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Sample records for affect school attendance

  1. School Counselors Improving Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, LaWanda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of interventions used to address attendance issues at a middle school located in the Southern United States. School-wide interventions were implemented to address absenteeism of all students and individual interventions were implemented to address absenteeism with targeted students. An explanation of each…

  2. Policy and Procedures Manual for Improving School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Educational and Cultural Services, Augusta. Office of Truancy, Dropout and Alternative Education.

    This procedures manual is intended to provide guidance to Maine school officials for developing strategies and policies to assure regular attendance of students in school. Part 1 examines factors affecting school attendance, noting that the school and home may serve as enablers for the student who becomes unaccountable for attendance. These…

  3. Compulsory School Attendance in Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar N.

    1995-01-01

    British standards governing school attendance have been modified and strengthened by the 1993 legislation. The required education may be received outside the public school system, but alternative schools in the private sector remain subject to control or regulation. (77 footnotes) (MLF)

  4. Pathways through Secondary School in a Comprehensive System: Does Parental Education and School Attended Affect Students' Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesters, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    As the Australian labour market restructured during the 1980s and 1990s, Year 12 retention rates more than doubled between 1983 and 1993 secondary schools diversified to include vocational education and training programs as alternative pathways through school. From a human capital perspective, the completion of vocational qualifications in school…

  5. Does the local food environment around schools affect diet? Longitudinal associations in adolescents attending secondary schools in East London

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The local retail food environment around schools may act as a potential risk factor for adolescent diet. However, international research utilising cross-sectional designs to investigate associations between retail food outlet proximity to schools and diet provides equivocal support for an effect. In this study we employ longitudinal perspectives in order to answer the following two questions. First, how has the local retail food environment around secondary schools changed over time and second, is this change associated with change in diet of students at these schools? Methods The locations of retail food outlets and schools in 2001 and 2005 were geo-coded in three London boroughs. Network analysis in a Geographic Information System (GIS) ascertained the number, minimum and median distances to food outlets within 400 m and 800 m of the school location. Outcome measures were ‘healthy’ and ‘unhealthy’ diet scores derived from adolescent self-reported data in the Research with East London Adolescents: Community Health Survey (RELACHS). Adjusted associations between distance from school to food retail outlets, counts of outlets near schools and diet scores were assessed using longitudinal (2001–2005 n=757) approaches. Results Between 2001 and 2005 the number of takeaways and grocers/convenience stores within 400 m of schools increased, with many more grocers reported within 800 m of schools in 2005 (p< 0.001). Longitudinal analyses showed a decrease of the mean healthy (−1.12, se 0.12) and unhealthy (−0.48, se 0.16) diet scores. There were significant positive relationships between the distances travelled to grocers and healthy diet scores though effects were very small (0.003, 95%CI 0.001 – 0.006). Significant negative relationships between proximity to takeaways and unhealthy diet scores also resulted in small parameter estimates. Conclusions The results provide some evidence that the local food environment around secondary schools

  6. Ready for School? Trauma Exposure and Mental Health in a Group of War-Affected Ugandan Adolescents Re-Attending School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jon-Hakon; Sorensen, Peer Moller; Waaktaar, Trine

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess trauma-related symptoms and mental health among war-exposed Ugandan adolescents (n = 81) as a basis for planning their re-attendance at school. Self-reports of exposure to traumatic events, trauma-related symptoms, and indicators of mental health were collected. While about half of the youths (51.9%)…

  7. 38 CFR 3.667 - School attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false School attendance. 3.667..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Adjustments and Resumptions § 3.667 School attendance. (a) General. (1) Pension or compensation may be paid from a child's 18th birthday based upon...

  8. An Analysis of Florida's School Districts' Attendance Policies and their Relationship to High School Attendance Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Ryan Turner

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental correlational study was to determine the relationship between the type of attendance policies in the high schools of the 67 Florida school districts, the size of the school district (number of high school students), the socioeconomic status SES) of the school district, and the average daily attendance rate of…

  9. Adolescent Marijuana Use and School Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, M. Christopher; French, Michael T.; Dennis, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between adolescent marijuana use and school attendance. Data were pooled from the 1997 and 1998 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse to form a sample of 15 168 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, who had not yet complete high school. The analysis determined the role of marijuana use in adolescent school dropout…

  10. Assessing Reasons for School Non-Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havik, Trude; Bru, Edvin; Ertesvåg, Sigrun K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess reasons for school non-attendance including somatic symptoms, subjective health complaints, truancy, and school refusal and to investigate the relationship of these with gender, grade, and self-reported special educational needs. The study is based on a self-reported questionnaire distributed to students…

  11. Youngsters who persistently do not attend school.

    PubMed

    Place, M; Kolvin, I

    1986-01-01

    5% of the children attending psychiatric clinics in the UK have difficulties with school attendance and these stem from difficulties which are predominantly social (truancy) or predominantly psychological or dynamic (school refusal). Adolescents who display school refusal are three times more likely to develop neurotic difficulties in adult life, especially if marked family difficulties are persistent. Up to 20% of the senior school pupils may truant in a 2-week period and teachers report these youngsters to be more aggressive and to show more neurotic symptoms then the regular school attenders. Their peers choose them significantly less often as friends, and the marked differences in the rate of absence between schools seems related to school philosophy and the degree of school involvement in the community. Truancy can be influenced by greater vigilance in the school and by legal intervention. Although absence from school in itself does not seem to adversely influence the youngsters' adult functioning, if it is associated with conduct problems and educational retardation, long-term difficulties are common. PMID:3822952

  12. Modification of school attendance for an elementary population.

    PubMed

    Barber, R M; Kagey, J R

    1977-01-01

    The staff and students of a school composed of Grades 1 through 3 participated in a program to increase school attendance. Children earned the opportunity to attend part or all of a monthly party by their attendance. Immediate feedback occurred each morning by placing stars on a classroom chart for each child present. The school's attendance during the program was compared both with attendance during preceding years and with attendance at other schools. The experimental school's attendance improved dramatically to become the best of all elementary schools in the system. PMID:16795547

  13. The Impact of Mass School Immunization on School Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggs-Stayner, Kathleen S.; Purdy, Teresa R.; Go, Gailya N.; McLaughlin, Natalie C.; Tryzynka, Penny S.; Sines, Joyce R.; Hlaing, Thein

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact a free, on-site influenza immunization program could have on attendance in Title 1 schools. Four Title 1 elementary schools participated in the study. Students at 2 schools were offered free FluMist[R] immunizations on site, and students at 2 control schools were not. Compliance on receiving…

  14. Patterns of School Attendance in Ontario Elementary and Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharples, B.; And Others

    This study examined issues related to student absenteeism in the Ontario schools. Eight elementary and sixteen secondary schools made up the sample. Data were gathered from school attendance records, questionnaires administered to teachers and students, school board policy statements, and interview schedules. Results suggest that a number of…

  15. International Determinants of Private School Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Leslie; Rutkowski, David; Plucker, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The current study uses Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data to investigate international determinants of private school attendance. In particular, we seek to understand whether student achievement and home background factors such as socioeconomic status (SES) or motivational and goal-oriented factors are more predictive…

  16. Out of School: A Phenomenological Exploration of Extended Non-Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Matt; Bishop, Felicity L.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "extended non-attendance" ("school phobia" or "school refusal") was distinguished from truancy early in the twentieth century, and refers to children who fear school and avoid attending. Despite much subsequent research, outcomes for those affected remain poor, and their voices remain largely absent…

  17. Family Income, School Attendance, and Academic Achievement in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Taryn W.; Hutchison, Lindsey; Winsler, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Low family income is associated with poor academic achievement among children. Higher rates of school absence and tardiness may be one mechanism through which low family income impacts children's academic success. This study examines relations between family income, as measured by receipt of free or reduced-price lunch, school attendance, and…

  18. Improving Academic Achievement of Students with Problematic Attendance by Implementing a Multisystemic School-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, James Edward

    2010-01-01

    This study addressed the problem of poor attendance adversely affecting grades and learning. Current school policies do not address problematic attendance for all school-aged children, perpetuating trends of academic failure. The research objective was to determine if unexcused absences had a greater negative impact on a high-stakes test compared…

  19. Impact of lupus on school attendance and performance.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, L N; Peterson, M G E; Hassett, A; Baratelli, M; Lehman, T J A

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive impairment in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can affect intelligence, academic achievement, arithmetic, reading comprehension, learning, visual memory and complex problem solving ability. In this prospective two-center study, we examined children's (and adolescents') and parents' perception of the impact of SLE on school; the relationship between child and parent reports on school-related issues; and the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and school-related issues. Patients aged 9-18 years with SLE and their parents completed corresponding child and parent reports of the SLE-specific HRQOL scale, Simple Measure of Impact of Lupus Erythematosus in Youngsters (SMILEY), and PedsQL(TM) generic and rheumatology modules. Patients also completed questions related to school attendance and performance. Qualified physicians assessed SLE activity, damage and severity. Forty-one patients (73% girls) with SLE with mean age of 15 +/- 3 years and 32 parents participated. Mean school domain scores for child and parent reports of the PedsQL( TM) generic report were lower compared with total and subscale scores. Patients reported difficulty with schoolwork, had problems with memory and concentration, and were sad about the effect of SLE on schoolwork and attendance. Moderate to strong correlations were found between child and parent reports on school-related items from all questionnaires. Eighty-three percent of patients felt that they would have done better in school if they did not have SLE. Moderate correlations (r = 0.3-0.4) were found between SMILEY total score and the following items: satisfaction with school performance, interest in schoolwork, remembering what was learned, and concentrating in class. Patients on intravenous chemotherapeutic medications missed more school days (p < 0.05) compared with patients on oral medications. Also, patients with a greater number of missed school days had increased

  20. School Characteristics that Influence Student Attendance: Experiences of Students in a School Avoidance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the reasons that four high school students who had previously refused to attend school willingly attended an alternative K-12 school for students with special needs. The two research questions that framed this study were (a) why do students who refused to attend their regular schools willingly attend Brookfield Park? and (b) in…

  1. Elementary School Nurse Interventions: Attendance and Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismuller, Penny C.; Grasska, Merry A.; Alexander, Marilyn; White, Catherine G.; Kramer, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Regular school attendance is a necessary part of the learning process; student absenteeism has a direct association with poor academic performance. School nurses can influence student attendance. This study describes the impact of school nurse interventions on student absenteeism and student health. A retrospective review of 240 randomly selected…

  2. Family income, school attendance, and academic achievement in elementary school.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Taryn W; Hutchison, Lindsey; Winsler, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Low family income is associated with poor academic achievement among children. Higher rates of school absence and tardiness may be one mechanism through which low family income impacts children's academic success. This study examines relations between family income, as measured by receipt of free or reduced-price lunch, school attendance, and academic achievement among a diverse sample of children from kindergarten to 4th grade (N = 35,419) using both random and within-child fixed-effects models. Generally, results suggest that the receipt of free or reduced-price lunch and duration of receipt have small but positive associations with school absences and tardies. Poor attendance patterns predict poorer grades, with absences more associated with grades than tardies. Given the small associations between receipt of free or reduced-price lunch and school attendance, and between the duration of receipt of free or reduced-price lunch and children's grades, results do not provide strong evidence that absences and tardies meaningfully attenuate relations between the duration of low family income and student achievement; poorer attendance and persistent low income independently predict poorer grades. Implications for policy and future research are discussed. PMID:23914750

  3. Indicated Truancy Interventions: Effects on School Attendance among Chronic Truant Students. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2012:10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; McCrea, Katherine Tyson; Pigott, Terri D.; Kelly, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this systematic review was to examine the effects of interventions on school attendance to inform policy, practice, and research. The questions guiding this study were: (1) Do truancy programs with a goal of increasing student attendance for truant youth affect school attendance behaviors of elementary and secondary students…

  4. Shifting Attendance Trajectories from Middle to High School: Influences of School Transitions and Changing School Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Aprile D.; Wang, Yijie

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine patterns of school attendance across middle and high school with a diverse sample of 8,908 students (48% female; 54% Latino, 31% White, 13% African American, 2% Asian American). Attendance declined from middle through high school, but this overall pattern masked important variations. In total, 44% of students maintained their attendance trajectories from middle to high school (11% stable high, 19% high-decreasing, 10% mid-decreasing, 4% low-decreasing), and shifting attendance trajectories often signaled greater school disengagement (38% shifted to poorer attendance trajectories, 18% experienced improved attendance trajectories). Transition experiences, school structural characteristics, and the divergence between students’ middle and high schools provided insights into which students recovered, becoming more engaged in high school versus those who became more disconnected. Implications for identifying and intervening with disengaged youth are discussed. PMID:24364827

  5. Comparisons of Undergraduate Borrowing and Its Effects on Graduate School Aspirations and Graduate School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyermann, Therese S.; Kim, Dongbin

    The factors that affect graduate school aspirations and attendance were studied in light of the fact that student loan borrowing has more than doubled in the past decade. Using data from two surveys conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute, this study investigated the educational degree aspirations of two separate college cohorts, one…

  6. Implementing Nunavut Education Act: Compulsory School Attendance Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwarteng, E. Fredua

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of Nunavut compulsory school attendance policy as part of the Nunavut Education Act (2002). Using a bottom-up approach to policy implementation in the literature and the author's six years teaching experience in Nunavut, the paper argues that the compulsory school attendance policy may not achieve its…

  7. Student Attendance Problems and School Organization: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Daniel Linden; Meckel, Adrienne Maravich

    1980-01-01

    Reports on a study that investigated the causes for student truancy and responses to the problem by two urban California secondary schools. Holds that attendance problems are much influenced by organizational structures and that school administrators are inadequately prepared to shape effective attendance policy. (GC)

  8. Strategies to Increase Student Attendance at an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick-Doria, Geraldine Ann

    2013-01-01

    This action research study addressed the need to increase student attendance at an elementary school. Previously, this school's Average Daily Attendance (ADA) has been 92%. With having nearly 900 students, there are approximately 70 daily absences, 1,400 monthly absences, and 13,000 yearly absences. To address the challenge, the researcher…

  9. Children's Economic Activities and Primary School Attendance in Rural Guatemala.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol A. M.

    To investigate whether low school attendance rates in Guatemala (about 35% of primary school aged children do not attend) are due primarily to the need for children in low income families to contribute to family income or child care and other housekeeping tasks, time use data were collected in 4 rural villages from mothers of 369 children, aged…

  10. Shifting Attendance Trajectories from Middle to High School: Influences of School Transitions and Changing School Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Aprile D.; Wang, Yijie

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine patterns of school attendance across middle and high school with a diverse sample of 8,908 students (48% female; 54% Latino, 31% White, 13% African American, 2% Asian American). Attendance declined from middle through high school, but this overall pattern masked important variations. In total, 44% of students…

  11. Minimum Wage and Community College Attendance: How Economic Circumstances Affect Educational Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    How do changes in minimum wages affect community college enrollment and employment? In particular, among adults without associate's or bachelor's degrees who may earn near the minimum wage, do endowment effects of a higher minimum wage encourage school attendance? Among adults without associate's or bachelor's degrees who may earn near the minimum…

  12. The Development of a Developmental, Annotated Time Line for Learning Disabled High School Students Planning To Attend College. Societal Factors Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Ellen

    An annotated time line to help learning disabled high school students and their families plan for and choose an appropriate college was developed. A review of the literature concerning the transition of learning disabled students from high school to college is presented as are results of interviews with college learning disability specialists,…

  13. Attendance Accounting and Reporting in California Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This manual presents the body of laws, regulations, and practices related to attendance accounting and reporting in California public schools. Following the introduction, section 1 presents information on compulsory attendance, including residency requirements, interdistrict transfers, exemptions, absences, and truancy. Section 2 provides…

  14. Cyclical Economic Conditions and School Attendance in Costa Rica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funkhouser, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Examines the importance of declining economic conditions in school attendance decision making for households with teenagers aged 12-17 in Costa Rica, using a reduced-form model. The 1981-83 economic recession coincided with a large attendance drop. Household labor market characteristics and student characteristics also significantly determine…

  15. High Expense: Disability Severity and Charter School Attendance in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcy, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Much of the literature related to the skimming or cropping of students by charter schools has ignored special education students. This article examines the relationship between the severity of student disabilities and their likelihood of having attended an Arizona charter school in the 2002-2003 school year. After adjusting for student traits,…

  16. Predicting the College Attendance Rate of Graduating High School Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    An important element of school counseling is providing assessments on the collective future needs and activities of a graduating school class. The College Attendance Rate (CAR) is defined here as the proportion of seniors graduating from a given high school, during a given year, that will enroll full-time at an academic college sometime during the…

  17. School Attendance and Non-Attendance in Canada and the United States: An Overview of the Project. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauker, Jerome D.; And Others

    This composition of related attendance studies of both Canada and the United States includes (1) a review of school attendance/nonattendance literature for 1975-86, the results, and a discussion involving the topics of nonattendance correlations, causes, and intervention; (2) a survey of compulsory school attendance legislation, the results, and a…

  18. The Gerrymandering of School Attendance Zones and the Segregation of Public Schools: A Geospatial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Meredith P.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, I employ geospatial techniques to assess the impact of school attendance zone "gerrymandering" on the racial/ethnic segregation of schools, using a large national sample of 15,290 attendance zones in 663 districts. I estimate the effect of gerrymandering on school diversity and school district segregation by comparing the…

  19. Some Antecedents to Compulsory School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Robert B.

    While the impact of schools in colonial America was soft before the mid-eighteenth century, devotion to education was strong and self-evident. By the early nineteenth century, schooling was well on its way to becoming universal for most children. As the nineteenth century wore on, the state became more and more involved in schooling. As taxation…

  20. Classroom Carbon Dioxide Concentration, School Attendance, and Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaihre, Santosh; Semple, Sean; Miller, Janice; Fielding, Shona; Turner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that classroom carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration is inversely related to child school attendance and educational attainment. Methods: Concentrations of CO[subscript 2] were measured over a 3-5?day period in 60 naturally ventilated classrooms of primary school children in Scotland. Concentrations of…

  1. Canadian Indian Children Who Had Never Attended School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lolita

    1973-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the performance on selected intelligence tests of a group of Canadian Indian children who had never been to school with the performance of a similar group of children who were attending school regularly. (Author/RK)

  2. High School Graduates: The Influence of Academics and Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardnett, Sharon G.

    2013-01-01

    Public awareness of the severity of the high school completion problem in terms of its educational, social, psychological, and economic impacts has grown in recent years. Using ex post facto data, this non-experimental, correlational study was designed to determine whether there are differences in academic performance and school attendance between…

  3. Extended School Non-Attenders' Views: Developing Best Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Isabel Rose; Purcell, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of legislation and research initiatives concerning children's participation in decision-making, there is less research in this area with regard to extended school non-attenders. Using semi-structured interviews, this research explores how the views of children and their families who have experienced school non-attendance…

  4. School Factors Associated with School Refusal- and Truancy-Related Reasons for School Non-Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havik, Trude; Bru, Edvin; Ertesvåg, Sigrun K.

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate how students' perceptions of relationships with peers at school and teachers' classroom management are associated with school refusal-related reasons and truancy-related reasons for school non-attendance. The study included controls for emotional stability and relevant parental variables. A student…

  5. School Attendance: Focusing on Engagement and Re-Engagement. Practice Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Every student absence jeopardizes the ability of students to succeed at school and schools to achieve their mission. School attendance is a constant concern in schools. Average daily attendance rates are a common determiner of school funding, so schools funded on the basis of average daily attendance have less resources to do the job. Students who…

  6. Increasing attendance for psychotherapy: implementation intentions and the self-regulation of attendance-related negative affect.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paschal; Aubrey, Richard; Kellett, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    The present study evaluated an implementation intention intervention that aimed to increase attendance at scheduled, initial appointments for psychotherapy by helping clients to manage negative feelings about attendance. Participants received a postal questionnaire that measured their views about attending psychotherapy. One half of the sample was randomly assigned to an implementation intention induction that was embedded in the questionnaire. Intention-to-treat analysis (N=390) indicated that participants who formed implementation intentions were more likely to attend compared to controls (75% vs. 63%), and this effect was even stronger among participants who returned the questionnaire (83% vs. 57%). Whereas anticipated affective costs (e.g., shame) had a negative impact on attendance for most participants, this effect was attenuated when participants formed implementation intentions and perceived that attendance would be beneficial. Thus, implementation intention formation can help clients to deal effectively with negative feelings that might otherwise prevent them attending their first psychotherapy appointment. PMID:18085903

  7. School Attendance and the District Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joubert-Guillory, Julie

    2009-01-01

    House Bill 1 became a major piece of legislation in Texas a few years ago. It was designed primarily to address public school finance, property tax relief, public school accountability, and education-related matters. This piece of legislation has forced districts to manage their finances very differently, undergo budget reductions, and continue…

  8. Review of "How New York City's Charter Schools Affect Achievement"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.

    2009-01-01

    "How New York City's Charter Schools Affect Achievement" estimates the effects on student achievement of attending a New York City charter school rather than a traditional public school and investigates the characteristics of charter schools associated with the most positive effects on achievement. Because the report relies on an inappropriate set…

  9. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  10. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  11. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  12. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  13. Longitudinal Attendance Patterns: Developing High School Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeneberger, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    The elementary and middle grades are a time of great developmental changes with the potential to impact children's longer-term growth. As students progress through their formal schooling during these time periods, the potential exists for children either to follow a course of healthy development associated with positive outcomes or to experience…

  14. Student Preparation Workbook for Outdoor School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilfillan, Warren C.; And Others

    Sixth grade students can prepare for the Multnomah County, Oregon, Outdoor School experience by completing the workbook designed to provide fundamental information about soil, water, plant, and animal resources. The workbook begins with an introduction to environmental manners, after which a section is devoted to each resource area. The glossary…

  15. Compulsory School Attendance and Truancy Laws. Information Memorandum 98-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Legislative Council, Madison.

    This information memorandum describes Wisconsin laws relating to compulsory school attendance and truancy. It outlines school-attendance requirements, exceptions, and alternatives; the written attendance policy; key definitions regarding truancy and school-attendance enforcement; and information on the truancy-planning committee and truancy plan.…

  16. Improving School Attendance: Can Participation in Outdoor Learning Influence Attendance for Young People with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The link between good attendance in school and academic performance has been acknowledged for some time now. However, improving school attendance for young people with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) or pupils at risk of exclusion can be a challenging task for educational leaders. This paper begins with a discussion of…

  17. Student Attendance and Mobility in Minneapolis Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinz, Elizabeth; Kapp, Lucy; Snapp, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the Minneapolis Public Schools, Minnesota, identified system-wide standards and practices to help all students achieve the goal of 95 percent attendance, an especially difficult goal for highly mobile students. The Kids Mobility Study in Minneapolis documents the connection between residential mobility and student achievement and…

  18. Intergroup Attitudes of European American Children Attending Ethnically Homogeneous Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlothlin, Heidi; Killen, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Intergroup attitudes were assessed in European American 1st-grade (M=6.99 years, SD=0.32) and 4th-grade (M=10.01 years, SD=0.36) children (N=138) attending ethnically homogeneous schools to test hypotheses about racial biases and interracial friendships. An Ambiguous Situations Task and an Intergroup Contact Assessment were administered to all…

  19. Research On School Attendance And Student Achievement: A Study Of Ohio Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2004-01-01

    The research and analysis completed for this study focuses on one variable and its relationship to student achievement: school wide student attendance. It is a variable that is often overlooked or taken for granted as an interesting but meaningless statistic, however, the positive impact of good school attendance on academic achievement may be…

  20. Student Perceptions of School Attendance at Alternative High Schools in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogea, Angelique

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate alternative high school students' perceptions of attendance and to determine if a relationship existed among those perceptions, student attendance rates, and Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) mathematics scores. Using survey methods, data were collected from 76 high school students who attended…

  1. The Effects of Participation in School Instrumental Music Programs on Student Academic Achievement and School Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Kevin O.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether or not students that participated in a school sponsored instrumental music program had higher academic achievement and attendance than students that did not participate in a school sponsor instrumental music program. Units of measurement included standardized test scores and attendance, without taking into consideration…

  2. 20 CFR 219.55 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... school attendance for child age 18. The child will be asked to submit (on a form furnished by the Board... statement from an official of the school verifying that the child is attending school full-time. The...

  3. Activity and school attendance monitoring system for adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Janani; Brown, Clark; Cheng, Chihwen; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease, the most common hemoglobin disorder, affects major organ systems with symptoms of pain, anemia and a multitude of chronic conditions. For adolescents, the disease adversely affects school attendance, academic progress and social activity. To effectively study the relationship among school attendance and other factors like demographics and academic performance, studies have relied on self-reporting and school records, all of which have some bias. In this study we design and prototype a system, called SickleSAM (Sickle cell School attendance and Activity Monitoring system), for automatically monitoring school attendance and daily activity of adolescents with sickle cell disease. SickleSAM intends to remove human bias and inaccuracies. The system uses built-in GPS to collect data which will be recorded into a cloud database using Short Messaging Service technology. SickleSAM is developed by Georgia Institute of Technology in conjunction with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). System effectiveness is being evaluated using a trial of 10 adolescents with the disease. PMID:23366422

  4. Activity and School Attendance Monitoring System for Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Janani; Brown, Clark; Cheng, Chihwen; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease, the most common hemoglobin disorder, affects major organ systems with symptoms of pain, anemia and a multitude of chronic conditions. For adolescents, the disease adversely affects school attendance, academic progress and social activity. To effectively study the relationship among school attendance and other factors like demographics and academic performance, studies have relied on self-reporting and school records, all of which have some bias. In this study we design and prototype a system, called SickleSAM (Sickle cell School attendance and Activity Monitoring system), for automatically monitoring school attendance and daily activity of adolescents with sickle cell disease. SickleSAM intends to remove human bias and inaccuracies. The system uses built-in GPS to collect data which will be recorded into a cloud database using Short Messaging Service technology. SickleSAM is developed by Georgia Institute of Technology in conjunction with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). System effectiveness is being evaluated using a trial of 10 adolescents with the disease. PMID:23366422

  5. Mapping School Segregation: Using GIS to Explore Racial Segregation between Schools and Their Corresponding Attendance Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohoni, Deenesh; Saporito, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    We examine whether student enrollment in nonneighborhood schools changes levels of racial segregation in public schools across urban school districts by comparing the racial composition of schools and their corresponding attendance area. This comparison was made possible by using geographic information systems (GIS) to link maps of elementary,…

  6. 76 FR 61148 - Proposed Information Collection (Approval of School Attendance) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Approval of School Attendance) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... ages of 18 and 23 attending school. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed... necessary for the proper performance of VBA's functions, including whether the information will...

  7. 76 FR 15050 - Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance or Termination) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance or Termination) Activity... 23 years old is attending school. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed... on: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of...

  8. Patient characteristics affecting attendance at general outpatient clinics.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, R J; Newell, S J; Edwards, S

    1996-01-01

    A study was carried out to identify the characteristics of children who do not attend appointments at general outpatient clinics. Over six months, 359 children who had an appointment at a general clinic were studied using a questionnaire given to parents (74% response rate) and by inspection of case notes. Based on their first appointment in the study period, children were divided into 'attenders' (n = 262) and 'non-attenders' (n = 97) for analysis. Non-attenders were significantly more likely to have one or more of the following characteristics: lower social class, poorer housing, unmarried parent(s) (56% v 33%), longer journey to clinic (35 v 27.6 minutes), more appointments per year (4.2 v 3.3), poorer past attendance record, and received their appointment by post (76% v 44%). Surprisingly parents of non-attenders rated their children to have a significantly more severe illness than those who attended. These results suggest that attendance is primarily determined by social and logistical factors as well as appointment details, rather than illness severity. PMID:8660073

  9. 20 CFR 219.54 - When evidence of school attendance is required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When evidence of school attendance is... school attendance is required. If a child age 18 applies for payments as a student, the Board will require evidence that the child is attending elementary or secondary school. After the child has...

  10. Medical Examination of School Entrants: Later School Problems and Absenteeism of Attenders and Non-attenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowat, David L.; White, Carolyn

    1985-01-01

    Children scheduled for medical examination before entering school were followed in school one or two years later. Examination nonattenders had a two-fold risk of repeating grades, special class placement, referral for speech-language problems, teacher-reported learning or behavior problems, failure of vision or hearing screening, transfer between…

  11. An Examination of Compulsory School Attendance Ages and High School Dropout and Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Rebecca N.; Reschly, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    An increasingly popular, but underresearched, initiative aimed at reducing high school dropout is raising the compulsory school attendance age. This study used a national data set from academic years 2001-02 to 2005-06 to examine the grade level at which students drop out, rates of dropout over time, and high school completion by state, region of…

  12. Barriers to School Attendance and Gender Inequality: Empirical Evidence from a Sample of Ghanaian Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Sharon; McCoy, Dana C.; Godfrey, Erin B.

    2016-01-01

    Governments in sub-Saharan Africa have made marked efforts to increase school enrollment. Yet attendance and completion rates remain low, particularly for girls. This study examines the reasons that school children do not attend school in a sample of Ghanaian students. Girls were more likely to miss school because a family member was sick, whereas…

  13. Learning to Count: School Finance Formula Count Methods and Attendance-Related Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Todd L.; Fermanich, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    School systems are under increasing pressure to improve student performance. Several states have recently explored adopting student count methods for school funding purposes that incentivize school attendance and continuous enrollment by adjusting funding for changes in enrollment or attendance over the course of the school year. However, no…

  14. Do School Attendance Rates Vary Between AFDC and Non-AFDC Supported Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, William F.; And Others

    This study investigates whether there is a difference between the attendance rates of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and non-AFDC-supported elementary school children in the Milwaukee public school system. A new proposal calls for expansion of the school attendance requirement, which now requires high school students to attend…

  15. 34 CFR 694.6 - Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending... AND READINESS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS (GEAR UP) § 694.6 Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools? (a) GEAR UP services to students attending private schools must...

  16. 34 CFR 694.6 - Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending... AND READINESS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS (GEAR UP) § 694.6 Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools? (a) GEAR UP services to students attending private schools must...

  17. 34 CFR 694.6 - Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending... FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS (GEAR UP) § 694.6 Who may provide GEAR UP services to students attending private schools? (a) GEAR UP services to students attending private schools must be provided— (1)...

  18. A Response to Intervention Model to Promote School Attendance and Decrease School Absenteeism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Christopher A.; Graczyk, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regular school attendance is foundational to children's success but school absenteeism is a common, serious, and highly vexing problem. Researchers from various disciplines have produced a rich yet diverse literature for conceptualizing problematic absenteeism that has led to considerable confusion and lack of consensus about a…

  19. 78 FR 55121 - Submission for Review: Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI 25-14 and Information; and Instructions for Completing the Self-Certification of Full-Time School Attendance for the School Year, RI 25-14A AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60-Day...

  20. Development and Implementation of a New Attendance Policy at Napa High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Ronald L.

    The attendance policy outlined in this document succeeded in increasing attendance in Napa High School, California. The program focused on student absences due to truancy, not illness, although many of the illness absences reported were due to other, not-so-legitimate causes. The attendance program utilized a direct relationship between the…

  1. Strong, smart and bold strategies for improving attendance and retention in an after-school intervention.

    PubMed

    Markoe Hayes, Suzanne; Chapple, Sabrina; Ramirez, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The Volunteers of America Greater Los Angeles (VOALA) Girls Inc. program is implementing and rigorously evaluating its Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy curriculum as part of a demonstration grant to identify effective teen pregnancy prevention programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Adolescent Health (OAH). A total of 517 participants from Title I urban middle and high schools were randomly assigned to either Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy (treatment) or Economic Literacy (control) in two cohorts. Programming occurred after school weekly at middle and high schools. Low attendance and loss of sample (attrition) are common challenges in after-school programming, negatively affecting both the ability of a program to be successful and the integrity of a randomized controlled trial. The current article discusses challenges encountered with recruitment, incentives, and school factors during a first cohort of youth and innovative implementation changes during a second cohort that resulted in increased attendance rates and decreased attrition rates. Commentary is provided by the OAH Project Officer as well as lessons learned after 2 years of implementing the program. PMID:24560079

  2. Differences in Students' Motivation to Attend College: Large versus Small High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horyna, Brittney; Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between the variables: school size, motivation, and college attendance to determine if the size of a student's high school, along with his/her motivational tendencies, influenced the student's choice to pursue a college education. Data was gathered from college students attending a small mid-west…

  3. The Relationship between Student Attendance and Academic Achievement in a Selected South Dakota High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    There is limited research available on the relationship between student attendance and academic achievement in secondary school. This quantitative, non-experimental study, conducted within a South Dakota high school of students in grades 9-12 during the years 2006-2012, examined the relationship between student attendance and academic achievement…

  4. The School Attendance Demonstration Project: Impact Analysis Using an Experimental and Longitudinal Research Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ronald A.

