alterations in the phytohormonal balance, or a decreased synthesis of antimicrobial compounds was the major cause for this effect requires further investigation. In plants with impaired phloem loading, a low C status of plant sink tissues did apparently not negatively affect plant C supply to the AM symbiosis. It is possible that, at least during vegetative and early generative growth, source rather than sink tissues exert control over amounts of C supplied to AM fungi. PMID:21382646

  3. Isolation of two aspartyl proteases from Trichoderma asperellum expressed during colonization of cucumber roots.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Ada; Harel, Michal; Chet, Ilan

    2004-09-01

    Trichoderma asperellum and cucumber seedlings were used as a model to study the modulation of Trichoderma gene expression during plant root colonization. Seedlings were grown in an aseptic hydroponics medium and inoculated with Trichoderma spore suspension. Proteins differentially secreted into the medium were isolated. Three major proteins of fungal origin were identified: two arabinofuranosidases (Abf1 and Abf2) and an aspartyl protease. Differential mRNA display was conducted on Trichoderma mycelia interacting and non-interacting, with the plant roots. Among the differentially regulated clones another aspartyl protease was identified. Sequencing of the genes revealed that the first aspartyl protease is a close homologue of PapA from T. harzianum and the other, of AP1 from Botryotinia fuckeliana. RT-PCR analysis confirms that the proteases are induced in response to plant roots attachment and are expressed in planta. papA, but not papB, is also induced in plate confrontation assays with the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. These data suggest that the identified proteases play a role in Trichoderma both as a mycoparasite and as a plant opportunistic symbiont.

  4. Hydrostatic factors affect the gravity responses of algae and roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Wayne, Randy; Leopold, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of Wayne et al. (1990) that plant cells perceive gravity by sensing a pressure differential between the top and the bottom of the cell was tested by subjecting rice roots and cells of Caracean algae to external solutions of various densities. It was found that increasing the density of the external medium had a profound effect on the polar ratio (PR, the ratio between velocities of the downwardly and upwardly streaming cytoplasm) of the Caracean algae cells. When these cells were placed in solutions of denser compound, the PR decreased to less than 1, as the density of the external medium became higher than that of the cell; thus, the normal gravity-induced polarity was reversed, indicating that the osmotic pressure of the medium affects the cell's ability to respond to gravity. In rice roots, an increase of the density of the solution inhibited the rate of gravitropism. These results agree with predictions of a hydrostatic model for graviperception.

  5. Quantification and role of organic acids in cucumber root exudates in Trichoderma harzianum T-E5 colonization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengge; Meng, Xiaohui; Yang, Xingming; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong

    2014-10-01

    The ability to colonize on plant roots is recognized as one of the most important characteristics of the beneficial fungi Trichoderma spp. The aim of this study is to prove that the utilization of organic acids is a major trait of Trichoderma harzianum T-E5 for colonization of cucumber roots. A series experiments in split-root hydroponic system and in vitro were designed to demonstrate the association between the utilization of organic acids and T-E5 colonization on cucumber roots. In the split-root hydroponic system, inoculation with T-E5 (T) significantly increased the biomass of cucumber plants compared with CK (non-inoculation with T-E5). The T-E5 hyphae densely covering the cucumber root surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three organic acids (oxalic acid, malic acid and citric acid) were identified from both the CK and T treatments by HPLC and LC/ESI-MS procedures. The amounts of oxalic acid and malic acid in T were significantly higher than those in CK. All the organic acids exhibited different and significant stimulation effects on the mycelial growth and conidial germination of T-E5 in vitro. An additional hydroponic experiment demonstrated the positive effects of organic acids on the T-E5 colonization of cucumber roots. In conclusion, the present study revealed that certain organic acids could be used as nutritional sources for Trichoderma harzianum T-E5 to reinforce its population on cucumber roots.

  6. Indole-3-acetaldoxime-derived compounds restrict root colonization in the beneficial interaction between Arabidopsis roots and the endophyte Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Nongbri, Pyniarlang L; Johnson, Joy Michal; Sherameti, Irena; Glawischnig, Erich; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    The growth-promoting and root-colonizing endophyte Piriformospora indica induces camalexin and the expression of CYP79B2, CYP79B3, CYP71A13, PAD3, and WRKY33 required for the synthesis of indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx)-derived compounds in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings. Upregulation of the mRNA levels by P. indica requires cytoplasmic calcium elevation and mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 but not root-hair-deficient 2, radical oxygen production, or the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1/oxidative signal-inducible 1 pathway. Because P. indica-mediated growth promotion is impaired in cyp79B2 cyp79B3 seedlings, while pad3 seedlings-which do not accumulate camalexin-still respond to the fungus, IAOx-derived compounds other than camalexin (e.g., indole glucosinolates) are required during early phases of the beneficial interaction. The roots of cyp79B2 cyp79B3 seedlings are more colonized than wild-type roots, and upregulation of the defense genes pathogenesis-related (PR)-1, PR-3, PDF1.2, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, and germin indicates that the mutant responds to the lack of IAOx-derived compounds by activating other defense processes. After 6 weeks on soil, defense genes are no longer upregulated in wild-type, cyp79B2 cyp79B3, and pad3 roots. This results in uncontrolled fungal growth in the mutant roots and reduced performance of the mutants. We propose that a long-term harmony between the two symbionts requires restriction of root colonization by IAOx-derived compounds.

  7. Effect of Bacteriophage on Colonization of Sugarbeet Roots by Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Stephens, P M; O'sullivan, M; O'gara, F

    1987-05-01

    The colonization potential of two fluorescent Pseudomonas strains (M11/4, B2/6) that exhibit antifungal activity in vitro was studied on the roots of sugarbeet plants in a clay loam soil. The cell density of the introduced bacteria declined on the root system over a 16-day test period in nonsterile soil. Strain B2/6 declined at a significantly faster rate compared with M11/4. This loss in viability and difference in colonization ability between M11/4 and B2/6 was not observed in sterile soil. Nutrient deprivation induced by indigenous microorganisms was excluded as a key factor involved in the decline of the introduced bacteria on the basis that strains M11/4 and B2/6 retained viability when subjected to nutrient starvation conditions over a 16-day period. Experiments designed to test whether antagonism by indigenous microorganisms was responsible for the decline in the introduced fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. population revealed the presence of large numbers of bacteriophage in the soil capable of lysing strain B2/6. Reconstitution experiments carried out with sugarbeet seedlings inoculated independently with strains M11/4 and B2/6 and grown in sterile soil to which a soil phage filtrate had been added showed a significant decrease in the viability of strain B2/6 relative to M11/4. Phage antagonistic toward strain B2/6 were detected in 43% of soils taken from the major sugarbeet growing regions of Ireland.

  8. Chemical alteration of the rhizosphere of the mycorrhizal-colonized wheat root.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Munir J; Pan, W L; Kennedy, A C

    2005-06-01

    Plexiglass pot growth chamber experiments were conducted to evaluate the chemical alterations in the rhizosphere of mycorrhizal wheat roots after inoculation with Glomus intraradices [arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)]. Exchange resins were used as sinks for nutrients to determine whether the inoculated plant can increase the solubility and the uptake of P and micronutrients. Treatments included: (1) soil (bulk soil); (2) AMF inoculation no P addition (I-P); (3) no inoculation with no P addition (NI-P); (4) AMF inoculation with addition of 50 mg P (kg soil)(-1) (I+P), and (5) no inoculation with addition of 50 mg P (kg soil)(-1) (NI+P). The AMF inoculum was added at a rate of four spores of G. intraradices (g soil)(-1). The exchange resin membranes were inserted vertically 5 cm apart in the middle of Plexiglass pots. Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Len) was planted in each Plexiglass pot and grown for 2 weeks in a growth chamber where water was maintained at field capacity. Rhizosphere pH and redox potential (Eh), nutrient bioavailability indices and mycorrhizal colonization were determined. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased the colonization more when P was not added, but did not increase the shoot dry weight at either P level. The rhizosphere pH was lower in the inoculated plants compared to the noninoculated plants in the absence of added P, while the Eh did not change. The decrease in pH in the rhizosphere of inoculated plants could be responsible for the increased P and Zn uptake observed with inoculation. In contrast, Mn uptake was decreased by inoculation. The resin-adsorbed P was increased by inoculation, which, along with the bioavailability index data, may indicate that mycorrhizal roots were able to increase the solubility of soil P.

  9. Survival of and wheat-root colonization by alginate encapsulated Herbaspirillum spp.

    PubMed

    el-Komy, H M

    2001-01-01

    The survival of Herbaspirillum spp. cells added directly or encapsulated in alginate beads and colonization of wheat roots was evaluated in soil microcosms. Cells entrapped in alginate in the presence of JNFb-broth and introduced into unplanted non-sterile clay loamy and sandy soils survived better than cells added directly to the same soils after 50 d incubation. On amendment by JNFb broth and/or skim milk the entrapped cells survived better than those prepared in water. Encapsulated cells survived better in a heavier textured soil (clay-loamy) than in a lighter (sandy) soil. Wheat plants growing in microcosms inoculated with various bead types from day 0 to day 30 exhibited high levels of histosphere colonization, nitrogenase activity (in situ) measured by acetylene reduction assay, plant dry mass and total N content but no symptoms of mottled stripe disease were observed. Comparable results of growth criteria and nitrogenase activity, but relatively lower bacterial populations, were obtained with wheat grown for 45 d after the inoculant had been introduced into the soil with different bead types.

  10. AM fungi root colonization increases the production of essential isoprenoids vs. nonessential isoprenoids especially under drought stress conditions or after jasmonic acid application.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Dolores; Rapparini, Francesca; Peñuelas, Josep

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi enhances plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stressors and finally plant growth. However, little is known about the effect of AM on isoprenoid foliar and root content. In this study we tested whether the AM symbiosis affects carbon resource allocation to different classes of isoprenoids such as the volatile nonessential isoprenoids (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and the non-volatile essential isoprenoids (abscisic acid, chlorophylls and carotenoids). By subjecting the plants to stressors such as drought and to exogenous application of JA, we wanted to test their interaction with AM symbiosis in conditions where isoprenoids usually play a role in resistance to stress and in plant defence. Root colonization by AM fungi favoured the leaf production of essential isoprenoids rather than nonessential ones, especially under drought stress conditions or after JA application. The increased carbon demand brought on by AM fungi might thus influence not only the amount of carbon allocated to isoprenoids, but also the carbon partitioning between the different classes of isoprenoids, thus explaining the not previously shown decrease of root volatile isoprenoids in AM plants. We propose that since AM fungi are a nutrient source for the plant, other carbon sinks normally necessary to increase nutrient uptake can be avoided and therefore the plant can devote more resources to synthesize essential isoprenoids for plant growth.

  11. Differential display of abundantly expressed genes of Trichoderma harzianum during colonization of tomato-germinating seeds and roots.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi-Koushki, Mehdi; Rouhani, Hamid; Mahdikhani-Moghaddam, Esmat

    2012-11-01

    The identification of Trichoderma genes whose expression is altered during early stages of interaction with developing roots of germinated seeds is an important step toward understanding the rhizosphere competency of Trichoderma spp. The potential of 13 Trichoderma strains to colonize tomato root and promote plant growth has been evaluated. All used strains successfully propagated in spermosphere and continued their growth in rhizoplane simultaneously root enlargement while the strains T6 and T7 were the most abundant in the apical segment of roots. Root colonization in most strains associated with promoting the roots and shoots growth while they significantly increased up to 43 and 40 % roots and shoots dry weights, respectively. Differential display reverse transcriptase-PCR (DDRT-PCR) has been developed to detect differentially expressed genes in the previously selected strain, Trichoderma harzianum T7, during colonization stages of tomato-germinating seeds and roots. Amplified DDRT-PCR products were analyzed on gel agarose and 62 differential bands excised, purified, cloned, and sequenced. Obtained ESTs were submit-queried to NCBI database by BLASTx search and gene ontology hierarchy. Most of transcripts (29 EST) corresponds to known and hypothetical proteins such as secretion-related small GTPase, 40S ribosomal protein S3a, 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, DNA repair protein rad50, lipid phosphate phosphatase-related protein type 3, nuclear essential protein, phospholipase A2, fatty acid desaturase, nuclear pore complex subunit Nup133, ubiquitin-activating enzyme, and 60S ribosomal protein L40. Also, 13 of these sequences showed no homology (E > 0.05) with public databases and considered as novel genes. Some of these ESTs corresponded to genes encodes enzymes potentially involved in nutritional support of microorganisms which have obvious importance in the establishment of Trichoderma in spermosphere and rhizosphere, via potentially functioning in

  12. Contrasting patterns of seed and root colonization by bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium and from the family Oxalobacteraceae.

    PubMed

    Green, Stefan J; Michel, Frederick C; Hadar, Yitzhak; Minz, Dror

    2007-08-01

    Microbial colonization of plant seeds and roots is a highly complex process in which soil and plant type can influence the composition of the root-associated and rhizosphere microbial communities. Amendment of compost, a common agricultural technique, introduces exogenous nutrients and microorganisms to the soil-plant environment, and can further influence microbial community composition in the plant environment. Although compost amendments can strongly influence soil and rhizosphere microbial communities, there is evidence that with increasing proximity to the root, plant influences predominate over soil effects. We hypothesized that the 'rhizosphere effect' observed with proximity to plant surfaces does not act equally on all microorganisms. To explore this issue, we examined two bacterial taxa that reproducibly colonized seed and root surfaces in an experiment examining the influence of compost amendment on plant-associated bacterial communities. Population-specific analyses revealed striking differences in the ecology of bacteria from the genus Chryseobacterium and the family Oxalobacteraceae in potting mix and plant-associated environments. Seed- and root-colonizing Oxalobacteraceae populations were highly sensitive to plant effects, and phylogenetic analyses of root-colonizing Oxalobacteraceae revealed the presence of root-associated populations that were highly similar, regardless of treatment, and differed from the potting mix populations detected at the same sampling points. Conversely, Chryseobacterium community composition was found to be essentially invariant within treatments, but was strongly influenced by compost amendment. This persistence and stable nature of the Chryseobacterium community composition demonstrates that rhizosphere selection is not the exclusive factor involved in determining the composition of the cucumber spermosphere and rhizosphere communities. PMID:18043640

  13. Induction of root colonization by Piriformospora indica leads to enhanced asiaticoside production in Centella asiatica.

    PubMed

    Satheesan, Jisha; Narayanan, Anith K; Sakunthala, Manjula

    2012-04-01

    Centella asiatica (Indian pennywort) has wide application in Indian and Chinese traditional medicines with documented evidence for wound healing and neuroprotective and anti-aging potential. Asiaticoside, a trisaccharide triterpene, is the most medicinally active compound in the plant. β-Amyrin synthase and squalene synthase have been identified as the two key genes in the triterpenoid pathway which regulate the production of asiaticoside in C. asiatica. The paper reports salient findings of our study utilizing the growth-promoting endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica to successfully colonize roots of C. asiatica in vitro cultures for investigating the effect of the mutualistic association on asiaticoside production. Co-cultivation of P. indica resulted in the rapid enhancement of root and shoot biomass of host plant, which was visible after 7 days of culture and continued up to 45 days. P. indica co-cultivation also favored the synthesis of asiaticosides, as evidenced by HPLC analysis which indicated about twofold increase (0.53% (w/w) in leaves and 0.23% (w/w) in whole plant) over control (0.33% (w/w) in leaves and 0.14% (w/w) in whole plant). Real-time PCR results confirmed the strong upregulation of squalene synthase and β-amyrin synthase transcripts in P. indica-challenged plants compared with the control. Our data demonstrate the potential use of P. indica as a means to enhance plant secondary metabolite production in planta with scope for further field evaluation.

  14. A paralog of the proteinaceous elicitor SM1 is involved in colonization of maize roots by Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Moran-Diez, Maria E; Ding, Shengli; Liu, Jinggao; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Mukherjee, Prasun K; Kenerley, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    The biocontrol agent, Trichoderma virens, has the ability to protect plants from pathogens by eliciting plant defense responses, involvement in mycoparasitism, or secreting antagonistic secondary metabolites. SM1, an elicitor of induced systemic resistance (ISR), was found to have three paralogs within the T. virens genome. The paralog sm2 is highly expressed in the presence of plant roots. Gene deletion mutants of sm2 were generated and the mutants were found to overproduce SM1. The ability to elicit ISR in maize against Colletotrichum graminicola was not compromised for the mutants compared to that of wild type isolate. However, the deletion strains had a significantly lowered ability to colonize maize roots. This appears to be the first report on the involvement of an effector-like protein in colonization of roots by Trichoderma.

  15. GeneChip profiling of transcriptional responses to soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, colonization of soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Puthoff, David P; Ehrenfried, Mindy L; Vinyard, Bryan T; Tucker, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is currently the most devastating pathogen of soybean. SCN penetrates the root and migrates toward the central vascular bundle where it establishes a complex multinucleated feeding structure that provides plant-derived nutrients to support the development and growth of the nematode. To identify host genes that play significant roles in SCN development in susceptible roots, RNA from SCN-inoculated and non-inoculated root pieces were hybridized to the Affymetrix soybean genome GeneChips. RNA was collected at 8, 12, and 16 d post-inoculation from root pieces that displayed multiple swollen female SCN and similar root pieces from non-inoculated roots. Branch roots and root tips were trimmed from the root pieces to minimize the amount of RNA contributed by these organs. Of the 35 593 transcripts represented on the GeneChip, approximately 26,500 were expressed in the SCN-colonized root pieces. ANOVA followed by False Discovery Rate analysis indicated that the expression levels of 4616 transcripts changed significantly (Q-value < or =0.05) in response to SCN. In this set of 4616 transcripts, 1404 transcripts increased >2-fold and 739 decreased >2-fold. Of the transcripts to which a function could be assigned, a large proportion was associated with cell wall structure. Other functional categories that included a large number of up-regulated transcripts were defence, metabolism, and histones, and a smaller group of transcripts associated with signal transduction and transcription. PMID:17977850

  16. Factors Affecting Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Nasopharynx in the First Six Months of Life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Janak A; Alvarez-Fernandez, Pedro; Jennings, Kristofer; Loeffelholz, Michael; McCormick, David; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal aureus (SA) colonization in early infancy is common, but the pattern and factors affecting its acquisition and persistence in the first few months of life are not well studied. Objectives To study the rate of SA nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization at monthly intervals in the first six months of life, and its association with environmental and host factors, and other pathogenic NP bacteria. Methods Data from a prospective study were analyzed on bacterial cultures of 1765 NP swabs from 367 infants who were followed from birth to 6 months of age. Demographic, breastfeeding, cigarette smoke exposure and daycare attendance data were collected at each monthly visit. Results The rate of infants colonized with SA was highest at age 1 month (25%) and declined to lowest rate by age 6 months (12%). The proportion of SA strains that was methicillin-resistant (MRSA) was also highest at age 1 month and declined rapidly by age 4 months (18% vs 6%, P = 0.05). Colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Moraxella catarrhalis (MC) increased at different rates up to age 6 months. Univariate analysis showed that SA colonization rate was significantly lower with increasing age, black race, day care attendance, and colonization with NTHI, MC and SP (P <0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that this effect was independently associated only with increasing age and MC colonization (P ≤0.05). Furthermore, the time to first acquisition of SA from one month of age onwards was significantly associated with day care attendance, and NTHI and MC colonization. None of the infants colonized with SA developed SA infections through age 6 months. Conclusions SA colonization of NP begins very early in life and declines quickly. MRSA has lower ability to maintain prolonged colonization status than methicillin-susceptible strains in the first 6 months of life. As the NP is colonized with other respiratory bacterial pathogens, the

  17. Rhizobacterial colonization of roots modulates plant volatile emission and enhances the attraction of a parasitoid wasp to host-infested plants.

    PubMed

    Pangesti, Nurmi; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Langendorf, Benjamin; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Pineda, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Beneficial root-associated microbes modify the physiological status of their host plants and affect direct and indirect plant defense against insect herbivores. While the effects of these microbes on direct plant defense against insect herbivores are well described, knowledge of the effect of the microbes on indirect plant defense against insect herbivores is still limited. In this study, we evaluate the role of the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r in indirect plant defense against the generalist leaf-chewing insect Mamestra brassicae through a combination of behavioral, chemical, and gene-transcriptional approaches. We show that rhizobacterial colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots results in an increased attraction of the parasitoid Microplitis mediator to caterpillar-infested plants. Volatile analysis revealed that rhizobacterial colonization suppressed the emission of the terpene (E)-α-bergamotene and the aromatics methyl salicylate and lilial in response to caterpillar feeding. Rhizobacterial colonization decreased the caterpillar-induced transcription of the terpene synthase genes TPS03 and TPS04. Rhizobacteria enhanced both the growth and the indirect defense of plants under caterpillar attack. This study shows that rhizobacteria have a high potential to enhance the biocontrol of leaf-chewing herbivores based on enhanced attraction of parasitoids. PMID:25783487

  18. Rhizobacterial colonization of roots modulates plant volatile emission and enhances the attraction of a parasitoid wasp to host-infested plants.

    PubMed

    Pangesti, Nurmi; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Langendorf, Benjamin; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Pineda, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Beneficial root-associated microbes modify the physiological status of their host plants and affect direct and indirect plant defense against insect herbivores. While the effects of these microbes on direct plant defense against insect herbivores are well described, knowledge of the effect of the microbes on indirect plant defense against insect herbivores is still limited. In this study, we evaluate the role of the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r in indirect plant defense against the generalist leaf-chewing insect Mamestra brassicae through a combination of behavioral, chemical, and gene-transcriptional approaches. We show that rhizobacterial colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots results in an increased attraction of the parasitoid Microplitis mediator to caterpillar-infested plants. Volatile analysis revealed that rhizobacterial colonization suppressed the emission of the terpene (E)-α-bergamotene and the aromatics methyl salicylate and lilial in response to caterpillar feeding. Rhizobacterial colonization decreased the caterpillar-induced transcription of the terpene synthase genes TPS03 and TPS04. Rhizobacteria enhanced both the growth and the indirect defense of plants under caterpillar attack. This study shows that rhizobacteria have a high potential to enhance the biocontrol of leaf-chewing herbivores based on enhanced attraction of parasitoids.

  19. Root colonization and spore abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in distinct successional stages from an Atlantic rainforest biome in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zangaro, Waldemar; Rostirola, Leila Vergal; de Souza, Priscila Bochi; de Almeida Alves, Ricardo; Lescano, Luiz Eduardo Azevedo Marques; Rondina, Artur Berbel Lírio; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Carrenho, Rosilaine

    2013-04-01

    The influence of plant functional groups and moderate seasonality on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal status (root colonization and spore density) was investigated during 13 consecutive months in a chronosequence of succession in southern Brazil, consisting of grassland field, scrub vegetation, secondary forest and mature forest, in a region of transition from tropical to subtropical zones. AM root colonization and spore density decreased with advancing succession and were highest in early successional sites with grassland and scrub vegetation, intermediary in the secondary forest and lowest in the mature forest. They were little influenced by soil properties, but were sufficiently influenced by the fine root nutrient status and fine root traits among different functional plant groups. AM root colonization and spore density were higher during the favourable plant growth season (spring and summer) than during the less favourable plant growth season (autumn and winter). Spore density displayed significant seasonal variation at all sites, whilst root colonization displayed significant seasonal variation in grassland, scrub and secondary forest, but not in mature forest. The data suggest that (1) different plant functional groups display different relationships with AM fungi, influencing their abundance differentially; (2) plant species from early successional phases are more susceptible to AM root colonization and maintain higher AM sporulation than late successional species; (3) fine root traits and nutrient status influence these AM fungal attributes; and (4) higher AM spore production and root colonization is associated with the season of higher light incidence and temperature, abundant water in soil and higher plant metabolic activity.

  20. Sustained exposure to abscisic acid enhances the colonization potential of the mutualist fungus Piriformospora indica on Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Peskan-Berghöfer, Tatjana; Vilches-Barro, Amaya; Müller, Teresa M; Glawischnig, Erich; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Root colonization by the beneficial fungus Piriformospora indica is controlled by plant innate immunity, but factors that channel this interaction into a mutualistic relationship are not known. We have explored the impact of abscisic acid (ABA) and osmotic stress on the P. indica interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana. The activation of plant innate immunity in roots was determined by measuring the concentration of the phytoalexin camalexin and expression of transcription factors regulating the biosynthesis of tryptophan-related defence metabolites. Furthermore, the impact of the fungus on the content of ABA, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid (JA) and JA-related metabolites was examined. We demonstrated that treatment with exogenous ABA or the ABA analogue pyrabactin increased fungal colonization efficiency without impairment of plant fitness. Concomitantly, ABA-deficient mutants of A. thaliana (aba1-6 and aba2-1) were less colonized, while plants exposed to moderate stress were more colonized than corresponding controls. Sustained exposure to ABA attenuated expression of transcription factors MYB51, MYB122 and WRKY33 in roots upon P. indica challenge or chitin treatment, and prevented an increase in camalexin content. The results indicate that ABA can strengthen the interaction with P. indica as a consequence of its impact on plant innate immunity. Consequently, ABA will be relevant for the establishment and outcome of the symbiosis under stress conditions.

  1. Disturbances during minirhizotron installation can affect root observation data

    SciTech Connect

    Joslin, J.D.; Wolfe, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Use of minirhizotrons in forested ecosystems has produced considerable information on production, mortality, distribution, and the phenology of root growth. But installation of minirhizotrons severs roots and disturbs soil, which can cause root proliferation in perennial plants. The authors compared the magnitude and vertical distribution of root growth observations in a mature hardwood forest during the growing season immediately after minirhizotron installation with observations more than two years later. They also compared the vertical root growth distribution during these two different years with the preinstallation distribution of fine root biomass. Before minirhizotron installation and again two years later, about 74% of fine root biomass was in the upper 30 cm of soil, but immediately after installation, 98% of the root elongation was in the upper 30 cm. Large differences in the quantity of root elongation were observed across different slope positions in the minirhizotron data from the first growing season (approximately four times greater on the upper slope as the lower slope). Such differences with slope position were not sen in the later minirhizotron data, nor in the preinstallation fine root biomass data. The evidence suggests that the minirhizotron data collected immediately after installation can be biased by disturbance of roots and soil during installation, which result in excessive root proliferation, particularly near the soil surface. Root proliferation appears to be the result of a response to both root pruning and to nutrient release in microsites near the newly installed minirhizotron.

  2. Hydroxycinnamic acid degradation, a broadly conserved trait, protects Ralstonia solanacearum from chemical plant defenses and contributes to root colonization and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Tiffany M.; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid defense compounds (HCAs) to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a Δfcs (feruloyl-CoA synthetase) mutant that cannot degrade HCAs was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen (1) grow, as a carbon source; (2) spread, by reducing physical barriers HCA-derived; and (3) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCAs in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCAs are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCAs: caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCAs contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity. PMID:25423265

  3. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation, a Broadly Conserved Trait, Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Chemical Plant Defenses and Contributes to Root Colonization and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Tiffany M; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-03-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) defense compounds to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a feruloyl-CoA synthetase (Δfcs) mutant that cannot degrade HCA was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen i) grow, as a carbon source; ii) spread, by reducing HCA-derived physical barriers; and iii) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCA in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCA are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCA, namely, caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCA contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity.

  4. The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on soil-root hydraulic conductance in Agrostis stolonifera L. under two water regimes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Dugo, Victoria

    2010-08-01

    The hypothesis that mycorrhizal colonization improves the soil-root conductance in plants was experimentally tested in a growth chamber using pot cultures of Agrostis stolonifera L. colonized by Glomus intraradices. Plants were grown in 50-l pots filled with autoclaved sand/silt soil (1:1), with and without the mycorrhizal fungus. Within the mycorrhizal treatment, half of the pots remained well watered, while the other half was subjected to a progressive water deficit. Soil water potential (estimated as plant water potential measured at the end of the dark period), xylem water potential measured at the tiller base, transpiration rate, and soil water content were monitored throughout the experiment. Soil-root hydraulic conductance was estimated as the ratio between the instantaneous transpiration rate and the soil and xylem water potential difference. To obtain cultures with similar nutritional status, the P in the modified Hoagland's nutrient solution was withheld from the inoculated pots and applied only once a month. Even though there were no differences on growth or nutrient status for the mycorrhizal treatments, water transport was enhanced by the inoculum presence. Transpiration rate was maintained at lower xylem water potential values in the presence of mycorrhizae. The analysis of the relationship between soil-root hydraulic resistance and soil water content showed that mycorrhizal colonization increased soil-root hydraulic conductance as the soil dried. For these growing conditions, this effect was ascribed to the range of 6-10%.

  5. Cultivar-Dependent Transcript Accumulation in Wheat Roots Colonized by Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96 Wild Type and Mutant Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Triticum aestivum L. (wheat), the root-colonizing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Q8r1-96 produces the antifungal metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), suppresses damage caused by soilborne root pathogens, and modulates multiple stress or defense pathways in wheat roots. To test...

  6. Biotic interactions affect the colonization behavior of aquatic detritivorous macroinvertebrates in a heterogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschut, Thomas A.; Meineri, Eric; Basset, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    It has previously been suggested that macroinvertebrates actively search for suitable patches to colonize. However, it is not well understood how the spatial arrangement of patches can affect colonization rates. In this study, we determined the importance of the environmental factors (distance, connectivity and resource availability) for patch colonization in an experimental system using Gammarus aequicauda (Amphipoda), Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda) and Ecrobia ventrosa (Gastropoda). Furthermore, we also assessed how the relative importance of each of these environmental factors differed in interactions between the three species. The single species experiments showed that distance was the most important factor for G. aequicauda and E. ventrosa. However, while E. ventrosa preferred patches close to the release point, G. aequicauda strongly preferred patches further from the release point. High resource availability was a strong determinant for the patch colonization of G. aequicauda and L. hookeri. Connectivity was only of moderate importance in the study system for L. hookeri and E. ventrosa. The effects of the environmental factors were strongly affected by interspecific interactions in the multispecies experiments. For G. aequicauda, the distance preference was lowered in the presence of E. ventrosa. Moreover, while for L. hookeri the effect of resource availability was ruled out by the species interactions, resource availability gained importance for E. ventrosa in the presence of any of the other species. Our results suggest a strong link between environmental factors and biotic interactions in the colonization of habitat patches and indicate that the effect of biotic interactions is especially important for species sharing similar traits.

  7. How the spatial variation of tree roots affects slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhun; Stokes, A.; Jourdan, C.; Rey, H.; Courbaud, B.; Saint-André, L.

    2010-05-01

    It is now widely recognized that plant roots can reinforce soil against shallow mass movement. Although studies on the interactions between vegetation and slope stability have significantly augmented in recent years, a clear understanding of the spatial dynamics of root reinforcement (through additional cohesion by roots) in subalpine forest is still limited, especially with regard to the roles of different forest management strategies or ecological landscapes. The architecture of root systems is important for soil cohesion, but in reality it is not possible to measure the orientation of each root in a system. Therefore, knowledge on the effect of root orientation and anisotropy on root cohesion on the basis of in situ data is scanty. To determine the effect of root orientation in root cohesion models, we investigated root anisotropy in two mixed, mature, naturally regenerated, subalpine forests of Norway spruce (Picea abies), and Silver fir (Abies alba). Trees were clustered into islands, with open spaces between each group, resulting in strong mosaic heterogeneity within the forest stand. Trenches within and between clusters of trees were dug and root distribution was measured in three dimensions. We then simulated the influence of different values for a root anisotropy correction factor in forests with different ecological structures and soil depths. Using these data, we have carried out simulations of slope stability by calculating the slope factor of safety depending on stand structure. Results should enable us to better estimate the risk of shallow slope failure depending on the type of forest and species.

  8. Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae endophytically colonize cassava roots following soil drench inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal entomopathogens Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae were investigated to determine if endophytic colonization could be achieved in cassava. An inoculation method based on drenching the soil around cassava stems using conidial suspensions resulted in endophytic colonization of ca...

  9. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  10. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  11. Effects of Colonization of the Roots of Domestic Rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Amaroo) by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Prasertsincharoen, Noppadol; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Gardiner, Christopher; Warner, Jeffrey; Elliman, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophytic bacterium that causes melioidosis and is often isolated from rice fields in Southeast Asia, where the infection incidence is high among rice field workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between this bacterium and rice through growth experiments where the effect of colonization of domestic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Amaroo) roots by B. pseudomallei could be observed. When B. pseudomallei was exposed to surface-sterilized seeds, the growth of both the root and the aerosphere was retarded compared to that in controls. The organism was found to localize in the root hairs and endodermis of the plant. A biofilm formed around the root and root structures that were colonized. Growth experiments with a wild rice species (Oryza meridionalis) produced similar retardation of growth, while another domestic cultivar (O. sativa L. cv Koshihikari) did not show retarded growth. Here we report B. pseudomallei infection and inhibition of O. sativa L. cv Amaroo, which might provide insights into plant interactions with this important human pathogen.

  12. Effects of Colonization of the Roots of Domestic Rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Amaroo) by Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Constantinoiu, Constantin; Gardiner, Christopher; Warner, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophytic bacterium that causes melioidosis and is often isolated from rice fields in Southeast Asia, where the infection incidence is high among rice field workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between this bacterium and rice through growth experiments where the effect of colonization of domestic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Amaroo) roots by B. pseudomallei could be observed. When B. pseudomallei was exposed to surface-sterilized seeds, the growth of both the root and the aerosphere was retarded compared to that in controls. The organism was found to localize in the root hairs and endodermis of the plant. A biofilm formed around the root and root structures that were colonized. Growth experiments with a wild rice species (Oryza meridionalis) produced similar retardation of growth, while another domestic cultivar (O. sativa L. cv Koshihikari) did not show retarded growth. Here we report B. pseudomallei infection and inhibition of O. sativa L. cv Amaroo, which might provide insights into plant interactions with this important human pathogen. PMID:25911477

  13. Effect of heavy metal contaminated shooting range soils on mycorrhizal colonization of roots and metal uptake by leek.

    PubMed

    Mozafar, A; Ruh, R; Klingel, P; Gamper, H; Egli, S; Frossard, E

    2002-10-01

    We grew leek (Allium porrum) in soils of two shooting ranges heavily contaminated with heavy metals in the towns of Zuchwil and Oberuzwil in Switzerland as a bioassay to test the activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in these soils. Soil samples were taken from (1) front of the shooting house (HOUSE), (2) the area between house and target (FIELD) and (3) the berm (BACKSTOP). Samples of Ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) growing naturally within the shooting ranges were also collected and the colonization of its roots by mycorrhizal fungi was measured. The number of AM spores in the soils was significantly reduced concomitant with the increase in the degree of soil contamination with metals. In Zuchwil, mycorrhizal fungi equally colonized roots of Ribwort plantain sampled from BACKSTOP and HOUSE. In Oberuzwil, however, plants from BACKSTOP had lower colonization when compared with those sampled from HOUSE. Colonization of leek was strongly reduced in the BACKSTOP soil of Zuchwil and slightly reduced in the BACKSTOP soil of Oberuzwil when compared with plants grown in respective HOUSE soil. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the leaves of leek grown in the BACKSTOP soil was within the range considered toxic for human consumption. This points to the high degree of bioavailability of these metal in these soils. Significant decrease in the number of mycorrhizal spores in the BACKSTOP soils in Zuchwil and the low colonization of leek roots grown in these soils point to possible changes in the species diversity of mycorrhizal fungi in these soils. PMID:12413302

  14. Functional characteristics of an endophyte community colonizing rice roots as revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sessitsch, A; Hardoim, P; Döring, J; Weilharter, A; Krause, A; Woyke, T; Mitter, B; Hauberg-Lotte, L; Friedrich, F; Rahalkar, M; Hurek, T; Sarkar, A; Bodrossy, L; van Overbeek, L; Brar, D; van Elsas, J D; Reinhold-Hurek, B

    2012-01-01

    Roots are the primary site of interaction between plants and microorganisms. To meet food demands in changing climates, improved yields and stress resistance are increasingly important, stimulating efforts to identify factors that affect plant productivity. The role of bacterial endophytes that reside inside plants remains largely unexplored, because analysis of their specific functions is impeded by difficulties in cultivating most prokaryotes. Here, we present the first metagenomic approach to analyze an endophytic bacterial community resident inside roots of rice, one of the most important staple foods. Metagenome sequences were obtained from endophyte cells extracted from roots of field-grown plants. Putative functions were deduced from protein domains or similarity analyses of protein-encoding gene fragments, and allowed insights into the capacities of endophyte cells. This allowed us to predict traits and metabolic processes important for the endophytic lifestyle, suggesting that the endorhizosphere is an exclusive microhabitat requiring numerous adaptations. Prominent features included flagella, plant-polymer-degrading enzymes, protein secretion systems, iron acquisition and storage, quorum sensing, and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Surprisingly, endophytes might be involved in the entire nitrogen cycle, as protein domains involved in N(2)-fixation, denitrification, and nitrification were detected and selected genes expressed. Our data suggest a high potential of the endophyte community for plant-growth promotion, improvement of plant stress resistance, biocontrol against pathogens, and bioremediation, regardless of their culturability.

  15. Healing following implantation of periodontitis affected roots into bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Karring, T; Nyman, S; Lindhe, J

    1980-04-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study whether new connective tissue attachment can occur to root surfaces which have been exposed to the oral environment and subsequently implanted into bone tissue. Twelve teeth in three beagle dogs were subjected to progressive periodontal breakdown to half the root length by placing cotton floss ligatures around the neck of the teeth. Following crown resection and root hemisection, the teeth were root filled and the roots thoroughly scaled and planed. Each root was extracted and implanted into bone cavities prepared in edentolous areas of the jaws in such a way that epithelial migration into the wound and bacterial infection were prevented during healing. Root implantation and sacrifice of the animals were scheduled to allow for observation periods of 1, 2 and 3 months. The results demonstrated that new connective tissue attachment did not occur to root surfaces which had been exposed to the oral environment, but healing was characterized by repair phenomena, i.e. mainly root resorption and ankylosis. In those areas of the roots where periodontal ligament tissue was preserved following tooth extraction, a functionally oriented attachment apparatus was reformed. The results indicate that in addition to apical migration of junctional epithelium and regrowth of subgingival plaque, the type of cells which repopulate the wound area may jeopardize new connective tissue attachment.

  16. First evidence of root morphological and architectural variations in young Posidonia oceanica plants colonizing different substrate typologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestri, Elena; de Battisti, Davide; Vallerini, Flavia; Lardicci, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Root morphology and root system architecture of young Posidonia oceanica plants established on two contrasting substrate types, sand and rock, were examined to provide insights into the strategy of adaptation of seagrasses to their environment. After germination, seedlings were planted on sandy patches and on rock within the same area, and survived plants were collected five years later for measurements of the size of the entire root complex and analysis of individual morphological and architectural root traits. Collected plants exhibited up to nine highly intermingled root systems and approx. 2.5 m of total root length. Maximum horizontal extension, total biomass and total length of roots were not significantly affected by substrate. However, on sand roots grew vertically reaching up to 13 cm, while on rock they extended more horizontally and did not penetrate deeper than 5-7 cm leading to the formation of a shallow, densely packed root complex. On rock, the number and the length of second-order laterals on an individual root system were reduced and the topological index higher than on sand (0.8 vs. 0.7) reflecting a more simple (herringbone) branching pattern. Again, root diameter was greater than on sand. The results suggest that P. oceanica can adjust root traits early during plant development according to substrate typology to maximize anchorage and substrate exploration efficiency. This plasticity enables the species to establish and persist also on rocky bottoms which generally prevent establishment of the majority of seagrasses.

  17. Halogenated auxins affect microtubules and root elongation in Lactuca sativa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, and 5,6-dichloro-indole-3-acetic acid (DCIAA) on growth and microtubule (MT) organization in roots of Lactuca sativa L. DCIAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) inhibited root elongation and depolymerized MTs in the cortex of the elongation zone, inhibited the elongation of stele cells, and promoted xylem maturation. Both auxins caused the plane of cell division to shift from anticlinal to periclinal. In contrast, TFIBA (100 micromolar) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% and stimulated the elongation of lateral roots, even in the presence of IBA, the microtubular inhibitors oryzalin and taxol, or the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. However, TFIBA inhibited the formation of lateral root primordia. Immunostaining showed that TFIBA stabilized MTs orientation perpendicular to the root axis, doubled the cortical cell length, but delayed xylem maturation. The data indicate that the auxin-induced inhibition of elongation and swelling of roots results from reoriented phragmoplasts, the destabilization of MTs in elongating cells, and promotion of vessel formation. In contrast, TFIBA induced promotion of root elongation by enhancing cell length, prolonging transverse MT orientation, delaying cell and xylem maturation.

  18. {alpha}7-nAChR-mediated suppression of hyperexcitability of colonic dorsal root ganglia neurons in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Abdrakhmanova, Galya R; AlSharari, Shakir; Kang, Minho; Damaj, M Imad; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2010-09-01

    Controlled clinical trials of nicotine transdermal patch for treatment of ulcerative colitis have been shown to improve histological and global clinical scores of colitis. Here we report that nicotine (1 microM) suppresses in vitro hyperexcitability of colonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) (L(1)-L(2)) neurons in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse model of acute colonic inflammation. Nicotine gradually reduced regenerative multiple-spike action potentials in colitis mice to a single action potential. Nicotine's effect on hyperexcitability of inflamed neurons was blocked in the presence of an alpha(7)-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, methyllicaconitine, while choline, the alpha(7)-nAChR agonist, induced a similar effect to that of nicotine. Consistent with these findings, nicotine failed to suppress hyperexcitability in colonic DRG neurons from DSS-treated alpha(7) knockout mice. Furthermore, colonic DRG neurons from DSS-treated alpha(7) knockout mice were characterized by lower rheobase (10 +/- 5 vs. 77 +/- 13 pA, respectively) and current threshold (28 +/- 4 vs. 103 +/- 8 pA, respectively) levels than DSS-treated C57BL/J6 mice. An interesting observation of this study is that 8 of 12 colonic DRG (L(1)-L(2)) neurons from control alpha(7) knockout mice exhibited multiple-spike action potential firing while no wild-type neurons did. Overall, our findings suggest that nicotine at low 1 microM concentration suppresses in vitro hyperexcitability of inflamed colonic DRG neurons in a mouse model of acute colonic inflammation via activation of alpha(7)-nAChRs.

  19. Identification of chemotaxis sensory proteins for amino acids in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 and their involvement in chemotaxis to tomato root exudate and root colonization.

    PubMed

    Oku, Shota; Komatsu, Ayaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 showed positive chemotactic responses toward 20 commonly-occurring l-amino acids. Genomic analysis revealed that P. fluorescens Pf0-1 possesses three genes (Pfl01_0124, Pfl01_0354, and Pfl01_4431) homologous to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pctA gene, which has been identified as a chemotaxis sensory protein for amino acids. When Pf01_4431, Pfl01_0124, and Pfl01_0354 were introduced into the pctA pctB pctC triple mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to amino acids, its transformants showed chemotactic responses to 18, 16, and one amino acid, respectively. This result suggests that Pf01_4431, Pfl01_0124, and Pfl01_0354 are chemotaxis sensory proteins for amino acids and their genes were designated ctaA, ctaB, and ctaC, respectively. The ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed only weak responses to Cys and Pro but no responses to the other 18 amino acids, indicating that CtaA, CtaB, and CtaC are major chemotaxis sensory proteins in P. fluorescens Pf0-1. Tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens strains was analyzed by gnotobiotic competitive root colonization assay. It was found that ctaA ctaB ctaC mutant was less competitive than the wild-type strain, suggesting that chemotaxis to amino acids, major components of root exudate, has an important role in root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1. The ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant was more competitive than the cheA mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1, which is non-chemotactic, but motile. This result suggests that chemoattractants other than amino acids are also involved in root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1.

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity in populations of plant-probiotic Pseudomonas spp. colonizing roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Christine; Bosco, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Several soil microorganisms colonizing roots are known to naturally promote the health of plants by controlling a range of plant pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. The use of theses antagonistic microorganisms, recently named plant-probiotics, to control plant-pathogenic fungi is receiving increasing attention, as they may represent a sustainable alternative to chemical pesticides. Many years of research on plant-probiotic microorganisms (PPM) have indicated that fluorescent pseudomonads producing antimicrobial compounds are largely involved in the suppression of the most widespread soilborne pathogens. Phenotype and genotype analysis of plant-probiotic fluorescent pseudomonads (PFP) have shown considerable genetic variation among these types of strains. Such variability plays an important role in the rhizosphere competence and the biocontrol ability of PFP strains. Understanding the mechanisms by which genotypic and phenotypic diversity occurs in natural populations of PFP could be exploited to choose those agricultural practices which best exploit the indigenous PFP populations, or to isolate new plant-probiotic strains for using them as inoculants. A number of different methods have been used to study diversity within PFP populations. Because different resolutions of the existing microbial diversity can be revealed depending on the approach used, this review first describes the most important methods used for the assessment of fluorescent Pseudomonas diversity. Then, we focus on recent data relating how differences in genotypic and phenotypic diversity within PFP communities can be attributed to geographic location, climate, soil type, soil management regime, and interactions with other soil microorganisms and host plants. It becomes evident that plant-related parameters exert the strongest influence on the genotypic and phenotypic variations in PFP populations.

