Science.gov

Sample records for affect simulation results

  1. Open cherry picker simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The simulation program associated with a key piece of support equipment to be used to service satellites directly from the Shuttle is assessed. The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform mounted at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) and is used to enhance extra vehicular activities (EVA). The results of simulations performed on the Grumman Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) and at the JSC Water Immersion Facility are summarized.

  2. Does migratory distance affect fuelling in a medium-distance passerine migrant?: results from direct and step-wise simulated magnetic displacements

    PubMed Central

    Ilieva, Mihaela; Bianco, Giuseppe; Åkesson, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In birds, fat accumulation before and during migration has been shown to be endogenously controlled and tuned by, among other factors, the Earth's magnetic field. However, our knowledge about the influence of the geomagnetic field on the fuelling in migrating birds is still limited to just a few nocturnally migrating passerine species. In order to study if variations of the magnetic field can also influence the fuelling of both day- and night-migrating passerines, we caught first-year dunnocks (Prunella modularis) and subjected them to three magnetic field conditions simulated by a system of magnetic coils: (1) local geomagnetic field of southern Sweden, (2) magnetic field corresponding to the centre of the expected wintering area, and (3) magnetic field met at the northern limit of the species' breeding distribution. We did not find a difference in mass increase between the birds kept in a local magnetic field and a field resembling their wintering area, irrespectively of the mode of magnetic displacement, i.e. direct or step-wise. However, the dunnocks magnetically displaced north showed a lower rate of fuelling in comparison to the control group, probably due to elevated activity. Compared with previous studies, our results suggest that the fuelling response to magnetic displacements during the migration period is specific to the eco-physiological situation. Future studies need to address if there is an effect of magnetic field manipulation on the level of migratory activity in dunnocks and how widespread the influence of local geomagnetic field parameters is on fuelling decisions in different bird species, which have different migratory strategies, distances and migration history. PMID:26883627

  3. Milestone M4900: Simulant Mixing Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-07-26

    This report addresses Milestone M4900, ''Simulant Mixing Sample Analysis Results,'' and contains the data generated during the ''Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions, and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant'' task. The Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for this task is BNF-003-98-0079A. A report with a narrative description and discussion of the data will be issued separately.

  4. DKIST Adaptive Optics System: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    The 4 m class Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), currently under construction, will be equipped with an ultra high order solar adaptive optics (AO) system. The requirements and capabilities of such a solar AO system are beyond those of any other solar AO system currently in operation. We must rely on solar AO simulations to estimate and quantify its performance.We present performance estimation results of the DKIST AO system obtained with a new solar AO simulation tool. This simulation tool is a flexible and fast end-to-end solar AO simulator which produces accurate solar AO simulations while taking advantage of current multi-core computer technology. It relies on full imaging simulations of the extended field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS), which directly includes important secondary effects such as field dependent distortions and varying contrast of the WFS sub-aperture images.

  5. Measurement and Simulation Results of Ti Coated Microwave Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding; McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    1998-11-01

    When microwave absorbers are put in a waveguide, a layer of resistive coating can change the distribution of the E-M fields and affect the attenuation of the signal within the microwave absorbers. In order to study such effect, microwave absorbers (TT2-111) were coated with titanium thin film. This report is a document on the coating process and measurement results. The measurement results have been used to check the simulation results from commercial software HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator.)

  6. Cassini radar : system concept and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melacci, P. T.; Orosei, R.; Picardi, G.; Seu, R.

    1998-10-01

    The Cassini mission is an international venture, involving NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Italian Space Agency (ASI), for the investigation of the Saturn system and, in particular, Titan. The Cassini radar will be able to see through Titan's thick, optically opaque atmosphere, allowing us to better understand the composition and the morphology of its surface, but the interpretation of the results, due to the complex interplay of many different factors determining the radar echo, will not be possible without an extensive modellization of the radar system functioning and of the surface reflectivity. In this paper, a simulator of the multimode Cassini radar will be described, after a brief review of our current knowledge of Titan and a discussion of the contribution of the Cassini radar in answering to currently open questions. Finally, the results of the simulator will be discussed. The simulator has been implemented on a RISC 6000 computer by considering only the active modes of operation, that is altimeter and synthetic aperture radar. In the instrument simulation, strict reference has been made to the present planned sequence of observations and to the radar settings, including burst and single pulse duration, pulse bandwidth, pulse repetition frequency and all other parameters which may be changed, and possibly optimized, according to the operative mode. The observed surfaces are simulated by a facet model, allowing the generation of surfaces with Gaussian or non-Gaussian roughness statistic, together with the possibility of assigning to the surface an average behaviour which can represent, for instance, a flat surface or a crater. The results of the simulation will be discussed, in order to check the analytical evaluations of the models of the average received echoes and of the attainable performances. In conclusion, the simulation results should allow the validation of the theoretical evaluations of the capabilities of microwave instruments, when

  7. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  8. An Analysis of Team Composition as It Affects Simulation Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnakumar, Parameswar; Chisholm, Thomas Alexander

    This study investigated the extent to which sex composition and average team academic achievement of student simulation teams affect team effectiveness. Seventy-four students in two sections of a marketing principles class were divided into 20 teams to test their decision-making skills. For 10 weeks, each team operated a simulated supermarket…

  9. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-12-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  10. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Adrian, Mark L.; Lobell, James V.; Simpson, David G.; Barrie, Alex; Winkert, George E.; Yeh, Pen-Shu; Moore, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. The Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) of the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) for MMS meets these demanding requirements by acquiring the electron velocity distribution functions (VDFs) for the full sky with high-resolution angular measurements every 30 ms. This will provide unprecedented access to electron scale dynamics within the reconnection diffusion region. The DES consists of eight half-top-hat energy analyzers. Each analyzer has a 6 deg. x 11.25 deg. Full-sky coverage is achieved by electrostatically stepping the FOV of each of the eight sensors through four discrete deflection look directions. Data compression and burst memory management will provide approximately 30 minutes of high time resolution data during each orbit of the four MMS spacecraft. Each spacecraft will intelligently downlink the data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal structure. Here we present the results of a simulation of the DES analyzer measurements, data compression and decompression, as well as ground-based analysis using as a seed re-processed Cluster/PEACE electron measurements. The Cluster/PEACE electron measurements have been reprocessed through virtual DES analyzers with their proper geometrical, energy, and timing scale factors and re-mapped via interpolation to the DES angular and energy phase-space sampling measurements. The results of the simulated DES measurements are analyzed and the full moments of the simulated VDFs are compared with those obtained from the Cluster/PEACE spectrometer using a standard quadrature moment, a newly implemented spectral spherical harmonic method, and a singular value decomposition method. Our preliminary moment calculations show a remarkable agreement within the uncertainties of the measurements, with the

  11. How processing digital elevation models can affect simulated water budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Lowery, M.A.; Campbell, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    For regional models, the shallow water table surface is often used as a source/sink boundary condition, as model grid scale precludes simulation of the water table aquifer. This approach is appropriate when the water table surface is relatively stationary. Since water table surface maps are not readily available, the elevation of the water table used in model cells is estimated via a two-step process. First, a regression equation is developed using existing land and water table elevations from wells in the area. This equation is then used to predict the water table surface for each model cell using land surface elevation available from digital elevation models (DEM). Two methods of processing DEM for estimating the land surface for each cell are commonly used (value nearest the cell centroid or mean value in the cell). This article demonstrates how these two methods of DEM processing can affect the simulated water budget. For the example presented, approximately 20% more total flow through the aquifer system is simulated if the centroid value rather than the mean value is used. This is due to the one-third greater average ground water gradients associated with the centroid value than the mean value. The results will vary depending on the particular model area topography and cell size. The use of the mean DEM value in each model cell will result in a more conservative water budget and is more appropriate because the model cell water table value should be representative of the entire cell area, not the centroid of the model cell.

  12. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, A. F.; Adrian, M. L.; Lobell, J. V.; Simpson, D. G.; Barrie, A.; Winkert, G. E.; Yeh, P.; Moore, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. The Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) of the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) for MMS meets these demanding requirements by acquiring the electron velocity distribution functions (VDF's) for the full sky with high-resolution angular measurements every 30 ms. This will provide unprecedented access to electron scale dynamics within the reconnection diffusion region. The DES consists of eight half-top-hat energy analyzers. Each analyzer has a 6° × 180° field of view (FOV) with a single pixel resolution of 6° × 11.25°. Full-sky coverage is achieved by electrostatically stepping the FOV of each of the eight sensors through four discrete deflection look directions. Data compression and burst memory management will provide approximately 30 minutes of high time resolution data during each orbit of the four MMS spacecraft. Each spacecraft will intelligently downlink the data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal structure. Here we present the results of a simulation of the DES analyzer measurements, data compression and decompression, as well as ground- based analysis using as a seed re-processed Cluster/PEACE electron measurements. The Cluster/PEACE electron measurements have been re-processed through virtual DES analyzers with their proper geometrical, energy, and timing scale factors and re-mapped via interpolation to the DES angular and energy phase- space sampling measurements. The results of the simulated DES measurements are analyzed and the full moments of the simulated VDF's are compared with those obtained from the Cluster/PEACE spectrometer using a standard quadrature moment, a newly implemented spectral spherical harmonic method, and a singular value decomposition method. Our preliminary moment calculations show a

  13. Medical Simulation Practices 2010 Survey Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCrindle, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Medical Simulation Centers are an essential component of our learning infrastructure to prepare doctors and nurses for their careers. Unlike the military and aerospace simulation industry, very little has been published regarding the best practices currently in use within medical simulation centers. This survey attempts to provide insight into the current simulation practices at medical schools, hospitals, university nursing programs and community college nursing programs. Students within the MBA program at Saint Joseph's University conducted a survey of medical simulation practices during the summer 2010 semester. A total of 115 institutions responded to the survey. The survey resus discuss overall effectiveness of current simulation centers as well as the tools and techniques used to conduct the simulation activity

  14. SALTSTONE MATRIX CHARACTERIZATION AND STADIUM SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2009-07-30

    SIMCO Technologies, Inc. was contracted to evaluate the durability of the saltstone matrix material and to measure saltstone transport properties. This information will be used to: (1) Parameterize the STADIUM{reg_sign} service life code, (2) Predict the leach rate (degradation rate) for the saltstone matrix over 10,000 years using the STADIUM{reg_sign} concrete service life code, and (3) Validate the modeled results by conducting leaching (water immersion) tests. Saltstone durability for this evaluation is limited to changes in the matrix itself and does not include changes in the chemical speciation of the contaminants in the saltstone. This report summarized results obtained to date which include: characterization data for saltstone cured up to 365 days and characterization of saltstone cured for 137 days and immersed in water for 31 days. Chemicals for preparing simulated non-radioactive salt solution were obtained from chemical suppliers. The saltstone slurry was mixed according to directions provided by SRNL. However SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel made a mistake in the premix proportions. The formulation SIMCO personnel used to prepare saltstone premix was not the reference mix proportions: 45 wt% slag, 45 wt% fly ash, and 10 wt% cement. SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel used the following proportions: 21 wt% slag, 65 wt% fly ash, and 14 wt% cement. The mistake was acknowledged and new mixes have been prepared and are curing. The results presented in this report are assumed to be conservative since the excessive fly ash was used in the SIMCO saltstone. The SIMCO mixes are low in slag which is very reactive in the caustic salt solution. The impact is that the results presented in this report are expected to be conservative since the samples prepared were deficient in slag and contained excess fly ash. The hydraulic reactivity of slag is about four times that of fly ash so the amount of hydrated binder formed per unit volume in the SIMCO saltstone samples is

  15. Exploring Space Physics Concepts Using Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM), a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the National Science Foundation, has the goal of developing a suite of integrated physics based computer models of the space environment that can follow the evolution of a space weather event from the Sun to the Earth. In addition to the research goals, CISM is also committed to training the next generation of space weather professionals who are imbued with a system view of space weather. This view should include an understanding of both helio-spheric and geo-space phenomena. To this end, CISM offers a yearly Space Weather Summer School targeted to first year graduate students, although advanced undergraduates and space weather professionals have also attended. This summer school uses a number of innovative pedagogical techniques including devoting each afternoon to a computer lab exercise that use results from research quality simulations and visualization techniques, along with ground based and satellite data to explore concepts introduced during the morning lectures. These labs are suitable for use in wide variety educational settings from formal classroom instruction to outreach programs. The goal of this poster is to outline the goals and content of the lab materials so that instructors may evaluate their potential use in the classroom or other settings.

  16. Early development of Xenopus embryos is affected by simulated gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Hiroki; Neff, Anton W.; Malacinski, George M.

    1994-01-01

    Early amphibian (Xenopus laevis) development under clinostat-simulated weightlessness and centrifuge-simulated hypergravity was studied. The results revealed significant effects on (i) 'morphological patterning' such as the cleavage furrow pattern in the vegetal hemisphere at the eight-cell stage and the shape of the dorsal lip in early gastrulae and (ii) 'the timing of embryonic events' such as the third cleavage furrow completion and the dorsal lip appearance. Substantial variations in sensitivity to simulated force fields were observed, which should be considered in interpreting spaceflight data.

  17. A dynamic traffic simulator for roads affected by natural hasards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Derron, M.-H.

    2012-04-01

    This work focuses on the issue of natural hazards threatening roads. Nowadays, risk estimations of rock falls or landslides affecting whole sections of road are generally quite accurate and under relatively good control. Mitigation measures provide intervention means to reduce the hazards along roads. However, as classical models of risk calculation on communication routes do not take into account the dynamic traffic parameters, little is known on the way of reducing the risk at road level. It is not known precisely what really happens on the road when an event occurs and how vehicles interact. A dynamic traffic simulator in development provides information on factors having an impact on the risk level related to the road. Variables such as visibility, curvature radius of turns or vehicle type were included in the model. Varying these variables within dynamic traffic simulations can suggest solutions to minimize the risks for road users. These simulations can provide answers to various questions, such as: does speed have a significant impact on the risk incurred by drivers? Is it possible to significantly reduce the risk with appropriate speeds? The simulation is performed with the MATLAB © software. The model is yet to be calibrated and validated through in situ tests.

  18. [Initial results with the Munich knee simulator].

    PubMed

    Frey, M; Riener, R; Burgkart, R; Pröll, T

    2002-01-01

    In orthopaedics more than 50 different clinical knee joint evaluation tests exist that have to be trained in orthopaedic education. Often it is not possible to obtain sufficient practical training in a clinical environment. The training can be improved by Virtual Reality technology. In the frame of the Munich Knee Joint Simulation project an artificial leg with anatomical properties is attached by a force-torque sensor to an industrial robot. The recorded forces and torques are the input for a simple biomechanical model of the human knee joint. The robot is controlled in such way that the user gets the feeling he moves a real leg. The leg is embedded in a realistic environment with a couch and a patient on it.