    The School Attendance Demonstration Project (SADP) was designed to improve school attendance among teenagers receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) benefits in San Diego County, California. An impact study was conducted from March 10, 1996 to March 10, 1998, to evaluate the effects of providing social services and imposing…

  5. Adaptive Skills and Maladaptive Behavior of Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders Attending Special Schools in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the profile of and relationships between adaptive skills and the maladaptive behaviors exhibited by adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) attending special schools in Singapore. Parents of 20 adolescents with ASD attending special schools completed the Development Behavior Checklist (DBC; Einfeld & Tonge, 1995;…

  6. Migration, Remittances, and Children's High School Attendance: The Case of Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Feng

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses a large nationally representative survey data to examine the impact of China's rural-urban migration on high school attendance of left-behind children by disentangling the effect of remittances from that of migration. The results show that the absence of adult household members has a negative impact on the high school attendance of…

  7. Monitoring Chronic Absence: Regular Attendance Is Essential to Succeeding in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Regular attendance is essential to succeeding in school, and chronic absence--missing excessive amounts of school for any reason--can cause students to be off track academically. Developed in partnership with Attendance Works, this fact sheet analyzes data from the "Data for Action 2013" survey to discuss how states use data to monitor…

  8. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. 404.745 Section 404.745 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for...

  9. Comparison of Health-Risk Behaviors among Students Attending Alternative and Traditional High Schools in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen E.; McMorris, Barbara J.; Kubik, Martha Y.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research, over a decade old, suggests students attending alternative high schools (AHS) engage in high levels of health-risk behaviors. Data from the 2007 Minnesota Student Survey for students attending AHS ("n" = 2,847) and traditional high schools (THS; "n" = 87,468) were used for this cross-sectional analysis to…

  10. A MODEL FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREAS UNDER SPECIFIED OBJECTIVES AND CONSTRAINTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'BRIEN, RICHARD J.

    THIS TECHNICAL NOTE, ONE OF A SERIES PUBLISHED ON THE URBAN EDUCATION MODEL, PRESENTS A MODEL FOR DETERMINING REQUIRED SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREAS WHEN RESTRICTIONS HAVE BEEN PLACED ON THE RACIAL AND/OR SOCIAL COMPOSITION OF EACH SCHOOL PLANT. THESE ATTENDANCE AREAS ARE GENERATED IN A MANNER INSURING THE ASSIGNMENT OF STUDENTS WHICH MINIMIZES THE…

  11. Encouraging School Enrollment and Attendance among Teenage Parents on Welfare: Early Impacts of Ohio's LEAP Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Robert G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents interim findings from an impact analysis of Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program. LEAP is a statewide program designed to encourage school attendance among pregnant and parenting teens on welfare. Suggests that LEAP has succeeded in its primary short-term goal of increasing the school enrollment and attendance of teen…

  12. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Indicated Interventions to Increase School Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Tyson-McCrea, Katherine; Pigott, Therese; Kelly, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the effects of intervention programs on school attendance behaviors of elementary and secondary school students to inform policy and practice. The specific questions guiding this study were: (1) Do indicated programs with a goal of increasing student attendance affect…

  13. Causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exams and college attendance: random assignment in Seoul high schools.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R; Choi, Jaesung

    2013-04-01

    Despite the voluminous literature on the potentials of single-sex schools, there is no consensus on the effects of single-sex schools because of student selection of school types. We exploit a unique feature of schooling in Seoul-the random assignment of students into single-sex versus coeducational high schools-to assess causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exam scores and college attendance. Our validation of the random assignment shows comparable socioeconomic backgrounds and prior academic achievement of students attending single-sex schools and coeducational schools, which increases the credibility of our causal estimates of single-sex school effects. The three-level hierarchical model shows that attending all-boys schools or all-girls schools, rather than coeducational schools, is significantly associated with higher average scores on Korean and English test scores. Applying the school district fixed-effects models, we find that single-sex schools produce a higher percentage of graduates who attended four-year colleges and a lower percentage of graduates who attended two-year junior colleges than do coeducational schools. The positive effects of single-sex schools remain substantial, even after we take into account various school-level variables, such as teacher quality, the student-teacher ratio, the proportion of students receiving lunch support, and whether the schools are public or private. PMID:23073751

  14. Causal Effects of Single-Sex Schools on College Entrance Exams and College Attendance: Random Assignment in Seoul High Schools

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunjoon; Behrman, Jere R.; Choi, Jaesung

    2012-01-01

    Despite the voluminous literature on the potentials of single-sex schools, there is no consensus on the effects of single-sex schools because of student selection of school types. We exploit a unique feature of schooling in Seoul—the random assignment of students into single-sex versus coeducational high schools—to assess causal effects of single-sex schools on college entrance exam scores and college attendance. Our validation of the random assignment shows comparable socioeconomic backgrounds and prior academic achievement of students attending single-sex schools and coeducational schools, which increases the credibility of our causal estimates of single-sex school effects. The three-level hierarchical model shows that attending all-boys schools or all-girls schools, rather than coeducational schools, is significantly associated with higher average scores on Korean and English test scores. Applying the school district fixed-effects models, we find that single-sex schools produce a higher percentage of graduates who attended four-year colleges and a lower percentage of graduates who attended two-year junior colleges than do coeducational schools. The positive effects of single-sex schools remain substantial, even after we take into account various school-level variables, such as teacher quality, the student-teacher ratio, the proportion of students receiving lunch support, and whether the schools are public or private. PMID:23073751

  15. How attendance and quality of participation affect treatment response to parent management training.

    PubMed

    Nix, Robert L; Bierman, Karen L; McMahon, Robert J

    2009-06-01

    This study examined whether attendance and quality of participation in parent management training predicted treatment response. Data were from 445 parents (55% minority, 62% single; almost all of low socioeconomic status) who had 1st-grade children with severe conduct problems. Quality of participation in weekly parent groups was based on group leader ratings. Parent outcomes were based on interviewer ratings, behavioral observations, parent reports, and teacher ratings. Results of hierarchical linear models suggested that few family characteristics predicted attendance in this efficacy trial and that attendance was not related to changes in parenting over the year. However, several family characteristics predicted quality of participation in parent management training, and this in turn predicted changes in parental perceptions, warmth, physical punishment, and school involvement. From a clinical perspective, these findings suggest that it is not enough to get parents to attend sessions; it is also necessary to facilitate their active engagement in the therapeutic process. PMID:19485585

  16. Prevalence of asthma among teenagers attending school in Tahiti.

    PubMed Central

    Liard, R; Chansin, R; Neukirch, F; Levallois, M; Leproux, P

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma was studied in 6731 adolescents (average age 13.5 years, 48.6% boys) attending school in three towns of the isle of Tahiti, according to the ethnic origin of both parents. The pupils completed a self-administered questionnaire in class; 14.3% gave an affirmative answer to the question "Have you ever had attacks of asthma?" (cumulative prevalence). That prevalence was 11.4% in the Europeans, 13.7% in the Chinese, 13.8% in the Polynesians, 15.3% in those whose parents were "halves" (half-bred from Polynesians and Europeans), and 16.0% in the miscellaneous group (= other origins) (P less than 0.02). Asthma was significantly more frequent in boys only among the Europeans and those with one European parent. The results of this study confirm the high prevalence of asthma in French Polynesia found in a previous study. They give no evidence of a racial difference in prevalence but suggest an influence of environment. PMID:3221164

  17. School Readiness among Low-Income, Latino Children Attending Family Childcare versus Centre-Based Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansari, Arya; Winsler, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Latino children often struggle in school. Early childhood education programmes are seen as critical for fostering children's school readiness. Latino families often choose family childcare (FCC) over centre-based childcare (CBC), yet little is known about the school readiness of Latino children attending FCC. We compared school readiness over the…

  18. The Talent Development Middle School Model: Context, Components, and Initial Impacts on Students' Performance and Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlihy, Corinne M.; Kemple, James J.

    2004-01-01

    The Talent Development Middle School model was created to make a difference in struggling urban middle schools. The model is part of a trend in school improvement strategies whereby whole-school reform projects aim to improve performance and attendance outcomes for students through the use of major changes in both the organizational structure and…

  19. Coloring outside the Lines: Racial Segregation in Public Schools and Their Attendance Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saporito, Salvatore; Sohoni, Deenesh

    2006-01-01

    Scholars have debated whether students' enrollment in private schools changes levels of racial segregation across urban school districts. The authors examine this issue by comparing the actual racial composition of schools with the racial composition of school-aged children living in the corresponding attendance areas. They do so by linking maps…

  20. Increasing Attendance for Psychotherapy: Implementation Intentions and the Self-Regulation of Attendance-Related Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeran, Paschal; Aubrey, Richard; Kellett, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated an implementation intention intervention that aimed to increase attendance at scheduled, initial appointments for psychotherapy by helping clients to manage negative feelings about attendance. Participants received a postal questionnaire that measured their views about attending psychotherapy. One half of the sample was…

  1. Extended Day-Care Attendance and First Grade School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, John C.

    The relationship to first grade ability and achievement levels of children with day-care attendance for as long as five years prior to entry into the first grade was studied. In particular, the study was concerned with the potentially harmful effects of prolonged program attendance itself as a form of maternal separation rather than with speed and…

  2. Oral Health Status of Disabled Individuals Attending Special Schools

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Ceyhan; Guven, Gunseli; Akgun, Ozlem Marti; Akkurt, Meltem Derya; Basak, Feridun; Akbulut, Erman

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of the dmft-DMFT indexes and the oral hygiene status of 136 individuals attending a special school for the disabled. Methods: Participants were grouped according to disability [Mental Retardation (MR), Cerebral Palsy (CP), Autistic Disorder (AD), Down Syndrome (DS), Other (OTH)] and age [2–6 years (n=24), 7–12 years (50 children) and 13+ years (62 children]. Caries examinations were carried out in accordance with WHO criteria and oral cleanliness was evaluated by visually assessing the presence of plaque on teeth. Results: The age range of patients was 2–26 years (mean age: 11.89±5.19 years). Mean dmft and DMFT scores by age group were as follows: 2–6 years: dmft=2.04±2.24; 7–12 years: dmft=2.24±2.60, DMFT=0.98±2.58; 13+years: DMFT=2.68±2.91. Overall, 15.4% of children had no caries or fillings. While dmft and DMFT levels (P>.05) did not vary significantly by type of disability, oral cleanliness did. Children with autism were observed to maintain the best oral hygiene and those with mental retardation (MR), the poorest. Conclusions: It is important for the dentist to concentrate on a preventive approach and provide proper dental education to parents of disabled individuals. Among the children with disabilities, more attention should be paid to the oral hygiene of MR group. PMID:20922154

  3. Association between Lifestyle and School Attendance in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Lifestyle factors are thought to be associated with students' academic performance. Whether lifestyle factors were associated with medical students' school attendance was determined. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of 157 healthy second-year medical students attending Osaka City University Graduate…

  4. Tackling Behaviour and Attendance Issues in Schools in Wales: Implications for Training and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Welsh Assembly Government published its Report on the review of behaviour and attendance in schools in Wales. The National Behaviour and Attendance Review (NBAR) in Wales was chaired by the author of this paper. Both the Review and the Welsh Assembly Government's response contained recommendations related to the training and…

  5. School attendance, health-risk behaviors, and self-esteem in adolescents applying for working papers.

    PubMed Central

    Suss, A. L.; Tinkelman, B. K.; Freeman, K.; Friedman, S. B.

    1996-01-01

    Since health-risk behaviors are often encountered in clusters among adolescents, it was hypothesized that adolescents with poor school attendance would be associated with more health-risk behaviors (e.g., substance use, violence) than those who attend school regularly. This study assessed the relationship between poor school attendance and health-risk behaviors, and described health-risk behaviors and self-esteem among adolescents seeking employment. In this cross-sectional study, school attendance (poor vs. regular attendance) was related to health-risk behaviors by asking 122 subjects seen at a New York City Working Papers Clinic to complete both a 72-item questionnaire about their health-risk behaviors and the 58-item Coopersmith Self-Esteem School Form Inventory. Chi-square and Fisher's Exact Tests were performed. The poor and regular attenders of school differed significantly in only 5 out of 44 items pertaining to health-risk behaviors. Self-esteem measures for the two groups did not differ from one another or from national norms. In this sample, depression "in general" (global) and "at home," but not "at school," were associated significantly with suicidal thoughts/attempts and serious past life events (e.g. family conflict, sexual abuse). There were no significant associations between depression or self-esteem and illicit substance or alcohol use. We found few associations between poor school attendance and health-risk behaviors in this sample of employment-seeking adolescents. The poor and regular attenders of school were similar in most aspects of their health-risk behaviors and self-esteem. PMID:8982520

  6. The Relationship of School Uniforms to Student Attendance, Achievement, and Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowell, Russell Edward

    2012-01-01

    This causal-comparative study examined the relationship of school uniforms to attendance, academic achievement, and discipline referral rates, using data collected from two high schools in rural southwest Georgia county school systems, one with a uniforms program and one without a uniforms program. After accounting for race and students with…

  7. Time Series in Education: The Analysis of Daily Attendance in Two High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopmans, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use of a time series approach to the analysis of daily attendance in two urban high schools over the course of one school year (2009-10). After establishing that the series for both schools were stationary, they were examined for moving average processes, autoregression, seasonal dependencies (weekly cycles),…

  8. Visible School Security Measures and Student Academic Performance, Attendance, and Postsecondary Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Fisher, Benjamin W.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. schools use visible security measures (security cameras, metal detectors, security personnel) in an effort to keep schools safe and promote adolescents' academic success. This study examined how different patterns of visible security utilization were associated with U.S. middle and high school students' academic performance, attendance,…

  9. Does Raising the State Compulsory School Attendance Age Achieve the Intended Outcomes? REL 2014-005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Philip E.; Duncan, Teresa G.

    2013-01-01

    Maryland recently raised its compulsory school attendance age from 16 to 18 in two stages: from 16 to 17 at the beginning of the 2014-15 school year and from 17 to 18 at the beginning of the 2016-17 school year (Maryland Senate Bill 362, 2012). The Maryland State Department of Education, a member of Regional Educational Laboratory…

  10. Sources of Stress for Greek Students with Intellectual Disabilities Attending Mainstream Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulis, Spiridon-Georgios; Floridis, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Students with intellectual disabilities often experience school-related stress. As a result, they are confronted with many difficulties in their daily school life. The goal of this study was to assess situations of school life that students attending Greek mainstream settings are likely to experience as stressful. Twenty students with mild…

  11. New York State School Facilities and Student Health, Achievement, and Attendance: A Data Analysis Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boese, Stephen; Shaw, John

    2005-01-01

    Students who attend schools with environmental hazards that impact indoor air quality are more likely to miss class, and therefore lose learning opportunities. Yet school environmental health and safety remains largely unregulated and there is no state or federal agency in charge of protecting children's environmental health in schools. This…

  12. 77 FR 75419 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; School Attendance Boundary Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ..., Acting Director, Information Collection Clearance Division, Privacy, Information and Records Management... Director of the Information Collection Clearance Division, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; School Attendance Boundary Survey (SABS)...

  13. School Asthma Screening and Case Management: Attendance and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moricca, Michelle L.; Grasska, Merry A.; BMarthaler, Marcia; Morphew, Tricia; Weismuller, Penny C.; Galant, Stanley P.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is related to school absenteeism and underperformance in elementary students. This pilot study assessed whether school nurse case management (CM) in children identified with asthma impacts academic performance and school absenteeism in one school. A validated questionnaire was used to identify children at risk for asthma and CM was provided…

  14. Abbott Students Attending Charter Schools: Funding Disparities and Legal Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulkley, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    Most of New Jersey's charter schools are located in the state's poorer, urban school districts, or "Abbott" districts, and exclusively serve students from those communities. A number of other schools are located outside of the Abbott districts but enroll students from these districts. Specifically, of the 50 charter schools operating in 2004-05,…

  15. Personality Traits Affect Teaching Performance of Attending Physicians: Results of a Multi-Center Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied effects of personality traits on job performance and academic performance in medicine. However, up till date, research in clinical teaching practice did not use quantitative methods and did not account for specialty differences. We empirically studied the relationship of attending physicians' personality traits with their teaching performance across surgical and non-surgical specialties. Method We conducted a survey across surgical and non-surgical specialties in eighteen medical centers in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated attending physicians' overall teaching performance, as well as the specific domains learning climate, professional attitude, communication, evaluation, and feedback, using the validated 21-item System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ). Attending physicians self-evaluated their personality traits on a 5-point scale using the validated 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI), yielding the Five Factor model: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness and openness. Results Overall, 622 (77%) attending physicians and 549 (68%) residents participated. Extraversion positively related to overall teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.02). Openness was negatively associated with scores on feedback for surgical specialties only (B: −0.10, 95% CI: −0.15 to −0.05, P<0.001) and conscientiousness was positively related to evaluation of residents for non-surgical specialties only (B: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.22, p = 0.01). Conclusions Extraverted attending physicians were consistently evaluated as better supervisors. Surgical attending physicians who display high levels of

  16. A Comparison of the Achievement Test Performance of Children Who Attended Montessori Schools and Those Who Attended Non-Montessori Schools in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Hsin-Hui

    2009-01-01

    There are two purposes of the current study. First was to examine whether or not children in the elementary school in Taiwan who had received Montessori early childhood education obtain significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than children who attended non-Montessori pre-elementary programs. Second one was…

  17. Intimate partner violence affects skilled attendance at most recent delivery among women in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Goo, Leslie; Harlow, Siobán D

    2012-07-01

    Delivery assistance by skilled health personnel is a key progress indicator for Millennium Development Goal 5, which aims to reduce the worldwide maternal mortality ratio by 75% between 1990 and 2015. The role of socio-demographic factors in determining skilled attendance at delivery has been widely explored, but relatively little attention has been paid to the effect of gender power relations on delivery care. This analysis investigated whether women's status in the household, as measured by their experience of intimate partner violence (IPV), affected skilled attendance at most recent delivery among women in Kenya. Cross-sectional data were obtained from the 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys (KDHS). 975 ever-married women who had given birth in the past year and completed the KDHS domestic violence module were included in the analysis. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between skilled attendance and IPV. In this sample, 46% reported having experienced any type of IPV, with 39% reporting physical violence, 21% emotional violence, and 13% sexual violence. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and number of antenatal visits, lifetime experience of emotional violence was found to decrease the odds of skilled attendance at most recent delivery by 40%, while lifetime experience of physical violence reduced the odds by 29%. Women's experience of IPV may influence receipt of skilled attendance during parturition, and should be addressed as national programs and their international partners align efforts to contribute to the achievement of Millennium Development Goal 5. PMID:21688110

  18. What Works after School? The Relationship between After-School Program Quality, Program Attendance, and Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leos-Urbel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between after-school program quality, program attendance, and academic outcomes for a sample of low-income after-school program participants. Regression and hierarchical linear modeling analyses use a unique longitudinal data set including 29 after-school programs that served 5,108 students in Grades 4 to 8…

  19. BLIND STUDENTS IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS--A PICTORIAL STORY OF BLIND STUDENTS ATTENDING SCHOOL WITH SIGHTED STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SIMCHES, RAPHAEL F.; AND OTHERS

    ADAPTATIONS IN CURRICULUM, EVALUATION PROCEDURES, STUDENT ACTIVITIES, SCHOOL SERVICES, AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES FOR BLIND CHILDREN ATTENDING SCHOOL WITH SIGHTED STUDENTS IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS ARE DISCUSSED. CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES ARE THE SAME FOR BLIND AND SIGHTED STUDENTS. SUCH SPECIAL DEVICES AS BRAILLE TEXTBOOKS AND RECORDINGS ARE…

  20. A Synchronous Distance Discussion Procedure with Reinforcement Mechanism: Designed for Elementary School Students to Achieve the Attending and Responding Stages of the Affective Domain Teaching Goals within a Class Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Kuo-An; Yang, Chia-Hao

    2008-01-01

    Distance education courses must cope with the difficulties imposed by delivering a class at a distance. As most courses only emphasize the cognitive aspects of the class and neglect the course's effect on the students, this gives no help for reaching the affective domain teaching goals. Especially for younger students, in distance education, when…

  1. How Effective Is Parental Prosecution as a Method of Improving School Attendance among Primary-Aged Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Just under half a million children and young people in state schools in England miss school every day. Indeed, improving school attendance has remained a key aim for successive governments. Various strategies have been adopted at both national and local levels in an attempt to tackle the persistent issue of school attendance with varying degrees…

  2. Household Perspectives on School Attendance in Rural Tibet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postiglione, Gerard; Jiao, Ben; Gyatso, Sonam

    2006-01-01

    This study explores household perspectives on school access at the village level in rural Tibet. Data from two rural areas are compared. This paper argues that despite abolition of all school fees, the use of Tibetan as a medium of instruction, the provision of boarding schools, and other incentives, dropout rates in rural areas remain high. This…

  3. School Quality Signals and Attendance in Rural Guatemala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jeffery H.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes school dropout in rural Guatemala using event history data and unusually detailed data on schools and teachers. Significant results for language of instruction, teacher education and fighting between students demonstrate the importance of accounting for school context influences on an outcome that has, historically, been…

  4. School asthma screening and case management: attendance and learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Moricca, Michelle L; Grasska, Merry A; BMarthaler, Marcia; Morphew, Tricia; Weismuller, Penny C; Galant, Stanley P

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is related to school absenteeism and underperformance in elementary students. This pilot study assessed whether school nurse case management (CM) in children identified with asthma impacts academic performance and school absenteeism in one school. A validated questionnaire was used to identify children at risk for asthma and CM was provided to link these students to medical care and assure asthma action plans at school. In the 40 children with confirmed diagnosis who received CM, academic performance on standardized testing postintervention was similar to the 76 children who were low risk for asthma. Average days absent due to illness in the CM group were reduced from 5.8 to 3.7 days in the postintervention school year. School nurse screening, CM, and collaboration with a medical provider resulted in early identification, referral, and subsequent treatment of students at risk for asthma and may have contributed to reduced illness absences. PMID:22797976

  5. Exploring the Educational Benefits of Attending an Ethnically Diverse Magnet High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Jill

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather teacher and student perceptions of the educational benefits that emerge from providing diverse learning environments for students attending an inter-district magnet school. Research Questions were (1) In what ways do teachers and students report that the magnet school offers an ethnically diverse learning…

  6. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Dietary Patterns of Preadolescents Attending Schools in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nepper, Martha J.; Chai, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined dietary intake of fruit and vegetables and dietary patterns of preadolescents attending schools in the Midwest. Methods: A total of 506 students (11.2 ± 1.3 years) from four public and private schools in Nebraska completed a validated 41-item Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess their dietary intake.…

  7. School Attendance and Child Labor in Ecuador. Policy Research Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Acevedo, Gloria

    Data from Ecuador's Living Standard and Measurement Surveys were used to analyze the characteristics and determinants of child labor and schooling. Of particular interest was the influence of adult wages on child labor. Survey data on children aged 10-17 included sex, age, rural or urban residence, monthly wages, whether or not attending school,…

  8. School Attendance Patterns, Unmet Educational Needs, and Truancy: A Chronological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines chronological patterns of attendance and academic performance of urban students who are identified as truants in Grade 8. A chronological review of 42 student records, from school entry through Grade 8, identified high frequencies of absenteeism and academic performance issues beginning at school entry and, in many cases,…

  9. 20 CFR 664.310 - When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth attending alternative schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., particularly for youth attending alternative schools? 664.310 Section 664.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.310 When is dropout status determined, particularly...

  10. 20 CFR 664.310 - When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth attending alternative schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., particularly for youth attending alternative schools? 664.310 Section 664.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.310 When is dropout status determined, particularly...

  11. 20 CFR 664.310 - When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth attending alternative schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., particularly for youth attending alternative schools? 664.310 Section 664.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.310 When is dropout status determined, particularly...

  12. An Exploratory Analysis of What Truant Students State Are the Reasons They Do Not Attend School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Joseph, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study in Phases 1 and 2 was to conduct an exploratory analysis of what chronically truant students state are the reasons they do not attend school. Methodology. The subjects in this study were 202 randomly selected students from four high schools in Los Angeles County. Subjects responded to the research instrument: (1)…

  13. Raising School Attendance: A Case Study of Good Practice in Monitoring and Raising Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to discuss the issue of managing and reducing school absenteeism and truancy. Design/methodology/approach: The article proposes the development and implementation of some long-term strategic approaches to tackling truancy and other forms of non-attendance from school. This article focuses on the innovative…

  14. Indigenous Mobility and School Attendance in Remote Australia: Cause or Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    Despite claims of a negative impact on Indigenous school attendance due to mobility no attempt has been made to estimate the number of school-age Indigenous children away from a home base at any one time. This paper uses census data to derive such estimates for the first time. It finds that Indigenous children are mostly sedentary within their…

  15. 76 FR 16859 - Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance-REPS); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Certification of School Attendance--REPS); Comment Request AGENCY...) benefits are actually in enrolled an approved school. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... on: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of...

  16. Health Risk Behaviors of Texas Students Attending Dropout Prevention/Recovery Schools in 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Nancy F.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Kelder, Steven H.; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Carvajal, Scott C.; Gingiss, Phyllis M.

    1999-01-01

    Determined the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among Texas high school students attending dropout prevention/recovery alternative schools. Student surveys indicated that a substantial number participated in behaviors that placed them at acute or chronic health risk. There were differences in prevalence of risk behaviors by gender,…

  17. A Profession at Risk: A Comparison of School Social Workers and Attendance Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, P. David

    Although school social workers (SSW's) are one of the few resources in the schools primarily designated to prevent and remediate personal and social problems that contribute to underachievement and deviant student behavior, many SSW's in Georgia are being replaced by noncertified attendance workers. Some educators claim that these attendance…

  18. Deaf children attending different school environments: sign language abilities and theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf children differed only in their school environment: One group attended a school with a teaching assistant (TA; Sign Language is offered only by the TA to a single deaf child), and the other group attended a bilingual program (Italian Sign Language and Italian). Linguistic abilities and understanding of false belief were assessed using similar materials and procedures in spoken Italian with hearing children and in Italian Sign Language with deaf children. Deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than deaf children attending school with the TA in tasks assessing lexical comprehension and ToM, whereas the performance of hearing children was in between that of the two deaf groups. As for lexical production, deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than the two other groups. No significant differences were found between early and late signers or between children with deaf and hearing parents. PMID:23131578

  19. Learning Strategies of Students Attending a "Second Chance" School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartier, Sylvie C.; Langevin, Louise; Robert, Josianne

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted in Quebec with 608 students (aged 16-19) in four "second chance" schools of the greater Montreal area. The objectives were twofold: (a) to identify the strategies of these students in the context of five learning activities; and (b) to compare the strategies of students who had withdrawn from school after their mandatory…

  20. Attending to the Noise: Applying Chaos Theory to School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Richard; Zinga, Mario

    The Common Knowledge: Pittsburgh (CK:P), a technology-based project, introduced the Internet into all levels of the Pittsburgh Public Schools during 1993-97. This is a case study of the ideology, strategies, and process of the CK:P project describes the project's activities, examines the project in light of school-reform literature, and uses its…

  1. Handbook on Services to Pupils Attending Nonpublic Schools. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Nonpublic School Services.

    This handbook interprets New York's education laws that require each public school district to provide permanent and requested noninstructional services for resident nonpublic school pupils. Each chapter describing a service includes a question and answer section; the document's final pages list legal citations and education department contacts.…

  2. Motion Picture Attendance and Factors Influencing Movie Selection among High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bruce A.

    In an audience research study, 64 high school students responded to a questionnaire concerning their movie attendance habits and the importance of ten variables to their decision-making process when choosing a movie to see. The results indicated that 26.6% attended movies once a month, 23.4% twice monthly, 6.3% three times a month, 4.7% four times…

  3. Socioeconomic and racial/ethnic factors affecting non-fatal medically attended injury rates in US children.

    PubMed Central

    Overpeck, M. D.; Jones, D. H.; Trumble, A. C.; Scheidt, P. C.; Bijur, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using a representative survey of US children, the purpose was to evaluate separate effects of socioeconomic and racial/ethnic factors, including access to care, on medically attended non-fatal injury rates. METHODS: Multivariate linear regression models were used to determine associations between injuries and health care coverage (insurance or Medicaid), having a place to go for care, race/ethnicity, maternal education, number of adults and children in the household, poverty, and urbanicity. The 1988 Child Health Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey included questions on medically attended injuries, and their cause, location, and effects on the child. Injury categories included total, consequential, occurrence at home or school, falls, and being struck or cut. RESULTS: Lack of health care coverage was consistently associated with lower medically attended injury rates in non-Hispanic blacks or whites and Mexican-Americans, but affected total rates for each group differently due to unequal distribution of health care coverage. Injuries occurred about 40% more frequently to children and adolescents living in single adult households compared with two adult homes for all injury categories except for injuries occurring at school. CONCLUSIONS: Preventive interventions targeted to specific populations based on assumptions that poverty, lack of education, or minority status result in greater risks for injuries require a closer look. Efficient targeting should address underlying factors such as differences in exposures and environments associated with single adult homes or recreational activities. Data sources used to target high risk populations for interventions need to address bias due to access to care. Images PMID:9493623

  4. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  5. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  6. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  7. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  8. The Effects of Part-Time Employment on High School Students' Grade Point Averages and Rate of School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffez, Jack

    To determine what effects employment will have on high school students' grade point averages and rate of school attendance, the author involved fifty-six students in an experiment. Twenty-eight students were employed part-time under the Youth Incentive Entitlement Project (YIEP). The twenty-eight students in the control group were eligible for…

  9. Relationship between School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports and Academic, Attendance, and Behavior Outcomes in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jennifer; Simonsen, Brandi; McCoach, D. Betsy; Sugai, George; Lombardi, Allison; Horner, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Attendance, behavior, and academic outcomes are important indicators of school effectiveness and long-term student outcomes. "Multi-tiered systems of support" (MTSS), such as "School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports" (SWPBIS), have emerged as potentially effective frameworks for addressing student needs and…

  10. Community Schools--Results that Turn around Failing Schools: Test Scores, Attendance, Graduation and College-Going Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Community Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Great strides have been made by community school initiatives across the nation in their efforts to impact student achievement, attendance, student engagement, graduation rates, parent involvement and more. Data on community schools is growing and the authors encourage readers to review research reports and syntheses on results. The results…

  11. Understandings and Misconceptions of Biology Concepts Held by Students Attending Small High Schools and Students Attending Large High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William D.; Marek, Edmund A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of school size to understanding of scientific concepts. Results indicated that students in small high schools had fewer instances of understanding and more instances of misunderstanding of the concepts of diffusion and homeostasis. No difference was observed for concepts related to food production in plants and…

  12. Authoritative Parenting Promotes Adolescent School Achievement and Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Laurence; Elmen, Julie D.

    As adolescents progress from elementary to secondary school, their academic success increasingly depends on their ability to manage their own time and behavior. Because the family plays such an important role in the development of responsible autonomy, this study examined authoritative parenting and the hypothesis that authoritative parents…

  13. Communication and Computation Skills for Blind Students Attending Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services 3, Dix Hills, NY.