  1. Colonization of root cells and plant growth promotion by Piriformospora indica occurs independently of plant common symbiosis genes

    PubMed Central

    Banhara, Aline; Ding, Yi; Kühner, Regina; Zuccaro, Alga; Parniske, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi (Glomeromycota) form symbiosis with and deliver nutrients via the roots of most angiosperms. AM fungal hyphae are taken up by living root epidermal cells, a program which relies on a set of plant common symbiosis genes (CSGs). Plant root epidermal cells are also infected by the plant growth-promoting fungus Piriformospora indica (Basidiomycota), raising the question whether this interaction relies on the AM-related CSGs. Here we show that intracellular colonization of root cells and intracellular sporulation by P. indica occurred in CSG mutants of the legume Lotus japonicus and in Arabidopsis thaliana, which belongs to the Brassicaceae, a family that has lost the ability to form AM as well as a core set of CSGs. A. thaliana mutants of homologs of CSGs (HCSGs) interacted with P. indica similar to the wild-type. Moreover, increased biomass of A. thaliana evoked by P. indica was unaltered in HCSG mutants. We conclude that colonization and growth promotion by P. indica are independent of the CSGs and that AM fungi and P. indica exploit different host pathways for infection. PMID:26441999

  2. Nitrogen Additions Affect Root Dynamics in a Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    As with many ecosystems, North American boreal forests are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. To examine potential effects on plant growth, we created nitrogen fertilization plots in three sites along an Alaskan fire chronosequence composed of forests aged 5, 17, and 80 years. Each site had been exposed to two years of nitrogen fertilization, with four control plots and four nitrogen plots per site. General observations indicate that aboveground net primary productivity appears to be nitrogen limited in each site. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would positively influence root dynamics as well, with nitrogen additions resulting in an increase in standing root biomass and length. To test our hypothesis, we used a minirhizotron camera to collect sequential images of roots in the top 10 cm of soil in both nitrogen fertilized and control plots in each site. Images were collected monthly during the growing season, with a total of five sampling times between May 2003 and May 2004. We then analyzed the images with WinRhizotron root measurement software. Nitrogen fertilization had varying effects on root biomass among the three sites, with a significant site by N interaction (P = 0.039). A decrease in root biomass was observed in the 5 and 80 year old sites, dropping from 207 g/m2 to 79 g/m2 and from 230 g/m2 to 129 g/m2 for the youngest and oldest sites, respectively. In contrast, root biomass increased from 52 g/m2 to 107 g/m2 in the 17 year old site. (Values are for the top 10 cm of soil only, and likely underestimate total root stocks.) Patterns in standing root lengths diverged from those of root biomass, with a 2.5-fold overall increase under nitrogen fertilization across all sites (P = 0.004). There were no significant differences among sites in nitrogen response. Standing root biomass and length differed from one another in their responses to nitrogen fertilization because nitrogen additions decreased specific root weight (as g

  3. Colonization process of olive tissues by Verticillium dahliae and its in planta interaction with the biocontrol root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Pilar; Navarro‐Raya, Carmen; Valverde‐Corredor, Antonio; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Dobinson, Katherine F.; Mercado‐Blanco, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    Summary The colonization process of Olea europaea by the defoliating pathotype of Verticillium dahliae, and the in planta interaction with the endophytic, biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 were determined. Differential fluorescent protein tagging was used for the simultaneous visualization of P. fluorescens PICF7 and V. dahliae in olive tissues. Olive plants were bacterized with PICF7 and then transferred to V. dahliae‐infested soil. Monitoring olive colonization events by V. dahliae and its interaction with PICF7 was conducted using a non‐gnotobiotic system, confocal laser scanner microscopy and tissue vibratoming sections. A yellow fluorescently tagged V. dahliae derivative (VDAT‐36I) was obtained by Agrobacterium tumefaciens‐mediated transformation. Isolate VDAT‐36I quickly colonized olive root surface, successfully invaded root cortex and vascular tissues via macro‐ and micro‐breakages, and progressed to the aerial parts of the plant through xylem vessel cells. Strain PICF7 used root hairs as preferred penetration site, and once established on/in root tissues, hindered pathogen colonization. For the first time using this approach, the entire colonization process of a woody plant by V. dahliae is reported. Early and localized root surface and root endophytic colonization by P. fluorescens PICF7 is needed to impair full progress of verticillium wilt epidemics in olive. PMID:21255281

  4. Colonization process of olive tissues by Verticillium dahliae and its in planta interaction with the biocontrol root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Navarro-Raya, Carmen; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Amyotte, Stefan G; Dobinson, Katherine F; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2009-07-01

    The colonization process of Olea europaea by the defoliating pathotype of Verticillium dahliae, and the in planta interaction with the endophytic, biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 were determined. Differential fluorescent protein tagging was used for the simultaneous visualization of P. fluorescens PICF7 and V. dahliae in olive tissues. Olive plants were bacterized with PICF7 and then transferred to V. dahliae-infested soil. Monitoring olive colonization events by V. dahliae and its interaction with PICF7 was conducted using a non-gnotobiotic system, confocal laser scanner microscopy and tissue vibratoming sections. A yellow fluorescently tagged V. dahliae derivative (VDAT-36I) was obtained by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Isolate VDAT-36I quickly colonized olive root surface, successfully invaded root cortex and vascular tissues via macro- and micro-breakages, and progressed to the aerial parts of the plant through xylem vessel cells. Strain PICF7 used root hairs as preferred penetration site, and once established on/in root tissues, hindered pathogen colonization. For the first time using this approach, the entire colonization process of a woody plant by V. dahliae is reported. Early and localized root surface and root endophytic colonization by P. fluorescens PICF7 is needed to impair full progress of verticillium wilt epidemics in olive.

  5. Differential effects of abiotic factors and host plant traits on diversity and community composition of root-colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a salt-stressed ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohong; Gong, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were investigated in roots of 18 host plant species in a salinized south coastal plain of Laizhou Bay, China. From 18 clone libraries of 18S rRNA genes, all of the 22 AMF phylotypes were identified into Glomus, of which 18 and 4 were classified in group A and B in the phylogenetic tree, respectively. The phylotypes related to morphologically defined Glomus species occurred generally in soil with higher salinity. AMF phylotype richness, Shannon index, and evenness were not significantly different between root samples from halophytes vs. non-halophytes, invades vs. natives, or annuals vs. perennials. However, AMF diversity estimates frequently differed along the saline gradient or among locations, but not among pH gradients. Moreover, UniFrac tests showed that both plant traits (salt tolerance, life style or origin) and abiotic factors (salinity, pH, or location) significantly affected the community composition of AMF colonizers. Redundancy and variation partitioning analyses revealed that soil salinity and pH, which respectively explained 6.9 and 4.2 % of the variation, were the most influential abiotic variables in shaping the AMF community structure. The presented data indicate that salt tolerance, life style, and origin traits of host species may not significantly affect the AMF diversity in roots, but do influence the community composition in this salinized ecosystem. The findings also highlight the importance of soil salinity and pH in driving the distribution of AMF in plant and soil systems.

  6. Terahertz absorption and reflection imaging of carcinoma-affected colon tissues embedded in paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Venckevicius, Rimvydas; Seliuta, Dalius; Valusis, Gintaras; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Molis, Gediminas; Carneiro, Fatima; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Granja, Pedro L.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, dehydrated human colon tissues embedded in paraffin were studied at THz frequency. A compact THz imaging system with high numerical aperture optics was developed for the analysis of adenocarcinoma-affected colon sections, in transmission and reflection geometry. A comprehensive analysis of the THz images revealed a contrast up to 23% between the neoplastic and control tissues. Absorption and reflection THz images demonstrated the possibility to distinguish adenocarcinoma-affected areas even without water in the tissue, as the main contrast mechanism in THz measurements has been observed to be water absorption in in vivo or freshly excised tissues. The present results corroborate with previous histologic findings in the same tissues, and confirm that the contrast prevails even in dehydrated tissues.

  7. Consequences of inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for root colonization and survival of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis seedlings after transplanting.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bill E; Novak, Stephen J; Serpe, Marcelo D

    2016-08-01

    In arid environments, the propagule density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may limit the extent of the plant-AMF symbiosis. Inoculation of seedlings with AMF could alleviate this problem, but the success of this practice largely depends on the ability of the inoculum to multiply and colonize the growing root system after transplanting. These phenomena were investigated in Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) seedlings inoculated with native AMF. Seedlings were first grown in a greenhouse in soil without AMF (non-inoculated seedlings) or with AMF (inoculated seedlings). In spring and fall, 3-month-old seedlings were transplanted outdoors to 24-L pots containing soil from a sagebrush habitat (spring and fall mesocosm experiments) or to a recently burned sagebrush habitat (spring and fall field experiments). Five or 8 months after transplanting, colonization was about twofold higher in inoculated than non-inoculated seedlings, except for the spring field experiment. In the mesocosm experiments, inoculation increased survival during the summer by 24 % (p = 0.011). In the field experiments, increased AMF colonization was associated with increases in survival during cold and dry periods; 1 year after transplanting, survival of inoculated seedlings was 27 % higher than that of non-inoculated ones (p < 0.001). To investigate possible mechanisms by which AMF increased survival, we analyzed water use efficiency (WUE) based on foliar (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios (δ (13)C). A positive correlation between AMF colonization and δ (13)C values was observed in the spring mesocosm experiment. In contrast, inoculation did not affect the δ (13)C values of fall transplanted seedlings that were collected the subsequent spring. The effectiveness of AMF inoculation on enhancing colonization and reducing seedling mortality varied among the different experiments, but average effects were estimated by meta-analyses. Several months after

  8. Consequences of inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for root colonization and survival of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis seedlings after transplanting.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bill E; Novak, Stephen J; Serpe, Marcelo D

    2016-08-01

    In arid environments, the propagule density of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may limit the extent of the plant-AMF symbiosis. Inoculation of seedlings with AMF could alleviate this problem, but the success of this practice largely depends on the ability of the inoculum to multiply and colonize the growing root system after transplanting. These phenomena were investigated in Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) seedlings inoculated with native AMF. Seedlings were first grown in a greenhouse in soil without AMF (non-inoculated seedlings) or with AMF (inoculated seedlings). In spring and fall, 3-month-old seedlings were transplanted outdoors to 24-L pots containing soil from a sagebrush habitat (spring and fall mesocosm experiments) or to a recently burned sagebrush habitat (spring and fall field experiments). Five or 8 months after transplanting, colonization was about twofold higher in inoculated than non-inoculated seedlings, except for the spring field experiment. In the mesocosm experiments, inoculation increased survival during the summer by 24 % (p = 0.011). In the field experiments, increased AMF colonization was associated with increases in survival during cold and dry periods; 1 year after transplanting, survival of inoculated seedlings was 27 % higher than that of non-inoculated ones (p < 0.001). To investigate possible mechanisms by which AMF increased survival, we analyzed water use efficiency (WUE) based on foliar (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios (δ (13)C). A positive correlation between AMF colonization and δ (13)C values was observed in the spring mesocosm experiment. In contrast, inoculation did not affect the δ (13)C values of fall transplanted seedlings that were collected the subsequent spring. The effectiveness of AMF inoculation on enhancing colonization and reducing seedling mortality varied among the different experiments, but average effects were estimated by meta-analyses. Several months after

  9. Efficient colonization of plant roots by the plant growth promoting bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, engineered to express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ben; Chen, Xiao Hua; Budiharjo, Anto; Bleiss, Wilfrid; Vater, Joachim; Borriss, Rainer

    2011-02-20

    A single copy of the gfp gene linked with the P(spac) promoter and flanked by the terminal FZB42 amyE sequences was stably integrated into the chromosome of plant growth promoting bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 via homologous recombination. A spontaneous mutant, FB01mut, emitting bright fluorescence was detected among the transformants and found suitable for colonization experiments performed with Zea mays, Arabidopsis thaliana and Lemna minor. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that FB01mut expressed 2.5 times more of the gfp transcript than the original GFP-labeled strain. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of plant roots infected with gfp+ tagged FZB42 revealed that the bacterium behaves different in colonizing surfaces of plant roots of different species. In contrast to maize, FZB42 colonized preferentially root tips when colonizing Arabidopsis. FZB42 colonized heavily Lemna fronds and roots by forming biofilms consisting of extracellular matrix and cells with altered morphology. Surfactin, but no other lipopeptide or polyketide synthesized by FZB42 under laboratory conditions, was detected in extracts of Lemna plantlets colonized by FZB42. Due to its stable and long-lasting emission of bright fluorescence without antibiotic pressure FB01mut is an excellent tool for studying plant colonization under competitive, environmental conditions.

  10. Genetic Responses Induced in Olive Roots upon Colonization by the Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    PubMed Central

    Schilirò, Elisabetta; Ferrara, Massimo; Nigro, Franco; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge on the genetic basis underlying interactions between beneficial bacteria and woody plants is still very limited, and totally absent in the case of olive. We aimed to elucidate genetic responses taking place during the colonization of olive roots by the native endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium wilt of olive. Roots of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after PICF7 inoculation. A Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA library enriched in induced genes was generated. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis validated the induction of selected olive genes. Computational analysis of 445 olive ESTs showed that plant defence and response to different stresses represented nearly 45% of genes induced in PICF7-colonized olive roots. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed induction of lipoxygenase, phenylpropanoid, terpenoids and plant hormones biosynthesis transcripts. Different classes of transcription factors (i.e., bHLH, WRKYs, GRAS1) were also induced. This work highlights for the first time the ability of an endophytic Pseudomonas spp. strain to mount a wide array of defence responses in an economically-relevant woody crop such as olive, helping to explain its biocontrol activity. PMID:23144916

  11. Plant growth promotion and root colonization by EPS producing Enterobacter sp. RZS5 under heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Patel, P R; Shaikh, S S

    2015-02-01

    The heavy metal resistant bacterium isolated from field soil and identified as Enterobacter sp. RZS5 tolerates a high concentration (100-2000 μM) of various heavy metal ions such as Mn2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, CO2+ and Fe2+ when grown in such environment and produces exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we have demonstrated EPS production by Enterobacter sp. RZS5 during 60 h of growth in yeast extract mannitol broth (YEMB). The yield increased by two fold after the addition of 60 μM of Ca2+; 50 μM of Fe2+ and 60 μM of Mg2+ ions in YEMB, and the optimization of physico-chemical parameters. EPS was extracted with 30% (v/v) of isopropanol as against the commonly used 50% (v/v) isopropanol method. EPS-rich broth promoted seed germination, shoot height, root length, number of leaves and chlorophyll content of wheat (Triticum aestivum) seed and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) seed. The higher colony-forming unit of Enterobacter sp. in soil inoculated with EPS rich broth of Enterobacter sp. indicated the root colonizing potential and rhizosphere competence of the isolate. The FTIR spectra of the EPS extract confirmed the presence of the functional group characteristics of EPS known to exhibit a high binding affinity towards certain metal ions. This overall growth and vigour in plants along with the effective root colonization, reflected the potential of the isolate as an efficient bio-inoculant in bioremediation.

  12. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets), many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments aiming to: (1) validate the induction of these genes, and (2) shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days). Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lipoxygenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e., JERF, bHLH, WRKY), as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mounts a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves). This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the “non-hostile” colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7. PMID:25250017

  13. Neonatal maternal deprivation sensitizes voltage-gated sodium channel currents in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shufen; Xiao, Ying; Zhu, Liyan; Li, Lin; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-02-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain in association with altered bowel movements. The underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role for sodium channels in a rat model of chronic visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were performed on adult male rats. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch-clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR. NMD significantly increased AWR scores, which lasted for ~6 wk in an association with hyperexcitability of colon DRG neurons. TTX-resistant but not TTX-sensitive sodium current density was greatly enhanced in colon DRG neurons in NMD rats. Compared with controls, activation curves showed a leftward shift in NMD rats whereas inactivation curves did not differ significantly. NMD markedly accelerated the activation time of peak current amplitude without any changes in inactivation time. Furthermore, NMD remarkably enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels but not at mRNA levels in colon-related DRGs. The expression of Na(V)1.9 was not altered after NMD. These data suggest that NMD enhances TTX-resistant sodium activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by a leftward shift of activation curve and by enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying chronic visceral pain and sensitization in patients with IBS. PMID:23139220

  14. Colonization and community structure of root-associated microorganisms of Sabina vulgaris with soil depth in a semiarid desert ecosystem with shallow groundwater.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takeshi; Usuki, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Junichi; Hirobe, Muneto; Miki, Naoko; Fukuda, Kenji; Zhang, Guosheng; Wang, Linhe; Yoshikawa, Ken; Yamanaka, Norikazu

    2012-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been observed in deep soil layers in arid lands. However, change in AMF community structure with soil depth and vertical distributions of the other root-associated microorganisms are unclear. Here, we examined colonization by AMF and dark septate fungi (DSF), as well as the community structure of AMF and endophytic fungi (EF) and endophytic bacteria (EB) in association with soil depth in a semiarid desert with shallow groundwater. Roots of Sabina vulgaris and soils were collected from surface to groundwater level at 20-cm intervals. Soil chemistry (water content, total N, and available P) and colonization of AMF and DSF were measured. Community structures of AMF, EF, and EB were examined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. AMF colonization decreased with soil depth, although it was mostly higher than 50%. Number of AMF phylotypes decreased with soil depth, but more than five phylotypes were observed at depths up to 100 cm. Number of AMF phylotypes had a significant and positive relationship with soil moisture level within 0-15% of soil water content. DSF colonization was high but limited to soil surface. Number of phylotypes of EF and EB were diverse even in deep soil layers, and the community composition was associated with the colonization and community composition of AMF. This study indicates that AMF species richness in roots decreases but is maintained in deep soil layers in semiarid regions, and change in AMF colonization and community structure associates with community structure of the other root-associated microorganisms.

  15. Accumulation of flavonoids and phenolic compounds in olive tree roots in response to mycorrhizal colonization: A possible mechanism for regulation of defense molecules.

    PubMed

    Mechri, Beligh; Tekaya, Meriem; Cheheb, Hechmi; Attia, Faouzi; Hammami, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus promotes plant growth and can alter the production of primary and secondary metabolites. The aim of this work was to determine the influence of AM fungi colonization on the content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and soluble carbohydrates in olive (Olea europaea L.) tree roots. The results revealed that mycorrhizal plants had a higher content of flavonoids and total phenols. Analysis of sugar contents showed enhanced levels of sucrose and fructose in mycorrhizal roots, while glucose amounts stayed constant. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the mycorrhizal root methanolic extracts was higher than that of the non- mycorrhizal root methanolic extracts. These results indicated that olive tree roots contain significant amounts of phenolic compounds, important factors for antioxidant capacity, which can be substantially modified by colonization of olive trees with AM fungi. PMID:26276403

  16. A function of SmeDEF, the major quinolone resistance determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, is the colonization of plant roots.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump.

  17. Colonization of Wheat Roots by an Exopolysaccharide-Producing Pantoea agglomerans Strain and Its Effect on Rhizosphere Soil Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Amellal, N.; Burtin, G.; Bartoli, F.; Heulin, T.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of bacterial secretion of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) on rhizosphere soil physical properties was investigated by inoculating strain NAS206, which was isolated from the rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum durum L.) growing in a Moroccan vertisol and was identified as Pantoea aglomerans. Phenotypic identification of this strain with the Biotype-100 system was confirmed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. After inoculation of wheat seedlings with strain NAS206, colonization increased at the rhizoplane and in root-adhering soil (RAS) but not in bulk soil. Colonization further increased under relatively dry conditions (20% soil water content; matric potential, −0.55 MPa). By means of genetic fingerprinting using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR, we were able to verify that colonies counted as strain NAS206 on agar plates descended from inoculated strain NAS206. The intense colonization of the wheat rhizosphere by these EPS-producing bacteria was associated with significant soil aggregation, as shown by increased ratios of RAS dry mass to root tissue (RT) dry mass (RAS/RT) and the improved water stability of adhering soil aggregates. The maximum effect of strain NAS206 on both the RAS/RT ratio and aggregate stability was measured at 24% average soil water content (matric potential, −0.20 MPa). Inoculated strain NAS206 improved RAS macroporosity (pore diameter, 10 to 30 μm) compared to the noninoculated control, particularly when the soil was nearly water saturated (matric potential, −0.05 MPa). Our results suggest that P. agglomerans NAS206 can play an important role in the regulation of the water content (excess or deficit) of the rhizosphere of wheat by improving soil aggregation. PMID:9758793

  18. A Function of SmeDEF, the Major Quinolone Resistance Determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Is the Colonization of Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump. PMID:24837376

  19. A function of SmeDEF, the major quinolone resistance determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, is the colonization of plant roots.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump. PMID:24837376

  20. Transpirational demand affects aquaporin expression in poplar roots.

    PubMed

    Laur, Joan; Hacke, Uwe G

    2013-05-01

    Isohydric plants tend to maintain a water potential homeostasis primarily by controlling water loss via stomatal conductance. However, there is accumulating evidence that plants can also modulate water uptake in a dynamic manner. The dynamics of water uptake are influenced by aquaporin-mediated changes in root hydraulics. Most studies in this area have been conducted on herbaceous plants, and less is known about responses of woody plants. Here a study was conducted to determine how roots of hybrid poplar plants (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides) respond to a step change in transpirational demand. The main objective was to measure the expression of selected aquaporin genes and to assess how transcriptional responses correspond to changes in root water flow (Q R) and other parameters of water relations. A subset of plants was grown in shade and was subsequently exposed to a 5-fold increase in light level. Another group of plants was grown at ~95% relative humidity (RH) and was then subjected to lower RH while the light level remained unchanged. Both plant groups experienced a transient drop in stem water potentials. At 28h after the increase in transpirational demand, water potentials recovered. This recovery was associated with changes in the expression of PIP1 and PIP2 subfamily genes and an increase in Q R. Stomata of plants growing at high RH were larger and showed incomplete closure after application of abscisic acid. Since stomatal conductance remained high and unchanged in these plants, it is suggested that the recovery in water potential in these plants was largely driven by the increase in Q R. PMID:23599275

  1. Growth, nitrogen uptake and flow in maize plants affected by root growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liangzheng; Niu, Junfang; Li, Chunjian; Zhang, Fusuo

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of a reduced maize root-system size on root growth and nitrogen (N) uptake and flow within plants. Restriction of shoot-borne root growth caused a strong decrease in the absorption of root: shoot dry weight ratio and a reduction in shoot growth. On the other hand, compensatory growth and an increased N uptake rate in the remaining roots were observed. Despite the limited long-distance transport pathway in the mesocotyl with restriction of shoot-borne root growth, N cycling within these plants was higher than those in control plants, implying that xylem and phloem flow velocities via the mesocotyl were considerably higher than in plants with an intact root system. The removal of the seminal roots in addition to restricting shoot-borne root development did not affect whole plant growth and N uptake, except for the stronger compensatory growth of the primary roots. Our results suggest that an adequate N supply to maize plant is maintained by compensatory growth of the remaining roots, increased N uptake rate and flow velocities within the xylem and phloem via the mesocotyl, and reduction in the shoot growth rate.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni pdxA Affects Flagellum-Mediated Motility to Alter Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Hashii, Noritaka; Uema, Masashi; Kawasaki, Nana; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Igimi, Shizunobu; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, PLP) is linked to a variety of biological functions in prokaryotes. Here, we report that the pdxA (putative 4-hydroxy-L-threonine phosphate dehydrogenase) gene plays a pivotal role in the PLP-dependent regulation of flagellar motility, thereby altering host colonization in a leading foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. A C. jejuni pdxA mutant failed to produce PLP and exhibited a coincident loss of flagellar motility. Mass spectrometric analyses showed a 3-fold reduction in the main flagellar glycan pseudaminic acid (Pse) associated with the disruption of pdxA. The pdxA mutant also exhibited reduced growth rates compared with the WT strain. Comparative metabolomic analyses revealed differences in respiratory/energy metabolism between WT C. jejuni and the pdxA mutant, providing a possible explanation for the differential growth fitness between the two strains. Consistent with the lack of flagellar motility, the pdxA mutant showed impaired motility-mediated responses (bacterial adhesion, ERK1/2 activation, and IL-8 production) in INT407 cells and reduced colonization of chickens compared with the WT strain. Overall, this study demonstrated that the pdxA gene affects the PLP-mediated flagellar motility function, mainly through alteration of Pse modification, and the disruption of this gene also alters the respiratory/energy metabolisms to potentially affect host colonization. Our data therefore present novel implications regarding the utility of PLP and its dependent enzymes as potent target(s) for the control of this pathogen in the poultry host. PMID:23936426

  3. A transcriptional regulator of the LuxR-UhpA family, FlcA, controls flocculation and wheat root surface colonization by Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Pereg-Gerk, L; Paquelin, A; Gounon, P; Kennedy, I R; Elmerich, C

    1998-03-01

    Genetic complementation of a spontaneous mutant, impaired in flocculation, Congo red binding, and colonization of root surface, led to the identification of a new regulatory gene in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7, designated flcA. The deduced amino acid sequence of flcA shared high similarity with a family of transcriptional activators of the LuxR-UphA family. The most significant match was with the AgmR protein, an activator for glycerol metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Derivatives of Sp7 resulting from site-directed Tn5 mutagenesis in the flcA coding sequence were constructed by marker exchange. Characterization of the resulting mutant strains showed that flcA controls the production of capsular polysaccharides, the flocculation process in culture, and the colonization of the root surface of wheat. This study provides new information on the genetic control of the mechanism of plant root colonization by Azospirillum.

  4. Colonizing Green? We Must Remember Our Roots of Harmony, Beauty, Balance, Restoration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Larry

    2008-01-01

    While tribal educators rightfully search for ways to address the global warming and climate crisis using sustainability initiatives, people should also be cautious. They risk colonizing, exploiting, or commodifying the "green" dimension of the climate and energy crisis. By centering and privileging Indigenous knowing that assumes a nurturing,…

  5. Identification of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotaxis sensory proteins for malate, succinate, and fumarate, and their involvement in root colonization.

    PubMed

    Oku, Shota; Komatsu, Ayaka; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 exhibited chemotactic responses to l-malate, succinate, and fumarate. We constructed a plasmid library of 37 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) genes of P. fluorescens Pf0-1. To identify a MCP for l-malate, the plasmid library was screened using the PA2652 mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to l-malate. The introduction of Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 genes restored the ability of the PA2652 mutant to respond to l-malate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed no response to l-malate or succinate, while the Pfl01_0728 single mutant did not respond to fumarate. These results indicated that Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 were the major MCPs for l-malate and succinate, and Pfl01_0728 was also a major MCP for fumarate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant unexpectedly exhibited stronger responses toward the tomato root exudate and amino acids such as proline, asparagine, methionine, and phenylalanine than those of the wild-type strain. The ctaA, ctaB, ctaC (genes of the major MCPs for amino acids), Pfl01_0728, and Pfl01_3768 quintuple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 was less competitive than the ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant in competitive root colonization, suggesting that chemotaxis to l-malate, succinate, and/or fumarate was involved in tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1.

  6. Identification of Pseudomonas fluorescens Chemotaxis Sensory Proteins for Malate, Succinate, and Fumarate, and Their Involvement in Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Shota; Komatsu, Ayaka; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 exhibited chemotactic responses to l-malate, succinate, and fumarate. We constructed a plasmid library of 37 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) genes of P. fluorescens Pf0-1. To identify a MCP for l-malate, the plasmid library was screened using the PA2652 mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to l-malate. The introduction of Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 genes restored the ability of the PA2652 mutant to respond to l-malate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed no response to l-malate or succinate, while the Pfl01_0728 single mutant did not respond to fumarate. These results indicated that Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 were the major MCPs for l-malate and succinate, and Pfl01_0728 was also a major MCP for fumarate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant unexpectedly exhibited stronger responses toward the tomato root exudate and amino acids such as proline, asparagine, methionine, and phenylalanine than those of the wild-type strain. The ctaA, ctaB, ctaC (genes of the major MCPs for amino acids), Pfl01_0728, and Pfl01_3768 quintuple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 was less competitive than the ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant in competitive root colonization, suggesting that chemotaxis to l-malate, succinate, and/or fumarate was involved in tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1. PMID:25491753

  7. Colonization of arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi on Ri T-DNA transformed roots in synthetic medium.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Khaliq; Bagyaraj, D J

    2000-11-01

    Hairy root culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculantum L.) was induced with three strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes namely A4, ATCC 15834 and LBA 9402. The best response in terms of growth of hairy root was observed with A. rhizogenes strain A4 and LBA 9402 followed by ATCC 15834. Hairy roots were maintained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium but it could also grow on minimal (M) medium. Spores of Gigaspora margarita were isolated by wet sieving and decanting method and further recovered by sucrose density gradient method. A new method for surface sterilization of spores has been described which is simpler than the methods described earlier. Surface sterilized spores of G. margarita were used for inoculation of transformed roots grown on M medium as it was found more favourable for germination and growth of spores. During co-cultivation, mycorrhizal spore germination and its penetration into root cortex were observed. Inter and intracellular mycelial spread and formation of arbuscules were also observed in the cortical region of transformed roots of this plant.

  8. Colonization on Root Surface by a Phenanthrene-Degrading Endophytic Bacterium and Its Application for Reducing Plant Phenanthrene Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuang; Sun, Kai; Sheng, Yuehui; Gu, Yujun; Gao, Yanzheng

    2014-01-01

    A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium, Pn2, was isolated from Alopecurus aequalis Sobol grown in soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Based on morphology, physiological characteristics and the 16S rRNA gene sequence, it was identified as Massilia sp. Strain Pn2 could degrade more than 95% of the phenanthrene (150 mg·L−1) in a minimal salts medium (MSM) within 48 hours at an initial pH of 7.0 and a temperature of 30°C. Pn2 could grow well on the MSM plates with a series of other PAHs, including naphthalene, acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, and degrade them to different degrees. Pn2 could also colonize the root surface of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam), invade its internal root tissues and translocate into the plant shoot. When treated with the endophyte Pn2 under hydroponic growth conditions with 2 mg·L−1 of phenanthrene in the Hoagland solution, the phenanthrene concentrations in ryegrass roots and shoots were reduced by 54% and 57%, respectively, compared with the endophyte-free treatment. Strain Pn2 could be a novel and useful bacterial resource for eliminating plant PAH contamination in polluted environments by degrading the PAHs inside plants. Furthermore, we provide new perspectives on the control of the plant uptake of PAHs via endophytic bacteria. PMID:25247301

  9. The cyclophilin A DIAGEOTROPICA gene affects auxin transport in both root and shoot to control lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, Maria G; Zhu, Jinsheng; Wang, Bangjun; Medvecká, Eva; Du, Yunlong; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Megraw, Molly; Filichkin, Sergei; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Friml, Jiří; Geisler, Markus

    2015-02-15

    Cyclophilin A is a conserved peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) best known as the cellular receptor of the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. Despite significant effort, evidence of developmental functions of cyclophilin A in non-plant systems has remained obscure. Mutations in a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cyclophilin A ortholog, DIAGEOTROPICA (DGT), have been shown to abolish the organogenesis of lateral roots; however, a mechanistic explanation of the phenotype is lacking. Here, we show that the dgt mutant lacks auxin maxima relevant to priming and specification of lateral root founder cells. DGT is expressed in shoot and root, and localizes to both the nucleus and cytoplasm during lateral root organogenesis. Mutation of ENTIRE/IAA9, a member of the auxin-responsive Aux/IAA protein family of transcriptional repressors, partially restores the inability of dgt to initiate lateral root primordia but not the primordia outgrowth. By comparison, grafting of a wild-type scion restores the process of lateral root formation, consistent with participation of a mobile signal. Antibodies do not detect movement of the DGT protein into the dgt rootstock; however, experiments with radiolabeled auxin and an auxin-specific microelectrode demonstrate abnormal auxin fluxes. Functional studies of DGT in heterologous yeast and tobacco-leaf auxin-transport systems demonstrate that DGT negatively regulates PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux transporters by affecting their plasma membrane localization. Studies in tomato support complex effects of the dgt mutation on PIN expression level, expression domain and plasma membrane localization. Our data demonstrate that DGT regulates auxin transport in lateral root formation.

  10. Changes in Genetic Diversity from Field to Laboratory During Colonization of Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Lainhart, William; Bickersmith, Sara A; Moreno, Marta; Rios, Carlos Tong; Vinetz, Joseph M; Conn, Jan E

    2015-11-01

    The process of colonizing any arthropod species, including vector mosquitoes, necessarily involves adaptation to laboratory conditions. The adaptation and evolution of colonized mosquito populations needs consideration when such colonies are used as representative models for pathogen transmission dynamics. A recently established colony of Anopheles darlingi, the primary malaria vector in Amazonian South America, was tested for genetic diversity and bottleneck after 21 generations, using microsatellites. As expected, laboratory An. darlingi had fewer private and rare alleles (frequency < 0.05), decreased observed heterozygosity, and more common alleles (frequency > 0.50), but no significant evidence of a bottleneck, decrease in total alleles, or increase in inbreeding compared with field specimens (founder population). Low-moderate differentiation between field and laboratory populations was detected. With these findings, and the documented inherent differences between laboratory and field populations, results of pathogen transmission studies using this An. darlingi colony need to be interpreted cautiously.

  11. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  12. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  13. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2015-12-04

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success.

  14. Analysis of gene expression profiles for cell wall modifying proteins and ACC synthases in soybean cyst nematode colonized roots, adventitious rooting hypocotyls, root tips, flooded roots, and IBA and ACC treatment roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that soybean cyst nematode (SCN) co-opts a part or all of one or more innate developmental process in soybean to establish its feeding structure, syncytium, in soybean roots. The syncytium in soybean roots is formed in a predominantly lateral direction within the vascular bundle by ...

  15. Colonic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some ... abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  16. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection.

    PubMed

    Baas, R; van der Werf, A; Lambers, H

    1989-09-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major. PMID:16667001

  17. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection 1

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Rob; van der Werf, Adrie; Lambers, Hans

    1989-01-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major. PMID:16667001

  18. Root Respiration and Growth in Plantago major as Affected by Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Infection.

    PubMed

    Baas, R; van der Werf, A; Lambers, H

    1989-09-01

    Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection and P on root respiration and dry matter allocation were studied in Plantago major L. ssp. pleiosperma (Pilger). By applying P, the relative growth rate of non-VAM controls and plants colonized by Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann) Gerdemann and Trappe was increased to a similar extent (55-67%). However, leaf area ratio was increased more and net assimilation rate per unit leaf area was increased less by VAM infection than by P addition. The lower net assimilation rate could be related to a 20 to 30% higher root respiration rate per unit leaf area of VAM plants. Root respiration per unit dry matter and specific net uptake rates of N and P were increased more by VAM infection than by P addition. Neither the contribution of the alternative respiratory path nor the relative growth rate could account for the differences in root respiration rate between VAM and non-VAM plants. It was estimated that increased fungal respiration (87%) and ion uptake rate (13%) contributed to the higher respiratory activity of VAM roots of P. major.

  19. Vanillin differentially affects azoxymethane-injected rat colon carcinogenesis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ket Li; Chong, Pei Pei; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-12-01

    Vanillin is the substance responsible for the flavor and smell of vanilla, a widely used flavoring agent. Previous studies reported that vanillin is a good antimutagen and anticarcinogen. However, there are also some contradicting findings showing that vanillin was a comutagen and cocarcinogen. This study investigated whether vanillin is an anticarcinogen or a cocarcinogen in rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Rats induced with AOM will develop aberrant crypt foci (ACF). AOM-challenged rats were treated with vanillin orally and intraperitoneally at low and high concentrations and ACF density, multiplicity, and distribution were observed. The gene expression of 14 colorectal cancer-related genes was also studied. Results showed that vanillin consumed orally had no effect on ACF. However, high concentrations (300 mg/kg body weight) of vanillin administered through intraperitoneal injection could increase ACF density and ACF multiplicity. ACF were mainly found in the distal colon rather than in the mid-section and proximal colon. The expression of colorectal cancer biomarkers, protooncogenes, recombinational repair, mismatch repair, and cell cycle arrest, and tumor suppressor gene expression were also affected by vanillin. Vanillin was not cocarcinogenic when consumed orally. However, it was cocarcinogenic when being administered intraperitoneally at high concentration. Hence, the use of vanillin in food should be safe but might have cocarcinogenic potential when it is used in high concentration for therapeutic purposes.

  20. Transient Rapid Changes in Nutrient Cycling at the Onset of Terrestrial Colonization by Rooted Plants in the Devonian Caithness Flagstone Group, Orkney Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippelli, G. M.; Beshears, M.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Devonian Period witnessed the colonization of vascular plants, resulting in the first well-drained forests with penetrative roots, accelerating silicate weathering and organic carbon burial, thereby affecting ocean biogeochemistry. This study addresses the transition in soil development drivers by examining the signature of key biologically active elements. Results from lacustrine sedimentary sequences from the Orcadian basin of Northern Scotland and the Orkney Islands suggest strong and transient variations in weathering and soil development during this interval. The research premise is that the lacustrine sequence will reflect weathering and local dissolved geochemical inputs from upland landscapes; these dissolved signals would then in part be captured by authigenic processes and be captured as the net geochemical export from upland weathering processes. Thirty samples from a stratigraphic sequence collected from the Caithness Flagstone Group were crushed, completely dissolved using microwave-assisted strong acid digestion, and analyzed by ICP-AES for Al, Ti, Ca, Fe, Mg, and P. Strong variations were observed in the biogeochemistry of P during this interval. The P/Ca ratio remained unvaried, indicating similar fates during the weathering transition, consistent with the common origin of these elements in apatite. But the P/Ti and P/Mg ratios reveal a sharp spike coincident with the rootedness development interval, with relatively low values before and after this interval. This spike is coincident with a minimum in the Fe/Ti ratio. In a model of plant colonization, a transient change in landscape geochemistry is expected, with an initial pulse of released P followed by a decrease as soil maturity leads to preferential P retention (i.e., closing up the P loophole; Fig. 1). In contrast, Fe is expected to display the inverse pattern, with increased retention (lower export to the basin) due to accumulation of iron oxyhydroxides in B horizons. The net impact of

  1. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought. PMID:19483186

  2. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought.

  3. Is the root-colonizing endophyte Acremonium strictum an ericoid mycorrhizal fungus?

    PubMed

    Grunewaldt-Stöcker, Gisela; von Alten, Henning

    2016-07-01

    In previous investigations, we found that Acremonium strictum (strain DSM 100709) developed intracellular structures with similarity to mycelia of ericoid mycorrhizal fungi in the rhizodermal cells of flax plants and in hair roots of Rhododendron plantlets. A. strictum had also been isolated from roots of ericaceous salal plants and was described as an unusual ericoid mycorrhizal fungus (ERMF). As its mycorrhizal traits were doubted, we revised the hypothesis of a mycorrhizal nature of A. strictum. A successful synthesis of mycorrhiza in hair roots of inoculated ericaceous plants was a first step of evidence, followed by fluorescence microscopy with FUN(®)1 cell stain to observe the vitality of the host cells at the early infection stage. In inoculation trials with in vitro-raised mycorrhiza-free Rhododendron plants in axenic liquid culture and in greenhouse substrate culture, A. strictum was never observed in living hair root cells. As compared to the ERMF Oidiodendron maius and Rhizoscyphus ericae that invaded metabolically active host cells and established a symbiotic unit, A. strictum was only found in cells that were dead or in the process of dying and in the apoplast. In conclusion, A. strictum does not behave like a common ERMF-if it is one at all. A comparison of A. strictum isolates from ericaceous and non-ericaceous hosts could reveal further identity details to generalize or specify our findings on the symbiotic nature of A. strictum. At least, the staining method enables to discern between true mycorrhizal and other root endophytes-a tool for further studies. PMID:26846148

  4. Burning management in the tallgrass prairie affects root decomposition, soil food web structure and carbon flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. A.; Denef, K.; Milano de Tomasel, C.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Wall, D. H.

    2015-09-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is a common management practice and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable, but significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition which, in turn, is significantly

  5. Fire affects root decomposition, soil food web structure, and carbon flow in tallgrass prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. Ashley; Denef, Karolien; Milano de Tomasel, Cecilia; Cotrufo, M. Francesca; Wall, Diana H.

    2016-05-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is common and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root-litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root-litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable but also significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition, which, in turn, is significantly affected by fire. Not

  6. Arsenic dynamics in the rhizosphere and its sequestration on rice roots as affected by root oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weisong; Wu, Chuan; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William

    2014-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of root oxidation on arsenic (As) dynamics in the rhizosphere and As sequestration on rice roots. There were significant differences (P < 0.05) in pH values between rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils, with pH 5.68-6.16 in the rhizosphere and 6.30-6.37 in non-rhizosphere soils as well as differences in redox potentials (P < 0.05). Percentage arsenite was lower (4%-16%) in rhizosphere soil solutions from rice genotypes with higher radial oxygen loss (ROL) compared with genotypes with lower ROL (P < 0.05). Arsenic concentrations in iron plaque and rice straw were significantly negatively correlated (R = -0.60, P < 0.05). Genotypes with higher ROL (TD71 and Yinjingruanzhan) had significantly (P < 0.001) lower total As in rice grains (1.35 and 0.96 mg/kg, respectively) compared with genotypes with lower ROL (IAPAR9, 1.68 mg/kg; Nanyangzhan 2.24 mg/kg) in the As treatment, as well as lower inorganic As (P < 0.05). The present study showed that genotypes with higher ROL could oxidize more arsenite in rhizosphere soils, and induce more Fe plaque formation, which subsequently sequestered more As. This reduced As uptake in aboveground plant tissues and also reduced inorganic As accumulation in rice grains. The study has contributed to further understanding the mechanisms whereby ROL influences As uptake and accumulation in rice. PMID:25079420

  7. Modulators affecting the immune dialogue between human immune and colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    cells leading to a balance in cytokine production. It is conceivable that the prevalence of anti-inflammatory cytokine production by PBMC in the affected colonic mucosa will contribute to the delay, or even to halt down malignant expansion. Targeting the interplay between immune and cancer cells by mediators capable to alter cytokine secretion toward increased anti-inflammatory cytokine release by PBMC and tumor associated macrophages, may serve as an additional strategy for treatment of malignant diseases. This review will focus on the inflammatory events preceding tumorigenesis in general, and on a number of modulators capable to affect colon cancer cell-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by PBMC through alteration of the immune cross-talk between PBMC and cancer cells. PMID:24834143

  8. Endomycorrhizal association of Funneliformis mosseae with transformed roots of Linum usitatissimum: germination, colonization, and sporulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Kim Maria; Rodrigues, Bernard Felinov

    2015-01-01

    Spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Funneliformis mosseae (Nicolson & Gerdemann) Walker & Schuessler were cultured in association with transformed roots of Linum usitatissimum L. (Linaceae) for the first time on modified Strullu–Romand medium (pH 5.5) in monoxenic culture. Germ tubes emerged through the spore wall in 88% of spores after 5 days. Hyphal contact with transformed linum roots was observed 5 days after co-cultivation. Paris-type arbuscules and hyphal coils were seen. Extra-radical branched absorbing structures were common. Terminal and intercalary secondary spores were also formed. Spore viability when assessed using vital dye staining (MTT test) was 83%. Secondary spores that proved viable were subsequently transferred from in vitro to in vivo culture where Arum-type arbuscules, intra-radical intercellular hyphae, and extra-radical spores were observed. The procedure established shows potential in AM inoculum mass production and possibility in application.

  9. Root attributes affecting water uptake of rice (Oryza sativa) under drought

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    Lowland rice roots have a unique physiological response to drought because of their adaptation to flooded soil. Rice root attributes that facilitate growth under flooded conditions may affect rice response to drought, but the relative roles of root structural and functional characteristics for water uptake under drought in rice are not known. Morphological, anatomical, biochemical, and molecular attributes of soil-grown rice roots were measured to investigate the genotypic variability and genotype×environment interactions of water uptake under variable soil water regimes. Drought-resistant genotypes had the lowest night-time bleeding rates of sap from the root system in the field. Diurnal fluctuation predominated as the strongest source of variation for bleeding rates in the field and root hydraulic conductivity (Lp r) in the greenhouse, and was related to expression trends of various PIP and TIP aquaporins. Root anatomy was generally more responsive to drought treatments in drought-resistant genotypes. Suberization and compaction of sclerenchyma layer cells decreased under drought, whereas suberization of the endodermis increased, suggesting differential roles of these two cell layers for the retention of oxygen under flooded conditions (sclerenchyma layer) and retention of water under drought (endodermis). The results of this study point to the genetic variability in responsiveness to drought of rice roots in terms of morphology, anatomy, and function. PMID:22791828

  10. Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedback affects root interactions and interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Marloes; Ravenek, Janneke M; Smit-Tiekstra, Annemiek E; van der Paauw, Jan Willem; de Caluwe, Hannie; van der Putten, Wim H; de Kroon, Hans; Mommer, Liesje

    2015-08-01

    Plant-soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as a factor influencing plant competition and species coexistence in grasslands. However, we do not know how spatial distribution of plant-soil feedback affects plant below-ground interactions. We investigated the way in which spatial heterogeneity of soil biota affects competitive interactions in grassland plant species. We performed a pairwise competition experiment combined with heterogeneous distribution of soil biota using four grassland plant species and their soil biota. Patches were applied as quadrants of 'own' and 'foreign' soils from all plant species in all pairwise combinations. To evaluate interspecific root responses, species-specific root biomass was quantified using real-time PCR. All plant species suffered negative soil feedback, but strength was species-specific, reflected by a decrease in root growth in own compared with foreign soil. Reduction in root growth in own patches by the superior plant competitor provided opportunities for inferior competitors to increase root biomass in these patches. These patterns did not cascade into above-ground effects during our experiment. We show that root distributions can be determined by spatial heterogeneity of soil biota, affecting plant below-ground competitive interactions. Thus, spatial heterogeneity of soil biota may contribute to plant species coexistence in species-rich grasslands. PMID:25871977

  11. Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedback affects root interactions and interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Marloes; Ravenek, Janneke M; Smit-Tiekstra, Annemiek E; van der Paauw, Jan Willem; de Caluwe, Hannie; van der Putten, Wim H; de Kroon, Hans; Mommer, Liesje

    2015-08-01

    Plant-soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as a factor influencing plant competition and species coexistence in grasslands. However, we do not know how spatial distribution of plant-soil feedback affects plant below-ground interactions. We investigated the way in which spatial heterogeneity of soil biota affects competitive interactions in grassland plant species. We performed a pairwise competition experiment combined with heterogeneous distribution of soil biota using four grassland plant species and their soil biota. Patches were applied as quadrants of 'own' and 'foreign' soils from all plant species in all pairwise combinations. To evaluate interspecific root responses, species-specific root biomass was quantified using real-time PCR. All plant species suffered negative soil feedback, but strength was species-specific, reflected by a decrease in root growth in own compared with foreign soil. Reduction in root growth in own patches by the superior plant competitor provided opportunities for inferior competitors to increase root biomass in these patches. These patterns did not cascade into above-ground effects during our experiment. We show that root distributions can be determined by spatial heterogeneity of soil biota, affecting plant below-ground competitive interactions. Thus, spatial heterogeneity of soil biota may contribute to plant species coexistence in species-rich grasslands.