  19. Monitoring of a slope affected by shallow landslides: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisina, Claudia; Zizioli, Davide; Bordoni, Massimiliano; Valentino, Roberto; Bittelli, Marco; Chersich, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Shallow landslides can be defined as slope movements, due to extreme rainfall events, affecting superficial deposits of small thickness; their failure surface is, generally, located within the soil-bedrock interface. Although they involve small volumes of soil, due to their close proximity to urbanized areas, they cause significant damage to structures and infrastructures and, sometimes, human losses. Therefore, identifying at slope scale the soil hydrological and mechanical processes which control the shallow landslide triggering mechanisms is becoming of crucial interest in order to assess the shallow landslide susceptibility using physically based models and to develop early-warning system. For doing this an experimental monitoring station was installed in an area of the North-Eastern Oltrepo Pavese (Northern Apennines, Italy), where several shallow landslide events occurred in the last years. The objectives of the research are: (a) to monitor the saturated and unsaturated zone response to seasonal and extreme rainfall events in order to identify the processes that determine the formation of shallow landslides; (b) to determine how antecedent precipitation could affect pore pressure development. The test site slope is representative of other sites in Northern Apennines subjected to shallow landslides: it is characterized by medium-high gradient (more than 15°), the land use is constituted by trees and shrubs developed on abandoned vineyards, the bedrock is made up of gravel, sand and poorly cemented conglomerates. The geotechnical characterization of superficial deposits was based on soils analysis conducted according to the ASTM standard, including assessment of the physical parameters of materials (grain size distribution, bulk and dry densities and Atterberg Limits), the shear strength parameters (direct shear and triaxial tests). A pedological and mineralogical characterization of the site were also carried out. The experimental station consists in a

  20. Sound frequency affects speech emotion perception: results from congenital amusia

    PubMed Central

    Lolli, Sydney L.; Lewenstein, Ari D.; Basurto, Julian; Winnik, Sean; Loui, Psyche

    2015-01-01

    Congenital amusics, or “tone-deaf” individuals, show difficulty in perceiving and producing small pitch differences. While amusia has marked effects on music perception, its impact on speech perception is less clear. Here we test the hypothesis that individual differences in pitch perception affect judgment of emotion in speech, by applying low-pass filters to spoken statements of emotional speech. A norming study was first conducted on Mechanical Turk to ensure that the intended emotions from the Macquarie Battery for Evaluation of Prosody were reliably identifiable by US English speakers. The most reliably identified emotional speech samples were used in Experiment 1, in which subjects performed a psychophysical pitch discrimination task, and an emotion identification task under low-pass and unfiltered speech conditions. Results showed a significant correlation between pitch-discrimination threshold and emotion identification accuracy for low-pass filtered speech, with amusics (defined here as those with a pitch discrimination threshold >16 Hz) performing worse than controls. This relationship with pitch discrimination was not seen in unfiltered speech conditions. Given the dissociation between low-pass filtered and unfiltered speech conditions, we inferred that amusics may be compensating for poorer pitch perception by using speech cues that are filtered out in this manipulation. To assess this potential compensation, Experiment 2 was conducted using high-pass filtered speech samples intended to isolate non-pitch cues. No significant correlation was found between pitch discrimination and emotion identification accuracy for high-pass filtered speech. Results from these experiments suggest an influence of low frequency information in identifying emotional content of speech. PMID:26441718

  1. Sound frequency affects speech emotion perception: results from congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Lolli, Sydney L; Lewenstein, Ari D; Basurto, Julian; Winnik, Sean; Loui, Psyche

    2015-01-01

    Congenital amusics, or "tone-deaf" individuals, show difficulty in perceiving and producing small pitch differences. While amusia has marked effects on music perception, its impact on speech perception is less clear. Here we test the hypothesis that individual differences in pitch perception affect judgment of emotion in speech, by applying low-pass filters to spoken statements of emotional speech. A norming study was first conducted on Mechanical Turk to ensure that the intended emotions from the Macquarie Battery for Evaluation of Prosody were reliably identifiable by US English speakers. The most reliably identified emotional speech samples were used in Experiment 1, in which subjects performed a psychophysical pitch discrimination task, and an emotion identification task under low-pass and unfiltered speech conditions. Results showed a significant correlation between pitch-discrimination threshold and emotion identification accuracy for low-pass filtered speech, with amusics (defined here as those with a pitch discrimination threshold >16 Hz) performing worse than controls. This relationship with pitch discrimination was not seen in unfiltered speech conditions. Given the dissociation between low-pass filtered and unfiltered speech conditions, we inferred that amusics may be compensating for poorer pitch perception by using speech cues that are filtered out in this manipulation. To assess this potential compensation, Experiment 2 was conducted using high-pass filtered speech samples intended to isolate non-pitch cues. No significant correlation was found between pitch discrimination and emotion identification accuracy for high-pass filtered speech. Results from these experiments suggest an influence of low frequency information in identifying emotional content of speech. PMID:26441718

  2. How Environment Affects Galaxy Metallicity: Lessons from the Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genel, S.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have found higher galaxy metallicities in richer environments. It is not yet clear, however, whether metallicity-environment dependencies are merely an indirect consequence of environmentally dependent formation histories, or of environment related processes directly affecting metallicity. Here, we present a detailed study of metallicity-environment correlations in a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, in particular the Illustris simulation. Illustris galaxies display similar relations to those observed. Utilizing our knowledge of simulated formation histories, and leveraging the large simulation volume, we construct galaxy samples of satellites and centrals that are matched in formation histories. This allows us to find that ˜1/3 of the metallicity-environment correlation is due to different formation histories in different environments. This is a combined effect of satellites (in particular, in denser environments) having on average lower z=0 star formation rates (SFRs), and of their older stellar ages, even at a given z=0 SFR. Most of the difference, ˜2/3, however, is caused by the higher concentration of star-forming disks of satellite galaxies, as this biases their SFR-weighted metallicities toward their inner, more metal-rich parts. With a newly defined quantity, the `radially averaged' metallicity, which captures the metallicity profile but is independent of the SFR profile, the metallicities of satellites and centrals become environmentally independent once they are matched in formation history. This effect may also explain most of the differences between metallicities of galaxies in different large-scale environmental densities. A prediction for observations is that those differences become smaller as smaller apertures are considered.

  3. Study of individual and group affective processes in the crew of a simulated mission to Mars: Positive affectivity as a valuable indicator of changes in the crew affectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Lačev, Alek; Šolcová, Iva

    2014-07-01

    The success of a long-duration space mission depends on various technical demands as well as on the psychological (cognitive, affective, and motivational) adaptation of crewmembers and the quality of interactions within the crew. We examined the ways crewmembers of a 520-day simulated spaceflight to Mars (held in the Institute for Biomedical Problems, in Moscow) experienced and regulated their moods and emotions. Results show that crewmembers experienced predominantly positive emotions throughout their 520-day isolation and the changes in mood of the crewmembers were asynchronous and balanced. The study suggests that during the simulation, crewmembers experienced and regulated their emotions differently than they usually do in their everyday life. In isolation, crewmembers preferred to suppress and neutralize their negative emotions and express overtly only emotions with positive valence. Although the affective processes were almost invariable throughout the simulation, two periods of time when the level of positive emotions declined were identified. Regarding the findings, the paper suggests that changes in positive affectivity could be a more valuable indicator of human experience in demanding but professional environments than changes in negative affectivity. Finally, the paper discusses the phenomenology of emotions during a real space mission.

  4. Can lepton number violating interactions affect the LSND results?

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, yuval

    1998-10-06

    If the atmospheric and the solar neutrino problem are both explained by neutrino oscillations, and if there are only three light neutrinos, then all mass-squared differences between the neutrinos are known. In such a case, existing terrestrial neutrino oscillation experiments cannot be significantly affected by neutrino oscillations, but, in principle there could be an anomaly in the neutrino flux due to new neutrino interactions. We discuss how a non-standard muon decay mu{sup +} --> e{sup +}anti-nu{sub e}nu{sub l} would modify the neutrino production processes of these experiments. Since SU(2){sub L} violation is small for New Physics above the weak scale one can use related flavor-violating charged lepton processes to constrain these decays in a model independent way. We show that the upper bounds on mu -->3e, muonium-antimuonium conversion and tau --> mu e e rule out any observable effect for the present experiments due to mu{sup +} --> e{sup +} n u{sub e}nu{sub l} for l = e, mu, tau respectively. Applying similar arguments to flavor-changing semi-leptonic reactions we exclude the possibility that the ''oscillation signals'' observed at LSND are due to flavor-changing interactions that conserve total lepton number.

  5. [Factors affecting the treatment results with pulmonary tuberculosis patients].

    PubMed

    Berezovskiĭ, B A; Salobaĭ, R Iu; Marchak, V V; Popova, I I; Zakopaĭlo, G G; Kucher, V A; Vasylyk, V U; Mikheĭ, L V

    1991-12-01

    A study is presented of the effect of social factors on the outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with freshly detected disease mainly in rural localities in 1985-1989. The outcomes of treatment depended mainly on the form and extension of the pathological process and terms of treatment. It was also established that the outcomes of tuberculosis are also influenced by unfavourable social factors which are more pronounced in persons with an extensive process. Treatment results were better in women with higher education than in similarly educator men. Among agricultural workers treatment efficacy was worse than among office workers and housewives. Life in the family effects more favourably treatment results than single life. Treatment results were worse in those living in unsatisfactory conditions, engaged in hard physical work, suffering of concomitant diseases and bad habits.

  6. Environmental Factors Affecting Asthma and Allergies: Predicting and Simulating Downwind Exposure to Airborne Pollen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey; Estes, Sue; Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Huete, Alfredo; Solano, Ramon; Ratana, Piyachat; Jiang, Zhangyan; Flowers, Len; Zelicoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the environmental factors that affect asthma and allergies and work to predict and simulate the downwind exposure to airborne pollen. Using a modification of Dust REgional Atmosphere Model (DREAM) that incorporates phenology (i.e. PREAM) the aim was to predict concentrations of pollen in time and space. The strategy for using the model to simulate downwind pollen dispersal, and evaluate the results. Using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), to get seasonal sampling of Juniper, the pollen chosen for the study, land cover on a near daily basis. The results of the model are reviewed.

  7. Does consideration of water routing affect simulated water and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Schneiderman, E. M.; Band, L. E.; Hwang, T.; Pierson, D. C.; Pradhanang, S. M.; Zion, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    The cycling of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is closely coupled with the cycling of water. An important mechanism connecting ecological and hydrological processes in terrestrial ecosystems is lateral flow of water along landscapes. Few studies, however, have examined explicitly how consideration of water routing affects simulated water and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study is to explore how consideration of water routing in a process-based hydroecological model affects simulated water and carbon dynamics. To achieve that end, we rasterized the regional hydroecological simulation systems (RHESSys) and employed the rasterized RHESSys (R-RHESSys) in a forested watershed. We performed and compared two contrasting simulations, one with and another without water routing. We found that R-RHESSys is able to correctly simulate major hydrological and ecological variables regardless of whether water routing is considered. When water routing was neglected, however, soil water table depth and saturation deficit were simulated to be smaller and spatially more homogeneous. As a result, evaporation, forest productivity and soil heterotrophic respiration also were simulated to be spatially more homogeneous compared to simulation with water routing. When averaged for the entire watershed, however, differences in simulated water and carbon fluxes are not significant between the two simulations. Overall, the study demonstrated that consideration of water routing enabled R-RHESSys to better capture our preconception of the spatial patterns of water table depth and saturation deficit across the watershed. Because the spatial pattern of soil moisture is fundamental to water efflux from land to the atmosphere, forest productivity and soil microbial activity, ecosystem and carbon cycle models, therefore, need to explicitly represent water routing in order to accurately quantify the magnitudes and patterns of water and carbon fluxes in terrestrial

  8. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4) are higher now than they have ever been during the past 420,000 years. However, concentrations have remained stable since 1999. Emissions associated with livestock husbandry are unlikely to have changed, so some combination of reduced production in wetlands, more efficient capture by landfills, or increased consumption by biological CH4 oxidation in upland soils may be responsible. Methane oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in upland soils and little is known about how these bacteria respond to anthropogenic global change, and how they will influence - or already are influencing - the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Might ongoing and future global changes increase biological CH4 oxidation? Soils were sampled from two field experiments to assess changes in rates of CH4 oxidation in response to global change simulations. Potential activities of CH4 oxidizing bacterial communities were measured through laboratory incubations under optimal temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CH4 concentrations (~18 ppm, or 10x ambient). The ongoing 6-year multifactorial Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated atmospheric N deposition, and increased wildfire frequency in an annual grassland in a Mediterranean-type climate in central California. The ongoing 1-year multifactorial Merriam Climate Change Experiment (MCCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, and reduced precipitation in four different types of ecosystems along an elevational gradient in a semi-arid climate in northern Arizona. The high desert grassland, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, and mixed conifer forest ecosystems range in annual precipitation from 100 to 1000 mm yr-1, and from productivity being strongly water limited to strongly temperature limited. Among JRGCE soils, elevated atmospheric CO2 increased potential CH4 oxidation rates (p=0.052) and wildfire

  9. The VIIRS Ocean Data Simulator Enhancements and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Wayne D.; Patt, Fredrick S.; Franz, Bryan A.; Turpie, Kevin R.; McClain, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    The VIIRS Ocean Science Team (VOST) has been developing an Ocean Data Simulator to create realistic VIIRS SDR datasets based on MODIS water-leaving radiances. The simulator is helping to assess instrument performance and scientific processing algorithms. Several changes were made in the last two years to complete the simulator and broaden its usefulness. The simulator is now fully functional and includes all sensor characteristics measured during prelaunch testing, including electronic and optical crosstalk influences, polarization sensitivity, and relative spectral response. Also included is the simulation of cloud and land radiances to make more realistic data sets and to understand their important influence on nearby ocean color data. The atmospheric tables used in the processing, including aerosol and Rayleigh reflectance coefficients, have been modeled using VIIRS relative spectral responses. The capabilities of the simulator were expanded to work in an unaggregated sample mode and to produce scans with additional samples beyond the standard scan. These features improve the capability to realistically add artifacts which act upon individual instrument samples prior to aggregation and which may originate from beyond the actual scan boundaries. The simulator was expanded to simulate all 16 M-bands and the EDR processing was improved to use these bands to make an SST product. The simulator is being used to generate global VIIRS data from and in parallel with the MODIS Aqua data stream. Studies have been conducted using the simulator to investigate the impact of instrument artifacts. This paper discusses the simulator improvements and results from the artifact impact studies.

  10. A simulation study of the flight dynamics of elastic aircraft. Volume 1: Experiment, results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Davidson, John B.; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    The simulation experiment described addresses the effects of structural flexibility on the dynamic characteristics of a generic family of aircraft. The simulation was performed using the NASA Langley VMS simulation facility. The vehicle models were obtained as part of this research. The simulation results include complete response data and subjective pilot ratings and comments and so allow a variety of analyses. The subjective ratings and analysis of the time histories indicate that increased flexibility can lead to increased tracking errors, degraded handling qualities, and changes in the frequency content of the pilot inputs. These results, furthermore, are significantly affected by the visual cues available to the pilot.

  11. Examining Factors that Affect Performance in Complex Simulation Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayrath, Michael Charles

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of manipulating the modality (text-only, voice-only, voice+text) of a tutorial and restriction (restricted vs. unrestricted) of a simulation's interface on retention and transfer of tutorial content. The tutorial prepared novice students to use Packet Tracer, a simulation developed by Cisco that teaches network…

  12. WorldView-2 data simulation and analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puetz, Angela M.; Lee, Krista; Olsen, R. Chris

    2009-05-01

    The WorldView-2 sensor, to be launched mid-2009, will have 8 MSI bands - 4 standard MSI spectral channels and an additional 4 non-traditional bands. Hyperspectral data from the AURORA sensor (from the former Advanced Power Technologies, Inc. (APTI)) was used to simulate the spectral response of the WorldView-2 Sensor and DigitalGlobe's 4- band QuickBird system. A bandpass filter method was used to simulate the spectral response of the sensors. The resulting simulated images were analyzed to determine possible uses of the additional bands available with the WorldView-2 sensor. Particular attention is given to littoral (shallow water) applications. The overall classification accuracy for the simulated QuickBird scene was 89%, and 94% for the simulated WorldView-2 scene.