    Outlined are evaluative and instructional procedures used by itinerant teachers of blind children in public schools to teach readiness for braille reading and writing, as well as braille reading and writing, signature writing, and the Nemeth Code of braille mathematics and scientific notation. Readiness for braille reading and writing is…

  14. Psychosocial Profile of Gifted Adolescents Attending a Public High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordaz-Villegas, Gabriela; Acle-Tomasini, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The current models in the study of giftedness such as the Triadic Interdependence define it as a favorable outcome of the interaction between intrinsic (intellectual capacity, creativity and motivation) and extrinsic (family, peers, and school) factors. Based on this, the purpose of this study was to identify and establish a profile…

  15. Comparison of health-risk behaviors among students attending alternative and traditional high schools in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karen E; McMorris, Barbara J; Kubik, Martha Y

    2013-10-01

    Previous research, over a decade old, suggests students attending alternative high schools (AHS) engage in high levels of health-risk behaviors. Data from the 2007 Minnesota Student Survey for students attending AHS (n = 2,847) and traditional high schools (THS; n = 87,468) were used for this cross-sectional analysis to compare prevalence estimates, adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and free and reduced lunch, for 28 health-risk behaviors. Students attending AHS were significantly more likely than students attending THS to report engaging in all behaviors related to unintentional injury and violence, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, and sexual activity, and were significantly less likely to report participating in physical activity, including sports teams. Students attending AHS continue to engage in high levels of health-risk behaviors as compared to their peers in THS. Updated national prevalence data were needed, as well as studies examining the role of protective factors in the lives of students attending AHS. PMID:23263265

  16. Does Improved Water Access Increase Child School Attendance? A Quasi-Experimental Approach From Rural Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Y.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of improved water access on child school attendance using two years of primary panel data from a quasi-experimental study in Oromiya, Ethiopia. A predominant form of child labor in rural poor households in least developed countries is water collection. Girls are often the primary water collectors for households, and because of the time intensive nature of water collection improved water access may allow for time to be reallocated to schooling (Rosen and Vincent 1999; Nankhuni and Findeis 2004). Understanding how improved water access may increase schooling for girls has important development policy implications. Indeed, abundant research on returns to education suggests increased schooling for girls is tied to improved future child and maternal health, economic opportunities, and lower fertility rates (Handa 1996; Schultz 1998; Michaelowa 2000). The literature to date finds that improved water access leads to increased schooling; however, there still exists a clear gap in the literature for understanding this relationship for two reasons. First, only four studies have directly examined the relationship between improved water access and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa, and analyses have been limited due to the use of cross-sectional data and research designs (Nankhuni and Findeis 2004; Koolwal and Van de Walle 2010; Ndiritu and Nyangan 2011; Nauges and Strand 2011). Indeed, only two studies have attempted to control for the endogenous nature of water access. Second, all studies use a binary school enrollment indicator from household surveys, which may suffer from response bias and may be an imperfect measure for actual schooling. Respondents may feel pressured to report that their children are enrolled in school if, like in Ethiopia, there are compulsory education laws. This may result in an overestimation of school enrollment. In addition, most children from rural poor households combine work and school, and a binary indicator does

  17. Does organizational culture affect out-patient DNA (did not attend) rates?

    PubMed

    Jackson, S

    1997-01-01

    Government interest in health service "did not attend" (DNA) rates was seen to occur by accident, following which efforts to reduce DNAs have tended to concentrate on operational rather than strategic issues. Considers the effect hospital culture has had on DNA rates from an organizational and patient perspective. Identifies some of the key cultural issues that impacted on DNA rates by utilizing observation and telephone survey research methods. Concludes that, in the main, the lack of customer-oriented organizational culture was seen to affect DNA rates adversely within one NHS provider trust. PMID:10179096

  18. Family Environment, Coping, and Mental Health in Adolescents Attending Therapeutic Day Schools

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Erin M.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin; Wilson, Helen W.; Brown, Larry K.; Houck, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined associations among family environment, coping, and emotional and conduct problems in adolescents attending therapeutic day schools due to mental health problems. METHODS Adolescents (N=417; 30.2% female) ages 13–20 (M=15.25) reported on their family environment (affective involvement and functioning), coping (emotion-focused support-seeking, cognitive restructuring, avoidant actions), and emotional and conduct problems. RESULTS Poorer family environment was associated with less emotion-focused support-seeking and cognitive restructuring, and more emotional and conduct problems. Emotional problems were negatively associated with cognitive restructuring, and conduct problems were negatively associated with all coping strategies. Cognitive restructuring accounted for the relationship between family environment and emotional problems. Cognitive restructuring and emotion-focused support-seeking each partially accounted for the relationship between family functioning and conduct problems, but not the relationship between family affective involvement and conduct problems. CONCLUSIONS Findings implicate the role of coping in the relationship between family environment and adolescent mental health. PMID:25151645

  19. My Rock: Black Women Attending Graduate School at a Southern Predominantly White University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Quentin R.; Bodenhorn, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Participants in this phenomenological study were 11 Black women who received an undergraduate degree from a historically Black college or university and were currently attending graduate school at a southern predominantly White university. This study investigated the adjustment experiences of these women to life on a southern predominantly White…

  20. Attainment of Developmental Tasks by Adolescents with Hearing Loss Attending Special Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2014-01-01

    The investigators compared the perceived attainment of developmental tasks by 181 German adolescents with hearing loss and 254 peers without hearing loss. The adolescents with hearing loss were attending special schools for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. On average, the two groups perceived similar levels of success across the assessed…

  1. Challenging Behaviors among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Multiple Disabilities Attending Special Schools in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to understand the profile of and the factors which impact upon challenging behaviors among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and multiple disabilities (MD). Teachers of 322 and 132 children with ASD and MD, respectively, attending special schools in Singapore, completed the Developmental Behavior Checklist, Teacher…

  2. Socio-Economic Influences on School Attendance: A study of a Canadian Country in 1871

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Frank T.; George, Peter J.

    1974-01-01

    Cross-section regression techniques are applied to census data from the year 1871 in Wentworth County, Ontario, to ascertain the influence of variables such as age, origin, locale -- urban or rural -- and family size on school attendance among children 10-16. (JH)

  3. Early Elementary Performance and Attendance in Baltimore City Schools' Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Faith; Olson, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    This study looks at attendance in the early grades of elementary school. In particular, the authors focus on students enrolled in Pre-Kindergarten (PreK) and Kindergarten (K). They follow these young students over several years to determine their pattern of chronic absence (CA), defined as missing more than one-ninth of days enrolled, and their…

  4. Examining Life Goals and School Attendance Rates of Afghan Students Receiving Higher Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bek, Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    This research is a descriptive study carried out to examine the relations between life goals and school attendance levels among Afghan students receiving higher education in Turkey. In total there were 198 Afghan students that participated in the study. Among which 159 were male and 39 female. All of these students were studying in 16 Turkish…

  5. AIDS Risk Among Students Attending Seventh-day Adventist Schools in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Gary L.; Hopp, Joyce W.; Marshak, Helen P. Hopp; Neish, Christine; Rhoads, Gayle

    1998-01-01

    Surveys of students attending Seventh-Day Adventist (SDA) high schools assessed sexual and drug-use behaviors that placed them at risk for contracting or transmitting HIV. Comparison of the results with data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that SDA students had lower rates of sexual intercourse and substance use. Parental…

  6. Characteristics of Bullies and Victims among Students with Emotional Disturbance Attending Approved Private Special Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carran, Deborah T.; Kellner, Millicent H.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to describe rates and types of bullying and victimization among 407 students with emotional disturbance (ED) in grades 6 through 10 attending private approved special education schools in New Jersey. These students anonymously completed the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire. Results indicated that compared with a general…

  7. Elimination of Drooling by an Adolescent Student with Autism Attending Public High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Shannon; Harchik, Alan E.; Luiselli, James K.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated a multicomponent intervention that successfully eliminated drooling by a 17-year-old student with autism who attended a public high school. The student was taught to perform compensatory responses (wiping his mouth and swallowing saliva), received positive reinforcement for having a "dry mouth," and was given opportunities to monitor…

  8. Achievement of Elementary School Students and Attendance in Preschool Programs in Johnson County, Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Emogene

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in achievement scores exist between students who attended the Johnson County School System preschool program and those who did not as measured by standardized TCAP achievement test Reading/Language Arts and Math scores of students in the third and fourth grades. The variables of grade…

  9. Effect of Religious Attendance on Years of Schooling in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohanty, Madhu S.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the USA, the study demonstrates that an individual's completed years of schooling later in life is positively related to his/her frequency of religious attendance during youth. Using the propensity score matching technique, the study shows that this relationship is causal. This conclusion remains valid for youths of different…

  10. School Behavior and Attendance during the First Year of Treatment for Childhood Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stehbens, James A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated school behavior and attendance of children with cancer (N=36) and hemophilia (N=26). Teacher ratings of students' behavior showed no differences before and after treatment. Children with cancer were absent four times more than healthy children; absenteeism of hemophiliacs was twice the normal rate. Academic performance was negatively…

  11. The Effects of Laws Governing Youth Employment and School Attendance on Youth Offenses and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Donald G.

    This report deals with three major problem areas--education, employment, and crime--facing the nation and its youth today. Specifically, the report addresses itself to the effects that school attendance laws and child labor laws have on the incidence of youth offenses and delinquency. It was further limited to the investigation of delinquencies in…

  12. Assessing the Psychological Changes of Gifted Students Attending a Residential High School with an Outcome Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Marlon R.; Cross, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the psychological changes that 272 students experienced while attending a residential school for gifted adolescents in the Midwest. This article shares the quantitative portion of a mixed-methods study. Outcome measurement data from the Youth Outcome Questionnaire Self-Report 2.0 (YOQ-SR) tracked students' level of…

  13. Student Attendance, Mobility, and Mathematics Achievement in an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, Carol S.; Kanyongo, Gibbs Y.

    2012-01-01

    The authors aim to describe student attendance-mobility within a large urban district in ways that are meaningful and useful to schools and the community. First, the prevalence of mobility and nonattendance in Grades 1-12 across all students and by gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic subgroups is presented. Second, the impact on student…

  14. Investigating Level of Mathematics Knowledge for Students Attending Vocational Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colakoglu, Nurdan

    2013-01-01

    Students attend mathematics courses in Turkey for totally 11 years, throughout education life ranging from primary school to university, including eight years in primary education and three years in secondary education (four years based on new arrangement); however, level of mathematic knowledge of students is upsetting when they reach university…

  15. 77 FR 71200 - Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... June 4, 2012 at Volume 77 FR 33007 allowing for a 60-day public comment period. No comments were... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41 AGENCY: U.S... Full-Time School Attendance. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44...

  16. "Does Charter School Attendance Improve Test Scores?" Comments and Reactions on the Arizona Achievement Study. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Christopher; Hollenbeck, Kevin

    In a recent report, Lewis Solmon, Kern Paark, and David Garcia (2001) seek to identify the impact of attending charter schools on student achievement using data from Arizona. Based on a sophisticated statistical analysis, these authors report that charter school attendance increases test score gains of students. This note raises some questions…

  17. An Investigation of Emotional Skills of Six-Year-Old Children Attending Nursery School According to Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durmusoglu-Saltali, Neslihan; Arslan, Emel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is for the emotional skills of six-year-old children attending nursery school according to some variables. The participants were 306 (135 girls and 171 boys) six-year-old children attending nursery school. Data were collected from Assessment of Children's Emotional Skills and personal information form. In order to analyze…

  18. Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mark

    This review explores which facility attributes affect academic outcomes the most and in what manner and degree. The research is examined in six categories: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size. The review concludes that school facilities affect learning.…

  19. Visible School Security Measures and Student Academic Performance, Attendance, and Postsecondary Aspirations.

    PubMed

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Fisher, Benjamin W

    2016-01-01

    Many U.S. schools use visible security measures (security cameras, metal detectors, security personnel) in an effort to keep schools safe and promote adolescents' academic success. This study examined how different patterns of visible security utilization were associated with U.S. middle and high school students' academic performance, attendance, and postsecondary educational aspirations. The data for this study came from two large national surveys--the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey (N = 38,707 students; 51% male, 77% White, MAge = 14.72) and the School Survey on Crime and Safety (N = 10,340 schools; average student composition of 50% male, 57% White). The results provided no evidence that visible security measures had consistent beneficial effects on adolescents' academic outcomes; some security utilization patterns had modest detrimental effects on adolescents' academic outcomes, particularly the heavy surveillance patterns observed in a small subset of high schools serving predominantly low socioeconomic students. The findings of this study provide no evidence that visible security measures have any sizeable effects on academic performance, attendance, or postsecondary aspirations among U.S. middle and high school students. PMID:25722253

  20. Medical Versus Nonmedical Immunization Exemptions for Child Care and School Attendance.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Routine childhood immunizations against infectious diseases are an integral part of our public health infrastructure. They provide direct protection to the immunized individual and indirect protection to children and adults unable to be immunized via the effect of community immunity. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have regulations requiring proof of immunization for child care and school attendance as a public health strategy to protect children in these settings and to secondarily serve as a mechanism to promote timely immunization of children by their caregivers. Although all states and the District of Columbia have mechanisms to exempt school attendees from specific immunization requirements for medical reasons, the majority also have a heterogeneous collection of regulations and laws that allow nonmedical exemptions from childhood immunizations otherwise required for child care and school attendance. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) supports regulations and laws requiring certification of immunization to attend child care and school as a sound means of providing a safe environment for attendees and employees of these settings. The AAP also supports medically indicated exemptions to specific immunizations as determined for each individual child. The AAP views nonmedical exemptions to school-required immunizations as inappropriate for individual, public health, and ethical reasons and advocates for their elimination. PMID:27573087

  1. Behavioral Disorder amongst Adolescents Attending Secondary School in Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chinawa, J. M.; Manyike, P. C.; Obu, H. A.; Odetunde, O. I.; Aniwada, E. C.; Ndu, I. K.; Chinawa, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Adolescents are prone to various forms of behavioral problems. These behavioral issues in adolescents can have serious consequences for the adolescents. Objectives. The objectives of the study are to determine the causative factors of adolescent problems and specific manifestations. Methods. Behavioral problems were investigated using a random sampling of adolescents from secondary schools in southeast Nigeria from February to April, 2014. A self-administered questionnaire was developed from Health Kids Colorado Questionnaire. Results. A total of 763 subjects completed the questionnaire. Adolescents who reported to have used tobacco 3 to 5 and 6 to 9 times during the last 30 days are just 3.14% and 3.4%, respectively. Nineteen (2.49%) adolescents claimed that they have had sex before but not in the last 3 months. Adolescents who attempted suicide are from 15 years and peaked at 18. Eighty-three (11%) adolescents who are 15 years old attempted suicide in a year; this peaks at 17 years where 235 (30.8%) committed suicide. Majority of adolescents with behavioral disorder are from the upper class family. Conclusion. This study revealed that adolescents exhibit several forms of behavioral problems. PMID:25276048

  2. The Effects of Middle School Bullying and Victimization on Adjustment through High School: Growth Modeling of Achievement, School Attendance, and Disciplinary Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marissa A.; Ojanen, Tiina; Gesten, Ellis L.; Smith-Schrandt, Heather; Brannick, Michael; Wienke Totura, Christine M.; Alexander, Lizette; Scanga, David; Brown, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The current 5-year longitudinal study examined the effects of middle school bullying and victimization on adolescent academic achievement, disciplinary referrals, and school attendance through high school (N = 2030; 1016 both boys and girls). Greater engagement in bullying behaviors was concurrently associated with lower achievement and school…

  3. Factors affecting disability in patients attending the internal medicine departments of general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sata, M; Yoshitake, K; Utsunomiya, H; Hatada, K; Ohtsuka, T; Sugasaki, H; Nakane, Y

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sociodemographic factors, physical factors and mental factors on the physical and social disability of patients attending outpatient clinics of general hospitals. Physical and psychiatric morbidity in 1580 consecutive patients attending the internal medicine department of general hospitals was assessed using a stratified two-stage sampling design method. Of the total, 336 patients completed the second stage interview composed of Primary Care Version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview and Groningen Social Disability Schedule to assess sociodemographic, physical and mental factors. In this study, restricted activity days, disability days and Brief Disability Questionnaire were used for the assessment of physical disability, and Groningen Social Disability Schedule was used for social disability. Sociodemographic, physical and mental factors were all related to disability. Among sociodemographic factors, unemployment was associated with physical disability and social disability mildly. Among physical factors, the severity of physical disease was not associated with disability and medically explained somatic symptoms were associated with disability. Furthermore, the mental factor was more strongly associated with physical and social disability. It could be said that the mental factor is more strongly associated with physical and social disability than sociodemographic or physical factors. In addition, even mild mental symptoms not leading to ICD-10 mental disorders affected disability. From the viewpoint of the patients' burden, it is important to assess the mental symptoms as well as physical status in outpatient clinics of internal medicine or primary care. PMID:10687740

  4. 5 CFR 843.410 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of the school or the records. (i) If the educational institution is above the high school level, the... equivalent. (ii) If the educational institution is at the high school level, the certification must be signed... full-time school attendance. 843.410 Section 843.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF...

  5. 5 CFR 843.410 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of the school or the records. (i) If the educational institution is above the high school level, the... equivalent. (ii) If the educational institution is at the high school level, the certification must be signed... full-time school attendance. 843.410 Section 843.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF...

  6. 5 CFR 843.410 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of the school or the records. (i) If the educational institution is above the high school level, the... equivalent. (ii) If the educational institution is at the high school level, the certification must be signed... full-time school attendance. 843.410 Section 843.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF...

  7. 5 CFR 843.410 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of the school or the records. (i) If the educational institution is above the high school level, the... equivalent. (ii) If the educational institution is at the high school level, the certification must be signed... full-time school attendance. 843.410 Section 843.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF...

  8. Do Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances Attending Schools for Special Education Have Lower Expectations Regarding the Transition to Adulthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margraf, Hannah; Pinquart, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with emotional and behavioral disturbances (EBD) and those attending special schools tend to have poorer adult outcomes than adolescents without EBD and peers from regular schools. Using a four-group comparison (students with or without EBD from special schools and students with or without EBD from regular schools), the present study…

  9. How Acute Total Sleep Loss Affects the Attending Brain: A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F.; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Design: Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. Methods: The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Conclusion: Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. Citation: Ma N, Dinges DF, Basner M, Rao H. How acute total

  10. Teacher Attendance Effects on Student Achievement: Research Study of Ohio Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roby, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Accountability for student learning and successful progression through each grade level has been a top priority concern for federal, state, and local educators. Studies have revealed several variables affecting student achievement, with much attentiveness on student attendance. (Barrington & Hendricks, 1989, Borland & Howsen 1998, Coutts,…

  11. Behavioural improvements and emotional gains for students attending an Australian School for Specific Purposes.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Melissa J; Cornish, Alison M

    2015-10-01

    Outcomes of students with behavioural and emotional difficulties attending a specialised educational programme, delivered in a tertiary education and health facility, were evaluated and compared with Australian normative data. A total of 45 students (5-10 years old) attending the school in Sydney, New South Wales, were identified. At enrolment, parent ratings on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) significantly deviated from Australian normative data on all scales for males and on the overall score, conduct and hyperactivity scales for females. Clinically significant levels of hyperactivity, peer problems and conduct symptoms were identified. After an average attendance at the school of 8.82 months, ratings on the Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) indicated improved overall functioning, alongside specific improvements on SDQ rated emotion, conduct and social symptoms, and in Health of the Nation Outcomes Scales Child and Adolescent (HoNOSCA) rated social impairment and parents' reported need for information about their child's condition. Male students' emotional symptoms no longer differed from those of typical Australian students. The findings provide initial evidence for the effectiveness of a multimodal, flexible and targeted school programme in remediating key student mental health symptoms. It is suggested that major concepts from attachment theory and explicitly taught behavioural skills are key elements of this unique programme that contribute to its apparent effectiveness. PMID:25183418

  12. Analysis of Math and Reading Achievement Scores of Students Attending Year-Round Calendar Schools and Traditional Calendar Schools in Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abakwue, Chimaeze Ikechi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there were a significant difference in math and reading academic achievement scores between eighth-grade students attending year-round calendar schools and eighth-grade students attending traditional calendar schools based on the TCAP. In addition, this study investigated math and reading achievement…

  13. Bullying and School Attendance: A Case Study of Senior High School Students in Ghana. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 41

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mairead; Bosumtwi-Sam, Cynthia; Sabates, Ricardo; Owusu, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This monograph analyses the effects of bullying on school attendance among senior high school students in Ghana. A strong correlation is found between being bullied and having poor attendance. The effects of emotional problems and of peer friendships on this correlation are then examined. For both boys and girls, having emotional problems is…

  14. Early-stage primary school children attending a school in the Malawian School Feeding Program (SFP) have better reversal learning and lean muscle mass growth than those attending a non-SFP school.

    PubMed

    Nkhoma, Owen W W; Duffy, Maresa E; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Davidson, Philip W; McSorley, Emeir M; Strain, J J; O'Brien, Gerard M

    2013-08-01

    In developing countries, schoolchildren encounter a number of challenges, including failure to complete school, poor health and nutrition, and poor academic performance. Implementation of school feeding programs (SFPs) in less developed countries is increasing and yet there is mixed evidence regarding their positive effects on nutrition, education, and cognition at the population level. This study evaluated cognitive and anthropometric outcomes in entry-level primary school children in Malawi with the aim of generating evidence for the ongoing debate about SFPs in Malawi and other developing countries. A total of 226 schoolchildren aged 6-8 y in 2 rural Malawian public primary schools were followed for one school year. Children attending one school (SFP school) received a daily ration of corn-soy blend porridge, while those attending the other (non-SFP school) did not. Baseline and post-baseline outcomes included the Cambridge Neurological Test Automated Battery cognitive tests of paired associate learning, rapid visual information processing and intra-extra dimensional shift, and anthropometric measurements of weight, height, and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). At follow-up, the SFP subcohort had a greater reduction than the non-SFP subcohort in the number of intra-extra predimensional shift errors made (mean 18.5 and 24.9, respectively; P-interaction = 0.02) and also showed an increase in MUAC (from 16.3 to 17.0; P-interaction <0.0001). The results indicate that the SFP in Malawi is associated with an improvement in reversal learning and catch-up growth in lean muscle mass in children in the SFP school compared with children in the non-SFP school. These findings suggest that the Malawian SFP, if well managed and ration sizes are sustained, may have the potential to improve nutritional and cognitive indicators of the most disadvantaged children. PMID:23803471

  15. DISASTER AND YOUTH VIOLENCE: THE EXPERIENCE OF SCHOOL ATTENDING YOUTH IN NEW ORLEANS

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey S.; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Clum, Gretchen A.; Brown, Lisanne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although disaster exposure is linked with increased child aggression, population-level trends are unknown. Pre- to post-Katrina changes in violence-related behaviors among New Orleans high school youth (ages 12-18) were assessed. Methods Data from the 2003 (pre-Katrina), 2005 (pre-Katrina) and 2007 (post-Katrina) New Orleans Youth Risk Behavior Survey (n=5,267) were utilized. Crude comparisons across years of population characteristics and violence behavior prevalence were made with chi-square analyses. Changes in violence-related behaviors over time were assessed with logistic regression models including indicators for survey years and controls for compositional changes. Results Age, gender and race/ethnicity of school-attending youth were stable across years. In models controlling for demographics, most behaviors were stable over time. Some changes were observed for all groups: dating violence and forced sex increased prior to the storm; weapon carrying and missing school due to feeling unsafe decreased after the storm. Among African American adolescents only, being threatened at school increased before Katrina. Conclusions Results do not support significant population-level increases in violent behavior among New Orleans school-attending youths post-Katrina. Factors that buffered New Orleans students from post-Katrina violence increases, such as population composition changes or increased supportive services, may explain these findings. PMID:21783056

  16. Does Raising the State Compulsory School Attendance Age Achieve the Intended Outcomes? Summary. REL 2014-005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Philip E.; Duncan, Teresa G.

    2013-01-01

    Maryland raised its compulsory school attendance age from 16 to 18 in two stages: from 16 to 17 at the beginning of the 2014/15 school year and from 17 to 18 at the beginning of the 2016/17 school year (Maryland Senate Bill 362, 2012). The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) sought technical assistance from the Regional Educational…

  17. An Examination of Barriers to Physical Education for Christian and Muslim Girls Attending Comprehensive Secondary Schools in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Dave; Hoyle, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    This study examined barriers to Physical Education (PE) in a sample of Christian and Muslim schoolgirls attending UK comprehensive secondary schools. Also assessed was whether religion and school year (age) had any impact upon barrier strength and if school year × religion interactions existed. A questionnaire was developed and exploratory factor…

  18. Using Group Counseling to Improve the Attendance of Elementary School Students with High Rates of Absenteeism: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Landman, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    The foundations of academic and social learning are laid in the early years of school, and attendance is critical to school success. However, research suggests that chronic absenteeism is a significant problem at the elementary school level (Chang & Romero, 2008; Romero & Lee, 2007). This paper presents the results of an action research study…

  19. Willingness to Remain Friends and Attend School with Lesbian and Gay Peers: Relational Expressions of Prejudice among Heterosexual Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poteat, V. Paul; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Koenig, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, heterosexual students' willingness to remain friends with peers who disclose that they are gay or lesbian and their willingness to attend schools that include gay and lesbian students were examined among two large middle school and high school samples (Sample 1: n = 20,509; 50.7% girls; Sample 2: n = 16,917; 50.2% girls). Boys were…

  20. Computerized Attendance Accounting and Emergency Assistance Communications: Viable Tools in Secondary School Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Vasel W.

    1971-01-01

    In the late 1968, the Space Technology Application Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated a pilot study to determine whether technological aids could be developed that would help secondary school administrators cope with the volatile and chaotic situations that often accompany student activism, disorders, and riots. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Sacramento City Unified School District (SCUSD) and at the John F. Kennedy Senior High School (JFK) in Sacramento, California. The problems at JFK and in the SCUSD were identified and described to the JPL team by members of the Kennedy staff and personnel at various levels and departments within the school district. The JPL team of engineers restricted their scope to problems that appeared solvable, or at least partially solvable, through the use of technological systems. Thus far, two hardware systems have been developed for use in the school. The first, a personal emergency assistance communication system, has already been tested operationally at JFK and has met the objectives established for it. The second technological aid developed was a computerized attendance accounting system. This system has been fabricated, tested, and installed at JFK. Full-scale operational testing began in April 1971. While studies and hardware tests were in progress at JFK, contacts were made with several other schools in order that, insofar as practicable, hardware designs could allow for possible adaptation to schools other than JFK.

  1. Chronotype, Light Exposure, Sleep, and Daytime Functioning in High School Students Attending Morning or Afternoon School Shifts: An Actigraphic Study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeanne Sophie; Gaudreault, Michael M; Perron, Michel; Laberge, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent maturation is associated with delays of the endogenous circadian phase. Consequently, early school schedules may lead to a mismatch between internal and external time, which can be detrimental to adolescent sleep and health. In parallel, chronotype is known to play a role in adolescent health; evening chronotype adolescents are at higher risk for sleep problems and lower academic achievement. In the summer of 2008, Kénogami High School (Saguenay, Canada) was destroyed by fire. Kénogami students were subsequently relocated to Arvida High School (situated 5.3 km away) for the 2008-2009 academic year. A dual school schedule was implemented, with Arvida students attending a morning schedule (0740-1305 h) and Kénogami students an afternoon schedule (1325-1845 h). This study aimed to investigate the effects of such school schedules and chronotype on sleep, light exposure, and daytime functioning. Twenty-four morning and 33 afternoon schedule students wore an actigraph during 7 days to measure sleep and light exposure. Academic achievement was obtained from school. Subjects completed validated questionnaires on daytime sleepiness, psychological distress, social rhythms, school satisfaction, alcohol, and chronotype. Overall, afternoon schedule students had longer sleep duration, lower sleepiness, and lower light exposure than morning schedule students. Evening chronotypes (E-types) reported higher levels of sleepiness than morning chronotypes (M-types) in both morning and afternoon schedules. Furthermore, M-types attending the morning schedule reported higher sleepiness than M-types attending the afternoon schedule. No difference was found between morning and afternoon schedule students with regard to academic achievement, psychological distress, social rhythms, school satisfaction, and alcohol consumption. However, in both schedules, M-type had more regular social rhythms and lower alcohol consumption. In summary, this study emphasizes that an early school

  2. The Mental Health of Children of Migrant Workers in Beijing: The Protective Role of Public School Attendance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qin; Li, Hong; Zou, Hong; Cross, Wendi; Bian, Ran; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to understand the mental health status of an understudied group of migrant children—children of migrant workers in China. A total of 1466 children from Beijing participated in the study that compared migrant children (n = 1019) to their local peers (n = 447) in public and private school settings. Results showed that overall, migrant children reported more internalizing and externalizing mental health problems and lower life satisfaction than local peers. However, public school attendance served as a protective factor for migrant children’s mental health. The mental health status of migrant children attending public schools, including externalizing problems as well as friend and school satisfaction, was not different from local children. In addition, our data indicates that the protective effect of public school attendance for migrant children may be even more salient among girls than boys, and for younger children than older children. PMID:26032665

  3. Motivational Theories as Applied to Ways To Improve School Attendance of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Person, Patti

    In light of the theory that student absenteeism and lack of motivation are intertwined, educators have begun to investigate the theories of motivation in order to apply them to creative attendance policies in an attempt to reduce the problem of student absenteeism. Motivational theories indicate common elements of the importance of the intrinsic…

  4. The influence of averageness on judgments of facial attractiveness: no own-age or own-sex advantage among children attending single-sex schools.

    PubMed

    Vingilis-Jaremko, Larissa; Maurer, Daphne; Gao, Xiaoqing

    2014-04-01

    We examined how recent biased face experience affects the influence of averageness on judgments of facial attractiveness among 8- and 9-year-old children attending a girls' school, a boys' school, and a mixed-sex school. We presented pairs of individual faces in which one face was transformed 50% toward its group average, whereas the other face was transformed 50% away from that average. Across blocks, the faces varied in age (adult, 9-year-old, or 5-year-old) and sex (male or female). We expected that averageness might influence attractiveness judgments more strongly for same-age faces and, for children attending single-sex schools, same-sex faces of that age because their prototype(s) should be best tuned to the faces they see most frequently. Averageness influenced children's judgments of attractiveness, but the strength of the influence was not modulated by the age of the face, nor did the effects of sex of face differ across schools. Recent biased experience might not have affected the results because of similarities between the average faces of different ages and sexes and/or because a minimum level of experience with a particular group of faces may be adequate for the formation of a veridical prototype and its influence on judgments of attractiveness. The results suggest that averageness affects children's judgments of the attractiveness of the faces they encounter in everyday life regardless of age or sex of face. PMID:24326246

  5. 34 CFR 200.78 - Allocation of funds to school attendance areas and schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of private school children, the LEA may— (A) Use the same poverty data the LEA uses to count public school children; (B)(1) Use comparable poverty data from a survey of families of private school students... based on a representative sample if complete actual data are unavailable; (C) Use comparable...

  6. 34 CFR 200.78 - Allocation of funds to school attendance areas and schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of private school children, the LEA may— (A) Use the same poverty data the LEA uses to count public school children; (B)(1) Use comparable poverty data from a survey of families of private school students... based on a representative sample if complete actual data are unavailable; (C) Use comparable...

  7. 34 CFR 200.78 - Allocation of funds to school attendance areas and schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of private school children, the LEA may— (A) Use the same poverty data the LEA uses to count public school children; (B)(1) Use comparable poverty data from a survey of families of private school students... based on a representative sample if complete actual data are unavailable; (C) Use comparable...

  8. 34 CFR 200.78 - Allocation of funds to school attendance areas and schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of private school children, the LEA may— (A) Use the same poverty data the LEA uses to count public school children; (B)(1) Use comparable poverty data from a survey of families of private school students... based on a representative sample if complete actual data are unavailable; (C) Use comparable...

  9. 34 CFR 200.78 - Allocation of funds to school attendance areas and schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of private school children, the LEA may— (A) Use the same poverty data the LEA uses to count public school children; (B)(1) Use comparable poverty data from a survey of families of private school students... based on a representative sample if complete actual data are unavailable; (C) Use comparable...

  10. Environmental Programs Information: Affecting Kansas Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the environmental issues that affect Kansas public schools. Specific programs that address these problems are included, along with their contact information. This document contains information on the following issues and programs: (1) Department of Health and Environment; (2) air; (3) asbestos; (4)…

  11. Design Matters: How School Environment Affects Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01

    The organization of space profoundly affects learning. Students feel better connected to a building that anticipates their needs and respects them as individuals. Built in 1971, Crow Island School, in Winnetka, Illinois, is a prize-winning facility that has provided generations of children with windowed classrooms, skylights, adjacent workrooms,…

  12. New Regulations Affect School Debt Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Carol Duane

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of changes in Treasury Regulations as they affect school debt financing, including bond and note construction and acquisition issues, other types of equipment and property financing, as well as tax and revenue anticipation notes for working capital needs. (MLF)

  13. Factors affecting women's response to an invitation to attend for a second breast cancer screening examination.

    PubMed Central

    Orton, M; Fitzpatrick, R; Fuller, A; Mant, D; Mlynek, C; Thorogood, M

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted to study the impact of women's previous experiences of breast cancer screening on their subsequent readiness to reattend. Women aged 45-64 years from three general practices were invited to attend for a second breast cancer screening test at a mobile clinic. Of the 1582 women who were invited, 1408 (89.0%) reattended. A questionnaire about their experience of the previous screening test was completed by 641 women who attended and 124 who did not attend the second test. Twenty six per cent of the women had found the previous test painful, and a minority also reported embarrassment (7%) or distress (6%). Women who did not reattend were significantly more likely than those who did to report the previous screening test as embarrassing or distressing and were significantly less likely to have found the clinic staff helpful or attendance for screening worthwhile or reassuring. No significant difference was found in the reattendance rate of women who had experienced a false positive result at the previous screening test compared with the remaining women. These results show that there may be substantial scope for reducing non-attendance by improving the way the service is provided, thereby enhancing the overall impact of breast cancer screening. PMID:1777275

  14. The National Behaviour and Attendance Review (NBAR) in Wales: Findings on School Behaviour from the Professional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and some of the findings on school behaviour obtained for the National Behaviour and Attendance Review (NBAR) in Wales. This work was undertaken over two years between 2006 and 2008. The Report was widely circulated in Wales to schools, local authorities, health and social service departments, as well as a wide…

  15. Problems and Preferences in Attending College: A Survey of Spanish Surname High School Students in the State of Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, James A.; And Others

    The study explored the problems and preferences Chicano high school juniors and seniors perceived with regard to attending college. Of the 458 respondents, 430 were high school juniors and seniors, 11 were graduates who did not enroll in college during the 1976 fall, and 14 were college freshmen. Data were collected using three questionnaires:…

  16. Still Worlds Apart: The Worldviews of Adolescent Males Attending Protestant and Catholic Secondary Schools in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Mandy; Francis, Leslie J.