  12. Colonization and plant growth promoting characterization of endophytic Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain Zong1 isolated from Sophora alopecuroides root nodules.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long Fei; Xu, Ya Jun; Ma, Zhan Qiang; Deng, Zhen Shan; Shan, Chang Juan; Wei, Ge Hong

    2013-01-01

    The endophytic strain Zong1 isolated from root nodules of the legume Sophora alopecuroides was characterized by conducting physiological and biochemical tests employing gfp-marking, observing their plant growth promoting characteristics (PGPC) and detecting plant growth parameters of inoculation assays under greenhouse conditions. Results showed that strain Zong1 had an effective growth at 28 ºC after placed at 4-60 ºC for 15 min, had a wide range pH tolerance of 6.0-11.0 and salt tolerance up to 5% of NaCl. Zong1 was resistant to the following antibiotics (μg/mL): Phosphonomycin (100), Penicillin (100) and Ampicillin (100). It could grow in the medium supplemented with 1.2 mmol/L Cu, 0.1% (w/v) methylene blue and 0.1-0.2% (w/v) methyl red, respectively. Zong1 is closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis based on analysis the sequence of 16S rRNA gene. Its expression of the gfp gene indicated that strain Zong1 may colonize in root or root nodules and verified by microscopic observation. Furthermore, co-inoculation with Zong1 and SQ1 (Mesorhizobium sp.) showed significant effects compared to single inoculation for the following PGPC parameters: siderophore production, phosphate solubilization, organic acid production, IAA production and antifungal activity in vitro. These results suggest strains P. chlororaphi Zong1 and Mesorhizobium sp. SQ1 have better synergistic or addictive effect. It was noteworthy that each growth index of co-inoculated Zong1+SQ1 in growth assays under greenhouse conditions is higher than those of single inoculation, and showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) when compared to a negative control. Therefore, as an endophyte P. chlororaphis Zong1 may play important roles as a potential plant-growth promoting agent. PMID:24294262

  13. Colonization and plant growth promoting characterization of endophytic Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain Zong1 isolated from Sophora alopecuroides root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Long Fei; Xu, Ya Jun; Ma, Zhan Qiang; Deng, Zhen Shan; Shan, Chang Juan; Wei, Ge Hong

    2013-01-01

    The endophytic strain Zong1 isolated from root nodules of the legume Sophora alopecuroides was characterized by conducting physiological and biochemical tests employing gfp-marking, observing their plant growth promoting characteristics (PGPC) and detecting plant growth parameters of inoculation assays under greenhouse conditions. Results showed that strain Zong1 had an effective growth at 28 ºC after placed at 4–60 ºC for 15 min, had a wide range pH tolerance of 6.0–11.0 and salt tolerance up to 5% of NaCl. Zong1 was resistant to the following antibiotics (μg/mL): Phosphonomycin (100), Penicillin (100) and Ampicillin (100). It could grow in the medium supplemented with 1.2 mmol/L Cu, 0.1% (w/v) methylene blue and 0.1–0.2% (w/v) methyl red, respectively. Zong1 is closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis based on analysis the sequence of 16S rRNA gene. Its expression of the gfp gene indicated that strain Zong1 may colonize in root or root nodules and verified by microscopic observation. Furthermore, co-inoculation with Zong1 and SQ1 (Mesorhizobium sp.) showed significant effects compared to single inoculation for the following PGPC parameters: siderophore production, phosphate solubilization, organic acid production, IAA production and antifungal activity in vitro. These results suggest strains P. chlororaphi Zong1 and Mesorhizobium sp. SQ1 have better synergistic or addictive effect. It was noteworthy that each growth index of co-inoculated Zong1+SQ1 in growth assays under greenhouse conditions is higher than those of single inoculation, and showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) when compared to a negative control. Therefore, as an endophyte P. chlororaphis Zong1 may play important roles as a potential plant-growth promoting agent. PMID:24294262

  14. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae.

    PubMed

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  15. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae.

    PubMed

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  16. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae

    PubMed Central

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  17. Gastrointestinal Mucins of Fut2-Null Mice Lack Terminal Fucosylation without Affecting Colonization by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Elizabeth A.; Holmén, Jessica M.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Domino, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Post-translational modification of apomucins by the sequential action of glycosyltransferases is required to produce mature mucins. The “Secretor” gene (FUT2) encodes an α(1,2)fucosyltransferase (E.C. 2.4.1.69) that catalyzes addition of terminal α(1,2)fucose residues on mucins and other molecules in mucosal epithelium. Mutant mice containing targeted replacement of Fut2 with the bacterial reporter gene lacZ were studied to determine the affect of the loss of Fut2 on glycosylation of mucins in the gastrointestinal tract. By whole organ X-gal staining, lacZ activity is prominently expressed in the foveolar pit and chief cells of the glandular stomach, Brunner's glands of the duodenum, and goblet cells in the large intestine of Fut2-LacZ null mice. Staining with Aleuria aurantia agglutinin demonstrates loss of l-fucosylated epithelial glycans throughout the gastrointestinal tract of Fut2-LacZ null mice, however, histologic appearance of the tissues appears normal. Analysis of oligosaccharides released from insoluble colonic mucins, largely Muc2, by mass spectrometry shows complete lack of terminal fucosylation of O-linked oligosaccharides in Fut2-LacZ null mice. Precursor glycans accumulate with no evidence of compensation by other fucosyltransferases or sialyltransferases on mucin glycosylation. Since Candida albicans has been reported to adhere to intestinal mucins creating a potential reservoir associated with vaginitis, Fut2-LacZ null and wild type mice were inoculated by gastric lavage with C. albicans. We observe no difference in colonization between genotypes suggesting mucin terminal fucosylation does not significantly influence C. albicans-host interaction in the intestine, highlighting that infections caused by the same organism at different mucosal surfaces are not equal. PMID:15958416

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity, root colonization, and soil alkaline phosphatase activity in response to maize-wheat rotation and no-tillage in North China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Yang, Anna; Zhu, Anning; Wang, Junhua; Dai, Jue; Wong, Ming Hung; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring the effects of no-tillage (NT) in comparison with conventional tillage (CT) on soil microbes could improve our understanding of soil biochemical processes and thus help us to develop sound management strategies. The objective of this study was to compare the species composition and ecological function of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi during the growth and rotation of crops under NT and CT. From late June 2009 to early June 2010, 32 topsoil (0-15 cm) samples from four individual plots per treatment (CT and NT) were collected at both the jointing and maturation stages of maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from a long-term experimental field that was established in an Aquic Inceptisol in North China in June 2006. The AM fungal spores were isolated and identified and then used to calculate species diversity indices, including the Shannon- Wiener index (H'), Evenness (E), and Simpson's index (D). The root mycorrhizal colonization and soil alkaline phosphatase activity were also determined. A total of 34 species of AM fungi within nine genera were recorded. Compared with NT, CT negatively affected the soil AM fungal community at the maize sowing stage, leading to decreases in the average diversity indices (from 2.12, 0.79, and 0.82 to 1.79, 0.72, and 0.74 for H', E, and D, respectively), root mycorrhizal colonization (from 28% to 20%), soil alkaline phosphatase activity (from 0.24 to 0.19 mg/g/24 h) and available phosphorus concentration (from 17.4 to 10.5 mg/kg) at the maize jointing stage. However, reductions in diversity indices of H', E, and D were restored to 2.20, 0.81, and 0.84, respectively, at the maize maturation stage. CT should affect the community again at the wheat sowing stage; however, a similar restoration in the species diversity of AM fungi was completed before the wheat jointing stage, and the highest Jaccard index (0.800) for similarity in the species composition of soil AM fungi between CT and NT was recorded at

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity, root colonization, and soil alkaline phosphatase activity in response to maize-wheat rotation and no-tillage in North China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Yang, Anna; Zhu, Anning; Wang, Junhua; Dai, Jue; Wong, Ming Hung; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring the effects of no-tillage (NT) in comparison with conventional tillage (CT) on soil microbes could improve our understanding of soil biochemical processes and thus help us to develop sound management strategies. The objective of this study was to compare the species composition and ecological function of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi during the growth and rotation of crops under NT and CT. From late June 2009 to early June 2010, 32 topsoil (0-15 cm) samples from four individual plots per treatment (CT and NT) were collected at both the jointing and maturation stages of maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from a long-term experimental field that was established in an Aquic Inceptisol in North China in June 2006. The AM fungal spores were isolated and identified and then used to calculate species diversity indices, including the Shannon- Wiener index (H'), Evenness (E), and Simpson's index (D). The root mycorrhizal colonization and soil alkaline phosphatase activity were also determined. A total of 34 species of AM fungi within nine genera were recorded. Compared with NT, CT negatively affected the soil AM fungal community at the maize sowing stage, leading to decreases in the average diversity indices (from 2.12, 0.79, and 0.82 to 1.79, 0.72, and 0.74 for H', E, and D, respectively), root mycorrhizal colonization (from 28% to 20%), soil alkaline phosphatase activity (from 0.24 to 0.19 mg/g/24 h) and available phosphorus concentration (from 17.4 to 10.5 mg/kg) at the maize jointing stage. However, reductions in diversity indices of H', E, and D were restored to 2.20, 0.81, and 0.84, respectively, at the maize maturation stage. CT should affect the community again at the wheat sowing stage; however, a similar restoration in the species diversity of AM fungi was completed before the wheat jointing stage, and the highest Jaccard index (0.800) for similarity in the species composition of soil AM fungi between CT and NT was recorded at

  20. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 mutant with enhanced competitive colonization ability and improved biocontrol activity against fungal root pathogens.

    PubMed

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-08-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible. PMID:21685161

  1. Regulation of the proliferation of colon cancer cells by compounds that affect glycolysis, including 3-bromopyruvate, 2-deoxyglucose and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Qureshi, Mehreen S; Buxhoeveden, Michael; Gengel, Nicolette; Kleinschmit, Jessica; Desbordes, Charles

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies performed by our group, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose blocked the acidification of the medium used for culture of colon cancer cells caused by incubation with biguanides and it had an additive inhibitory effect on growth. In the present work, we found that 3-bromopyruvate can also prevent the lowering of pH caused by biguanide treatment. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited colonic cancer cell proliferation, but the effect was not always additive to that of biguanides and an additive effect was more notable in combined treatment with 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose. The induction of alkaline phosphatase activity by butyrate was not consistently affected by combination with other agents that modified glucose metabolism. The drug combinations that were examined inhibited proliferation of wild-type and p53-null cells and affected colonic cancer lines with different growth rates.

  2. Cell surface fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors in mice with germline Smad3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Domino, Steven E.; Karnak, David M.; Hurd, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aims: Neoplasia-related alterations in cell surface α(1,2)fucosylated glycans have been reported in multiple tumors including colon, pancreas, endometrium, cervix, bladder, lung, and choriocarcinoma. Spontaneous colorectal tumors from mice with a germline null mutation of transforming growth factor-β signaling gene Smad3 (Madh3) were tested for α(1,2)fucosylated glycan expression. Methods: Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin-I lectin staining, fucosyltransferase gene northern blot analysis, and a cross of mutant mice with Fut2 and Smad3 germline mutations were performed. Results: Spontaneous colorectal tumors from Smad3 (-/-) homozygous null mice were found to express α(1,2)fucosylated glycans in an abnormal pattern compared to adjacent nonneoplastic colon. Northern blot analysis of α(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes Fut1 and Fut2 revealed that Fut2, but not Fut1, steady-state mRNA levels were significantly increased in tumors relative to adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Mutant mice with a Fut2-inactivating germline mutation were crossed with Smad3 targeted mice. In Smad3 (-/-)/Fut2 (-/-) double knock-out mice, UEA-I lectin staining was eliminated from colon and colon tumors, however, the number and size of tumors present by 24 weeks of age did not vary regardless of the Fut2 genotype. Conclusions: In this model of colorectal cancer, cell surface α(1,2)fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors. PMID:17264540

  3. Does MTA affect fiber post retention in repaired cervical root canal perforations?

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Guimarães, Karine Rodrigues; Mendes, Laís de Oliveira; Soares, Carlos José; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on the retention of fiber posts in repaired root canal perforations. Ten-millimeter post spaces were prepared in 60 endodontically treated bovine incisors. Root perforations were created in half of the root canals in the cervical area prior to being filled with white MTA-Angelus. Fiber posts were luted into the root canals with two self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem or Set) or self-etching (Panavia F) resin cements. The posts were submitted to a pull-out test, and the data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). The fiber posts exhibited reduced retention in MTA-repaired root canal perforations, regardless of the type of resin cement that was used (p < 0.001). Self-adhesive resin cements provided higher bond strength values than Panavia F, while no difference was observed between RelyX Unicem and Set (p > 0.05). The presence of MTA in repaired root perforations negatively affected post retention. In addition, self-adhesive cements seemed to be the best option to lute fiber posts within a root canal in these cases.

  4. The Novel Lipopeptide Poaeamide of the Endophyte Pseudomonas poae RE*1-1-14 Is Involved in Pathogen Suppression and Root Colonization.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Jahanshah, Ghazaleh; de Bruijn, Irene; Song, Chunxu; Ianni, Federica; Pataj, Zoltán; Gerhardt, Heike; Pianet, Isabelle; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Berg, Gabriele; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2015-07-01

    Endophytic Pseudomonas poae strain RE*1-1-14 was originally isolated from internal root tissue of sugar beet plants and shown to suppress growth of the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani both in vitro and in the field. To identify genes involved in its biocontrol activity, RE*1-1-14 random mutagenesis and sequencing led to the identification of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster predicted to encode a lipopeptide (LP) with a 10-amino-acid peptide moiety. The two unlinked gene clusters consisted of three NRPS genes, designated poaA (cluster 1) and poaB and poaC (cluster 2), spanning approximately 33.7 kb. In silico analysis followed by chemical analyses revealed that the encoded LP, designated poaeamide, is a structurally new member of the orfamide family. Poaeamide inhibited mycelial growth of R. solani and different oomycetes, including Phytophthora capsici, P. infestans, and Pythium ultimum. The novel LP was shown to be essential for swarming motility of strain RE*1-1-14 and had an impact on root colonization of sugar beet seedlings The poaeamide-deficient mutant colonized the rhizosphere and upper plant cortex at higher densities and with more scattered colonization patterns than the wild type. Collectively, these results indicate that Pseudomonas poae RE*1-1-14 produces a structurally new LP that is relevant for its antagonistic activity against soilborne plant pathogens and for colonization of sugar beet roots.

  5. The Novel Lipopeptide Poaeamide of the Endophyte Pseudomonas poae RE*1-1-14 Is Involved in Pathogen Suppression and Root Colonization.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Jahanshah, Ghazaleh; de Bruijn, Irene; Song, Chunxu; Ianni, Federica; Pataj, Zoltán; Gerhardt, Heike; Pianet, Isabelle; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Berg, Gabriele; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2015-07-01

    Endophytic Pseudomonas poae strain RE*1-1-14 was originally isolated from internal root tissue of sugar beet plants and shown to suppress growth of the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani both in vitro and in the field. To identify genes involved in its biocontrol activity, RE*1-1-14 random mutagenesis and sequencing led to the identification of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster predicted to encode a lipopeptide (LP) with a 10-amino-acid peptide moiety. The two unlinked gene clusters consisted of three NRPS genes, designated poaA (cluster 1) and poaB and poaC (cluster 2), spanning approximately 33.7 kb. In silico analysis followed by chemical analyses revealed that the encoded LP, designated poaeamide, is a structurally new member of the orfamide family. Poaeamide inhibited mycelial growth of R. solani and different oomycetes, including Phytophthora capsici, P. infestans, and Pythium ultimum. The novel LP was shown to be essential for swarming motility of strain RE*1-1-14 and had an impact on root colonization of sugar beet seedlings The poaeamide-deficient mutant colonized the rhizosphere and upper plant cortex at higher densities and with more scattered colonization patterns than the wild type. Collectively, these results indicate that Pseudomonas poae RE*1-1-14 produces a structurally new LP that is relevant for its antagonistic activity against soilborne plant pathogens and for colonization of sugar beet roots. PMID:25761208

  6. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 Can Produce a Second Flagellar Apparatus, Which Is Important for Plant Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Muriel, Candela; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The genomic sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of a 41 kb cluster of genes that encode the production of a second flagellar apparatus. Among 2,535 pseudomonads strains with sequenced genomes, these genes are only present in the genomes of F113 and other six strains, all but one belonging to the P. fluorescens cluster of species, in the form of a genetic island. The genes are homologous to the flagellar genes of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. Regulation of these genes is mediated by the flhDC master operon, instead of the typical regulation in pseudomonads, which is through fleQ. Under laboratory conditions, F113 does not produce this flagellum and the flhDC operon is not expressed. However, ectopic expression of the flhDC operon is enough for its production, resulting in a hypermotile strain. This flagellum is also produced under laboratory conditions by the kinB and algU mutants. Genetic analysis has shown that kinB strongly represses the expression of the flhDC operon. This operon is activated by the Vfr protein probably in a c-AMP dependent way. The strains producing this second flagellum are all hypermotile and present a tuft of polar flagella instead of the single polar flagellum produced by the wild-type strain. Phenotypic variants isolated from the rhizosphere produce this flagellum and mutation of the genes encoding it, results in a defect in competitive colonization, showing its importance for root colonization. PMID:27713729

  7. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to determine the effects of [CO2] elevation on the community structure of rice root-associated bacteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from rice roots at the panicle formation stage and analyzed by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to characterize the members of the bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis of a weighted UniFrac distance matrix revealed that the community structure was clearly affected by elevated [CO2]. The predominant community members at class level were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria in the control (ambient) and FACE plots. The relative abundance of Methylocystaceae, the major methane-oxidizing bacteria in rice roots, tended to decrease with increasing [CO2] levels. Quantitative PCR revealed a decreased copy number of the methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene and increased methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) in elevated [CO2]. These results suggest elevated [CO2] suppresses methane oxidation and promotes methanogenesis in rice roots; this process affects the carbon cycle in rice paddy fields. PMID:25750640

  8. Parasitoid-specific induction of plant responses to parasitized herbivores affects colonization by subsequent herbivores.

    PubMed

    Poelman, Erik H; Zheng, Si-Jun; Zhang, Zhao; Heemskerk, Nanda M; Cortesero, Anne-Marie; Dicke, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    Plants are exposed to a suite of herbivorous attackers that often arrive sequentially. Herbivory affects interactions between the host plants and subsequently attacking herbivores. Moreover, plants may respond to herbivory by emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that attract carnivorous natural enemies of the herbivores. However, information borne by VOCs is ubiquitous and may attract carnivores, such as parasitoids, that differ in their effectiveness at releasing the plant from its herbivorous attackers. Furthermore, the development of parasitoids within their herbivorous hosts, attacking a given host plant, may influence the elicitation of defensive reactions in the host plant. This may, in turn, affect the behavior of subsequent herbivores attacking the host plant. Here, we show that the species identity of a parasitoid had a more significant effect on defense responses of Brassica oleracea plants than the species identity of the herbivorous hosts of the parasitoids. Consequently, B. oleracea plants that were damaged by caterpillars (Pieris spp.) parasitized by different parasitoid species varied in the degree to which diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella) selected the plants for oviposition. Attracting parasitoids in general benefitted the plants by reducing diamondback moth colonization. However, the species of parasitoid that parasitized the herbivore significantly affected the magnitude of this benefit by its species-specific effect on herbivore-plant interactions mediated by caterpillar regurgitant. Our findings show that information-mediated indirect defense may lead to unpredictable consequences for plants when considering trait-mediated effects of parasitized caterpillars on the host plant and their consequences because of community-wide responses to induced plants. PMID:22084113

  9. Parasitoid-specific induction of plant responses to parasitized herbivores affects colonization by subsequent herbivores.

    PubMed

    Poelman, Erik H; Zheng, Si-Jun; Zhang, Zhao; Heemskerk, Nanda M; Cortesero, Anne-Marie; Dicke, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    Plants are exposed to a suite of herbivorous attackers that often arrive sequentially. Herbivory affects interactions between the host plants and subsequently attacking herbivores. Moreover, plants may respond to herbivory by emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that attract carnivorous natural enemies of the herbivores. However, information borne by VOCs is ubiquitous and may attract carnivores, such as parasitoids, that differ in their effectiveness at releasing the plant from its herbivorous attackers. Furthermore, the development of parasitoids within their herbivorous hosts, attacking a given host plant, may influence the elicitation of defensive reactions in the host plant. This may, in turn, affect the behavior of subsequent herbivores attacking the host plant. Here, we show that the species identity of a parasitoid had a more significant effect on defense responses of Brassica oleracea plants than the species identity of the herbivorous hosts of the parasitoids. Consequently, B. oleracea plants that were damaged by caterpillars (Pieris spp.) parasitized by different parasitoid species varied in the degree to which diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella) selected the plants for oviposition. Attracting parasitoids in general benefitted the plants by reducing diamondback moth colonization. However, the species of parasitoid that parasitized the herbivore significantly affected the magnitude of this benefit by its species-specific effect on herbivore-plant interactions mediated by caterpillar regurgitant. Our findings show that information-mediated indirect defense may lead to unpredictable consequences for plants when considering trait-mediated effects of parasitized caterpillars on the host plant and their consequences because of community-wide responses to induced plants.

  10. Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 can colonize and improve P uptake of Plantago lanceolata after exposure to ionizing gamma radiation in root organ culture.

    PubMed

    Kothamasi, David; Wannijn, Jean; van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; van Gompel, Axel; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie; Declerck, Stéphane; Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2016-04-01

    Long-lived radionuclides such as (90)Sr and (137)Cs can be naturally or accidentally deposited in the upper soil layers where they emit β/γ radiation. Previous studies have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can accumulate and transfer radionuclides from soil to plant, but there have been no studies on the direct impact of ionizing radiation on AMF. In this study, root organ cultures of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 were exposed to 15.37, 30.35, and 113.03 Gy gamma radiation from a (137)Cs source. Exposed spores were subsequently inoculated to Plantago lanceolata seedlings in pots, and root colonization and P uptake evaluated. P. lanceolata seedlings inoculated with non-irradiated AMF spores or with spores irradiated with up to 30.35 Gy gamma radiation had similar levels of root colonization. Spores irradiated with 113.03 Gy gamma radiation failed to colonize P. lanceolata roots. P content of plants inoculated with non-irradiated spores or of plants inoculated with spores irradiated with up to 30.35 Gy gamma radiation was higher than in non-mycorrhizal plants or plants inoculated with spores irradiated with 113.03 Gy gamma radiation. These results demonstrate that spores of R. irregularis MUCL 41833 are tolerant to chronic ionizing radiation at high doses. PMID:26467250

  11. Plant growth-promoting fungus, Trichoderma koningi suppresses isoflavonoid phytoalexin vestitol production for colonization on/in the roots of Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Masunaka, Akira; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Takenaka, Shigehito

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the colonization of Lotus japonicus by plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF) and biosynthesis of the isoflavonoid phytoalexin vestitol, a major defensive response of leguminous plants, was analyzed. When PGPF including Trichoderma koningi, Fusarium equiseti, and Penicillium simplicissimum were inoculated onto L. japonicus roots, only T. koningi colonized the roots long-term and increased plant dry weight (126%). Microscopic observations of transverse sections of roots colonized by T. koningi demonstrated intercellular hyphal growth and the formation of yeast-like cells. The induction of plant defenses by fungal infections was examined by Northern analysis of genes involved in vestitol biosynthesis and HPLC of vestitol production in L. japonicus. Inoculation with symbiotic Mesorhizobium loti did not induce any accumulation of the transcripts. T. koningi immediately suppressed transcript levels to those induced by M. loti. The vestitol transuded from roots by T. koningi was detected at a level equivalent to that transuded by M. loti. Other PGPF and Calonectoria ilicola pathogenic to soybean but not to L. japonicus, stimulated continuous expression of genes and exudation of vestitol. These PGPF resembled mycorrhizal fungi in the establishment of symbiotic associations rather than fungal parasites.

  12. Factors affecting the attachment of rhizospheric bacteria to bean and soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Albareda, Marta; Dardanelli, Marta Susana; Sousa, Carolina; Megías, Manuel; Temprano, Francisco; Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce N

    2006-06-01

    The plant rhizosphere is an important soil ecological environment for plant-microorganism interactions, which include colonization by a variety of microorganisms in and around the roots that may result in symbiotic, endophytic, associative, or parasitic relationships within the plant, depending on the type of microorganisms, soil nutrient status, and soil environment. Rhizosphere competence may be attributable to the differences in the extent of bacterial attachment to the root surface. We present results of the effect of various factors on the attachment to bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and soybean (Glycine max) roots of some bacterial species of agronomic importance, such as Rhizobium tropici, Rhizobium etli, Ensifer fredii (homotypic synonym Sinorhizobium fredii), and Azospirillum brasilense; as well as the attachment capability of the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Chryseobacterium balustinum. Additionally, we have studied various bacterial traits, such as autoaggregation and flagella movements, which have been postulated to be important properties for bacterial adhesion to surfaces. The lack of mutual incompatibility between rhizobial strains and C. balustinum has been demonstrated in coinoculation assays. PMID:16684104

  13. The possible involvement of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the systemic promotion of phenolic biosynthesis in clover roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honghui; Zhang, Ruiqin; Chen, Weili; Gu, Zhenhong; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhao, Haiquan; Yao, Qing

    2015-04-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization can induce both the local and the systemic increase in phenolic accumulation in hosts. However, the signaling molecules responsible for the systemic induction is still unclear. In this study, a split-root rhizobox system was designed to explore these molecules, with one half of clover (Trifolium repense) roots colonized by AMF, Funneliformis mosseae (formerly known as Glomus mosseae), and the other not (NM/M). Plants with two halves both (M/M) or neither (NM/NM) inoculated were also established for comparison. The contents of phenols and the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in roots were monitored, the activities of L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in roots were assayed, and the expressions of pal and chs (gene encoding chalcone synthase) genes in roots were also quantified using qRT-PCR. Results indicated that when phenolic content in NM/NM plants was lower than that in M/M plants, AMF colonization systemically induced the increase in phenolic content in NM/M plants. Similarly, the accumulations of SA and H2O2 were increased by AMF both locally and systemically, while that of NO was only increased locally. Moreover, enzyme assay and qRT-PCR were in accordance with these results. These data suggest that AMF colonization can systemically increase the phenolic biosynthesis, and SA and H2O2 are possibly the signaling molecules involved. The role of MeSA, a signaling molecule capable of long distance transport in this process, is also discussed.

  14. Polysaccharide from seeds of Plantago asiatica L. affects lipid metabolism and colon microbiota of mouse.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Wu, Qi-Meng; Li, Chang; Fu, Zhi-Hong; Gong, Joshua; Cui, Steve W; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. was given via oral administration to mice (0.4 g/kg body weight, 30 days) to observe its effects on mouse nutrient metabolism and colon microbiota. It was found the polysaccharide intake could lower the apparent absorption of lipid. Total triglyceride, cholesterol, and atherogenic index in blood serum with total lipid and cholesterol levels in liver of polysaccharide group mice were all significantly lower than those of the control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the effect of the polysaccharide intake on mouse colon bacterial communities was investigated. Mice from the polysaccharide group showed a higher colon bacterial diversity than the control group. Bacteroides sp., Eubacterium sp., butyrate-producing bacteria Butyrivibrio sp., and probiotics Bifidobacterium bifidum , Lactobacillus fermentum , and Lactobacillus reuteri in mouse colon were all increased after polysaccharide intake. These indicated that the intake of polysaccharide from P. asiatica L. could be beneficial for lipid metabolism and colon microbiota. PMID:24341731

  15. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy.

  16. Glycerol Affects Root Development through Regulation of Multiple Pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Jinfang; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    treatment altered endogenous levels of G3P, phosphate and ROS, affected auxin distribution and cell division in the root meristem, and eventually resulted in modifications of root development. PMID:24465999

  17. Systemic responses in a tolerant olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivar upon root colonization by the vascular pathogen Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Verticillium wilt of olive (VWO) is caused by the vascular pathogen Verticillium dahliae. One of the best VWO management measures is the use of tolerant cultivars; however, our knowledge on VWO tolerance/resistance genetics is very limited. A transcriptomic analysis was conducted to (i) identify systemic defense responses induced/repressed in aerial tissues of the tolerant cultivar Frantoio upon root colonization by V. dahliae, and (ii) determine the expression pattern of selected defense genes in olive cultivars showing differential susceptibility to VWO. Two suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries, enriched in up-regulated (FU) and down-regulated (FD) genes respectively, were generated from “Frantoio” aerial tissues. Results showed that broad systemic transcriptomic changes are taking place during V. dahliae-“Frantoio” interaction. A total of 585 FU and 381 FD unigenes were identified, many of them involved in defense response to (a)biotic stresses. Selected genes were then used to validate libraries and evaluate their temporal expression pattern in “Frantoio.” Four defense genes were analyzed in cultivars Changlot Real (tolerant) and Picual (susceptible). An association between GRAS1 and DRR2 gene expression patterns and susceptibility to VWO was observed, suggesting that these transcripts could be further evaluated as markers of the tolerance level of olive cultivars to V. dahliae. PMID:26441865

  18. Gel-free proteomic analysis of soybean root proteins affected by calcium under flooding stress

    PubMed Central

    Oh, MyeongWon; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Soybean is sensitive to flooding stress and exhibits reduced growth under flooding conditions. To better understand the flooding-responsive mechanisms of soybean, the effect of exogenous calcium on flooding-stressed soybeans was analyzed using proteomic technique. An increase in exogenous calcium levels enhanced soybean root elongation and suppressed the cell death of root tip under flooding stress. Proteins were extracted from the roots of 4-day-old soybean seedlings exposed to flooding stress without or with calcium for 2 days and analyzed using gel-free proteomic technique. Proteins involved in protein degradation/synthesis/posttranslational modification, hormone/cell wall metabolisms, and DNA synthesis were decreased by flooding stress; however, their reductions were recovered by calcium treatment. Development, lipid metabolism, and signaling-related proteins were increased in soybean roots when calcium was supplied under flooding stress. Fermentation and glycolysis-related proteins were increased in response to flooding; however, these proteins were not affected by calcium supplementation. Furthermore, urease and copper chaperone proteins exhibited similar profiles in 4-day-old untreated soybeans and 4-day-old soybeans exposed to flooding for 2 days in the presence of calcium. These results suggest that calcium might affect the cell wall/hormone metabolisms, protein degradation/synthesis, and DNA synthesis in soybean roots under flooding stress. PMID:25368623

  19. A paralog of the proteinaceous elicitor sm1 affects colonization of maize roots by Trichoderma virens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biocontrol agent, Trichoderma virens, has the ability to protect plants from pathogens by eliciting plant defense responses, involvement in mycoparasitism, or secreting antagonistic secondary metabolites. SM1, an elicitor of induced systemic resistance (ISR), was found to have three paralogs wi...

  20. Drought stress and leaf herbivory affect root terpenoid concentrations and growth of Tanacetum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Sandra; Müller, Caroline

    2014-10-01

    Plant responses of both shoots and roots to combined abiotic and biotic stress have been rarely investigated. However, stresses such as drought and aboveground herbivory might lead to conflicting resource allocation patterns and pronounced shifts in shoot vs. root defenses. In the present study, the effects of water availability and leaf herbivory by caterpillars of a generalist on various shoot and root traits of the aromatic plant Tanacetum vulgare L. were investigated. This species contains terpenoids in leaves and roots, which can differ in composition among individuals, forming so-called chemotypes. To test for intraspecific variation, responses were investigated in two chemotypes, the thujone and the carvyl acetate chemotype. Furthermore, effects of differences in plant quality on the herbivores were studied. Shoot biomass significantly decreased due to drought and herbivory, whereas the root/shoot ratio increased following drought but was unaffected by herbivory. No shifts in C/N ratios were found. In contrast to our expectation, leaf terpenoid concentrations decreased only slightly due to drought, whereas root terpenoids were significantly induced by both drought and herbivory. Chemotypes showed distinct responses to drought at least in the root/shoot ratio, with a higher drought sensitivity of the carvyl acetate chemotype. The body mass of the caterpillars was unaffected by the irrigation treatment but depended on chemotype and terpenoid concentration of the plants. Thus, both qualitative and quantitative defenses strongly affect herbivore development. The present results offer new insights into the above- and belowground organ-specific responses of plants. They highlight the importance of roots in response to various environmental challenges.

  1. Fluoride inhibits root water transport and affects leaf expansion and gas exchange in aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, Mohammed; Zwiazek, Janusz J.

    2003-03-01

    The effects of sodium fluoride (0.3, 5 and 10 mM NaF) on root hydraulic conductivity, and gas exchange processes were examined in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) seedlings grown in solution culture. A long-term exposure of roots to NaF significantly decreased root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and stomatal conductance ( gs). Root absorbed NaF significantly affected electrolyte leakage in leaf tissues and substantially restricted leaf expansion. NaF did not significantly affect leaf chlorophyll contents but decreased net photosynthesis (Pn). A short-term exposure of excised roots to 5 mM NaF and KF significantly decreased root water flow (Qv) with a concomitant decline in root respiration and reduced gs when applied through intact roots or excised stems. The same molar concentration of NaCl also decreased Qv and gs in intact seedlings, but to a lesser extent than NaF or KF, and did not significantly affect root respiration. The results suggest that fluoride metabolically inhibited Qv or Lp, probably by affecting water channel activity. We suggest that the metabolic inhibition of Lp by root-absorbed fluoride affected gas exchange and leaf expansion in aspen seedlings.

  2. The presence of root-feeding nematodes - Not AMF - Affects an herbivore dispersal strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roissart, Annelies; Peña, Eduardo de la; Van Oyen, Lien; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Bonte, Dries

    2013-10-01

    Plant quality and aboveground herbivore performance are influenced either directly or indirectly by the soil community. As herbivore dispersal is a conditional strategy relative to plant quality, we examined whether belowground biotic interactions (the presence of root-feeding nematodes or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) affect aerial dispersal of a phytophagous mite (Tetranychus urticae) through changes in performance of their host plant (Phaseolus vulgaris). Aerial dispersal strategies of mites were analyzed in wind-tunnel experiments, in which a unique mite pre-dispersal behavior (rearing) was assessed in relation to the presence of belowground biota on the host plant on which mites developed. Spider mite pre-dispersal behavior significantly increased with the experienced mite density on the host during development. Additionally, plants infected with root-feeding nematodes induced an increase of spider mite aerial dispersal behavior. The results highlight that belowground herbivores can affect population dynamics of aboveground herbivores by altering dispersal strategies.

  3. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization.

    PubMed

    Bible, Amber N; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher W; Jawdy, Sara S; Weston, David J; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W; Coutinho, Teresa A; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of IAA. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343. PMID:27148182

  4. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Amber N.; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Weston, David J.; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; Bohn, Paul W.; Coutinho, Teresa A.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of IAA. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343. PMID:27148182

  5. A Carotenoid-Deficient Mutant in Pantoea sp. YR343, a Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, Is Defective in Root Colonization

    DOE PAGES

    Bible, Amber; Fletcher, Sarah J; Pelletier, Dale A; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Jawdy, Sara; Weston, David; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Masyuko, Rachel; Polisetti, Sneha; et al

    2016-04-18

    The complex interactions between plants and their microbiome can have a profound effect on the health and productivity of the plant host. A better understanding of the microbial mechanisms that promote plant health and stress tolerance will enable strategies for improving the productivity of economically-important plants. Pantoea sp. YR343 is a motile, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the roots of Populus deltoides that possesses the ability to solubilize phosphate and produce the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Pantoea sp. YR343 readily colonizes plant roots and does not appear to be pathogenic when applied to the leaves or roots of selected plant hosts. Tomore » better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in plant association and rhizosphere survival by Pantoea sp. YR343, we constructed a mutant in which the crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was deleted. Phytoene synthase is responsible for converting geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to phytoene, an important precursor to the production of carotenoids. As predicted, the ΔcrtB mutant is defective in carotenoid production, and shows increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, we find that the ΔcrtB mutant is impaired in biofilm formation and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Finally we demonstrate that the ΔcrtB mutant shows reduced colonization of plant roots. Taken together, these data suggest that carotenoids are important for plant association and/or rhizosphere survival in Pantoea sp. YR343.« less

  6. Both population size and patch quality affect local extinctions and colonizations.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the habitat of many species is fragmented, resulting in small local populations with individuals occasionally dispersing between the remaining habitat patches. In a solitary bee metapopulation, extinction probability was related to both local bee population sizes and pollen resources measured as host plant population size. Patch size, on the other hand, had no additional predictive power. The turnover rate of local bee populations in 63 habitat patches over 4 years was high, with 72 extinction events and 31 colonization events, but the pollen plant population was stable with no extinctions or colonizations. Both pollen resources and bee populations had strong and independent effects on extinction probability, but connectivity was not of importance. Colonizations occurred more frequently within larger host plant populations. For metapopulation survival of the bee, large pollen plant populations are essential, independent of current bee population size.

  7. Alcohol and Smoking Affect Risk of Uncomplicated Colonic Diverticulosis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Shimbo, Takuro; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Sekine, Katsunori; Tanaka, Shohei; Aoki, Tomonori; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Junichi; Yanase, Mikio; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Mizokami, Masashi; Uemura, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Colonic diverticula are located predominantly on the right side in Asia and on the left side in Europe and the United States. Factors associated with uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis and its distribution pattern have been unknown. Our aims are to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study in adults who underwent colonoscopy. Alcohol, alcohol related flushing, smoking, medications, and comorbidities were assessed by interview on the colonoscopy day. Alcohol consumption was categorized as nondrinker, light (1–180 g/week), moderate (181–360 g/week), and heavy (≥361 g/week). Smoking index was defined as the number of cigarettes per day multiplied by the number of smoking years and categorized as nonsmoker, <400, 400–799, and ≥800. A total of 2,164 consecutive patients were enrolled. Overall, 542 patients (25.1%) had uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis located on the right side (50%), bilaterally (29%), and on the left side (21%). Univariate analysis revealed age, male, smoking index, alcohol consumption, aspirin use, anticoagulants use, corticosteroid use, hypertension, and atherosclerotic disease as factors significantly associated with diverticulosis. Alcohol related flushing was not associated with the disease. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age (P<0.01), increasing alcohol consumption (P<0.01) and smoking (P<0.01), and atherosclerotic disease (P<0.01) as significantly associated factors. Alcohol and smoking were associated with right-sided and bilateral diverticula. In conclusion, one in four Japanese adults have colonic diverticulosis (50% right-sided). Age, alcohol consumption, and smoking were found to be significant risk factors for uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis, particularly right-sided and bilateral. PMID:24339905

  8. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Vera L.; Temperton, Vicky M.; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm−3) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g−1) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24–340 seeds m−2) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0–10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4–1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m−2 suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  9. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Vera L; Temperton, Vicky M; Nagel, Kerstin A; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm(-3)) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g(-1)) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24-340 seeds m(-2)) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0-10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4-1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m(-2) suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  10. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Vera L; Temperton, Vicky M; Nagel, Kerstin A; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm(-3)) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g(-1)) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24-340 seeds m(-2)) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0-10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4-1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m(-2) suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  11. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  12. Temporal dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots of representative shrub species in a semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castro, Iván; Ferrol, Nuria; Cornejo, Pablo; Barea, José-Miguel

    2012-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis plays an important role in improving plant fitness and soil quality, particularly in fragile and stressed environments, as those in certain areas of Mediterranean ecosystems. AM fungal communities are usually affected by dynamic factors such as the plant community structure and composition, which in turn are imposed by seasonality. For this reason, a one-year-round time-course trial was performed by sampling the root system of two representative shrubland species (Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus zygis) within a typical Mediterranean ecosystem from the Southeast of Spain. The 18S rDNA gene, of the AM fungal community in roots, was subjected to PCR-SSCP, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Forty-three different AM fungal sequence types were found which clustered in 16 phylotypes: 14 belonged to the Glomeraceae and two to the Diversisporaceae. Surprisingly, only two of these phylotypes were related with sequences of morphologically defined species: Glomus intraradices and Glomus constrictum. Significant differences were detected for the relative abundance of some phylotypes while no effects were found for the calculated diversity indices. These results may help to design efficient mycorrhizal-based revegetation programs for this type of ecosystems. PMID:22124663

  13. In Azospirillum brasilense, mutations in flmA or flmB genes affect polar flagellum assembly, surface polysaccharides, and attachment to maize roots.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Fernando Ariel; Medeot, Daniela Beatriz; Liaudat, Juan Pablo; Pistorio, Mariano; Jofré, Edgardo

    2016-09-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a soil bacterium capable of promoting plant growth. Several surface components were previously reported to be involved in the attachment of A. brasilense to root plants. Among these components are the exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the polar flagellum. Flagellin from polar flagellum is glycosylated and it was suggested that genes involved in such a posttranslational modification are the same ones involved in the biosynthesis of sugars present in the O-antigen of the LPS. In this work, we report on the characterization of two homologs present in A. brasilense Cd, to the well characterized flagellin modification genes, flmA and flmB, from Aeromonas caviae. We show that mutations in either flmA or flmB genes of A. brasilense resulted in non-motile cells due to alterations in the polar flagellum assembly. Moreover, these mutations also affected the capability of A. brasilense cells to adsorb to maize roots and to produce LPS and EPS. By generating a mutant containing the polar flagellum affected in their rotation, we show the importance of the bacterial motility for the early colonization of maize roots.

  14. Folate supplementation differently affects uracil content in DNA in the mouse colon and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High folate intake may increase the risk of cancer, especially in the elderly. The present study examined the effects of ageing and dietary folate on uracil misincorporation into DNA, which has a mutagenic effect, in the mouse colon and liver. Old (18 months; n 42) and young (4 months; n 42) male C5...

  15. Root exudation and root development of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Tizian) as affected by different soils.

    PubMed

    Neumann, G; Bott, S; Ohler, M A; Mock, H-P; Lippmann, R; Grosch, R; Smalla, K

    2014-01-01

    Development and activity of plant roots exhibit high adaptive variability. Although it is well-documented, that physicochemical soil properties can strongly influence root morphology and root exudation, particularly under field conditions, a comparative assessment is complicated by the impact of additional factors, such as climate and cropping history. To overcome these limitations, in this study, field soils originating from an unique experimental plot system with three different soil types, which were stored at the same field site for 10 years and exposed to the same agricultural management practice, were used for an investigation on effects of soil type on root development and root exudation. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Tizian) was grown as a model plant under controlled environmental conditions in a minirhizotrone system equipped with root observation windows (rhizoboxes). Root exudates were collected by placing sorption filters onto the root surface followed by subsequent extraction and GC-MS profiling of the trapped compounds. Surprisingly, even in absence of external stress factors with known impact on root exudation, such as pH extremes, water and nutrient limitations/toxicities or soil structure effects (use of sieved soils), root growth characteristics (root length, fine root development) as well as profiles of root exudates were strongly influenced by the soil type used for plant cultivation. The results coincided well with differences in rhizosphere bacterial communities, detected in field-grown lettuce plants cultivated on the same soils (Schreiter et al., this issue). The findings suggest that the observed differences may be the result of plant interactions with the soil-specific microbiomes. PMID:24478764

  16. Metabolic and transcriptional response of central metabolism affected by root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica under salinity in barley.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Ghabooli, Mehdi; Khatabi, Behnam; Hajirezaei, Mohammad Reza; Schweizer, Patrick; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2016-04-01

    The root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica enhances plant adaptation to environmental stress based on general and non-specific plant species mechanisms. In the present study, we integrated the ionomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics data to identify the genes and metabolic regulatory networks conferring salt tolerance in P. indica-colonized barley plants. To this end, leaf samples were harvested at control (0 mM NaCl) and severe salt stress (300 mM NaCl) in P. indica-colonized and non-inoculated barley plants 4 weeks after fungal inoculation. The metabolome analysis resulted in an identification of a signature containing 14 metabolites and ions conferring tolerance to salt stress. Gene expression analysis has led to the identification of 254 differentially expressed genes at 0 mM NaCl and 391 genes at 300 mM NaCl in P. indica-colonized compared to non-inoculated samples. The integration of metabolome and transcriptome analysis indicated that the major and minor carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and ethylene biosynthesis pathway might play a role in systemic salt-tolerance in leaf tissue induced by the root-colonized fungus.