  13. Simulated Birdwatchers’ Playback Affects the Behavior of Two Tropical Birds

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Berton C.; Haskell, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Although recreational birdwatchers may benefit conservation by generating interest in birds, they may also have negative effects. One such potentially negative impact is the widespread use of recorded vocalizations, or “playback,” to attract birds of interest, including range-restricted and threatened species. Although playback has been widely used to test hypotheses about the evolution of behavior, no peer-reviewed study has examined the impacts of playback in a birdwatching context on avian behavior. We studied the effects of simulated birdwatchers’ playback on the vocal behavior of Plain-tailed Wrens Thryothorus euophrys and Rufous Antpittas Grallaria rufula in Ecuador. Study species’ vocal behavior was monitored for an hour after playing either a single bout of five minutes of song or a control treatment of background noise. We also studied the effects of daily five minute playback on five groups of wrens over 20 days. In single bout experiments, antpittas made more vocalizations of all types, except for trills, after playback compared to controls. Wrens sang more duets after playback, but did not produce more contact calls. In repeated playback experiments, wren responses were strong at first, but hardly detectable by day 12. During the study, one study group built a nest, apparently unperturbed, near a playback site. The playback-induced habituation and changes in vocal behavior we observed suggest that scientists should consider birdwatching activity when selecting research sites so that results are not biased by birdwatchers’ playback. Increased vocalizations after playback could be interpreted as a negative effect of playback if birds expend energy, become stressed, or divert time from other activities. In contrast, the habituation we documented suggests that frequent, regular birdwatchers’ playback may have minor effects on wren behavior. PMID:24147094

  14. CONTINUOSLY STIRRED TANK REACTOR PARAMETERS THAT AFFECT SLUDGE BATCH 6 SIMULANT PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Fernandez, A.

    2010-05-28

    ). Precipitated MnO{sub 2} is combined with metal nitrates and fed into the CSTR. The metals are precipitated by a caustic NaOH stream. The rates at which these streams are added allows for pH adjustment of the mixture. A graphical representation of this process is given in Figure 1. In using the CSTR method for developing simulant, there are various parameters that can be adjusted in order to effectuate a physical change in the resulting simulant: pH, temperature, mixing speed, and flow rate. How will changing these parameters affect the physical properties of the sludge simulant? The ability to determine which parameter affects a particular property could allow one to develop a simulant that would better match the physical characteristics of HLW sludge.

  15. Aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM": Model, validation and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, K. G.; Golubev, A. I.; Petrov, A. M.; Piskunov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol kinetic code "AERFORM" is modified to simulate droplet and ice particle formation in mixed clouds. The splitting method is used to calculate condensation and coagulation simultaneously. The method is calibrated with analytic solutions of kinetic equations. Condensation kinetic model is based on cloud particle growth equation, mass and heat balance equations. The coagulation kinetic model includes Brownian, turbulent and precipitation effects. The real values are used for condensation and coagulation growth of water droplets and ice particles. The model and the simulation results for two full-scale cloud experiments are presented. The simulation model and code may be used autonomously or as an element of another code.

  16. Experimental and simulational result multipactors in 112 MHz QWR injector

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Brutus, J. C.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.

    2015-05-03

    The first RF commissioning of 112 MHz QWR superconducting electron gun was done in late 2014. The coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and Cathode Stalk (stalk) were installed and tested for the first time. During this experiment, we observed several multipacting barriers at different gun voltage levels. The simulation work was done within the same range. The comparison between the experimental observation and the simulation results are presented in this paper. The observations during the test are consisted with the simulation predictions. We were able to overcome most of the multipacting barriers and reach 1.8 MV gun voltage under pulsed mode after several round of conditioning processes.

  17. Preliminary Results from SCEC Earthquake Simulator Comparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullis, T. E.; Barall, M.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Ward, S. N.; Heien, E.; Zielke, O.; Pollitz, F. F.; Dieterich, J. H.; Rundle, J. B.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Turcotte, D. L.; Kellogg, L. H.; Field, E. H.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake simulators are computer programs that simulate long sequences of earthquakes. If such simulators could be shown to produce synthetic earthquake histories that are good approximations to actual earthquake histories they could be of great value in helping to anticipate the probabilities of future earthquakes and so could play an important role in helping to make public policy decisions. Consequently it is important to discover how realistic are the earthquake histories that result from these simulators. One way to do this is to compare their behavior with the limited knowledge we have from the instrumental, historic, and paleoseismic records of past earthquakes. Another, but slow process for large events, is to use them to make predictions about future earthquake occurrence and to evaluate how well the predictions match what occurs. A final approach is to compare the results of many varied earthquake simulators to determine the extent to which the results depend on the details of the approaches and assumptions made by each simulator. Five independently developed simulators, capable of running simulations on complicated geometries containing multiple faults, are in use by some of the authors of this abstract. Although similar in their overall purpose and design, these simulators differ from one another widely in their details in many important ways. They require as input for each fault element a value for the average slip rate as well as a value for friction parameters or stress reduction due to slip. They share the use of the boundary element method to compute stress transfer between elements. None use dynamic stress transfer by seismic waves. A notable difference is the assumption different simulators make about the constitutive properties of the faults. The earthquake simulator comparison project is designed to allow comparisons among the simulators and between the simulators and past earthquake history. The project uses sets of increasingly detailed

  18. Hyper-X Stage Separation: Simulation Development and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, David E.; Martin, John G.; Robinson, Jeffrey S.; Bose, David M.; Strovers, Brian K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of stage separation simulation development and results for NASA's Hyper-X program; a focused hypersonic technology effort designed to move hypersonic, airbreathing vehicle technology from the laboratory environment to the flight environment. This paper presents an account of the development of the current 14 degree of freedom stage separation simulation tool (SepSim) and results from use of the tool in a Monte Carlo analysis to evaluate the risk of failure for the separation event. Results from use of the tool show that there is only a very small risk of failure in the separation event.

  19. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  20. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-21

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  1. How microphysical choices affect simulated infrared brightness temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberg, S.; Köhler, C.; Seifert, A.; Crewell, S.

    2015-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) today relies more and more on satellite data, both for assimilation and for evaluation. However, process-based analyses of the biases between observed and simulated satellite data, which go beyond a mere identification of the biases, are rare. The present study investigates a long-known bias (Böhme et al., 2011) between brightness temperatures (BTs) simulated from the regional NWP model COSMO-DE forecasts via RTTOV (Radiative Transfer for TOVS) and those observed by Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). The pivotal question is whether a novel two-moment cloud ice scheme, developed by Köhler (2013) primarily to improve the representation of ice nucleation processes, exhibits an improved performance with respect to this bias and, if that is so, to provide a process-based analysis which identifies the reasons for the improved behaviour. It is shown that the new two-moment cloud ice scheme reduces the BT bias distinctly and can therefore be considered an improvement in comparison to two standard schemes, the two-category ice scheme and the three-category ice scheme. The improvement in simulated BTs is due to a vertical redistribution of cloud ice to lower model levels. Sensitivity studies identify two of the introduced changes in the two-moment cloud ice scheme to be hand-in-hand responsible for most of the improved performance: the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme and the consideration of cloud ice sedimentation. Including only cloud ice sedimentation without changing the heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme has no distinct effect on cloud ice. Further sensitivity studies with varying aerosol number densities reveal a comparably small sensitivity, indicating that the use of a physically reasonable heterogeneous ice nucleation scheme is far more important than the exact knowledge of the actual aerosol number densities.

  2. Results from Binary Black Hole Simulations in Astrophysics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Present and planned gravitational wave observatories are opening a new astronomical window to the sky. A key source of gravitational waves is the merger of two black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), in particular, is expected to observe these events with signal-to-noise ratio's in the thousands. To fully reap the scientific benefits of these observations requires a detailed understanding, based on numerical simulations, of the predictions of General Relativity for the waveform signals. New techniques for simulating binary black hole mergers, introduced two years ago, have led to dramatic advances in applied numerical simulation work. Over the last two years, numerical relativity researchers have made tremendous strides in understanding the late stages of binary black hole mergers. Simulations have been applied to test much of the basic physics of binary black hole interactions, showing robust results for merger waveform predictions, and illuminating such phenomena as spin-precession. Calculations have shown that merging systems can be kicked at up to 2500 km/s by the thrust from asymmetric emission. Recently, long lasting simulations of ten or more orbits allow tests of post-Newtonian (PN) approximation results for radiation from the last orbits of the binary's inspiral. Already, analytic waveform models based PN techniques with incorporated information from numerical simulations may be adequate for observations with current ground based observatories. As new advances in simulations continue to rapidly improve our theoretical understanding of the systems, it seems certain that high-precision predictions will be available in time for LISA and other advanced ground-based instruments. Future gravitational wave observatories are expected to make precision.

  3. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  4. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  5. Simulating lightning into the RAMS model: implementation and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, S.; Avolio, E.; Petracca, M.; Panegrossi, G.; Sanò, P.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.

    2014-05-01

    This paper shows the results of a tailored version of a previously published methodology, designed to simulate lightning activity, implemented into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The method gives the flash density at the resolution of the RAMS grid-scale allowing for a detailed analysis of the evolution of simulated lightning activity. The system is applied in detail to two case studies occurred over the Lazio Region, in Central Italy. Simulations are compared with the lightning activity detected by the LINET network. The cases refer to two thunderstorms of different intensity. Results show that the model predicts reasonably well both cases and that the lightning activity is well reproduced especially for the most intense case. However, there are errors in timing and positioning of the convection, whose magnitude depends on the case study, which mirrors in timing and positioning errors of the lightning distribution. To assess objectively the performance of the methodology, standard scores are presented for four additional case studies. Scores show the ability of the methodology to simulate the daily lightning activity for different spatial scales and for two different minimum thresholds of flash number density. The performance decreases at finer spatial scales and for higher thresholds. The comparison of simulated and observed lighting activity is an immediate and powerful tool to assess the model ability to reproduce the intensity and the evolution of the convection. This shows the importance of the use of computationally efficient lightning schemes, such as the one described in this paper, in forecast models.

  6. Effects of personal relevance and simulated darkness on the affective appraisal of a virtual environment

    PubMed Central

    Houtkamp, Joske M.; Vreugdenhil, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether personal relevance influences the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment (VE) in simulated darkness. In the real world, darkness often evokes thoughts of vulnerability, threat, and danger, and may automatically precipitate emotional responses consonant with those thoughts (fear of darkness). This influences the affective appraisal of a given environment after dark and the way humans behave in that environment in conditions of low lighting. Desktop VEs are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and (architectural or lighting) interventions on human behaviour and feelings of safety. Their (ecological) validity for these purposes depends critically on their ability to correctly address the user’s cognitive and affective experience. Previous studies with desktop (i.e., non-immersive) VEs found that simulated darkness only slightly affects the user’s behavioral and emotional responses to the represented environment, in contrast to the responses observed for immersive VEs. We hypothesize that the desktop VE scenarios used in previous studies less effectively induced emotional and behavioral responses because they lacked personal relevance. In addition, factors like signs of social presence and relatively high levels of ambient lighting may also have limited these responses. In this study, young female volunteers explored either a daytime or a night-time (low ambient light level) version of a desktop VE representing a deserted (no social presence) prototypical Dutch polder landscape. To enhance the personal relevance of the simulation, a fraction of the participants were led to believe that the virtual exploration tour would prepare them for a follow-up tour through the real world counterpart of the VE. The affective appraisal of the VE and the emotional response of the participants were measured through self-report. The results show that the VE was appraised as slightly less pleasant and

  7. Effects of personal relevance and simulated darkness on the affective appraisal of a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Toet, Alexander; Houtkamp, Joske M; Vreugdenhil, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether personal relevance influences the affective appraisal of a desktop virtual environment (VE) in simulated darkness. In the real world, darkness often evokes thoughts of vulnerability, threat, and danger, and may automatically precipitate emotional responses consonant with those thoughts (fear of darkness). This influences the affective appraisal of a given environment after dark and the way humans behave in that environment in conditions of low lighting. Desktop VEs are increasingly deployed to study the effects of environmental qualities and (architectural or lighting) interventions on human behaviour and feelings of safety. Their (ecological) validity for these purposes depends critically on their ability to correctly address the user's cognitive and affective experience. Previous studies with desktop (i.e., non-immersive) VEs found that simulated darkness only slightly affects the user's behavioral and emotional responses to the represented environment, in contrast to the responses observed for immersive VEs. We hypothesize that the desktop VE scenarios used in previous studies less effectively induced emotional and behavioral responses because they lacked personal relevance. In addition, factors like signs of social presence and relatively high levels of ambient lighting may also have limited these responses. In this study, young female volunteers explored either a daytime or a night-time (low ambient light level) version of a desktop VE representing a deserted (no social presence) prototypical Dutch polder landscape. To enhance the personal relevance of the simulation, a fraction of the participants were led to believe that the virtual exploration tour would prepare them for a follow-up tour through the real world counterpart of the VE. The affective appraisal of the VE and the emotional response of the participants were measured through self-report. The results show that the VE was appraised as slightly less pleasant and more

  8. Recent results from simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The nonlinear saturation of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is best studied through numerical MHD simulations. Recent results of simulations that adopt the local shearing box approximation, and fully global models that follow the entire disk, are described. Outstanding issues remain, such as a first-principles understanding of the dynamo processes that control saturation with no net magnetic flux. Important directions for future work include a better understanding of basic plasma processes, such as reconnection, dissipation, and particle acceleration, in the MHD turbulence driven by the MRI.

  9. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D. Costin, M. Rattoni, B. Vienne, C. Vabre, A. Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-31

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  10. Immersion factors affecting perception and behaviour in a virtual reality power wheelchair simulator.

    PubMed

    Alshaer, Abdulaziz; Regenbrecht, Holger; O'Hare, David

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality based driving simulators are increasingly used to train and assess users' abilities to operate vehicles in a controlled and safe way. For the development of those simulators it is important to identify and evaluate design factors affecting perception, behaviour, and driving performance. In an exemplary power wheelchair simulator setting we identified the three immersion factors display type (head-mounted display v monitor), ability to freely change the field of view (FOV), and the visualisation of the user's avatar as potentially affecting perception and behaviour. In a study with 72 participants we found all three factors affected the participants' sense of presence in the virtual environment. In particular the display type significantly affected both perceptual and behavioural measures whereas FOV only affected behavioural measures. Our findings could guide future Virtual Reality simulator designers to evoke targeted user behaviours and perceptions. PMID:27633192

  11. Immersion factors affecting perception and behaviour in a virtual reality power wheelchair simulator.

    PubMed

    Alshaer, Abdulaziz; Regenbrecht, Holger; O'Hare, David

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality based driving simulators are increasingly used to train and assess users' abilities to operate vehicles in a controlled and safe way. For the development of those simulators it is important to identify and evaluate design factors affecting perception, behaviour, and driving performance. In an exemplary power wheelchair simulator setting we identified the three immersion factors display type (head-mounted display v monitor), ability to freely change the field of view (FOV), and the visualisation of the user's avatar as potentially affecting perception and behaviour. In a study with 72 participants we found all three factors affected the participants' sense of presence in the virtual environment. In particular the display type significantly affected both perceptual and behavioural measures whereas FOV only affected behavioural measures. Our findings could guide future Virtual Reality simulator designers to evoke targeted user behaviours and perceptions.