    2008-01-01

    This study draws together two research traditions: John Greer's pioneering research among pupils in Protestant and Catholic schools in Northern Ireland and Leslie J. Francis's research concerning teenage religion and values in England and Wales. A sample of 1,585 13- to 15-year-old male pupils attending Catholic schools (n = 712) and Protestant…

  17. Getting in, Dropping out, and Staying on: Determinants of Girls' School Attendance in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeVin, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Ethnographic research was carried out in 1997-98 to identify factors that determined school attendance among Nepali women in the Kathmandu Valley a generation ago. Findings indicate that gender, caste, poverty, cultural prejudice, and rural residence prevented a majority from going to school. Of those who went, most, regardless of academic talent,…

  18. A Phenomenological Study of Sexual Harassment and Violence among Girls Attending High Schools in Urban Slums, Nairobi, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuya, Benta A.; Onsomu, Elijah O.; Moore, DaKysha; Sagwe, Jackline

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, 31% of young Kenyan women ages 15-24 reported sexual harassment and violence (SHV), with a majority experiencing sexual debut due to coercion (Central Bureau of Statistics, 2004). Data were obtained from a sample of 20 girls attending school in Kamu and Lafamu (pseudonyms used for the study sites), 10 girls who had dropped out of school,…

  19. An Examination of Assessment Scores between Students Who Attend Public Schools and Students Who Were Homeschooled Prior to Entering a Virtual Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Virtual charter schools, emerging in the 1990s, are a recent development in the education field and reflect today's technology-oriented society. This study examined existing data to evaluate what, if any, difference existed between students who attended public school and those who were homeschooled prior to entering the virtual charter school. …

  20. Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Middle School Students Attending Bureau Funded Schools, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Lana; Everett, Sherry; Ranslow, Steve

    This report presents findings from a spring 1997 survey of all middle-school students (grades 6-8) enrolled in schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The Centers for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was completed by 6,990 students in 115 of the 122 BIA-funded middle schools; the overall response rate was 74 percent.…

  1. Willingness to remain friends and attend school with lesbian and gay peers: relational expressions of prejudice among heterosexual youth.

    PubMed

    Poteat, V Paul; Espelage, Dorothy L; Koenig, Brian W

    2009-08-01

    In this study, heterosexual students' willingness to remain friends with peers who disclose that they are gay or lesbian and their willingness to attend schools that include gay and lesbian students were examined among two large middle school and high school samples (Sample 1: n = 20,509; 50.7% girls; Sample 2: n = 16,917; 50.2% girls). Boys were less willing than girls to remain friends or attend schools with gay and lesbian peers, as were students in earlier grades than were students in later grades. Further, there was small, yet significant, variability in these scores across schools. Greater racial diversity within the school partially accounted for this school-level variability; students in more racially diverse schools reported greater willingness to remain friends and attend school with gay and lesbian peers. Findings suggest that while intervention programs must continue to address blatant and overt physical aggression against sexual minority youth, there is also a significant need for programming to address the more subtle expressions of sexual prejudice that contribute to unwelcoming and unsafe school climates. PMID:19636738

  2. Does Posting PowerPoint Presentations on WebCT Affect Class Performance or Attendance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Laura L.

    2009-01-01

    Grade earned and class attendance records were examined to determine if posting PowerPoint notes on a web-based course management system was related to enhanced performance or increased absences. There were no differences in either grades or absences between classes that had notes posted and those that did not. However, results indicated…

  3. Does Attendance to a Four-Year Academic College versus Vocational College Affect Future Wages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keng, Shao-Hsun; Lo, Ya-Fen

    2011-01-01

    Taiwan is one of the few countries in which bachelor degrees can be earned by attending either 4-year academic colleges or vocational colleges. This paper offers new evidence on whether returns to B.A. degrees are significantly different between academic and vocational 4-year colleges using the 1998-1999 Taiwanese College Graduate Survey. The…

  4. Factors Affecting Academic Achievement in Single Mothers Attending Public Two-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shakebra L.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, cross-sectional, correlation research study explored the relationships between self-efficacy, social support, and academic achievement among single mothers aged 18 and older attending Mississippi public two-year institutions. A total of 82 single mothers provided data for this study by completing the following research…

  5. How Attendance and Quality of Participation Affect Treatment Response to Parent Management Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Robert L.; Bierman, Karen L.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether attendance and quality of participation in parent management training predicted treatment response. Data were from 445 parents (55% minority, 62% single; almost all of low socioeconomic status) who had 1st-grade children with severe conduct problems. Quality of participation in weekly parent groups was based on group…

  6. Primary School Attendance and Completion among Lower Secondary School Age Children in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    At the World Education Forum in Dakar in 2000, governments pledged to achieve education for all by 2015. However, if current enrollment trends continue, the number of out-of-school children could increase from current levels. Greater focus is needed on lower secondary school age (13-16 years) children. These children are not included estimates of…

  7. Weekday affects attendance rate for medical appointments: large-scale data analysis and implications.

    PubMed

    Ellis, David A; Jenkins, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The financial cost of missed appointments is so great that even a small percentage reduction in Did Not Attend (DNA) rate could save significant sums of money. Previous studies have identified many factors that predict DNA rate, including patient age, gender, and transport options. However, it is not obvious how healthcare providers can use this information to improve attendance, as such factors are not under their control. One factor that is under administrative control is appointment scheduling. Here we asked whether DNA rate could be reduced by altering scheduling policy. In Study 1, we examined attendance records for 4,538,294 outpatient hospital appointments across Scotland between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2010. DNA rate was highest for Mondays (11%), lowest for Fridays (9.7%), and decreased monotonically over the week (Monday-Friday comparison [χ(2)(1, N  = 1,585,545)  = 722.33, p<0.0001]; Relative Risk Reduction 11.8%). This weekly decline was present for male and female patient groups of all ages, but was steeper for younger age groups. In Study 2, we examined attendance records for 10,895 appointments at a single GP clinic in Glasgow. Here again, DNA rate was highest for Mondays (6.2%), lowest for Fridays (4.2%), and decreased monotonically over the week (Monday-Friday comparison [χ(2)(1, N  = 4767)  = 9.20, p<0.01]; Relative Risk Reduction 32.3%). In two very different settings, appointments at the beginning of the week were more likely to be missed than appointments at the end of the week. We suggest that DNA rate could be significantly reduced by preferentially loading appointments onto high-attendance days. PMID:23272102

  8. Does Community Poverty Reduce Children's School Attendance More at Primary Education than at Secondary Education? Evidence from Post-Conflict Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamanda, Mamusu

    2016-01-01

    In Sierra Leone, the number of primary schools is almost seven times more than junior-secondary schools (JSS). Living in a poor community has been shown to reduce children's school attendance because of lower access and poorer quality of education in these communities. However, it is unclear whether living in a poor community reduces attendance at…

  9. Attendance at Basic Sciences Lectures: A Student Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Antonio; Ramos, Gilberto

    Factors that may affect a medical student's decision to attend basic science lectures were investigated. Basic science faculty members and administrators' views on student lecture attendance were elicited to construct a questionnaire. A total of 103 first-year and 75 second-year medical students attending a Puerto Rican medical school responded to…

  10. Youth Risk Behavior Survey of High School Students Attending Bureau Funded Schools, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Lana; Everett, Sherry; Ranslow, Steve

    In 1997, a second survey was conducted of all 9th through 12th graders enrolled in schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). As in 1994, the survey instrument used was the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, developed by the Centers for Disease Control. Surveys were completed by 5,606 students out of a total high school population of 7,780.…

  11. Waddling on the Dark Side: Ambient Light Affects Attendance Behavior of Little Penguins.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Airam; Chiaradia, André; Wasiak, Paula; Renwick, Leanne; Dann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Visible light on Earth largely comes from the sun, including light reflected from the moon. Predation risk is strongly determined by light conditions, and some animals are nocturnal to reduce predation. Artificial lights and its consequent light pollution may disrupt this natural behavior. Here, we used 13 years of attendance data to study the effects of sun, moon, and artificial light on the attendance pattern of a nocturnal seabird, the little penguin Eudyptula minor at Phillip Island, Australia. The little penguin is the smallest and the only penguin species whose activity on land is strictly nocturnal. Automated monitoring systems recorded individually marked penguins every time they arrived (after sunset) at or departed (before sunrise) from 2 colonies under different lighting conditions: natural night skylight and artificial lights (around 3 lux) used to enhance penguin viewing for ecotourism around sunset. Sunlight had a strong effect on attendance as penguins arrived on average around 81 min after sunset and departed around 92 min before sunrise. The effect of moonlight was also strong, varying according to moon phase. Fewer penguins came ashore during full moon nights. Moon phase effect was stronger on departure than arrival times. Thus, during nights between full moon and last quarter, arrival times (after sunset) were delayed, even though moonlight levels were low, while departure times (before sunrise) were earlier, coinciding with high moonlight levels. Cyclic patterns of moon effect were slightly out of phase but significantly between 2 colonies, which could be due to site-specific differences or presence/absence of artificial lights. Moonlight could be overridden by artificial light at our artificially lit colony, but the similar amplitude of attendance patterns between colonies suggests that artificial light did not mask the moonlight effect. Further research is indeed necessary to understand how seabirds respond to the increasing artificial night

  12. Knowledge and perception about tuberculosis among children attending primary school in Ntcheu District, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Nyasulu, Peter; Kambale, Susan; Chirwa, Tobias; Umanah, Teye; Singini, Isaac; Sikwese, Simon; Banda, Hastings T; Banda, Rhoda P; Chimbali, Henry; Ngwira, Bagrey; Munthali, Alister

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge and perceptions about tuberculosis (TB) can influence care-seeking behavior and adherence to treatment. Previous studies in Malawi were conducted to assess knowledge and attitudes regarding TB in adults, with limited data on knowledge in children. Objectives This study assessed knowledge and perceptions about TB in children aged 10–14 years attending primary school in Ntcheu District, Malawi. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in four primary schools in Ntcheu District. Data on knowledge and perception of TB were collected using a structured questionnaire. Pearson chi-square test was used to determine the association between socioeconomic factors and TB knowledge and perception. A P<0.05 was considered significant. Results The study found that the learners had high knowledge regarding the cause, spread, and TB preventive measures. Almost 90% of learners knew that TB is caused by a germ, however, a lower proportion knew about TB symptoms ie, night sweats (49%) and enlarged cervical lymph nodes (40%). We found that 68% of learners did not know the duration of anti-TB treatment. No association was found between age, learners’ grade, and knowledge (P>0.05). Conclusion Lack of knowledge regarding TB and gaps identified, may be due to a deficiency in the content of the school curriculum or the availability of information, education, and communication materials. This is the first study to report on knowledge and perceptions of TB among primary school learners in Malawi. These results will inform the development of relevant information, education, and communication materials to enhance awareness about TB among school going children. PMID:27069367

  13. Survey of Low Vision among Students Attending Schools for the Blind in Nigeria: A Descriptive and Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosuro, Adedamola L.; Ajaiyeoba, Ayotunde I.; Bekibele, Charles O.; Eniola, Michael S.; Adedokun, Babatunde A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of low vision among students attending all the schools for the blind in Oyo State, Nigeria. The study set out to determine the proportion of students with low vision/severe visual impairment after best correction, to determine the causes of the low vision, to document the associated pathologies, to determine the types of treatment and visual aid devices required, and to provide the visual aids needed to the students in the schools. Materials and Methods: All schools students for the blind in Oyo State were evaluated between August 2007 and January 2008. All the students underwent a thorough ophthalmic examination that included measurement of visual acuity, retinoscopy and subjective refraction, tests for visual aids where indicated, and a structured questionnaire was administered. Results: A total of 86 students were included in the study and the mean age was 19.4 ± 8.19 years. Twenty six (30%) were under 16 years of age. The most common cause of blindness was bilateral measles keratopathy/vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in 25 students (29.1%). The most common site affected was the cornea in 25 students (29.1%), the lens in 23 (26.7%), and the retina/optic nerve in 16 (18.6%). Preventable blindness was mainly from measles keratopathy/VAD (29.1%). Eleven students benefited from refraction and correction with visual aids; two having severe visual impairment (SVI), and nine having visual impairment (VI) after correction. Conclusion: The prevalence of low vision in the schools for the blind in Oyo State is 2.3%, while the prevalence of visual impairment is 10.5%. These results suggest that preventable and treatable ocular conditions are the source of significant childhood blindness in Oyo State. PMID:23248540

  14. Screen Time at Home and School among Low-Income Children Attending Head Start

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Erica N.; Whitaker, Robert C.; Marino, Alexis J.; Anderson, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the patterns of screen viewing at home and school among low-income preschool-aged children attending Head Start and identify factors associated with high home screen time in this population. Few studies have examined both home and classroom screen time, or included computer use as a component of screen viewing. Methods Participants were 2221 low-income preschool-aged children in the United States studied in the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) in spring 2007. For 5 categories of screen viewing (television, video/DVD, video games, computer games, other computer use), we assessed children’s typical weekday home (parent-reported) and classroom (teacher-reported) screen viewing in relation to having a television in the child’s bedroom and sociodemographic factors. Results Over half of children (55.7%) had a television in their bedroom, and 12.5% had high home screen time (>4 hours/weekday). Television was the most common category of home screen time, but 56.6% of children had access to a computer at home and 37.5% had used it on the last typical weekday. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, children with a television in their bedroom were more likely to have high home screen time [odds ratio=2.57 (95% confidence interval: 1.80–3.68)]. Classroom screen time consisted almost entirely of computer use; 49.4% of children used a classroom computer for ≥1 hour/week, and 14.2% played computer games at school ≥5 hours/week. Conclusions In 2007, one in eight low-income children attending Head Start had >4 hours/weekday of home screen time, which was associated with having a television in the bedroom. In the Head Start classroom, television and video viewing were uncommon but computer use was common. PMID:24891924

  15. Service-Learning: Does It Affect Attitudes, Grades, and Attendance of Students Who Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cofer, Jennifer

    In spring 1996 Franklin County (KY) schools conducted a research project with three teachers at Western Hills High School to determine whether student attitudes change as a result of becoming involved in service learning. Each teacher used one class for a test group and another for a control group. Two types of pre- and posttests were given to…

  16. Youth Risk Behavior Survey of Middle School Students Attending Bureau Funded Schools, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Sherry; Sussman, Michele; Ranslow, Steve; Shaughnessy, Lana

    This youth risk behavior survey was completed by 7,667 students at 127 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) middle schools. The document is organized around the six categories of behavior that contribute substantially to the leading causes of death, illness, and social problems in the United States: unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco use;…

  17. School Readiness Gains Made by Ethnically Diverse Children in Poverty Attending Center-Based Childcare and Public School Pre-Kindergarten Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsler, Adam; Tran, Henry; Hartman, Suzanne C.; Madigan, Amy L.; Manfra, Louis; Bleiker, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although intensive early childhood interventions and high quality preschool programs have been shown to foster children's school readiness, little is known about the school readiness gains made by ethnically and linguistically diverse children in poverty receiving subsidies to attend center-based childcare or those in public school…

  18. A prospective study of methamphetamine use as a predictor of high school non-attendance in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This prospective study investigated the association between life-long methamphetamine and other drug use and high school non-attendance, in a sample of high school students in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods A random sample of 1535 high school students completed a baseline questionnaire in 2006, and were asked to complete a follow-up questionnaire 12 months later. The questionnaire included questions on substance use, including tobacco, alcohol, methamphetamine and cannabis use, demographic factors, and questions relating to school attendance and performance. Results Forty-three percent of the students surveyed at baseline did not complete a follow-up questionnaire after 12 months. Compared with students who were not using selected substances, an adjusted logistic regression model showed that life-time methamphetamine use in addition to other substances was significantly associated with non-attendance (OR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.24 - 5.36) when other non-substance use factors (repeating a year at school and being older than the norm for current grade) were taken into account. Conclusions Early identification of students with methamphetamine and other substance use problems, and a supportive rather than punitive school policy, may be valuable in improving high school completion and student retention rates. PMID:20964830

  19. Substance use and dietary practices among students attending alternative high schools: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Substance use and poor dietary practices are prevalent among adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine frequency of substance use and associations between cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use and selected dietary practices, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, high-fat foods, fruits and vegetables, and frequency of fast food restaurant use among alternative high school students. Associations between multi-substance use and the same dietary practices were also examined. Methods A convenience sample of adolescents (n = 145; 61% minority, 52% male) attending six alternative high schools in the St Paul/Minneapolis metropolitan area completed baseline surveys. Students were participants in the Team COOL (Controlling Overweight and Obesity for Life) pilot study, a group randomized obesity prevention pilot trial. Mixed model multivariate analyses procedures were used to assess associations of interest. Results Daily cigarette smoking was reported by 36% of students. Cigarette smoking was positively associated with consumption of regular soda (p = 0.019), high-fat foods (p = 0.037), and fast food restaurant use (p = 0.002). Alcohol (p = 0.005) and marijuana use (p = 0.035) were positively associated with high-fat food intake. With increasing numbers of substances, a positive trend was observed in high-fat food intake (p = 0.0003). There were no significant associations between substance use and fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions Alternative high school students who use individual substances as well as multiple substances may be at high risk of unhealthful dietary practices. Comprehensive health interventions in alternative high schools have the potential of reducing health-compromising behaviors that are prevalent among this group of students. This study adds to the limited research examining substance use and diet among at-risk youth. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01315743 PMID:21518437

  20. DSM-III-R disorders, social factors and management of school attendance problems in the normal population.

    PubMed

    Berg, I; Butler, A; Franklin, J; Hayes, H; Lucas, C; Sims, R

    1993-10-01

    Eighty 13-15-year-old children who failed to attend one of four schools for more than 40% of a term, without good reason, were studied. A systematic schedule (C.A.P.A.) was used in interviewing parents and children. Twenty-five had DSM-III-R Disruptive Behaviour Disorders and 15 had Anxiety/Mood Disorders. Truancy was associated with the former and school refusal with the latter but both often occurred without any Disorder. Fourteen children had neither school refusal nor truancy. Compared to controls, poor attenders came from materially disadvantaged homes. School refusal with anxiety disorders rarely received psychiatric treatment. Non-disturbed absentees were not usually dealt with appropriately. PMID:8245141

  1. The Role of Living-Learning Programs in Women's Plans to Attend Graduate School in STEM Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szelenyi, Katalin; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the role of living-learning (L/L) programs in undergraduate women's plans to attend graduate school in STEM fields. Using data from the 2004-2007 National Study of Living Learning Programs (NSLLP), the only existing multi-institutional, longitudinal dataset examining L/L program outcomes, the findings show that women's…

  2. An Evaluative Study of the Academic Achievement of Homeschooled Students versus Traditionally Schooled Students Attending a Catholic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This research study was designed to provide a formal evaluation of the academic achievement of homeschooled students compared to traditionally schooled students attending a Catholic university located in South Florida. In addition, this study offers empirical data for all those interested in the academic success of homeschooled students in higher…

  3. 76 FR 29805 - Submission for Review: Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49 AGENCY: U.S. Office... opportunity to comment on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0215, Verification of Full-Time...@opm.gov or faxed to (202) 606-0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RI 25-49, Verification of...

  4. Comparing among the Experiences of Self-Cutting, Hitting, and Scratching in Chinese Adolescents Attending Secondary Schools: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Jianing; Ma, Congfen; Lin, Min-Pei; Leung, Freedom

    2015-01-01

    This study examined adolescents' experiences associated with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and compared among the experiences of self-cutting, hitting, and scratching. Participants included 42 Chinese adolescents attending secondary schools. They had at least three NSSI episodes in the preceding year. Information about their experiences of NSSI…

  5. Community Adaptation of Youth Accessing Residential Programs or a Home-Based Alternative: School Attendance and Academic Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frensch, Karen; Cameron, Gary; Preyde, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Caregivers of 210 youth receiving residential treatment (RT) or intensive family services (IFS) in Ontario were interviewed about the long term community adaptation of youth after leaving these programs. School attendance and academic functioning data at admission, discharge, and 12-18 months post-discharge were analyzed to explore predictors of…

  6. 77 FR 33007 - Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Initial Certification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-41 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other federal agencies...

  7. 76 FR 54810 - Submission for Review: 3206-0215, Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: 3206-0215, Verification of Full-Time School Attendance, RI 25-49 AGENCY: U... on May 23, 2011 at Volume 76 FR 29805 allowing for a 60-day public comment period. No comments were... Management must confirm that a full-time enrollment has been maintained. Analysis Agency:...

  8. "Paper Doesn't Judge You": The Literacy Practices of Three Girls Who Attended an Alternative School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytash, Kristine E.

    2009-01-01

    Literacy practices can be considered powerful tools used to claim a space, establish an identity, or provide a voice in various social interactions. The goals of this study were to understand the literacy practices of three female young adults who attended an alternative school prior to my study in the spring of 2008. The study also explored the…

  9. Prospective Analysis of the Transition to Sexual Experience and Changes in Sexual Self-Esteem among Adolescents Attending Therapeutic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Rebecca R.; Houck, Christopher D.; Barker, David; Zeanah, Paula D.; Brown, Larry K.

    2012-01-01

    Given increased sexual risk-taking among youth with mental health problems, this study sought to understand the developmental trajectory of sexual self-esteem (SSE) among this vulnerable population and how it is impacted by sexual experiences. Participants were 185 adolescents who attended therapeutic/alternative schools in southern New England.…

  10. Hidden Gains: Effects of Early U.S. Compulsory Schooling Laws on Attendance and Attainment by Social Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauscher, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Research on early compulsory schooling laws finds minimal effects on attendance but fails to investigate heterogeneous effects. Similarly, research proposes limited contexts in which expansion policies can increase equality but has difficulty separating policy and cohort effects. Capitalizing on within-country variation in timing of early…

  11. Student Perceptions of Diminished Teacher and Classmate Support following the Transition to High School: Are They Related to Declining Attendance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Wit, David J.; Karioja, Kim; Rye, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Student perceptions of teacher and classmate support have been identified as a powerful protective factor for a range of children's outcomes. Evidence suggests that students perceive less support as they advance to higher grades, a factor that may be linked to declines in school attendance. This study utilized a sample of 2,616 students enrolled…

  12. The Prevalence and Determinants of Overweight and Obesity among French Youths and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Attending Special Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begarie, Jerome; Maiano, Christophe; Leconte, Pascale; Ninot, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of overweight and obesity and a panel of potential determinants among French youths and adults with an intellectual disability (ID). The sample used consisted of 1120 youths and adults with an ID, from 5 to 28 years old, attending a French special education school. The results indicated that 19.8% of the…

  13. The Relationship of Participation in Extracurricular Activities to Student Achievement, Student Attendance, and Student Behavior in a Nebraska School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible relationships between participation in extracurricular activities and student achievement, participation in extracurricular activities and attendance, and participation in extracurricular activities and behavior. The setting for this study was a high school in western Nebraska. Data for 275 of the…

  14. Attending High School Algebra I: In Search of Well-Managed, Engaging, Culturally Relevant, and Caring Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannett, Cassandra Dunn

    2012-01-01

    The inequities in learning between the rich and the poor have become pervasive in United States. This is evidenced by the high school graduation rates, college attendance percentages, and employment statistics. Upon another wave of reform, the Common Core State Standards in mathematics are currently being adopted in hopes of increasing learning…

  15. Attendance, Performance and the Acquisition of Early Literacy Skills: A Comparison of Indigenous and Non-Indigenous School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, John; Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.; Helmer, Janet; Oteng, Georges; Lea, Tess; Bartlett, Claire; Smith, Heather; Emmett, Sue

    2010-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of a web-based early literacy intervention, ABRACADABRA, a small exploratory study was conducted over one term in three primary schools in the Northern Territory. Of particular concern was the relationship between attendance and the acquisition of early literacy skills of Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. Using the…

  16. The Effects of the Primary Movement Programme on the Academic Performance of Children Attending Ordinary Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan-Black, Julie-Anne

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence of a primary reflex (the Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex) in children attending ordinary primary school and how this related to attainments in a number of academic areas. The effectiveness of a specific movement intervention programme in reducing primary reflex persistence and improving academic…

  17. An Evaluative Study of the Academic Achievement of Homeschooled Students versus Traditionally Schooled Students Attending a Catholic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Marc

    2011-01-01

    This applied dissertation was designed to provide a formal evaluation of the academic achievement of homeschooled students compared to traditionally schooled students attending a relatively young, Catholic university located in South Florida. As approximately 30% of the university's current student population has been homeschooled through high…

  18. Onset of Smoking Behaviors and Participation in Leisure Physical Activities of Turkish Adolescents Attending Vocational Health Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasi, Feryal; Hey, William; Mumcu, Gonca; Koksal, Leyla; Luleci, Emel; Sur, Haydar

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted with the aim of examining the relationships between smoking behavior and leisure physical activity habits of adolescents (n=170, 85F & 85M, mean age= 15.42 [plus or minus] 0.58, age range=15-17 years) attending vocational health schools in Turkey. Participants were randomly selected from four provinces of…

  19. Attending to Attendance. Fastback 450.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, John W.

    This fastback document examines student absenteeism and offers advice on what schools can do to improve attendance. It looks at truancy, absenteeism, and tardiness and how, since the first days of compulsory education, educators have had to deal with these obstacles to education. Since the 1970s absenteeism has been identified by many educators as…

  20. Improving Attendance and Retention in Out-of-School Time Programs. Research-to-Results Practitioner Insights. Publication # 2007-17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Elena; Wilson, Brooke; Valladares, Sherylls; Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta

    2007-01-01

    Regular participation in out-of-school time activities is associated with benefits for children. However, children cannot reap the benefits of program participation if they do not attend programs in the first place. This brief focuses on ways in which out-of-school time programs can improve the attendance and retention of children and youth in…

  1. 9th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Jeffrey C.; Schmidt, Jeffrey K.; Lemke, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    This is the 9th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District RUSD). Over the past decade, the conditions affecting the district as well as the school outcomes have changed in some ways and remained stable in others. This analysis compares RUSD to nine peer school districts and the state of Wisconsin. RUSD peer…

  2. Effects of a free school breakfast programme on school attendance, achievement, psychosocial function, and nutrition: a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 55,000 children in New Zealand do not eat breakfast on any given day. Regular breakfast skipping has been associated with poor diets, higher body mass index, and adverse effects on children's behaviour and academic performance. Research suggests that regular breakfast consumption can improve academic performance, nutrition and behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial of a free school breakfast programme. The aim of the trial is to determine the effects of the breakfast intervention on school attendance, achievement, psychosocial function, dietary habits and food security. Methods/Design Sixteen primary schools in the North Island of New Zealand will be randomised in a sequential stepped wedge design to a free before-school breakfast programme consisting of non-sugar coated breakfast cereal, milk products, and/or toast and spreads. Four hundred children aged 5-13 years (approximately 25 per school) will be recruited. Data collection will be undertaken once each school term over the 2010 school year (February to December). The primary trial outcome is school attendance, defined as the proportion of students achieving an attendance rate of 95% or higher. Secondary outcomes are academic achievement (literacy, numeracy, self-reported grades), sense of belonging at school, psychosocial function, dietary habits, and food security. A concurrent process evaluation seeks information on parents', schools' and providers' perspectives of the breakfast programme. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will provide robust evidence of the effects of a school breakfast programme on students' attendance, achievement and nutrition. Furthermore the study provides an excellent example of the feasibility and value of the stepped wedge trial design in evaluating pragmatic public health intervention programmes. Trial Registration Number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) - ACTRN

  3. Transition and protective agency of early childhood learning behaviors as portents of later school attendance and adjustment.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Paul A; Rikoon, Samuel H; Fantuzzo, John W

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on the study of differential change trajectories for early childhood learning behaviors as they relate to future classroom adjustment and school attendance. A large sample (N=2152) of Head Start children was followed through prekindergarten, kindergarten, and 1st grade. Classroom learning behaviors were assessed twice each year by teachers who observed gradual declines in Competence Motivation and Attentional Persistence as children transitioned through schooling. Cross-classified multilevel growth models revealed distinct transitional pathways for future adjustment versus maladjustment and sporadic versus chronic absenteeism. Generalized multilevel logistic modeling and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that teachers' earliest assessments were substantially predictive of eventual good classroom adjustment and school attendance, with increasing accuracy for prediction of future sociobehavioral adjustment as time progressed. PMID:26790703

  4. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  5. Physical activity, dietary practices, and other health behaviors of at-risk youth attending alternative high schools.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Martha Y; Lytle, Leslie; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2004-04-01

    This study assessed the interest of alternative high school staff in intervention research on students' eating and physical activity habits and the feasibility of conducting such research in alternative school settings. A two-phase descriptive design incorporated both quantitative and qualitative methods. In fall/winter 2001-2002, alternative high school administrators in Minnesota were surveyed (response rate = 83%; n = 130/157). During summer 2002, one-on-one, semistructured interviews were conducted with key school personnel (n = 15) from urban and suburban schools. Findings indicated few schools had been invited to participate in research on nutrition (11%) and physical activity (7%). However, more than 80% of administrators reported interest in their students participating in such research. Most schools offered health and PE classes and had access to indoor gym facilities and outdoor play areas. While most schools offered a school lunch program, participation was low, cold lunches were common, and food often was unappealing. Beverage and snack vending machines were common. Overall, the physical environment of most alternative schools did not support physical activity and healthy eating as normative behavior. Interest in interventions on physical inactivity, unhealthy dietary practices, and other priority health-risk behavior common in students attending alternative schools was high among teachers and administrators. Results suggest research in alternative high schools is feasible and successful implementation and evaluation of programs possible. PMID:15193001

  6. A population dynamic approach to evaluating the impact of school attendance on the unit cost and effectiveness of school-based schistosomiasis chemotherapy programmes.