  17. Metabolic and transcriptional response of central metabolism affected by root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica under salinity in barley.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Ghabooli, Mehdi; Khatabi, Behnam; Hajirezaei, Mohammad Reza; Schweizer, Patrick; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2016-04-01

    The root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica enhances plant adaptation to environmental stress based on general and non-specific plant species mechanisms. In the present study, we integrated the ionomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics data to identify the genes and metabolic regulatory networks conferring salt tolerance in P. indica-colonized barley plants. To this end, leaf samples were harvested at control (0 mM NaCl) and severe salt stress (300 mM NaCl) in P. indica-colonized and non-inoculated barley plants 4 weeks after fungal inoculation. The metabolome analysis resulted in an identification of a signature containing 14 metabolites and ions conferring tolerance to salt stress. Gene expression analysis has led to the identification of 254 differentially expressed genes at 0 mM NaCl and 391 genes at 300 mM NaCl in P. indica-colonized compared to non-inoculated samples. The integration of metabolome and transcriptome analysis indicated that the major and minor carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and ethylene biosynthesis pathway might play a role in systemic salt-tolerance in leaf tissue induced by the root-colonized fungus. PMID:26951140

  18. Roots affect the response of heterotrophic soil respiration to temperature in tussock grass microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Scott L.; Millard, Peter; Hunt, John E.; Rogers, Graeme N. D.; Whitehead, David

    2012-01-01

    Aims and Background While the temperature response of soil respiration (RS) has been well studied, the partitioning of heterotrophic respiration (RH) by soil microbes from autotrophic respiration (RA) by roots, known to have distinct temperature sensitivities, has been problematic. Further complexity stems from the presence of roots affecting RH, the rhizosphere priming effect. In this study the short-term temperature responses of RA and RH in relation to rhizosphere priming are investigated. Methods Temperature responses of RA, RH and rhizosphere priming were assessed in microcosms of Poa cita using a natural abundance δ13C discrimination approach. Results The temperature response of RS was found to be regulated primarily by RA, which accounted for 70 % of total soil respiration. Heterotrophic respiration was less sensitive to temperature in the presence of plant roots, resulting in negative priming effects with increasing temperature. Conclusions The results emphasize the importance of roots in regulating the temperature response of RS, and a framework is presented for further investigation into temperature effects on heterotrophic respiration and rhizosphere priming, which could be applied to other soil and vegetation types to improve models of soil carbon turnover. PMID:22492330

  19. Antimicrobial resistances do not affect colonization parameters of intestinal E. coli in a small piglet group

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Kadlec, Kristina; Guenther, Sebastian; Filter, Matthias; Schwarz, Stefan; Ewers, Christa; Wieler, Lothar H

    2009-01-01

    Background Although antimicrobial resistance and persistence of resistant bacteria in humans and animals are major health concerns worldwide, the impact of antimicrobial resistance on bacterial intestinal colonization in healthy domestic animals has only been rarely studied. We carried out a retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility status and the presence of resistance genes in intestinal commensal E. coli clones from clinically healthy pigs from one production unit with particular focus on effects of pheno- and/or genotypic resistance on different nominal and numerical intestinal colonization parameters. In addition, we compared the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes with the occurrence of virulence associated genes typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Results In general, up to 72.1% of all E. coli clones were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole or tetracycline with a variety of different resistance genes involved. There was no significant correlation between one of the nominal or numerical colonization parameters and the absence or presence of antimicrobial resistance properties or resistance genes. However, there were several statistically significant associations between the occurrence of single resistance genes and single virulence associated genes. Conclusion The demonstrated resistance to the tested antibiotics might not play a dominant role for an intestinal colonization success in pigs in the absence of antimicrobial drugs, or cross-selection of other colonization factors e.g. virulence associated genes might compensate "the cost of antibiotic resistance". Nevertheless, resistant strains are not outcompeted by susceptible bacteria in the porcine intestine. Trial Registration The study was approved by the local animal welfare committee of the "Landesamt für Arbeitsschutz, Gesundheitsschutz und technische Sicherheit" Berlin, Germany (No. G0037/02). PMID

  20. The Subcellular Localization of Tubby-Like Proteins and Participation in Stress Signaling and Root Colonization by the Mutualist Piriformospora indica1[W

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Marco Uwe; Bissue, Jeff Kweku; Zocher, Kathleen; Attard, Agnès; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Becker, Katja; Imani, Jafargholi; Eichmann, Ruth; Schäfer, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Tubby and Tubby-like proteins (TLPs) were first discovered in mammals, where they are involved in the development and function of neuronal cells. Due to their importance as plasma membrane (PM)-tethered transcription factors or mediators of vesicle trafficking, their lack causes obesity and other disease syndromes. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding of the carboxyl-terminal Tubby domain attaches these proteins to the PM and vesicles and is essential for function. TLPs are conserved across eukaryotic kingdoms including plants, suggesting fundamental biological functions of TLPs. Plant TLPs possess an amino-terminal F-box domain that distinguishes them from other eukaryotic TLPs. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encodes 11 AtTLPs that fall into six phylogenetic clades. We identified the significance of AtTLPs for root colonization of Arabidopsis by the mutualistic fungus Piriformospora indica. Our results further indicate conserved phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding sites in the Tubby domains that are required for PM anchoring of AtTLPs. More detailed studies revealed phospholipase C-triggered release of AtTLP3 from the PM, indicating a conserved mechanism as reported for mammalian Tubby and TLP3. We further show that hydrogen peroxide stimulates the release of AtTLP3 from the PM, presumably for activating downstream events. Different from mammalian homologs, the amino-terminal part of almost all AtTLPs has nucleocytosolic and plastidial localization patterns. Thus, it is tempting to assume that TLPs translate reactive oxygen species currents into signaling not only for transcriptional regulation in the nucleus but also affect plastid-associated functions after release from the PM. PMID:22751378

  1. [Colonic balantidiasis].

    PubMed

    González de Canales Simón, P; del Olmo Martínez, L; Cortejoso Hernández, A; Arranz Santos, T

    2000-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a Protozoa that is not usually pathogenic in man, although epidemics have been described in tropical areas. It mainly affects the colon and clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic forms to severe dysenteric syndromes. We present a case of endoscopically diagnosed colonic balantidiasis and review the most important characteristics of this parasite-induced disease. PMID:10804691

  2. Expression of characteristics of ammonium nutrition as affected by pH of the root medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaillou, S.; Vessey, J. K.; Morot-Gaudry, J. F.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Henry, L. T.; Boutin, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    To study the effect of root-zone pH on characteristic responses of NH4+ -fed plants, soybeans (Glycine max inverted question markL. inverted question mark Merr. cv. Ransom) were grown in flowing solution culture for 21 d on four sources of N (1.0 mol m-3 NO3-, 0.67 mol m-3 NO3- plus 0.33 mol m-3 NH4+, 0.33 mol m-3 NO3- plus 0.67 mol m-3 NH4+, and 1.0 mol m-3 NH4+) with nutrient solutions maintained at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Amino acid concentration increased in plants grown with NH4+ as the sole source of N at all pH levels. Total amino acid concentration in the roots of NH4+ -fed plants was 8 to 10 times higher than in NO3(-)-fed plants, with asparagine accounting for more than 70% of the total in the roots of these plants. The concentration of soluble carbohydrates in the leaves of NH4+ -fed plants was greater than that of NO3(-)-fed plants, but was lower in roots of NH4+ -fed plants, regardless of pH. Starch concentration was only slightly affected by N source or root-zone pH. At all levels of pH tested, organic acid concentration in leaves was much lower when NH4+ was the sole N source than when all or part of the N was supplied as NO3-. Plants grown with mixed NO3- plus NH4+ N sources were generally intermediate between NO3(-)- and NH4+ -fed plants. Thus, changes in tissue composition characteristic of NH4+ nutrition when root-zone pH was maintained at 4.5 and growth was reduced, still occurred when pH was maintained at 5.0 or above, where growth was not affected. The changes were slightly greater at pH 4.5 than at higher pH levels.

  3. Folic Acid Supplementation Adversely Affects Chemosensitivity of Colon Cancer Cells to 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Lisa; Yang, Michael; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Streutker, Catherine J; Grin, Andrea; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2016-07-01

    Folic acid (FA) fortification and widespread supplemental use have significantly increased folate status in North America. Furthermore, >50% of colorectal cancer patients use FA supplement. The increased folate status may interfere with cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effect of FA supplementation on chemosensitivity of human colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) using a xenograft model. Mice harboring human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were randomized to receive the control, or 4× or 12.5× supplemental levels of FA. Within each diet group, mice were randomized to receive 5-FU+leucovorin or saline and xenograft growth and characteristics were determined. The expression of genes involved in folate metabolism and cancer treatment was determined. FA supplementation and 5-FU significantly interacted to influence xenograft growth (P < 0.007). At the control level, 5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of the xenografts (P < 0.0001). However, at the 4× supplemental level, 5-FU-treated xenografts grew faster than untreated xenografts (P = 0.048) while at the 12.5× supplemental level, 5-FU exhibited no effect. Cell proliferation, degree of necrosis, and expression of the selected genes did not significantly differ by the supplemental levels of FA. Our data suggest that FA supplementation may be detrimental to 5-FU chemotherapy of colon cancer and pose public health concern.

  4. Increasing shrub abundance and N addition in Arctic tundra affect leaf and root litter decomposition differently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, J.; van de Weg, M. J.; Shaver, G. R.; Gough, L.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in global climate have resulted in a ';greening' of the Arctic as the abundance of deciduous shrub species increases. Consequently, not only the living plant community, but also the litter composition changes, which in turn can affect carbon turnover patterns in the Arctic. We examined effects of changing litter composition (both root and leaf litter) on decomposition rates with a litter bag study, and specifically focused on the impact of deciduous shrub Betula nana litter on litter decomposition from two evergreen shrubs (Ledum palustre, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and one graminoid (Eriophorum vaginatum) species. Additionally, we investigated how decomposition was affected by nutrient availability by placing the litterbags in an ambient and a fertilized moist acidic tundra environment. Measurements were carried out seasonally over 2 years (after snow melt, mid-growing season, end growing season). We measured litter mass loss over time, as well as the respiration rates (standardized for temperature and moisture) and temperature sensitivity of litter respiration at the time of harvesting the litter bags. For leaves, Betula litter decomposed faster than the other three species, with Eriophorum leaves decomposing the slowest. This pattern was observed for both mass loss and litter respiration rates, although the differences in respiration became smaller over time. Surprisingly, combining Betula with any other species resulted in slower overall weight loss rates than would be predicted based on monoculture weight loss rates. This contrasted with litter respiration at the time of sampling, which showed a positive mixing effect of adding Betula leaf liter to the other species. Apparently, during the first winter months (September - May) Betula litter decomposition is negatively affected by mixing the species and this legacy can still be observed in the total mass loss results later in the year. For root litter there were fewer effects of species identity on root

  5. Colonic epithelial ion transport is not affected in patients with diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Osbak, Philip S; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen S; Kaltoft, Nicolai; Tilotta, Maria C; Hansen, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonic diverticular disease is a bothersome condition with an unresolved pathogenesis. It is unknown whether a neuroepithelial dysfunction is present. The aim of the study was two-fold; (1) to investigate colonic epithelial ion transport in patients with diverticulosis and (2) to adapt a miniaturized Modified Ussing Air-Suction (MUAS) chamber for colonic endoscopic biopsies. Methods Biopsies were obtained from the sigmoid part of the colon. 86 patients were included. All patients were referred for colonoscopy on suspicion of neoplasia and they were without pathological findings at colonoscopy (controls) except for diverticulosis in 22 (D-patients). Biopsies were mounted in MUAS chambers with an exposed area of 5 mm2. Electrical responses to various stimulators and inhibitors of ion transport were investigated together with histological examination. The MUAS chamber was easy to use and reproducible data were obtained. Results Median basal short circuit current (SCC) was 43.8 μA·cm-2 (0.8 – 199) for controls and 59.3 μA·cm-2 (3.0 – 177.2) for D-patients. Slope conductance was 77.0 mS·cm-2 (18.6 – 204.0) equal to 13 Ω·cm2 for controls and 96.6 mS·cm-2 (8.4 – 191.4) equal to 10.3 Ω·cm2 for D-patients. Stimulation with serotonin, theophylline, forskolin and carbachol induced increases in SCC in a range of 4.9 – 18.6 μA·cm-2, while inhibition with indomethacin, bumetanide, ouabain and amiloride decreased SCC in a range of 6.5 – 27.4 μA·cm-2, and all with no significant differences between controls and D-patients. Histological examinations showed intact epithelium and lamina propria before and after mounting for both types of patients. Conclusion We conclude that epithelial ion transport is not significantly altered in patients with diverticulosis and that the MUAS chamber can be adapted for studies of human colonic endoscopic biopsies. PMID:17888183

  6. Knockdown of the Symbiotic Sucrose Synthase MtSucS1 Affects Arbuscule Maturation and Maintenance in Mycorrhizal Roots of Medicago truncatula1[W

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Markus Christian; Keck, Matthias; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Küster, Helge; Hohnjec, Natalija

    2010-01-01

    The relevance of the symbiosis-induced Medicago truncatula sucrose synthase gene MtSucS1 for an efficient arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) was studied using two independent antisense lines that displayed up to 10-fold reduced SucS1 levels in roots. Mycorrhizal MtSucS1-reduced lines exhibited an overall stunted aboveground growth under inorganic phosphorus limitation. Apart from a reduced plant height, shoot weight, and leaf development, a delayed flowering, resulting in a lower seed yield, was observed. In addition, the root-to-shoot and root weight ratios increased significantly. Gene expression studies demonstrated a major reversion of AM-associated transcription, exhibiting a significant repression of well-known plant AM marker and mycosymbiont genes, together indicating a diminished AM fungus colonization of MtSucS1-antisense lines. Concomitantly, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling revealed that mycorrhizal MtSucS1-reduced lines were affected in important nodes of the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus metabolism, accentuating a physiological significance of MtSucS1 for AM. In fact, antisensing MtSucS1 provoked an impaired fungal colonization within the less abundant infected regions, evident from strongly reduced frequencies of internal hyphae, vesicles, and arbuscules. Moreover, arbuscules were early senescing, accompanied with a reduced development of mature arbuscules. This defective mycorrhiza status correlated with reduced phosphorus and nitrogen levels and was proportional to the extent of MtSucS1 knockdown. Together, our results point to an important role for MtSucS1 in the establishment and maintenance of arbuscules in the AM symbiosis. PMID:20007443

  7. Osmotic stress at the barley root affects expression of circadian clock genes in the shoot.

    PubMed

    Habte, Ermias; Müller, Lukas M; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an important timing system that controls physiological responses to abiotic stresses in plants. However, there is little information on the effects of the clock on stress adaptation in important crops, like barley. In addition, we do not know how osmotic stress perceived at the roots affect the shoot circadian clock. Barley genotypes, carrying natural variation at the photoperiod response and clock genes Ppd-H1 and HvELF3, were grown under control and osmotic stress conditions to record changes in the diurnal expression of clock and stress-response genes and in physiological traits. Variation at HvELF3 affected the expression phase and shape of clock and stress-response genes, while variation at Ppd-H1 only affected the expression levels of stress genes. Osmotic stress up-regulated expression of clock and stress-response genes and advanced their expression peaks. Clock genes controlled the expression of stress-response genes, but had minor effects on gas exchange and leaf transpiration. This study demonstrated that osmotic stress at the barley root altered clock gene expression in the shoot and acted as a spatial input signal into the clock. Unlike in Arabidopsis, barley primary assimilation was less controlled by the clock and more responsive to environmental perturbations, such as osmotic stress. PMID:24895755

  8. Factors affecting irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boutsioukis, C; Psimma, Z; van der Sluis, L W M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and critical analysis of published data on irrigant extrusion to identify factors causing, affecting or predisposing to irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation of human mature permanent teeth. An electronic search was conducted in Cochrane Library, LILACS, PubMed, SciELO, Scopus and Web of Knowledge using a combination of the terms 'irrigant', 'rinse', 'extrusion', 'injection', 'complication', 'accident', 'iatrogenic', 'root canal', 'tooth' and 'endodontic'. Additional studies were identified by hand-searching of six endodontic journals and the relevant chapters of four endodontic textbooks, resulting in a total of 460 titles. No language restriction was imposed. After applying screening and strict eligibility criteria by two independent reviewers, 40 case reports and 10 ex vivo studies were included in the review. A lack of clinical studies focusing on irrigant extrusion during root canal irrigation was evident. The reviewed case reports focused mainly on the clinical manifestations and management of the accidents and did not provide adequate details on the possible factors that may influence irrigant extrusion. The data from the included ex vivo studies were inconclusive due to major methodological limitations, such as not simulating the presence of periapical tissues and not assessing the validity of irrigant detection methods. The extensive variability in the protocols employed hindered quantitative synthesis. The choice of factors investigated in ex vivo studies seems not to have been driven by the available clinical evidence. These issues need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:23289914

  9. Two TTX-resistant Na+ currents in mouse colonic dorsal root ganglia neurons and their role in colitis-induced hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Beyak, Michael J; Ramji, Noor; Krol, Karmen M; Kawaja, Michael D; Vanner, Stephen J

    2004-10-01

    The composition of Na+ currents in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons depends on their neuronal phenotype and innervation target. Two TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents [voltage-gated Na channels (Nav)] have been described in small DRG neurons; one with slow inactivation kinetics (Nav1.8) and the other with persistent kinetics (Nav1.9), and their modulation has been implicated in inflammatory pain. This has not been studied in neurons projecting to the colon. This study examined the relative importance of these currents in inflammation-induced changes in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. Colonic sensory neurons were retrogradely labeled, and colitis was induced by instillation of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) into the lumen of the distal colon. Seven to ten days later, immunohistochemical properties were characterized in controls, and whole cell recordings were obtained from small (<40 pF) labeled DRG neurons from control and TNBS animals. Most neurons exhibited both fast TTX-sensitive (TTX-S)- and slow TTX-R-inactivating Na+ currents, but persistent TTX-R currents were uncommon (<15%). Most labeled neurons were CGRP (79%), tyrosine kinase A (trkA) (84%) immunoreactive, but only a small minority bind IB4 (14%). TNBS-colitis caused ulceration, thickening of the colon and significantly increased neuronal excitability. The slow TTX-R-inactivating Na current density (Nav1.8) was significantly increased, but other Na currents were unaffected. Most small mouse colonic sensory neurons are CGRP, trkA immunoreactive, but not isolectin B4 reactive and exhibit fast TTX-S, slow TTX-R, but not persistent TTX-R Na+ currents. Colitis-induced hyperexcitability is associated with increased slow TTX-R (Nav1.8) Na+ current. Together, these findings suggest that colitis alters trkA-positive neurons to preferentially increase slow TTX-R Na+ (Nav1.8) currents. PMID:15205116

  10. Carcinogen and dietary lipid regulate ras expression and localization in rat colon without affecting farnesylation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Davidson, L A; Lupton, J R; Jiang, Y H; Chapkin, R S

    1999-05-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data suggest that dietary fiber and fat are major determinants of colorectal cancer. However, the mechanisms by which these dietary constituents alter the incidence of colon cancer have not been elucidated. Evidence indicates that dominant gain-of-function mutations short-circuit protooncogenes and contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. Therefore, we began to dissect the mechanisms whereby dietary fat and fiber, fed during the initiation, promotion and progression stages of colon tumorigenesis, regulate ras p21 localization, expression and mutation frequency. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (140) were provided with corn oil or fish oil and pectin or cellulose plus or minus the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design and killed after 34 weeks. We have previously shown adenocarcinoma incidence in these animals to be 70.3% (52/74) for corn oil + AOM and 56.1% (37/66) for fish oil + AOM (P < 0.05). Total ras expression as well as ras membrane:cytosol ratio was 4- to 6-fold higher in colon tumors than in mucosa from AOM- or saline-injected rats. Expression of ras in the mucosal membrane fraction was 13% higher for animals fed corn oil compared with fish oil feeding (P < 0.05), which is noteworthy since ras must be localized at the plasma membrane to function. The elevated ras membrane:cytosol ratio in tumors was not due to increased farnesyl protein transferase activity or prenylation state, as nearly all detectable ras was in the prenylated form. Phosphorylated p42 and p44 mitogen activated protein kinase (ERK) expression was two-fold higher in tumor extracts compared with uninvolved mucosa from AOM- and saline-injected rats (P < 0.05). The frequency of K-ras mutations was not significantly different between the various groups, but there was a trend toward a greater incidence of mutations in tumors from corn oil fed rats (85%) compared with fish oil fed rats (58%). Our results indicate that the carcinogen

  11. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  12. Methanolic extracts of bitter melon inhibit colon cancer stem cells by affecting energy homeostasis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Moran, Elizabeth; Velayutham, Ravichandiran; Mitra, Ashim; Umar, Shahid; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Bitter melon fruit is recommended in ancient Indian and Chinese medicine for prevention/treatment of diabetes. However its effects on cancer progression are not well understood. Here, we have determined the efficacy of methanolic extracts of bitter melon on colon cancer stem and progenitor cells. Both, whole fruit (BMW) and skin (BMSk) extracts showed significant inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, with BMW showing greater efficacy. In addition, the cells were arrested at the S phase of cell cycle. Moreover, BMW induced the cleavage of LC3B but not caspase 3/7, suggesting that the cells were undergoing autophagy and not apoptosis. Further confirmation of autophagy was obtained when western blots showed reduced Bcl-2 and increased Beclin-1, Atg 7 and 12 upon BMW treatment. BMW reduced cellular ATP levels coupled with activation of AMP activated protein kinase; on the other hand, exogenous additions of ATP lead to revival of cell proliferation. Finally, BMW treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in the number and size of colonospheres. The extracts also decreased the expression of DCLK1 and Lgr5, markers of quiescent, and activated stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the extracts of bitter melon can be an effective preventive/therapeutic agent for colon cancer. PMID:23533514

  13. Analysis of soybean root proteins affected by gibberellic acid treatment under flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myeong Won; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Flooding is a serious abiotic stress for soybean because it restricts growth and reduces grain yields. To investigate the effect of gibberellic acid (GA) on soybean under flooding stress, root proteins were analyzed using a gel-free proteomic technique. Proteins were extracted from the roots of 4-days-old soybean seedlings exposed to flooding stress in the presence and absence of exogenous GA3 for 2 days. A total of 307, 324, and 250 proteins were identified from untreated, and flooding-treated soybean seedlings without or with GA3, respectively. Secondary metabolism- and cell-related proteins, and proteins involved in protein degradation/synthesis were decreased by flooding stress; however, the levels of these proteins were restored by GA3 supplementation under flooding. Fermentation- and cell wall-related proteins were not affected by GA3 supplementation. Furthermore, putative GA-responsive proteins, which were identified by the presence of a GA-responsive element in the promoter region, were less abundant by flooding stress; however, these proteins were more abundant by GA3 supplementation under flooding. Taken together, these results suggest that GA3 affects the abundance of proteins involved in secondary metabolism, cell cycle, and protein degradation/synthesis in soybeans under flooding stress. PMID:24702262

  14. Nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd accumulation in Panax notoginseng roots by affecting root cell wall properties.

    PubMed

    Kan, Qi; Wu, Wenwei; Yu, Wenqian; Zhang, Jiarong; Xu, Jin; Rengel, Zed; Chen, Limei; Cui, Xiuming; Chen, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen is a traditional medicinal herb in China. However, the high capacity of its roots to accumulate cadmium (Cd) poses a potential risk to human health. Although there is some evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating Cd toxicity, the origin of Cd-induced NO and its function in plant responses to Cd remain unknown. In this study, we examined NO synthesis and its role in Cd accumulation in P. notoginseng roots. Cd-induced NO production was significantly decreased by application of the nitrate reductase inhibitor tungstate but not the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (N(G)-methyl-l-arginine acetate), indicating that nitrate reductase is the major contributor to Cd-induced NO production in P. notoginseng roots. Under conditions of Cd stress, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) increased Cd accumulation in root cell walls but decreased Cd translocation to the shoot. In contrast, the NO scavenger cPTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) and tungstate both significantly decreased NO-increased Cd retention in root cell walls. The amounts of hemicellulose 1 and pectin, together with pectin methylesterase activity, were increased with the addition of SNP but were decreased by cPTIO and tungstate. Furthermore, increases or decreases in hemicellulose 1 and pectin contents as well as pectin methylesterase activity fit well with the increased or decreased retention of Cd in the cell walls of P. notoginseng roots. The results suggest that nitrate reductase-mediated NO production enhances Cd retention in P. notoginseng roots by modulating the properties of the cell wall.

  15. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M; Harris, Curtis C; Lønning, Per E; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01-1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01-1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  16. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B.; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M.; Harris, Curtis C.; Lønning, Per E.; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01–1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00–1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01–1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00–1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  17. Cecal volatile fatty acids and broiler chick susceptibility to Salmonella typhimurium colonization as affected by aflatoxins and T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Kubena, L F; Bailey, R H; Byrd, J A; Young, C R; Corrier, D E; Stanker, L H; Rottinghaust, G E

    2001-04-01

    cecal concentrations of VFA can be affected by toxins, such as high concentrations of T-2 toxin, and that resistance to Salmonella colonization may be reduced. Further research is necessary to determine the biological significance of these changes.

  18. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Thomas; Stopnisek, Nejc; Agnoli, Kirsty; Eberl, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots and shoots harbor complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e., the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii) or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains) were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities. PMID:24409174

  19. Microbial populations and activities in the rhizoplane of rock-weathering desert plants. I. Root colonization and weathering of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Puente, M E; Bashan, Y; Li, C Y; Lebsky, V K

    2004-09-01

    Dense layers of bacteria and fungi in the rhizoplane of three species of cactus (Pachycereus pringlei, Stenocereus thurberi, Opuntia cholla) and a wild fig tree (Ficus palmeri) growing in rocks devoid of soil were revealed by bright-field and fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. These desert plants are responsible for rock weathering in an ancient lava flow at La Purisima-San Isidro and in sedimentary rock in the Sierra de La Paz, both in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The dominant bacterial groups colonizing the rhizoplane were fluorescent pseudomonads and bacilli. Seven of these bacterial species were identified by the 16S rRNA molecular method. Unidentified fungal and actimomycete species were also present. Some of the root-colonizing microorganisms fixed in vitro N(2), produced volatile and non-volatile organic acids that subsequently reduced the pH of the rock medium in which the bacteria grew, and significantly dissolved insoluble phosphates, extrusive igneous rock, marble, and limestone. The bacteria were able to release significant amounts of useful minerals, such as P, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn from the rocks and were thermo-tolerant, halo-tolerant, and drought-tolerant. The microbial community survived in the rhizoplane of cacti during the annual 10-month dry season. This study indicates that rhizoplane bacteria on cacti roots in rock may be involved in chemical weathering in hot, subtropical deserts.

  20. Microbial populations and activities in the rhizoplane of rock-weathering desert plants. I. Root colonization and weathering of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Puente, M E; Bashan, Y; Li, C Y; Lebsky, V K

    2004-09-01

    Dense layers of bacteria and fungi in the rhizoplane of three species of cactus (Pachycereus pringlei, Stenocereus thurberi, Opuntia cholla) and a wild fig tree (Ficus palmeri) growing in rocks devoid of soil were revealed by bright-field and fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. These desert plants are responsible for rock weathering in an ancient lava flow at La Purisima-San Isidro and in sedimentary rock in the Sierra de La Paz, both in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The dominant bacterial groups colonizing the rhizoplane were fluorescent pseudomonads and bacilli. Seven of these bacterial species were identified by the 16S rRNA molecular method. Unidentified fungal and actimomycete species were also present. Some of the root-colonizing microorganisms fixed in vitro N(2), produced volatile and non-volatile organic acids that subsequently reduced the pH of the rock medium in which the bacteria grew, and significantly dissolved insoluble phosphates, extrusive igneous rock, marble, and limestone. The bacteria were able to release significant amounts of useful minerals, such as P, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn from the rocks and were thermo-tolerant, halo-tolerant, and drought-tolerant. The microbial community survived in the rhizoplane of cacti during the annual 10-month dry season. This study indicates that rhizoplane bacteria on cacti roots in rock may be involved in chemical weathering in hot, subtropical deserts. PMID:15375735

  1. Endophytic colonization of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots by the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia reveals plant growth promotion and a general defense and stress transcriptomic response.

    PubMed

    Larriba, Eduardo; Jaime, María D L A; Nislow, Corey; Martín-Nieto, José; Lopez-Llorca, Luis Vicente

    2015-07-01

    Plant crop yields are negatively conditioned by a large set of biotic and abiotic factors. An alternative to mitigate these adverse effects is the use of fungal biological control agents and endophytes. The egg-parasitic fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia has been traditionally studied because of its potential as a biological control agent of plant-parasitic nematodes. This fungus can also act as an endophyte in monocot and dicot plants, and has been shown to promote plant growth in different agronomic crops. An Affymetrix 22K Barley GeneChip was used in this work to analyze the barley root transcriptomic response to P. chlamydosporia root colonization. Functional gene ontology (GO) and gene set enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in stress response were enriched in the barley transcriptome under endophytism. An 87.5% of the probesets identified within the abiotic stress response group encoded heat shock proteins. Additionally, we found in our transcriptomic analysis an up-regulation of genes implicated in the biosynthesis of plant hormones, such as auxin, ethylene and jasmonic acid. Along with these, we detected induction of brassinosteroid insensitive 1-associated receptor kinase 1 (BR1) and other genes related to effector-triggered immunity (ETI) and pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Our study supports at the molecular level the growth-promoting effect observed in plants endophytically colonized by P. chlamydosporia, which opens the door to further studies addressing the capacity of this fungus to mitigate the negative effects of biotic and abiotic factors on plant crops.

  2. Root-zone acidity affects relative uptake of nitrate and ammonium from mixed nitrogen sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) were grown for 21 days on 4 sources of N (1.0 mM NO3-, 0.67 mM NO3- plus 0.33 mM NH4+, 0.33 mM NO3- plus 0.67 mM NH4+, and 1.0 mM NH4+) in hydroponic culture with the acidity of the nutrient solution controlled at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Dry matter and total N accumulation of the plants was not significantly affected by N-source at any of the pH levels except for decreases in these parameters in plants supplied solely with NH4+ at pH 4.5. Shoot-to-root ratios increased in plants which had an increased proportion [correction of proporiton] of NH4(+)-N in their nutrient solutions at all levels of root-zone pH. Uptake of NO3- and NH4+ was monitored daily by ion chromatography as depletion of these ions from the replenished hydroponic solutions. At all pH levels the proportion of either ion that was absorbed increased as the ratio of that ion increased in the nutrient solution. In plants which were supplied with sources of NO3- plus NH4+, NH4+ was absorbed at a ratio of 2:1 over NO3- at pH 6.0. As the pH of the root-zone declined, however, NH4+ uptake decreased and NO3- uptake increased. Thus, the NH4+ to NO3- uptake ratio declined with decreases in root-zone pH. The data indicate a negative effect of declining root-zone pH on NH4+ uptake and supports a hypothesis that the inhibition of growth of plants dependent on NH4(+)-N at low pH is due to a decline in NH4+ uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by N stress.

  3. Factors affecting induction and development of in vitro rooting in apple rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Sharma, T; Modgil, M; Thakur, M

    2007-09-01

    Shoots of apple rootstocks raised in vitro were transferred to various rooting media to study the effect of different factors on root initiation and development. Various concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) initiated rooting but maximum rooting percentage was found with 2.0 and 2.5 mg l(-1) of IBA in M7 and with 1.0 mg l(-1) of IBA in MM106. The drawback was that the roots were thick, short and with profuse callus. The presence of activated charcoal (AC) in the rooting medium improved the rooting quality but reduced the rooting percentage in both the rootstocks. In high auxin dip of 70, 80 and 90 mg l(-1) IBA for 2, 2 and 1 hr showed 75-85 per cent rooting in M7, but lacked reproducibility of the results. Whereas in MM106, 66 - 70 % rooting was achieved with 70 mg l(-1) of IBA dip for 3 h. Root induction in shoots in IBA containing liquid medium (LM) in dark for few days and root elongation in IBA--free medium in light proved most effective. On the other hand, continuous light treatment showed reduced rooting. Reduction of MS salts and sucrose in root elongation medium showed decreased rooting. Plantlets from two--stage rooting procedure showed more rapid growth and satisfactory survival during hardening of plants and on transfer to field. PMID:17907750

  4. Phytotoxic cyanamide affects maize (Zea mays) root growth and root tip function: from structure to gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Szajko, Katarzyna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Cyanamide (CA) is a phytotoxic compound produced by four Fabaceae species: hairy vetch, bird vetch, purple vetch and black locust. Its toxicity is due to complex activity that involves the modification of both cellular structures and physiological processes. To date, CA has been investigated mainly in dicot plants. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of CA in the restriction of the root growth of maize (Zea mays), representing the monocot species. CA (3mM) reduced the number of border cells in the root tips of maize seedlings and degraded their protoplasts. However, CA did not induce any significant changes in the organelle structure of other root cells, apart from increased vacuolization. CA toxicity was also demonstrated by its effect on cell cycle activity, endoreduplication intensity, and modifications of cyclins CycA2, CycD2, and histone HisH3 gene expression. In contrast, the arrangement of microtubules was not altered by CA. Treatment of maize seedlings with CA did not completely arrest mitotic activity, although the frequency of dividing cells was reduced. Furthermore, prolonged CA treatment increased the proportion of endopolyploid cells in the root tip. Cytological malformations were accompanied by an induction of oxidative stress in root cells, which manifested as enhanced accumulation of H2O2. Exposure of maize seedlings to CA resulted in an increased concentration of auxin and stimulated ethylene emission. Taken together, these findings suggested that the inhibition of root growth by CA may be a consequence of stress-induced morphogenic responses.

  5. Phytotoxic cyanamide affects maize (Zea mays) root growth and root tip function: from structure to gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Szajko, Katarzyna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Cyanamide (CA) is a phytotoxic compound produced by four Fabaceae species: hairy vetch, bird vetch, purple vetch and black locust. Its toxicity is due to complex activity that involves the modification of both cellular structures and physiological processes. To date, CA has been investigated mainly in dicot plants. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of CA in the restriction of the root growth of maize (Zea mays), representing the monocot species. CA (3mM) reduced the number of border cells in the root tips of maize seedlings and degraded their protoplasts. However, CA did not induce any significant changes in the organelle structure of other root cells, apart from increased vacuolization. CA toxicity was also demonstrated by its effect on cell cycle activity, endoreduplication intensity, and modifications of cyclins CycA2, CycD2, and histone HisH3 gene expression. In contrast, the arrangement of microtubules was not altered by CA. Treatment of maize seedlings with CA did not completely arrest mitotic activity, although the frequency of dividing cells was reduced. Furthermore, prolonged CA treatment increased the proportion of endopolyploid cells in the root tip. Cytological malformations were accompanied by an induction of oxidative stress in root cells, which manifested as enhanced accumulation of H2O2. Exposure of maize seedlings to CA resulted in an increased concentration of auxin and stimulated ethylene emission. Taken together, these findings suggested that the inhibition of root growth by CA may be a consequence of stress-induced morphogenic responses. PMID:24709147

  6. Deciphering the route of Ralstonia solanacearum colonization in Arabidopsis thaliana roots during a compatible interaction: focus at the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Digonnet, Catherine; Martinez, Yves; Denancé, Nicolas; Chasseray, Marine; Dabos, Patrick; Ranocha, Philippe; Marco, Yves; Jauneau, Alain; Goffner, Deborah

    2012-11-01

    The compatible interaction between the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the GMI1000 strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium, Ralstonia solanacearum, was investigated in an in vitro pathosystem. We describe the progression of the bacteria in the root from penetration at the root surface to the xylem vessels and the cell type-specific, cell wall-associated modifications that accompanies bacterial colonization. Within 6 days post inoculation, R. solanacearum provoked a rapid plasmolysis of the epidermal, cortical, and endodermal cells, including those not directly in contact with the bacteria. Plasmolysis was accompanied by a global degradation of pectic homogalacturonanes as shown by the loss of JIM7 and JIM5 antibody signal in the cell wall of these cell types. As indicated by immunolabeling with Rsol-I antibodies that specifically recognize R. solanacearum, the bacteria progresses through the root in a highly directed, centripetal manner to the xylem poles, without extensive multiplication in the intercellular spaces along its path. Entry into the vascular cylinder was facilitated by cell collapse of the two pericycle cells located at the xylem poles. Once the bacteria reached the xylem vessels, they multiplied abundantly and moved from vessel to vessel by digesting the pit membrane between adjacent vessels. The degradation of the secondary walls of xylem vessels was not a prerequisite for vessel colonization as LM10 antibodies strongly labeled xylem cell walls, even at very late stages in disease development. Finally, the capacity of R. solanacearum to specifically degrade certain cell wall components and not others could be correlated with the arsenal of cell wall hydrolytic enzymes identified in the bacterial genome.

  7. Deciphering the route of Ralstonia solanacearum colonization in Arabidopsis thaliana roots during a compatible interaction: focus at the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Digonnet, Catherine; Martinez, Yves; Denancé, Nicolas; Chasseray, Marine; Dabos, Patrick; Ranocha, Philippe; Marco, Yves; Jauneau, Alain; Goffner, Deborah

    2012-11-01

    The compatible interaction between the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the GMI1000 strain of the phytopathogenic bacterium, Ralstonia solanacearum, was investigated in an in vitro pathosystem. We describe the progression of the bacteria in the root from penetration at the root surface to the xylem vessels and the cell type-specific, cell wall-associated modifications that accompanies bacterial colonization. Within 6 days post inoculation, R. solanacearum provoked a rapid plasmolysis of the epidermal, cortical, and endodermal cells, including those not directly in contact with the bacteria. Plasmolysis was accompanied by a global degradation of pectic homogalacturonanes as shown by the loss of JIM7 and JIM5 antibody signal in the cell wall of these cell types. As indicated by immunolabeling with Rsol-I antibodies that specifically recognize R. solanacearum, the bacteria progresses through the root in a highly directed, centripetal manner to the xylem poles, without extensive multiplication in the intercellular spaces along its path. Entry into the vascular cylinder was facilitated by cell collapse of the two pericycle cells located at the xylem poles. Once the bacteria reached the xylem vessels, they multiplied abundantly and moved from vessel to vessel by digesting the pit membrane between adjacent vessels. The degradation of the secondary walls of xylem vessels was not a prerequisite for vessel colonization as LM10 antibodies strongly labeled xylem cell walls, even at very late stages in disease development. Finally, the capacity of R. solanacearum to specifically degrade certain cell wall components and not others could be correlated with the arsenal of cell wall hydrolytic enzymes identified in the bacterial genome. PMID:22729825

  8. Drug membrane transporters and CYP3A4 are affected by hypericin, hyperforin or aristoforin in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Šemeláková, M; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2016-07-01

    Our previous results have shown that the combination of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy (HY-PDT) at sub-optimal dose with hyperforin (HP) (compounds of Hypericum sp.), or its stable derivative aristoforin (AR) stimulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to antitumour activity. This enhanced oxidative stress evoked the need for an explanation for HY accumulation in colon cancer cells pretreated with HP or AR. Generally, the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutics is limited by drug resistance related to the overexpression of drug efflux transporters in tumour cells. Therefore, the impact of non-activated hypericin (HY), HY-PDT, HP and AR on cell membrane transporter systems (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1-MRP1/ABCC1, Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-MRP2/ABCC2, Breast cancer resistance protein - BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein-P-gp/ABCC1) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) was evaluated. The different effects of the three compounds on their expression, protein level and activity was determined under specific PDT light (T0+, T6+) or dark conditions (T0- T6-). We found that HP or AR treatment affected the protein levels of MRP2 and P-gp, whereas HP decreased MRP2 and P-gp expression mostly in the T0+ and T6+ conditions, while AR decreased MRP2 in T0- and T6+. Moreover, HY-PDT treatment induced the expression of MRP1. Our data demonstrate that HP or AR treatment in light or dark PDT conditions had an inhibitory effect on the activity of individual membrane transport proteins and significantly decreased CYP3A4 activity in HT-29 cells. We found that HP or AR significantly affected intracellular accumulation of HY in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that HY, HP and AR might affect the efficiency of anti-cancer drugs, through interaction with membrane transporters and CYP3A4. PMID:27261575

  9. Microbial colonization affects the efficiency of photovoltaic panels in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Marcia A; Zilles, Roberto; Mocelin, Andre; Gaylarde, Christine C; Gorbushina, Anna; Heidrich, Gabriele; Giudice, Mauro C; Del Negro, Gilda M B; John, Vanderley M

    2015-07-01

    Sub-aerial biofilm (SAB) development on solar panels was studied in São Paulo. After 6, 12 and 18 months' exposure, photovoltaic panels were covered by increasing proportions of organic matter (42%, 53% and 58%, respectively). Fungi were an important component of these biofilms; very few phototrophs were found. Major microorganisms detected were melanised meristematic ascomycetes and pigmented bacterial genera Arthrobacter and Tetracoccus. While diverse algae, cyanobacteria and bacteria were identified in biofilms at 6 and 12 months, diversity at a later stage was reduced to that typical for SAB: the only fungal group detected in 18 month biofilm was the meristematic Dothideomycetes and the only phototrophs Ulothrix and Chlorella. Photovoltaic modules showed significant power reductions after 6, 12 (both 7%) and 18 (11%) months. The lack of difference in power reduction between 6 and 12 months reflects the dual nature of soiling, which can result from the deposition of particulates as well as from SAB fouling. Although 12-month old SAB demonstrated an almost 10-fold increase in fungal colonization and a higher organic content, the larger non-microbial particles (above 10 μm), which were important for efficiency reduction of lightly-biofilmed panels, were removed by high rainfall just before the 12-month sampling.

  10. Microbial colonization affects the efficiency of photovoltaic panels in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Marcia A; Zilles, Roberto; Mocelin, Andre; Gaylarde, Christine C; Gorbushina, Anna; Heidrich, Gabriele; Giudice, Mauro C; Del Negro, Gilda M B; John, Vanderley M

    2015-07-01

    Sub-aerial biofilm (SAB) development on solar panels was studied in São Paulo. After 6, 12 and 18 months' exposure, photovoltaic panels were covered by increasing proportions of organic matter (42%, 53% and 58%, respectively). Fungi were an important component of these biofilms; very few phototrophs were found. Major microorganisms detected were melanised meristematic ascomycetes and pigmented bacterial genera Arthrobacter and Tetracoccus. While diverse algae, cyanobacteria and bacteria were identified in biofilms at 6 and 12 months, diversity at a later stage was reduced to that typical for SAB: the only fungal group detected in 18 month biofilm was the meristematic Dothideomycetes and the only phototrophs Ulothrix and Chlorella. Photovoltaic modules showed significant power reductions after 6, 12 (both 7%) and 18 (11%) months. The lack of difference in power reduction between 6 and 12 months reflects the dual nature of soiling, which can result from the deposition of particulates as well as from SAB fouling. Although 12-month old SAB demonstrated an almost 10-fold increase in fungal colonization and a higher organic content, the larger non-microbial particles (above 10 μm), which were important for efficiency reduction of lightly-biofilmed panels, were removed by high rainfall just before the 12-month sampling. PMID:25909440

  11. Physcomitrella patens mutants affected on heat dissipation clarify the evolution of photoprotection mechanisms upon land colonization.

    PubMed

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Gerotto, Caterina; Giacometti, Giorgio M; Bassi, Roberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2010-06-15

    Light is the source of energy for photosynthetic organisms; when in excess, however, it also drives the formation of reactive oxygen species and, consequently, photoinhibition. Plants and algae have evolved mechanisms to regulate light harvesting efficiency in response to variable light intensity so as to avoid oxidative damage. Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) consists of the rapid dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat. Although widespread among oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, NPQ shows important differences in its machinery. In land plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, NPQ depends on the presence of PSBS, whereas in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it requires a different protein called LHCSR. In this work, we show that both proteins are present in the moss Physcomitrella patens. By generating KO mutants lacking PSBS and/or LHCSR, we also demonstrate that both gene products are active in NPQ. Plants lacking both proteins are more susceptible to high light stress than WT, implying that they are active in photoprotection. These results suggest that NPQ is a fundamental mechanism for survival in excess light and that upon land colonization, photosynthetic organisms evolved a unique mechanism for excess energy dissipation before losing the ancestral one found in algae.