  12. Simulated acid rain affects birch leaf endophyte populations.

    PubMed

    Helander, M L; Neuvonen, S; Sieber, T; Petrini, O

    1993-11-01

    Endophytes were frequently isolated from mountain birch (Betula pubescens var. tortuosa (Ledeb.) Nyman) leaves at a subarctic site where natural air pollution is low. We tested whether simulated acid rain had any influence on the occurrence of endophytes. Dry controls with only ambient rain and irrigated controls treated with spring water of pH 6 were compared with acid treatments at pH 3 and pH 4, prepared by adding both sulphuric and nitric acids. Treatments began in 1985 and leaf samples were taken twice during the summer of 1992. Leaves were surface sterilized, five leaf disks from each leaf placed on malt extract agar, and growing colonies were counted and identified. The most frequently isolated endophyte from birch leaves was a Fusicladium anamorph of Venturia sp. (88% of all the isolates in July and 75% of all the isolates in August), followed by a sterile mycelium and Melanconium sp. The number of endophytes isolated and the species number increased from July to August. Endophytes were most frequently isolated from the basal part of the midrib. The percentage of colonization by endophytes was similar in short and long shoots. More endophytes were isolated from leaves of branches taken at 1 m height than at 2 m height. The stronger acid rain treatment (pH 3) reduced by approximately 25% the number of isolated endophytes in August. Treatments did not have any effect on species composition of endophyte assemblages in birch leaves.

  13. Effects of Virtual Human Appearance Fidelity on Emotion Contagion in Affective Inter-Personal Simulations.

    PubMed

    Volante, Matias; Babu, Sabarish V; Chaturvedi, Himanshu; Newsome, Nathan; Ebrahimi, Elham; Roy, Tania; Daily, Shaundra B; Fasolino, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Realistic versus stylized depictions of virtual humans in simulated inter-personal situations and their ability to elicit emotional responses in users has been an open question for artists and researchers alike. We empirically evaluated the effects of near visually realistic vs. non-realistic stylized appearance of virtual humans on the emotional response of participants in a medical virtual reality system that was designed to educate users in recognizing the signs and symptoms of patient deterioration. In a between-subjects experiment protocol, participants interacted with one of three different appearances of a virtual patient, namely visually realistic, cartoon-shaded and charcoal-sketch like conditions in a mixed reality simulation. Emotional impact were measured via a combination of quantitative objective measures were gathered using skin Electrodermal Activity (EDA) sensors, and quantitative subjective measures such as the Differential Emotion Survey (DES IV), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), and Social Presence questionnaire. The emotional states of the participants were analyzed across four distinct time steps during which the medical condition of the virtual patient deteriorated (an emotionally stressful interaction), and were contrasted to a baseline affective state. Objective EDA results showed that in all three conditions, male participants exhibited greater levels of arousal as compared to female participants. We found that negative affect levels were significantly lower in the visually realistic condition, as compared to the stylized appearance conditions. Furthermore, in emotional dimensions of interest-excitement, surprise, anger, fear and guilt participants in all conditions responded similarly. However, in social emotional constructs of shyness, presence, perceived personality, and enjoyment-joy, we found that participants responded differently in the visually realistic condition as compared to the cartoon and sketch conditions. Our

  14. Simulating lightning into the RAMS model: implementation and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, S.; Avolio, E.; Petracca, M.; Panegrossi, G.; Sanò, P.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.

    2014-11-01

    This paper shows the results of a tailored version of a previously published methodology, designed to simulate lightning activity, implemented into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The method gives the flash density at the resolution of the RAMS grid scale allowing for a detailed analysis of the evolution of simulated lightning activity. The system is applied in detail to two case studies occurred over the Lazio Region, in Central Italy. Simulations are compared with the lightning activity detected by the LINET network. The cases refer to two thunderstorms of different intensity which occurred, respectively, on 20 October 2011 and on 15 October 2012. The number of flashes simulated (observed) over Lazio is 19435 (16231) for the first case and 7012 (4820) for the second case, and the model correctly reproduces the larger number of flashes that characterized the 20 October 2011 event compared to the 15 October 2012 event. There are, however, errors in timing and positioning of the convection, whose magnitude depends on the case study, which mirrors in timing and positioning errors of the lightning distribution. For the 20 October 2011 case study, spatial errors are of the order of a few tens of kilometres and the timing of the event is correctly simulated. For the 15 October 2012 case study, the spatial error in the positioning of the convection is of the order of 100 km and the event has a longer duration in the simulation than in the reality. To assess objectively the performance of the methodology, standard scores are presented for four additional case studies. Scores show the ability of the methodology to simulate the daily lightning activity for different spatial scales and for two different minimum thresholds of flash number density. The performance decreases at finer spatial scales and for higher thresholds. The comparison of simulated and observed lighting activity is an immediate and powerful tool to assess the model ability to reproduce the

  15. Enhanced vision systems: results of simulation and operational tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Peter; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich

    1998-07-01

    Today's aircrews have to handle more and more complex situations. Most critical tasks in the field of civil aviation are landing approaches and taxiing. Especially under bad weather conditions the crew has to handle a tremendous workload. Therefore DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance has developed a concept for an enhanced vision system (EVS), which increases performance and safety of the aircrew and provides comprehensive situational awareness. In previous contributions some elements of this concept have been presented, i.e. the 'Simulation of Imaging Radar for Obstacle Detection and Enhanced Vision' by Doehler and Bollmeyer 1996. Now the presented paper gives an overview about the DLR's enhanced vision concept and research approach, which consists of two main components: simulation and experimental evaluation. In a first step the simulational environment for enhanced vision research with a pilot-in-the-loop is introduced. An existing fixed base flight simulator is supplemented by real-time simulations of imaging sensors, i.e. imaging radar and infrared. By applying methods of data fusion an enhanced vision display is generated combining different levels of information, such as terrain model data, processed images acquired by sensors, aircraft state vectors and data transmitted via datalink. The second part of this contribution presents some experimental results. In cooperation with Daimler Benz Aerospace Sensorsystems Ulm, a test van and a test aircraft were equipped with a prototype of an imaging millimeter wave radar. This sophisticated HiVision Radar is up to now one of the most promising sensors for all weather operations. Images acquired by this sensor are shown as well as results of data fusion processes based on digital terrain models. The contribution is concluded by a short video presentation.

  16. ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN COLLISIONLESS SYSTEMS. III. RESULTS FROM SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Eric I.; Egerer, Colin P. E-mail: egerer.coli@uwlax.edu

    2015-05-20

    The equilibria formed by the self-gravitating, collisionless collapse of simple initial conditions have been investigated for decades. We present the results of our attempts to describe the equilibria formed in N-body simulations using thermodynamically motivated models. Previous work has suggested that it is possible to define distribution functions for such systems that describe maximum entropy states. These distribution functions are used to create radial density and velocity distributions for comparison to those from simulations. A wide variety of N-body code conditions are used to reduce the chance that results are biased by numerical issues. We find that a subset of initial conditions studied lead to equilibria that can be accurately described by these models, and that direct calculation of the entropy shows maximum values being achieved.

  17. Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-04-26

    Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

  18. Numerical simulation results in the Carthage Cotton Valley field

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, D.N.; Pennington, B.F.

    1982-01-01

    By coordinating three-dimensional reservoir simulations with pressure-transient tests, core analyses, open-hole and production logs, evaluations of tracer data during hydraulic fracturing, and geologic mapping, Champlin Petroleum obtained better predictions of the reserves and the long-term deliverability of the very tight (less than 0.1-md) Cotton Valley gas reservoir in east Texas. The simulation model that was developed proved capable of optimizing the well spacing and the fracture length. The final history match with the simulator indicated that the formation permeability of the very tight producing zones is substantially lower than suggested by conventional core analysis, 640-acre well spacing will not drain this reservoir efficiently in a reasonable time, and reserves are higher than presimulation estimates. Other results showed that even very long-term pressure buildups in this multilayer reservoir may not reach the straight line required in the conventional Horner pressure-transient analysis, type curves reflecting finite fracture flow capacity can be very useful, and pressure-drawdown analyses from well flow rates and flowing tubing pressure can provide good initial estimates of reservoir and fracture properties for detailed reservoir simulation without requiring expensive, long-term shut-ins of the well.

  19. Embodied simulation as part of affective evaluation processes: task dependence of valence concordant EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, André; Funcke, Jakob Maria

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on recent findings, this study examines whether valence concordant electromyography (EMG) responses can be explained as an unconditional effect of mere stimulus processing or as somatosensory simulation driven by task-dependent processing strategies. While facial EMG over the Corrugator supercilii and the Zygomaticus major was measured, each participant performed two tasks with pictures of album covers. One task was an affective evaluation task and the other was to attribute the album covers to one of five decades. The Embodied Emotion Account predicts that valence concordant EMG is more likely to occur if the task necessitates a somatosensory simulation of the evaluative meaning of stimuli. Results support this prediction with regard to Corrugator supercilii in that valence concordant EMG activity was only present in the affective evaluation task but not in the non-evaluative task. Results for the Zygomaticus major were ambiguous. Our findings are in line with the view that EMG activity is an embodied part of the evaluation process and not a mere physical outcome.

  20. Preliminary Results of Laboratory Simulation of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shou-Biao; Xie, Jin-Lin; Hu, Guang-Hai; Li, Hong; Huang, Guang-Li; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2011-10-01

    In the Linear Magnetized Plasma (LMP) device of University of Science and Technology of China and by exerting parallel currents on two parallel copper plates, we have realized the magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasma. With the emissive probes, we have measured the parallel (along the axial direction) electric field in the process of reconnection, and verified the dependence of reconnection current on passing particles. Using the magnetic probe, we have measured the time evolution of magnetic flux, and the measured result shows no pileup of magnetic flux, in consistence with the result of numerical simulation.

  1. Molecular beam simulation of planetary atmospheric entry - Some recent results.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. B.; Reid, N. M.; Nier, A. O.; Hayden, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of molecular beam techniques to simulate entry into planetary atmospheres. Molecular beam sources for producing fast beams containing CO2 and atomic oxygen are discussed. Results pertinent to the design and calibration of a mass spectrometer ion source for measurement of the Martian atmosphere during the free molecule portion of the entry trajectory are also presented. The shortcomings and advantages of this simulation technique are discussed, and it is demonstrated that even with certain inadequacies much information useful to the ion source design was obtained. Particularly, it is shown that an open-cavity configuration retains sensitivity to atomic oxygen, provides reasonable signal enhancement from the stagnation effect, is not highly sensitive to pitch and yaw effects, and presents no unforeseen problems in measuring CO2 or atomic oxygen.

  2. Simulation results for an innovative anti-multipath digital receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Wilson, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Simulation results are presented for the error rate performance of the recursive digital MAP detector for known M-ary signals in multiplicative and additive Gaussian noise. Plots of detection error rate versus additive signal to noise ratio are given, with multipath interference strength as a parameter. For comparison, the error rates of conventional coherent and noncoherent digital MAP detectors are simultaneously simulated and graphed. It is shown that with nonzero multiplicative noise, the error rates of the conventional detectors saturate at an irreducible level as additive signal to noise ratio increases. The error rate for the innovative detector continues to decrease rapidly with increasing additive signal to noise ratio. In the absence of multiplicative interference, the conventional coherent detector and the innovative detector are shown to exhibit identical performance.-

  3. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  4. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, W S; Alamgir, M; Sutherland, W A

    1984-09-01

    A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report.

  5. Ballistics ordnance gelatine - How different concentrations, temperatures and curing times affect calibration results.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Fisk, Wesley; Wachsberger, Christian; Byard, Roger W

    2015-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether different concentrations of ordnance gelatine, water types, temperatures and curing times would have an effect on projectile penetration of a gelatine tissue surrogate. Both Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) specified gelatines were compared against the FBI calibration standard. 10% w/w and 20% w/w concentrations of gelatine with Bloom numbers of 250 and 285 were prepared and cured at variable temperatures (3-20°C) for 21 hours-3 weeks. Each block was shot on four occasions on the same range using steel calibre 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) air rifle at the required standard velocity of 180 ± 4.5 m/s, to ascertain the mean penetration depth. The results showed no significant difference in mean penetration depth using the three different water types (p > 0.05). Temperature changes and curing times did affect penetration depth. At 10°C, mean penetration depth with 20% gelatine 285 Bloom for the two water types tested was 49.7 ± 1.5 mm after 21 h curing time, whereas the same formulation at 20°C using two different water types was 79.1 ± 2.1 mm after 100 h curing time (p < 0.001). Neither of the NATO 20% concentrations of gelatine at 10°C or a 20% concentration of 285 Bloom gelatine at 10°C met the same calibration standard as the FBI recommended 10% formulation at 4°C. A 20% concentration of 285 Bloom at 20°C met the same calibration/penetration criteria as a 10% concentration of 250 Bloom at 4 °C after 100 h of curing, therefore matching the FBI calibration standard for a soft tissue simulant for wound ballistics research. These results demonstrate significant variability in simulant properties. Failure to standardise ballistic simulants may invalidate experimental results.

  6. Ballistics ordnance gelatine - How different concentrations, temperatures and curing times affect calibration results.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Fisk, Wesley; Wachsberger, Christian; Byard, Roger W

    2015-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether different concentrations of ordnance gelatine, water types, temperatures and curing times would have an effect on projectile penetration of a gelatine tissue surrogate. Both Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) specified gelatines were compared against the FBI calibration standard. 10% w/w and 20% w/w concentrations of gelatine with Bloom numbers of 250 and 285 were prepared and cured at variable temperatures (3-20°C) for 21 hours-3 weeks. Each block was shot on four occasions on the same range using steel calibre 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) air rifle at the required standard velocity of 180 ± 4.5 m/s, to ascertain the mean penetration depth. The results showed no significant difference in mean penetration depth using the three different water types (p > 0.05). Temperature changes and curing times did affect penetration depth. At 10°C, mean penetration depth with 20% gelatine 285 Bloom for the two water types tested was 49.7 ± 1.5 mm after 21 h curing time, whereas the same formulation at 20°C using two different water types was 79.1 ± 2.1 mm after 100 h curing time (p < 0.001). Neither of the NATO 20% concentrations of gelatine at 10°C or a 20% concentration of 285 Bloom gelatine at 10°C met the same calibration standard as the FBI recommended 10% formulation at 4°C. A 20% concentration of 285 Bloom at 20°C met the same calibration/penetration criteria as a 10% concentration of 250 Bloom at 4 °C after 100 h of curing, therefore matching the FBI calibration standard for a soft tissue simulant for wound ballistics research. These results demonstrate significant variability in simulant properties. Failure to standardise ballistic simulants may invalidate experimental results. PMID:26165674

  7. Stellar populations of stellar halos: Results from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. A.; Conroy, C.; Pillepich, A.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of both major and minor mergers is expected to significantly affect gradients of stellar ages and metallicities in the outskirts of galaxies. Measurements of observed gradients are beginning to reach large radii in galaxies, but a theoretical framework for connecting the findings to a picture of galactic build-up is still in its infancy. We analyze stellar populations of a statistically representative sample of quiescent galaxies over a wide mass range from the Illustris simulation. We measure metallicity and age profiles in the stellar halos of quiescent Illustris galaxies ranging in stellar mass from 1010 to 1012 M ⊙, accounting for observational projection and luminosity-weighting effects. We find wide variance in stellar population gradients between galaxies of similar mass, with typical gradients agreeing with observed galaxies. We show that, at fixed mass, the fraction of stars born in-situ within galaxies is correlated with the metallicity gradient in the halo, confirming that stellar halos contain unique information about the build-up and merger histories of galaxies.