    PubMed

    Carabin, H; Chan, M S; Guyatt, H L

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents a first attempt at modelling the possible cost and effectiveness of reaching non-enrolled children through school-based programmes using empirical data from Egypt. A sex/school-attendance/age-structured population dynamic model was used to predict trends in infection and early disease. Four treatment delivery strategies were compared: school-based (coverage of 85 %) and school-aged targeted (coverage of 25, 50 and 85 %). The school-aged targeted strategies also included the school-based programme. For each alternative strategy, the maximum unit cost was calculated to obtain a cost-effectiveness ratio equal or smaller to the one obtained with the school-based programme (unit cost of US$ 0.60). The analysis showed that, for S. mansoni in Lower Egypt, a programme where only 85% of children attending school were treated would still prevent 77 % of the early disease cases prevented with a programme where 85 % of all school-age children were treated. However, using the school-aged targeted strategy, from US $ 0.06 to US $ 1.03 extra unit costs could be spent to reach non-enrolled children and still be more cost-effective. Treating non-enrolled children is an important consideration in maximizing the effectiveness of treatment programmes while maintaining a cost-effectiveness comparable to school-based delivery. PMID:11085237

  7. Do Physical Activity Facilities near Schools Affect Physical Activity in High School Girls?

    PubMed Central

    Trilk, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Dowda, Marsha; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Porter, Dwayne E.; Hibbert, James; Pate, Russell R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities within walking distance of school and physical activity behavior in 12th grade girls during after-school hours. Methods Girls (N=1394) from 22 schools completed a self-report to determine physical activity after 3:00 pm. The number of physical activity facilities within a 0.75-mile buffer of the school was counted with a Geographic Information System. Associations between the number of facilities and girls’ physical activity were examined using linear mixed-model analysis of variance. Results Overall, girls who attended schools with ≥ 5 facilities within the buffer reported more physical activity per day than girls in schools with < 5 facilities. In addition, girls who attended rural schools with ≥ 5 facilities reported ~12% more physical activity per day than girls who attended rural schools with < 5 facilities. No difference existed for girls in urban/suburban schools with ≥ 5 vs. < 5 facilities. Conclusion When school siting decisions are made, the number of physical activity facilities surrounding the school should be considered to encourage physical activity in 12th grade girls. PMID:21334248

  8. Retention and Access Issues Affecting Black Women Attending Predominantly White Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De War, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the self-reported experiences of Black, female, undergraduate students at a small, predominantly White, Midwestern college in the United States in order to identify factors affecting retention. Specific attention was paid to how participants perceived the effects of personal and institutional factors in relation to their…

  9. Suicidal Expression among School-Attending Adolescents in a Middle-Income Sub-Saharan Country

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael L.; Dunlavy, Andrea C.; Viswanathan, Bharathi; Bovet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    We investigated correlates for suicidal expression among adolescents in the Seychelles. Data on 1,432 students (52% females) were derived from the Global School-based Health Survey. Participants were divided into three groups: those with no suicidal behavior (N = 1,199); those with suicide ideation/SI (N = 89); and those reporting SI with a plan to carry out a suicide attempt/SISP (N = 139), each within a 12-month recall period. Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined the strength of associations with social, behavioral and economic indicators while adjusting for covariates. Sixteen percent of school-attending adolescents reported a suicidal expression (10% with a plan/6.2% without). Those reporting SI were younger (relative risk ratio RRR = 0.81; CI = 0.68–0.96), indicated signs of depression (RRR = 1.69; CI = 1.05–2.72) and loneliness (RRR=3.36; CI =1.93–5.84). Tobacco use (RRR = 2.34; CI = 1.32–4.12) and not having close friends (RRR = 3.32; CI = 1.54–7.15) were significantly associated with SI. Those with SISP were more likely to be female (RRR = 0.47; 0.30–0.74), anxious (RRR = 3.04; CI = 1.89–4.88) and lonely (RRR = 1.74; CI = 1.07–2.84). Having no close friends (RRR = 2.98; 1.56–5.69) and using tobacco (RRR = 2.41; 1.48–3.91) were also strongly associated. Having parents who were understanding was protective (RRR = 0.50; CI = 0.31–0.82). Our results suggest that school health promotion programs may benefit from targeting multiple factors associated with suicidal expression. More research, particularly multilevel designs are needed to identify peer and family influences which may modify associations with suicidality. PMID:23202835

  10. Victimization from bullying among school-attending adolescents in grades 7 to 10 in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Siziya, Seter; Rudatsikira, Emmanuel; Muula, Adamson S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Among school- attending adolescents, victimization from bullying is associated with anxiety, depression and poor academic performance. There are limited reports on victimization from bullying in Zambia; we therefore conducted this study to determine the prevalence and correlates for victimization from bullying among adolescents in grades 7 to 10 in the country in order to add information on the body of knowledge on victimization from bullying. Methods: The 2004 Zambia Global School-based Health Survey (GSHS) data among adolescents in grades 7 to 10 were obtained from the World Health Organization. We estimated the prevalence of victimization from bullying. We also conducted weighted multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent factors associated with victimization from bullying, and report adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Of 2136 students who participated in the 2004 Zambia GSHS, 1559 had information on whether they were bullied or not. Of these, 1559 students, 62.8% (60.0% of male and 65.0% of female) participants reported having been bullied in the previous 30 days to the survey. We found that respondents of age less than 14 years were 7% (AOR=0.93; 95%CI [0.91, 0.95]) less likely to have been bullied compared to those aged 16 years or older. Being a male (AOR=1.07; 95%CI [1.06, 1.09]), lonely (AOR=1.24; 95%CI [1.22, 1.26]), worried (AOR=1.12; 95%CI [1.11, 1.14]), consuming alcohol (AOR=2.59; 95%CI [2.55, 2.64]), missing classes (AOR=1.30; 95%CI [1.28, 1.32]), and considering attempting suicide (AOR=1.20; 95%CI [1.18, 1.22]) were significantly associated with bullying victimization. Conclusions: Victimization from bullying is prevalent among in-school adolescents in grades 7 to 10 in Zambia, and interventions to curtail it should consider the factors that have been identified in this study. PMID:21502789

  11. Parent attendance and homework adherence predict response to a family-school intervention for children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Angela T; Marshall, Stephen A; Mautone, Jennifer A; Soffer, Stephen L; Jones, Heather A; Costigan, Tracy E; Patterson, Anwar; Jawad, Abbas F; Power, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relative contribution of two dimensions of parent engagement, attendance and homework adherence, to parent and child treatment response and explored whether early engagement was a stronger predictor of outcomes than later engagement. The sample consisted of parents of participants (n = 92; M age = 9.4 years, SD = 1.27; 67% male, 69% White) in a 12-session evidence-based family-school intervention for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Attendance was assessed using clinician records, and homework adherence was measured by rating permanent products. Outcomes included parent and teacher ratings of family involvement in education, parenting practices, and child functioning. Accounting for the contributions of baseline scores and attendance, homework adherence was a significant predictor of parental self-efficacy, the parent-teacher relationship, parenting through positive involvement, and the child's inattention to homework and homework productivity. Accounting for the contribution of baseline scores and homework adherence, attendance was a significant predictor of one outcome, the child's academic productivity. Early homework adherence appeared to be more predictive of outcomes than later adherence, whereas attendance did not predict outcomes during either half of treatment. These results indicate that, even in the context of evidence-based practice, it is the extent to which parents actively engage with treatment, rather than the number of sessions they attend, that is most important in predicting intervention response. Because attendance is limited as an index of engagement and a predictor of outcomes, increased efforts to develop interventions to promote parent adherence to behavioral interventions for children are warranted. PMID:23688140

  12. School and the 17-Year-Old: A Comparison of Career Development Skills of 17-Year-Olds Attending School and Those Not Attending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    National performance for 17-year-olds in school, 17-year-olds not in school and young adults aged 26-35 in the area of career and occupational development (COD) was assessed to determine whether or not education status and career development skills are related. Within each of the groups, performance of various subgroups was examined, defined by…

  13. Multiple Sexual Partnerships among Female Adolescents in Rural Uganda: The effects of family structure and school attendance

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, Nanlesta A.; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Gray, Ronald H.; Sekasanvu, Joseph; Lutalo, Tom; Nalugoda, Fred; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A better understanding is needed of the contextual factors that influence HIV risk behaviors among female adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The objectives of this study were to assess the influence of family structure on lifetime sexual partners and on the number of sexual partners in the last year among female adolescents in rural Rakai, Uganda; and to determine if the influence of family structure on these outcomes differed by adolescents’ school attendance status. Methods The sample consisted of 2,337 unmarried adolescent girls, aged 15-19, enrolled in the Rakai Community Cohort Study. The last survey interview within the time period 2001-2008 available for each girl was used. Analyses were stratified by age (15-17 year olds and 18-19 year olds) and school status. Multinomial logistic regression was used. Results Living in a household with a biological father was protective against both outcomes. Family structure was not associated with the outcomes among in-school adolescents but was significantly associated with outcomes among out-of-school adolescents. Conclusions Findings suggest that understanding the familial context in which female adolescents develop, as well as its interaction with school attendance, is important for HIV prevention efforts. Both research and programmatic initiatives must consider the interplay between the family and school domains when considering ways to reduce HIV acquisition among adolescent women. PMID:25415632

  14. The School Attendance Officer 1900-1939: Policeman to Welfare Worker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The article argues that the local authority attendance officers responsible for the enforcement of compulsory attendance changed their approach to truancy under the influence of child welfare legislation and changing views of the child in the first decade of the twentieth century. Some of the changes in their work emerged as a direct response to…

  15. Preschool Attendance in Chicago Public Schools: Relationships with Learning Outcomes and Reasons for Absences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Stacy B.; Gwynne, Julia A.; Stitziel Pareja, Amber; Allensworth, Elaine M.; Moore, Paul; Jagesic, Sanja; Sorice, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Significant attention is currently focused on ensuring that children are enrolled in preschool. However, regular attendance is also critically important. Children with better preschool attendance have higher kindergarten readiness scores, this is especially true for students entering with low skills. Unfortunately, many preschool-aged children are…

  16. Do K-12 School Facilities Affect Education Outcomes? Staff Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ed; Green, Harry A.; Roehrich-Patrick, Lynnisse; Joseph, Linda; Gibson, Teresa

    This report explains that there is growing evidence of a correlation between the adequacy of a school facility and student behavior and performance. In general, students attending school in newer, betterfacilities score 5 to 17 points higher on standardized tests than those attending in substandard buildings. School facility factors such as…

  17. 10th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Jeffrey C.; Dickman, Anneliese; Schmidt, Jeffrey K.

    2007-01-01

    This is the 10th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District RUSD). Analysis continues to focus on the long-term historical trends in RUSD, comparing RUSD to nine peer school districts and the State of Wisconsin. RUSD peer districts are Wisconsin's largest (Milwaukee Public Schools are not included) and their…

  18. 11th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This is the 11th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District (RUSD). Analysis continues to focus on the long-term historical trends in RUSD, comparing RUSD to nine peer school districts and the State of Wisconsin. RUSD peer districts are Wisconsin's largest (Milwaukee Public Schools are not included) and their…

  19. Longitudinal Study of an After-School, Inquiry-Based Science Intervention on Low-Achieving Children's Affective Perceptions of Learning Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Huann-Shyang; Lawrenz, Frances P.; Hong, Zuway-R.

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study explores the effects of an after-school, inquiry-based science intervention on improving low-achieving elementary school children's affective perceptions of learning science (APLS) and positive thinking. Thirty-nine low-achieving children nominated by their teachers attended a three-semester intervention and formed the…

  20. Improving the Attendance Rate for African American Male Students in an After School Reading Program through Parental Involvement, Positive Male Role Models, and Tutorial Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanksley, Mary Dennard

    This practicum was designed to improve the attendance rate for African American male students in the After School Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) program. The attendance rate for male students was far below that of female students. The following strategies to increase male participation in the reading program were developed: local businesses and…

  1. Do Schooling Laws Matter? Evidence from the Introduction of Compulsory Attendance Laws in the United States. NBER Working Paper No. 18477

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Karen; Lingwall, Jeff; Stephens, Melvin, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of introducing compulsory attendance laws on the schooling of U.S. children for three overlapping time periods: 1880-1927, 1890-1927, and 1898-1927. The previous literature finds little effect of the laws, which is somewhat surprising given that the passage of these laws coincided with rising attendance. Using…

  2. Student Success in First-Year University Physics and Mathematics Courses: Does the high-school attended make a difference?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Bluman, George; Tiedje, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper considers school factors that contribute to a successful transition from high school to first-year university Physics courses at the University of British Columbia by employing a two-level hierarchical model. It is assumed that there is a relationship between student performance and the high school they graduated from. It is shown that school location and type affect student performance: students from public schools in the Metro Vancouver area perform better in first year compared to students from independent schools and schools in distant communities. The study also considers rankings of schools based on student performance in first-year university Physics and Calculus courses. These university-based rankings differ significantly (essentially in reverse order) from the well-known Fraser Institute rankings based on measures internal to high schools.

  3. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of School Bond Elections in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lode, Marlin D.

    In spite of a nationwide concern for the crumbling infrastructure of school buildings, the prospects of passing bond issues to repair or replace buildings are elusive. This study examined positive and negative factors that affected the outcomes of school bond elections in four purposefully-selected school districts in Iowa. Variables that…

  4. Family-School Links: How Do They Affect Educational Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan, Ed.; Dunn, Judith F., Ed.

    This book explores issues related to the links between families and schools and how they affect children's educational achievement, and is organized as follows: Part 1, titled "Families and Schools: How Can They Work Together To Promote Children's School Success?" contains the following chapters: chapter 1, "Family Involvement in Chidrens' and…

  5. Hypovitaminosis D among healthy adolescent girls attending an inner city school

    PubMed Central

    Das, G; Crocombe, S; McGrath, M; Berry, J L; Mughal, M Z

    2006-01-01

    Aims To determine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D among healthy adolescent schoolgirls attending an inner city multiethnic girls' school. Methods Fifty one (28%) of 182 girls (14 white, 37 non‐white; median age 15.3 years, range 14.7–16.6) took part in the study. Biochemical parameters, dietary vitamin D intake, muscle function parameters, duration of daily sunlight exposure (SE), and percentage of body surface area exposed (%BSA) were measured. Results Thirty seven (73%) girls were vitamin D deficient (25‐hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) <30 nmol/l) and 9 (17%) were severely deficient (25OHD <12.5 nmol/l). The median (range) 25OHD concentration of white girls (37.3 nmol/l (18.3–73.3)) was higher than that of non‐white girls (14.8 nmol/l (5.8–42.8)). The median (range) concentration of parathyroid hormone in white girls (2.8 pmol/l (1.0–3.7)) was lower than that of non‐white girls (3.4 pmol/l (1.7–34.2)). Serum Ca, inorganic phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, and 1,25‐dihydroxyvitamin D were not different in white and non‐white girls. For the whole group, 25OHD concentration was related to the estimated SE and %BSA, but not to estimated intake of vitamin D. In white girls, the estimated SE and %BSA were significantly higher than that of non‐white girls. The median times taken to complete the Gower's manoeuvre and grip strength were not different in the two groups; these variables were not related to serum 25OHD. Conclusions Hypovitaminosis D is common among healthy adolescent girls; non‐white girls are more severely deficient. Reduced sunshine exposure rather than diet explains the difference in vitamin D status of white and non‐white girls. PMID:16174640

  6. School Psychologists Working with Children Affected by Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dezen, Kristin A.; Gurl, Aaron; Ping, Jenn

    2010-01-01

    School psychologists encounter children regularly who have been affected by abuse and neglect. Maltreatment adversely affects the mental health status and academic achievement of youth, thereby making the topic an area of concern for school psychologists. More recently, child protection laws have been expanded to include mandatory child abuse…

  7. School-within-a-School and Its Effectiveness as Measured by Improved Grades, Increased Attendance, and Student Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelmire, Amanda E.

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of high school students not graduating is alarming, a successful transition from middle school to high school can place students on the path toward graduation. In 2009, a large, suburban high school implemented a school-within-a-school program to help ease this difficult transition for incoming, at-risk freshmen students. The…

  8. Variables Affecting Change at Laguna Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    After nearly 14 years of non-Indian administration, Laguna Elementary School (LES) has acquired a principal and a teacher supervisor who are not merely Indian, but of the Laguna Tribe itself, making LES the only school in the Southern Pueblos Agency with Tribal members as administrators. At first glance the situation is ideal, but there are…

  9. Factors Affecting School Quality in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that are theorized to be determinants of school quality in the 67 counties of Florida from 2000 to 2011. The model constructed for this purpose is comprised of a mix of independent variables that include county educational attainment (number of high school graduates and State University System enrollees) and…

  10. 20 CFR 664.310 - When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth attending alternative schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.310 When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth... time of registration is not a dropout. An individual who is out-of school at the time of registration and subsequently placed in an alternative school, may be considered an out-of-school youth for...

  11. 20 CFR 664.310 - When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth attending alternative schools?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.310 When is dropout status determined, particularly for youth... time of registration is not a dropout. An individual who is out-of school at the time of registration and subsequently placed in an alternative school, may be considered an out-of-school youth for...

  12. Can Community and School-Based Supports Improve the Achievement of First-Generation Immigrant Children Attending High-Poverty Schools?

    PubMed

    Dearing, Eric; Walsh, Mary E; Sibley, Erin; Lee-St John, Terry; Foley, Claire; Raczek, Anastacia E

    2016-05-01

    Using a quasi-experimental design, the effects of a student support intervention were estimated for the math and reading achievement of first-generation immigrant children (n = 667, M = 11.05 years of age) attending high-poverty, urban elementary schools. The intervention was designed to help schools identify developmental strengths and barriers to learning and, in turn, connect children to community and school supports aligned with their strengths and needs. By exploiting within-school changes in the implementation of the intervention, the present study revealed statistically and practically significant treatment effects indicating improvements in math and reading achievement at the end of elementary school. In addition, the intervention appears to considerably narrow achievement gaps between English language learners and immigrant children proficient in English. PMID:27028490

  13. Factors Affecting Burnout and School Engagement among High School Students: Study Habits, Self- Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilge, Filiz; Tuzgol Dost, Meliha; Cetin, Bayram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines high school students' levels of burnout and school engagement with respect to academic success, study habits, and self-efficacy beliefs. The data were gathered during the 2011-2012 school year from 633 students attending six high schools located in Ankara, Turkey. The analyses were conducted on responses from 605 students.…

  14. An Exploration of How U.S. Army Officers Attending the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Decide Whether or Not to Attend Graduate School: A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Charles David

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored how U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC) students decided whether or not to attend graduate school. The focus was on how U.S. Army students made their decision. The purpose of the study was to illuminate the issues related to this decision in adult development, adult learning, career decision…

  15. An Examination of Primary School Attendance and Completion among Secondary School Age Adolescents in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sierra Leone was ravaged by a civil war between 1991 and 2002. Since the end of the war, it has witnessed an unprecedented increase in school enrollments. Although school enrollment has increased, the number of school age children who are out of school remains high. The focus of international agencies is on children of primary school age, yet a…

  16. Association of a Full-Day versus Part-Day Preschool Intervention with School Readiness, Attendance, and Parent Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Richardson, Brandt A.; Hayakawa, C. Momoko; Lease, Erin M.; Warner-Richter, Mallory; Englund, Michelle M.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Sullivan, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Importance Early childhood interventions have demonstrated many positive effects on well-being. Whether attending for the full day vs part day improves outcomes is unknown. Objective To evaluate the association between a school-based full- and part-day early childhood development program and multiple indicators of school readiness, attendance, and parent involvement for a large cohort of low-income children. Design, Setting, and Participants End-of-preschool follow-up of a nonrandomized, matched-group cohort of predominantly low-income, ethnic minority children who enrolled in the Child-Parent Centers for the full school day (7 hours; n = 409) or part of the day (3 hours on average; n = 573) in the fall of 2012 in 11 schools in Chicago, Ill. Interventions The Midwest Child-Parent Center Education Program provides comprehensive education, family-support, and health services from preschool to third grade in high-poverty neighborhoods. In the preschool component assessed in this study, 3- and 4-year-olds in enrolled in the program for full- or part-day. Main Outcomes and Measures School readiness skills in 6 domains and on a total score at the end of the year, attendance and chronic absences, and parental involvement. Mean raw scores and the number of items for readiness domains were as follows: literacy (57.1, 12 items), language (37.8, 6), math (36.3, 7), cognitive (57.6, 10), socioemotional (55.4, 9), physical health (33.8, 5), and the total (278.0; 49). Results Full-day preschool participants had higher scores than part-day peers in the same schools on socioemotional development (58.6 vs. 54.5; diff. = 4.1; P = .025; 95% CI = 0.5, 7.6), language (39.9 vs. 37.3; diff = 2.6; P =.010; 95% CI = 0.6, 4.6), math (40.0 vs. 36.4; diff. = 3.6; P = .022; 95% CI = 0.5, 6.7), and physical health (35.5 vs. 33.6; diff. = 1.9; P = .006; 95% CI = 0.5, 3.2) but not parent involvement in school (3.95 vs. 4.65; diff. = -0.70; P = .170; 95% CI = -1.7, 3.0). The full-day group also

  17. The probability distribution of attendance to hospital emergency units for school students in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mona Hassan Ahmed; Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmed; Mokhtar, Samiha Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a retrospective study designed to examine the assumption that emergency arrivals at the Sporting Students' Hospital in Alexandria follow a Poisson distribution. Data about all arrivals at the emergency room (ER) for the year, 2000 (43076 arrivals) was extracted from the records of the emergency department and classified by age, sex, school, reason for visit, date and time of visit. Data analysis revealed that 12.9% of the total arrivals indicated hospital admission either to the inpatient units (12.5%) or the ICU (0.4%). Goodness of fit test showed that admissions to the ICU fit the Poisson distribution but those admitted to the inpatient units did not follow the assumed distribution. However the latter group did not fit exactly the normal distribution which indicated that deviance from the Poisson is due to the large mean non-elective admissions (14.74% per day). Hence the Poisson assumption is not excluded as the inpatient emergency admissions are still randomly distributed and independent. Univariate and multivariate Poisson regression of the daily emergency admissions gave another clue to the goodness of fit of emergency admissions to the Poisson process. Regression analysis showed significantly higher loge number of emergency admissions among the age group 12 or more, male students, medical conditions in contrast to injuries, governmental schools, and at 04:00-11:59 pm in contrast to midnight to 07:59 am. Results of the present study indicated the random nature of demand for emergency admission which affects use of bed stock. A prospective study of these admissions on daily basis is needed. PMID:16922150

  18. The Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties of Primary School Children with Poor Attendance Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Two complementary studies of poor and better attenders are presented. To measure emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) different teacher-completed rating scales were employed, and to determine social difficulties, the studies used sociometry and some items from the scales. One study had a longitudinal design. It revealed that, after…

  19. Friendship and Bullying Patterns in Children Attending a Language Base in a Mainstream School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study involved perceptions of bullying in six Year 7 children attending a speech and language base part-time and the perceptions of their mainstream peers without speech and language problems. Base-taught children and mainstreamed peers completed a bullying questionnaire and a social inclusion survey. Base-taught children with language…

  20. 12th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henken, Rob; Dickman, Anneliese; Schmidt, Jeff; Kramer, Renee

    2009-01-01

    This is the 12th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District (RUSD). This year, the analysis again focuses on the long-term historical trends in RUSD. The analysis compares RUSD data to data of nine peer school districts as well as statewide data. The peer districts are defined as those Wisconsin districts with…

  1. 8th Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Jeffrey C.; Dickman, Anneliese M.; Schmidt, Jeffrey K.; Bartholin, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    This is the 8th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District RUSD). Each study has confirmed that the Racine Unified School District (RUSD) faces greater challenges than its peers. Although these challenges have led Racine to spend slightly above the average amount per pupil, district performance tends to be below…

  2. Lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer mortality in a population attending school adjacent to styrene-butadiene facilities, 1963-1993

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, J. E.; Rothman, K. J.; Dreyer, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic cancers and other causes among students. DESIGN: The study used school records, yearbooks, and Texas Department of Health records for the school years 1963-64 to 1992-93 to construct a cohort of 15,403 students. Three mortality databases were searched to identify deaths, and mortality rates in the cohort were compared with mortality rates from the United States and Texas. Computed standardised mortality ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used. SETTING: Eastern Texas high school adjacent to facilities that have been producing synthetic styrene-butadiene since 1943. MAIN RESULTS: 338 deaths were identified. The all causes standardised mortality ratio was 0.84 (95% confidence intervals 0.74, 0.95) for men and 0.89 (0.73, 1.09) for women. The standardised mortality ratio for all lymphatic and haematopoietic cancers was 1.64 (95% confidence intervals 0.85, 2.87) for men and 0.47 (0.06, 1.70) for women. The slight male excess in lymphatic and haematopoietic cancers was stronger among men who attended school for two years or less. CONCLUSIONS: The overall mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer among the students was little different from that of the United States as a whole. A moderate excess for men, predominantly among the shorter-term students, was offset by a deficit among women. These variations are compatible with random fluctuations; the overall pattern is not indicative of an effect of environmental exposure sustained while attending the high school.   PMID:10396534

  3. The Academic Impacts of Attending a KIPP Charter School in Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Caleb P.

    2013-01-01

    KIPP Delta College Preparatory School (KIPP: DCPS), an open-enrollment charter school, opened in 2002 in Helena, Arkansas. Since its opening, KIPP: DCPS students have consistently outperformed their peers in the Helena/West Helena School district, and moreover, recent test scores suggest that white students and minority students are achieving at…

  4. Who Attends Charter Schools and How Are Those Students Doing? Exploratory Analysis of NAEP Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudowsky, Naomi; Ginsburg, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This report examines what the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) can tell us about charter school enrollment and student performance compared to that of regular public schools. The study uses NAEP reading and mathematics data from 2011 and the earlier years when charter school data first became available (2003 for grade 4; 2005 for…

  5. The Effects of High School Math Curriculum on College Attendance: Evidence from the NLSY97

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aughinbaugh, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of youth who graduated from high school in the late 1990s and early 2000s, this paper examines the impact of high school math curriculum on the decision to go to college. Results that control for unobserved differences between students and their families suggest that a more rigorous high school math curriculum is associated with a…

  6. Joint Analysis of Preschool Attendance and School Performance in the Short and Long-Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Renato; Tansini, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at explaining the academic performance of a sample of children starting their first year at public schools in Montevideo, Uruguay, during 1999. We are mainly interested in the effect of pre-school education on the children's academic results. Previous probit and OLS estimations suggested that pre-school education has a positive…

  7. School-Related Factors Affecting High School Seniors' Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Jarrod M.; Lo, Celia C.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the 2005 Monitoring the Future survey were used to examine relationships between school-related factors and high school seniors' lifetime methamphetamine use. The study applied logistic regression techniques to evaluate effects of social bonding variables and social learning variables on likelihood of lifetime methamphetamine use. The…

  8. Legislation Affecting School Crime and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menacker, Julius

    National polls of public attitudes toward public education consistently rank school safety and drug abuse at the top of the problem list. This paper describes some federal and state legislative responses to the problems and offers a preventative approach. Federal legislation has taken the form of two major statutes--the Comprehensive Drug Abuse…

  9. Trends Affecting North Carolina School Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liner, Charles D.

    1984-01-01

    State estimates show Average Daily Membership (ADM) will decline in the period 1982-83 to 1987-88; ADM will also fall substantially in the late 1980s and early l990s in junior and senior high schools. Five tables and charts show actual and projected ADM and percentage change in selected populations, 1970-80. (PB)

  10. Non-Attendance and Utilization of a Speech and Language Therapy Service: A Retrospective Pilot Study of School-Aged Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Amy; Flynn, Catherine; Antonijevic-Elliott, Stanislava; Lyons, Rena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-attendance and inappropriate referrals affect the effective and efficient running of healthcare services. Non-engagement with speech and language therapy (SLT) services may lead to negative long-term consequences for children in need of SLT intervention. Currently there is a dearth of research on non-attendance and non-engagement…

  11. Affective Evaluation Techniques in School Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Mary S.

    1981-01-01

    Ways in which affective measurement and evaluation techniques could be used for health instruction include: (1) determining student behavioral information and assisting in the removal of barriers to smooth classroom functioning; (2) attitude measurement; and (3) evaluation of classroom learning. Several types of affective measurement techniques…

  12. School Violence Prevention: Climate and Moral Perspectives of Sixth through Eighth Grade Students Attending a Southern California Catholic School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Diane Diaz

    2010-01-01

    The need for U.S. teachers to better understand School Violence Prevention is growing. Evidence suggests however, that 10 years and 10 billion dollars after the Columbine High School massacre, our public schools are not safer (www.community-matters.org). There has been an "after the fact" approach to the problem of school violence. After an…

  13. The Effect of Attending Steiner Schools during Childhood on Health in Adulthood: A Multicentre Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, H. Felix; Binting, Sylvia; Bockelbrink, Angelina; Heusser, Peter; Hueck, Christoph; Keil, Thomas; Roll, Stephanie; Witt, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Background It is speculated that attending Steiner schools, whose pedagogical principles include an account for healthy psycho-physical development, may have long-term beneficial health effects. We examined whether the current health status differed between former attendees of German Steiner schools and adults from the general population. Furthermore, we examined factors that might explain those differences. Methods We included former Steiner school attendees from 4 schools in Berlin, Hanover, Nuremberg and Stuttgart and randomly selected population controls. Using a self-report questionnaire we assessed sociodemographics, current and childhood lifestyle and health status. Outcomes were self-reports on 16 diseases: atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac insufficiency, angina pectoris, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, osteoarthritis, rheumatism, cancer, diabetes, depression and multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, participants rated the symptom burden resulting from back pain, cold symptoms, headache, insomnia, joint pain, gastrointestinal symptoms and imbalance. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were calculated for each outcome. Results 1136 Steiner school attendees and 1746 controls were eligible for analysis. Both groups were comparable regarding sex, age and region, but differed in nationality and educational status. After adjusting for possible confounders, we found statistically significant effects of Steiner school attendance for osteoarthritis (OR 0.69 [0.49–0.97]) and allergic rhinitis (OR 0.77, [0.59–1.00]) as well as for symptom burden from back pain (OR 0.80, [0.64–1.00]), insomnia (OR 0.65, [0.50–0.84]), joint pain (OR 0.62, [0.48–0.82]), gastrointestinal symptoms (OR 0.76, [0.58–1.00]) and imbalance (OR 0.60, [0.38–0.93]). Conclusions The risk of most examined diseases did not differ between former Steiner school attendees and the

  14. Characteristics and Experiences of Children and Young People with Severe Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour Attending 52-Week Residential Special Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilling, N.; McGill, P.; Cooper, V.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study sought to gather information about the characteristics and experiences of children and young people with severe intellectual disabilities and severe challenging behaviour attending 52-week residential special schools. Method: Staff of nine schools completed postal questionnaires on the characteristics and experiences of 156…

  15. The Development of a Structured Support System in a Large Urban High School to Increase High Needs Students' Attendance at a Post-Secondary Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Candace E.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of high needs high school students (defined as students with little or no parent support, first generation potential college students, or students living with someone other than their biological parents) are graduating from high school, but not attending a post-secondary institution. This study focused on the effects that a…

  16. Comparison of asthma prevalence among African American teenage youth attending public high schools in rural Georgia and urban Detroit

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Dennis R.; Tingen, Martha S.; Havstad, Suzanne; Waller, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Christine C.; Joseph, Christine C. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of asthma among urban African American (AA) populations has attracted research attention while the prevalence among rural AA populations is poorly documented. Objective To compare the prevalence of asthma among AA youth in rural Georgia and urban Detroit, Michigan. Methods The prevalence of asthma was compared in population-based samples of 7297 youth attending Detroit public high schools and in 2523 youth attending public high schools in rural Georgia. Current asthma was defined as a physician diagnosis and symptoms in the previous 12 months. Undiagnosed asthma was defined as multiple respiratory symptoms in the previous 12 months without a physician diagnosis. Results In Detroit, 6994 (95.8%) youth were AA compared to 1514 (60.0%) in GA. Average population density in high school ZIP codes was 5628 people/mi2 in Detroit and 45.1 people/mi2 in GA. The percent of poverty and of students qualifying for free or reduced lunches were similar in both areas. The prevalence of current diagnosed asthma among AA youth in Detroit and GA were similar: 15.0% (95% CI 14.1–15.8), and 13.7% (CI 12.0–17.1) (p=.22), respectively. Undiagnosed asthma prevalence in AA youth was 8.0% in Detroit and 7.5% in GA (p=.56). Asthma symptoms were reported more frequently among those with diagnosed asthma in Detroit while those with undiagnosed asthma in Georgia reported more symptoms. Conclusions Among AA youth living in similar socioeconomic circumstances, asthma prevalence is as high in rural Georgia as it is in urban Detroit suggesting that urban residence is not an asthma risk factor. Clinical Implications Asthma prevalence was as common among African American high school students in rural Georgia as among students in urban Detroit, Michigan. Asthma is more likely related to poverty than urban residence. PMID:25825215

  17. HIV Testing Among Teens Attending Therapeutic Schools: Having a Personal Source of Information About HIV/AIDS Matters!

    PubMed

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K

    2015-06-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13-19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two US cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends. PMID:25656380

  18. Traumatised permanent teeth in 11-16-year-old Saudi Arabian children with a sensory impairment attending special schools.

    PubMed

    AlSarheed, M; Bedi, R; Hunt, N P

    2003-06-01

    - The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of traumatised permanent teeth among sensory (visual (VI) and hearing (HI)) impaired children attending special schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All the dental injuries involved incisor teeth, and trauma was noted in 33 (6.7%) children attending government schools (control group) compared to 7 (9%) VI children and 24 (11.4%) HI children. Differences in the dental trauma only reached statistical significance between the HI and control group (P < 0.05). Gender differences were only apparent in the HI group, with males having higher levels of traumatised teeth. In addition, HI children aged 11-12 years were more prone to trauma than children in the control group of the same age (P < 0.05). In conclusion, sensory impaired children do have a tendency for more dental trauma. However, this was only statistically significant for HI children. Whereas a gender difference was most noticeable for the HI group, with males having higher levels of trauma, this was noticeable by its absence among VI children. PMID:12752532

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for non-carious cervical lesions in children attending special needs schools in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Arunoday; Debnath, Nitai; Kumar, Amit; K Badiyani, Bhumika; Basak, Debashish; S A Ali, Mohamed; B Ismail, Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the prevalence and risk factors for development of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) in children attending special needs schools in India. The participants were 395 children aged 12-15 years with disabilities in learning, communication, physical function, and/or development. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, dietary habits, and risk factors for NCCLs. The chi-square test, bivariate analysis, and logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Presence of NCCLs was associated with use of toothpowder or other materials for teeth cleaning, use of harder toothbrushes, use of a horizontal scrub technique for toothbrushing, consumption of a vegetarian diet, and greater consumption of lemon. The overall prevalence of NCCLs was 22.7%. Most lesions involved minimal loss of contour or defects <1 mm in depth. The prevalence of non-carious cervical lesions was slightly higher than the global average. Effective policies should be developed for oral health care among children attending special needs schools. PMID:25807907

  20. HIV testing among teens attending therapeutic schools: Having a personal source of information about HIV/AIDS matters!

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Rebecca R.; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13 to 19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two U.S. cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends. PMID:25656380

  1. School Conditions Affecting Implementation of the Primary Program in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooden, Susan H.