  12. Phenotypic differentiation does not affect tumorigenicity of primary human colon cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Dubash, Taronish D; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Oppel, Felix; Giessler, Klara M; Weber, Sarah; Dieter, Sebastian M; Hüllein, Jennifer; Zenz, Thorsten; Herbst, Friederike; Scholl, Claudia; Weichert, Wilko; Werft, Wiebke; Benner, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Schneider, Martin; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2016-02-28

    Within primary colorectal cancer (CRC) a subfraction of all tumor-initiating cells (TIC) drives long-term progression in serial xenotransplantation. It has been postulated that efficient maintenance of TIC activity in vitro requires serum-free spheroid culture conditions that support a stem-like state of CRC cells. To address whether tumorigenicity is indeed tightly linked to such a stem-like state in spheroids, we transferred TIC-enriched spheroid cultures to serum-containing adherent conditions that should favor their differentiation. Under these conditions, primary CRC cells did no longer grow as spheroids but formed an adherent cell layer, up-regulated colon epithelial differentiation markers, and down-regulated TIC-associated markers. Strikingly, upon xenotransplantation cells cultured under either condition equally efficient formed serially transplantable tumors. Clonal analyses of individual lentivirally marked TIC clones cultured under either culture condition revealed no systematic differences in contributing clone numbers, indicating that phenotypic differentiation does not select for few individual clones adapted to unfavorable culture conditions. Our results reveal that CRC TIC can be propagated under conditions previously thought to induce their elimination. This phenotypic plasticity allows addressing primary human CRC TIC properties in experimental settings based on adherent cell growth.

  13. Colon cancer metastasis in mouse liver is not affected by hypercoagulability due to Factor V Leiden mutation

    PubMed Central

    Klerk, CPW; Smorenburg, SM; Spek, CA; Van Noorden, CJF

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown life-prolonging effects of antithrombotics in cancer patients, but the molecular mechanisms remain unknown due to the multitude of their effects. We investigated in a mouse model whether one of the targets of antithrombotic therapy, fibrin deposition, stimulates tumour development. Fibrin may provide either protection of cancer cells in the circulation against mechanical stress and the immune system, or form a matrix for tumours and/or angiogenesis in tumours to develop. Mice homozygous for Factor V Leiden (FVL), a mutation in one of the coagulation factors that facilitates fibrin formation, were used to investigate whether hypercoagulability affects tumour development in an experimental metastasis model. Liver metastases of colon cancer were induced in mice with the FVL mutation and wild-type littermates. At day 21, number and size of tumours at the liver surface, fibrin/fibrinogen distribution, vessel density and the presence of newly formed vessels in tumours were analysed. Number and size of tumours did not differ between mice with and without the FVL mutation. Fibrin/fibrinogen was found in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and cancer cells, in blood vessels in liver and tumour tissue and diffusely distributed outside vessels in tumours, indicating leaky vessels. Vessel density and angiogenesis varied widely between tumours, but a pre-dominance for vessel-rich or vessel-poor tumours or vessel formation could not be found in either genotype. In conclusion, the FVL mutation has no effect on the development of secondary tumours of colon cancer in livers of mice. Fibrin deposition and thus inhibition of fibrin formation by anticoagulants do not seem to affect tumour development in this model. PMID:17635646

  14. The root-colonizing endophyte Pirifomospora indica confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis by stimulating the expression of drought stress-related genes in leaves.

    PubMed

    Sherameti, Irena; Tripathi, Swati; Varma, Ajit; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Piriformospora indica is an endophytic fungus that colonizes the roots of many plant species, including Arabidopsis. We exposed 18-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings, which were either cocultivated with the fungus or mock-treated for the last 9 days, to mild drought stress for 84 h. During the first 36 to 48 h, seedlings cocultivated with the fungus continued to grow, while the uncolonized controls did not. This results in a threefold difference in the fresh weight and a more than twofold difference in the chlorophyll content. The photosynthetic efficiency was only slightly reduced in the colonized (F variable/F maximum [Fv/Fm] at t(0 h) = 0.82 and t(36 h) = 0.79) and was severely impaired in the uncolonized (Fv/Fm at t(0 h) = 0.81 and (t)(36 h) = 0.49) seedlings, which also showed symptoms of withering. When seedlings exposed to drought stress for 72 or 84 h were transferred to soil, 10% (72 h) and none (84 h) of uncolonized seedlings reached the flowering stage and produced seeds, while 59% (72 h) and 47% (84 h) of the colonized seedlings flowered and produced seeds. After exposure to drought stress for 3 h, the message levels for RESPONSE TO DEHYDRATION 29A, EARLY RESPONSE TO DEHYDRATION1, ANAC072, DEHYDRATION-RESPONSE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN2A, SALT-, AND DROUGHT-INDUCED RING FINGER1, phospholipase Ddelta, CALCINEURIN B-LIKE PROTEIN (CBL)1, CBL-INTERACTING PROTEIN KINASE3, and the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) were upregulated in the leaves of P. indica-colonized seedlings. Uncolonized seedlings responded 3 to 6 h later, and the message levels increased much less. We identified an Arabidopsis ethylmethane-sulfonate mutant that is less resistant to drought stress and in which the stress-related genes were not upregulated in the presence of P. indica. Thus, P. indica confers drought-stress tolerance to Arabidopsis, and this is associated with the priming of the expression of a quite diverse set of stress-related genes in the leaves. Transfer to soil was again

  15. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  16. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  17. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  18. Nodulation of Soybeans as Affected by Half-root Infection with Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Ko, M. P.; Barker, K. R.; Huang, J.-S.

    1984-01-01

    A split-root technique was applied to soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Lee 68, to characterize the nature of the nodulation suppression by race 1 of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines. Root-halves of each split-root plant were inoculated with Rhizobium japonicum, and one root-half only was inoculated with various numbers of SCN eggs. Nodulation (indicated by nodule number, nodule weights, and ratio of nodule weight to root weight) and nitrogen-fixing capacity (indicated by rate of acetylene reduction) were systemically and variously suppressed on both root-halves of the split-root plant 5 weeks after half-root inoculation with 12,500 SCN eggs. Inoculation with 500 eggs caused this suppression only on the SCN-infected (+NE) root-half; nodulation on the companion uninfected (-NE) root-half was stimulated slightly. The +NE root-halves inoculated with 5,000 eggs were excised at 2-week intervals; nodulation on the remaining -NE root-halves was not different from that of the noninoculated control when measured 6 weeks after the SCN inoculation. Thus, the systemic suppression of nodulation was reversible upon the removal of the SCN. Similarly, application of various levels of KNO₃ to the -NE root-halves of the split-root plant did not alleviate the suppressed nodulation on the companion +NE root-halves, even though plant growth was much improved at certain levels of nitrogen (125 μg N/g soil). This indicated that the localized suppression of nodulation by SCN was caused by factors in addition to poor plant growth. PMID:19295882

  19. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX) family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG) using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most likely by preventing premature

  20. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression.

    PubMed

    Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D; Saxton, Arnold M

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (g s), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of g s and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as g s and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for g s and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations. PMID:27524989

  1. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Augé, Robert M.; Toler, Heather D.; Saxton, Arnold M.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of gs and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as gs and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for gs and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations. PMID:27524989

  2. Glucocorticoids and the non-steroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator, compound A, differentially affect colon cancer-derived myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drebert, Zuzanna; Bracke, Marc; Beck, Ilse M

    2015-05-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor that positively or negatively regulates the transcription of various specific target genes. Not only steroidal glucocorticoids can bind and activate the glucocorticoid receptor, but also the intensively examined non-steroidal selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators can do so, albeit with a select effector profile skewed to glucocorticoid receptor transrepression. Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory afflictions, but also as anti-cancer therapies or adjuvants thereof. As the impact of glucocorticoids and selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators has scarcely been researched in this setting, we focused on colon cancer and its stromal environment, in particular the stromal myofibroblasts, which are known to influence cancer cells via paracrine signaling. In these myofibroblasts, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone is able to drive the glucocorticoid receptor into the nucleus and thus negatively regulates the expression of particular pro-inflammatory genes in TNFα-stimulated cells. The selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator compound A has an impaired ability to translocate GR, presumably underpinning its modest anti-inflammatory properties in these cells. Only dexamethasone, and not compound A, can upregulate the glucocorticoid receptor transactivation-dependent GILZ expression. Neither dexamethasone, nor compound A affects myofibroblast cell viability. However, compound A retards the growth of this myofibroblast cell line. Additionally, dexamethasone can inhibit the expression of Tenascin C, hepatocyte growth factor, and TGFβ, which are all factors known for their impact on colon cancer cell invasion, in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner. In contrast, compound A can only slightly diminish the expression of just hepatocyte growth factor, and not tenascin C or TGFβ. Combined, our results expose new tumor microenvironment-modulating effects of

  3. The impact of pre- and/or probiotics on human colonic metabolism: does it affect human health?

    PubMed

    De Preter, Vicky; Hamer, Henrike M; Windey, Karen; Verbeke, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Since many years, the role of the colonic microbiota in maintaining the host's overall health and well-being has been recognized. Dietary modulation of the microbiota composition and activity has been achieved by the use of pre-, pro- and synbiotics. In this review, we will summarize the available evidence on the modification of bacterial metabolism by dietary intervention with pre-, pro- and synbiotics. Enhanced production of SCFA as a marker of increased saccharolytic fermentation is well documented in animal and in vitro studies. Decreased production of potentially toxic protein fermentation metabolites, such as sulfides, phenolic and indolic compounds, has been less frequently demonstrated. Besides, pre-, pro- and synbiotics also affect other metabolic pathways such as the deconjugation of secondary bile acids, bacterial enzyme activities and mineral absorption. Data from human studies are less conclusive. The emergence of new analytical techniques such as metabolite profiling has revealed new pathways affected by dietary intervention. However, an important challenge for current and future research is to relate changes in bacterial metabolism to concrete health benefits. Potential targets and expected benefits have been identified: reduced risk for the metabolic syndrome and prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:21207512

  4. Achyranthes aspera Root Extracts Induce Human Colon Cancer Cell (COLO-205) Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway and S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2014-01-01

    Achyranthes aspera (AA) has been used traditionally for the cure of various disorders. However, the action of root extracts of AA as anticancer agent and its cellular mechanism remain unclear. The aim was to screen the antitumor effect of ethanolic (EAA) and aqueous (AAA) root extracts on the growth of colon cancer COLO-205 cells by testing their cytotoxicity, followed by their effect on clonogenicity, migration, and induction of apoptosis. Mechanisms leading to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were also investigated by expression studies of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, p16, p21, and p27 genes, followed by flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle distribution. Cytotoxicity screening of AA extracts indicated greater cytotoxic activity of AAA extract against COLO-205 cells. A series of events marked by apoptosis revealed loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in AAA treated cells to a greater extent. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, p16, p21, and p27 were markedly increased in the AAA treated cells, along with decreased Bcl-2 expression. The cell cycle arrest at S phase was detected by flow cytometric analysis after treatment with AAA. Overall the study signifies the aqueous extracts as a promising therapeutic candidate against cancer. PMID:25401123

  5. Biological control of crown gall on grapevine and root colonization by nonpathogenic Rhizobium vitis strain ARK-1.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A nonpathogenic strain of Rhizobium vitis ARK-1 was tested as a biological control agent for grapevine crown gall. When grapevine roots were soaked in a cell suspension of strain ARK-1 before planting in the field, the number of plants with tumors was reduced. The results from seven field trials from 2009 to 2012 were combined in a meta-analysis. The integrated relative risk after treatment with ARK-1 was 0.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.29, P0.001), indicating that the disease incidence was significantly reduced by ARK-1. In addition, the results from four field trials from 2007 to 2009 using R. vitis VAR03-1, a previously reported biological control agent for grapevine crown gall, were combined in a meta-analysis. The integrated relative risk after treatment with VAR03-1 was 0.24 (95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.53, P0.001), indicating the superiority of ARK-1 in inhibiting grapevine crown gall over VAR03-1 under field conditions. ARK-1 did not cause necrosis on grapevine shoot explants. ARK-1 established populations on roots of grapevine tree rootstock and persisted inside roots for two years. PMID:23708779

  6. Diversity of fungi associated with hair roots of ericaceous plants is affected by land use.

    PubMed

    Hazard, Christina; Gosling, Paul; Mitchell, Derek T; Doohan, Fiona M; Bending, Gary D

    2014-03-01

    Culture-independent molecular studies have provided new insights into the diversity of fungi associating with ericaceous plant roots. However, there is little understanding of the distribution of these fungi across landscapes, or the effects of environmental heterogeneity on ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) fungal diversity and distribution. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and selective sequence analyses of the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA were used to infer fungal diversity of bait Vaccinium macrocarpon grown in soils from nine peatland sites in Ireland, representing three different land uses (bog, rough grazing and forest plantation) and the fungal communities of field-collected Calluna vulgaris for five of these nine sites. A diverse range of potential ERM fungi were found, and the sampling approach significantly affected the diversity of the fungal community. Despite significant site groupings of the fungal communities associated with V. macrocarpon and C. vulgaris, fungal communities were significantly dissimilar between sites with different land uses. Soil nitrogen content significantly explained 52% of the variation in the V. macrocarpon fungal communities. Evidence suggests that environmental heterogeneity has a role in shaping ERM fungal community composition at the landscape scale.

  7. Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: How continents affect mantle convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trubitsyn, V.P.; Mooney, W.D.; Abbott, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional convection models with moving continents show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. If the continents are wider than the wavelength of the convection cells (???3000 km, the thickness of the mantle), they cause neighboring deep mantle thermal upwellings to coalesce into a single focused upwelling. This focused upwelling zone will have a potential temperature anomaly of about 200??C, much higher than the 100??C temperature anomaly of upwelling zones generated beneath typical oceanic lithosphere. Extensive high-temperature melts (including flood basalts and late potassic granites) will be produced, and the excess temperature anomaly will induce continental uplift (as revealed in sea level changes) and the eventual breakup of the supercontinent. The mantle thermal anomaly will persist for several hundred million years after such a breakup. In contrast, small continental blocks (<1000 km diameter) do not induce focused mantle upwelling zones. Instead, small continental blocks are dragged to mantle downwelling zones, where they spend most of their time, and will migrate laterally with the downwelling. As a result of sitting over relatively cold mantle (downwellings), small continental blocks are favored to keep their cratonic roots. This may explain the long-term survival of small cratonic blocks (e.g., the Yilgarn and Pilbara cratons of western Australia, and the West African craton). The optimum size for long-term stability of a continental block is <3000 km. These results show that continents profoundly affect the pattern of mantle convection. These effects are illustrated in terms of the timing and history of supercontinent breakup, the production of high-temperature melts, and sea level changes. Such two-dimensional calculations can be further refined and tested by three-dimensional numerical simulations of mantle convection with moving continental and oceanic plates.

  8. Soil Tillage Management Affects Maize Grain Yield by Regulating Spatial Distribution Coordination of Roots, Soil Moisture and Nitrogen Status

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinbing; Zhou, Baoyuan; Sun, Xuefang; Yue, Yang; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the root system through the soil profile has an impact on moisture and nutrient uptake by plants, affecting growth and productivity. The spatial distribution of the roots, soil moisture, and fertility are affected by tillage practices. The combination of high soil density and the presence of a soil plow pan typically impede the growth of maize (Zea mays L.).We investigated the spatial distribution coordination of the root system, soil moisture, and N status in response to different soil tillage treatments (NT: no-tillage, RT: rotary-tillage, SS: subsoiling) and the subsequent impact on maize yield, and identify yield-increasing mechanisms and optimal soil tillage management practices. Field experiments were conducted on the Huang-Huai-Hai plain in China during 2011 and 2012. The SS and RT treatments significantly reduced soil bulk density in the top 0–20 cm layer of the soil profile, while SS significantly decreased soil bulk density in the 20–30 cm layer. Soil moisture in the 20–50 cm profile layer was significantly higher for the SS treatment compared to the RT and NT treatment. In the 0-20 cm topsoil layer, the NT treatment had higher soil moisture than the SS and RT treatments. Root length density of the SS treatment was significantly greater than density of the RT and NT treatments, as soil depth increased. Soil moisture was reduced in the soil profile where root concentration was high. SS had greater soil moisture depletion and a more concentration root system than RT and NT in deep soil. Our results suggest that the SS treatment improved the spatial distribution of root density, soil moisture and N states, thereby promoting the absorption of soil moisture and reducing N leaching via the root system in the 20–50 cm layer of the profile. Within the context of the SS treatment, a root architecture densely distributed deep into the soil profile, played a pivotal role in plants’ ability to access nutrients and water. An

  9. Soil Tillage Management Affects Maize Grain Yield by Regulating Spatial Distribution Coordination of Roots, Soil Moisture and Nitrogen Status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinbing; Zhou, Baoyuan; Sun, Xuefang; Yue, Yang; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the root system through the soil profile has an impact on moisture and nutrient uptake by plants, affecting growth and productivity. The spatial distribution of the roots, soil moisture, and fertility are affected by tillage practices. The combination of high soil density and the presence of a soil plow pan typically impede the growth of maize (Zea mays L.).We investigated the spatial distribution coordination of the root system, soil moisture, and N status in response to different soil tillage treatments (NT: no-tillage, RT: rotary-tillage, SS: subsoiling) and the subsequent impact on maize yield, and identify yield-increasing mechanisms and optimal soil tillage management practices. Field experiments were conducted on the Huang-Huai-Hai plain in China during 2011 and 2012. The SS and RT treatments significantly reduced soil bulk density in the top 0-20 cm layer of the soil profile, while SS significantly decreased soil bulk density in the 20-30 cm layer. Soil moisture in the 20-50 cm profile layer was significantly higher for the SS treatment compared to the RT and NT treatment. In the 0-20 cm topsoil layer, the NT treatment had higher soil moisture than the SS and RT treatments. Root length density of the SS treatment was significantly greater than density of the RT and NT treatments, as soil depth increased. Soil moisture was reduced in the soil profile where root concentration was high. SS had greater soil moisture depletion and a more concentration root system than RT and NT in deep soil. Our results suggest that the SS treatment improved the spatial distribution of root density, soil moisture and N states, thereby promoting the absorption of soil moisture and reducing N leaching via the root system in the 20-50 cm layer of the profile. Within the context of the SS treatment, a root architecture densely distributed deep into the soil profile, played a pivotal role in plants' ability to access nutrients and water. An optimal

  10. Soil Tillage Management Affects Maize Grain Yield by Regulating Spatial Distribution Coordination of Roots, Soil Moisture and Nitrogen Status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinbing; Zhou, Baoyuan; Sun, Xuefang; Yue, Yang; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the root system through the soil profile has an impact on moisture and nutrient uptake by plants, affecting growth and productivity. The spatial distribution of the roots, soil moisture, and fertility are affected by tillage practices. The combination of high soil density and the presence of a soil plow pan typically impede the growth of maize (Zea mays L.).We investigated the spatial distribution coordination of the root system, soil moisture, and N status in response to different soil tillage treatments (NT: no-tillage, RT: rotary-tillage, SS: subsoiling) and the subsequent impact on maize yield, and identify yield-increasing mechanisms and optimal soil tillage management practices. Field experiments were conducted on the Huang-Huai-Hai plain in China during 2011 and 2012. The SS and RT treatments significantly reduced soil bulk density in the top 0-20 cm layer of the soil profile, while SS significantly decreased soil bulk density in the 20-30 cm layer. Soil moisture in the 20-50 cm profile layer was significantly higher for the SS treatment compared to the RT and NT treatment. In the 0-20 cm topsoil layer, the NT treatment had higher soil moisture than the SS and RT treatments. Root length density of the SS treatment was significantly greater than density of the RT and NT treatments, as soil depth increased. Soil moisture was reduced in the soil profile where root concentration was high. SS had greater soil moisture depletion and a more concentration root system than RT and NT in deep soil. Our results suggest that the SS treatment improved the spatial distribution of root density, soil moisture and N states, thereby promoting the absorption of soil moisture and reducing N leaching via the root system in the 20-50 cm layer of the profile. Within the context of the SS treatment, a root architecture densely distributed deep into the soil profile, played a pivotal role in plants' ability to access nutrients and water. An optimal

  11. The colonization patterns of different fungi on roots of Cymbidium hybridum plantlets and their respective inoculation effects on growth and nutrient uptake of orchid plantlets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Jing-Ze; Liu, Shu; Chen, Chun-Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Cao, Jun-Xi

    2014-07-01

    Cymbidium hybridum is one of the most popular pot orchids and cut flowers worldwide. However, the long vegetative growth period and the discordant blooming retarded its mass production. The mixotrophic nutritional mode of some chlorophyllous Cymbidium suggested the essential role of mycorrhizal fungi in the growth of adult green orchids. Here 34 root-associated endophytes were obtained from wild and cultivated Cymbidium and eight strains exhibited obvious growth-promoting effects on the C. hybridum plantlets with increasing root number, root diameter or new bud initiation. Among these, three isolates CL01, ZH3A-3 and CY5-1 with distinct cultural traits and colonization patterns showed better growth-promoting effects. Internal transcribed spacer sequence analyses and morphological observation revealed isolate CL01 belonged to Tulasnella-like Rhizoctonia, ZH3A-3, Umbelopsis nana and CY5-1, Scytalidium lignicola. Microscopic study showed isolate CL01 formed typical orchid mycorrhiza and isolate CY5-1 formed pseudo-mycorrhiza with orchid, whereas hyphae of isolate ZH3A-3 aggregated in the host velamen cells at regular intervals and caused the hypertrophied nucleus and aggregated cytoplasm of neighboring host cell. These three isolates significantly enhanced the increased percentage of total fresh weight of plantlets compared with un-inoculated control (83, 99 and 75%, respectively). In addition, isolate CL01 increased the N, P, Zn, Cu, Fe contents and ZH3A-3 significantly improved K, Ca, Cu, Mn contents of the symbiotic plantlets compared with control. These results suggested that the mass production of C. hybridum and related orchids could be improved by different beneficial fungi from its parents.

  12. Gentiana dinarica Beck hairy root cultures and evaluation of factors affecting growth and xanthone production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The induction and establishment of hairy root cultures of Gentiana dinarica using two strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (A4M70GUS and 15834/PI) is reported for the first time. Hairy roots were formed from the shoots 25 days after inoculation, and strain 15834/PI had higher induction rate of hairy ...

  13. Nitrogen fertilizer rate affects root exudation, the rhizosphere microbiome and nitrogen-use-efficiency of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition and function of microbial communities present in the rhizosphere of crops has been linked to edaphic factors and root exudate composition. In this paper, we examined the effect of N fertilizer rate on maize root exudation, the associated rhizosphere community, and nitrogen-use-effici...

  14. Nature, evolution and characterisation of rhizospheric chemical exudates affecting root herbivores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Similarly as aboveground, root-feeding insect herbivores meet the necessity to locate and identify suitable resources. To do so in the darkness of the soil matrix, they mainly rely on root chemical exudations and therefore evolved a complex behavior and sense of smell. Because of their impact on cro...

  15. Life cycle stage and water depth affect flooding-induced adventitious root formation in the terrestrial species Solanum dulcamara

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Visser, Eric J. W.; de Kroon, Hans; Huber, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Flooding can occur at any stage of the life cycle of a plant, but often adaptive responses of plants are only studied at a single developmental stage. It may be anticipated that juvenile plants may respond differently from mature plants, as the amount of stored resources may differ and morphological changes can be constrained. Moreover, different water depths may require different strategies to cope with the flooding stress, the expression of which may also depend on developmental stage. This study investigated whether flooding-induced adventitious root formation and plant growth were affected by flooding depth in Solanum dulcamara plants at different developmental stages. Methods Juvenile plants without pre-formed adventitious root primordia and mature plants with primordia were subjected to shallow flooding or deep flooding for 5 weeks. Plant growth and the timing of adventitious root formation were monitored during the flooding treatments. Key Results Adventitious root formation in response to shallow flooding was significantly constrained in juvenile S. dulcamara plants compared with mature plants, and was delayed by deep flooding compared with shallow flooding. Complete submergence suppressed adventitious root formation until up to 2 weeks after shoots restored contact with the atmosphere. Independent of developmental stage, a strong positive correlation was found between adventitious root formation and total biomass accumulation during shallow flooding. Conclusions The potential to deploy an escape strategy (i.e. adventitious root formation) may change throughout a plant’s life cycle, and is largely dependent on flooding depth. Adaptive responses at a given stage of the life cycle thus do not necessarily predict how the plant responds to flooding in another growth stage. As variation in adventitious root formation also correlates with finally attained biomass, this variation may form the basis for variation in resistance to shallow

  16. Variations in the chemical composition of cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz) leaves and roots as affected by genotypic and environmental variation.

    PubMed

    Burns, Anna Elizabeth; Gleadow, Roslyn Margaret; Zacarias, Anabela M; Cuambe, Constantino Estevão; Miller, Rebecca Elizabeth; Cavagnaro, Timothy Richard

    2012-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of cassava cultivars, in terms of cyanogenic potential and composition of macro- and micronutrients, sampled from different locations in rural Mozambique. Total cyanide concentrations in fresh cassava tissues were measured using portable cyanide testing kits, and elemental nutrients were later analyzed from dried plant tissue. Variation in cyanogenic potential and nutrient composition occurred both among cultivars and across locations. The majority of cultivars contained >100 ppm total cyanide, fresh weight, and are therefore considered to be dangerously poisonous unless adequately processed before consumption. Leaf cyanogenic and nutrient content varied with plant water status, estimated using carbon isotope discrimination (δ(13)C). The colonization of roots of all cultivars by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was also quantified and found to be high, indicating that mycorrhizas could play a key role in plant nutrient acquisition in these low-input farming systems.

  17. [The influence of the difference of caries detective methods on the bond strength for caries affected root canal dentin].

    PubMed

    Otake, Shiho

    2010-03-01

    Firm adhesion of composite resin and dentin is the basic premise for building up resin composite cores successfully. To assess the efficacy of several caries detective methods (stained with Caries Detector and probing with sharp probe) for caries affected root canal dentin, microtensile bond strengths of resin composite to caries-affected root canal dentin and failure mode distribution were analyzed in this study. Color and hardness were used for assessment of root caries as follows: Dye stain group (pale pink stained with Caries Detector), Probing group (probing with sharp probe) and Sound dentin group (Control). The bond strengths (mean +/- standard deviation) of the Probing group (64.6 +/- 11.9 MPa) and the Sound dentin group (68.7 +/- 11.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those of the Dye stain group (46.9 +/- 7.9 MPa, p<0.05). However, there is no significant difference in fracture mode between the Dye stain group and the Probing group (p<0.05). This could be attributed to that the thick smear layer caused a loss of hybrid layer strength. In conclusion, the caries removal technique of the root canal dentin affected the bond strength of the resin composite.

  18. Virosecurinine induces apoptosis by affecting Bcl-2 and Bax expression in human colon cancer SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan-Rong; Xia, Yong-Hui; Yao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Ying; Ji, Zhao-Ning

    2012-04-01

    Virosecurinine, the major alkaloid isolated from Securinega suffruticosa Pall Rehd was found to exhibit growth inhibition and cytotoxicity against huaman colon cancer SW480 cells via the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Due to its greater cytotoxic potency and selectivity towards SW480 cells, flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution of control and treated SW480 cells whereas Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry analysis was carried out to confirm apoptosis induced by virosecurinine in SW480 cells. Apoptotic regulatory genes were determined by RT-PCR analysis. Virosecurinine was found to induce G1/S cell cycle arrest which led to predominantly apoptotic mode of cell death. Mechanistically, virosecurinine was found to up-regulated the Bax gene expression and down-regulated the Bcl-2 expression in SW480, The ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax was significantly decreased. Hence, we suggest that virosecurinine induced apoptosis in SW480 cells by affecting the expression of bcl-2 and bax. PMID:22570942

  19. Proliferation rate but not mismatch repair affects the long-term response of colon carcinoma cells to 5FU treatment.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, B; Hanski, M L; Zeitz, M; Hanski, C

    2012-07-01

    The role of mismatch repair (MMR) in the response of colon carcinoma cells to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) is not well understood. In most of the in vitro studies only short-term response was investigated. We focussed here on the influence of MMR status on the mechanism of the short- and long-term response to clinically relevant 5FU concentrations by using isogenic or semiisogenic cell line pairs expressing/nonexpressing the hMLH1 protein, an important component of the MMR system. We show that the lower survival of MMR-proficient than of MMR-deficient cells in the clonogenic survival assay is due to a more frequent early cell arrest and to subsequent senescence. By contrast, the long-term cell growth after treatment, which is also affected by long-term arrest and senescence, is independent from the MMR status. The overall effect on the long-term cell growth is a cumulative result of cell proliferation rate-dependent growth inhibition, apoptosis and necrotic cell death. The main long-term cytotoxic effect of 5FU is the inhibition of growth while apoptosis and the necrotic cell death are minor contributions.

  20. Effects of Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard; Brassicaceae) on mycorrhizal colonization and community structure in three herbaceous plants in a mixed deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Burke, David J

    2008-11-01

    Herbaceous plant species are important components of forest ecosystems, and their persistence in forests may be affected by invasive plant species that reduce mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots. I examined the effect of the invasive plant Alliaria petiolata on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonizing the roots of three forest plant species. AMF root colonization and community structure was examined from plants that were growing either in the absence or presence of Alliaria under natural forest conditions. AMF root colonization varied among the plant species but was not significantly affected by Alliaria. With molecular methods, ∼12 different taxa of AMF could be distinguished among the root samples, and these taxa belonged to the genera Acaulospora and Glomus, with Glomus dominating AMF communities. There were significant differences between the community of AMF colonizing roots of Maianthemum racemosum and Trillium grandiflorum, but only AMF communities of Maianthemum roots were significantly affected by Alliaria. Indicator species analysis found that an Acaulospora species type was a significant indicator of Maianthemum plants grown in the absence of Alliaria. These results suggest invasive plants like Alliaria may selectively suppress AMF fungi, and this suppression can affect AMF communities colonizing the roots of some native plant species.

  1. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells.

  2. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells. PMID:25305245

  3. Genetic Variability in Nodulation and Root Growth Affects Nitrogen Fixation and Accumulation in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Bourion, Virginie; Laguerre, Gisele; Depret, Geraldine; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Salon, Christophe; Duc, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Legume nitrogen is derived from two different sources, symbiotically fixed atmospheric N2 and soil N. The effect of genetic variability of root and nodule establishment on N acquisition and seed protein yield was investigated under field conditions in pea (Pisum sativum). In addition, these parameters were related to the variability in preference for rhizobial genotypes. Methods Five different spring pea lines (two hypernodulating mutants and three cultivars), previously identified in artificial conditions as contrasted for both root and nodule development, were characterized under field conditions. Root and nodule establishment was examined from the four-leaf stage up to the beginning of seed filling and was related to the patterns of shoot dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. The genetic structure of rhizobial populations associated with the pea lines was obtained by analysis of nodule samples. The fraction of nitrogen derived from symbiotic fixation was estimated at the beginning of seed filling and at physiological maturity, when seed protein content and yield were determined. Key Results The hypernodulating mutants established nodules earlier and maintained them longer than was the case for the three cultivars, whereas their root development and nitrogen accumulation were lower. The seed protein yield was higher in ‘Athos’ and ‘Austin’, the two cultivars with increased root development, consistent with their higher N absorption during seed filling. Conclusion The hypernodulating mutants did not accumulate more nitrogen, probably due to the C cost for nodulation being higher than for root development. Enhancing exogenous nitrogen supply at the end of the growth cycle, by increasing the potential for root N uptake from soil, seems a good option for improving pea seed filling. PMID:17670753

  4. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  5. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus. PMID:20974537

  6. Biological Effects of a Root Conditioning Treatment on Periodontally Affected Teeth--An In Vitro Analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline Cristina; Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Ferreira, Jessica Afonso; Magalhães, Denildo de; Dechichi, Paula; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluated the root surfaces modifications resulted by application of different chemicals agents, and their influence on the fibrin network and fibroblasts attachment. From 96 anterior mandibular human extracted incisor teeth, 192 dentin blocks of buccal and lingual surface were obtained and randomly divided into 6 groups: Cont- control group, which received no treatment; Root surface scaling and root planing (Srp); Citric acid-Srp; EDTA-Srp; Tetracycline capsule-Srp; Tetracycline gel-Srp. After dentin treatments the specimens were analyzed as follows: 1) demineralization level and residues of the product by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); 2) adhesion of blood components after 20 min of surface treatment by SEM; 3) fibroblast attachment after 24 h by SEM; 4) cell metabolism after 24 h by MTT assay. Data were analyzed using Fisher Exact, One-way ANOVA test followed by Dunn's test, Tukey test and Dunnett test (α=0.05). Citric acid, EDTA and Tetracycline gel resulted in adequate demineralization with no completely smear layer and smear plug removal on root dentin surface. Tetracycline capsule produced great tetracycline residues with several demineralization areas. Tetracycline gel and EDTA groups presented more fibroblast fixation than other experimental groups. The highest mean blood clot adhesion score was observed in roots treated with tetracycline gel. EDTA and Tetracycline gel surface treatment removed the smear layer over dentin surface and promoted adhesion of fibrin network and fibroblast cells attachment.

  7. Morphological variability in tree root architecture indirectly affects coexistence among competitors in the understory.

    PubMed

    Aschehoug, Erik T; Callaway, Ragan M

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between plants can have strong effects on community structure and function. Variability in the morphological, developmental, physiological, and biochemical traits of plants can influence the outcome of plant interactions and thus have important ecological consequences. However, the ecological ramifications of trait variability in plants are poorly understood and have rarely been tested in the field. We experimentally tested the effects of morphological variation in root architecture of Quercus douglasii trees in the field on interactions between understory plants and community composition. Our results indicate that variability among Q. douglasii tree root systems initiates a striking reversal in the competitive effects of dominant understory grass species on a less common species. Trees with a deep-rooted morphology facilitated exotic annual grasses and these annual grasses, in turn, competitively excluded the native perennial bunchgrass, Stipapulchra. In contrast, Q. douglasii trees with shallow-rooted morphologies directly suppressed the growth of exotic annual grasses and indirectly released S. pulchra individuals from competition with these annual grasses. Morphological variation in the root architecture of Q. douglasii created substantial conditionality in the outcomes of competition among species which enhanced the potential for indirect interactions to sustain coexistence and increase community diversity.

  8. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus.

  9. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in F. vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging. PMID:26483826

  10. Modification of nitrate uptake pathway in plants affects the cadmium uptake by roots.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mei Yan; Fan, Shi Kai; Fang, Xian Zhi; Jin, Chong Wei

    2015-01-01

    NRT1.1 is a dual-affinity nitrate (NO3(-)) transporter involved in both high- and low-affinity NO3(-) uptake in Arabidopsis plants. In a recent study, we showed that, under cadmium (Cd) exposure, blocking the NRT1.1-mediated NO3(-) uptake reduces Cd entry into roots, thus lowing Cd levels in plants and improving plant growth. In addition, we also found that the Cd levels in edible parts of 11 Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) cultivars correlated well with the NO3(-) uptake rates of their roots. These results suggested that the NO3(-) uptake of roots negatively regulate Cd uptake. Modification of NO3(-) uptake in crops by modulating NO3(-) uptake pathway might provide a biological engineering approach to reducing Cd accumulation in edible organs, thus improving food safety.

  11. Chemical stress by different agents affects the melatonin content of barley roots.

    PubMed

    Arnao, Marino B; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa

    2009-04-01

    The presence of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) in plants has been clearly demonstrated. However, while this indoleamine has been intensively studied in animals, especially in mammals, the same is not true in the case of plants, where one of the most interesting aspects is its possible role as antioxidative molecule in physiological processes. Some data reflect the possible protective role that melatonin may exert in some stress situations such as ultraviolet (UV)-radiation, induced senescence and copper stress. The present work was designed to establish how the melatonin content changes in plants as a result of chemically induced stress. For this, barley plants were exposed in different treatments to the chemical-stress agents: sodium chloride, zinc sulphate or hydrogen peroxide. After different times, the content of melatonin in treated roots and control roots were determined using liquid chromatography (LC) with time-of-flight/mass spectrometry and LC with fluorescence detection for identification and quantification, respectively. The data show that the melatonin content in roots increased due to stress, reaching up to six times the melatonin content of control roots. Induction was time dependent, while hydrogen peroxide (10 mm) and zinc sulphate (1 mm) were the most effective inducers. The capacity of roots to absorb melatonin from soil was also studied. The data establish, for first time, that the chemical-stress agents assayed can induce the biosynthesis of melatonin in barley roots and produce a significant increase in their melatonin content. Such an increase in melatonin probably plays an important antioxidative role in the defense against chemically induced stress and other abiotic/biotic stresses. PMID:19196434

  12. Soil Type and Maize Cultivar Affect the Genetic Diversity of Maize Root-Associated Burkholderia cepacia Populations.

    PubMed

    Dalmastri; Chiarini; Cantale; Bevivino; Tabacchioni

    1999-10-01

    Abstract Burkholderia cepacia populations associated with the Zea mays root system were investigated to assess the influence of soil type, maize cultivar, and root localization on the degree of their genetic diversity. A total of 180 B. cepacia isolates were identified by restriction analysis of the amplified 16S rDNA (ARDRA technique). The genetic diversity among B. cepacia isolates was analyzed by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, using the 10-mer primer AP5. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) method was applied to estimate the variance components for the RAPD patterns. The results indicated that, among the factors studied, the soil was clearly the dominant one in affecting the genetic diversity of maize root-associated B. cepacia populations. In fact, the percentage of variation among populations was significantly higher between B. cepacia populations recovered from maize planted in different soils than between B. cepacia populations isolated from different maize cultivars and from distinct root compartments such as rhizoplane and rhizosphere. The analysis of the genetic relationships among B. cepacia isolates resulted in dendrograms showing bacterial populations with frequent recombinations and a nonclonal genetic structure. The dendrograms were also in agreement with the AMOVA results. We were able to group strains obtained from distinct soils on the basis of their origin, confirming that soil type had the major effect on the degree of genetic diversity of the maize root-associated B. cepacia populations analyzed. On the other hand, strains isolated from distinct root compartments exhibited a random distribution which confirmed that the rhizosphere and rhizoplane populations analyzed did not significantly differ in their genetic structure.http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00248/bibs/38n3p273.html

  13. High root temperature affects the tolerance to high light intensity in Spathiphyllum plants.

    PubMed

    Soto, Adriana; Hernández, Laura; Quiles, María José

    2014-10-01

    Spathiphyllum wallisii plants were sensitive to temperature stress under high illumination, although the susceptibility of leaves to stress may be modified by root temperature. Leaves showed higher tolerance to high illumination, in both cold and heat conditions, when the roots were cooled, probably because the chloroplast were protected by excess excitation energy dissipation mechanisms such as cyclic electron transport. When the roots were cooled both the activity of electron donation by NADPH and ferredoxin to plastoquinone and the amount of PGR5 polypeptide, an essential component of cyclic electron flow around PSI, increased. However, when the stems were heated or cooled under high illumination, but the roots were heated, the quantum yield of PSII decreased considerably and neither the electron donation activity by NADPH and ferredoxin to plastoquinone nor the amount of PGR5 polypeptide increased. In such conditions, the cyclic electron flow cannot be enhanced by high light and PSII is damaged as a result of insufficient dissipation of excess light energy. Additionally, the damage to PSII induced the increase in both chlororespiratory enzymes, NDH complex and PTOX.

  14. Southern root-knot nematode affects common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) interference with cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern root-knot nematode and common cocklebur will both interfere with cotton growth and yield. A greater understanding of the interaction of these pests on cotton growth and yield is needed for effective IPM (integrated pest management). An additive design was used in outdoor micro-plots with fi...

  15. Perturbation of polyamine catabolism can strongly affect root development and xylem differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Alessandra; Federico, Rodolfo; Moreno, Sandra; Lucretti, Sergio; Moschou, Panagiotis N; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2011-09-01

    Spermidine (Spd) treatment inhibited root cell elongation, promoted deposition of phenolics in cell walls of rhizodermis, xylem elements, and vascular parenchyma, and resulted in a higher number of cells resting in G(1) and G(2) phases in the maize (Zea mays) primary root apex. Furthermore, Spd treatment induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation as well as precocious differentiation and cell death in both early metaxylem and late metaxylem precursors. Treatment with either N-prenylagmatine, a selective inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO) enzyme activity, or N,N(1)-dimethylthiourea, a hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenger, reverted Spd-induced autofluorescence intensification, DNA fragmentation, inhibition of root cell elongation, as well as reduction of percentage of nuclei in S phase. Transmission electron microscopy showed that N-prenylagmatine inhibited the differentiation of the secondary wall of early and late metaxylem elements, and xylem parenchymal cells. Moreover, although root growth and xylem differentiation in antisense PAO tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were unaltered, overexpression of maize PAO (S-ZmPAO) as well as down-regulation of the gene encoding S-adenosyl-l-methionine decarboxylase via RNAi in tobacco plants promoted vascular cell differentiation and induced programmed cell death in root cap cells. Furthermore, following Spd treatment in maize and ZmPAO overexpression in tobacco, the in vivo H(2)O(2) production was enhanced in xylem tissues. Overall, our results suggest that, after Spd supply or PAO overexpression, H(2)O(2) derived from polyamine catabolism behaves as a signal for secondary wall deposition and for induction of developmental programmed cell death.

  16. Seasonal Changes Affect Root Prunasin Concentration in Prunus serotina and Override Species Interactions between P. serotina and Quercus petraea.

    PubMed

    Robakowski, Piotr; Bielinis, Ernest; Stachowiak, Jerzy; Mejza, Iwona; Bułaj, Bartosz

    2016-03-01

    The allocation of resources to chemical defense can decrease plant growth and photosynthesis. Prunasin is a cyanogenic glycoside known for its role in defense against herbivores and other plants. In the present study, fluctuations of prunasin concentrations in roots of Prunus serotina seedlings were hypothesized to be: (1) dependent on light, air temperature, and humidity; (2) affected by competition between Prunus serotina and Quercus petraea seedlings, with mulching with Prunus serotina leaves; (3) connected with optimal allocation of resources. For the first time, we determined prunasin concentration in roots on several occasions during the vegetative season. The results indicate that seasonal changes have more pronounced effects on prunasin concentration than light regime and interspecific competition. Prunus serotina invested more nitrogen in the synthesis of prunasin under highly restricted light conditions than in higher light environments. In full sun, prunasin in roots of Prunus serotina growing in a monoculture was correlated with growth and photosynthesis, whereas these relationships were not found when interspecific competition with mulching was a factor. The study demonstrates that prunasin concentration in Prunus serotina roots is the result of species-specific adaptation, light and temperature conditions, ontogenetic shift, and, to a lesser extent, interspecific plant-plant interactions. PMID:26961681

  17. Management of colonic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Gingold, Daniel; Murrell, Zuri

    2012-12-01

    Colonic volvulus is a common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide. It can affect all parts of the colon, but most commonly occurs in the sigmoid and cecal areas. This disease has been described for centuries, and was studied by Hippocrates himself. Currently, colonic volvulus is the third most common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide, and is responsible for ∼15% of large bowel obstructions in the United States. This article will discuss the history of colonic volvulus, and the predisposing factors that lead to this disease. Moreover, the epidemiology and diagnosis of each type of colonic volvulus, along with the various treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24294126

  18. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  19. How do alternative root water uptake models affect the inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters and the prediction of evapotranspiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayler, Sebastian; Salima-Sultana, Daisy; Selle, Benny; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Högy, Petra; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Soil water extraction by roots affects the dynamics and distribution of soil moisture and controls transpiration, which influences soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes. Consequently, root water uptake requires close attention when predicting water fluxes across the land surface, e.g., in agricultural crop models or in land surface schemes of weather and climate models. The key parameters for a successful simultaneous simulation of soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration in Richards equation-based models are the soil hydraulic parameters, which describe the shapes of the soil water retention curve and the soil hydraulic conductivity curve. As measurements of these parameters are expensive and their estimation from basic soil data via pedotransfer functions is rather inaccurate, the values of the soil hydraulic parameters are frequently inversely estimated by fitting the model to measured time series of soil water content and evapotranspiration. It is common to simulate root water uptake and transpiration by simple stress functions, which describe from which soil layer water is absorbed by roots and predict when total crop transpiration is decreased in case of soil water limitations. As for most of the biogeophysical processes simulated in crop and land surface models, there exist several alternative functional relationships for simulating root water uptake and there is no clear reason for preferring one process representation over another. The error associated with alternative representations of root water uptake, however, contributes to structural model uncertainty and the choice of the root water uptake model may have a significant impact on the values of the soil hydraulic parameters estimated inversely. In this study, we use the agroecosystem model system Expert-N to simulate soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration at three agricultural field sites located in two contrasting regions in Southwest Germany (Kraichgau, Swabian Alb). The Richards

  20. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  1. Xylo-oligosaccharides and inulin affect genotoxicity and bacterial populations differently in a human colonic simulator challenged with soy protein.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Claus T; Petersen, Anne; Licht, Tine R; Conlon, Michael A

    2013-09-23

    High dietary intakes of some protein sources, including soy protein, can increase colonic DNA damage in animals, whereas some carbohydrates attenuate this. We investigated whether inulin and xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) could be protective against DNA strand breaks by adding them to a human colonic simulator consisting of a proximal vessel (PV) (pH 5.5) and a distal vessel (DV) (pH 6.8) inoculated with human faeces and media containing soy protein. Genotoxicity of the liquid phase and microbial population changes in the vessels were measured. Soy protein (3%) was fermented with 1% low amylose cornstarch for 10 day followed by soy protein with 1% XOS or 1% inulin for 10 day. Inulin did not alter genotoxicity but XOS significantly reduced PV genotoxicity and increased DV genotoxicity. Inulin and XOS significantly increased butyrate concentration in the DV but not PV. Numbers of the key butyrate-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly increased in the PV and DV by inulin but significantly decreased by XOS in both vessels. Other bacteria examined were also significantly impacted by the carbohydrate treatments or by the vessel (i.e., pH). There was a significant overall inverse correlation between levels of damage induced by the ferments and levels of sulphate-reducing bacteria, Bacteroides fragilis, and acetate. In conclusion, dietary XOS can potentially modulate the genotoxicity of the colonic environment and specific bacterial groups and short chain fatty acids may mediate this.