  8. Planck 2015 results. XII. Full focal plane simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the 8th full focal plane simulation set (FFP8), deployed in support of the Planck 2015 results. FFP8 consists of 10 fiducial mission realizations reduced to 18 144 maps, together with the most massive suite of Monte Carlo realizations of instrument noise and CMB ever generated, comprising 104 mission realizations reduced to about 106 maps. The resulting maps incorporate the dominant instrumental, scanning, and data analysis effects, and the remaining subdominant effects will be included in future updates. Generated at a cost of some 25 million CPU-hours spread across multiple high-performance-computing (HPC) platforms, FFP8 is used to validate and verify analysis algorithms and their implementations, and to remove biases from and quantify uncertainties in the results of analyses of the real data.

  9. Understanding how hydrodynamics affects particle transport in saturated fractures using modelling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianflone, S.; Lakhian, V.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 35% of Canadians and Americans utilize groundwater for drinking water and as such, it is essential to understand the mechanisms which may jeopardize this resource. Porous media aquifers typically provide significant removal of particulate contaminants (eg. viruses, bacteria); however, fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards often provide pathways for particles to move in greater numbers and speed than in porous media. Thus, understanding flow and transport in fractures is important for the preservation and use of groundwater sources. Models based on coupling flow and transport equations can be used in understanding transport in fractures. Both experiments and simulations have shown that there are inconsistencies in current transport, attachment and detachment theory, particularly when particle size is varied. The assumption that hydrodynamic effects do not significantly affect transport of particles is likely untrue. As well, it has been shown that preferential flow paths occur in fractures, but the effects of path specific properties such as fracture geometry have yet to be thoroughly explored. It has been observed that eddies caused by local changes in geometry exist in fractures in the environment and models have demonstrated that such eddies will retard the flow of particles. In this work, two 2D fractures were randomly generated with a mean aperture of approximately 2mm. Finite element software, COMSOL Multiphysics, generated flow fields through the fractures by numerically solving the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation for varied flow rates. Eddies were observed in one of the fractures at both low (~1 m/day) and high (>100 m/day) velocities. A program was written using random walk particle tracking to simulate transport. Theories of attachment, detachment and matrix flow are not included in this model in order to isolate hydrodynamic forces. In combination with the modelling procedure, the two fractures were inscribed into pieces of

  10. Validation results of wind diesel simulation model TKKMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, L. M.

    The document summarizes the results of TKKMOD validation procedure. TKKMOD is a simulation model developed at Helsinki University of Technology for a specific wind-diesel system layout. The model has been included into the European wind-diesel modeling software package WDLTOOLS under the CEC JOULE project Engineering Design Tools for Wind-Diesel Systems (JOUR-0078). The simulation model is utilized for calculation of long-term performance of the reference system configuration for given wind and load conditions. The main results are energy flows, energy losses in the system components, diesel fuel consumption, and the number of diesel engine starts. The work has been funded through the Finnish Advanced Energy System R&D Programme (NEMO). The validation has been performed using the data from EFI (Norwegian Electric Power Institute), since data from the Finnish reference system is not yet available. The EFI system has a slightly different configuration with similar overall operating principles and approximately same battery capacity. The validation data set, 394 hours of measured data, is from the first prototype wind-diesel system on the island FROYA off the Norwegian coast.

  11. Tomography and calibration for Raven: from simulations to laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Kate; Correia, Carlos; Lardière, Olivier; Andersen, Dave; Bradley, Colin; Pham, Laurie; Blain, Célia; Nash, Reston; Gamroth, Darryl; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses static and dynamic tomographic wave-front (WF) reconstructors tailored to Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) for Raven, the first MOAO science and technology demonstrator recently installed on an 8m telescope. We show the results of a new minimum mean- square error (MMSE) solution based on spatio-angular (SA) correlation functions, which extends previous work in Correia et al, JOSA-A 20131 to adopt a zonal representation of the wave-front and its associated signals. This solution is outlined for the static reconstruction and then extended for the use of stand-alone temporal prediction and as a prediction model in a pupil plane based Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) algorithm. We have fully tested our algorithms in the lab and compared the results to simulations of the Raven system. These simulations have shown that an increase in limiting magnitude of up to one magnitude can be expected when prediction is implemented and up to two magnitudes when the LQG is used.

  12. Some results on ethnic conflicts based on evolutionary game simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jun; Yi, Yunfei; Wu, Hongrun; Liu, Yuhang; Tong, Xiaonian; Zheng, Bojin

    2014-07-01

    The force of the ethnic separatism, essentially originating from the negative effect of ethnic identity, is damaging the stability and harmony of multiethnic countries. In order to eliminate the foundation of the ethnic separatism and set up a harmonious ethnic relationship, some scholars have proposed a viewpoint: ethnic harmony could be promoted by popularizing civic identity. However, this viewpoint is discussed only from a philosophical prospective and still lacks support of scientific evidences. Because ethnic group and ethnic identity are products of evolution and ethnic identity is the parochialism strategy under the perspective of game theory, this paper proposes an evolutionary game simulation model to study the relationship between civic identity and ethnic conflict based on evolutionary game theory. The simulation results indicate that: (1) the ratio of individuals with civic identity has a negative association with the frequency of ethnic conflicts; (2) ethnic conflict will not die out by killing all ethnic members once for all, and it also cannot be reduced by a forcible pressure, i.e., increasing the ratio of individuals with civic identity; (3) the average frequencies of conflicts can stay in a low level by promoting civic identity periodically and persistently.

  13. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  14. Wastewater neutralization control based in fuzzy logic: Simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Garrido, R.; Adroer, M.; Poch, M.

    1997-05-01

    Neutralization is a technique widely used as a part of wastewater treatment processes. Due to the importance of this technique, extensive study has been devoted to its control. However, industrial wastewater neutralization control is a procedure with a lot of problems--nonlinearity of the titration curve, variable buffering, changes in loading--and despite the efforts devoted to this subject, the problem has not been totally solved. in this paper, the authors present the development of a controller based in fuzzy logic (FLC). In order to study its effectiveness, it has been compared, by simulation, with other advanced controllers (using identification techniques and adaptive control algorithms using reference models) when faced with various types of wastewater with different buffer capacity or when changes in the concentration of the acid present in the wastewater take place. Results obtained show that FLC could be considered as a powerful alternative for wastewater neutralization processes.

  15. SLAC E144 Plots, Simulation Results, and Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The 1997 E144 experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) utilitized extremely high laser intensities and collided huge groups of photons together so violently that positron-electron pairs were briefly created, actual particles of matter and antimatter. Instead of matter exploding into heat and light, light actually become matter. That accomplishment opened a new path into the exploration of the interactions of electrons and photons or quantum electrodynamics (QED). The E144 information at this website includes Feynmann Diagrams, simulation results, and data files. See also aseries of frames showing the E144 laser colliding with a beam electron and producing an electron-positron pair at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e144/focpic/focpic.html and lists of collaborators' papers, theses, and a page of press articles.

  16. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  17. Diamond-NICAM-SPRINTARS: downscaling and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of initiative "Research Program on Climate Change Adaptation" (RECCA) which investigates how predicted large-scale climate change may affect a local weather, and further examines possible atmospheric hazards that cities may encounter due to such a climate change, thus to guide policy makers on implementing new environmental measures, a "Development of Seamless Chemical AssimiLation System and its Application for Atmospheric Environmental Materials" (SALSA) project is funded by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and is focused on creating a regional (local) scale assimilation system that can accurately recreate and predict a transport of carbon dioxide and other air pollutants. In this study, a regional model of the next generation global cloud-resolving model NICAM (Non-hydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model) (Tomita and Satoh, 2004) is used and ran together with a transport model SPRINTARS (Spectral Radiation Transport Model for Aerosol Species) (Takemura et al, 2000) and a chemical transport model CHASER (Sudo et al, 2002) to simulate aerosols across urban cities (over a Kanto region including metropolitan Tokyo). The presentation will mainly be on a "Diamond-NICAM" (Figure 1), a regional climate model version of the global climate model NICAM, and its dynamical downscaling methodologies. Originally, a global NICAM can be described as twenty identical equilateral triangular-shaped panels covering the entire globe where grid points are at the corners of those panels, and to increase a resolution (called a "global-level" in NICAM), additional points are added at the middle of existing two adjacent points, so a number of panels increases by fourfold with an increment of one global-level. On the other hand, a Diamond-NICAM only uses two of those initial triangular-shaped panels, thus only covers part of the globe. In addition, NICAM uses an adaptive mesh scheme and its grid size can gradually decrease, as the grid

  18. New simulation and measurement results on gateable DEPFET devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bähr, Alexander; Aschauer, Stefan; Hermenau, Katrin; Herrmann, Sven; Lechner, Peter H.; Lutz, Gerhard; Majewski, Petra; Miessner, Danilo; Porro, Matteo; Richter, Rainer H.; Schaller, Gerhard; Sandow, Christian; Schnecke, Martina; Schopper, Florian; Stefanescu, Alexander; Strüder, Lothar; Treis, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    To improve the signal to noise level, devices for optical and x-ray astronomy use techniques to suppress background events. Well known examples are e.g. shutters or frame-store Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs). Based on the DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) principle a so-called Gatebale DEPFET detector can be built. Those devices combine the DEPFET principle with a fast built-in electronic shutter usable for optical and x-ray applications. The DEPFET itself is the basic cell of an active pixel sensor build on a fully depleted bulk. It combines internal amplification, readout on demand, analog storage of the signal charge and a low readout noise with full sensitivity over the whole bulk thickness. A Gatebale DEPFET has all these benefits and obviates the need for an external shutter. Two concepts of Gatebale DEPFET layouts providing a built-in shutter will be introduced. Furthermore proof of principle measurements for both concepts are presented. Using recently produced prototypes a shielding of the collection anode up to 1 • 10-4 was achieved. Predicted by simulations, an optimized geometry should result in values of 1 • 10-5 and better. With the switching electronic currently in use a timing evaluation of the shutter opening and closing resulted in rise and fall times of 100ns.

  19. Dominant factors affecting temperature rise in simulations of human thermoregulation during RF exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2011-12-01

    Numerical models of the human thermoregulatory system can be used together with realistic voxel models of the human anatomy to simulate the body temperature increases caused by the power absorption from radio-frequency electromagnetic fields. In this paper, the Pennes bioheat equation with a thermoregulatory model is used for calculating local peak temperatures as well as the body-core-temperature elevation in a realistic human body model for grounded plane-wave exposures at frequencies 39, 800 and 2400 MHz. The electromagnetic power loss is solved by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the discretized bioheat equation is solved by the geometric multigrid method. Human thermoregulatory models contain numerous thermophysiological and computational parameters—some of which may be subject to considerable uncertainty—that affect the simulated core and local temperature elevations. The goal of this paper is to find how greatly the computed temperature is influenced by changes in various modelling parameters, such as the skin blood flow rate, models for vasodilation and sweating, and clothing and air movement. The results show that the peak temperature rises are most strongly affected by the modelling of tissue blood flow and its temperature dependence, and mostly unaffected by the central control mechanism for vasodilation and sweating. Almost the opposite is true for the body-core-temperature rise, which is however typically greatly lower than the peak temperature rise. It also seems that ignoring the thermoregulation and the blood temperature increase is a good approximation when the local 10 g averaged specific absorption rate is smaller than 10 W kg-1.

  20. Refrigeration and freezing of porcine tissue does not affect the retardation of fragment simulating projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Carr, D J; Mabbott, A; Beckett, S; Clasper, J C

    2015-05-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to UK service personnel in modern conflicts. Numerical injury models to simulate such injuries utilise algorithms based upon gelatin and animal tissue testing but data is limited on many fragment simulating projectiles and these simulants cannot represent human anatomy. Testing with post mortem specimens may overcome this limitation but no information exists about how post mortem tissue changes and storage conditions in humans or animals may affect projectile penetration. Two chisel nosed cylinders (0.49 g and 1.10 g) and a 0.51 g (5 mm) sphere were fired into three groups of porcine tissue (fresh, refrigerated and frozen then refrigerated) and compared to 20% gelatin. Depth of projectile penetration was ascertained with the assistance of computed tomography and kinetic energy absorption by tissues measured using Doppler radar and high speed photography. No difference in depth of penetration was found between porcine tissue stored in the different manners compared with 20% gelatin by impact velocities less than 100 m/s. Insufficient numbers of projectiles were retained in tissue at higher velocities for statistical analysis to be undertaken. Energy absorbed per millimetre of tissue ranged between 0.42 and 0.98 J/mm for different porcine tissue despite differing storage. This pilot study would suggest that the effect of refrigerating or freezing porcine tissue followed by thawing has no effect on its ability to retard these projectiles. Further research is required to ascertain if these results occur at greater velocities and for other types of projectile. PMID:25882156

  1. Refrigeration and freezing of porcine tissue does not affect the retardation of fragment simulating projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Carr, D J; Mabbott, A; Beckett, S; Clasper, J C

    2015-05-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to UK service personnel in modern conflicts. Numerical injury models to simulate such injuries utilise algorithms based upon gelatin and animal tissue testing but data is limited on many fragment simulating projectiles and these simulants cannot represent human anatomy. Testing with post mortem specimens may overcome this limitation but no information exists about how post mortem tissue changes and storage conditions in humans or animals may affect projectile penetration. Two chisel nosed cylinders (0.49 g and 1.10 g) and a 0.51 g (5 mm) sphere were fired into three groups of porcine tissue (fresh, refrigerated and frozen then refrigerated) and compared to 20% gelatin. Depth of projectile penetration was ascertained with the assistance of computed tomography and kinetic energy absorption by tissues measured using Doppler radar and high speed photography. No difference in depth of penetration was found between porcine tissue stored in the different manners compared with 20% gelatin by impact velocities less than 100 m/s. Insufficient numbers of projectiles were retained in tissue at higher velocities for statistical analysis to be undertaken. Energy absorbed per millimetre of tissue ranged between 0.42 and 0.98 J/mm for different porcine tissue despite differing storage. This pilot study would suggest that the effect of refrigerating or freezing porcine tissue followed by thawing has no effect on its ability to retard these projectiles. Further research is required to ascertain if these results occur at greater velocities and for other types of projectile.

  2. LANGMUIR WAVE DECAY IN INHOMOGENEOUS SOLAR WIND PLASMAS: SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A. S.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-08-20

    Langmuir turbulence excited by electron flows in solar wind plasmas is studied on the basis of numerical simulations. In particular, nonlinear wave decay processes involving ion-sound (IS) waves are considered in order to understand their dependence on external long-wavelength plasma density fluctuations. In the presence of inhomogeneities, it is shown that the decay processes are localized in space and, due to the differences between the group velocities of Langmuir and IS waves, their duration is limited so that a full nonlinear saturation cannot be achieved. The reflection and the scattering of Langmuir wave packets on the ambient and randomly varying density fluctuations lead to crucial effects impacting the development of the IS wave spectrum. Notably, beatings between forward propagating Langmuir waves and reflected ones result in the parametric generation of waves of noticeable amplitudes and in the amplification of IS waves. These processes, repeated at different space locations, form a series of cascades of wave energy transfer, similar to those studied in the frame of weak turbulence theory. The dynamics of such a cascading mechanism and its influence on the acceleration of the most energetic part of the electron beam are studied. Finally, the role of the decay processes in the shaping of the profiles of the Langmuir wave packets is discussed, and the waveforms calculated are compared with those observed recently on board the spacecraft Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and WIND.