    2000-01-01

    A study of two elementary schools identified school conditions affecting implementation of Kentucky state reforms of primary education: innovation advocates, teacher-relevant implementation strategies, and supportive principals. Essential elements were a fit between leadership style and faculty needs and time to develop collaborative working…

  2. Understanding How Domestic Violence Affects Behavior in High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Malika

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader with an understanding of how domestic violence affects the behavior of high school students. The presentation is designed to provide the reader with a working definition of domestic violence, the rate of occurrence and its effects on high school students. Additionally the paper will summarize the negative effects…

  3. Alcohol and Drug Use among Gang Members: Experiences of Adolescents Who Attend School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swahn, Monica H.; Bossarte, Robert M.; West, Bethany; Topalli, Volkan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Problems related to gangs have been noted in large cities and in many schools across the United States. This study examined the patterns of alcohol, drug use, and related exposures among male and female high school students who were gang members. Methods: Analyses were based on the Youth Violence Survey, conducted in 2004, and…

  4. Educational Attainments of Spina Bifida Children Attending Ordinary or Special Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Janet; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Spina Bifida children (N=22) in regular and special schools were matched for IQ and their academic achievement compared. Data from tests revealed that Ss from special schools were behind their peers in mathematics with no significant differences in reading. (CL)

  5. The Relationship between Type of High School Attended and Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donlan, Andrew Kenny

    2003-01-01

    Incidents of violence in recent years have intensified concern about student conduct in our nation's schools, and have heightened the desire, among educators and others, to find ways of ameliorating the problem. Social science can play a supportive role, by providing insight into the origins of deviance in schools. However, while previous…

  6. Teachers Attending to Students' Mathematical Reasoning: Lessons from an After-School Research Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, John M.; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-01

    There is a documented need for more opportunities for teachers to learn about students' mathematical reasoning. This article reports on the experiences of a group of elementary and middle school mathematics teachers who participated as interns in an after-school, classroom-based research project on the development of mathematical ideas involving…

  7. Effects of after-school programs with at-risk youth on attendance and externalizing behaviors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Kristen P; Maynard, Brandy R; Polanin, Joshua R; Vaughn, Michael G; Sarteschi, Christine M

    2015-03-01

    The popularity, demand, and increased federal and private funding for after-school programs have resulted in a marked increase in after-school programs over the past two decades. After-school programs are used to prevent adverse outcomes, decrease risks, or improve functioning with at-risk youth in several areas, including academic achievement, crime and behavioral problems, socio-emotional functioning, and school engagement and attendance; however, the evidence of effects of after-school programs remains equivocal. This systematic review and meta-analysis, following Campbell Collaboration guidelines, examined the effects of after-school programs on externalizing behaviors and school attendance with at-risk students. A systematic search for published and unpublished literature resulted in the inclusion of 24 studies. A total of 64 effect sizes (16 for attendance outcomes; 49 for externalizing behavior outcomes) extracted from 31 reports were included in the meta-analysis using robust variance estimation to handle dependencies among effect sizes. Mean effects were small and non-significant for attendance and externalizing behaviors. A moderate to large amount of heterogeneity was present; however, no moderator variable tested explained the variance between studies. Significant methodological shortcomings were identified across the corpus of studies included in this review. Implications for practice, policy and research are discussed. PMID:25416228

  8. Effects of After-School Programs with At-Risk Youth on Attendance and Externalizing Behaviors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The popularity, demand, and increased federal and private funding for after-school programs have resulted in a marked increase in after-school programs over the past two decades. After-school programs are used to prevent adverse outcomes, decrease risks, or improve functioning with at-risk youth in several areas, including academic achievement, crime and behavioral problems, socio-emotional functioning, and school engagement and attendance; however, the evidence of effects of after-school programs remains equivocal. This systematic review and meta-analysis, following Campbell Collaboration guidelines, examined the effects of after-school programs on externalizing behaviors and school attendance with at-risk students. A systematic search for published and unpublished literature resulted in the inclusion of 24 studies. A total of 64 effect sizes (16 for attendance outcomes; 49 for externalizing behavior outcomes) extracted from 31 reports were included in the meta-analysis using robust variance estimation to handle dependencies among effect sizes. Mean effects were small and non-significant for attendance and externalizing behaviors. A moderate to large amount of heterogeneity was present; however, no moderator variable tested explained the variance between studies. Significant methodological shortcomings were identified across the corpus of studies included in this review. Implications for practice, policy and research are discussed. PMID:25416228

  9. Effects of a free school breakfast programme on children's attendance, academic achievement and short-term hunger: results from a stepped-wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, Delvina; Turley, Maria; Jiang, Yannan; Michie, Jo; Maddison, Ralph; Hattie, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Free school breakfast programmes (SBPs) exist in a number of high-income countries, but their effects on educational outcomes have rarely been evaluated in randomised controlled trials. Methods A 1-year stepped-wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial was undertaken in 14 New Zealand schools in low socioeconomic resource areas. Participants were 424 children, mean age 9±2 years, 53% female. The intervention was a free daily SBP. The primary outcome was children's school attendance. Secondary outcomes were academic achievement, self-reported grades, sense of belonging at school, behaviour, short-term hunger, breakfast habits and food security. Results There was no statistically significant effect of the breakfast programme on children's school attendance. The odds of children achieving an attendance rate <95% was 0.76 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.02) during the intervention phase and 0.93 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.31) during the control phase, giving an OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.59 to 1.11), p=0.19. There was a significant decrease in children's self-reported short-term hunger during the intervention phase compared with the control phase, demonstrated by an increase of 8.6 units on the Freddy satiety scale (95% CI 3.4 to 13.7, p=0.001). There were no effects of the intervention on any other outcome. Conclusions A free SBP did not have a significant effect on children's school attendance or academic achievement but had significant positive effects on children's short-term satiety ratings. More frequent programme attendance may be required to influence school attendance and academic achievement. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR)—ACTRN12609000854235. PMID:23043203

  10. Assessing the Connection Between Health and Education: Identifying Potential Leverage Points for Public Health to Improve School Attendance

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tony; Coller, Karen; Guerrero, Lourdes R.; Wong, Mitchell D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined multiple variables influencing school truancy to identify potential leverage points to improve school attendance. Methods. A cross-sectional observational design was used to analyze inner-city data collected in Los Angeles County, California, during 2010 to 2011. We constructed an ordinal logistic regression model with cluster robust standard errors to examine the association between truancy and various covariates. Results. The sample was predominantly Hispanic (84.3%). Multivariable analysis revealed greater truancy among students (1) with mild (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22, 2.01) and severe (AOR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.04, 3.13) depression (referent: no depression), (2) whose parents were neglectful (AOR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.21, 4.03) or indulgent (AOR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.04, 2.82; referent: authoritative parents), (3) who perceived less support from classes, teachers, and other students regarding college preparation (AOR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.81, 0.95), (4) who had low grade point averages (AOR = 2.34; 95% CI = 1.49, 4.38), and (5) who reported using alcohol (AOR = 3.47; 95% CI = 2.34, 5.14) or marijuana (AOR = 1.59; 95% CI = 1.06, 2.38) during the past month. Conclusions. Study findings suggest depression, substance use, and parental engagement as potential leverage points for public health to intervene to improve school attendance. PMID:25033134

  11. [The dangers of attendance. About the genesis of health care in Dutch schools (c. 1900)].

    PubMed

    de Beer, Fedor; Bakker, Nelleke

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the origins of the school medical service in The Netherlands. They focus on the period of transition from nineteenth-century concern for school hygiene--focusing on the improvement of buildings, school desks and timetables--to twentieth-century prevention of diseases and infirmities through medical inspection of pupils' health by school doctors. The research shows that in the Netherlands, when compared to Belgium and England, the state played only a minor role in this respect, as no legislation was introduced. Moreover, the instructions of the first generation of municipal school doctors were limited to medical examination; treatment of the illnesses they found continued to be the privilege of private practitioners. The sectarian character of Dutch society around 1900 seems to have been an important circumstance, stimulating restraint from interfering with religion-based education and its pupils in particular on the part of the government. School doctors' limited instruction appears to have been crucial for the acceptance of the service for denominational groups. Teachers' organisations welcomed the service, as they admitted their own lack of hygienic knowledge and the service did not interfere with teaching itself. Nevertheless, compulsory education seems to have ruled out other solutions to reduce the dangers of classroom education, particularly catching contagious and other 'school' diseases. The medical profession did not have to act as imperialists to become the protector of children that were forced to go to school. In the Netherlands, school medical inspection was created by a society that no longer accepted the health hazards of classroom education. PMID:22586758

  12. [School attendance of children with trisomy 21. A 4-year experiment].

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Roth, M P

    1983-04-28

    Four years ago a class was started with 8 children from 7 to 11 years of age with Down's syndrome. The classroom is in a state school. The children lived at home. They were with the other children of the school for several classes and for lunch. Like other children they learned reading, writing and arithmetic. Psychomotricity was emphasized. The children's I.Q. and behavior were studied before entering the class. After 24 to 30 months every child was able to read and write. Their I.Q.'s were retested after 4 years and the results were far better than previously. The children gained confidence and began to cope very well at school and outside school. PMID:6306812

  13. Analysis of the factors that affect dental health behaviour and attendance at scheduled dental check-ups using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimiko; Oda, Megumi

    2011-04-01

    A questionnaire survey was administered to 317 parents who attended infant health check-ups in City B, Okayama Prefecture between October, 2008 and March, 2009. The questionnaire survey studied 7 factors based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model. We analysed factors that affected oral health behaviour and attendance at scheduled dental health check-ups. The survey containing 22 items concerning matters such as 'QOL' and 'health problems' was posted to parents and guardians in advance, and then collected on the day of the medical check-up. The collected data was analysed using the t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, following which we conducted a covariance structure analysis. The results showed that dental health behaviour was directly affected by reinforcing factors, and indirectly associated with enabling and predisposing factors influenced by reinforcing factors. It was also shown that predisposing factors and oral health behaviour were associated with attendance at scheduled oral health check-ups. The results indicated that strengthening oral health education by sharing knowledge that acts as predisposing factors and introducing adaptations of oral health behaviour that that fit individual lives will lead to improved attendance at scheduled dental health check-ups. PMID:21519364

  14. Asthma Symptoms Among Adolescents Who Attend Public Schools That Are Located Near Confined Swine Feeding Operations

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Stephen W.; Wilcosky, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Little is known about the health effects of living in close proximity to industrial swine operations. We assessed the relationship between estimated exposure to airborne effluent from confined swine feeding operations and asthma symptoms among adolescents who were aged 12 to 14 years. METHODS During the 1999–2000 school year, 58 169 adolescents in North Carolina answered questions about their respiratory symptoms, allergies, medications, socioeconomic status, and household environments. To estimate the extent to which these students may have been exposed during the school day to air pollution from confined swine feeding operations, we used publicly available data about schools (n = 265) and swine operations (n = 2343) to generate estimates of exposure for each public school. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for wheezing within the past year were estimated using random-intercepts binary regression models, adjusting for potential confounders, including age, race, socioeconomic status, smoking, school exposures, and household exposures. RESULTS The prevalence of wheezing during the past year was slightly higher at schools that were estimated to be exposed to airborne effluent from confined swine feeding operations. For students who reported allergies, the prevalence of wheezing within the past year was 5% higher at schools that were located within 3 miles of an operation relative to those beyond 3 miles and 24% higher at schools in which livestock odor was noticeable indoors twice per month or more relative to those with no odor. CONCLUSIONS Estimated exposure to airborne pollution from confined swine feeding operations is associated with adolescents’ wheezing symptoms. PMID:16818539

  15. The Relationship between African American High School Students' Desire to Attend College, Their Perceived Likelihood to Attend College and Actual College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Makini Lateefah

    2013-01-01

    African American students continue to be an underrepresented population in institutions of higher education. This study uses Mickelson's Attitude-Achievement Paradox to explain the effect of individual and contextual SES, students' sense of belonging, achievement and engagement on student's desire to attend college and perceived likelihood of…

  16. Why adolescents do not attend school. The views of students and parents.

    PubMed

    Klerman, L V; Weitzman, M; Alpert, J J; Lamb, G A; Kayne, H; Gerominini, K R; Rose, L; Cohen, L

    1987-09-01

    Despite the magnitude and importance of the problem, little is known about why many students are absent from school. This study assessed what a sample of excessively absent students and their parents believed were the reasons for the students' absences. In response to an open-ended question about their main reason for absence, almost half of the students reported a health-related reason. When asked whether any of 15 potential problems contributed to their absence, many reported common and acute physical illnesses, headaches or stomachaches, and other aches or pains. Half mentioned factors relating to low motivation or a concern about the school environment. The parents' responses were remarkably similar except they were more likely to cite emotional problems of the student, school violence, and racial problems. When individual student's responses were compared with those of his or her parents, agreement on individual items were little better than would be expected by chance. PMID:3667396

  17. Prospective analysis of the transition to sexual experience and changes in sexual self-esteem among adolescents attending therapeutic schools.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Houck, Christopher D; Barker, David; Zeanah, Paula D; Brown, Larry K

    2012-02-01

    Given increased sexual risk-taking among youth with mental health problems, this study sought to understand the developmental trajectory of sexual self-esteem (SSE) among this vulnerable population and how it is impacted by sexual experiences. Participants were 185 adolescents who attended therapeutic/alternative schools in southern New England. Changes in five domains of SSE identified by Zeanah and Schwarz (1996) were examined across adolescents who either: 1) were sexually active at baseline, 2) transitioned to activity during the study, and 3) remained inexperienced at follow-up. In support of the hypothesis that changes in SSE precede onset of experience, youth who transitioned reported higher baseline scores in the Skills domain than those who remained inexperienced. SSE was subsequently impacted by sexual activity, with differences in several domains found at baseline and follow-up across level of experience. Changes in SSE following sexual experience depended, in part, on the percentage of casual partners teens reported. PMID:21726896

  18. Does Cost of Schooling Affect Enrollment by the Poor? Universal Primary Education in Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deininger, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Evaluates the impact of Uganda's program of "Universal Primary Education," which, starting from 1997, dispensed with fees for primary enrollment. Finds, for example, that while the program was associated with a dramatic increase in primary school attendance and that inequalities in attendance related to gender, income, and region were…

  19. Success in These Schools? Visual Counternarratives of Young Men of Color and Urban High Schools They Attend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Shaun R.

    2015-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of published scholarship on urban high schools in the United States focuses on problems of inadequacy, instability, underperformance, and violence. Similarly, across all schooling contexts, most of what has been written about young men of color continually reinforces deficit narratives about their educational possibility.…

  20. Focus on Fundamentals: A Longitudinal Study of Students Attending a Fundamental School. ERS Relevant Research for School Decisions, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, LouAnn S.; And Others

    A longstanding debate in education pits advocates of liberal curricula against advocates of "back-to-basics," fundamental education. The study described in this publication examined the long term results of a fundamental elementary school that began operating in August 1978 with 347 students. During the 1989-90 school year, the first group of…

  1. The Relationship between the High School's Performance and Students' College Attendance Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Gary; Tanner, David

    2012-01-01

    Declining college admission test scores during the 1970s raised concerns that America's primary schools were inadequately preparing students for college or the workforce. Rock's (1985) analysis of SAT scores indicated that seniors in 1980 scoring at the 50th percentile for vocabulary would have placed at the 41st percentile in 1972. Mathematics…

  2. The Subjective Well-Being of Israeli Adolescents Attending Specialized School Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkibi, Hod; Ronen, Tammie; Assoulin, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Although adolescents' well-being has long been considered a central goal in therapy and education, research focusing on the link between subjective well-being (SWB; happiness) and studying in specialized school classes is rather limited. Using a between-subjects design, the present study examined whether adolescents studying in sports, arts, or…

  3. Why Attend School? Chinese Immigrant and European American Preschoolers' Views and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jin; Yamamoto, Yoko; Luo, Lily; Batchelor, Andrea K.; Bresnahan, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    The developing views of the purposes of school learning (PSLs) and related achievement among immigrant Chinese preschoolers and their European American (EA) age-mates were examined. Both culture and socioeconomic status (SES) were considered simultaneously, an often neglected research approach to studying Asian children. One hundred and fifty…

  4. School Attendance Revisited: A Study of Urban African American Students' Grade Point Averages and Coping Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Robbie J.; Steward, Astin Devine; Blair, Jonathan; Jo, Hanik; Hill, Martin F.

    2008-01-01

    Urban African American first-year high school students' absenteeism was found to be negatively related to grade point average (GPA) and avoidance as a means of coping (use of substances as a way to escape--food, alcohol, smoking, caffeine, etc.) and positively related to use of social support as a means of coping (efforts to stay emotionally…

  5. What the Research Shows, Volume 2. The Benefits of Attending a Girls' School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition of Girls' Schools (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication has been fully revamped and updated with new academic and scientific research. It contains: (1) twelve pages of reports and commentary from education researchers; (2) an expanded section on gender and the brain, citing the most recent studies; (3) new National Coalition of Girls' Schools alumnae survey findings integrated…

  6. Scholastic Journalism Enrollment Changes and Attendance at University Programs for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iorio, Sharon Hartin; Garner, R. Brooks

    Almost from its beginning, scholastic journalism, in a number of schools, has fought an up-hill battle against the stereotype of academic orphan relegated to a low priority position in the curriculum, the perception of administration, and fiscal allocation. In order to address the status of scholastic journalism, a study surveyed the attitudes of…

  7. Carnegie Units and High School Attendance Policies: An Absence of Thought?!?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outhouse, Craig Michael

    2012-01-01

    This case was developed as part of a doctoral course for educational administration students who were specializing in K-12 educational administration. It could be used in a leadership, special education, or policy course for future school leaders or teachers. Currently, most educational institutions use Carnegie Units to structure how students…

  8. A Collaborative Bovine Artificial Insemination Short Course for Students Attending a Caribbean Veterinary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Joseph C.; Robinson, James Q.; DeJarnette, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) of cattle is a critical career skill for veterinarians interested in food animal practice. Consequently, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Student Chapter of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, Select Sires, and University of Idaho Extension have partnered to offer an intensive 2-day course to…

  9. Moving for Opportunities? Examining the Public School Attendance and Reading Achievement of Migrant Students in Beijing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, privately-run migrant schools have been established to provide affordable education for children of migrant workers who encountered difficulties in receiving compulsory education in urban areas due to China's household registration system. Recent policies promulgated by China's government have gradually eliminated the…

  10. The Effect of Early Childhood Developmental Program Attendance on Future School Enrollment in Rural North India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazarika, Gautam; Viren, Vejoya

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of prior participation in early childhood developmental programs, considered endogenous, upon 7-18 years olds' school enrollment in rural North India. Analyses by age group of data from the World Bank's 1997-98 Survey of Living Conditions in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar reveal that 7-10 year olds, 11-14 year olds, and…

  11. Assessment of the Psychosocial Development of Children Attending Nursery Schools in Karen Refugee Camps in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The Karen, an ethnic minority group in Burma, have experienced a prolonged state of exile in refugee camps in neighboring Thailand because of ethnic conflict in their home country. Nursery schools in the three largest Karen refugee camps aim to promote the psychosocial development of young children by providing a child-centered, creative,…

  12. Bullying in German Adolescents: Attending Special School for Students with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study analysed bullying in German adolescents with and without visual impairment. Ninety-eight adolescents with vision loss from schools for students with visual impairment, of whom 31 were blind and 67 had low vision, were compared with 98 sighted peers using a matched-pair design. Students with low vision reported higher levels of…

  13. The Characteristics of Schools and Classrooms Attended by Successful Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Rachuba, Laura T.

    Using data from the Prospects study ("Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity"), the individual characteristics that distinguish academically successful, or resilient, elementary school students of minority and low-socioecononmic status (SES) backgrounds from their less successful, nonresilient…

  14. 13th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henken, Rob; Dickman, Anneliese; Schmidt, Jeff; Wynn, Tess

    2010-01-01

    This is the 13th annual report on the conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District (RUSD). This year, the analysis again focuses on the long-term historical trends in RUSD and compares the district to nine peer districts across the state. The peer districts are those with the most similar enrollments to RUSD. The report is configured in…

  15. Perception of Social Relationships with Classmates and Social Support in Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome Attending Mainstream Schools in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisula, Ewa; Lukowska, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    One of the factors affecting successful inclusion of adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS) in mainstream schools is positive relationships with classmates. The present study investigates how adolescents with AS: (1) perceive their classmates' attitude towards them; (2) what attitude towards classmates they declare; and (3) how they assess the…

  16. Effects of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on Attendance, Grades, and Discipline Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Suspension from school removes students from the educational environment and interferes with school progress by decreasing prospects of gaining academic and social skills. Suspension also negatively affects school attendance and is an indicator of future disciplinary problems. To address problem behaviors that can lead to school suspensions,…

  17. Factors Affecting Attendance at and Timing of Formal Antenatal Care: Results from a Qualitative Study in Madang, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Erin V. W.; Pell, Christopher; Angwin, Angeline; Auwun, Alma; Daniels, Job; Mueller, Ivo; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Pool, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriate antenatal care (ANC) is key for the health of mother and child. However, in Papua New Guinea (PNG), only a third of women receive any ANC during pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research, this paper explores the influences on ANC attendance and timing of first visit in the Madang region of Papua New Guinea. Methods Data were collected in three sites utilizing several qualitative methods: free-listing and sorting of terms and definitions, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, observation in health care facilities and case studies of pregnant women. Respondents included pregnant women, their relatives, biomedical and traditional health providers, opinion leaders and community members. Results Although generally reported to be important, respondents’ understanding of the procedures involved in ANC was limited. Factors influencing attendance fell into three main categories: accessibility, attitudes to ANC, and interpersonal issues. Although women saw accessibility (distance and cost) as a barrier, those who lived close to health facilities and could easily afford ANC also demonstrated poor attendance. Attitudes were shaped by previous experiences of ANC, such as waiting times, quality of care, and perceptions of preventative care and medical interventions during pregnancy. Interpersonal factors included relationships with healthcare providers, pregnancy disclosure, and family conflict. A desire to avoid repeat clinic visits, ideas about the strength of the fetus and parity were particularly relevant to the timing of first ANC visit. Conclusions This long-term in-depth study (the first of its kind in Madang, PNG) shows how socio-cultural and economic factors influence ANC attendance. These factors must be addressed to encourage timely ANC visits: interventions could focus on ANC delivery in health facilities, for example, by addressing healthcare staff’s attitudes towards pregnant women. PMID:24842484

  18. Pattern of Headache in School Going Children Attending Specialized Clinic in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Md Azharul; Rahman, Kazi Mohibur; Haque, Badrul; Chowdhury, Rajib Nayan; Khan, Sharif Uddin; Hasan, ATM Hasibul; Mondol, Md Badrul Alam; Habib, Monsur; Mohammad, Quazi Deen

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the pattern of headache and its associated symptoms in school going children. Methods The data of all the school going children attending the Headache Clinic in the Dept. of Neurology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 1021 patients from October 1996 to September 2011 were selected. Data were collected through a predesigned questionnaire containing information on age, sex, social status, clinical features, opthalmoscopic findings, management, and in selected cases imaging results. Result The mean age of headache in school children was 12.6±1.08 years with relatively older age of presentation among girls. The sex ratio was 1.64:1 in favor of girls at older age. Tension type headache (71.1%) was the most common form of headache, followed by migraine (18.4%) and mixed headache (6.7%). Though the girls had more frequent headache of both tension type (59.4%) and migraine (68.1%) variety, the latter was significantly associated in girls (p<0.001). Headache was of moderate severity in 53.3%, whereas severe headache was experienced by 19.9% of the children. The children commonly had nausea and/or vomiting (47.2%), as well as photophobia (24.7%) with headache. Mental stress (34%) and sunlight (30.9%) were common triggering factors whereas a sound sleep relieved headache in the majority (59.4%). Paracetamol (83.3%) and nortryptyline (62.8%) were the most commonly prescribed drug taken by them. Conclusion Headache is a major health problem in school children, apart from other common health issues at this age. With increasing age, the girls more commonly suffer not only from migraine but also with other chronic headache. The direct causal association is yet to be determined. PMID:23074548

  19. 76 FR 33030 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Certification of School Attendance-REPS) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ..., 1981. Beneficiaries over age 18 and under age 23 must be enrolled full-time in an approved post.... Affected Public: Individuals or households. Estimated Annual Burden: 300 hours. Estimated Average...

  20. Language Learning Strategies and Beliefs about Language Learning in High-School Students and Students Attending English Institutes: Are They Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeb, Fateme; Zamani, Elham

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a comparative study exploring language learning strategy use and beliefs about language learning of high-school students and students attending English institutes. Oxford's (1990) strategy inventory for language learning (SILL) and Horwitz's (1987) beliefs about language learning inventory (BALLI), were used to collect data.…

  1. Assessing Outgroup Prejudice among 13-15-Year-Old Students Attending Catholic and Protestant Secondary Schools in Northern Ireland: An Empirical Enquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Leslie J.; Village, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Northern Ireland has been and remains a religiously divided community. This study sets out to examine outgroup prejudice among a sample of 1799 13-15-year-old students attending Catholic or Protestant schools and employs both bivariate analyses and hierarchical modelling to chart the associations between outgroup prejudice and personal factors…

  2. Progression of impairment in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder through the transition out of high school: Contributions of parent involvement and college attendance.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrea L; Strickland, Noelle J; Murray, Desiree W; Tamm, Leanne; Swanson, James M; Hinshaw, Stephen P; Arnold, L Eugene; Molina, Brooke S G

    2016-02-01

    Long-term, prospective follow-up studies of children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show that symptoms tend to decline with age, but impairments in daily life functioning often persist into adulthood. We examined the developmental progression of impairments before and after the transition out of high school in relation to parent involvement during adolescence, parent support during adulthood, and college attendance, using 8 waves of data from the prospective 16-year follow-up of the Multimodal Treatment of ADHD (MTA) study. Participants were 548 proband children diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) ADHD Combined Type and 258 age- and sex-matched comparison children (Local Normative Comparison Group; LNCG) randomly sampled from probands' schools. Impairment was assessed consistently by parent report from childhood through adulthood. Results showed that impairment worsens over time both before and after the transition to adulthood for those with ADHD histories, in contrast to non-ADHD peers, whose impairments remained stably low over time. However, impairment stabilized after leaving high school for young adults with ADHD histories who attended college. Involved parenting in adolescence was associated with less impairment overall. Attending college was associated with a stable post-high school trajectory of impairment regardless of parents' involvement during adolescence, but young adults with histories of involved parenting and who attended college were the least impaired overall. PMID:26854508

  3. The Internalization of Jewish Values by Children Attending Orthodox Jewish Schools, and Its Relationship to Autonomy-Supportive Parenting and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lori R.; Milyavskaya, Marina; Koestner, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the way in which children attending Orthodox Jewish schools internalize the value of both their Jewish studies and secular studies, as well as the value of Jewish cultural practices. A distinction was made between identified internalization, where children perceive Jewish studies and Jewish culture to be an important…

  4. Social and Musical Objectives or Experiences School Music Teachers Anticipate Their Students Will Achieve as a Result of Attending a Summer Music Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate specific social and musical objectives or experiences school music teachers anticipate their students will achieve as a result of attending a summer music camp. A survey instrument was developed to collect demographic data and responses to questions regarding 14 specific musical and social variables.…

  5. The Effects of an Extended Learning Program on Students with Visual Impairments in Grades Four through Eight Attending a Specialized School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kim Sadler

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an extended learning program on mathematics achievement and self-determination skills for students with visual impairments in grades four through eight attending a specialized school in a southern state. The research population consisted of the total enrollment of students in grades four through eight attending…

  6. Effects of College Educational Debt on Graduate School Attendance and Early Career and Lifestyle Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how college educational debt affects various post-baccalaureate decisions of bachelor's degree recipients. I employ the Baccalaureate and Beyond 93/97 survey data. Using college-aid policies as instrumental variables to correct for the endogeneity of student college debt level, I find that for public college graduates, college…

  7. Factors Affecting Role Stress and Burnout among School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Wendy Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine factors affecting role stress and burnout among practicing school counselors as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educators Survey (MBI-ES) and the Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scale. The MBI-ES utilizes three subscales to measure burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal…

  8. Cognitive and Affective Learning Outcomes of Gifted Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcourt, Marcia A. B.; Cornell, Dewey G.; Goldberg, Marc D.

    2007-01-01

    This project was a 2-year investigation of elementary school children placed in programs for high-ability learners. The primary purpose of the study was to investigate academic and affective changes in students during their first 2 years in a gifted program. Students were assessed during the fall of one year and the spring of the next year.…

  9. Yoga in Public School Improves Adolescent Mood and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felver, Joshua C.; Butzer, Bethany; Olson, Katherine J.; Smith, Iona M.; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to directly compare the acute effects of participating in a single yoga class versus a single standard physical education (PE) class on student mood. Forty-seven high school students completed self-report questionnaires assessing mood and affect immediately before and after participating in a single yoga class…

  10. Pre-existing adversity, level of child protection involvement, and school attendance predict educational outcomes in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Miriam J; Taylor, Catherine L; O'Donnell, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Maltreatment largely occurs in a multiple-risk context. The few large studies adjusting for confounding factors have raised doubts about whether low educational achievement results from maltreatment or co-occurring risk factors. This study examined prevalence, risk and protective factors for low educational achievement among children involved with the child protection system compared to other children. We conducted a population-based record-linkage study of children born in Western Australia who sat national Year 3 reading achievement tests between 2008 and 2010 (N=46,838). The longitudinal study linked data from the Western Australian Department of Education, Department of Child Protection and Family Support, Department of Health, and the Disability Services Commission. Children with histories of child protection involvement (unsubstantiated maltreatment reports, substantiations or out-of-home care placement) were at three-fold increased risk of low reading scores. Adjusting for socio-demographic adversity partially attenuated the increased risk, however risk remained elevated overall and for substantiated (OR=1.68) and unsubstantiated maltreatment (OR=1.55). Risk of low reading scores in the out-of-home care group was fully attenuated after adjusting for socio-demographic adversity (OR=1.16). Attendance was significantly higher in the out-of-home care group and served a protective role. Neglect, sexual abuse, and physical abuse were associated with low reading scores. Pre-existing adversity was also significantly associated with achievement. Results support policies and practices to engage children and families in regular school attendance, and highlight a need for further strategies to prevent maltreatment and disadvantage from restricting children's opportunities for success. PMID:26626345

  11. Dietary habits of young people attending secondary schools serving a multiethnic, inner‐city community in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Margaret A; Bankart, John; Sinfield, Paul; Talbot, Diane; Farooqi, Azhar; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2007-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is an escalating health concern with important implications, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although South Asians in the UK have an increased risk of developing these conditions, detailed studies on their lifestyles including the dietary habits of young people are scarce. Methods As part of an action research project, a food intake questionnaire was used to survey the dietary habits of 11–15‐year olds attending five inner‐city schools serving a predominantly South Asian population. Food choices were considered in the overall sample and in South Asians compared with white Europeans. Results 3418 (72% of registered pupils) responses were obtained. A subset of 3018 pupils could be categorised as either South Asian (86%) or white European (14%). Around one fifth of pupils started the school day without eating anything. Responses indicated high consumption of “negative” foods such as sweets, including Asian sweets (63%), but lower rates for “positive” foods such as vegetables (34%). In the full sample, 26% said they had consumed more than one can of sugar‐sweetened fizzy drink and 17% reported eating more than one packet of full‐fat crisps on the previous day. Poor dietary habits were indicated in both South Asian and white European pupils. Conclusions Our large‐scale survey confirmed poor dietary habits in secondary school pupils from a multiethnic community. Urgent efforts are needed to find ways of encouraging healthy lifestyles, particularly in populations with a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:17308215

  12. Dental pain among 10–15 year old children attending oral health promoting schools: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Saheer, Abdul; Kousalya, Pallavi Swami; Raju, Rekha; Gubbihal, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dental pain is a major public health problem and one of the consequences of oral diseases which requires significant adjustments in life management leading to decreased quality of life. Objective: To assess prevalence of dental pain and its impact on daily life and to explore its relationship with oral health behavior and clinical oral status among 10-15 year old school children attending oral health promoting schools. Method: This cross sectional study was conducted in 6 schools serving low -middle socio economic strata in Bangalore, India. A total of 1237 children were surveyed for history of dental pain during past 3 month. Participants who reported dental pain completed self-reported oral health behaviour and Child dental pain questionnaire. Clinical oral examination included assessment of dental caries, periodontal status. Data was analyzed using t - test, Chi-square test, ANOVA and Regression Analysis. Results: Prevalence of dental pain was 15.6% (n = 194). Among children with pain, 17%, 43% and 40% reported mild, moderate and severe pain. Impact on daily activities was reported by 66%. Mean DMFT and DMFS was 1.80 and 2.11 Mean deft and defs was 2.47 and 3.41. Multiple logistic regression revealed that severity and impact of dental pain was associated with gender, frequency of tooth brushing, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience. Conclusion: Prevalence of Dental pain is associated with brushing behavior, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience, showing need for further attention to these conditions and a need to strengthen preventive and therapeutic dental services. PMID:26942112

  13. Community Schools--Producing Results that Turn around Failing Schools: Test Scores, Attendance, Graduation, College-Going Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Community Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Coalition for Community Schools, housed at the Institute for Educational Leadership, is an alliance of national, state and local organizations in education K-16, youth development, community planning and development, family support, health and human services, government and philanthropy as well as national, state and local community school…

  14. Nutritional Status of Adolescents Attending the Iranian Secondary School in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Maryam; MSL, Huang; Taib, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Zarei, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim or this study was to determine factors associated with body weight status among Iranian adolescents in the two Secondary Schools run by the Embassy in Kuala Lumpur. Methods: A self administered questionnaire was used to assess socio demographic characteristics, physical activity, and body image. Dietary intake was recorded through individual interviews with the researcher. The Physical Activity Questionnaire for children (PAQ-C) was used to evaluate levels of physical activity of the adolescents. Results: One-third (32.2%) of respondents were of normal weight, 14.5% and 11.1% were overweight and obese respectively, while 18.6% and 23.6% were severe thinness and thinness respectively. While the distribution of obese respondents by gender was almost the same, overweight females (16.4%) exceeded overweight males (12.7%) and although more females were in the thinness category (24.7% compared to 22.7%), more males were severely thin (20.0%) compared to 17.1% of the females. Body weight status was significantly associated with age (p < 0.05), gender (p < 0.05) and grade (p < 0.05). Males had significantly higher physically activity scores than females (p < 0.05). Intake of all micronutrients were higher than Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), except for vitamins B1, B2, C, D and E, Folate, Zinc, Magnesium, Potassium, Calcium and Phosphorus. There was a tendency for the females to overestimate their weight and 72.6% of them expressed their desire to lose weight while 60% of the males wanted to gain weight. There was also significant association between body weight status and perception of ideal body size (p = 0.000) and healthy body size (p = 0.000). Conclusion: This study provides some information for the Iranian Secondary school to design intervention programs to improve the body weight status of their students. PMID:25363094

  15. Successful Attendance Policies and Programs. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Partnerships, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    What steps can be taken to assure that High School students have the best attendance possible? It is commonly believed and well supported by research that students who attend school regularly are more successful than those who do not. The challenge for high schools is to design and implement attendance policies and programs that monitor,…

  16. Student Attendance: Research and Strategies. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Howard

    2005-01-01

    What are the characteristics of successful student attendance programs for the high school? It is commonly believed and well supported by research that students who attend school regularly are more successful than those who do not. The challenge for high schools is to design and implement attendance policies and programs that monitor, encourage,…

  17. Compulsory Attendance vs. Home Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Jerry C.

    Most states require compulsory attendance of students through age 16. Challenges to the compulsory attendance laws often derive from disputes between parents and school officials over home instruction. This paper reviews prominent court cases that address legal issues pertaining to home schooling. The landmark case of "Pierce v. Society of…