  2. Viminaria juncea does not vary its shoot phosphorus concentration and only marginally decreases its mycorrhizal colonization and cluster-root dry weight under a wide range of phosphorus supplies

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Mariana C. R.; Pearse, Stuart J.; Oliveira, Rafael S.; Lambers, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The Australian legume species Viminaria juncea forms both cluster roots and mycorrhizal associations. The aim of this study was to identify if these root specializations are expressed at differential supplies of phosphorus (P) and at different shoot P concentrations [P]. Methods Seedlings were planted in sand and provided with a mycorrhizal inoculum and basal nutrients plus one of 21 P treatments, ranging from 0 to 50 mg P kg−1 dry soil. Plants were harvested after 12 weeks, and roots, shoots and cluster roots were measured for length and fresh and dry weight. The number of cluster roots, the percentage of mycorrhizal colonization, and shoot [P] were determined. Key Results Shoot biomass accumulation increased with increasing P supply until a shoot dry weight of 3 g was reached at a P supply of approx. 27·5 mg P kg−1 dry soil. Neither cluster-root formation nor mycorrhizal colonization was fully suppressed at the highest P supply. Most intriguingly, shoot [P] did not differ across treatments, with an average of 1·4 mg P kg−1 shoot dry weight. Conclusions The almost constant shoot [P] in V. juncea over the very wide range of P supplies is, to our knowledge, unprecedented. To maintain these stable values, this species down-regulates its growth rate when no P is supplied; conversely, it down-regulates its P-uptake capacity very tightly at the highest P supplies, when its maximum growth rate has been reached. It is proposed that the persistence of cluster roots and mycorrhizal colonization up to the highest P treatments is a consequence of its tightly controlled shoot [P]. This unusual P physiology of V. juncea is surmised to be related to the habitat of this N2-fixing species. Water and nutrients are available at a low but steady supply for most of the year, negating the need for storage of P which would be metabolically costly and be at the expense of metabolic energy and P available for symbiotic N2 fixation. PMID:23456689

  3. Root pressurization affects growth-induced water potentials and growth in dehydrated maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Tang, An-Ching; Boyer, John S

    2003-11-01

    Profiles of water potential (Psi w) were measured from the soil to the tips of growing leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) when pressure (P) was applied to the soil/root system. At moderately low soil Psi w, leaf elongation was somewhat inhibited, large tensions existed in the xylem, and Psi w were slightly lower in the elongating leaf tissues than in the xylem, i.e. a growth-induced Psi w was present but small. With P, the tension was relieved, enlarging the difference in Psi w between the xylem and the elongating tissues, i.e. enlarging the growth-induced Psi w, which is critical for growth. Guttation occurred, confirming the high Psi w of the xylem, and the mature leaf tissue rehydrated. Water uptake increased and met the requirements of transpiration. Leaf elongation recovered to control rates. Under more severe conditions at lower soil Psi w, P induced only a brief elongation and the growth-induced Psi w responded only slightly. Guttation did not occur, water flow did not meet the requirements of transpiration, and the mature leaf tissues did not rehydrate. A rewatering experiment indicated that a low conductance existed in the severely dehydrated soil, which limited water delivery to the root and shoot. Therefore, the initial growth inhibition appeared to be hydraulic because the enlargement of the growth-induced Psi w by P together with rehydration of the mature leaf tissue were essential for growth recovery. In more severe conditions, P was ineffective because the soil could not supply water at the required rate, and metabolic factors began to contribute to the inhibition. PMID:14512379

  4. AtrbohD and AtrbohF positively regulate abscisic acid-inhibited primary root growth by affecting Ca2+ signalling and auxin response of roots in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yiheng; Sun, Lirong; Song, Yalin; Wang, Limin; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Liyue; Liu, Bo; Li, Ning; Miao, Chen; Hao, Fushun

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. In this study, the double mutant atrbohD1/F1 and atrbohD2/F2, in which both AtrbohD and AtrbohF were disrupted, were less sensitive to ABA suppression of root cell elongation than wild-type (WT) plants. Furthermore, the double mutants showed impaired ABA responses in roots, including ROS generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) increases, and activation of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels compared with WT. Exogenous H2O2 can activate the Ca(2+) currents in roots of atrbohD1/F1. In addition, exogenous application of the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid effectively promoted ABA inhibition of root growth of the mutants relative to that of WT. The ABA-induced decreases in auxin sensitivity of the root tips were more pronounced in WT than in atrbohD1/F1. These findings suggest that both AtrbohD and AtrbohF are essential for ABA-promoted ROS production in roots. ROS activate Ca(2+) signalling and reduce auxin sensitivity of roots, thus positively regulating ABA-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

  5. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  6. Root Diseases: Primary Agents and Secondary Consequences of Disturbance

    SciTech Connect

    Otrosina, W.J.; Ferrell, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    A pathogen such as the P-group of Heterobasidion annosum has become an intractable problem in many Sienna east side pine stands in California because the fungus is adapted to colonization of freshly cut stump surfaces. Other diseases such as blackstain root disease are associated with certain root feeding bark beetles that are attracted to tree roots after site disturbances such as thinning. Fire may also affect various root disease fungi and their pathological behavior in longleaf pine through interactions with various soil factors as a consequence of various land use.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) in response to restoration practices.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Catherine; York, Robert A; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2012-01-01

    Interactions with soil microbiota determine the success of restoring plants to their native habitats. The goal of our study was to understand the effects of restoration practices on interactions of giant sequoia Sequoiadendron giganteum with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomeromycota). Natural regeneration of Sequoiadendron is threatened by the absence of severe fires that create forest canopy gaps. Generating artificial canopy gaps offers an alternative tool for giant sequoia restoration. We investigated the effect of regeneration practices, including (i) sapling location within gaps, (ii) gap size and (iii) soil substrate, on AM fungal colonization of giant sequoia sapling roots in a native giant sequoia grove of the Sierra Nevada, California. We found that the extent of AM fungal root colonization was positively correlated with sapling height and light availability, which were related to the location of the sapling within the gap and the gap size. While colonization frequency by arbuscules in saplings on ash substrate was higher relative to saplings in mineral soil, the total AM fungal root colonization was similar between the substrates. A negative correlation between root colonization by Glomeromycota and non-AM fungal species indicated antagonistic interactions between different classes of root-associated fungi. Using DNA genotyping, we identified six AM fungal taxa representing genera Glomus and Ambispora present in Sequoiadendron roots. Overall, we found that AM fungal colonization of giant sequoia roots was associated with availability of plant-assimilated carbon to the fungus rather than with the AM fungal supply of mineral nutrients to the roots. We conclude that restoration practices affecting light availability and carbon assimilation alter feedbacks between sapling growth and activity of AM fungi in the roots.

  8. Glucosinolate concentration in turnip (Brassica rapa ssp. rapifera L.) roots as affected by nitrogen and sulfur supply.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Schonhof, Ilona; Krumbein, Angelika; Li, Long; Stützel, Hartmut; Schreiner, Monika

    2007-10-17

    Three greenhouse pot experiments were conducted with four different nitrogen (N) treatments (80, 160, 240, and 320 kg ha (-1)) in combination with three sulfur (S) treatments (10, 20, and 60 kg ha (-1)) to study the effects of combined N and S supply on glucosinolate concentration and composition in turnip roots. Total glucosinolate concentration varied widely from 9.7 (N 320S 10) to 91.6 (N 160S 60) mg (100 g) (-1) root fresh weight (FW) and individual glucosinolate concentrations were increased with increasing S supply regardless of the N treatment, whereas enhanced N supply (160 - 320 N ha (-1)) at the high S level (60 kg ha (-1)) did not affect total glucosinolate concentration. In contrast, assumingly attributed to the individual glucosinolate biosynthesis concentration of N-containing tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolate was highest with increased N supply, whereas S-containing methionine-derived aromatic and aliphatic glucosinolates decreased with increasing N supply combined at low S level (10-20 kg ha (-1)).

  9. Glucosinolate concentration in turnip (Brassica rapa ssp. rapifera L.) roots as affected by nitrogen and sulfur supply.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Schonhof, Ilona; Krumbein, Angelika; Li, Long; Stützel, Hartmut; Schreiner, Monika

    2007-10-17

    Three greenhouse pot experiments were conducted with four different nitrogen (N) treatments (80, 160, 240, and 320 kg ha (-1)) in combination with three sulfur (S) treatments (10, 20, and 60 kg ha (-1)) to study the effects of combined N and S supply on glucosinolate concentration and composition in turnip roots. Total glucosinolate concentration varied widely from 9.7 (N 320S 10) to 91.6 (N 160S 60) mg (100 g) (-1) root fresh weight (FW) and individual glucosinolate concentrations were increased with increasing S supply regardless of the N treatment, whereas enhanced N supply (160 - 320 N ha (-1)) at the high S level (60 kg ha (-1)) did not affect total glucosinolate concentration. In contrast, assumingly attributed to the individual glucosinolate biosynthesis concentration of N-containing tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolate was highest with increased N supply, whereas S-containing methionine-derived aromatic and aliphatic glucosinolates decreased with increasing N supply combined at low S level (10-20 kg ha (-1)). PMID:17854152

  10. Dietary choice affects Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 colonization and disease.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Steven D; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Smith, Mark A; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Merrell, D Scott; O'Brien, Alison D

    2013-06-01

    The likelihood that a single individual infected with the Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing, food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 will develop a life-threatening sequela called the hemolytic uremic syndrome is unpredictable. We reasoned that conditions that enhance Stx binding and uptake within the gut after E. coli O157:H7 infection should result in greater disease severity. Because the receptor for Stx, globotriaosylceramide, is up-regulated in the presence of butyrate in vitro, we asked whether a high fiber diet (HFD) that reportedly enhances butyrate production by normal gut flora can influence the outcome of an E. coli O157 infection in mice. To address that question, groups of BALB/c mice were fed high (10%) or low (2%) fiber diets and infected with E. coli O157:H7 strain 86-24 (Stx2+). Mice fed an HFD exhibited a 10- to 100-fold increase in colonization, lost 15% more body weight, exhibited signs of morbidity, and had 25% greater mortality relative to the low fiber diet (LFD)-fed group. Additionally, sections of intestinal tissue from HFD-fed mice bound more Stx1 and expressed more globotriaosylceramide than did such sections from LFD-fed mice. Furthermore, the gut microbiota of HFD-fed mice compared with LFD-fed mice contained reduced levels of native Escherichia species, organisms that might protect the gut from colonization by incoming E. coli O157:H7. Taken together, these results suggest that susceptibility to infection and subsequent disease after ingestion of E. coli O157:H7 may depend, at least in part, on individual diet and/or the capacity of the commensal flora to produce butyrate.

  11. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling☆

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P.N.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5 mM at 24 h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  12. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential.

  13. Campylobacter colonization and proliferation in the broiler chicken upon natural field challenge is not affected by the bird growth rate or breed.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Fraser J; Bailey, Richard A; Watson, Kellie A; McAdam, Jim; Avendaño, Santiago; Stanley, William A; Koerhuis, Alfons N M

    2014-11-01

    The zoonotic association between Campylobacter bacteria in poultry and humans has been characterized by decades of research which has attempted to elucidate the epidemiology of this complex relationship and to reduce carriage within poultry. While much work has focused on the mechanisms facilitating its success in contaminating chicken flocks (and other animal hosts), it remains difficult to consistently exclude Campylobacter under field conditions. Within the United Kingdom poultry industry, various bird genotypes with widely varying growth rates are available to meet market needs and consumer preferences. However, little is known about whether any differences in Campylobacter carriage exist across this modern broiler range. The aim of this study was to establish if a relationship exists between growth rate or breed and cecal Campylobacter concentration after natural commercial flock Campylobacter challenge. In one investigation, four pure line genotypes of various growth rates were grown together, while in the second, eight different commercial broiler genotypes were grown individually. In both studies, the Campylobacter concentration was measured in the ceca at 42 days of age, revealing no significant difference in cecal load between birds of different genotypes both in mixed- and single-genotype pens. This is important from a public health perspective and suggests that other underlying reasons beyond genotype are likely to control and affect Campylobacter colonization within chickens. Further studies to gain a better understanding of colonization dynamics and subsequent proliferation are needed, as are novel approaches to reduce the burden in poultry.

  14. Functional RelBE-Family Toxin-Antitoxin Pairs Affect Biofilm Maturation and Intestine Colonization in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Amanda J.; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements that typically encode a stable toxin and its labile antitoxin. These cognate pairs are abundant in prokaryotes and have been shown to regulate various cellular functions. Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen that is the causative agent of cholera, harbors at least thirteen TA loci. While functional HigBA, ParDE have been shown to stabilize plasmids and Phd/Doc to mediate cell death in V. cholerae, the function of seven RelBE-family TA systems is not understood. In this study we investigated the function of the RelBE TA systems in V. cholerae physiology and found that six of the seven relBE loci encoded functional toxins in E. coli. Deletion analyses of each relBE locus indicate that RelBE systems are involved in biofilm formation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) resistance. Interestingly, all seven relBE loci are induced under the standard virulence induction conditions and two of the relBE mutants displayed a colonization defect, which was not due to an effect on virulence gene expression. Although further studies are needed to characterize the mechanism of action, our study reveals that RelBE systems are important for V. cholerae physiology. PMID:26275048

  15. Constitutive Expression of OsIAA9 Affects Starch Granules Accumulation and Root Gravitropic Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Sha; Li, Qianqian; Liu, Shanda; Pinas, Nicholaas M.; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) genes are early auxin response genes ecoding short-lived transcriptional repressors, which regulate auxin signaling in plants by interplay with Auxin Response Factors (ARFs). Most of the Aux/IAA proteins contain four different domains, namely Domain I, Domain II, Domain III, and Domain IV. So far all Aux/IAA mutants with auxin-related phenotypes identified in both Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa) are dominant gain-of-function mutants with mutations in Domain II of the corresponding Aux/IAA proteins, suggest that Aux/IAA proteins in both Arabidopsis and rice are largely functional redundantly, and they may have conserved functions. We report here the functional characterization of a rice Aux/IAA gene, OsIAA9. RT-PCR results showed that expression of OsIAA9 was induced by exogenously applied auxin, suggesting that OsIAA9 is an auxin response gene. Bioinformatic analysis showed that OsIAA9 has a repressor motif in Domain I, a degron in Domain II, and the conserved amino acid signatures for protein-protein interactions in Domain III and Domain IV. By generating transgenic plants expressing GFP-OsIAA9 and examining florescence in the transgenic plants, we found that OsIAA9 is localized in the nucleus. When transfected into protoplasts isolated from rosette leaves of Arabidopsis, OsIAA9 repressed reporter gene expression, and the repression was partially released by exogenously IAA. These results suggest that OsIAA9 is a canonical Aux/IAA protein. Protoplast transfection assays showed that OsIAA9 interacted ARF5, but not ARF6, 7, 8 and 19. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing OsIAA9 have increased number of lateral roots, and reduced gravitropic response. Further analysis showed that OsIAA9 transgenic Arabidopsis plants accumulated fewer granules in their root tips and the distribution of granules was also affected. Taken together, our study showed that OsIAA9 is a transcriptional repressor, and it regulates gravitropic

  16. Null mutation of chloride channel 7 (Clcn7) impairs dental root formation but does not affect enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Bervoets, Theodore J M; Henriksen, Kim; Everts, Vincent; Bronckers, Antonius L J J

    2016-02-01

    ClC-7, located in late endosomes and lysosomes, is critical for the function of osteoclasts. Secretion of Cl(-) by the ruffled border of osteoclasts enables H(+) secretion by v-H(+)-ATPases to dissolve bone mineral. Mice lacking ClC-7 show altered lysosomal function that leads to severe lysosomal storage. Maturation ameloblasts are epithelial cells with a ruffled border that secrete Cl(-) as well as endocytose and digest large quantities of enamel matrix proteins during formation of dental enamel. We tested the hypothesis that ClC-7 in maturation ameloblasts is required for intracellular digestion of matrix fragments to complete enamel mineralization. Craniofacial bones and developing teeth in Clcn7(-/-) mice were examined by micro-CT, immunohistochemistry, quantified histomorphometry and electron microscopy. Osteoclasts and ameloblasts in wild-type mice stained intensely with anti-ClC-7 antibody but not in Clcn7(-/-) mice. Craniofacial bones in Clcn7(-/-) mice were severely osteopetrotic and contained 1.4- to 1.6-fold more bone volume, which was less mineralized than the wild-type littermates. In Clcn7(-/-) mice maturation ameloblasts and osteoclasts highly expressed Ae2 as in wild-type mice. However, teeth failed to erupt, incisors were much shorter and roots were disfigured. Molars formed a normal dental crown. In compacted teeth, dentin was slightly less mineralized, enamel did not retain a matrix and mineralized fairly normal. We concluded that ClC-7 is essential for osteoclasts to resorb craniofacial bones to enable tooth eruption and root development. Disruption of Clcn7 reduces bone and dentin mineral density but does not affect enamel mineralization.

  17. Caesium inhibits the colonization of Medicago truncatula by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Lea; Dubchak, Sergiy; Turnau, Katarzyna; Broadley, Martin R; White, Philip J

    2015-03-01

    Contamination of soils with radioisotopes of caesium (Cs) is of concern because of their emissions of harmful β and γ radiation. Radiocaesium enters the food chain through vegetation and the intake of Cs can affect the health of organisms. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form mutualistic symbioses with plants through colonization of the roots and previous studies on the influence of AM on Cs concentrations in plants have given inconsistent results. These studies did not investigate the influence of Cs on AM fungi and it is therefore not known if Cs has a direct effect on AM colonization. Here, we investigated whether Cs influences AM colonization and if this effect impacts on the influence of Rhizophagus intraradices on Cs accumulation by Medicago truncatula. M. truncatula was grown with or without R. intraradices in pots containing different concentrations of Cs. Here, we present the first evidence that colonization of plants by AM fungi can be negatively affected by increasing Cs concentrations in the soil. Mycorrhizal colonization had little effect on root or shoot Cs concentrations. In conclusion, the colonization by AM fungi is impaired by high Cs concentrations and this direct effect of soil Cs on AM colonization might explain the inconsistent results reported in literature that have shown increased, decreased or unaffected Cs concentrations in AM plants.

  18. Oxygen deficiency and salinity affect cell-specific ion concentrations in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Kotula, Lukasz; Clode, Peta L; Striker, Gustavo G; Pedersen, Ole; Läuchli, André; Shabala, Sergey; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen deficiency associated with soil waterlogging adversely impacts root respiration and nutrient acquisition. We investigated the effects of O2 deficiency and salinity (100 mM NaCl) on radial O2 concentrations and cell-specific ion distributions in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Microelectrode profiling measured O2 concentrations across roots in aerated, aerated saline, stagnant or stagnant saline media. X-ray microanalysis at two positions behind the apex determined the cell-specific elemental concentrations of potassium (K), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) across roots. Severe O2 deficiency occurred in the stele and apical regions of roots in stagnant solutions. O2 deficiency in the stele reduced the concentrations of K, Na and Cl in the pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells at the subapical region. Near the root apex, Na declined across the cortex in roots from the aerated saline solution but was relatively high in all cell types in roots from the stagnant saline solution. Oxygen deficiency has a substantial impact on cellular ion concentrations in roots. Both pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells are involved in energy-dependent K loading into the xylem and in controlling radial Na and Cl transport. At root tips, accumulation of Na in the outer cell layers likely contributed to reduction of Na in inner cells of the tips.

  19. Natural variation in the expression of ORGANIC CATION TRANSPORTER 1 affects root length responses to cadaverine in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Allison K; Vaughn, Laura M; Masson, Patrick H

    2015-02-01

    Polyamines, including cadaverine, are organic cations that affect numerous biological processes including transcription, translation, cell signalling, and ion channel activity. They often function in biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. Because little is known about how plants respond to cadaverine, a quantitative natural variation approach was used to identify genetic factors that contribute to this response. Here it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana accessions have varying root length responses to exogenous cadaverine: Cape Verde Islands (Cvi) was one of the most resistant accessions tested, whereas Landsberg erecta (Ler) was one of the most sensitive. Recombinant inbred lines, near isogenic lines, and a microarray were used to show that variation in ORGANIC CATION TRANSPORTER 1 (OCT1) is at least partially responsible for this difference. OCT1 expression was higher in Cvi than in Ler, and oct1 mutants were more sensitive to cadaverine than wild-type plants. In oct1 mutants transformed with an ectopic copy of OCT1 originating from either Cvi or Ler, the expression level of the transgene, not its accession, correlated with the cadaverine response. These results suggest that decreased OCT1 expression confers cadaverine sensitivity in some accessions. PMID:25403917

  20. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Fan, Weijuan; Firon, Nurit; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway in developing storage roots, leading to greater lignin content in the Lc transgenic lines, compared to the wild type. This was also evidenced by the enhanced lignification of vascular cells in the early storage roots. Furthermore, increased expression of the β-amylase gene in leaves and storage roots also accelerated starch degradation and increased the sugar use efficiency, providing more energy and carbohydrate sources for lignin biosynthesis in the Lc transgenic sweet potato. Lesser starch accumulation was observed in the developing storage roots at the initiation stage in the Lc plants. Our study provides experimental evidence of the basic carbohydrate metabolism underlying the development of storage roots, which is the transformation of lignin biosynthesis to starch biosynthesis. PMID:26727353

  1. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Fan, Weijuan; Firon, Nurit; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway in developing storage roots, leading to greater lignin content in the Lc transgenic lines, compared to the wild type. This was also evidenced by the enhanced lignification of vascular cells in the early storage roots. Furthermore, increased expression of the β-amylase gene in leaves and storage roots also accelerated starch degradation and increased the sugar use efficiency, providing more energy and carbohydrate sources for lignin biosynthesis in the Lc transgenic sweet potato. Lesser starch accumulation was observed in the developing storage roots at the initiation stage in the Lc plants. Our study provides experimental evidence of the basic carbohydrate metabolism underlying the development of storage roots, which is the transformation of lignin biosynthesis to starch biosynthesis. PMID:26727353

  2. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Fan, Weijuan; Firon, Nurit; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway in developing storage roots, leading to greater lignin content in the Lc transgenic lines, compared to the wild type. This was also evidenced by the enhanced lignification of vascular cells in the early storage roots. Furthermore, increased expression of the β-amylase gene in leaves and storage roots also accelerated starch degradation and increased the sugar use efficiency, providing more energy and carbohydrate sources for lignin biosynthesis in the Lc transgenic sweet potato. Lesser starch accumulation was observed in the developing storage roots at the initiation stage in the Lc plants. Our study provides experimental evidence of the basic carbohydrate metabolism underlying the development of storage roots, which is the transformation of lignin biosynthesis to starch biosynthesis.

  3. MADS-box transcription factor OsMADS25 regulates root development through affection of nitrate accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunyan; Liu, Yihua; Zhang, Aidong; Su, Sha; Yan, An; Huang, Linli; Ali, Imran; Liu, Yu; Forde, Brian G; Gan, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors are vital regulators participating in plant growth and development process and the functions of most of them are still unknown. ANR1 was reported to play a key role in controlling lateral root development through nitrate signal in Arabidopsis. OsMADS25 is one of five ANR1-like genes in Oryza Sativa and belongs to the ANR1 clade. Here we have investigated the role of OsMADS25 in the plant's responses to external nitrate in Oryza Sativa. Our results showed that OsMADS25 protein was found in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm. Over-expression of OsMADS25 significantly promoted lateral and primary root growth as well as shoot growth in a nitrate-dependent manner in Arabidopsis. OsMADS25 overexpression in transgenic rice resulted in significantly increased primary root length, lateral root number, lateral root length and shoot fresh weight in the presence of nitrate. Down-regulation of OsMADS25 in transgenic rice exhibited significantly reduced shoot and root growth in the presence of nitrate. Furthermore, over-expression of OsMADS25 in transgenic rice promoted nitrate accumulation and significantly increased the expressions of nitrate transporter genes at high rates of nitrate supply while down-regulation of OsMADS25 produced the opposite effect. Taken together, our findings suggest that OsMADS25 is a positive regulator control lateral and primary root development in rice.

  4. The impact of L5 dorsal root ganglion degeneration and Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm on descending colon dilatation following spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study; first report

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Cengiz; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yolas, Coskun; Kabalar, Mehmet Esref; Gundogdu, Betul; Duman, Aslihan; Kanat, Ilyas Ferit; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Context: Somato-sensitive innervation of bowels are maintained by lower segments of spinal cord and the blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on Adamkiewicz artery. Although bowel problems are sometimes seen in subarachnoid hemorrhage neither Adamkiewicz artery spasm nor spinal cord ischemia has not been elucidated as a cause of bowel dilatation so far. Aims: The goal of this study was to study the effects Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) vasospasm in lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on bowel dilatation severity. Settings and Design: An experimental rabbit study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 25 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH (N = 13), serum saline (SS) (SS; N = 7) and control (N = 5) groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 21 days, volume values of descending parts of large bowels and degenerated neuron density of L5DRG were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). Two-tailed t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean volume of imaginary descending colons was estimated as 93 ± 12 cm3 in the control group and 121 ± 26 cm3 in the SS group and 176 ± 49 cm3 in SAH group. Volume augmentations of the descending colons and degenerated neuron density L5DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An inverse relationship between the living neuronal density of the L5DRG and the volume of imaginary descending colon values was occurred. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies. PMID:25972712

  5. Biotic and abiotic variables affecting internalization and fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates in leafy green roots.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Webb, Cathy C; Davey, Lindsey E; Payton, Alison S; Flitcroft, Ian D; Doyle, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Preharvest internalization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the roots of leafy greens is a food safety risk because the pathogen may be systemically transported to edible portions of the plant. In this study, both abiotic (degree of soil moisture) and biotic (E. coli O157:H7 exposure, presence of Shiga toxin genes, and type of leafy green) factors were examined to determine their potential effects on pathogen internalization into roots of leafy greens. Using field soil that should have an active indigenous microbial community, internalized populations in lettuce roots were 0.8 to 1.6 log CFU/g after exposure to soil containing E. coli O157:H7 at 5.6 to 6.1 log CFU/g. Internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into leafy green plant roots was higher when E. coli O157:H7 populations in soil were increased to 7 or 8 log CFU/g or when the soil was saturated with water. No differences were noted in the extent to which internalization of E. coli O157:H7 occurred in spinach, lettuce, or parsley roots; however, in saturated soil, maximum levels in parsley occurred later than did those in spinach or lettuce. Translocation of E. coli O157:H7 from roots to leaves was rare; therefore, decreases observed in root populations over time were likely the result of inactivation within the plant tissue. Shiga toxin-negative (nontoxigenic) E. coli O157:H7 isolates were more stable than were virulent isolates in soil, but the degree of internalization of E. coli O157:H7 into roots did not differ between isolate type. Therefore, these nontoxigenic isolates could be used as surrogates for virulent isolates in field trials involving internalization.

  6. Contrasting preferences of arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septate fungi colonizing boreal and subarctic Avenella flexuosa.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, M; Raveala, K; Wäli, P R; Ruotsalainen, A L

    2014-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophytic (DSE) fungi are ubiquitous in grass roots, but their colonizations may vary according to latitudinal gradient and site conditions. We investigated how vegetation zone (boreal vs. subarctic), humus thickness, and site openness affect root fungal colonizations of the grass Avenella flexuosa. More precisely, we hypothesized that AM and DSE fungal colonizations would have different responses to environmental conditions such that AM fungi could be more common in boreal zone, whereas we expected DSE fungi to be more affected by the amount of humus. We found site openness to affect AM and DSE fungi in a contrasting manner, in interaction with the vegetation zone. AM colonization was high at open coastal dunes, whereas DSE fungi were more common at forested sites, in the boreal zone. Humus thickness affected AM fungi negatively and DSE fungi positively. To conclude, the observed AM and DSE fungal colonization patterns were largely contrasting. AM fungi were favored in seashore conditions characterized by thin humus layer, whereas DSE fungi were favored in conditions of higher humus availability.

  7. Root dynamics in an artificially constructed regenerating longleaf pine ecosystem are affected by atmospheric CO(2) enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, S G.; Davis, M A.; Mitchell, R J.; Prior, S A.; Boykin, D L.; Rogers, H H.; Runion, G B.

    2001-08-01

    Differential responses to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration exhibited by different plant functional types may alter competition for above- and belowground resources in a higher CO(2) world. Because C allocation to roots is often favored over C allocation to shoots in plants grown with CO(2) enrichment, belowground function of forest ecosystems may change significantly. We established an outdoor facility to examine the effects of elevated CO(2) on root dynamics in artificially constructed communities of five early successional forest species: (1) a C(3) evergreen conifer (longleaf pine, Pinus palustris Mill.); (2) a C(4) monocotyledonous bunch grass (wiregrass, Aristida stricta Michx.); (3) a C(3) broadleaf tree (sand post oak, Quercus margaretta); (4) a C(3) perennial herbaceous legume (rattlebox, Crotalaria rotundifolia Walt. ex Gemel); and (5) an herbaceous C(3) dicotyledonous perennial (butterfly weed, Asclepias tuberosa L.). These species are common associates in early successional longleaf pine savannahs throughout the southeastern USA and represent species that differ in life-form, growth habit, physiology, and symbiotic relationships. A combination of minirhizotrons and soil coring was used to examine temporal and spatial rooting dynamics from October 1998 to October 1999. CO(2)-enriched plots exhibited 35% higher standing root crop length, 37% greater root length production per day, and 47% greater root length mortality per day. These variables, however, were enhanced by CO(2) enrichment only at the 10-30 cm depth. Relative root turnover (flux/standing crop) was unchanged by elevated CO(2). Sixteen months after planting, root biomass of pine was 62% higher in elevated compared to ambient CO(2) plots. Conversely, the combined biomass of rattlebox, wiregrass, and butterfly weed was 28% greater in ambient compared to high CO(2) plots. There was no difference in root biomass of oaks after 16 months of exposure to elevated CO(2). Using root and shoot

  8. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M.; Lang, Jessica K.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  9. Pilot Clinical Study of the Effects of Ginger Root Extract on Eicosanoids in Colonic Mucosa of Subjects at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Suzanna M.; Turgeon, D. Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T.; Wright, Benjamin D.; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk. PMID:24760534

  10. Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T; Wright, Benjamin D; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

  11. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  12. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  13. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  14. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1991-01-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  15. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance.

    PubMed

    Henry, L T; Raper, C D

    1991-03-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  16. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  17. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Rensen; Liao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean.

  18. Waterlogging in late dormancy and the early growth phase affected root and leaf morphology in Betula pendula and Betula pubescens seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Fang; Roitto, Marja; Sutinen, Sirkka; Lehto, Tarja; Heinonen, Jaakko; Zhang, Gang; Repo, Tapani

    2016-01-01

    The warmer winters of the future will increase snow-melt frequency and rainfall, thereby increasing the risk of soil waterlogging and its effects on trees in winter and spring at northern latitudes. We studied the morphology of roots and leaves of 1-year-old silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and pubescent birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) seedlings exposed to waterlogging during dormancy or at the beginning of the growing season in a growth-chamber experiment. The experiment included 4-week dormancy (Weeks 1-4), a 4-week early growing season (Weeks 5-8) and a 4-week late growing season (Weeks 9-12). The treatments were: (i) no waterlogging, throughout the experiment ('NW'); (ii) 4-week waterlogging during dormancy (dormancy waterlogging 'DW'); (iii) 4-week waterlogging during the early growing season (growth waterlogging 'GW'); and (iv) 4-week DW followed by 4-week GW during the early growing season ('DWGW'). Dormancy waterlogging affected the roots of silver birch and GW the roots and leaf characteristics of both species. Leaf area was reduced in both species by GW and DWGW. In pubescent birch, temporarily increased formation of thin roots was seen in root systems of GW seedlings, which suggests an adaptive mechanism with respect to excess soil water. Additionally, the high density of non-glandular trichomes and their increase in DWGW leaves were considered possible morphological adaptations to excess water in the soil, as was the constant density of stem lenticels during stem-diameter growth. The higher density in glandular trichomes of DWGW silver birch suggests morphological acclimation in that species. The naturally low density of non-glandular trichomes, low density of stem lenticels in waterlogged seedlings and decrease in root growth seen in DWGW and DW silver birch seedlings explain, at least partly, why silver birch grows more poorly relative to pubescent birch in wet soils. PMID:26420790

  19. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean. PMID:26432877

  20. Effect of Root Extracts of Medicinal Herb Glycyrrhiza glabra on HSP90 Gene Expression and Apoptosis in the HT-29 Colon Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Nourazarian, Seyed Manuchehr; Nourazarian, Alireza; Majidinia, Maryam; Roshaniasl, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common lethal cancer types worldwide. In recent years, widespread and large-scale studies have been done on medicinal plants for anti-cancer effects, including Glycyrrhiza glabra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an ethanol extract Glycyrrhiza glabra on the expression of HSP90, growth and apoptosis in the HT-29 colon cancer cell line. HT-29 cells were treated with different concentrations of extract (50,100,150, and 200 μg/ml). For evaluation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, we used MTT assay and flow cytometry technique, respectively. RT-PCR was also carried out to evaluate the expression levels of HSP90 genes. Results showed that Glycyrrhiza glabra inhibited proliferation of the HT-29 cell line at a concentration of 200 μg/ml and this was confirmed by the highest rate of cell death as measured by trypan blue and MTT assays. RT-PCR results showed down-regulation of HSP90 gene expression which implied an ability of Glycyrrhiza glabra to induce apoptosis in HT-29 cells and confirmed its anticancer property. Further studies are required to evaluate effects of the extract on other genes and also it is necessary to make an extensive in vivo biological evaluation and subsequently proceed with clinical evaluations.

  1. Iron Oxide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Effects on Plant Performance and Root Associated Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David J.; Pietrasiak, Nicole; Situ, Shu F.; Abenojar, Eric C.; Porche, Mya; Kraj, Pawel; Lakliang, Yutthana; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of positively and negatively charged Fe3O4 and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on the growth of soybean plants (Glycine max.) and their root associated soil microbes. Soybean plants were grown in a greenhouse for six weeks after application of different amounts of NPs, and plant growth and nutrient content were examined. Roots were analyzed for colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nodule-forming nitrogen fixing bacteria using DNA-based techniques. We found that plant growth was significantly lower with the application of TiO2 as compared to Fe3O4 NPs. The leaf carbon was also marginally significant lower in plants treated with TiO2 NPs; however, leaf phosphorus was reduced in plants treated with Fe3O4. We found no effects of NP type, concentration, or charge on the community structure of either rhizobia or AM fungi colonizing plant roots. However, the charge of the Fe3O4 NPs affected both colonization of the root system by rhizobia as well as leaf phosphorus content. Our results indicate that the type of NP can affect plant growth and nutrient content in an agriculturally important crop species, and that the charge of these particles influences the colonization of the root system by nitrogen-fixing bacteria. PMID:26445042

  2. Iron Oxide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Effects on Plant Performance and Root Associated Microbes.

    PubMed

    Burke, David J; Pietrasiak, Nicole; Situ, Shu F; Abenojar, Eric C; Porche, Mya; Kraj, Pawel; Lakliang, Yutthana; Samia, Anna Cristina S

    2015-10-05

    In this study, we investigated the effect of positively and negatively charged Fe₃O₄ and TiO₂ nanoparticles (NPs) on the growth of soybean plants (Glycine max.) and their root associated soil microbes. Soybean plants were grown in a greenhouse for six weeks after application of different amounts of NPs, and plant growth and nutrient content were examined. Roots were analyzed for colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nodule-forming nitrogen fixing bacteria using DNA-based techniques. We found that plant growth was significantly lower with the application of TiO₂ as compared to Fe₃O₄ NPs. The leaf carbon was also marginally significant lower in plants treated with TiO₂ NPs; however, leaf phosphorus was reduced in plants treated with Fe₃O₄. We found no effects of NP type, concentration, or charge on the community structure of either rhizobia or AM fungi colonizing plant roots. However, the charge of the Fe₃O₄ NPs affected both colonization of the root system by rhizobia as well as leaf phosphorus content. Our results indicate that the type of NP can affect plant growth and nutrient content in an agriculturally important crop species, and that the charge of these particles influences the colonization of the root system by nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

  3. Iron Oxide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Effects on Plant Performance and Root Associated Microbes.

    PubMed

    Burke, David J; Pietrasiak, Nicole; Situ, Shu F; Abenojar, Eric C; Porche, Mya; Kraj, Pawel; Lakliang, Yutthana; Samia, Anna Cristina S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of positively and negatively charged Fe₃O₄ and TiO₂ nanoparticles (NPs) on the growth of soybean plants (Glycine max.) and their root associated soil microbes. Soybean plants were grown in a greenhouse for six weeks after application of different amounts of NPs, and plant growth and nutrient content were examined. Roots were analyzed for colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nodule-forming nitrogen fixing bacteria using DNA-based techniques. We found that plant growth was significantly lower with the application of TiO₂ as compared to Fe₃O₄ NPs. The leaf carbon was also marginally significant lower in plants treated with TiO₂ NPs; however, leaf phosphorus was reduced in plants treated with Fe₃O₄. We found no effects of NP type, concentration, or charge on the community structure of either rhizobia or AM fungi colonizing plant roots. However, the charge of the Fe₃O₄ NPs affected both colonization of the root system by rhizobia as well as leaf phosphorus content. Our results indicate that the type of NP can affect plant growth and nutrient content in an agriculturally important crop species, and that the charge of these particles influences the colonization of the root system by nitrogen-fixing bacteria. PMID:26445042

  4. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad; Nielsen, Alexander; Hendriksen, Rene S; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-01-07

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin/gentamicin, sulphonamide, tetracycline, hygromycin B, β-lactams and streptomycin [aac(3)-IV, sul2, tet(X), aph(4), bla TEM-1 and strA/B], with all but tet(X) located on the same conjugative plasmid. Nineteen pigs were randomly allocated into two inoculation groups, one treated with apramycin (pen 2) and one non-treated (pen 3), along with a non-inoculated control group (pen 1). Two pigs of pen 2 and 3 were inoculated intragastrically with a rifampicin resistant variant of the strain. Apramycin treatment in pen 2 was initiated immediately after inoculation. Strain colonization was assessed in the feces from all pigs. E. coli 912 was shown to spread to non-inoculated pigs in both groups. The selective effect did not persist beyond 3 days post-treatment, and the strain was not detected from this time point in pen 2. We demonstrated that E. coli 912 was able to spread between pigs in the same pen irrespective of treatment, and apramycin treatment resulted in significantly higher counts compared to the non-treated group. This represents the first demonstration of how antimicrobial treatment affects spread of resistant bacteria in pig production. The use of apramycin may lead to enhanced spread of gentamicin-resistant E. coli. Since gentamicin is a first-choice drug for human bacteremia, this is of concern.

  5. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  6. Disruption of AtOCT1, an organic cation transporter gene, affects root development and carnitine-related responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lelandais-Brière, Christine; Jovanovic, Mariana; Torres, Gisèle A M; Perrin, Yolande; Lemoine, Rémi; Corre-Menguy, Fabienne; Hartmann, Caroline

    2007-07-01

    In animals, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTs) are involved in homeostasis and distribution of various small endogenous amines (e.g. carnitine, choline) and detoxification of xenobiotics such as nicotine. Here, we describe the characterization of AtOCT1, an Arabidopsis protein that shares most of the conserved features of mammalian plasma membrane OCTs. Transient expression of an AtOCT1::GFP fusion protein in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis protoplasts supported localization in the plasmalemma. AtOCT1 functionally complemented the Deltacit2/Deltaagp2p yeast strain that is defective in plasma membrane carnitine transport. Disruption of AtOCT1 in an Arabidopsis oct1-1 knockout mutant affected both the expression of carnitine-related genes and the developmental defects induced by exogenous carnitine. RT-PCR and promoter-uidA fusion analysis showed that AtOCT1 was expressed in vascular tissues of various organs and at sites of lateral root formation. Correlating with this expression pattern, oct1-1 seedlings grown in vitro exhibited a higher degree of root branching than the wild-type, showing that the disruption of AtOCT1 affected root development under certain conditions. PMID:17521409

  7. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  8. Pyrabactin regulates root hydraulic properties in maize seedlings by affecting PIP aquaporins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenqiang; Li, Jia; Jia, Jia; Wang, Fei; Cao, Cuiling; Hu, Jingjiang; Mu, Zixin

    2015-09-01

    Pyrabactin, an agonist of abscisic acid (ABA), has led to the isolation and characterization of pyrabactin resistance 1/pyrabactin resistance 1-like (PYR1/PYLs) ABA receptors in Arabidopsis, which has well explained ABA-mediated stomatal movement and stress-related gene expression. In addition to inducing stomatal closure and inhibiting transpiration, ABA can also enhance root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr), thus maintaining water balance under water deficiency-related stress, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, the root hydraulic properties of maize seedlings in response to pyrabactin were compared to those caused by ABA. Similar to ABA, lower concentration of pyrabactin induced a remarkable increase in Lpr as well as in the gene expression of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (ZmPIP) aquaporin and in the ZmPIP2; 1/2; 2 protein abundance. The pyrabactin-induced enhancement of Lpr was abolished by H2O2 application, indicating that pyrabactin regulates Lpr by modulating ZmPIP at transcriptional, translational and post-translational (activity) level. Pyrabactin-mediated water transport and ZmPIP gene expression were phosphorylation-dependent, suggesting that ABA-PYR1-(PP2C)-protein kinase-AQP signaling pathway may be involved in this process. As we know this is the first established ABA signaling transduction pathway that mediated water transport in roots. This observation further addressed the importance of PYR1/PYLs ABA receptor in regulating plant water use efficiency from the under ground level. Except inhibiting transpiration in leaves, our result introduces the exciting possibility of application ABA agonists for regulating roots water uptake in field, with a species- and dose dependent manner. PMID:26000467

  9. Pyrabactin regulates root hydraulic properties in maize seedlings by affecting PIP aquaporins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenqiang; Li, Jia; Jia, Jia; Wang, Fei; Cao, Cuiling; Hu, Jingjiang; Mu, Zixin

    2015-09-01

    Pyrabactin, an agonist of abscisic acid (ABA), has led to the isolation and characterization of pyrabactin resistance 1/pyrabactin resistance 1-like (PYR1/PYLs) ABA receptors in Arabidopsis, which has well explained ABA-mediated stomatal movement and stress-related gene expression. In addition to inducing stomatal closure and inhibiting transpiration, ABA can also enhance root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr), thus maintaining water balance under water deficiency-related stress, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, the root hydraulic properties of maize seedlings in response to pyrabactin were compared to those caused by ABA. Similar to ABA, lower concentration of pyrabactin induced a remarkable increase in Lpr as well as in the gene expression of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (ZmPIP) aquaporin and in the ZmPIP2; 1/2; 2 protein abundance. The pyrabactin-induced enhancement of Lpr was abolished by H2O2 application, indicating that pyrabactin regulates Lpr by modulating ZmPIP at transcriptional, translational and post-translational (activity) level. Pyrabactin-mediated water transport and ZmPIP gene expression were phosphorylation-dependent, suggesting that ABA-PYR1-(PP2C)-protein kinase-AQP signaling pathway may be involved in this process. As we know this is the first established ABA signaling transduction pathway that mediated water transport in roots. This observation further addressed the importance of PYR1/PYLs ABA receptor in regulating plant water use efficiency from the under ground level. Except inhibiting transpiration in leaves, our result introduces the exciting possibility of application ABA agonists for regulating roots water uptake in field, with a species- and dose dependent manner.

  10. Tomato growth as affected by root-zone temperature and the addition of gibberellic acid and kinetin to nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; White, J. W.; Salisbury, F. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of root-zone temperature on young tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Heinz 1350) was evaluated in controlled environments using a recirculating solution culture system. Growth rates were measured at root-zone temperatures of 15 degrees, 20 degrees, 25 degrees, and 30 degrees C in a near optimum foliar environment. Optimum growth occurred at 25 degrees to 30 degrees during the first 4 weeks of growth and 20 degrees to 25 degrees during the 5th and 6th weeks. Growth was severely restricted at 15 degrees. Four concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and kinetin were added to the nutrient solution in a separate trial; root-zone temperature was maintained at 15 degrees and 25 degrees. Addition of 15 micromoles GA3 to solutions increased specific leaf area, total leaf area, and dry weight production of plants in both temperature treatments. GA3-induced growth stimulation was greater at 15 degrees than at 25 degrees. GA3 may promote growth by increasing leaf area, enhancing photosynthesis per unit leaf area, or both. Kinetic was not useful in promoting growth at either temperature.