  3. Airborne ICESat-2 simulator (MABEL) results from Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, T.; Markus, T.; Brunt, K. M.; Walsh, K.; Hancock, D.; Cook, W. B.; Brenner, A. C.; Csatho, B. M.; De Marco, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a next-generation laser altimeter designed to continue key observations of sea ice freeboard, ice sheet elevation change, vegetation canopy height, earth surface elevation and sea surface heights. Scheduled for launch in mid-2016, ICESat-2 will collect data between 88 degrees north and south using a high-repetition rate (10 kHz) laser operating at 532nm, and using a photon-counting detection strategy. Our airborne simulator, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL) uses a similar photon-counting measurement strategy, operates at 532nm (16 beams) and 1064 nm (8 beams) to collect similar data to what we expect for ICESat-2. The comparison between frequencies allows for studies of possible penetration of green light into water or snow. MABEL collects more spatially-dense data than ICESat-2 (2cm along-track vs. 70 cm along track for ICESat-2, and has a smaller footprint than ICESat-2 (2m nominal diameter vs. 10m nominal diameter for ICESat-2) requiring geometric and radiometric scaling to relate MABEL data to simulate ICESat-2 data. We based MABEL out of Keflavik, Iceland during April 2012, and collected ~ 100 hours of data from 20km altitude over a variety of targets. MABEL collected sea ice data over the Nares Strait, and off the east coast of Greenland, the later flight in coordination with NASA's Operation IceBridge, which collected ATM data along the same track within 90 minutes of MABEL data collection. MABEL flew a variety of lines over Greenland in the southwest, Jakobshavn region, and over the ice sheet interior, including 4 hours of coincident data with Operation IceBridge in southwest Greenland. MABEL flew a number of calibration sites, including corner cubes in Svalbard, Summit Station (where a GPS survey of the surface elevation was collected within an hour of our overflight), and well-surveyed targets in Iceland and western Greenland. In this presentation, we present an overview of

  4. Simulating wind-affected snow accumulations at catchment to basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstral, Adam; Marks, Danny; Gurney, Robert

    2013-05-01

    In non-forested mountain regions, wind plays a dominant role in determining snow accumulation and melt patterns. A new, computationally efficient algorithm for distributing the complex and heterogeneous effects of wind on snow distributions was developed. The distribution algorithm uses terrain structure, vegetation, and wind data to adjust commonly available precipitation data to simulate wind-affected accumulations. This research describes model development and application in three research catchments in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwest Idaho, USA. All three catchments feature highly variable snow distributions driven by wind. The algorithm was used to derive model forcings for Isnobal, a mass and energy balance distributed snow model. Development and initial testing took place in the Reynolds Mountain East catchment (0.36 km2) where R2 values for the wind-affected snow distributions ranged from 0.50 to 0.67 for four observation periods spanning two years. At the Upper Sheep Creek catchment (0.26 km2) R2 values for the wind-affected model were 0.66 and 0.70. These R2 values matched or exceeded previously published cross-validation results from regression-based statistical analyses of snow distributions in similar environments. In both catchments the wind-affected model accurately located large drift zones, snow-scoured slopes, and produced melt patterns consistent with observed streamflow. Models that did not account for wind effects produced relatively homogenous SWE distributions, R2 values approaching 0.0, and melt patterns inconsistent with observed streamflow. The Dobson Creek (14.0 km2) application incorporated elevation effects into the distribution routine and was conducted over a two-dimensional grid of 6.67 × 105 pixels. Comparisons with satellite-derived snow-covered-area again demonstrated that the model did an excellent job locating regions with wind-affected snow accumulations. This final application demonstrated that the

  5. Results of a Flight Simulation Software Methods Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce

    1995-01-01

    A ten-page questionnaire was mailed to members of the AIAA Flight Simulation Technical Committee in the spring of 1994. The survey inquired about various aspects of developing and maintaining flight simulation software, as well as a few questions dealing with characterization of each facility. As of this report, 19 completed surveys (out of 74 sent out) have been received. This paper summarizes those responses.

  6. Mentoring Resulting in a New Model: Affect-Centered Transformational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, David W.; Tejeda, Armando R.

    2014-01-01

    The authors were professor and student, in a doctoral leadership course, during fall semester of 2013-2014. Across the term the professor mentored the mentee, guiding him to the creation of the next, needed model for leadership. The new model, known as The Affect-Centered Transformational Leadership Model, came about as the result. Becoming an…

  7. SIMULATION OF DNAPL DISTRIBUTION RESULTING FROM MULTIPLE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional and three-phase (water, NAPL and gas) numerical simulator, called NAPL, was employed to study the interaction between DNAPL (PCE) plumes in a variably saturated porous media. Several model verification tests have been performed, including a series of 2-D labo...

  8. FINAL SIMULATION RESULTS FOR DEMONSTRATION CASE 1 AND 2

    SciTech Connect

    David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland

    2003-10-15

    The goal of this DOE Vision-21 project work scope was to develop an integrated suite of software tools that could be used to simulate and visualize advanced plant concepts. Existing process simulation software did not meet the DOE's objective of ''virtual simulation'' which was needed to evaluate complex cycles. The overall intent of the DOE was to improve predictive tools for cycle analysis, and to improve the component models that are used in turn to simulate equipment in the cycle. Advanced component models are available; however, a generic coupling capability that would link the advanced component models to the cycle simulation software remained to be developed. In the current project, the coupling of the cycle analysis and cycle component simulation software was based on an existing suite of programs. The challenge was to develop a general-purpose software and communications link between the cycle analysis software Aspen Plus{reg_sign} (marketed by Aspen Technology, Inc.), and specialized component modeling packages, as exemplified by industrial proprietary codes (utilized by ALSTOM Power Inc.) and the FLUENT{reg_sign} computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (provided by Fluent Inc). A software interface and controller, based on an open CAPE-OPEN standard, has been developed and extensively tested. Various test runs and demonstration cases have been utilized to confirm the viability and reliability of the software. ALSTOM Power was tasked with the responsibility to select and run two demonstration cases to test the software--(1) a conventional steam cycle (designated as Demonstration Case 1), and (2) a combined cycle test case (designated as Demonstration Case 2). Demonstration Case 1 is a 30 MWe coal-fired power plant for municipal electricity generation, while Demonstration Case 2 is a 270 MWe, natural gas-fired, combined cycle power plant. Sufficient data was available from the operation of both power plants to complete the cycle configurations. Three runs

  9. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Data Compression Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, A. C.; Adrian, M. L.; Yeh, P.; Winkert, G. E.; Lobell, J. V.; Viňas, A. F.; Simpson, D. G.; Moore, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. To meet these requirements, the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) consists of eight (8) identical half top-hat electron sensors and eight (8) identical ion sensors and an Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). The sensors (electron or ion) are grouped into pairs whose 6° × 180° fields-of-view (FOV) are set 90° apart. Each sensor is equipped with electrostatic aperture steering to allow the sensor to scan a 45° × 180° fan about the its nominal viewing (0° deflection) direction. Each pair of sensors, known as the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) and the Dual Ion Spectrometer (DIS), occupies a quadrant on the MMS spacecraft and the combination of the eight electron/ion sensors, employing aperture steering, image the full-sky every 30-ms (electrons) and 150-ms (ions), respectively. To probe the diffusion regions of reconnection, the highest temporal/spatial resolution mode of FPI results in the DES complement of a given spacecraft generating 6.5-Mb s-1 of electron data while the DIS generates 1.1-Mb s-1 of ion data yielding an FPI total data rate of 7.6-Mb s-1. The FPI electron/ion data is collected by the IDPU then transmitted to the Central Data Instrument Processor (CIDP) on the spacecraft for science interest ranking. Only data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal/spatial structure will be intelligently down-linked by the spacecraft. Currently, the FPI data rate allocation to the CIDP is 1.5-Mb s-1. Consequently, the FPI-IDPU must employ data/image compression to meet this CIDP telemetry allocation. Here, we present simulations of the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 algorithm- based compression of the FPI-DES electron data. Compression analysis is based upon a seed of re- processed Cluster/PEACE electron measurements. Topics to be

  10. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Data Compression Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrie, A.; Adrian, Mark L.; Yeh, P.-S.; Winkert, G. E.; Lobell, J. V.; Vinas, A.F.; Simpson, D. J.; Moore, T. E.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. To meet these requirements, the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) consists of eight (8) identical half top-hat electron sensors and eights (8) identical ion sensors and an Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). The sensors (electron or ion) are grouped into pairs whose 6 deg x 180 deg fields-of-view (FOV) are set 90 deg apart. Each sensor is equipped with electrostatic aperture steering to allow the sensor to scan a 45 deg x 180 deg fan about its nominal viewing (0 deg deflection) direction. Each pair of sensors, known as the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) and the Dual Ion Spectrometer (DIS), occupies a quadrant on the MMS spacecraft and the combination of the eight electron/ion sensors, employing aperture steering, image the full-sky every 30-ms (electrons) and 150-ms (ions), respectively. To probe the results in the DES complement of a given spacecraft generating 6.5-Mbs(exp -1) of electron data while the DIS generates 1.1-Mbs(exp -1) of ion data yielding an FPI total data rate of 6.6-MBs(exp -1). The FPI electron/ion data is collected by the IDPU then transmitted to the Central Data Instrument Processor (CIDP) on the spacecraft for science interest ranking. Only data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal/spatial structure will be intelligently down-linked by the spacecraft. Currently, the FPI data rate allocation to the CIDP is 1.5-Mbs(exp -1). Consequently, the FPI-IDPU must employ data/image compression to meet this CIDP telemetry allocation. Here, we present simulations of the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 algorithm-based compression of the FPI-DES electron data. Compression analysis is based upon a seed of re-processed Cluster/PEACE electron measurements. Topics to be discussed include: review of compression algorithm; data quality

  11. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Data Compression Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, A.; Adrian, M. L.; Yeh, P.; Winkert, G.; Lobell, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. To meet these requirements, the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) consists of eight (8) identical half top-hat electron sensors and eight (8) identical ion sensors and an Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). The sensors (electron or ion) are grouped into pairs whose 6° x 180° fields-of-view (FOV) are set 90° apart. Each sensor is equipped with electrostatic aperture steering to allow the sensor to scan a 45° x 180° fan about the its nominal viewing (0° deflection) direction. Each pair of sensors, known as the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) and the Dual Ion Spectrometer (DIS), occupies a quadrant on the MMS spacecraft and the combination of the eight electron/ion sensors, employing aperture steering, image the full-sky every 30-ms (electrons) and 150-ms (ions), respectively. To probe the diffusion regions of reconnection, the highest temporal/spatial resolution mode of FPI results in the DES complement of a given spacecraft generating 6.5-Mb s-1 of electron data while the DIS generates 1.1-Mb s-1 of ion data yielding an FPI total data rate of 6.6-Mb s-1. The FPI electron/ion data is collected by the IDPU then transmitted to the Central Data Instrument Processor (CIDP) on the spacecraft for science interest ranking. Only data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal/spatial structure will be intelligently down-linked by the spacecraft. Currently, the FPI data rate allocation to the CIDP is 1.5-Mb s-1. Consequently, the FPI-IDPU must employ data/image compression to meet this CIDP telemetry allocation. Here, we present updated simulations of the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 algorithm-based compression of the FPI-DES electron data as well as the FPI-DIS ion data. Compression analysis is based upon a seed of re-processed Cluster

  12. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  13. Results from tight and loose coupled multiphysics in nuclear fuels performance simulations using BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Andrs, D.; Williamson, R. L.; Hales, J. D.; Perez, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won't converge and vice versa. (authors)

  14. Results from Tight and Loose Coupled Multiphysics in Nuclear Fuels Performance Simulations using BISON

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. Andrs; R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez

    2013-05-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won’t converge and vice versa.

  15. AFFECT AND THE FRAMING EFFECT WITHIN INDIVIDUALS OVER TIME: RISK TAKING IN A DYNAMIC INVESTMENT SIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    SEO, MYEONG-GU; GOLDFARB, BRENT; BARRETT, LISA FELDMAN

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of affect (pleasant or unpleasant feelings) and decision frames (gains or losses) in risk taking in a 20-day stock investment simulation in which 101 participants rated their current feelings while making investment decisions. As predicted, affect attenuated the relationships between decision frames and risk taking. After experiencing losses, individuals made more risky choices, in keeping with the framing effect. However, this tendency decreased and/or disappeared when loss was simultaneously experienced with either pleasant or unpleasant feelings. Similarly, individuals’ tendency to avoid risk after experiencing gains disappeared or even reversed when they simultaneously experienced pleasant feelings. PMID:26412860

  16. Factors Affecting Stream Nutrient Loads: A Synthesis of Regional SPARROW Model Results for the Continental United States1

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Stephen D; Alexander, Richard B; Schwarz, Gregory E; Crawford, Charles G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We compared the results of 12 recently calibrated regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models covering most of the continental United States to evaluate the consistency and regional differences in factors affecting stream nutrient loads. The models – 6 for total nitrogen and 6 for total phosphorus – all provide similar levels of prediction accuracy, but those for major river basins in the eastern half of the country were somewhat more accurate. The models simulate long-term mean annual stream nutrient loads as a function of a wide range of known sources and climatic (precipitation, temperature), landscape (e.g., soils, geology), and aquatic factors affecting nutrient fate and transport. The results confirm the dominant effects of urban and agricultural sources on stream nutrient loads nationally and regionally, but reveal considerable spatial variability in the specific types of sources that control water quality. These include regional differences in the relative importance of different types of urban (municipal and industrial point vs. diffuse urban runoff) and agriculture (crop cultivation vs. animal waste) sources, as well as the effects of atmospheric deposition, mining, and background (e.g., soil phosphorus) sources on stream nutrients. Overall, we found that the SPARROW model results provide a consistent set of information for identifying the major sources and environmental factors affecting nutrient fate and transport in United States watersheds at regional and subregional scales. PMID:22457574

  17. Factors affecting stream nutrient loads: A synthesis of regional SPARROW model results for the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, Stephen D.; Alexander, Richard B.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the results of 12 recently calibrated regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models covering most of the continental United States to evaluate the consistency and regional differences in factors affecting stream nutrient loads. The models - 6 for total nitrogen and 6 for total phosphorus - all provide similar levels of prediction accuracy, but those for major river basins in the eastern half of the country were somewhat more accurate. The models simulate long-term mean annual stream nutrient loads as a function of a wide range of known sources and climatic (precipitation, temperature), landscape (e.g., soils, geology), and aquatic factors affecting nutrient fate and transport. The results confirm the dominant effects of urban and agricultural sources on stream nutrient loads nationally and regionally, but reveal considerable spatial variability in the specific types of sources that control water quality. These include regional differences in the relative importance of different types of urban (municipal and industrial point vs. diffuse urban runoff) and agriculture (crop cultivation vs. animal waste) sources, as well as the effects of atmospheric deposition, mining, and background (e.g., soil phosphorus) sources on stream nutrients. Overall, we found that the SPARROW model results provide a consistent set of information for identifying the major sources and environmental factors affecting nutrient fate and transport in United States watersheds at regional and subregional scales. ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Simulated environmental criticalities affect transglutaminase of Malus and Corylus pollens having different allergenic potential.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Rosa Anna; Di Sandro, Alessia; Paris, Roberta; Pagliarani, Giulia; Tartarini, Stefano; Ricci, Giampaolo; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Verderio, Elisabetta; Del Duca, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    Increases in temperature and air pollution influence pollen allergenicity, which is responsible for the dramatic raise in respiratory allergies. To clarify possible underlying mechanisms, an anemophilous pollen (hazel, Corylus avellana), known to be allergenic, and an entomophilous one (apple, Malus domestica), the allergenicity of which was not known, were analysed. The presence also in apple pollen of known fruit allergens and their immunorecognition by serum of an allergic patient were preliminary ascertained, resulting also apple pollen potentially allergenic. Pollens were subjected to simulated stressful conditions, provided by changes in temperature, humidity, and copper and acid rain pollution. In the two pollens exposed to environmental criticalities, viability and germination were negatively affected and different transglutaminase (TGase) gel bands were differently immunodetected with the polyclonal antibody AtPng1p. The enzyme activity increased under stressful treatments and, along with its products, was found to be released outside the pollen with externalisation of TGase being predominant in C. avellana, whose grain presents a different cell wall composition with respect to that of M. domestica. A recombinant plant TGase (AtPng1p) stimulated the secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) activity, that in vivo is present in human mucosa and is involved in inflammation. Similarly, stressed pollen, hazel pollen being the most efficient, stimulated to very different extent sPLA(2) activity and putrescine conjugation to sPLA(2). We propose that externalised pollen TGase could be one of the mediators of pollen allergenicity, especially under environmental stress induced by climate changes.