  18. Non-Sexual Transmission of Trichomonas vaginalis in Adolescent Girls Attending School in Ndola, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Crucitti, Tania; Jespers, Vicky; Mulenga, Chanda; Khondowe, Shepherd; Vandepitte, Judith; Buvé, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for trichomoniasis among young women in Ndola, Zambia. Method The study was a cross-sectional study among adolescent girls aged 13-16 years in Ndola, Zambia. Study participants were recruited from schools in selected administrative areas that represented the different socio-economic strata in town. Consenting participants were interviewed about their socio-demographic characteristics; sexual behaviour; and hygiene practices. Self-administered vaginal swabs were tested for Trichomonas vaginalis. HSV-2 antibodies were determined on serum to validate the self-reported sexual activity. Results A total of 460 girls participated in the study. The overall prevalence of trichomoniasis was 27.1%, 33.9% among girls who reported that they had ever had sex and 24.7% among virgins. In multivariate analysis the only statistically significant risk factor for trichomoniasis was inconsistent use of soap. For the virgins, none of the risk factors was significantly associated with trichomoniasis, but the association with use of soap (not always versus always) and type of toilet used (pit latrine/bush versus flush toilet) was of borderline significance. Conclusion We found a high prevalence of trichomoniasis in girls in Ndola who reported that they had never had sex. We postulate that the high prevalence of trichomoniasis in virgins in Ndola is due to non-sexual transmission of trichomoniasis via shared bathing water and inconsistent use of soap. PMID:21305023

  19. Factors Affecting Children's Judgement of Culturally Deviant Acts: Findings from an International School in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsuki, Aya; Tanaka, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between perceptions of culturally deviant acts and multicultural experiences of elementary-school children attending an international school in Japan. Findings indicated that children judged a Japanese harsher than a foreigner, irrespective of the children's age. It was also found that younger children were…

  20. Understanding How Participation in an After School Arts Program Affects Students in Their General Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gacherieu, Dustin R.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to answer the question: "When ethnically diverse fourth- and fifth-grade students participate in a ten-week musical program, are there any shifts in the following: academic performance, attitude towards school, social skills, self-esteem, public speaking ability, and/or school attendance?" This study was conducted at an…

  1. School Refusal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmer, Mary

    2008-01-01

    School attendance is an ongoing concern for administrators, particularly in middle level and high school. Frequent absences affect student learning, test scores, and social development. Absenteeism is often the result of emotional disorders, such as anxiety or depression. Administrators who understand the causes of school refusal behavior and are…

  2. Anxiety symptoms in young people with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools: Associations with gender, adaptive functioning and autism symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Magiati, Iliana; Ong, Clarissa; Lim, Xin Yi; Tan, Julianne Wen-Li; Ong, Amily Yi Lin; Patrycia, Ferninda; Fung, Daniel Shuen Sheng; Sung, Min; Poon, Kenneth K; Howlin, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Anxiety-related problems are among the most frequently reported mental health difficulties in autism spectrum disorder. As most research has focused on clinical samples or high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder, less is known about the factors associated with anxiety in community samples across the ability range. This cross-sectional study examined the association of gender, age, adaptive functioning and autism symptom severity with different caregiver-reported anxiety symptoms. Participants were caregivers of 241 children (6-18 years old) with autism spectrum disorder attending special schools in Singapore. Measures included the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and assessments of overall emotional, behavioural and adaptive functioning. Caregivers reported more anxiety symptoms in total, but fewer social anxiety symptoms, than Spence Children's Anxiety Scale Australian/Dutch norms. There were no gender differences. Variance in total anxiety scores was best explained by severity of repetitive speech/stereotyped behaviour symptoms, followed by adaptive functioning. Severity of repetitive speech/behaviour symptoms was a significant predictor of separation anxiety, generalized anxiety, panic/agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive subscale symptoms, but not of social phobia and physical injury fears. Adaptive functioning and chronological age predicted social phobia and generalized anxiety symptoms only. Severity of social/communication autism symptoms did not explain any anxiety symptoms, when the other variables were controlled for. Findings are discussed in relation to the existing literature. Limitations and possible implications for prevention, assessment and intervention are also discussed. PMID:25916865

  3. The Impact of a School-Based Enterprise Program on the Achievement and Behavior of Special Education Students Attending High Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilot, Grover Cleve

    2011-01-01

    Our nation's K-12 schools are faced with numerous critical challenges that affect student achievement and consequently impact society. Key challenges, such as elevating academic achievement, meeting state and No Child Left Behind (NCLB) standards, high dropout rates, at-risk students, parental involvement, and the recruitment and retention of…

  4. High School Substance Use as a Predictor of College Attendance, Completion, and Dropout: A National Multicohort Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Megan E.; Schulenberg, John E.; O'Malley, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    National data from Monitoring the Future were used to examine patterns and predictors of college attendance. Samples of American 12th-grade students from 1977 to 2003 were followed for 7 years (modal ages 18-25; N = 10,020). College attendance and graduation patterns varied considerably over historical time and based on family background.…

  5. Factors That Affect Quality of Life among People Living with HIV Attending an Urban Clinic in Uganda: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mutabazi-Mwesigire, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and primary general care for people living with HIV (PLHIV) in resource limited settings, PLHIV are living longer, and HIV has been transformed into a chronic illness. People are diagnosed and started on treatment when they are relatively well. Although ART results in clinical improvement, the ultimate goal of treatment is full physical functioning and general well-being, with a focus on quality of life rather than clinical outcomes. However, there has been little research on the relationship of specific factors to quality of life in PLHIV. The objective of this study was to investigate factors associated with quality of life among PLHIV in Uganda receiving basic care and those on ART. Methods We enrolled 1274 patients attending an HIV outpatient clinic into a prospective cohort study. Of these, 640 received ART. All were followed up at 3 and 6 months. Health related quality of life was assessed with the MOS-HIV Health Survey and the Global Person Generated Index (GPGI). Multivariate linear regression and logistic regression with generalized estimating equations were used to examine the relationship of social behavioral and disease factors with Physical Health Summary (PHS) score, Mental Health Summary (MHS) score, and GPGI. Results Among PLHIV receiving basic care, PHS was associated with: sex (p=0.045) - females had lower PHS; age in years at enrollment (p=0.0001) - older patients had lower PHS; and depression (p<0.001) - depressed patients had lower PHS. MHS was only associated with opportunistic infection (p=0.01) - presence of an opportunistic infection was associated with lower MHS. For the GPG the associated variables were age (p=0.03) - older patients had lower GPGI; education (p=0.01) – higher education associated with higher GPGI; and depression - patients with depression had a lower GPGI (p<0.001). Among patients on ART, PHS was associated with: study visit (p=0.01), with increase in

  6. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Meeting the Challenge of Combating Chronic Absenteeism: Impact of the NYC Mayor's Interagency Task Force on Chronic Absenteeism and School Attendance and Its Implications for Other Cities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an intervention designed to reduce rates of chronic student absenteeism in New York City public schools. The study authors reported that schools participating in the intervention experienced greater reductions in rates of student chronic absenteeism than the comparison schools. Students who attended the…

  7. Factors affecting nutritional status of Malaysian primary school children.

    PubMed

    Zaini, M Z Anuar; Lim, C T; Low, W Y; Harun, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the nutritional status of a randomly selected cohort of school children and the factors affecting it. This random survey was conducted in the state of Selangor, involving 1,405 primary students (aged 9-10 years from 54 national primary schools). Physical examination was carried out on all the students. Information on the students was also obtained from the parents. Blood samples were taken by using the finger pricking technique. Body mass index (BMI) was used as a measure of physical growth. The students were mainly from urban areas (82.9%). The mean age was 9.71 years and a higher proportion was females (51%). Malays constituted 83.6%, Indians 11.6% and Chinese 4.2% of the study population. The mean weight and height were 32.30 kg and 135.18 cm respectively. The mean BMI was 17.42 kg/m2, with 1.2% of the students underweight, 76.3% normal BMI, 16.3% overweight and 6.3% were obese. Nutritional status was significantly related to blood pressure, history of breast feeding, eating fast food, taking canned/bottled drinks, income and educational level of parents. Significant differences in nutritional status between sexes and locations (rural/urban) were also found. The prevalence of overweight and obese children was of concern. There is thus an urgent need for the School Health Program to periodically monitor the school children's eating habits and physical growth. Appropriate counselling on nutritional intake and physical activities should be given not only to schoolchildren but also to their teachers and parents or caregivers. PMID:16425649

  8. The Effect of Regular Participation in an After-School Program on Student Achievement, Attendance, and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastchal-Temple, Andrea Sheree

    2012-01-01

    Many school districts are using research-based strategies to increase student achievement. The "No Child Left Behind Act" of 2001 was created and implemented to assist all students becoming proficient in reading and mathematics by 2014. One strategy many school districts implemented includes an after-school program. One school district…

  9. The Effects of 21st Century Community Learning Center Programs on Math, Reading, and School Attendance in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Sharonda

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between after-school programs and standardized assessment results of schools in Texas. Information was collected from the Texas Education Agency (TEA) website including Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) reports and after-school grantees. The independent variables were after-school 21st Century…

  10. How Can a Traditional Greek Dances Programme Affect the Motor Proficiency of Pre-School Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venetsanou, Fotini; Kambas, Antonis

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the effect of an introductory traditional Greek dances programme on the motor proficiency development of pre-school-age children. The sample of this research consisted of 66 students (36 boys and 30 girls) attending public kindergarten in Argolida prefecture (Greece), aged 4-6 years (X = 59.79 plus or…

  11. How Teachers Values Affect Their Evaluation of Children of Immigrants: Findings from Islamic and Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirin, Selcuk R.; Ryce, Patrice; Mir, Madeeha

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the implications of how teachers' views of immigrant parents predict their ratings of first-grade students' academic competence and behavioral problems. Teachers rated 191 first-grade immigrant students attending Islamic and public schools in the Northeast United States. The results showed that when teachers perceived parents…

  12. Analysis of Two Urban Middle Schools: Factors Affecting Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, V. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Because of increasing student enrollment, a new school was formed in a small low-income Southern California school district. Teachers could choose to transfer to the new school or remain at the existing school. Over five years, quantitative analyses of demographic data showed little differences between the two schools across the years except for a…

  13. QuickStats: Percentage* of Medically Attended Injury Episodes(†) That Resulted in Time Lost from Work(§) or School,(¶) by Number of Days Lost - National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    During 2011-2014, an average of 15.6 million medically attended injury episodes were reported annually among employed persons aged ≥13 years. Nearly half of these injury episodes resulted in time lost from work: 7% for <1 day, 26% for 1-5 days, and 15% for ≥6 days. An average of 9.4 million medically attended injury episodes were reported annually among persons aged ≥5 years who attended school. More than one third of these injury episodes resulted in time lost from school: 9% for <1 day, 25% for 1-5 days, and 3% for ≥6 days. PMID:27388767

  14. Changes in a middle school food environment affect food behavior and food choices.

    PubMed

    Wordell, Doug; Daratha, Kenn; Mandal, Bidisha; Bindler, Ruth; Butkus, Sue Nicholson

    2012-01-01

    Increasing rates of obesity among children ages 12 to 19 years have led to recommendations to alter the school food environment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are associations between an altered school food environment and food choices of middle school students both in and outside of school. In a midsized western city, two of six middle schools allowed only bottled water in vending machines, only milk and fruit on à la carte menus, and offered a seasonal fruit and vegetable bar. Three years after the intervention was initiated, seventh- and eighth-grade students attending the two intervention schools and four control middle schools were surveyed about their food choices. A total of 2,292 surveys were completed. Self-reported frequency of consumption for nine food groups in the survey was low; consumption was higher outside than in school. Boys consumed more milk than girls although girls consumed more fruits and vegetables. Significant socioeconomic differences existed. Compared with students who paid the full lunch fee, students qualifying for free and reduced-price meals consumed more milk and juice in schools but less outside school; more candy and energy drinks in school; and more sweet drinks, candy, pastries, and energy drinks outside school. Students in intervention schools were 24% more likely to consume milk outside school, 27% less likely to consume juice in school, and 56% less likely to consume sweet pastries in school. There were no differences in fruit and vegetable consumption reported by children in control and intervention schools. Overall, there was a positive association between a modified school food environment and student food behavior in and outside school. Policies related to the school food environment are an important strategy to address the obesity epidemic in our country. PMID:22709644

  15. At-Risk Youth in Crisis: A Handbook for Collaboration between Schools and Social Services. Volume 5: Attendance Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn-Benton Education Services District, Albany, OR.

    Guidelines for responding to immediate crisis situations in attendance and strategies for longterm prevention are presented in this handbook, which stresses the need for interagency cooperation. The handbook serves as a model for both content and process, with the ultimate aim of promoting an arena in which the most appropriate service delivery…

  16. Public, Catholic Single-Sex, and Catholic Coeducational High Schools: Their Effects on Achievement, Affect, and Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.

    1991-01-01

    Using data from the High School and Beyond survey, compares junior and senior year performance and other variables in Catholic single sex, Catholic coed, and public schools. Finds Catholic school students are urged to take more academically demanding courses; this accounts for public/Catholic differences in achievement and university attendance.…

  17. The contribution of schools to supporting the well being of children affected by HIV in eastern Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Pufall, Erica L.; Gregson, Simon; Eaton, Jeffrey W.; Masoka, Tidings; Mpandaguta, Edith; Andersen, Louise; Skovdal, Morten; Nyamukapa, Constance; Campbell, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Schools are often cited as a source of support for orphans and children affected by HIV/AIDS in populations experiencing generalized HIV epidemics and severe poverty. Here we investigate the success of schools at including and supporting the well being of vulnerable children in rural Zimbabwe. Design Data from a cross-sectional household survey of 4577 children (aged 6–17 years), conducted between 2009 and 2011, were linked to data on the characteristics of 28 primary schools and 18 secondary schools from a parallel monitoring and evaluation facility survey. Methods We construct two measures of school quality (one general and one HIV-specific) and use multivariable regression to test whether these were associated with improved educational outcomes and well being for vulnerable children. Results School quality was not associated with primary or secondary school attendance, but was associated with children’s being in the correct grade for age [adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2–3.5, P = 0.01]. General and HIV-specific school quality had significant positive effects on well being in the primary school-age children (coefficient 5.1, 95% CI 2.4–7.7, P < 0.01 and coefficient 3.0, 95% CI 0.4–5.6, P = 0.02, respectively), but not in the secondary school-age children (P > 0.2). There was no evidence that school quality provided an additional benefit to the well being of vulnerable children. Community HIV prevalence was negatively associated with well being in the secondary school-age children (coefficient −0.7, 95% CI −1.3 to −0.1, P = 0.03). Conclusions General and HIV-specific school quality may enhance the well being of primary school-age children in eastern Zimbabwe. Local community context also plays an important role in child well being. PMID:24991911

  18. Effects of Attending Single-Sex and Coeducational High Schools on Achievement, Attitudes, Behaviors, and Sex Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of single-sex versus coeducational arrangements were compared for 2,332 Catholic high school students representing 21 single-sex boys', 26 single-sex girls', and 33 coeducational schools. Various outcomes during the sophomore-to-senior period were nearly unaffected by school type. These findings contradict those of earlier national…

  19. Performance Levels in Science and Other Subjects for Jamaican Adolescents Attending Single-Sex and Co-Educational High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marlene A.

    1985-01-01

    Examination results from 1146 Jamaican high school students in single-sex and coeducational schools indicated students from coeducational schools had lower performance on all measures. A subsample provided more information on sex differences, performance in individual subjects, and students receiving grades of A or B. (DH)

  20. Crackdown on Attendance--The Word Is Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Richard

    1983-01-01

    Procedures successful for one school in establishing good attendance include phone calls on all unexplained absences, discipline for unexcused absences, incentives for good attendance, charting attendance patterns, and staff coordination for monitoring attendance. Increased state aid, a more positive school climate, and greater student achievement…

  1. A Win-Win Solution: The Empirical Evidence on How Vouchers Affect Public Schools. School Choice Issues in Depth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This report collects the results of all available empirical studies on how vouchers affect academic achievement in public schools. Contrary to the widespread claim that vouchers hurt public schools, it finds that the empirical evidence consistently supports the conclusion that vouchers improve public schools. No empirical study has ever found that…

  2. HIV-Affected Children and Adolescents: What School Social Workers Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dorie J.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of issues facing HIV-affected children and adolescents and aims to help school social workers become better equipped to recognize the secondary effects of the AIDS epidemic among HIV-affected children. Concludes with recommendations for addressing the needs of HIV-affected children and adolescents through school social work.…

  3. The Relationship of Selected Academic and Educational Factors on Student Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Sharon K.

    2009-01-01

    Truancy (student attendance) is a serious concern that affects most school districts across the country. Truancy is a statistic that seems to elude school districts in coming up with an exact number, but they do know it exists. The reason this is so is because of a lack of a true definition of truancy. Statistics have shown that students skip…

  4. An Evaluative Study of the Need for Revision or Inclusion in the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges Standards Items Relative to Computer Literacy and Programming; Student Conduct and Attendance; and Length of Student Day/Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, James; Steadman, David G.

    In response to recent national reports on educational excellence and effective schools, the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges commissioned research and recommendations for possible standards and policy revision or implementation in three areas: (1) student conduct and attendance; (2) length of the student day/year and more effectively…

  5. Teaching School Science within the Cognitive and Affective Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kok Siang; Heng, Chong Yong; Tan, Shuhui

    2013-01-01

    In classrooms, science is usually taught within the cognitive domain while the psychomotor learning domain is achieved through performing science experiments in the laboratory. Although students attend civic and moral education and pastoral care classes where values and life skills are often taught directly, learning experiences in most school…

  6. High School Employment, School Performance, and College Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chanyoung; Orazem, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    The proportion of U.S. high school students working during the school year ranges from 23% in the freshman year to 75% in the senior year. This study estimates how cumulative work histories during the high school years affect probability of dropout, high school academic performance, and the probability of attending college. Variations in…

  7. Asthma Status and Severity Affects Missed School Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonie, Sheniz A.; Sterling, David A.; Figgs, Larry; Castro, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Excessive school absence disrupts learning and is a strong predictor of premature school dropout. School-aged children with asthma are absent more often compared to their healthy peers without asthma; yet, the causes are inadequately documented. We sought to determine the difference in mean absence days between children with and without asthma,…

  8. Variables Affecting Academic Achievement in New Mexico Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.; Martellaro, Helena C.

    To determine if a relationship can be found between school size and academic achievement, a study examined correlations for 566 New Mexico public schools (grades 5, 8, and 11) from 1978 to 1981. The measure of academic achievement used was the schools' average "total scale score" on the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills. The two questions to be…

  9. Household Constraints on Schooling by Gender: Empirical Evidence from Ethiopia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Pauline; Al-Samarrai, Samer

    2001-01-01

    Examines individual and household characteristics that affect the probability of a boy or girl attending and completing primary school in two regions of Ethiopia. Finds that school attendance was related to household wealth, parents' education, and child's nutritional status, while completion was affected more by economic constraints and, for…

  10. Evaluating the Impact of a Summer Dropout Prevention Program for Incoming Freshmen Attending an Under-Resourced High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Elizabeth; Shriberg, David; Alves, Alison; de Oca, Jessie Montes; Reker, Kassandra; Roche, Meghan; Salgado, Manuel; Stegmaier, Jessica; Viellieu, Lindsay; Karahalios, Vicky; Knoll, Michael; Adams, Kristen; Diaz, Yahaira; Rau, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Low high school completion rates are an ongoing challenge for educators. This study provides the results of an evaluation of a ninth-grade summer transition program offered at a large public school with a high freshman dropout rate. The evaluation consisted of preprogram and postprogram surveys and interviews with 64 incoming freshman…

  11. Young People with Intellectual Disabilities Attending Mainstream and Segregated Schooling: Perceived Stigma, Social Comparison and Future Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, G.; Jahoda, A.; Gumley, A.; Knott, F.

    2006-01-01

    `Mainstream schooling is a key policy in the promotion of social inclusion of young people with learning disabilities. Yet there is limited evidence about the school experience of young people about to leave mainstream as compared with segregated education, and how it impacts on their relative view of self and future aspirations. Methods: Sixty…

  12. Working with "Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning" (SEAL): Associations with School Ethos, Pupil Social Experiences, Attendance, and Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Robin; Weare, Katherine; Farr, William

    2014-01-01

    A programme of resources and activities relating to "Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning" (SEAL) has been rolled out nationally to primary and secondary schools in the UK, but we know little about how variations in the implementation of this work relate to key indicators of school success. In the present study, a team of experienced…

  13. Examining the Effects of Gender, Poverty, Attendance, and Ethnicity on Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry Performance in a Public High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiq, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades school accountability for student performance has become an issue at the forefront of education. The federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and various regulations by individual states have set standards for student performance at both the district and individual public and charter school levels, and certain…

  14. Accessing Stem-Focused Education: Factors That Contribute to the Opportunity to Attend Stem High Schools across the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers-Chapman, M. Felicity

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, policy makers, researchers, and educators have focused on the preparation of individuals in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. One popular policy lever is STEM-focused high schools. The purpose of this study is to identify which student populations have access to STEM secondary schools. By comparing…

  15. Physical Activity, Dietary Practices, and Other Health Behaviors of At-Risk Youth Attending Alternative High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lytle, Leslie; Fulkerson, Jayne A.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the interest of alternative high school staff in intervention research on students' eating and physical activity habits and the feasibility of conducting such research in alternative school settings. A two-phase descriptive design incorporated both quantitative and qualitative methods. In fall/winter 2001-2002, alternative high…

  16. The Association Between Pupil Attendance and Socio-Economic Status in the Community School Districts of New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Bernard R.; And Others

    In discharging its constitutional responsibility for maintaining and supporting free public schools, the state financially aids local school districts to insure that lack of wealth is not an obstacle to providing at least a mimimum educational program. State aid to education in New York State is dependent on two factors: the full value of real…

  17. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  18. Factors Affecting the Involvement of Teachers in Guidance and Counselling as a Whole-School Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Sarah K. Y.; Hui, Eadaoin K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores factors affecting the involvement of regular secondary school teachers in the whole-school approach to guidance and counselling by interviewing 12 secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. Emerging themes include teachers' ownership of their role in student guidance and counselling, the alignment of their disposition with…

  19. The Path Not Taken: How Does School Organization Affect Eighth-Grade Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Stiefel, Leanna; Rubenstein, Ross; Zabel, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Although rearranging school organizational features is a popular school reform, little research exists to inform policymakers about how grade spans affect achievement. This article examines how grade spans and the school transitions that students make between fourth and eighth grade shape student performance in eighth grade. The authors estimate…

  20. Learning How To Learn: An Affective Curriculum for Students at Risk of Dropping Out of School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Thom

    Environmental Readiness Learning (ERL) is the affective curriculum component developed by the Bedford Stuyvesant Street Academy (New York) to improve the behavior, academic achievement, and self-esteem of urban high school students with histories of prior school failure. The program design reflects the school's philosophy that educational success…

  1. School and Classroom Goal Structures: Effects on Affective Responses in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Koidou, Eirini; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Grouios, George

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the relative impact of school and classroom goal structures on students' affective responses and the mediating role of motivation. The sample of the study consisted of 368 high school students, who completed measures of school and classroom goal structures, motivational regulations in physical education, boredom, and…

  2. Trends and Issues Affecting School Facilities in Rural America: Challenges and Opportunities for Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Sarah; Earthman, Glen

    School facilities needs in rural America and the means to meet them are affected by rural population trends, building inadequacies and obsolescence, and financial problems. Overall, America's schools have seen increased public school enrollments since the mid-1980s, but rural enrollments have declined, particularly in communities with fewer than…

  3. The Effect of High School Shootings on Schools and Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Louis-Philippe; Kim, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze how fatal shootings in high schools affect schools and students using data from shooting databases, school report cards, and the Common Core of Data. We examine schools' test scores, enrollment, number of teachers, graduation, attendance, and suspension rates at schools that experienced a shooting, employing a difference-in-differences…

  4. Evaluation of the Computerized Attendance Mailer System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, JoAnne E.

    This evaluation study addresses the effectiveness of weekly attendance mailer letters sent to parents of students with irregular attendance patterns at 22 Detroit, Michigan, high schools. Three questions researched were: (1) Are the letters effective in reducing the occurrence of in-school truancy? (2) Are letters an effective means of…

  5. Factors Affecting Technology Uses in Schools: An Ecological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Yong; Frank, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    Why is technology not used more in schools? Many researchers have tried to solve this persistent puzzle. The authors of this article report on their study of technology uses in 19 schools. They suggest an ecological metaphor, using the example of the introduction of the zebra mussel into the Great Lakes, to integrate and organize sets of factors…

  6. Evaluating School Improvement Plans and Their Affect on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a school improvement plan (SIP) has become an integral part of many school reform efforts. However, there are almost no studies that empirically examine the effectiveness of SIPs. The few studies examining the planning activities of organizations have generally focused on the private sector and have not provided clear or…

  7. Factors Affecting the Performance of Public Schools in Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattar, Dorine M.

    2012-01-01

    By sampling extreme cases (five high-performing schools and five low-performing ones), the researcher revealed the differences in the teachers' motivation (Mattar, 2010) as well as the extent to which Principals adopted the instructional leadership style (Mattar, 2012) in the two sets of schools. Here, she looked for additional issues, within the…

  8. Factors Affecting Teacher Satisfaction in an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpert, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to distinguish factors that influence the satisfaction levels of teachers in urban school districts. This work also distinguished factors that directly impacted teachers' level of satisfaction towards their work and their attitude towards the administration of their schools. Forty-one teachers from two kindergarten…

  9. The response of 1578 school leavers to a campaign combining commercial, Health Boards' and GDPs' sponsorship in an effort to improve dental attendance.

    PubMed

    Craven, R; Blinkhorn, A S; Schou, L

    1993-03-20

    A dental health promotion campaign was developed by Forth Valley Health Board in conjunction with the Scottish Health Education Group and the Department of Marketing at Strathclyde University. The aim was to encourage dental attendance among early school leavers. The emphasis was on the contribution of dental care to appearance and attractiveness. To highlight the importance of appearance, a major clothing retailer offered discounts on clothes to participants who made a dental visit. The impact of the campaign was evaluated by a questionnaire 3 months after its close. Recall of the campaign was high at 62% and 16% actually initiated a dental visit. However, only 2% claimed that the campaign was their main reason for attending. The project demonstrated the feasibility of collaboration between a commercial company and a health board in a health promotion effort. The results underline the difficulties in initiating a behaviour change, overcoming apathy and modifying the lack of felt need for dental care among the age group concerned. It does, however, suggest that there is potential for a more prolonged marketing effort. PMID:8448061

  10. 12 month changes in dietary intake of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities following the NEAT Girls cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Collins, Clare E; Dewar, Deborah L; Schumacher, Tracy L; Finn, Tara; Morgan, Philip J; Lubans, David R

    2014-02-01

    Poor dietary habits and obesity are more prevalent in lower socio-economic status (SES) communities. The NEAT Girls cluster randomized controlled trial was a school-based obesity prevention program targeting adolescent girls in low SES schools in NSW, Australia. The aim was to evaluate the 12-month impact of key nutrition program messages on dietary intake and food behaviors. Diet was assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Individual foods were categorized into nutrient-dense or energy-dense, nutrient-poor food groups and the percentage contribution to total energy intake calculated. Participants were aged 13.2±0.5years (n=330). There were no statistically significant group-by-time effects for dietary intake or food related behaviors, with 12-month trends suggesting more intervention group girls had improved water intakes (59% consuming⩽three glasses per day to 54% at 12 months vs. 50% to 61% in controls, p=0.052), with a greater proportion consuming < one sweetened beverage per day (24-41% vs. 34-37% in controls, p=0.057). Further research including more intensive nutrition intervention strategies are required to evaluate whether dietary intake in adolescent girls attending schools in low SES communities can be optimized. PMID:24239513

  11. Cheaper by the Dozen: Using Sibling Discounts at Catholic Schools to Estimate the Price Elasticity of Private School Attendance. NBER Working Paper No. 15461

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dynarski, Susan; Gruber, Jonathan; Li, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    The effect of vouchers on sorting between private and public schools depends upon the price elasticity of demand for private schooling. Estimating this elasticity is empirically challenging because prices and quantities are jointly determined in the market for private schooling. We exploit a unique and previously undocumented source of variation…

  12. An Examination of the Impact That Selected School Characteristics Have on the Academic Achievement of Students Attending High Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of school locale, size and poverty levels (SES) on student achievement has been of great interest in school research for more than the last five decades. The increasing public demand to hold schools accountable for their effects on student outcomes lends urgency to the task of exploring variables related to student achievement that are…

  13. Charter Schools... Taking a Closer Look: How Charter Schools Operate, Who Attends Them, How They Are Distinctive, and How They Fare Academically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulkley, Katrina E.

    2012-01-01

    Since the adoption of the first charter school law in Minnesota in 1991, charter schools have received considerable attention. Three U.S. presidents, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama, have all supported charters, and the Obama administration has highlighted charter schools under its Race to the Top fund and in regulations for its…

  14. An Examination of Attendance, Sports or Club Involvement, Special Education Involvement, and Ethnicity as Predictors of High School Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Many students do not graduate from high school, which could lead to poorer quality of life, lower paying jobs, and increased crime. Previous researchers have indicated that Hispanic and African American students graduate at a significantly lower rate than White students. However, there remains an important gap in the current literature regarding…

  15. The Influence of a Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program on Student Perceptions and Desire to Attend Graduate School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, David A.; Krueger, Paul S.; Kendrick, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate research opportunities are valued by university faculty and administrators in part because of the belief that they are useful for attracting students to graduate school. Other perceived benefits are that these programs improve students' engagement in their respective disciplines, enhance students' understanding of theory by…

  16. Capturing the Pupil Voice of Secondary Gifted and Talented Students Who Had Attended an Enrichment Programme in Their Infant School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted during the Easter holidays of 2010 at Rawmarsh City Learning Centre with 16 students from school years 8 to 11 who had participated, during their infant years, in a gifted and talented Key Stage One Enrichment Cluster. The students represented a wide range of backgrounds, and five were identified as being on the autistic…

  17. Characteristics and Academic Performance of High School Students Attending VVC Directly after Graduation, 1996-2001. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Mark; Mistretta, Sandra; Lewallen, Willard

    Motivated by an interest in developing a better understanding of the students who enter Victor Valley Community College (VVCC) (California) directly from high school, the study outlined in this document was guided by four main purposes: (1) to gain an understanding of the characteristics of these students as they enter the institution so that…

  18. The Impact of School of Attendance, Classroom, Interventionist, Ethnicity, and Level of Educational Support on Oral Reading Fluency Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Andrew James

    2013-01-01

    Response to intervention (RtI) is an approach to assist students with learning difficulties. There is limited research into the effectiveness of RtI within rural school districts. To address that gap, this quantitative, experimental study tested the theory of RtI, comparing the tier of intervention to oral reading fluency, controlling for…

  19. Music as Engaging, Educational Matrix: Exploring the Case of Marginalised Students Attending an "Alternative" Music Industry School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, David; Riddle, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    "Harmony High" is an alternative school where music functions as an educational magnet to attract marginalised students who have disengaged from the mainstream. Through an investigation of the student perspective, we discover that while acting as a magnet, music also becomes the educational matrix or "heart and soul" that helps…

  20. Leadership Practices and the Relationship between Teacher Attendance and Teacher Perceptions of Leadership Behaviors in a Large Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batiste, Monica Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Of all the work that occurs within the P-12 education institutions, the interaction involving the teacher and pupil is the most significant contributing factor of student success (United States Department of Education, 2013). Yet, the problem of teacher absenteeism persists in schools throughout the United States. The accumulated results of…

  1. Learning: The Experiences of Adults Who Work Full-Time while Attending Graduate School Part-Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Bridget N.; Cordova, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The experiences of students who are working full-time and going to graduate school part-time were the focus of this phenomenological investigation. Data analysis showed that these individuals, who reported high job involvement and strong career planning, were often stymied when they attempted to apply new ideas to the workplace. Those with strong…

  2. Invest for the Long Term or Attend to Immediate Needs? Schools and the Employment of Less Educated Youths and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz, Inaki; Siles, Gregori; Vrecer, Natalija

    2011-01-01

    For the past 20 years, researchers worldwide have shared a consensus that tracking leads to failure in school. But educational systems continue to use this practice for many reasons. One argument used to support the practice is that students who enter the vocational track early in their careers tend to enter the labour market more quickly. Data…

  3. Attendance and Truancy Programs. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    According to the 2000 census, high school dropouts had a 52% employment rate, compared to 71% for high school graduates and 83% for college graduates. According to NCSE, the national dropout rate is 30% of which 80% had been chronically absent from school ("School attendance tracking: Challenges and effective practices"), which puts the high…

  4. Understanding the dynamics of teacher attention: Examples of how high school physics and physical science teachers attend to student ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Matty

    Attending to student ideas is critical for supporting students' science learning (Driver, Guesne, & Tiberghien, 1985; National Research Council, 1996). But, paying attention to student ideas in science class is difficult and does not happen often (Davis, 2001; Feldman, 2002; Levin, 2008; Levitt, 2001; Simmons, et al, 1999). Researchers have looked at how institutional expectations, curricular materials, and a teacher's cognition influence how that teacher picks up on and makes sense of student ideas (Ainley & Luntley, 2007; Levin, 2008; Rop, 2002; Tabak & Reiser, 1999; Wallach & Even, 2005). I argue that we do not yet have adequate ways of characterizing and understanding teachers' attention at the level of the interaction. I have evidence that suggests that when we look in such a fine-grained way, many of our current explanations for what teachers do and pay attention to are not sufficient. The aim of this dissertation is to build on the burgeoning body of work on teacher attention by looking at how to characterize a teacher's attention as that teacher interacts with students in the classroom and studying how a teacher's attention is situated in the teacher's framing of his or her interaction with students. In short, a person's frame or framing of the situation is his or her definition of what is going on in the interaction (Tannen, 1993). I discuss the implications for how we can support teachers' attention to student ideas and some areas for future research motivated by the findings of this study.