  11. Bioavailable concentrations of germanium and rare earth elements in soil as affected by low molecular weight organic acids and root exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Tesch, Silke; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    , lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in the rhizosphere and therefore the enhancement of bioavailability of the mentioned elements to plants. Based on the suction cup experiment we conclude that in vertical soil profile the bioavailable germanium is heavily affected by the activity of exudates, as the complexation processes of germanium take place at the root zone and below affected by the interplay of the infiltration of citric acid solutions and the actually produced exudates. These studies have been carried out in the framework of the PhytoGerm project, financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Germany. BS contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow. The authors are grateful to students and laboratory assistants contributing in the field work and sample preparation.

  12. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P < 0.05). The Multlink™ showed between RelyX™ ARC and RelyX™ U100 (GI to GIII; GII to GV) ( P < 0.05). The ANOVA showed significant statistical similar ( P > 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC

  13. Overexpression of a Brassica rapa NGATHA gene in Arabidopsis thaliana negatively affects cell proliferation during lateral organ and root growth.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Byung Ha; Kim, Eun Yu; Seo, Young Sam; Lee, Sangman; Kim, Woo Taek; Song, Jong Tae; Kim, Jeong Hoe

    2009-12-01

    In an effort to elucidate biological functions of transcription factors of Brassica rapa L. (ssp. pekinensis), an NGATHA homolog, BrNGA1, that belongs to the B3-type transcription factor superfamily was identified and expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BrNGA1, named BrNGA1ox, displayed markedly reduced organ growth compared with the wild type: lateral organs, such as leaves, flowers and cotyledons, were small and distinctively narrow, and their root growth was also severely retarded. Reduced sizes of BrNGA1ox organs were mainly due to reduction in cell numbers. Kinematic analysis of leaf growth revealed that both the rate and duration of cell proliferation declined during organogenesis, which was consistent with the reduced expression of cyclin genes. Reduction in organ growth was strongly correlated with the small size of meristematic cell pools in the shoot and root meristems. Taken together, these data indicate that BrNGA1 acts as a negative regulator of cell proliferation and may do so, in part, by regulating the size of the meristematic cell pool.

  14. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  15. The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp strain affects the pathogenesis-related gene expression of the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on wheat roots

    PubMed Central

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gazengel, Kévin; Boutin, Morgane; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The main effects of antagonistic rhizobacteria on plant pathogenic fungi are antibiosis, fungistasis or an indirect constraint through the induction of a plant defence response. To explore different biocontrol mechanisms, an in vitro confrontation assay was conducted with the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp as a biocontrol agent of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In parallel with the assessment of disease extension, together with the bacterial and fungal root colonization rates, the transcript levels of candidate fungal pathogenicity and plant-induced genes were monitored during the 10-day infection process. The bacterial inoculation of wheat roots with the Pf29Arp strain reduced the development of Ggt-induced disease expressed as attack frequency and necrosis length. The growth rates of Ggt and Pf29Arp, monitored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction of DNA amounts with a part of the Ggt 18S rDNA gene and a specific Pf29Arp strain detection probe, respectively, increased throughout the interactions. Bacterial antagonism and colonization had no significant effect on root colonization by Ggt. The expression of fungal and plant genes was quantified in planta by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the interactions thanks to the design of specific primers and an innovative universal reference system. During the early stages of the tripartite interaction, several of the fungal genes assayed were down-regulated by Pf29Arp, including two laccases, a β-1,3-exoglucanase and a mitogen-activated protein kinase. The plant host glutathione-S-transferase gene was induced by Ggt alone and up-regulated by Pf29Arp bacteria in interaction with the pathogen. We conclude that Pf29Arp antagonism acts through the alteration of fungal pathogenesis and probably through the activation of host defences. PMID:21726382

  16. Root-zone acidity and nitrogen source affects Typha latifolia L. growth and uptake kinetics of ammonium and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Brix, Hans; Dyhr-Jensen, Kirsten; Lorenzen, Bent

    2002-12-01

    The NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) uptake kinetics by Typha latifolia L. were studied after prolonged hydroponics growth at constant pH 3.5, 5.0, 6.5 or 7.0 and with NH(4)(+) or NO(3)(-) as the sole N-source. In addition, the effects of pH and N source on H(+) extrusion and adenine nucleotide content were examined. Typha latifolia was able to grow with both N sources at near neutral pH levels, but the plants had higher relative growth rates, higher tissue concentrations of the major nutrients, higher contents of adenine nucleotides, and higher affinity for uptake of inorganic nitrogen when grown on NH(4)(+). Growth almost completely stopped at pH 3.5, irrespective of N source, probably as a consequence of pH effects on plasma membrane integrity and H(+) influx into the root cells. Tissue concentrations of the major nutrients and adenine nucleotides were severely reduced at low pH, and the uptake capacity for inorganic nitrogen was low, and more so for NO(3)(-)-fed than for NH(4)(+)-fed plants. The maximum uptake rate, V(max), was highest for NH(4)(+) at pH 6.5 (30.9 micro mol h(-1) g(-1) root dry weight) and for NO(3)(-) at pH 5.0 (31.7 micro mol h(-1) g(-1) root dry weight), and less than 10% of these values at pH 3.5. The affinity for uptake as estimated by the half saturation constant, K((1/2)), was lowest at low pH for NH(4)(+) and at high pH for NO(3)(-). The changes in V(max) and K((1/2)) were thus consistent with the theory of increasing competition between cations and H(+) at low pH and between anions and OH(-) at high pH. C(min) was independent of pH, but slightly higher for NO(3)(-) than for NH(4)(+) (C(min)(NH(4)(+)) approximately 0.8 mmol m(-3); C(min)(NO(3)(-)) approximately 2.8 mmol m(-3)). The growth inhibition at low pH was probably due to a reduced nutrient uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by nutrient stress. Typha latifolia seems to be well adapted to growth in wetland soils where NH(4)(+) is the prevailing nitrogen compound, but very low p

  17. Factors affecting the production of SCEs by maleic hydrazide in root-tip chromosomes of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Cortés, F; Escalza, P; Mateos, S; Díaz-Recasens, M

    1987-10-01

    We have investigated the influence of pH on the induction of chromatid-type aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by maleic hydrazide (MH) in root-tip cells of Allium cepa. For both cytogenetic endpoints, the lower the pH of the treatment solution, the higher were the frequencies of chromosome alterations detected at metaphase. We have further studied the persistence of lesions giving rise to SCEs during successive cell cycles, as well as the influence of BrdU concentration in the post-treatment medium on the yield of MH-induced SCEs. Our results suggest that the cytogenetic action of MH in many respects resembles that of bifunctional alkylating agents.

  18. Patterns in root traits of woody species hosting arbuscular and ectomycorrhizas: implications for the evolution of belowground strategies

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Louise H; Callahan, Hilary S; Midford, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    Root traits vary enormously among plant species but we have little understanding of how this variation affects their functioning. Of central interest is how root traits are related to plant resource acquisition strategies from soil. We examined root traits of 33 woody species from northeastern US forests that form two of the most common types of mutualisms with fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and ectomycorrhizas (EM). We examined root trait distribution with respect to plant phylogeny, quantifying the phylogenetic signal (K statistic) in fine root morphology and architecture, and used phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs) to test whether taxa forming different mycorrhizal associations had different root traits. We found a pattern of species forming roots with thinner diameters as species diversified across time. Given moderate phylogenetic signals (K = 0.44–0.68), we used PICs to examine traits variation among taxa forming AM or EM, revealing that hosts of AM were associated with lower branching intensity (rPIC = −0.77) and thicker root diameter (rPIC = −0.41). Because EM evolved relatively more recently and intermittently across plant phylogenies, significant differences in root traits and colonization between plants forming AM and EM imply linkages between the evolution of these biotic interactions and root traits and suggest a history of selection pressures, with trade-offs for supporting different types of associations. Finally, across plant hosts of both EM and AM, species with thinner root diameters and longer specific root length (SRL) had less colonization (rPIC = 0.85, −0.87), suggesting constraints on colonization linked to the evolution of root morphology. PMID:25247056

  19. Ectopic expression of foxtail millet zip-like gene, SiPf40, in transgenic rice plants causes a pleiotropic phenotype affecting tillering, vascular distribution and root development.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yunxia; Wang, Baosheng; Zhao, Qian; Ao, Guangming; Yu, Jingjuan

    2010-12-01

    Plant architecture determines grain production in rice (Oryza sativa) and is affected by important agronomic traits such as tillering, plant height, and panicle morphology. Many key genes involved in controlling the initiation and outgrowth of axillary buds, the elongation of stems, and the architecture of inflorescences have been isolated and analyzed. Previous studies have shown that SiPf40, which was identified from a foxtail millet (Setaria italica) immature seed cDNA library, causes extra branches and tillers in SiPf40-transgenic tobacco and foxtail millet, respectively. To reconfirm its function, we generated transgenic rice plants overexpressing SiPf40 under the control of the ubiquitin promoter. SiPf40-overexpressing transgenic plants have a greater tillering number and a wider tiller angle than wild-type plants. Their root architecture is modified by the promotion of lateral root development, and the distribution of xylem and phloem in the vascular bundle is affected. Analysis of hormone levels showed that the ratios of indole-3-acetic acid/zeatin (IAA/ZR) and IAA/gibberellic acid (IAA/GA) decreased in SiPf40-transgenic plants compared with wild-type plants. These findings strongly suggest that SiPf40 plays an important role in plant architecture.

  20. Spore population, colonization, species diversity and factors influencing the association of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with litchi trees in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajit; Anal, Dubedi

    2016-01-01

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in association with litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) trees were studied during 2012-2013, where orchard soil had high pH (7.42-9.53) and salinity (0.07- 0.39 dSm(-1)). A total of 105 rhizospheric soil and root samples were collected considering variables like location, age of tree, cultivar and production management. Results showed that spore count was in the range of 1-22 g(-1) soil. All the examined root segments had colonization of AMF, which ranged between 3.3 to 90.0%. AMF community comprised of Glomus mosseae, G. intaradices, G. constricta, G. coronatum, G. fasciculatum, G. albidum, G. hoi, G. multicauli, Acaulospora scrobiculata, A. laevis, Rhizophagus litchi and Entrophosphora infrequens. Higher spore density and AMF colonization were observed at medium level (13-28 kg ha(-1)) of available phosphorus that decreased ('r' = -0.21 for spore density, -0.48 for root colonization) with increasing soil phosphorus. While nitrogen did not influence the AMF association, a weak negative linear relationship with AMF colonization ('r' = -0.30) was apparent in the medium level (112-200 kg ha(-1)) of potash. Micronutrients (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn and B) did not affect spore density (zero or a very weak linear correlation) but influenced root colonization ('r' = -0.53 to -0.44), the effect being more prominent above critical limits. Nutritionally sufficient, irrigated litchi orchards had greater spore count (46% samples having 5-22 spores g(-1) soil) and colonization (> 50% in 37.4% roots examined) than nutrient deficient, non-irrigated orchards, indicating essentiality of a threshold nutrients and moisture regime for the association. AMF symbiosis was influenced by cultivar (greater in 'China'), but tree age was not correlated to mycorrhizal association. A consortium of native species coupled with the understanding of nutrient effects on AMF would be useful for field application in litchi. PMID:26930865

  1. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  2. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  3. Nitrogen Source and External Medium pH Interaction Differentially Affects Root and Shoot Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sarasketa, Asier; González-Moro, M. Begoña; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium nutrition often represents an important growth-limiting stress in plants. Some of the symptoms that plants present under ammonium nutrition have been associated with pH deregulation, in fact external medium pH control is known to improve plants ammonium tolerance. However, the way plant cell metabolism adjusts to these changes is not completely understood. Thus, in this work we focused on how Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root respond to different nutritional regimes by varying the nitrogen source (NO3- and NH4+), concentration (2 and 10 mM) and pH of the external medium (5.7 and 6.7) to gain a deeper understanding of cell metabolic adaptation upon altering these environmental factors. The results obtained evidence changes in the response of ammonium assimilation machinery and of the anaplerotic enzymes associated to Tricarboxylic Acids (TCA) cycle in function of the plant organ, the nitrogen source and the degree of ammonium stress. A greater stress severity at pH 5.7 was related to NH4+ accumulation; this could not be circumvented in spite of the stimulation of glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and TCA cycle anaplerotic enzymes. Moreover, this study suggests specific functions for different gln and gdh isoforms based on the nutritional regime. Overall, NH4+ accumulation triggering ammonium stress appears to bear no relation to nitrogen assimilation impairment. PMID:26870054

  4. SB202190 affects cell response to hydroxyurea-induced genotoxic stress in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Winnicki, Konrad; Maszewski, Janusz

    2012-11-01

    Genotoxic stress caused by a variety of chemical and physical agents may lead to DNA breaks and genome instability. Response to DNA damage depends on ATM/ATR sensor kinases and their downstream proteins, which arrange cell cycle checkpoints. Activation of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated)/ATR (ATM and Rad 3-related) signaling pathway triggers cell cycle arrest (by keeping cyclin-Cdk complexes inactive), combined with gamma-phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and induction of DNA repair processes. However, genotoxic stress activates also mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) which may control the functions of checkpoint proteins both directly, by post-translational modifications, or indirectly, by regulation of their expression. Our results indicate that in root meristem cells of Vicia faba, MAP kinase signaling pathway takes part in response to hydroxyurea-induced genotoxic stress. It is shown that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, triggers PCC (premature chromosome condensation) more rapidly, but only if cell cycle checkpoints are alleviated by caffeine. Since SB202190 and, independently, caffeine reduces HU-mediated histone H4 Lys5 acetylation, it may be that there is a cooperation of MAP kinase signaling pathways and ATM/ATR-dependent checkpoints during response to genotoxic stress.

  5. The comparative performance of Roots type aircraft engine superchargers as affected by change in impeller speed and displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, Marsden; Wilson, Ernest E

    1929-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made on three sizes of roots type aircraft engine superchargers. The impeller contours and diameters of these machines were the same, but the length were 11, 8 1/4, and 4 inches, giving displacements of 0.509, 0.382, and 0.185 cubic foot per impeller revolution. The information obtained serves as a basis for the examination of the individual effects of impeller speed and displacement on performance and of the comparative performance when speed and displacement are altered simultaneously to meet definite service requirements. According to simple theory, when assuming no losses, the air weight handled and the power required for a given pressure difference are directly proportional to the speed and the displacement. These simple relations are altered considerably by the losses. When comparing the performance of different sizes of machines whose impeller speeds are so related that the same service requirements are met, it is found that the individual effects of speed and displacement are canceled to a large extent, and the only considerable difference is the difference in the power losses which decrease with increase in the displacement and the accompanying decrease in speed. This difference is small in relation to the net power of the engine supercharger unit, so that a supercharger with short impellers may be used in those applications where the space available is very limited with any considerable sacrifice in performance.

  6. Oral intake of encapsulated dried ginger root powder hardly affects human thermoregulatory function, but appears to facilitate fat utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Katakura, Masanori; Hara, Toshiko; Tanabe, Yoko; Shido, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a single oral ingestion of ginger on thermoregulatory function and fat oxidation in humans. Morning and afternoon oral intake of 1.0 g dried ginger root powder did not alter rectal temperature, skin blood flow, O2 consumption, CO2 production, and thermal sensation and comfort, or induce sweating at an ambient temperature of 28 °C. Ginger ingestion had no effect on threshold temperatures for skin blood flow or thermal sweating. Serum levels of free fatty acids were significantly elevated at 120 min after ginger ingestion in both the morning and afternoon. Morning ginger intake significantly reduced respiratory exchange ratios and elevated fat oxidation by 13.5 % at 120 min after ingestion. This was not the case in the afternoon. These results suggest that the effect of a single oral ginger administration on the peripheral and central thermoregulatory function is miniscule, but does facilitate fat utilization although the timing of the administration may be relevant.

  7. Oral intake of encapsulated dried ginger root powder hardly affects human thermoregulatory function, but appears to facilitate fat utilization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Katakura, Masanori; Hara, Toshiko; Tanabe, Yoko; Shido, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a single oral ingestion of ginger on thermoregulatory function and fat oxidation in humans. Morning and afternoon oral intake of 1.0 g dried ginger root powder did not alter rectal temperature, skin blood flow, O2 consumption, CO2 production, and thermal sensation and comfort, or induce sweating at an ambient temperature of 28 °C. Ginger ingestion had no effect on threshold temperatures for skin blood flow or thermal sweating. Serum levels of free fatty acids were significantly elevated at 120 min after ginger ingestion in both the morning and afternoon. Morning ginger intake significantly reduced respiratory exchange ratios and elevated fat oxidation by 13.5 % at 120 min after ingestion. This was not the case in the afternoon. These results suggest that the effect of a single oral ginger administration on the peripheral and central thermoregulatory function is miniscule, but does facilitate fat utilization although the timing of the administration may be relevant.

  8. Chemopreventive effect of Korean Angelica root extract on TRAMP carcinogenesis and integrative “omic” profiling of affected neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Li; Tang, Suni; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2016-01-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanol extract exerts anti-cancer activity in several allograft and xenograft models. Here we examined its chemopreventive efficacy through gavage administration against primary carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice and wild type littermates were given a daily gavage (5 mg/mouse, Monday-Friday) of AGN or vehicle, beginning at 8 weeks of age (WOA). All mice were terminated at 24 WOA, unless earlier euthanasia was necessitated by large tumors. Whereas AGN-treated TRAMP mice decreased dorsolateral prostate lesion growth by 30% (P = 0.009), they developed fewer and smaller neuroendocrine-carcinomas (NE-Ca) (0.12 g/mouse) than vehicle-treated counterparts (0.81g/mouse, P = 0.037). We analyzed the proteome and transcriptome of banked NE-Ca to gain molecular insights. Angiogenesis-antibody array detected a substantial reduction in AGN-treated NE-Ca of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an angiogenesis stimulator. iTRAQ proteomics plus data mining suggested changes of genes upstream and downstream of FGF2 functionally consistent with AGN inhibiting FGF2/FGFR1 signaling at different levels of the transduction cascade. Moreover, AGN upregulated mRNA of genes related to immune responses, restored expression of many tumor suppressor genes, and prostate function and muscle differentiation genes. On the other hand, AGN down-regulated mRNA of genes related to neuron signaling, oncofetal antigens, inflammation and mast cells, Wnt signaling, embryonic morphogenesis, biosynthesis, cell adhesion, motility, invasion and angiogenesis. These changes suggest not only multiple cancer cell targeting actions of AGN but also impact on the tumor microenvironments such as angiogenesis, inflammation and immune surveillance. PMID:25307620

  9. Chemopreventive effect of Korean Angelica root extract on TRAMP carcinogenesis and integrative "omic" profiling of affected neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Li; Tang, Suni; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-12-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanol extract exerts anti-cancer activity in several allograft and xenograft models. Here we examined its chemopreventive efficacy through gavage administration against primary carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice and wild type littermates were given a daily gavage (5 mg/mouse, Monday-Friday) of AGN or vehicle, beginning at 8 wk of age (WOA). All mice were terminated at 24 WOA, unless earlier euthanasia was necessitated by large tumors. Whereas AGN-treated TRAMP mice decreased dorsolateral prostate lesion growth by 30% (P = 0.009), they developed fewer and smaller neuroendocrine-carcinomas (NE-Ca) (0.12 g/mouse) than vehicle-treated counterparts (0.81 g/mouse, P = 0.037). We analyzed the proteome and transcriptome of banked NE-Ca to gain molecular insights. Angiogenesis-antibody array detected a substantial reduction in AGN-treated NE-Ca of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an angiogenesis stimulator. iTRAQ proteomics plus data mining suggested changes of genes upstream and downstream of FGF2 functionally consistent with AGN inhibiting FGF2/FGFR1 signaling at different levels of the transduction cascade. Moreover, AGN upregulated mRNA of genes related to immune responses, restored expression of many tumor suppressor genes, and prostate function and muscle differentiation genes. On the other hand, AGN down-regulated mRNA of genes related to neuron signaling, oncofetal antigens, inflammation, and mast cells, Wnt signaling, embryonic morphogenesis, biosynthesis, cell adhesion, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. These changes suggest not only multiple cancer cell targeting actions of AGN but also impact on the tumor microenvironments such as angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune surveillance.

  10. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure. PMID:26383867

  11. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure.

  12. The Urease Inhibitor NBPT Negatively Affects DUR3-mediated Uptake and Assimilation of Urea in Maize Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Laura; Tomasi, Nicola; Zamboni, Anita; Varanini, Zeno; Pinton, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of urease inhibitors in agriculture, little information is available on their effect on nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation. Aim of this work was to study, at physiological and transcriptional level, the effects of N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) on urea nutrition in hydroponically grown maize plants. Presence of NBPT in the nutrient solution limited the capacity of plants to utilize urea as a N-source; this was shown by a decrease in urea uptake rate and 15N accumulation. Noteworthy, these negative effects were evident only when plants were fed with urea, as NBPT did not alter 15N accumulation in nitrate-fed plants. NBPT also impaired the growth of Arabidopsis plants when urea was used as N-source, while having no effect on plants grown with nitrate or ammonium. This response was related, at least in part, to a direct effect of NBPT on the high affinity urea transport system. Impact of NBPT on urea uptake was further evaluated using lines of Arabidopsis overexpressing ZmDUR3 and dur3-knockout; results suggest that not only transport but also urea assimilation could be compromised by the inhibitor. This hypothesis was reinforced by an over-accumulation of urea and a decrease in ammonium concentration in NBPT-treated plants. Furthermore, transcriptional analyses showed that in maize roots NBPT treatment severely impaired the expression of genes involved in the cytosolic pathway of ureic-N assimilation and ammonium transport. NBPT also limited the expression of a gene coding for a transcription factor highly induced by urea and possibly playing a crucial role in the regulation of its acquisition. This work provides evidence that NBPT can heavily interfere with urea nutrition in maize plants, limiting influx as well as the following assimilation pathway. PMID:26635834

  13. The Decreased apical dominance1/Petunia hybrida CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE8 Gene Affects Branch Production and Plays a Role in Leaf Senescence, Root Growth, and Flower Development

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Kimberley C.; Simkin, Andrew J.; Janssen, Bart J.; Templeton, Kerry R.; Loucas, Holly M.; Simons, Joanne L.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; Gleave, Andrew P.; Clark, David G.; Klee, Harry J.

    2005-01-01

    Carotenoids and carotenoid cleavage products play an important and integral role in plant development. The Decreased apical dominance1 (Dad1)/PhCCD8 gene of petunia (Petunia hybrida) encodes a hypothetical carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) and ortholog of the MORE AXILLARY GROWTH4 (MAX4)/AtCCD8 gene. The dad1-1 mutant allele was inactivated by insertion of an unusual transposon (Dad-one transposon), and the dad1-3 allele is a revertant allele of dad1-1. Consistent with its role in producing a graft-transmissible compound that can alter branching, the Dad1/PhCCD8 gene is expressed in root and shoot tissue. This expression is upregulated in the stems of the dad1-1, dad2, and dad3 increased branching mutants, indicating feedback regulation of the gene in this tissue. However, this feedback regulation does not affect the root expression of Dad1/PhCCD8. Overexpression of Dad1/PhCCD8 in the dad1-1 mutant complemented the mutant phenotype, and RNA interference in the wild type resulted in an increased branching phenotype. Other differences in phenotype associated with the loss of Dad1/PhCCD8 function included altered timing of axillary meristem development, delayed leaf senescence, smaller flowers, reduced internode length, and reduced root growth. These data indicate that the substrate(s) and/or product(s) of the Dad1/PhCCD8 enzyme are mobile signal molecules with diverse roles in plant development. PMID:15705953

  14. Root and leaf traits reflect distinct resource acquisition strategies in tropical lianas and trees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Courtney G; Wright, S Joseph; Wurzburger, Nina

    2016-04-01

    In Neotropical forests, lianas are increasing in abundance relative to trees. This increased species richness may reflect a positive response to global change factors including increased temperature, atmospheric CO2, habitat fragmentation, and drought severity; however, questions remain as to the specific mechanisms facilitating the response. Previous work suggests that lianas may gain an ecological advantage over trees through leaf functional traits that offer a quick return on investment of resources, although it is unknown whether this pattern extends to root traits and relationships with fungal or bacterial symbionts belowground. We sampled confamilial pairs of liana and tree species and quantified morphological and chemical traits of leaves and fine roots, as well as root symbiont abundance, to determine whether functional traits associated with resource acquisition differed between the two. Compared to trees, lianas possessed higher specific leaf area, specific root length, root branching intensity, and root nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations, and lower leaf and root tissue density, leaf and root carbon (C), root diameter, root C:P and N:P, and mycorrhizal colonization. Our study provides new evidence that liana leaf and root traits are characterized by a rapid resource acquisition strategy relative to trees. These liana functional traits may facilitate their response to global change, raising questions about how increased liana dominance might affect ecosystem processes of Neotropical forests.

  15. Above-ground herbivory causes rapid and sustained changes in mycorrhizal colonization of grasses.

    PubMed

    Wearn, James A; Gange, Alan C

    2007-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play a vital role in ecosystem functioning. In most grasslands, herbivory by both vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores is common and thus in order to assess herbivore effects on multitrophic-level interactions both should be considered. This study investigated the effects of grazing by rabbit and insect herbivores on root-colonization of grasses by AMF in two lowland grasslands in southern England, UK. A long-term exclosure site was used to provide a temporal assessment in order to elucidate whether any short-term responses to herbivore removal were sustained. Root samples from three grass species at each site were analysed in terms of total mycorrhizal colonization and proportional colonization by individual mycorrhizal structures. Colonization levels were up to 1.6 times greater under moderate levels of rabbit grazing (with summer maxima of 25% and winter minima of 11%) than in intensely grazed swards or fenced plots at both sites. The change was fast (within 8 weeks), consistent throughout the sampled field plots, and temporally sustainable over a 19-year period. There was no significant effect of insect herbivory on total colonization but proportional colonization by different AM structures was affected on some sample dates where vertebrate herbivores had been removed, indicating a slight effect on fungal structure allocation. The results suggest that the type of herbivore and perhaps more importantly the intensity of grazing are key determinants of below-ground effects upon mycorrhizal-host plant symbiosis. The data suggest that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization within grass host plants is strongly influenced by C assimilation and allocation.

  16. Unraveling the Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization on Arsenic Tolerance in Medicago: Glomus mosseae is More Effective than G. intraradices, Associated with Lower Expression of Root Epidermal Pi Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Helle M.; Smith, F. Andrew; Smith, Sally E.

    2012-01-01

    We used medic (Medicago truncatula) to investigate effects of inoculation with two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and application of arsenate (AsV) and phosphate (Pi) on mechanisms underlying increased tolerance (in terms of growth) of AM plants to AsV. We tested the hypotheses that (1) inoculation with AM fungi results in down-regulation of MtPht1;1 and MtPht1;2 genes (encoding high-affinity Pi and AsV uptake systems in the direct root epidermal pathway) and up-regulation of the AM-induced MtPht1;4 (responsible for transfer of Pi from the arbuscular interface to cortical cells), and (2) these changes are involved in decreased As uptake relative to P uptake and hence increased As tolerance. We also measured expression of MtMT4, a Pi starvation-inducible gene, other genes encoding Pi uptake systems (MtPht 1;5 and MtPht1;6) and arsenate reductase (MtACR) and phytochelatin synthase (MtPCS), to gain insights into broader aspects of P transfers in AM plants and possible detoxification mechanisms. Medic responded slightly to AM colonization in terms of growth in the absence of As, but positively in terms of P uptake. Both growth and P responses in AM plants were positive when As was applied, indicating As tolerance relative to non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. All AM plants showed high expression of MtPT4 and those inoculated with Glomus mosseae showed higher selectivity against As (shown by P/As molar ratios) and much lower expression of MtPht1;1 (and to some extent MtPht1;2) than Glomus intraradices-inoculated or NM plants. Results are consistent with increased P/As selectivity in AM plants (particularly those inoculated with G. mosseae) as a consequence of high P uptake but little or no As uptake via the AM pathway. However, the extent to which selectivity is dependent on down-regulation of direct Pi and AsV uptake through epidermal cells is still not clear. Marked up-regulation of a PCS gene and an ACR gene in AM plants may also be involved and requires further

  17. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease.

  18. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Eliakim, Rami

    2016-08-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE-the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  19. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  20. Insights Into Triticum aestivum Seedling Root Rot Caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Vera Buxa, Stefanie; Furch, Alexandra; Friedt, Wolfgang; Gottwald, Sven

    2015-12-01

    Fusarium graminearum is one of the most common and potent fungal pathogens of wheat (Triticum aestivum), known for causing devastating spike infections and grain yield damage. F. graminearum is a typical soil-borne pathogen that builds up during consecutive cereal cropping. Speculation on systemic colonization of cereals by F. graminearum root infection have long existed but have not been proven. We have assessed the Fusarium root rot disease macroscopically in a diverse set of 12 wheat genotypes and microscopically in a comparative study of two genotypes with diverging responses. Here, we show a 'new' aspect of the F. graminearum life cycle, i.e., the head blight fungus uses a unique root-infection strategy with an initial stage typical for root pathogens and a later stage typical for spike infection. Root colonization negatively affects seedling development and leads to systemic plant invasion by tissue-adapted fungal strategies. Another major outcome is the identification of partial resistance to root rot. Disease severity assessments and histological examinations both demonstrated three distinct disease phases that, however, proceeded differently in resistant and susceptible genotypes. Soil-borne inoculum and root infection are considered significant components of the F. graminearum life cycle with important implications for the development of new strategies of resistance breeding and disease control.

  1. Root tips moving through soil

    PubMed Central

    Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    Root elongation occurs by the generation of new cells from meristematic tissue within the apical 1–2 mm region of root tips. Therefore penetration of the soil environment is carried out by newly synthesized plant tissue, whose cells are inherently vulnerable to invasion by pathogens. This conundrum, on its face, would seem to reflect an intolerable risk to the successful establishment of root systems needed for plant life. Yet root tip regions housing the meristematic tissues repeatedly have been found to be free of microbial infection and colonization. Even when spore germination, chemotaxis, and/or growth of pathogens are stimulated by signals from the root tip, the underlying root tissue can escape invasion. Recent insights into the functions of root border cells, and the regulation of their production by transient exposure to external signals, may shed light on long-standing observations. PMID:21455030

  2. Synergistic growth effect among bacteria recovered from root canal infections

    PubMed Central

    Moreira Júnior, Gil; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino; Bambirra, Bernardo Henrique Silva; Bambirra, Felipe Henrique Silva; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Farias, Luiz Macedo; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Moreira, Elizabeth Spangler

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ecological relationships between bacterial species that colonize infected root canals. Root canal bacteria recovered from one patient with pulp canal necrosis were evaluated in vitro for synergistic and antagonistic activities determined by mono and co-culture growth kinetics and the production of bacteriocin-like substances using the double layer diffusion method. Peptostreptococcus prevotii triggered a significant increase of Fusobacterium nucleatum growth, while the former bacteria did not affect the growth of P. prevotii. The bacterial species did not produce antagonism activity against itself or against any of the other two species. Despite many studies have demonstrated the capability of root canal microorganisms to produce antagonistic substances, these in vitro experimental tests show the synergistic effect of P. prevotii on the growth of F. nucleatum. PMID:24031714

  3. Association of azospirillum with grass roots.

    PubMed

    Umali-Garcia, M; Hubbell, D H; Gaskins, M H; Dazzo, F B

    1980-01-01

    The association between grass roots and Azospirillum brasilense Sp 7 was investigated by the Fahraeus slide technique, using nitrogen-free medium. Young inoculated roots of pearl millet and guinea grass produced more mucilaginous sheath (mucigel), root hairs, and lateral roots than did uninoculated sterile controls. The bacteria were found within the mucigel that accumulated on the root cap and along the root axes. Adherent bacteria were associated with granular material on root hairs and fibrillar material on undifferentiated epidermal cells. Significantly fewer numbers of azospirilla attached to millet root hairs when the roots were grown in culture medium supplemented with 5 mM potassium nitrate. Under these growth conditions, bacterial attachment to undifferentiated epidermal cells was unaffected. Aseptically collected root exudate from pearl millet contained substances which bound to azospirilla and promoted their adsorption to the root hairs. This activity was associated with nondialyzable and proteasesensitive substances in root exudate. Millet root hairs adsorbed azospirilla in significantly higher numbers than cells of Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, Azotobacter, Klebsiella, or Escherichia. Pectolytic activities, including pectin transeliminase and endopolygalacturonase, were detected in pure cultures of A. brasilense when this species was grown in a medium containing pectin. These studies describe colonization of grass root surfaces by A. brasilense and provide a possible explanation for the limited colonization of intercellular spaces of the outer root cortex.

  4. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  5. Seasonal variation in nitrogen net uptake and root plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity of Scots pine seedlings as affected by nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Iivonen, Sari; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2002-01-01

    We examined changes in nitrogen (N) net uptake and activity and amount of plasma membrane H+-ATPase (PM-ATPase) in roots of hydroponically cultured Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings throughout a simulated second growing season. Seedlings were grown with low (0.25 mM N) or high (2.5 mM N) nutrient availability to determine whether root PM-ATPase is dependent on an external nutrient supply. Climatic conditions in the growth chamber simulated the mean growing season from May to mid-October in southern Finland. Root PM-ATPase activity varied considerably during the growing season and was higher in current-year roots than in previous-year roots. Total PM-ATPase activity of current-year roots was highest at the end of the growing season, whereas PM-ATPase activity per unit fresh mass of current-year roots and specific absorption rate of N were highest in mid-July and decreased at the end of the growing season. This indicates that the decrease in PM-ATPase activity per unit fresh mass of the roots at the end of the growing season was compensated by the increased size of the root system. Seasonal variation in PM-ATPase activity had no clear dependence on root zone temperature. The response of PM-ATPase to root zone temperature was dependent on the developmental stage of the seedling. High nutrient availability resulted in increased root PM-ATPase activity and an extended period of root growth in autumn. PMID:11772550

  6. Growth media simulating ileal and colonic environments affect the intracellular proteome and carbon fluxes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Sabrina; Huber, Claudia; Eylert, Eva; Elsenhans, Ines; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Herbert

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the intracellular proteome of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry after growth in simulated ileal environment media (SIEM) and simulated colonic environment media (SCEM) under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Differentially expressed intracellular proteins were identified and allocated to functional protein groups. Moreover, metabolic fluxes were analyzed by isotopologue profiling with [U-(13)C(6)]glucose as a tracer. The results of this study show that EDL933 responds with differential expression of a complex network of proteins and metabolic pathways, reflecting the high metabolic adaptability of the strain. Growth in SIEM and SCEM is obviously facilitated by the upregulation of nucleotide biosynthesis pathway proteins and could be impaired by exposition to 50 µM 6-mercaptopurine under aerobic conditions. Notably, various stress and virulence factors, including Shiga toxin, were expressed without having contact with a human host.

  7. The diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi amplified from grapevine roots (Vitis vinifera L.) in Oregon vineyards is seasonally stable and influenced by soil and vine age.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, R Paul; Mihara, Keiko L

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in 10 Oregon vineyards was assessed by examining spores in soil and amplifying mycorrhizal DNA from roots. Seventeen spore morphotypes were found in soil, including seven species in the Acaulosporaceae. Eighteen phylotypes were amplified from grape roots with AM1 and NS31 primers, and clones were dominated by Glomus spp. (> 99%). A few clones (< 1%) representing a single phylotype within Gigasporaceae, and a single clone within Archaeosporaceae were amplified from roots with AM1-NS31 primers. A separate experiment employing known proportions of grape roots colonized by Glomus intraradices or by Gigaspora rosea showed that fungi within Gigasporaceae might be underrepresented in clone abundance when Glomus spp. co-occur in roots. No clones representing fungi within the Acaulosporaceae were amplified from vineyards, although specific fungi within Acaulosporaceae were shown to colonize Pinot noir roots in sterilized soil and were amplified from these roots. Four Glomus phylotypes, including G. intraradices, were found in roots from all 10 vineyards, and these fungi accounted for 81% of clones. AMF phylotypes amplified from roots did not change during the growing season, although six phylotypes varied with soil type. The presence of three phylotypes was affected by vineyard age, and phylotype richness appeared to decline as vineyard age increased beyond 20 y. PCA analysis supported the hypothesis that the AMF community is different in red-hill soils than in valley soils and indicated certain phylotypes might be associated with lower soil and vine nutrient status. However, the changes in the AMF community in grape roots across vineyards were subtle because most root samples were dominated by the same three or four phylotypes. A separate analysis using primers to amplify AMF from the Archeasporaceae/Paraglomeraceae showed most root samples also were colonized by at least one Paraglomus or Archaeospora phylotype.

  8. Carbon Allocation into Different Fine-Root Classes of Young Abies alba Trees Is Affected More by Phenology than by Simulated Browsing

    PubMed Central

    Endrulat, Tina; Buchmann, Nina; Brunner, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Abies alba (European silver fir) was used to investigate possible effects of simulated browsing on C allocation belowground by 13CO2 pulse-labelling at spring, summer or autumn, and by harvesting the trees at the same time point of the labelling or at a later season for biomass and for 13C-allocation into the fine-root system. Before budburst in spring, the leader shoots and 50% of all lateral shoots of half of the investigated 5-year old Abies alba saplings were clipped to simulate browsing. At harvest, different fine-root classes were separated, and starch as an important storage compartment was analysed for concentrations. The phenology had a strong effect on the allocation of the 13C-label from shoots to roots. In spring, shoots did not supply the fine-roots with high amounts of the 13C-label, because the fine-roots contained less than 1% of the applied 13C. In summer and autumn, however, shoots allocated relatively high amounts of the 13C-label to the fine roots. The incorporation of the 13C-label as structural C or as starch into the roots is strongly dependent on the root type and the root diameter. In newly formed fine roots, 3–5% of the applied 13C was incorporated, whereas 1–3% in the ≤0.5 mm root class and 1–1.5% in the >0.5–1.0 mm root class were recorded. Highest 13C-enrichment in the starch was recorded in the newly formed fine roots in autumn. The clipping treatment had a significant positive effect on the amount of allocated 13C-label to the fine roots after the spring labelling, with high relative 13C-contents observed in the ≤0.5 mm and the >0.5–1.0 mm fine-root classes of clipped trees. No effects of the clipping were observed after summer and autumn labelling in the 13C-allocation patterns. Overall, our data imply that the season of C assimilation and, thus, the phenology of trees is the main determinant of the C allocation from shoots to roots and is clearly more important than browsing. PMID:27123860

  9. Carbon Allocation into Different Fine-Root Classes of Young Abies alba Trees Is Affected More by Phenology than by Simulated Browsing.

    PubMed

    Endrulat, Tina; Buchmann, Nina; Brunner, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Abies alba (European silver fir) was used to investigate possible effects of simulated browsing on C allocation belowground by 13CO2 pulse-labelling at spring, summer or autumn, and by harvesting the trees at the same time point of the labelling or at a later season for biomass and for 13C-allocation into the fine-root system. Before budburst in spring, the leader shoots and 50% of all lateral shoots of half of the investigated 5-year old Abies alba saplings were clipped to simulate browsing. At harvest, different fine-root classes were separated, and starch as an important storage compartment was analysed for concentrations. The phenology had a strong effect on the allocation of the 13C-label from shoots to roots. In spring, shoots did not supply the fine-roots with high amounts of the 13C-label, because the fine-roots contained less than 1% of the applied 13C. In summer and autumn, however, shoots allocated relatively high amounts of the 13C-label to the fine roots. The incorporation of the 13C-label as structural C or as starch into the roots is strongly dependent on the root type and the root diameter. In newly formed fine roots, 3-5% of the applied 13C was incorporated, whereas 1-3% in the ≤0.5 mm root class and 1-1.5% in the >0.5-1.0 mm root class were recorded. Highest 13C-enrichment in the starch was recorded in the newly formed fine roots in autumn. The clipping treatment had a significant positive effect on the amount of allocated 13C-label to the fine roots after the spring labelling, with high relative 13C-contents observed in the ≤0.5 mm and the >0.5-1.0 mm fine-root classes of clipped trees. No effects of the clipping were observed after summer and autumn labelling in the 13C-allocation patterns. Overall, our data imply that the season of C assimilation and, thus, the phenology of trees is the main determinant of the C allocation from shoots to roots and is clearly more important than browsing. PMID:27123860

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a mountain grassland II: Seasonal variation of colonization studied, along with its relation to grazing and metabolic host type.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Mónica A; González Maza, Mirta E; Cabello, Marta N

    2003-01-01

    The relationships among seasons, host metabolic type, grazing and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization were analyzed in a high South American native grassland. This study investigated seasonal changes and grazing effects on the symbiotic endomycorrhizal interaction in 5 Poaceae [C(3) metabolic pathway: Briza subaristata Lam., Deyeuxia hieronymi (Hack.) Türpe and Poa stuckertii (Hack.) Parodi; with C(4) metabolic pathway: Eragrostis lugens Nees and Sorghastrum pellitum (Hack.) Parodi; and a Rosaceae (Alchemilla pinnata Ruíz & Pav.)]. All hosts were dominant species in the mountain grassland in central Argentina. It was found that the seasons markedly influenced endomycorrhizal colonization, whereas grazing did not affect this interaction. C(4) grasses presented the highest root colonization. Hosts Briza subaristata (C(3) metabolic pathway) and Sorghastrum pellitum (C(4) metabolic pathway) showed Arum- and Paris-type colonization and intermediate forms.

  11. Will changes in root-zone temperature in boreal spring affect recovery of photosynthesis in Picea mariana and Populus tremuloides in a future climate?

    PubMed

    Fréchette, Emmanuelle; Ensminger, Ingo; Bergeron, Yves; Gessler, Arthur; Berninger, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Future climate will alter the soil cover of mosses and snow depths in the boreal forests of eastern Canada. In field manipulation experiments, we assessed the effects of varying moss and snow depths on the physiology of black spruce (Picea -mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the boreal black spruce forest of western Québec. For 1 year, naturally regenerated 10-year-old spruce and aspen were grown with one of the following treatments: additional N fertilization, addition of sphagnum moss cover, removal of mosses, delayed soil thawing through snow and hay addition, or accelerated soil thawing through springtime snow removal. Treatments that involved the addition of insulating moss or snow in the spring caused lower soil temperature, while removing moss and snow in the spring caused elevated soil temperature and thus had a warming effect. Soil warming treatments were associated with greater temperature variability. Additional soil cover, whether moss or snow, increased the rate of photosynthetic recovery in the spring. Moss and snow removal, on the other hand, had the opposite effect and lowered photosynthetic activity, especially in spruce. Maximal electron transport rate (ETR(max)) was, for spruce, 39.5% lower after moss removal than with moss addition, and 16.3% lower with accelerated thawing than with delayed thawing. Impaired photosynthetic recovery in the absence of insulating moss or snow covers was associated with lower foliar N concentrations. Both species were affected in that way, but trembling aspen generally reacted less strongly to all treatments. Our results indicate that a clear negative response of black spruce to changes in root-zone temperature should be anticipated in a future climate. Reduced moss cover and snow depth could adversely affect the photosynthetic capacities of black spruce, while having only minor effects on trembling aspen. PMID:22021010

  12. Will changes in root-zone temperature in boreal spring affect recovery of photosynthesis in Picea mariana and Populus tremuloides in a future climate?

    PubMed

    Fréchette, Emmanuelle; Ensminger, Ingo; Bergeron, Yves; Gessler, Arthur; Berninger, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Future climate will alter the soil cover of mosses and snow depths in the boreal forests of eastern Canada. In field manipulation experiments, we assessed the effects of varying moss and snow depths on the physiology of black spruce (Picea -mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the boreal black spruce forest of western Québec. For 1 year, naturally regenerated 10-year-old spruce and aspen were grown with one of the following treatments: additional N fertilization, addition of sphagnum moss cover, removal of mosses, delayed soil thawing through snow and hay addition, or accelerated soil thawing through springtime snow removal. Treatments that involved the addition of insulating moss or snow in the spring caused lower soil temperature, while removing moss and snow in the spring caused elevated soil temperature and thus had a warming effect. Soil warming treatments were associated with greater temperature variability. Additional soil cover, whether moss or snow, increased the rate of photosynthetic recovery in the spring. Moss and snow removal, on the other hand, had the opposite effect and lowered photosynthetic activity, especially in spruce. Maximal electron transport rate (ETR(max)) was, for spruce, 39.5% lower after moss removal than with moss addition, and 16.3% lower with accelerated thawing than with delayed thawing. Impaired photosynthetic recovery in the absence of insulating moss or snow covers was associated with lower foliar N concentrations. Both species were affected in that way, but trembling aspen generally reacted less strongly to all treatments. Our results indicate that a clear negative response of black spruce to changes in root-zone temperature should be anticipated in a future climate. Reduced moss cover and snow depth could adversely affect the photosynthetic capacities of black spruce, while having only minor effects on trembling aspen.