  19. Simulations Build Efficacy: Empirical Results from a Four-Week Congressional Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Mack; Glenn, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a four-week congressional committee simulation implemented in upper level courses on Congress and the Legislative process at two liberal arts colleges. We find that the students participating in the simulation possessed high levels of political knowledge and confidence in their political skills prior to the simulation. An…

  20. Electrical properties of polarizable ionic solutions. II. Computer simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillol, J. M.; Levesque, D.; Weis, J. J.

    1989-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations for two limiting models of ionic solutions: one where the solvent molecules are polar, but nonpolarizable; the other where they are only polarizable (but have no permanent dipole moment). For both models, the static two-body correlation functions, the frequency-dependent dielectric constant and conductivity are calculated and the statistical uncertainty on these quantities estimated for molecular dynamics runs of the order of 105 integration steps. For the case of the polar solvent, the accuracy of the computed static interionic correlation functions allows a valuable test of the hypernetted chain integral equation theory at an ionic concentration of 0.04. The quantitative variation of the fluctuations of polarization and electrical current with change of boundary conditions is evaluated within the context of the second model (polarizable nonpolar solvent). Applying the relationships derived in Part I between the phenomenological coefficients and susceptibilities, it is shown that consistent values for the dielectric constant and electrical conductivity are obtained. The sum rules which generalize the Stillinger-Lovett conditions to ionic solutions are computed and shown to be satisfied in our simulations. The evaluation of these sum rules constitutes an important test of the convergence of the electrolyte system to an equilibrium state.

  1. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; et al

    2016-04-19

    Here, the direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivitymore » analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.« less

  2. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Dixit, S. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moody, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Petrasso, R. D.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Sio, H.; Skupsky, S.; Zylstra, A.

    2016-05-01

    Direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.

  3. Effects of mothers' simulated withdrawal and depressed affect on mother-toddler interactions.

    PubMed

    Seiner, S H; Gelfand, D M

    1995-10-01

    Effects of enacted maternal withdrawal and depression were observed in a sample of 18-36-month-old children during counterbalanced brief (10-min) episodes of simulated depression and normal affect. As predicted, when mothers enacted withdrawal and depressed affect by becoming less positive, expressive, involved, talkative, and responsive, toddlers physically withdrew from them, made more negative physical bids for attention, and became more unfocused and generally negative. Children accepted their unresponsive mothers' infrequent interaction bids, but did not attempt to comfort them when they appeared depressed. In mothers' normal mood episodes, children were more positive, were never unfocused, and played closer to their mothers. As expected, toddlers reacted negatively to transitory maternal withdrawal and depressed affect, displaying their distress in a developmentally appropriate manner. PMID:7555227

  4. Oral Factors Affecting Titanium Elution and Corrosion: An In Vitro Study Using Simulated Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Suito, Hideki; Iwawaki, Yuki; Goto, Takaharu; Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ti, which is biocompatible and resistant to corrosion, is widely used for dental implants, particularly in patients allergic to other materials. However, numerous studies have reported on Ti allergy and the in vitro corrosion of Ti. This study investigated the conditions that promote the elution of Ti ions from Ti implants. Methods Specimens of commercially pure Ti, pure nickel, a magnetic alloy, and a gold alloy were tested. Each specimen was immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) whose pH value was controlled (2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 7.4, and 9.0) using either hydrochloric or lactic acid. The parameters investigated were the following: duration of immersion, pH of the SBF, contact with a dissimilar metal, and mechanical stimulus. The amounts of Ti ions eluted were measured using a polarized Zeeman atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Eluted Ti ions were detected after 24 h (pH of 2.0 and 3.0) and after 48 h (pH of 9.0). However, even after 4 weeks, eluted Ti ions were not detected in SBF solutions with pH values of 5.0 and 7.4. Ti elution was affected by immersion time, pH, acid type, mechanical stimulus, and contact with a dissimilar metal. Elution of Ti ions in a Candida albicans culture medium was observed after 72 h. Significance Elution of Ti ions in the SBF was influenced by its pH and by crevice corrosion. The results of this study elucidate the conditions that lead to the elution of Ti ions in humans, which results in implant corrosion and Ti allergy. PMID:23762461

  5. Graphic Warning Labels Elicit Affective and Thoughtful Responses from Smokers: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Abigail T.; Peters, Ellen; Strasser, Andrew A.; Emery, Lydia F.; Sheerin, Kaitlin M.; Romer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Observational research suggests that placing graphic images on cigarette warning labels can reduce smoking rates, but field studies lack experimental control. Our primary objective was to determine the psychological processes set in motion by naturalistic exposure to graphic vs. text-only warnings in a randomized clinical trial involving exposure to modified cigarette packs over a 4-week period. Theories of graphic-warning impact were tested by examining affect toward smoking, credibility of warning information, risk perceptions, quit intentions, warning label memory, and smoking risk knowledge. Methods Adults who smoked between 5 and 40 cigarettes daily (N = 293; mean age = 33.7), did not have a contra-indicated medical condition, and did not intend to quit were recruited from Philadelphia, PA and Columbus, OH. Smokers were randomly assigned to receive their own brand of cigarettes for four weeks in one of three warning conditions: text only, graphic images plus text, or graphic images with elaborated text. Results Data from 244 participants who completed the trial were analyzed in structural-equation models. The presence of graphic images (compared to text-only) caused more negative affect toward smoking, a process that indirectly influenced risk perceptions and quit intentions (e.g., image->negative affect->risk perception->quit intention). Negative affect from graphic images also enhanced warning credibility including through increased scrutiny of the warnings, a process that also indirectly affected risk perceptions and quit intentions (e.g., image->negative affect->risk scrutiny->warning credibility->risk perception->quit intention). Unexpectedly, elaborated text reduced warning credibility. Finally, graphic warnings increased warning-information recall and indirectly increased smoking-risk knowledge at the end of the trial and one month later. Conclusions In the first naturalistic clinical trial conducted, graphic warning labels are more effective

  6. ASTRA Simulation Results of RF Propagation in Plasma Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Joshua; Oneal, Brandon; Smith, Aaron; Sen, Sudip

    2015-04-01

    Transport barriers in toroidal plasmas play a major role in achieving the required confinement for reactor grade plasmas. They are formed by different mechanisms, but most of them are associated with a zonal flow which suppresses turbulence. A different way of producing a barrier has been recently proposed which uses the ponderomotive force of RF waves to reduce the fluctuations due to drift waves, but without inducing any plasma rotation. Using this mechanism, a transport coefficient is derived which is a function of RF power, and it is incorporated in transport simulations performed for the Brazilian tokamak TCABR, as a possible test bed for the theoretical model. The formation of a transport barrier is demonstrated at the position of the RF wave resonant absorption surface, having the typical pedestal-like temperature profile.

  7. Implementation and Simulation Results using Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Bowes, Angela; Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    An Autonomous Aerobraking software system is currently under development with support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) that would move typically ground-based operations functions to onboard an aerobraking spacecraft, reducing mission risk and mission cost. The suite of software that will enable autonomous aerobraking is the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) and consists of an ephemeris model, onboard atmosphere estimator, temperature and loads prediction, and a maneuver calculation. The software calculates the maneuver time, magnitude and direction commands to maintain the spacecraft periapsis parameters within design structural load and/or thermal constraints. The AADS is currently tested in simulations at Mars, with plans to also evaluate feasibility and performance at Venus and Titan.

  8. Factors affecting sediment trapping in vegetated filter strips: simulation study using VFSMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zreig, Majed

    2001-06-01

    Soil and water conservation practices have been promoted for a long time, in order to sustain agricultural activities and prevent environmental pollution. Vegetated filter strips (VFS) have been used to reduce sediment pollution into water bodies at or near the pollutant source. However, factors effecting VFS performance under natural conditions have not been well understood owing to the physical, time and financial limitations of field experiments. The use of well-validated simulation models to understand the performance of VFS and factors affecting sediment deposition is highly justified. The objective of this research is to investigate sediment trapping in VFS and to study various factors affecting VFS performance using the simulation model VFSMOD, which was developed by researchers at University of North Carolina. Recently, VFSMOD has been validated successfully by using 21 filters with varying length, slope and vegetated cover. A wide range of five parameters was selected for the simulations, namely filter length, filter slope, manning roughness coefficient, soil type and characteristics of incoming sediment from adjacent fields. Computer simulations revealed that the length of filter is the most significant factor affecting sediment trapping in VFS. The relative increase in trapping efficiencies was not linearly related to an increase in filter length. Inflow sediment class also has a major influence on sediment trapping in VFS. The trapping efficiency of clay sediments in a 15 m length VFS was 47% compared with 92% for silt from incoming sediment. Manning roughness coefficient had a moderate effect on sediment trapping and was more significant in short filters. Land slope and soil type of VFS had a minor influence on the performance of VFS.

  9. SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; David Best, D

    2006-09-12

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

  10. Spatial resolution effect on the simulated results of watershed scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelde, Ane; Antiguedad, Iñaki; Brito, David; Jauch, Eduardo; Neves, Ramiro; Sauvage, Sabine; Sánchez-Pérez, José Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models are useful tools for water resources planning, development and management. Currently, their use is being spread and more complex modeling systems are being employed for these purposes. The adding of complexity allows the simulation of water quality related processes. Nevertheless, this implies a considerable increase on the computational requirements, which usually is compensated on the models by a decrease on their spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the models is known to affect the simulation of hydrological processes and therefore, also the nutrient exportation and cycling processes. However, the implication of the spatial resolution on the simulated results is rarely assessed. In this study, we examine the effect of the change in the grid size on the integrated and distributed results of the Alegria River watershed model (Basque Country, Northern Spain). Variables such as discharge, water table level, relative water content of soils, nitrogen exportation and denitrification are analyzed in order to quantify the uncertainty involved in the spatial discretization of the watershed scale models. This is an aspect that needs to be carefully considered when numerical models are employed in watershed management studies or quality programs.

  11. Simulated microgravity affects semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase expression in recombinant Escherichia coli by HPLC-ESI-QQQ analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqian; Lai, Chengjun; Duan, Jinyan; Guan, Ningxin; Ullah, Kaleem; Deng, Yulin

    2012-05-01

    Simulated microgravity has been reported to affect the gene, protein expression, and its function in the cells. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO; E.C.1.4.3.6.) is widely distributed in vascular cells, smooth muscle cells, and adipocytes. It is noteworthy whether the expression of SSAO is affected under simulated microgravity or not. In this study, an SSAO-transformed Escherichia coli BL21 was constructed firstly. Then, a sensitive, selective, and accurate method based on high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization triple quadrupole (HPLC-ESI-QQQ) was developed to determine the amount of SSAO in the E. coli BL21. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 5.0 and 10 fmol, respectively. Finally, SSAO expression in the recombinant E. coli BL21 was evaluated with various gravity and temperature conditions by HPLC-ESI-QQQ analysis. It is interesting that the tendency in the alteration of SSAO under simulated microgravity showed temperature difference. At 18 °C, the amount of SSAO in the inclusion bodies and soluble fractions under the simulated microgravity increased by 83% and 116%, respectively, compared with normal gravity. However, the decrease by 38% and 49% in the inclusion bodies and soluble fractions under the simulated microgravity was observed at 37 °C. Results obtained here indicate that the SSAO expression under simulated microgravity is dramatically sensitive to the temperature. On the other hand, a novel bioreactor from this study may also be useful for the recombinant protein expression in the field of gene engineering.

  12. A Monte Carlo study of parameters affecting computer simulations of crater saturation density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronow, A.

    1985-02-01

    Computer models of cratered surfaces often use inputs of uncertain nature and importance. This work evaluates the sensitivity of the resulting crater-saturation estimates to the input parameters, principally applicable to the study of craters upward from 8 km diameter. In order of decreasing importance, crater saturation simulations are found to be sensitive to: (1) the dynamic range of crater diameters used, (2) the effectiveness of ejecta-blanket obliteration assumed, and (3) the number of points taken to describe the crater rim. The size of the largest crater in proportion to the size of the simulated surface has no effect on the results when the edges of the simulated surface are correctly treated and craters are not counted simply by integers. Craters should be counted by their fractions lying within the simulated area. A similar procedure is recommended when gathering crater size-density data from images.

  13. A Monte Carlo study of parameters affecting computer simulations of crater saturation density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A.

    1985-01-01

    Computer models of cratered surfaces often use inputs of uncertain nature and importance. This work evaluates the sensitivity of the resulting crater-saturation estimates to the input parameters, principally applicable to the study of craters upward from 8 km diameter. In order of decreasing importance, crater saturation simulations are found to be sensitive to: (1) the dynamic range of crater diameters used, (2) the effectiveness of ejecta-blanket obliteration assumed, and (3) the number of points taken to describe the crater rim. The size of the largest crater in proportion to the size of the simulated surface has no effect on the results when the edges of the simulated surface are correctly treated and craters are not counted simply by integers. Craters should be counted by their fractions lying within the simulated area. A similar procedure is recommended when gathering crater size-density data from images.

  14. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  15. Role of soil erodibility in affecting available nitrogen and phosphorus losses under simulated rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Wu, Binbin; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Zongxue

    2014-06-01

    The loss of available nutrients and the effects of soil erodibility on available nutrients losses were rarely researched. Here, laboratory simulation experiments were conducted to determine the soil erodibility effects on the available nitrogen (AN) and phosphorus (AP) losses. The impacts of rainfall intensity and slope on AN and AP losses were also studied. Two contrasting agricultural soils (Burozems and Cinnamon) that occur throughout the northern erosion region of China were selected. Two rainfall intensities (60 and 120 mm h-1) and two slopes (10% and 20%) were studied. Overall, greater runoff, sediment and available nutrient losses occurred from the Cinnamon soil due to its greater soil erodibility, which was approximately 2.8 times greater than that of the Burozems soil. The influence of runoff on sediment was positively linear. The absolute slope of the regression line between runoff rate and sediment yield rate was suitable as a soil erodibility indicator. Runoff-associated AN and AP losses were mainly controlled by runoff rate, and were weakly affected by soil erodibility (p > 0.05). However, soil erodibility significantly influenced the sediment-associated AN and AP losses (p < 0.01), and a positive logarithmic correlation best described their relationships. Since the runoff-associated AN and AP losses dominated the total AN and AP losses for both soils, soil erodibility also exhibited negligible influence on the total AN and AP losses (p > 0.05). Increasing rainfall intensity and slope generally increased the runoff, sediment, and available nutrient losses for both soils, but had no significant influences on their relationships. Our results provide a better understanding of soil and nutrient loss mechanisms.