  5. Factors Affecting Student Engagement: A Case Study Examining Two Cohorts of Students Attending a Post-1992 University in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Mark; Sellars, Christopher; Smith, Julian; Barber, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Issues relating to student retention and student engagement remain high on the agendas of higher education institutions worldwide. This case study considers the factors that impact on student engagement within a sample of first year undergraduate sports students attending a post 1992 university in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom.…

  6. Social Capital, Place of Residence, and College Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of High School and Beyond data reveals that suburban students were most likely and rural students were least likely to attend college. Parental expectation of college attendance was the most powerful predictor of subsequent college attendance across residence categories. College attendance of rural students was also predicted by community…

  7. A Study on Students' Affective Factors in Junior High School English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Biyi; Zhou, Yaping

    2012-01-01

    Affect is considered as aspects of emotion, feeling, mood or attitude which condition behaviors in second language acquisition. Positive affect is good for studying while negative affect will inevitably hinder learners' learning process. As we know, students in junior high school are special groups as they are experiencing great changes both in…

  8. An Africentric Rite of Passage Program and Its Impact on Adolescent African-American Male Attendance, Discipline, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford-Little, Monica

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine an Africentric rite of passage program's impact on African-American male high school students. It is intended to determine whether a rite of passage program will affect attendance, discipline and achievement. The study also investigates the development of a school-based Africentric program as well as its…

  9. Effects of After-School Programs on Attendance and Externalizing Behaviors with Primary and Secondary School Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Kremer, Kristen P.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Sarteschi, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the number and types of after-school programs (ASPs) have increased substantially as a result of increased federal and private spending and because ASPs are perceived to provide wide-ranging and far-reaching benefits to students, families, schools and the public. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is…

  10. The Effects of School Level Factors in Affecting Secondary School Teachers' Participation in Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Yan Fung; Kwong, Tsz Man

    This study investigated the effects of school-level and individual-level factors influencing the participation and nonparticipation of secondary school teachers in continuing professional education (CPE). Researchers randomly selected 25 out of Hong Kong's 442 secondary schools to participate. All teachers in the schools were invited to complete a…

  11. Factors Affecting Retirement Attitude among Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Wan-Chen; Chiang, Chia-Hsun; Chuang, Hsueh-Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships of teacher efficacy, perceived organizational control, and the teacher-student age gap with teachers' retirement attitudes. Stratified random sampling was adopted to collect survey responses. A total of 498 valid surveys from 33 elementary schools were collected. Correlational analyses revealed significant…

  12. External and Internal Scanning: Identifying Variables that Affect Your School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Jerry J.

    1989-01-01

    Principals and others involved in strategic or operational planning decisions need a data collection process with a systematic internal and external scanning structure. Internal data originate from students, school climate, finance, and human resource variables. External data include demography, government finance and budgetary allocations,…

  13. Early Teacher Expectations Disproportionately Affect Poor Children's High School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorhagen, Nicole S.

    2013-01-01

    This research used prospective longitudinal data to examine the associations between first-grade teachers' over- and underestimation of their students' math abilities, basic reading abilities, and language skills and the students' high school academic performance, with special attention to the subject area and moderating effects of student…

  14. Affective Benefits from Academic Competitions for Middle School Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Mehmet A.; Debelak, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Academic competitions have long been an aspect of programming for the gifted. These competitions can facilitate a learning environment that presents gifted students the academic challenge that often is difficult to create in a single classroom or school. They can offer the types of experiences that foster the development of productive attitudes…

  15. Psychosocial Interventions for School Refusal Behavior with Primary and Secondary School Students: A Campbell Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Brendel, Kristen E.; Bulanda, Jeffery J; Thompson, Aaron M.; Pigott, Terri D.

    2015-01-01

    School refusal behavior, affecting between 1% and 5% of school-age children, is a psychosocial problem for students characterized by severe emotional distress and anxiety at the prospect of going to school, leading to difficulties in attending school and, in some cases, significant absences from school (Burke & Silverman, 1987; Elliot, 1999;…

  16. The Usefulness of Performance Matrix Tests in Locomotor System Evaluation of Girls Attending a Ballet School — Preliminary Observation

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Małgorzata; Siatkowski, Idzi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Learning ballet is connected with continuous use of the locomotor system while subjecting it to high loads. Therefore, we conducted some research defining the appearance of weak links in the motor system, in order to eliminate the risk of injury. [Methods] Fifty-two female students of a ballet school were examined. To identify weak links, low-threshold Performance Matrix tests were performed. An analysis of weak link occurrence in the locomotor system was carried out, using two way analysis of variance ANOVA Tukey’s HSD test, clustering methods and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). [Results] The average age of the subjects was 11.64±0.53 years (mean ± standard deviation), their average body height was 151.1±7.5 cm, their average body weight was 35.92±5.41 kg, and their average time of learning at ballet school was 2.17±0.65 years. We found that there were significant differences in weak links occurrence in the motor system of every girl examined. [Conclusions] Weak links were found in every location of the motor system. Our results show that the influence of weak link location is essentially different from their occurrence, and that learning ballet has a significantly different impact on the number of weak links in different locations. PMID:24567673

  17. Why Green Clean Our Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Margot; Grevatt, Peter; Merse, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Healthy school environments are essential to ensure the best setting for learning. When school environments are unhealthy, students and staff may be exposed to harmful pollutants and chemicals that can cause their health, attendance, and scholastic performance to suffer. Among the factors that can affect the environmental quality of school indoor…

  18. Gender Stereotyping and Affective Attitudes towards Science in Chinese Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Mingxin; Hu, Weiping; Jiannong, Shi; Adey, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This study explores explicit and implicit gender-science stereotypes and affective attitudes towards science in a sample of Chinese secondary school students. The results showed that (1) gender-science stereotyping was more and more apparent as the specialization of science subjects progresses through secondary school, becoming stronger from the…

  19. A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of School Belonging Factors on Negative Affect in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.; Furlong, Michael J.; Homel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    School belonging, measured as a unidimensional construct, is an important predictor of negative affective problems in adolescents, including depression and anxiety symptoms. A recent study found that one such measure, the Psychological Sense of School Membership scale, actually comprises three factors: Caring Relations, Acceptance, and Rejection.…

  20. Individual and School Factors Affecting Students' Participation and Success in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz; Hattie, John; Tumen, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify school factors that affect students' achievements at the secondary and tertiary levels of education. The analysis included data of 9,894 students who studied in Auckland regional secondary schools in 2004. The results indicate that, although student demographic characteristics are associated with students'…

  1. High School Students' Affective Dispositions in Science: Scientific Inquiry with Information Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Ebenezer, Jazlin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of high school students' long-term authentic research projects with Information Technologies (IT) in small groups in and out of school time on their affective dispositions in science. This study was conducted in the context of a three-year NSF project, namely, Translating Information…

  2. Effective or Affective Schools? Technological and Emotional Discourses of Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ben

    2012-01-01

    British schools have been positioned by recent educational policy discourses as sites of innovation and transformation in new technological contexts, but more recent concerns about well-being suggest a more "affective turn" in educational policy-making. This article provides an analysis of a project which has explored the ways in which schools are…

  3. The Effect of School and Task Structure on Teacher Interaction, Classroom Organization and Student Affects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramowitz, Susan

    This research paper sought to determine whether smaller sized schools decrease student alienation and increase program diversity both within the school and compared to others. Hypotheses tested were: (1) participation in small work units positively affects teacher task interdependence resulting in greater teacher interaction; (2) teacher…

  4. Affective Self-Regulation Trajectories during Secondary School Predict Substance Use among Urban Minority Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kenneth W.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Acevedo, Bianca P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between trajectories of affective self-regulation skills during secondary school and young adult substance use in a large multiethnic, urban sample (N = 995). During secondary school, participants completed a measure of cognitive and behavioral skills used to control negative, unpleasant emotions or perceived…

  5. Helping High School Students Read Like Experts: Affective Evaluation, Salience, and Literary Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Sarah; Horton, William

    2015-01-01

    This study explored whether a month-long instructional intervention in affective evaluation can help struggling high school readers to engage in literary interpretation in ways similar to expert readers' practices. We compared pre- and post-intervention think-aloud protocols from five high school students as they read a literary short story with…

  6. Experiences of School Principals with Newcomers from War-Affected Countries in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoko, Janet Mola

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on the results of an exploratory study of experiences of 2 urban school principals about leading schools with immigrants from war-affected countries in Africa. It examines how they perceived their preparation for multicultural leadership, and explores lessons that leadership development institutions can learn from their…

  7. Factors Affecting the Happiness of Urban Elementary School Students: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenney, Jodiann K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this transformative mixed methods study was to examine the school happiness of upper elementary students in three Connecticut urban demonstration schools. The study examined the differences in students' happiness based on ethnicity, gender, and their interaction. It also investigated the factors that affect students' happiness in…

  8. An Investigation of Factors Affecting the Use of Educational Technology in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazu, Ibrahim Yasar

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the related factors that affect the usage of educational technology in primary schools. This study depends on literature analysis and the questionnaire to collect data. Specifically, the items employed in this study were derived from the teachers' and school administrators' perceptions of using…

  9. Schools, Families, and Communities Affecting the Dropout Rate: Implications and Strategies for Family Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie

    2010-01-01

    Serious social and economic consequences affect the local and national levels when students drop out of school. Research has shown that collaboration among schools, families, and communities in the academic progression of students can decrease their drop out probability. The author presents findings related to a qualitative study conducted in…

  10. A Pilot Study of a 6-Week Parenting Program for Mothers of Pre-school Children Attending Family Health Centers in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khowaja, Yasmin; Karmaliani, Rozina; Hirani, Shela; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Rafique, Ghazala; McFarlane, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, parenting programs to address behavioural and emotional problems associated with child maltreatment in developing countries have received much attention. There is a paucity of literature on effective parent education interventions in the local context of Pakistan. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of offering a 6-week parenting program for mothers of pre-school children attending family health centres (FHCs) in Karachi, the largest metropolitan city of Pakistan. Methods: A pilot quasi-experimental trial was conducted. Two FHCs were selected, one as the intervention and the second as the control. A total of 57 mothers of pre-school children (n = 30 intervention; n = 27 control) participated in this study. Mothers in the intervention group received SOS Help for parents module, while mothers in the control group received information about routine childcare. A parenting scale (PS) was administered before the program was implemented and repeated 2 weeks after the program was completed in both groups. Statistical analysis was performed to compare participants’ attributes. Descriptive analysis was conducted to compare pre- and post-test mean scores along with standard deviation for parenting subscales in the intervention and control groups. Results: A total of 50 mothers (n = 25 intervention; n = 25 control) completed the 6-week program. Attrition was observed as 5/30 (17%) in the intervention arm and 2/27 (2%) in the control arm. Mothers commonly reported the burden of daily domestic and social responsibilities as the main reason for dropping out. Furthermore, the majority of participants in the control group recommended increasing the duration of weekly sessions from 1 to 1.5 hours, thereby decreasing the program period from 6 to 4 weeks. Mothers in intervention group reported substantial improvement in parenting skills as indicated by mean difference in their pre- and post-test scores for laxness and over-reactivity. Conclusion

  11. What Matters for Staying On-Track and Graduating in Chicago Public Highs Schools: A Close Look at Course Grades, Failures, and Attendance in the Freshman Year. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allensworth, Elaine M.; Easton, John Q.

    2007-01-01

    Despite increasing recognition that a high school diploma is a minimum requirement for success in the workplace, nearly half of Chicago Public Schools (CPS) students fail to graduate, and in some CPS high schools, more students drop out than graduate. Research on dropping out has shown that the decision to persist in or leave school is affected by…

  12. Charter Schools: ED-Sponsored Charter School Research and Demonstration Programs. Research Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Student Achievement, Curriculum, and Assessment (ED/OERI), Washington, DC.

    This report offers a brief synopsis of findings from a comprehensive, 4-year study of charter schools. The study was designed to find out what types of students attend charter schools, how charter laws and policies affect charter schools in each state, the conditions under which charter schools improve or do not improve student achievement and…

  13. The Effects of School Climate Change on Student Success in a Fifth and Sixth Grade School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    The significance of the study was to examine intentional strategies to improve school climate relative to student school success as measured by academic achievement, attendance, and student behavior. It was important to understand how student school success was affected by factors related to school climate improvement such as leadership and change…

  14. Do Student Migrations Affect School Performance? Evidence from Wisconsin's Inter-District Public School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsch, David M.; Zimmer, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the competitive effects of a unique school choice program implemented in the late 1990s, Wisconsin's open enrollment program, which allows families to send their children to schools outside their home district. In contrast to other school choice programs, districts not only face negative consequences from losing students and…

  15. Does Private School Competition Affect Public School Achievement? An Analysis of North Carolina Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Eric S.

    This report describes a study conducted to determine if there were any applicable effects from private-school competition on public-school student achievement in North Carolina. The study examined multiple student outcomes, including elementary and secondary student achievement results, student dropout rates, and high school student achievement…

  16. School Counsel: How Appropriate Guidance Affects Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Zoe Blumberg; Venegas, Kristan M.; Oliverez, Paz Maya; Colyar, Julia E.

    2004-01-01

    Detrimental differences in educational opportunities for students of color continue to exist in the post-Brown United States. This article focuses on inequities in access to higher education by addressing the following question: How do disparities in counseling services affect college access for students of color? Guided by a review of the…

  17. Does Being Assigned to a Low School Track Negatively Affect Psychological Adjustment? A Longitudinal Study in the First Year of Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Müller, Christoph Michael; Hofmann, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the 1st year in secondary school for some students goes hand in hand with an increase in adjustment difficulties. One factor that might influence this process on an individual, compositional, and institutional level is the academic track a student attends. It was hypothesized that being assigned to a low-qualifying…

  18. Compulsory Attendance: An Analysis of Litigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddon, Leo Levy, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine court cases dealing with compulsory attendance laws, also known as compulsory education laws, for the purpose of establishing the issues, outcomes, and trends in compulsory attendance litigation. In this manner, school officials could be provided guidance on dealing with issues surrounding the attendance…

  19. Improving Attendance. Minimum Standards Implementation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Elementary and Secondary Education.

    One of a series of implementation documents prepared in conjunction with the revised minimum standards adopted in 1983 by the Ohio State Board of Education for elementary and secondary schools, this publication provides guidelines for developing attendance policies and procedures, reviews considerations related to attendance, and suggests…

  20. A Deeper Investigation into the Psychological Changes of Intellectually Gifted Students Attending a Residential Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Marlon R.; Cross, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    This discourse is the qualitative component of a mixed-methods study that examined how students were psychologically affected while attending a 2-year residential high school (Academy) in the Midwest. This aspect of the study focused on the emic perspective of nine students using a phenomenological-type approach. To that end, interviews were…

  1. Does Combining School and Work Affect School and Post-School Outcomes? Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anlezark, Alison; Lim, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In this report the authors seek to answer the question of whether combining school and work is detrimental or beneficial to a student's school educational performance and labour market outcomes. They find that young people who combine school and work are distributed right across the school population. Results show that individuals can combine…

  2. Affective Assemblages: Body Matters in the Pedagogic Practices of Contemporary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Set within the affective turn in cultural and social theory, in this paper, I explore the significance of materiality and matter, most specifically, bodily matter, in the pedagogic practices of contemporary school classrooms. The received view in education is that affect is tantamount to emotion or feeling and that materials, such as bodily…

  3. Safe Thinking and Affect Regulation (STAR): Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention in Alternative/Therapeutic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Larry K.; Nugent, Nicole R.; Houck, Christopher D.; Lescano, Celia M.; Whiteley, Laura B.; Barker, David; Viau, Lisa; Zlotnick, Caron

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Safe Thinking and Affect Regulation (STAR), a 14-session HIV-prevention program for adolescents at alternative/therapeutic schools. Because these youth frequently have difficulties with emotions and cognitions, it was designed to improve sexuality-specific affect management and cognitive monitoring, as…

  4. Causal Predominance of Cognitions in Disturbed Affects among Finnish Primary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Raimo

    1990-01-01

    A putative causal relationship of cognitions to affects in different phases of teachers' stress cycles was studied for 414 elementary school teachers in Finland. Results provide only negligible support for the causal predominance of cognitions in disturbed affects; the opposite seemed to prevail. Implications for teacher satisfaction are…

  5. Associations between classroom CO2 concentrations and student attendance in Washington and Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Shendell, Derek G.; Prill, Richard; Fisk, William J.; Apte, Michael G.; Blake, David; Faulkner, David

    2004-01-01

    Student attendance in American public schools is a critical factor in securing limited operational funding. Student and teacher attendance influence academic performance. Limited data exist on indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, and how IEQ affects attendance, health, or performance. This study explored the association of student absence with measures of indoor minus outdoor carbon dioxide concentration (dCO{sub 2}). Absence and dCO{sub 2} data were collected from 409 traditional and 25 portable classrooms from 14 schools located in six school districts in the states of Washington and Idaho. Study classrooms had individual heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, except two classrooms without mechanical ventilation. Classroom attributes, student attendance and school-level ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status (SES) were included in multivariate modeling. Forty-five percent of classrooms studied had short-term indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations above 1000 parts-per-million (ppm). A 1000 ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} was associated (p < 0.05) with a 0.5% to 0.9% decrease in annual average daily attendance (ADA), corresponding to a relative 10% to 20% increase in student absence. Outside air (ventilation) rates estimated from dCO{sub 2} and other collected data were not associated with absence. Annual ADA was 2% higher (p < 0.0001) in traditional than in portable classrooms.

  6. Does perceived teacher affective support matter for middle school students in mathematics classrooms?

    PubMed

    Sakiz, Gonul; Pape, Stephen J; Hoy, Anita Woolfolk

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the importance of perceived teacher affective support in relation to sense of belonging, academic enjoyment, academic hopelessness, academic self-efficacy, and academic effort in middle school mathematics classrooms. A self-report survey was administered to 317 seventh- and eighth-grade students in 5 public middle schools. Structural equation modeling indicated significant associations between perceived teacher affective support and middle school students' motivational, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. The structural model explained a significant proportion of variance in students' sense of belonging (42%), academic enjoyment (43%), self-efficacy beliefs (43%), academic hopelessness (18%), and academic effort (32%) in mathematics classrooms. In addition to providing the basis for a concise new measure of perceived teacher affective support, these findings point to the importance of students' perceptions of the affective climate within learning environments for promoting academic enjoyment, academic self-efficacy, and academic effort in mathematics. PMID:22386122

  7. The interplay between sleep behavior and affect in elementary school children's daily life.

    PubMed

    Könen, Tanja; Dirk, Judith; Leonhardt, Anja; Schmiedek, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Recent reviews raised the idea of a bidirectional relation between sleep behavior and affect in adults, but little is known about this interplay in general and especially regarding children. In this micro-longitudinal study, the interplay of sleep and affect was captured directly in children's daily life context in and out of school through ambulatory assessment. For 31 consecutive days, 110 elementary school children (8-11 years old) provided information about their last night's sleep and reported their current affect at four daily occasions in school and at home on smartphones. A multilevel approach was used to analyze the relation between sleep and affect the next day (morning, noon, and afternoon) and the relation between evening affect and subsequent sleep. At the within-person level, sleep quality was related to all observed facets of affect the next day and the strongest effects were found in the morning. The effect of sleep quality on positive affect was particularly pronounced for children who on average went to bed early and slept long. There were, however, no direct within-person effects of sleep quantity on affect. Furthermore, evening affect was related to subsequent sleep. The findings support the idea of a bidirectional relation between affect and sleep in children's daily life (including school). They suggest that good sleep provides a basis and resource for children's affective well-being the next day and demonstrate the importance of analyzing within-person variations of children's sleep. Micro-longitudinal findings can contribute to explain how macro-longitudinal relations between sleep and affect develop over time. PMID:27236036

  8. Playing doctor: Simulation in medical school as affective practice.

    PubMed

    Underman, Kelly

    2015-07-01

    Simulated patient encounters, in which a trained layperson role-plays a patient, have become increasingly important in medical education. One such type is the gynecological teaching associate (GTA), who teaches medical students how to perform the pelvic examination using her own body. This paper considers the role that simulation like the GTA session plays in medical students' professional socialization. Drawn from interviews and archival sources gathered from medical students, medical faculty, and GTAs, this paper explores the tensions between artificiality and authenticity in order to understand how, through pedagogical practice, medical students come to embody medical culture through simulation. This paper uses the theoretical framework of the medical habitus to understand the role of emotion in medical student socialization. It argues that simulation is an example of affective practice: any rehearsal of techniques or styles of expressing, experiencing, or managing emotion that reshape the body's capacity to feel. PMID:26022187

  9. Using Data to Affect School Change: A Critical Leadership Skill Serving as the Keystone of the School Improvement Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Favero, Frank

    2009-01-01

    This article is a synopsis of three performance tasks designed for students enrolled in an educational leadership graduate level course Using Data to Affect Change. These performance tasks address the requisite knowledge and skills that an effective school leader should possess in order to improve the quality of instruction and at the same time…

  10. Factors Affecting High School Baseball Coaches' Enforcement of School Tobacco Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaves, Ted; Strack, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of policy bans and recommendations against spit tobacco (ST) use, baseball athletes have demonstrated ST prevalence rates ranging from 34% to 50% in high school, 42% in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and 50% in the professional ranks. To evaluate enforcement of ST bans, high school baseball coaches in North Carolina…

  11. Does a Student's Use of Technology outside School Affect Mathematic Achievement in School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Using the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) restricted-data set, the researcher examined the national sample and the NAEP reported sub-groups of gender, race/ethnicity, and socio-economic status (SES). This researcher investigated how factors of student technology use in school and outside school, student attributes, academic…

  12. Children’s representations of school support for HIV-affected peers in rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV has left many African children caring for sick relatives, orphaned or themselves HIV-positive, often facing immense challenges in the absence of significant support from adults. With reductions in development funding, public sector budgetary constraints, and a growing emphasis on the importance of indigenous resources in the HIV response, international policy allocates schools a key role in ‘substituting for families’ (Ansell, 2008) in supporting child health and well-being. We explore children’s own accounts of the challenges facing their HIV-affected peers and the role of schools in providing such support. Methods Contextualised within a multi-method study of school support for HIV-affected children in rural Zimbabwe, and regarding children’s views as a key resource for child-relevant intervention and policy, 128 school children (10–14) wrote a story about an HIV-affected peer and how school assisted them in tackling their problems. Results Children presented harrowing accounts of negative impacts of HIV on the social, physical and mental well-being of peers, and how these manifested in the school setting. Whilst relationships with fellow learners and teachers were said to provide a degree of support, this was patchy and minimal, generally limited to small-scale and often one-off acts of material help or kindness (e.g. teachers giving children pens and exercise books or peers sharing school lunches), with little potential to impact significantly on the wider social drivers of children’s daily challenges. Despite having respect for the enormity of the challenges many HIV-affected peers were coping with, children tended to keep a distance from them. School was depicted as a source of the very bullying, stigma and social exclusion that undermined children’s opportunities for well-being in their lives more generally. Conclusions Our findings challenge glib assumptions that schools can serve as a significant ‘indigenous’ supports of

  13. Affective State of School Pupils during Their First Lesson of the Day--Effect of Morningness-Eveningness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randler, Christoph; Rahafar, Arash; Arbabi, Talat; Bretschneider, Rebekka

    2014-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results concerning chronopsychological effects at school is the worse school performance in evening-oriented adolescents. The study intends to correlate affective state with chronotype. Therefore, we carried out a field study in adolescents in a natural setting (in school) and assessed their actual affective state during…

  14. Gender Differences in Introductory University Physics Performance: The Influence of High School Physics Preparation and Affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazari, Zahra

    2006-12-01

    The attrition of females studying physics after high school has been a continuing concern for the physics education community. If females are well prepared, feel confident, and do well in introductory college physics, they may be inclined to study physics further. This quantitative study uses HLM to identify factors from high school physics preparation (content, pedagogy, and assessment) and the affective domain that predict female and male performance in introductory college physics. The study includes controls for student demographic and academic background characteristics, and the final dataset consists of 1973 surveys from 54 introductory college physics classes. The results highlight high school physics and affective experiences that differentially predict female and male performance. These experiences include: learning requirements, computer graphing/analysis, long written problems, everyday world examples, community projects cumulative tests/quizzes, father's encouragement, family's belief that science leads to a better career, and the length of time students believe that high school physics would help in university physics. There were also experiences that similarly predict female and male performance. The results paint a dynamic picture of the factors from high school physics and the affective domain that influence the future physics performance of females and males. The implication is that there are many aspects to the teaching of physics in high school that, although widely used and thought to be effective, need reform in their implementation in order to be fully beneficial to females and/or males in college.

  15. HIGH PREVALENCE OF Blastocystis spp. INFECTION IN CHILDREN AND STAFF MEMBERS ATTENDING PUBLIC URBAN SCHOOLS IN SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Rebolla, Mayra Frozoni; Silva, Eliete Maria; Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Falcão, Alexandre Xavier; Rebolla, Maria Vicentina Frozoni; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno

    2016-01-01

    After a gastroenteritis outbreak of unknown etiology in the municipality of Sebastião da Grama, São Paulo, Brazil, we conducted a parasitological survey to establish the epidemiological profile of enteroparasitosis in children and staff members attending the public urban schools in operation in town. The cross-sectional study evaluated 172 children aged 11 months to 6 years old and 33 staff members aged 19 to 58 years old. Overall, 96 (55.81%) children and 20 (60.61%) staff members were mono-parasitized, while 58 (33.72%) children and 4 (12.12%) workers were poly-parasitized. Protozoa (88.37%; 72.73%) was more prevalent than helminthes (3.48%; 0%) in children and staff members respectively.Blastocystis spp. was the most prevalent parasite in children (86.63%) and staff members (66.67%). The age of 1 year old or less was found to be associated with increased prevalence of giardiasis [OR = 13.04; 95%CI 2.89-58.91; p = 0.00] and public garbage collection was identified as a protective factor against intestinal helminth infections [OR = 0.06; 95%CI 0.00-0.79; p = 0.03]. Although most of the children tested positive for Blastocystis spp. and also presented clinical signs/symptoms (62.2%), this association was not statistically significant [OR = 1.35; 95%CI 0.53-3.44; p = 0.51]. Intestinal parasites still represent a public health concern and this study underscores the importance of further investigations to better understand the pathogenic role of Blastocystis spp. PMID:27074325

  16. HIGH PREVALENCE OF Blastocystis spp. INFECTION IN CHILDREN AND STAFF MEMBERS ATTENDING PUBLIC URBAN SCHOOLS IN SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    REBOLLA, Mayra Frozoni; SILVA, Eliete Maria; GOMES, Jancarlo Ferreira; FALCÃO, Alexandre Xavier; REBOLLA, Maria Vicentina Frozoni; FRANCO, Regina Maura Bueno

    2016-01-01

    After a gastroenteritis outbreak of unknown etiology in the municipality of Sebastião da Grama, SãoPaulo, Brazil, we conducted a parasitological survey to establish the epidemiological profile of enteroparasitosis in children and staff members attending the public urban schools in operation in town. The cross-sectional study evaluated 172 children aged 11 months to 6 years old and 33 staff members aged 19 to 58 years old. Overall, 96 (55.81%) children and 20 (60.61%) staff members were mono-parasitized, while 58 (33.72%) children and 4 (12.12%) workers were poly-parasitized. Protozoa (88.37%; 72.73%) was more prevalent than helminthes (3.48%; 0%) in children and staff members respectively.Blastocystis spp. was the most prevalent parasite in children (86.63%) and staff members (66.67%). The age of 1 year old or less was found to be associated with increased prevalence of giardiasis [OR = 13.04; 95%CI 2.89-58.91; p = 0.00] and public garbage collection was identified as a protective factor against intestinal helminth infections [OR = 0.06; 95%CI 0.00-0.79; p = 0.03]. Although most of the children tested positive for Blastocystis spp. and also presented clinical signs/symptoms (62.2%), this association was not statistically significant [OR = 1.35; 95%CI 0.53-3.44; p = 0.51]. Intestinal parasites still represent a public health concern and this study underscores the importance of further investigations to better understand the pathogenic role of Blastocystis spp. PMID:27074325

  17. Risk Factors Affecting School Readiness in Premature Infants With Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patrianakos-Hoobler, Athena I.; Msall, Michael E.; Marks, Jeremy D.; Huo, Dezheng; Schreiber, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Advances in neonatal care have resulted in children born pre-maturely with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) successfully reaching school age. It is unknown how many will be ready for school and what factors affect school readiness in these children at high risk. Our objective was to assess readiness of children born prematurely with RDS in the last decade for entry into public school, and determine risk factors associated with lack of school readiness in this population. METHODS This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Follow-up data were collected for 135 of 167 (81%) surviving premature infants with RDS requiring surfactant-replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation. The children were seen between July 2005 and September 2006 (average age: 5.7 ± 1.0 years) and underwent standardized neurodevelopmental and health assessments and socioeconomic status classification. A 4-level school-readiness score was constructed by using each child’s standardized scores on assessments of basic concepts (Bracken School-Readiness Assessment), perceptual skills (Visual-Motor Integration Test), receptive vocabulary (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition), daily living functional skills (Pediatric Functional Independence Measure), and presence of sensory impairments or autism. Proportional odds models were used to identify risk factors predicting lower school-readiness levels. RESULTS Of the children examined, the mean birth weight was 1016 ± 391 g, and the mean gestational age was 27.5 ± 2.6 weeks. Ninety-one (67%) children were school-ready. Using multivariate analysis, male gender, chronic lung disease, and severe intraventricular hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia were associated with lower school-readiness levels. However, the most powerful factor determining school-readiness level was low socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION Interventions targeting neonatal morbidities may be much less effective at improving overall performance at

  18. The relationship between affect and constructivism as viewed by middle school science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Denise L.

    The purpose of this research was to examine middle school science teachers' perceptions of their students' affective behaviors at each level of the affective domain (receiving, responding, valuing, organization, characterization of value system), perceptions of the usefulness of constructivism as a curricular theory, and constructivist teaching strategies. This study investigated the relationship between affect and constructivism to determine if constructivist strategies can predict levels of affective behavior. Affect is a broad generalization that includes elements (i.e., interests, attitudes, values, emotions, and feelings). The importance of this research relates to enhancing learning, increasing achievement, participatory democracy, and facilitating understanding of science, as well as promoting the development of higher order thinking skills. A nonexperimental, descriptive research design was used to determine the relationship between affect and constructivism. A total of 111 middle school teachers participated in this study. Three instruments were used in this study: Taxonomy of Affective Behavior (TAB), Survey of Science Instruction (SSI), and a short demographic survey. Statistical significance obtained from one-sample t-tests provided evidence that teachers were aware that the affective domain was a viable construct. Statistical evidence of one-sample t-tests provided evidence that teachers perceived constructivism was useful to teach science to middle school students. Pearson product moment correlations results indicated statistically significant relationships between perceptions of constructivism and associated constructivist teaching strategies. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed a relationship between affect and constructivism. Teacher responses indicated they felt constrained from implementing constructivism due to an emphasis on testing. Colleges of education, curriculum specialists, science teachers, and school districts may

  19. Changes in Medical Practice towards the Child with Spina Bifida: Implications for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tew, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The improved surgical management of children with spina bifida is among the reasons for a decreased number of severely physically and/or mentally affected children. Such improvements have resulted in more spina bifida children attending British ordinary schools and fewer attending special schools. (Author/DB)

  20. Longitudinal Study of an After-school, Inquiry-based Science Intervention on Low-achieving Children's Affective Perceptions of Learning Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiang-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Huann-Shyang; Lawrenz, Frances P.; Hong, Zuway-R.

    2014-09-01

    This longitudinal study explores the effects of an after-school, inquiry-based science intervention on improving low-achieving elementary school children's affective perceptions of learning science (APLS) and positive thinking. Thirty-nine low-achieving children nominated by their teachers attended a three-semester intervention and formed the experimental group; another 87 typical fourth graders were randomly selected as the comparison group. The elementary school student questionnaire was administered to assess all participants' APLS and positive thinking. In addition, eight target students from the experimental group with the lowest scores on either APLS or positive thinking were selected for observation and interviews. Factor analyses, paired-wise t-tests, and theme content analyses were used to compare the similarities and differences between groups and within semesters. It was found that the experimental group children's APLS and positive thinking were gradually and significantly more improved than their counterparts' during the intervention. Interview and observation results were consistent with the quantitative findings. This longitudinal study provided evidence that the after-school, inquiry-based science intervention acted as a facilitating agent for improving low achievers' APLS and positive thinking. Instructional implications and research recommendations are discussed.