  13. Root-to-Root Travel of the Beneficial Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    PubMed Central

    Bashan, Yoav; Holguin, Gina

    1994-01-01

    The root-to-root travel of the beneficial bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on wheat and soybean roots in agar, sand, and light-textured soil was monitored. We used a motile wild-type (Mot+) strain and a motility-deficient (Mot-) strain which was derived from the wild-type strain. The colonization levels of inoculated roots were similar for the two strains. Mot+ cells moved from inoculated roots (either natural or artificial roots in agar, sand, or light-textured soil) to noninoculated roots, where they formed a band-type colonization composed of bacterial aggregates encircling a limited part of the root, regardless of the plant species. The Mot- strain did not move toward noninoculated roots of either plant species and usually stayed at the inoculation site and root tips. The effect of attractants and repellents was the primary factor governing the motility of Mot+ cells in the presence of adequate water. We propose that interroot travel of A. brasilense is an essential preliminary step in the root-bacterium recognition mechanism. Bacterial motility might have a general role in getting Azospirillum cells to the site where firmer attachment favors colonization of the root system. Azospirillum travel toward plants is a nonspecific active process which is not directly dependent on nutrient deficiency but is a consequence of a nonspecific bacterial chemotaxis, influenced by the balance between attractants and possibly repellents leaked by the root. PMID:16349297

  14. Differential effects of fenpropimorph and fenhexamid, two sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicides, on arbuscular mycorrhizal development and sterol metabolism in carrot roots.

    PubMed

    Campagnac, Estelle; Fontaine, Joël; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj; Laruelle, Frédéric; Durand, Roger; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne

    2008-12-01

    Sterols composition of transformed carrot roots incubated in presence of increasing concentrations of fenpropimorph (0.02; 0.2; 2mgl(-1)) and fenhexamid (0.02; 0.2; 2; 20mgl(-1)), colonized or not by Glomus intraradices was determined. In mycorrhizal roots treated with fenpropimorph, normal Delta(5)-sterols were replaced by unusual compounds such as 9beta,19-cyclopropylsterols (24-methylpollinastanol), Delta(8,14)-sterols (ergosta-8,14-dienol, stigmasta-8,14-dienol), Delta(8)-sterols (Delta(8) sitosterol) and Delta(7)-sterols (ergosta-7,22-dienol). After application of fenpropimorph, a drastic reduction of the mycorrhizal root growth, root colonization and extraradical fungal development was observed. Application of fenhexamid did not modify sterol profiles and the total colonization of roots. But the arbuscule frequency of the fungal partner was significantly affected. Comparison of the effects caused by the tested fungicides indicates that the usual phytosterols may be involved in symbiosis development. Indeed, observed modifications of root sterols composition could explain the high fenpropimorph toxicity to the AM symbiosis. However, the absence of sterolic modifications in the roots treated with fenhexamid could account for its more limited impact on mycorrhization.

  15. Order of arrival structures arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of plants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-03-01

    Priority effects - the impact of a species' arrival on subsequent community development - have been shown to influence species composition in many organisms. Whether priority effects among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) structure fungal root communities is not well understood. Here, we investigated whether priority effects influence the success of two closely related AMF species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Glomus aggregatum), hypothesizing that a resident AMF suppresses invader success, this effect is time-dependent and a resident will experience reduced growth when invaded. We performed two glasshouse experiments using modified pots, which permitted direct inoculation of resident and invading AMF on the roots. We quantified intraradical AMF abundances using quantitative PCR and visual colonization percentages. We found that both fungi suppressed the invading species and that this effect was strongly dependent on the time lag between inoculations. In contrast to our expectations, neither resident AMF was negatively affected by invasion. We show that order of arrival can influence the abundance of AMF species colonizing a host. These priority effects can have important implications for AMF ecology and the use of fungal inocula in sustainable agriculture.

  16. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes. PMID:27399695

  17. Cytokinin producing bacteria stimulate amino acid deposition by wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Melentiev, Alexander I; Martynenko, Elena V; Timergalina, Leila N; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Shendel, Galina V; Kuz'mina, Ludmila Yu; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-10-01

    Phytohormone production is one mechanism by which rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth, but it is not clear whether the bacteria gain from this mechanism. The hypothesis that microbial-derived cytokinin phytohormones stimulate root exudation of amino acids was tested. The rhizosphere of wheat plants was drenched with the synthetic cytokinin trans-zeatin or inoculated with Bacillus subtilis IB-22 (which produces zeatin type cytokinins) or B. subtilis IB-21 (which failed to accumulate cytokinins). Growing plants in a split root system allowed spatial separation of zeatin application or rhizobacterial inoculation to one compartment and analyses of amino acid release from roots (rhizodeposition) into the other compartment (without either microbial inoculation or treatment with exogenous hormone). Supplying B. subtilis IB-22 or zeatin to either the whole root system or half of the roots increased concentrations of amino acids in the soil solution although the magnitude of the increase was greater when whole roots were treated. There was some similarity in amino acid concentrations induced by either bacterial or zeatin treatment. Thus B. subtilis IB-22 increased amino acid rhizodeposition, likely due to its ability to produce cytokinins. Furthermore, B. subtilis strain IB-21, which failed to accumulate cytokinins in culture media, did not significantly affect amino acid concentrations in the wheat rhizosphere. The ability of rhizobacteria to produce cytokinins and thereby stimulate rhizodeposition may be important in enhancing rhizobacterial colonization of the rhizoplane.

  18. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana’s roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes PMID:27399695

  19. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  20. Ecophysiology of wetland plant roots: A modelling comparison of aeration in relation to species distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorrell, B.K.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.; Woods, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the potential for inter-specific differences in root aeration to determine wetland plant distribution in nature. We compared aeration in species that differ in the type of sediment and depth of water they colonize. Differences in root anatomy, structure and physiology were applied to aeration models that predicted the maximum possible aerobic lengths and development of anoxic zones in primary adventitious roots. Differences in anatomy and metabolism that provided higher axial fluxes of oxygen allowed deeper root growth in species that favour more reducing sediments and deeper water. Modelling identified factors that affected growth in anoxic soils through their effects on aeration. These included lateral root formation, which occurred at the expense of extension of the primary root because of the additional respiratory demand they imposed, reducing oxygen fluxes to the tip and stele, and the development of stelar anoxia. However, changes in sediment oxygen demand had little detectable effect on aeration in the primary roots due to their low wall permeability and high surface impedance, but appeared to reduce internal oxygen availability by accelerating loss from laterals. The development of pressurized convective gas flow in shoots and rhizomes was also found to be important in assisting root aeration, as it maintained higher basal oxygen concentrations at the rhizome-root junctions in species growing into deep water. (C) 2000 Annals of Botany Company.

  1. Gibberellins interfere with symbiosis signaling and gene expression and alter colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza is a mutualistic plant-fungus interaction that confers great advantages for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enter the host root and form symbiotic structures that facilitate nutrient supplies between the symbionts. The gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones known to inhibit AM fungal infection. However, our transcriptome analysis and phytohormone quantification revealed GA accumulation in the roots of Lotus japonicus infected with AM fungi, suggesting that de novo GA synthesis plays a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza development. We found pleiotropic effects of GAs on the AM fungal infection. In particular, the morphology of AM fungal colonization was drastically altered by the status of GA signaling in the host root. Exogenous GA treatment inhibited AM hyphal entry into the host root and suppressed the expression of Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization1 (RAM1) and RAM2 homologs that function in hyphal entry and arbuscule formation. On the other hand, inhibition of GA biosynthesis or suppression of GA signaling also affected arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the host root. Low-GA conditions suppressed arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced subtilisin-like serine protease1 (SbtM1) expression that is required for AM fungal colonization and reduced hyphal branching in the host root. The reduced hyphal branching and SbtM1 expression caused by the inhibition of GA biosynthesis were recovered by GA treatment, supporting the theory that insufficient GA signaling causes the inhibitory effects on arbuscular mycorrhiza development. Most studies have focused on the negative role of GA signaling, whereas our study demonstrates that GA signaling also positively interacts with symbiotic responses and promotes AM colonization of the host root.

  2. Gibberellins Interfere with Symbiosis Signaling and Gene Expression and Alter Colonization by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Lotus japonicus1

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza is a mutualistic plant-fungus interaction that confers great advantages for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enter the host root and form symbiotic structures that facilitate nutrient supplies between the symbionts. The gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones known to inhibit AM fungal infection. However, our transcriptome analysis and phytohormone quantification revealed GA accumulation in the roots of Lotus japonicus infected with AM fungi, suggesting that de novo GA synthesis plays a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza development. We found pleiotropic effects of GAs on the AM fungal infection. In particular, the morphology of AM fungal colonization was drastically altered by the status of GA signaling in the host root. Exogenous GA treatment inhibited AM hyphal entry into the host root and suppressed the expression of Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization1 (RAM1) and RAM2 homologs that function in hyphal entry and arbuscule formation. On the other hand, inhibition of GA biosynthesis or suppression of GA signaling also affected arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the host root. Low-GA conditions suppressed arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced subtilisin-like serine protease1 (SbtM1) expression that is required for AM fungal colonization and reduced hyphal branching in the host root. The reduced hyphal branching and SbtM1 expression caused by the inhibition of GA biosynthesis were recovered by GA treatment, supporting the theory that insufficient GA signaling causes the inhibitory effects on arbuscular mycorrhiza development. Most studies have focused on the negative role of GA signaling, whereas our study demonstrates that GA signaling also positively interacts with symbiotic responses and promotes AM colonization of the host root. PMID:25527715

  3. [Alleviated affect of exogenous CaCl2 on the growth, antioxidative enzyme activities and cadmium absorption efficiency of Wedelia trilobata hairy roots under cadmium stress].

    PubMed

    Shi, Heping; Wang, Yunling; Tsang, PoKeung Eric; Chan, LeeWah Andrew

    2012-06-01

    In order to study the physiological mechanism of exogenous calcium on the toxicity of heavy metal cadmium (Cd) to Wedelia trilobata hairy roots, the effects of Cd alone, and in combination with different concentrations of Ca on growth, contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), Cd2+ absorption in W. trilobata hairy roots were investigated. Cd concentrations lower than 50 micromol/L enhanced the growth of hairy roots, while concentrations higher than 100 micromol/L inhibited growth, making the branched roots short and small, and also turning the root tips brown, even black. In comparison with the control (0 micromol/L Cd), the soluble protein content in hairy roots was found to increase when cultured with 10-50 micromol/L Cd, and decrease when exposed to a cadmium concentration higher than 100 micromol/L Cd. In addition, the activities of POD and SOD activity and MDA content were significantly higher than the control. Compared to the control (hairy roots cultured without 10-30 mmol/L Ca), 100 micromol/L Cd or 300 micromol/L Cd in combination with 10-30 mmol/L Ca resulted in increased growth, causing the main root and secondary roots thicker and also an increase in soluble protein content. On the contrary, MDA content and POD and SOD activities decreased. Quantitative analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry showed that W. trilobata hairy roots can absorb and adsorb heavy metal Cd in the ionic form of Cd2+. The maximum content of Cd2+ absorbed by the hairy roots was obtained with a concentration 100 micromol/L Cd2+ while that of Cd2+ adsorbed by hairy roots was achieved with a concentration of 300 micromol/L Cd2+. The exogenous addition of 10-30 mmol/L Ca2+ was found to reduce the absorption, adsorption of Cd2+ and the toxicity of Cd significantly. This reduction in toxicity was caused by the reduction in the absorption of Cd and decreasing the lipid peroxidation through regulating the

  4. Localized and non-localized effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on accumulation of osmolytes and aquaporins and on antioxidant systems in maize plants subjected to total or partial root drying.

    PubMed

    Bárzana, Gloria; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alters host plant physiology under drought stress, but no information is available on whether or not the AM affects respond to drought locally or systemically. A split-root system was used to obtain AM plants with total or only half root system colonized as well as to induce physiological drought affecting the whole plant or non-physiological drought affecting only the half root system. We analysed the local and/or systemic nature of the AM effects on accumulation of osmoregulatory compounds and aquaporins and on antioxidant systems. Maize plants accumulated proline both, locally in roots affected by drought and systemically when the drought affected the whole root system, being the last effect ampler in AM plants. PIPs (plasma membrane intrinsic proteins) aquaporins were also differently regulated by drought in AM and non-AM root compartments. When the drought affected only the AM root compartment, the rise of lipid peroxidation was restricted to such compartment. On the contrary, when the drought affected the non-AM root fraction, the rise of lipid peroxidation was similar in both root compartments. Thus, the benefits of the AM symbiosis not only rely in a lower oxidative stress in the host plant, but it also restricts locally such oxidative stress.

  5. Localized and non-localized effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on accumulation of osmolytes and aquaporins and on antioxidant systems in maize plants subjected to total or partial root drying.

    PubMed

    Bárzana, Gloria; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alters host plant physiology under drought stress, but no information is available on whether or not the AM affects respond to drought locally or systemically. A split-root system was used to obtain AM plants with total or only half root system colonized as well as to induce physiological drought affecting the whole plant or non-physiological drought affecting only the half root system. We analysed the local and/or systemic nature of the AM effects on accumulation of osmoregulatory compounds and aquaporins and on antioxidant systems. Maize plants accumulated proline both, locally in roots affected by drought and systemically when the drought affected the whole root system, being the last effect ampler in AM plants. PIPs (plasma membrane intrinsic proteins) aquaporins were also differently regulated by drought in AM and non-AM root compartments. When the drought affected only the AM root compartment, the rise of lipid peroxidation was restricted to such compartment. On the contrary, when the drought affected the non-AM root fraction, the rise of lipid peroxidation was similar in both root compartments. Thus, the benefits of the AM symbiosis not only rely in a lower oxidative stress in the host plant, but it also restricts locally such oxidative stress. PMID:25630435

  6. Instruments and methods for the quantitative measurement of factors affecting hygienist/dentist efforts during scaling and root planing of the teeth.

    PubMed

    White, D J; Cox, E R; Arends, J; Nieborg, J H; Leydsman, H; Wieringa, D W; Dijkman, A G; Ruben, J R

    1996-01-01

    Manual calculus debridement through scaling accounts for a significant proportion of hygienist efforts in dental and periodontal practices. Despite this, little is quantitatively known concerning the effects of instruments, technique and treatments on debridement (scaling) efficiency or efficacy. The total work effort expended by therapists in calculus debridement results from the sum of the efforts associated with each scaling stroke. Each scaling stroke, in turn, is affected by a variety of physical forces, including those in the control of the therapist and those intrinsic to the calculus substrate. The development of procedures and treatments to facilitate easier calculus removal requires consideration of the physical and technique-related factors which contribute to hygienist effort. Instruments have recently been developed which can quantitatively measure force dynamics associated with scaling procedures, including both therapist-applied forces and forces developed due to the extreme hardness and tenacity of supra- and subgingival calculus deposits. The scaling instrument developed to quantitatively record developed forces in scaling, the Quanticalc, can be used for the assessment of techniques and treatments which can soften calculus, facilitating easier debridement. The device can also be used to instruct therapists on factors contributing to surface roughness and tactile response to these factors. The scaling instrument developed to quantitatively measure therapist applied forces in scaling, the Zappa device, can be used for assessment of techniques which can increase the efficiency of calculus removal with minimal damage to sound root substance. In this paper, the force dynamics associated with manual scaling procedures of dental professionals are defined. These force dynamics account for the total work expended by hygienists and other professionals in the important task of calculus removal. Using this as a foundation, the design, use, calibration and

  7. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community response to warming and grazing differs between soil and roots on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zheng, Yong; Gao, Cheng; He, Xinhua; Ding, Qiong; Kim, Yongchan; Rui, Yichao; Wang, Shiping; Guo, Liang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form symbiotic associations with most plant species in terrestrial ecosystems, and are affected by environmental variations. To reveal the impact of disturbance on an AM fungal community under future global warming, we examined the abundance and community composition of AM fungi in both soil and mixed roots in an alpine meadow on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. Warming and grazing had no significant effect on AM root colonization, spore density and extraradical hyphal density. A total of 65 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of AM fungi were identified from soil and roots using molecular techniques. AM fungal OTU richness was higher in soil (54 OTUs) than in roots (34 OTUs), and some AM fungi that differed between soil and roots, showed significantly biased occurrence to warming or grazing. Warming and grazing did not significantly affect AM fungal OTU richness in soil, but warming with grazing significantly increased AM fungal OTU richness in roots compared to the grazing-only treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the AM fungal community composition was significantly different between soil and roots, and was significantly affected by grazing in roots, whereas in soil it was significantly affected by warming and plant species richness. The results suggest that the AM fungal community responds differently to warming and grazing in soil compared with roots. This study provides insights into the role of AM fungi under global environmental change scenarios in alpine meadows of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  8. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community response to warming and grazing differs between soil and roots on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Zheng, Yong; Gao, Cheng; He, Xinhua; Ding, Qiong; Kim, Yongchan; Rui, Yichao; Wang, Shiping; Guo, Liang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form symbiotic associations with most plant species in terrestrial ecosystems, and are affected by environmental variations. To reveal the impact of disturbance on an AM fungal community under future global warming, we examined the abundance and community composition of AM fungi in both soil and mixed roots in an alpine meadow on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. Warming and grazing had no significant effect on AM root colonization, spore density and extraradical hyphal density. A total of 65 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of AM fungi were identified from soil and roots using molecular techniques. AM fungal OTU richness was higher in soil (54 OTUs) than in roots (34 OTUs), and some AM fungi that differed between soil and roots, showed significantly biased occurrence to warming or grazing. Warming and grazing did not significantly affect AM fungal OTU richness in soil, but warming with grazing significantly increased AM fungal OTU richness in roots compared to the grazing-only treatment. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the AM fungal community composition was significantly different between soil and roots, and was significantly affected by grazing in roots, whereas in soil it was significantly affected by warming and plant species richness. The results suggest that the AM fungal community responds differently to warming and grazing in soil compared with roots. This study provides insights into the role of AM fungi under global environmental change scenarios in alpine meadows of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. PMID:24086741

  9. Ageing and gastrointestinal sensory function: altered colonic mechanosensory and chemosensory function in the aged mouse

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Christopher; Nocchi, Linda; Yu, Yang; Donovan, Jemma; Grundy, David

    2016-01-01

    Key points Remarkably little is known about how age affects the sensory signalling pathways in the gastrointestinal tract despite age‐related gastrointestinal dysfunction being a prime cause of morbidity amongst the elderly populationHigh‐threshold gastrointestinal sensory nerves play a key role in signalling distressing information from the gut to the brain.We found that ageing is associated with attenuated high‐threshold afferent mechanosensitivity in the murine colon, and associated loss of TRPV1 channel function.These units have the capacity to sensitise in response to injurious events, and their loss in ageing may predispose the elderly to lower awareness of GI injury or disease. Abstract Ageing has a profound effect upon gastrointestinal function through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we investigated the effect of age upon gastrointestinal sensory signalling pathways in order to address the mechanisms underlying these changes. In vitro mouse colonic and jejunal preparations with attached splanchnic and mesenteric nerves were used to study mechanosensory and chemosensory afferent function in 3‐, 12‐ and 24‐month‐old C57BL/6 animals. Quantitative RT‐PCR was used to investigate mRNA expression in colonic tissue and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells isolated from 3‐ and 24‐month animals, and immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the number of 5‐HT‐expressing enterochromaffin (EC) cells. Colonic and jejunal afferent mechanosensory function was attenuated with age and these effects appeared earlier in the colon compared to the jejunum. Colonic age‐related loss of mechanosensory function was more pronounced in high‐threshold afferents compared to low‐threshold afferents. Chemosensory function was attenuated in the 24‐month colon, affecting TRPV1 and serotonergic signalling pathways. High‐threshold mechanosensory afferent fibres and small‐diameter DRG neurons possessed lower functional TRPV1 receptor responses

  10. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots, root tips, and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)-infected roots.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Mark L; Xue, Ping; Yang, Ronghui

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of plant roots by root knot and cyst nematodes requires a functional ethylene response pathway. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and whether its role in nematode colonization is direct or indirect, for example lateral root initiation or root hair growth, is not known. The temporal requirement for ethylene and localized synthesis of ethylene during the life span of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) on soybean roots was further investigated. Although a significant increase in ethylene evolution was not detected from SCN-colonized roots, the concentration of the immediate precursor to ethylene, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), was higher in SCN-colonized root pieces and root tips than in other parts of the root. Moreover, expression analysis of 17 ACC synthase (ACS) genes indicated that a select set of ACS genes is expressed in SCN-colonized root pieces that is clearly different from the set of genes expressed in non-colonized roots or root tips. Semi-quantitative real-time PCR indicated that ACS transcript accumulation correlates with the high concentration of ACC in root tips. In addition, an ACS-like sequence was found in the public SCN nucleotide database. Acquisition of a full-length sequence for this mRNA (accession GQ389647) and alignment with transcripts for other well-characterized ACS proteins indicated that the nematode sequence is missing a key element required for ACS activity and therefore probably is not a functional ACS. Moreover, no significant amount of ACC was found in any growth stage of SCN that was tested.

  11. Ethylene and jasmonic acid act as negative modulators during mutualistic symbiosis between Laccaria bicolor and Populus roots.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Khachane, Amit; Ouassou, Malika; Sundberg, Björn; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2014-04-01

    The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid have interconnecting roles during the response of plant tissues to mutualistic and pathogenic symbionts. We used morphological studies of transgenic- or hormone-treated Populus roots as well as whole-genome oligoarrays to examine how these hormones affect root colonization by the mutualistic ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N. We found that genes regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid were regulated in the late stages of the interaction between L. bicolor and poplar. Both ethylene and jasmonic acid treatments were found to impede fungal colonization of roots, and this effect was correlated to an increase in the expression of certain transcription factors (e.g. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1) and a decrease in the expression of genes associated with microbial perception and cell wall modification. Further, we found that ethylene and jasmonic acid showed extensive transcriptional cross-talk, cross-talk that was opposed by salicylic acid signaling. We conclude that ethylene and jasmonic acid pathways are induced late in the colonization of root tissues in order to limit fungal growth within roots. This induction is probably an adaptive response by the plant such that its growth and vigor are not compromised by the fungus. PMID:24383411

  12. Aquaporins and root water relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  13. Metabolic transition in mycorrhizal tomato roots

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Javier; Gamir, Jordi; Aroca, Ricardo; Pozo, María J.; Flors, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial plant–microorganism interactions are widespread in nature. Among them, the symbiosis between plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is of major importance, commonly improving host nutrition and tolerance against environmental and biotic challenges. Metabolic changes were observed in a well-established symbiosis between tomato and two common AMF: Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae. Principal component analysis of metabolites, determined by non-targeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, showed a strong metabolic rearrangement in mycorrhizal roots. There was generally a negative impact of mycorrhizal symbiosis on amino acid content, mainly on those involved in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. On the other hand, many intermediaries in amino acid and sugar metabolism and the oxylipin pathway were among the compounds accumulating more in mycorrhizal roots. The metabolic reprogramming also affected other pathways in the secondary metabolism, mainly phenyl alcohols (lignins and lignans) and vitamins. The results showed that source metabolites of these pathways decreased in mycorrhizal roots, whilst the products derived from α-linolenic and amino acids presented higher concentrations in AMF-colonized roots. Mycorrhization therefore increased the flux into those pathways. Venn-diagram analysis showed that there are many induced signals shared by both mycorrhizal interactions, pointing to general mycorrhiza-associated changes in the tomato metabolome. Moreover, fungus-specific fingerprints were also found, suggesting that specific molecular alterations may underlie the reported functional diversity of the symbiosis. Since most positively regulated pathways were related to stress response mechanisms, their potential contribution to improved host stress tolerance is discussed. PMID:26157423

  14. Metabolic transition in mycorrhizal tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Javier; Gamir, Jordi; Aroca, Ricardo; Pozo, María J; Flors, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial plant-microorganism interactions are widespread in nature. Among them, the symbiosis between plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is of major importance, commonly improving host nutrition and tolerance against environmental and biotic challenges. Metabolic changes were observed in a well-established symbiosis between tomato and two common AMF: Rhizophagus irregularis and Funneliformis mosseae. Principal component analysis of metabolites, determined by non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, showed a strong metabolic rearrangement in mycorrhizal roots. There was generally a negative impact of mycorrhizal symbiosis on amino acid content, mainly on those involved in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. On the other hand, many intermediaries in amino acid and sugar metabolism and the oxylipin pathway were among the compounds accumulating more in mycorrhizal roots. The metabolic reprogramming also affected other pathways in the secondary metabolism, mainly phenyl alcohols (lignins and lignans) and vitamins. The results showed that source metabolites of these pathways decreased in mycorrhizal roots, whilst the products derived from α-linolenic and amino acids presented higher concentrations in AMF-colonized roots. Mycorrhization therefore increased the flux into those pathways. Venn-diagram analysis showed that there are many induced signals shared by both mycorrhizal interactions, pointing to general mycorrhiza-associated changes in the tomato metabolome. Moreover, fungus-specific fingerprints were also found, suggesting that specific molecular alterations may underlie the reported functional diversity of the symbiosis. Since most positively regulated pathways were related to stress response mechanisms, their potential contribution to improved host stress tolerance is discussed. PMID:26157423

  15. Is the Inherent Potential of Maize Roots Efficient for Soil Phosphorus Acquisition?

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yan; Chen, Keru; Teng, Wan; Zhan, Ai; Tong, Yiping; Feng, Gu; Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Fusuo; Chen, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture requires improved phosphorus (P) management to reduce the overreliance on P fertilization. Despite intensive research of root adaptive mechanisms for improving P acquisition, the inherent potential of roots for efficient P acquisition remains unfulfilled, especially in intensive agriculture, while current P management generally focuses on agronomic and environmental concerns. Here, we investigated how levels of soil P affect the inherent potential of maize (Zea mays L.) roots to obtain P from soil. Responses of root morphology, arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, and phosphate transporters were characterized and related to agronomic traits in pot and field experiments with soil P supply from deficiency to excess. Critical soil Olsen-P level for maize growth approximated 3.2 mg kg−1, and the threshold indicating a significant environmental risk was about 15 mg kg−1, which represented the lower and upper levels of soil P recommended in current P management. However, most root adaptations involved with P acquisition were triggered when soil Olsen-P was below 10 mg kg−1, indicating a threshold for maximum root inherent potential. Therefore, to maintain efficient inherent potential of roots for P acquisition, we suggest that the target upper level of soil P in intensive agriculture should be reduced from the environmental risk threshold to the point maximizing the inherent potential of roots. PMID:24594677

  16. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    PubMed

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation.

  17. Is the inherent potential of maize roots efficient for soil phosphorus acquisition?

    PubMed

    Deng, Yan; Chen, Keru; Teng, Wan; Zhan, Ai; Tong, Yiping; Feng, Gu; Cui, Zhenling; Zhang, Fusuo; Chen, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture requires improved phosphorus (P) management to reduce the overreliance on P fertilization. Despite intensive research of root adaptive mechanisms for improving P acquisition, the inherent potential of roots for efficient P acquisition remains unfulfilled, especially in intensive agriculture, while current P management generally focuses on agronomic and environmental concerns. Here, we investigated how levels of soil P affect the inherent potential of maize (Zea mays L.) roots to obtain P from soil. Responses of root morphology, arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, and phosphate transporters were characterized and related to agronomic traits in pot and field experiments with soil P supply from deficiency to excess. Critical soil Olsen-P level for maize growth approximated 3.2 mg kg(-1), and the threshold indicating a significant environmental risk was about 15 mg kg(-1), which represented the lower and upper levels of soil P recommended in current P management. However, most root adaptations involved with P acquisition were triggered when soil Olsen-P was below 10 mg kg(-1), indicating a threshold for maximum root inherent potential. Therefore, to maintain efficient inherent potential of roots for P acquisition, we suggest that the target upper level of soil P in intensive agriculture should be reduced from the environmental risk threshold to the point maximizing the inherent potential of roots. PMID:24594677

  18. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    PubMed

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation. PMID:26084921

  19. Root architecture impacts on root decomposition rates in switchgrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaff, M.; Schadt, C.; Garten, C. T.; Jastrow, J. D.; Phillips, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Roots strongly contribute to soil organic carbon accrual, but the rate of soil carbon input via root litter decomposition is still uncertain. Root systems are built up of roots with a variety of different diameter size classes, ranging from very fine to very coarse roots. Since fine roots have low C:N ratios and coarse roots have high C:N ratios, root systems are heterogeneous in quality, spanning a range of different C:N ratios. Litter decomposition rates are generally well predicted by litter C:N ratios, thus decomposition of roots may be controlled by the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots. With this study we asked how root architecture (i.e. the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots) affects the decomposition of roots systems in the biofuels crop switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). To understand how root architecture affects root decomposition rates, we collected roots from eight switchgrass cultivars (Alamo, Kanlow, Carthage, Cave-in-Rock, Forestburg, Southlow, Sunburst, Blackwell), grown at FermiLab (IL), by taking 4.8-cm diameter soil cores from on top of the crown and directly next to the crown of individual plants. Roots were carefully excised from the cores by washing and analyzed for root diameter size class distribution using WinRhizo. Subsequently, root systems of each of the plants (4 replicates per cultivar) were separated in 'fine' (0-0.5 mm), 'medium' (0.5-1 mm) and 'coarse' roots (1-2.5 mm), dried, cut into 0.5 cm (medium and coarse roots) and 2 mm pieces (fine roots), and incubated for 90 days. For each of the cultivars we established five root-treatments: 20g of soil was amended with 0.2g of (1) fine roots, (2) medium roots, (3) coarse roots, (4) a 1:1:1 mixture of fine, medium and coarse roots, and (5) a mixture combining fine, medium and coarse roots in realistic proportions. We measured CO2 respiration at days 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 during the experiment. The 13C signature of the soil was -26‰, and the 13C signature

  20. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Colonization of Human Colonic Epithelium In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steven B.; Cook, Vivienne; Tighe, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis and more severe complications, such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathology is most pronounced in the colon, but to date there is no direct clinical evidence showing EHEC binding to the colonic epithelium in patients. In this study, we investigated EHEC adherence to the human colon by using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) of colonic biopsy samples and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells. We show for the first time that EHEC colonizes human colonic biopsy samples by forming typical attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions which are dependent on EHEC type III secretion (T3S) and binding of the outer membrane protein intimin to the translocated intimin receptor (Tir). A/E lesion formation was dependent on oxygen levels and suppressed under oxygen-rich culture conditions routinely used for IVOC. In contrast, EHEC adherence to polarized T84 cells occurred independently of T3S and intimin and did not involve Tir translocation into the host cell membrane. Colonization of neither biopsy samples nor T84 cells was significantly affected by expression of Shiga toxins. Our study suggests that EHEC colonizes and forms stable A/E lesions on the human colon, which are likely to contribute to intestinal pathology during infection. Furthermore, care needs to be taken when using cell culture models, as they might not reflect the in vivo situation. PMID:25534942

  1. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  2. Colonization of Barley by the Broad-Host Hemibiotrophic Pathogen Phytophthora palmivora Uncovers a Leaf Development-Dependent Involvement of Mlo.

    PubMed

    Le Fevre, Ruth; O'Boyle, Bridget; Moscou, Matthew J; Schornack, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of barley Mlo demonstrated that filamentous pathogens rely on plant genes to achieve entry and lifecycle completion in barley leaves. While having a dramatic effect on foliar pathogens, it is unclear whether overlapping or distinct mechanisms affect filamentous pathogen infection of roots. To remove the bias connected with using different pathogens to understand colonization mechanisms in different tissues, we have utilized the aggressive hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora palmivora. P. palmivora colonizes root as well as leaf tissues of barley (Hordeum vulgare). The infection is characterized by a transient biotrophy phase with formation of haustoria. Barley accessions varied in degree of susceptibility, with some accessions fully resistant to leaf infection. Notably, there was no overall correlation between degree of susceptibility in roots compared with leaves, suggesting that variation in different genes influences host susceptibility above and below ground. In addition, a developmental gradient influenced infection, with more extensive colonization observed in mature leaf sectors. The mlo5 mutation attenuates P. palmivora infection but only in young leaf tissues. The barley-P. palmivora interaction represents a simple system to identify and compare genetic components governing quantitative colonization in diverse barley tissue types.

  3. Colonization of Barley by the Broad-Host Hemibiotrophic Pathogen Phytophthora palmivora Uncovers a Leaf Development-Dependent Involvement of Mlo.

    PubMed

    Le Fevre, Ruth; O'Boyle, Bridget; Moscou, Matthew J; Schornack, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of barley Mlo demonstrated that filamentous pathogens rely on plant genes to achieve entry and lifecycle completion in barley leaves. While having a dramatic effect on foliar pathogens, it is unclear whether overlapping or distinct mechanisms affect filamentous pathogen infection of roots. To remove the bias connected with using different pathogens to understand colonization mechanisms in different tissues, we have utilized the aggressive hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora palmivora. P. palmivora colonizes root as well as leaf tissues of barley (Hordeum vulgare). The infection is characterized by a transient biotrophy phase with formation of haustoria. Barley accessions varied in degree of susceptibility, with some accessions fully resistant to leaf infection. Notably, there was no overall correlation between degree of susceptibility in roots compared with leaves, suggesting that variation in different genes influences host susceptibility above and below ground. In addition, a developmental gradient influenced infection, with more extensive colonization observed in mature leaf sectors. The mlo5 mutation attenuates P. palmivora infection but only in young leaf tissues. The barley-P. palmivora interaction represents a simple system to identify and compare genetic components governing quantitative colonization in diverse barley tissue types. PMID:26927001

  4. Procerum root disease physiology and disease interactions with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Procerum root disease of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.), caused by Leptographium procerum (Kendr.) Wingf., has been epidemic in Virginia Christmas tree plantations since 1990. Symptoms of chlorosis, wilt, and decreased apical growth resemble those of water stress. Resin infiltration of the xylem at the stem base may be responsible for vascular occlusion leading to severe water deficits and mortality. The pathogen has been isolated from the roots of ozone-sensitive eastern white pines in the field, although not from nearby tolerant trees. Ozone sensitivity may predispose the trees to infection. This study investigates the physiology of diseased white pines, and looks at the effects of ozone fumigation on disease development. Impacts of vascular occlusion upon host water relations and gas exchange were investigated in 8-yr-old, plantation-grown, white pine Christmas trees. Disease severity was estimated as the proportion of resin-soaked cross-sectional area at the base of the stem. The linear response of six physiological variables to disease severity was highly significant. Pre-dawn water potential, daily change in pre-dawn to mid-day water potential, stomatal conductance, and photosynthetic and transpiration rates all decreased significantly with increasing disease severity. Fumigation studies were conducted on white and loblolly (P. taeda L.) pine seedlings to determine if ozone exposure increased the incidence of root disease or the amount of stem tissue colonized by L. procerum. Six weeks post-inoculation, root and stem tissue were plated on a medium selective for L. procerum. Ozone treatment did not significantly affect the proportion of diseased roots per seedling or the vertical colonization of stem tissue in seedlings of either species.

  5. Effect of Microbial Inoculants on the Indigenous Actinobacterial Endophyte Population in the Roots of Wheat as Determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vanessa M.; Franco, Christopher M. M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of single actinobacterial endophyte seed inoculants and a mixed microbial soil inoculant on the indigenous endophytic actinobacterial population in wheat roots was investigated by using the molecular technique terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Wheat was cultivated either from seeds coated with the spores of single pure actinobacterial endophytes of Microbispora sp. strain EN2, Streptomyces sp. strain EN27, and Nocardioides albus EN46 or from untreated seeds sown in soil with and without a commercial mixed microbial soil inoculant. The endophytic actinobacterial population within the roots of 6-week-old wheat plants was assessed by T-RFLP. Colonization of the wheat roots by the inoculated actinobacterial endophytes was detected by T-RFLP, as were 28 to 42 indigenous actinobacterial genera present in the inoculated and uninoculated plants. The presence of the commercial mixed inoculant in the soil reduced the endophytic actinobacterial diversity from 40 genera to 21 genera and reduced the detectable root colonization by approximately half. The results indicate that the addition of a nonadapted microbial inoculum to the soil disrupted the natural actinobacterial endophyte population, reducing diversity and colonization levels. This was in contrast to the addition of a single actinobacterial endophyte to the wheat plant, where the increase in colonization level could be confirmed even though the indigenous endophyte population was not adversely affected. PMID:15528499

  6. Photosynthesis, water use, and root viability under water stress as affected by expression of SAG12-ipt controlling cytokinin synthesis in Agrostis stolonifera.

    PubMed

    Merewitz, Emily B; Gianfagna, Thomas; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    Water stress reduces endogenous cytokinin (CK) content and may inhibit CK production. Maintenance of endogenous CK levels by genetic transformation with ipt in leaves and roots undergoing senescence may promote stress tolerance. This study was designed to determine the physiological effects of ipt expression on immature and mature leaves and in roots for plants exposed to different levels of water stress for creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants containing the ipt gene, encoding the enzyme adenine isopentenyl phosphotransferase for CK synthesis ligated to a senescence-activated promoter (SAG12), and wild-type 'Penncross' (WT) were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber and exposed to water stress by weekly additions of polyethylene glycol 8000 to reduce the growing solution osmotic potential from -0.05 to -0.3, -0.5, -0.7, -1.0, and -1.4 MPa. Immature and mature leaves and roots of SAG12-ipt creeping bentgrass were evaluated for ipt expression, CK content, leaf relative water content (RWC), chlorophyll content (Chl), photochemical efficiency (F(v)F(m)), osmotic adjustment (OA), photosynthesis rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration (E), water use efficiency (WUE), carbon isotope discrimination (Δ), and root viability. Expression of ipt was detected in all plant parts and a higher CK content, primarily in the form of isopentyladenine (iPa), was found in SAG12-ipt plants but not in the WT plants under water stress. Immature leaves exhibited higher iPa and OA at all treatment levels. Mature leaves of SAG12-ipt plants maintained higher OA, Pn, Chl, WUE, and Δ, whereas g(s) and E were relatively unaffected compared to the WT. Roots of SAG12-ipt plants had higher levels of iPa and greater root viability than the WT. The results demonstrate that expression of ipt enhanced the tolerance of creeping bentgrass to water stress, which could be attributed to the positive effects on osmotic adjustment, efficient water use, and maintaining higher

  7. Photosynthesis, water use, and root viability under water stress as affected by expression of SAG12-ipt controlling cytokinin synthesis in Agrostis stolonifera

    PubMed Central

    Merewitz, Emily B.; Gianfagna, Thomas; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    Water stress reduces endogenous cytokinin (CK) content and may inhibit CK production. Maintenance of endogenous CK levels by genetic transformation with ipt in leaves and roots undergoing senescence may promote stress tolerance. This study was designed to determine the physiological effects of ipt expression on immature and mature leaves and in roots for plants exposed to different levels of water stress for creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants containing the ipt gene, encoding the enzyme adenine isopentenyl phosphotransferase for CK synthesis ligated to a senescence-activated promoter (SAG12), and wild-type ‘Penncross’ (WT) were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber and exposed to water stress by weekly additions of polyethylene glycol 8000 to reduce the growing solution osmotic potential from –0.05 to –0.3, –0.5, –0.7, –1.0, and –1.4 MPa. Immature and mature leaves and roots of SAG12-ipt creeping bentgrass were evaluated for ipt expression, CK content, leaf relative water content (RWC), chlorophyll content (Chl), photochemical efficiency (FvFm), osmotic adjustment (OA), photosynthesis rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration (E), water use efficiency (WUE), carbon isotope discrimination (Δ), and root viability. Expression of ipt was detected in all plant parts and a higher CK content, primarily in the form of isopentyladenine (iPa), was found in SAG12-ipt plants but not in the WT plants under water stress. Immature leaves exhibited higher iPa and OA at all treatment levels. Mature leaves of SAG12-ipt plants maintained higher OA, Pn, Chl, WUE, and Δ, whereas gs and E were relatively unaffected compared to the WT. Roots of SAG12-ipt plants had higher levels of iPa and greater root viability than the WT. The results demonstrate that expression of ipt enhanced the tolerance of creeping bentgrass to water stress, which could be attributed to the positive effects on osmotic adjustment, efficient water use, and maintaining

  8. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  9. [Influences of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and phosphorus level on the lateral root formation of tomato seedlings].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Chen, Wei-li; Xu, Chun-xiang; Zhu, Hong-hui; Yao, Qing

    2015-04-01

    To explore the influences of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and P level on plant root system architecture, tomato seedlings were inoculated with AMF strain Rhizophagus irregularis BGC JX04B under two P levels, and the influences of AMF and P level on lateral root (LR) formation of tomato seedlings were studied. Results indicated that the promoting effect of AMF on plant biomass was not evident, but significantly decreased the root to shoot ratio of plants. AMF significantly increased the primary root length but decreased the 1st order LR length and interacted with the mycorrhizal colonization period. AMF significantly lowered the 2nd-3rd order LR number and the ratio of 2nd order LR number to 1st order LR number, but did not significantly affect the 1st-2nd order LR density. High P level (50 mg x kg(-1) P) significantly promoted the plant growth and decreased the root to shoot ratio of plants. It had no significant effect on the primary root length and the 1st order root length, but significantly enhanced the 1st-3rd order LR number and the ratio of 2nd order LR number to P order LR number, increased the 1st-2nd order LR density. It suggested that AMF and P level did not share a common mechanism to influence the LR formation of tomato plants. The influence of high P level may depend on its promoting effects on nutrient uptake and plant growth, while the influence of AMF is more complex. Furthermore, the interaction between AMF and mycorrhizal colonization period implies the possible involvement of carbohydrate distribution (sugar signaling) in the regulation of root system architecture by AMF.

  10. Linking root traits to nutrient foraging in arbuscular mycorrhizal trees in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Eissenstat, David M; Kucharski, Joshua M; Zadworny, Marcin; Adams, Thomas S; Koide, Roger T

    2015-10-01

    The identification of plant functional traits that can be linked to ecosystem processes is of wide interest, especially for predicting vegetational responses to climate change. Root diameter of the finest absorptive roots may be one plant trait that has wide significance. Do species with relatively thick absorptive roots forage in nutrient-rich patches differently from species with relatively fine absorptive roots? We measured traits related to nutrient foraging (root morphology and architecture, root proliferation, and mycorrhizal colonization) across six coexisting arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) temperate tree species with and without nutrient addition. Root traits such as root diameter and specific root length were highly correlated with root branching intensity, with thin-root species having higher branching intensity than thick-root species. In both fertilized and unfertilized soil, species with thin absorptive roots and high branching intensity showed much greater root length and mass proliferation but lower mycorrhizal colonization than species with thick absorptive roots. Across all species, fertilization led to increased root proliferation and reduced mycorrhizal colonization. These results suggest that thin-root species forage more by root proliferation, whereas thick-root species forage more by mycorrhizal fungi. In mineral nutrient-rich patches, AM trees seem to forage more by proliferating roots than by mycorrhizal fungi.

  11. A Brassica napus PHT1 phosphate transporter, BnPht1;4, promotes phosphate uptake and affects roots architecture of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Zhao, Cai-Zhi; Liu, Chun-Sen; Huang, Ke-Lin; Guo, Qian-Qian; Chang, Li-Li; Xiong, Huan; Li, Xue-Bao

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the essential nutrient elements for plant development. In this work, BnPht1;4 gene, encoding a phosphate transporter of PHT1 family, was isolated from Brassica napus. BnPht1;4 possesses the major characteristic of PHT1 high-affinity Pi transporters in plants, such as plasma-membrane localization and 12 transmembrane-spanning domains. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analysis and promoter activity assay showed BnPht1;4 was inert in plants under Pi sufficient conditions. However, expression of this gene was remarkably enhanced in roots under Pi deficient conditions. Interestingly, under low Pi conditions, its promoter activity is impaired in tips of elongated roots, suggesting that the high-affinity Pi transporter may be not involved in low Pi response at root tip area. The experimental results also indicated that BnPht1;4 induction by Pi deficiency is dependent on the existence of sugar. In 35S:BnPht1;4 transgenic Arabidopsis, the increase of Pi availability resulted in the change of root architecture under Pi deficient conditions, showing longer primary roots and lower lateral root density than that of wild type. By cis-element analysis, two P1BS and two W-box elements were found in BnPht1;4 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid assay indicated that PHR1 could bind to the BnPht1;4 promoter. P1BS elements in BnPht1;4 promoter are essential for BnPht1;4 induction in Pi starvation response. Furthermore, WRKY75 could bind to the BnPht1;4 promoter, in which W-box elements are important for this binding. These results indicated BnPht1;4 may be dually controlled by two family regulators under low Pi responses. Thus, our data on the regulative mechanism of high-affinity Pi transporter in Pi starvation response will be valuable for B. napus molecular agriculture. PMID:25194430

  12. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation on cadmium induced Medicago truncatula root isoflavonoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Achref; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Daher, Zeina; van Tuinen, Diederik; Aschi-Smit, Samira; Morandi, Dominique

    2012-11-01

    Cadmium is a serious environmental pollution threats to the planet. Its accumulation in plants affects many cellular functions, resulting in growth and development inhibition, whose mechanisms are not fully understood. However, some fungi forming arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with the majority of plant species have the capacity to buffer the deleterious effect of this heavy metal. In the present work we investigated the capacity of Rhizophagus irregularis (syn. Glomus irregularis) to alleviate cadmium stress in Medicago truncatula. In spite of a reduction in all mycorrhizal parameters, plants colonized for 21 days by R. irregularis and treated by 2 mg kg⁻¹ cadmium displayed less growth inhibition in comparison to plants grown without cadmium. Cadmium strongly increased the accumulation of some isoflavonoids and their derivates: formononetin, malonylononin, medicarpin 3-O-β-(6'-malonylglucoside), medicarpin and coumestrol. Interestingly, in plants colonized by R. irregularis we noticed a strong reduction of the