  16. How historic simulation-observation discrepancy affects future warming projections in a very large model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Projections of future climate made by model-ensembles have credibility because the historic simulations by these models are consistent with, or near-consistent with, historic observations. However, it is not known how small inconsistencies between the ranges of observed and simulated historic climate change affects the future projections made by a model ensemble. Here, the impact of historical simulation-observation inconsistencies on future warming projections is quantified in a 4-million member Monte Carlo ensemble from a new efficient Earth System Model (ESM). Of the 4-million ensemble members, a subset of 182,500 are consistent with historic ranges of warming, heat uptake and carbon uptake simulated by the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) ensemble. This simulation-consistent subset projects similar future warming ranges to the CMIP5 ensemble for all four RCP scenarios, indicating the new ESM represents an efficient tool to explore parameter space for future warming projections based on historic performance. A second subset of 14,500 ensemble members are consistent with historic observations for warming, heat uptake and carbon uptake. This observation-consistent subset projects a narrower range for future warming, with the lower bounds of projected warming still similar to CMIP5, but the upper warming bounds reduced by 20-35 %. These findings suggest that part of the upper range of twenty-first century CMIP5 warming projections may reflect historical simulation-observation inconsistencies. However, the agreement of lower bounds for projected warming implies that the likelihood of warming exceeding dangerous levels over the twenty-first century is unaffected by small discrepancies between CMIP5 models and observations.

  17. Simulating soybean canopy temperature as affected by weather variables and soil water potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Hourly weather data for several clear sky days during summer at Phoenix and Baltimore which covered a wide range of variables were used with a plant atmosphere model to simulate soybean (Glycine max L.) leaf water potential, stomatal resistance and canopy temperature at various soil water potentials. The air and dew point temperatures were found to be the significant weather variables affecting the canopy temperatures. Under identical weather conditions, the model gives a lower canopy temperature for a soybean crop with a higher rooting density. A knowledge of crop rooting density, in addition to air and dew point temperatures is needed in interpreting infrared radiometric observations for soil water status. The observed dependence of stomatal resistance on the vapor pressure deficit and soil water potential is fairly well represented. Analysis of the simulated leaf water potentials indicates overestimation, possibly due to differences in the cultivars.

  18. Preliminary Benchmarking and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to create Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) input stacks for benchmarked measurements sufficient for future perturbation studies and analysis. The approach was to utilize historical experimental measurements to recreate the empirical spectral results in MCNP, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results demonstrate that perturbation analysis of benchmarked MCNP spectra can be used to obtain a better understanding of field measurement results which may be of national interest. If one or more spectral radiation measurements are made in the field and deemed of national interest, the potential source distribution, naturally occurring radioactive material shielding, and interstitial materials can only be estimated in many circumstances. The effects from these factors on the resultant spectral radiation measurements can be very confusing. If benchmarks exist which are sufficiently similar to the suspected configuration, these benchmarks can then be compared to the suspect measurements. Having these benchmarks with validated MCNP input stacks can substantially improve the predictive capability of experts supporting these efforts.

  19. Characterization of Factors Affecting Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis Results With Synthetic and Protein Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Aaron B; Carnell, Pauline; Carpenter, John F

    2016-04-01

    In many manufacturing and research areas, the ability to accurately monitor and characterize nanoparticles is becoming increasingly important. Nanoparticle tracking analysis is rapidly becoming a standard method for this characterization, yet several key factors in data acquisition and analysis may affect results. Nanoparticle tracking analysis is prone to user input and bias on account of a high number of parameters available, contains a limited analysis volume, and individual sample characteristics such as polydispersity or complex protein solutions may affect analysis results. This study systematically addressed these key issues. The integrated syringe pump was used to increase the sample volume analyzed. It was observed that measurements recorded under flow caused a reduction in total particle counts for both polystyrene and protein particles compared to those collected under static conditions. In addition, data for polydisperse samples tended to lose peak resolution at higher flow rates, masking distinct particle populations. Furthermore, in a bimodal particle population, a bias was seen toward the larger species within the sample. The impacts of filtration on an agitated intravenous immunoglobulin sample and operating parameters including "MINexps" and "blur" were investigated to optimize the method. Taken together, this study provides recommendations on instrument settings and sample preparations to properly characterize complex samples. PMID:27019960

  20. In-vitro fertilisation treatment: factors affecting its results and outcome.

    PubMed

    Qublan, H S; Malkawi, H Y; Tahat, Y A; Areidah, S; Nusair, B; Khreisat, B M; Al-Quraan, G; Abu-Assaf, A; Hadaddein, M F; Abu-Jassar, H

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine factors affecting results and outcome of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). In this retrospective study, a total of 891 infertile women underwent IVF/ICSI cycles at the King Hussein Medical Center (KHMC) between January 2001 and December 2002. Conventional IVF treatment was performed in 64.6% of women and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in 35.4%, using a standardised long luteal protocol. Pregnancy rate was analysed according to age, type of infertility, cause of infertility, duration of infertility, number of eggs collected and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels. A total of 126 cycles (14.1%) were cancelled. Among 765 cycles continued, fertilisation rate was 73.9%, implantation rate was 15.1% and pregnancy rate was 29.8%. Pregnant women had a multiple pregnancy rate of 28.9%, abortion rate of 13.6% and ectopic pregnancy rate of 1.3%. Duration and type of infertility had no significant effect on the pregnancy rate. Factors which appear to affect significantly the outcome of treatment include the woman's age, cause of infertility, basal concentrations of FSH, adequate ovarian responsiveness and the number of eggs collected. In some cases with poor outcome, the understanding of these factors may predict the results and lead to the development of new strategies to improve the outcome of IVF treatment.

  1. Good vibrations switch attention: an affective function for network oscillations in evolutionary simulations.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Phaf, R Hans

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, a new hypothesis on the neural mechanisms linking affect to attention was brought forward by evolutionary simulations on agents navigating a virtual environment while collecting food and avoiding predation. The connection strengths between nodes in the networks controlling the agents were subjected to random variation, and the fittest agents were selected for reproduction. Unexpectedly, oscillations of node activations emerged, which drastically enhanced the agent's fitness. We analyzed the mechanisms involved in the modulation of attention and found that oscillations acted on competitive networks. Response selection depended on the connection structure, but the speed and efficacy of switching between selections was modulated by oscillation frequency. The main focus of the present study was the differential emergence of stimulus-specific oscillation frequencies. Oscillations had a higher frequency in an appetitive motivational state than in an aversive state. We suggest that oscillations in biological networks also mediate the affective modulation of attention. PMID:20498346

  2. [Greenhouse tomato transpiration and its affecting factors: correlation analysis and model simulation].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Zhe; Li, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Rong; Sun, San-Jie; Chen, Kai-Li

    2012-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the correlations between the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato and the related affecting factors such as total leaf area per plant, soil relative moisture content, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation under different treatments of supplementary irrigation. A regression model for the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato was established. There existed significant linear correlations between the daily transpiration and the test affecting factors, and the affecting factors had complicated mutual effects. Soil relative moisture content was the main decision factor of the transpiration, with the decision coefficient being 27.4%, and daily minimum relative humidity was the main limiting factor, with the decision coefficient being -119.7%. The square value of the regression coefficient (R2) between the predicted and measured tomato daily transpiration was 0.81, root mean squared error (RMSE) was 68.52 g, and relative prediction error (RE) was 19.4%, suggesting that the regression model established by using the main affecting factors selected through path analysis could better simulate the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato. PMID:23173461

  3. [Greenhouse tomato transpiration and its affecting factors: correlation analysis and model simulation].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Zhe; Li, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Rong; Sun, San-Jie; Chen, Kai-Li

    2012-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the correlations between the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato and the related affecting factors such as total leaf area per plant, soil relative moisture content, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation under different treatments of supplementary irrigation. A regression model for the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato was established. There existed significant linear correlations between the daily transpiration and the test affecting factors, and the affecting factors had complicated mutual effects. Soil relative moisture content was the main decision factor of the transpiration, with the decision coefficient being 27.4%, and daily minimum relative humidity was the main limiting factor, with the decision coefficient being -119.7%. The square value of the regression coefficient (R2) between the predicted and measured tomato daily transpiration was 0.81, root mean squared error (RMSE) was 68.52 g, and relative prediction error (RE) was 19.4%, suggesting that the regression model established by using the main affecting factors selected through path analysis could better simulate the daily transpiration of greenhouse tomato.

  4. Recent Simulation Results on Ring Current Dynamics Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zaharia, Sorin G.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Plasma sheet conditions and electromagnetic field configurations are both crucial in determining ring current evolution and connection to the ionosphere. In this presentation, we investigate how different conditions of plasma sheet distribution affect ring current properties. Results include comparative studies in 1) varying the radial distance of the plasma sheet boundary; 2) varying local time distribution of the source population; 3) varying the source spectra. Our results show that a source located farther away leads to a stronger ring current than a source that is closer to the Earth. Local time distribution of the source plays an important role in determining both the radial and azimuthal (local time) location of the ring current peak pressure. We found that post-midnight source locations generally lead to a stronger ring current. This finding is in agreement with Lavraud et al.. However, our results do not exhibit any simple dependence of the local time distribution of the peak ring current (within the lower energy range) on the local time distribution of the source, as suggested by Lavraud et al. [2008]. In addition, we will show how different specifications of the magnetic field in the simulation domain affect ring current dynamics in reference to the 20 November 2007 storm, which include initial results on coupling the CRCM with a three-dimensional (3-D) plasma force balance code to achieve self-consistency in the magnetic field.

  5. Linkage results on 11q21-22 in Eastern Quebec pedigrees densely affected by schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Maziade, M.; Raymond, V.; Cliche, D.

    1995-12-18

    The 11q21-22 region is of interest for schizophrenia because several candidate genes are located in this section of the genome. The 11q21-22 region, including DRD2, was surveyed by linkage analysis in a sample (N = 242) made of four large multigenerational pedigrees densely affected by schizophrenia (SZ) and eight others by bipolar disorder (BP). These pedigrees were ascertained in a large area of Eastern Quebec and Northern New Brunswick and are still being extended. Family members were administered a {open_quotes}consensus best-estimate diagnosis procedure{close_quotes} (DSM-III-R criteria) blind to probands and relatives` diagnosis and to pedigree assignment (SZ or BP). For linkage analysis, 11 microsatellite polymorphism (CA repeat) markers, located at 11q21-22, and comprising DRD2, were genotyped. Results show no evidence of a major gene for schizophrenia. However, a maximum lod score of 3.41 at the D11S35 locus was observed in an affected-only analysis of one large SZ family, pedigree 255. Whether or not the positive linkage trend in pedigree 255 reflects a true linkage for a small proportion of SZ needs to be confirmed through the extension of this kindred and through replication. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. The Factors Affecting Airspace Capacity in Europe: A Cross-Sectional Time-Series Analysis Using Simulated Controller Workload Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Ochieng, Washington Y.; McAuley, Gérard; Lenzi, Jean Michel; Lepadatu, Catalin

    2004-09-01

    Air traffic in Europe is increasing at a rapid rate and traffic patterns no longer display pronounced daily peaks but instead exhibit peak spreading. Airspace capacity planning can no longer be for the peak period but must consider the whole day. En route airspace capacity in the high density European air traffic network is determined by controller workload. Controller workload is primarily affected by the features of the air traffic and ATC sector. This paper considers the air traffic and ATC sector factors that affect controller workload throughout the whole day. A simulation study using the widely used Reorganized ATC Mathematical Simulator (RAMS) model of air traffic controller workload is conducted for the Central European Air Traffic Services (CEATS) Upper Area Control Centre region of Europe. A cross-sectional time series analysis of the simulation output is conducted with corrections for temporal autocorrelation in the data. The results indicate that a subset of traffic and sector variables and their parameter estimates can be used to predict controller workload in any sector of the CEATS region in any given hour.

  7. Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-04-18

    It is shown in this work that basic measurements made from well defined source detector configurations can be readily converted in to benchmark quality results by which Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) input stacks can be validated. Specifically, a recent measurement made in support of national security at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is described with sufficient detail to be submitted to the American Nuclear Society’s (ANS) Joint Benchmark Committee (JBC) for consideration as a radiation measurement benchmark. From this very basic measurement, MCNP input stacks are generated and validated both in predicted signal amplitude and spectral shape. Not modeled at this time are those perturbations from the more recent pulse height light (PHL) tally feature, although what spectral deviations are seen can be largely attributed to not including this small correction. The value of this work is as a proof-of-concept demonstration that with well documented historical testing can be converted into formal radiation measurement benchmarks. This effort would support virtual testing of algorithms and new detector configurations.

  8. Personality, social support and affective states during simulated microgravity in healthy women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Michel

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the time-course of stress and recovery states and their relations to social support and personality traits in healthy women during a long-term head-down tilt bed rest. Personality, social support and affective states were assessed in 16 women exposed to simulated microgravity for a 60-day duration involving three stages: a 20-day baseline control period (BDC), a 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (HDT) and a 20-day post-HDT ambulatory recovery period (R+). Participants were divided into two groups: an exercise (Exe, n = 8) and a control group (Ctl, n = 8). All the participants experienced significantly more stress during the HDT period. But exercise did not improve the impaired effects of simulated microgravity. The Exe group perceived more stress and less recovery than the Ctl group during the HDT period. Among the five major personality factors, only Neuroticism was related to both social and affective variables. Neuroticism was positively associated with stress and negatively associated with recovery and social support (S-SSQ). Practical implications in psychological countermeasures for better dealing with the key human factor in spaceflights are discussed.

  9. Vibronic coupling simulations for linear and nonlinear optical processes: Simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Jensen, Lasse

    2012-02-01

    A vibronic coupling model based on time-dependent wavepacket approach is applied to simulate linear optical processes, such as one-photon absorbance and resonance Raman scattering, and nonlinear optical processes, such as two-photon absorbance and resonance hyper-Raman scattering, on a series of small molecules. Simulations employing both the long-range corrected approach in density functional theory and coupled cluster are compared and also examined based on available experimental data. Although many of the small molecules are prone to anharmonicity in their potential energy surfaces, the harmonic approach performs adequately. A detailed discussion of the non-Condon effects is illustrated by the molecules presented in this work. Linear and nonlinear Raman scattering simulations allow for the quantification of interference between the Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller terms for different molecules.

  10. Head orientation affects the intracranial pressure response resulting from shock wave loading in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Keane, Nickolas J; Bir, Cynthia A; Ryan, Anne G; Xu, Liaosa; Vandevord, Pamela J

    2012-10-11

    Since an increasing number of returning military personnel are presenting with neurological manifestations of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there has been a great focus on the effects resulting from blast exposure. It is paramount to resolve the physical mechanism by which the critical stress is being inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study quantitatively measured the effect of head orientation on intracranial pressure (ICP) of rats exposed to a shock wave. Furthermore, the study examined how skull maturity affects ICP response of animals exposed to shock waves at various orientations. Results showed a significant increase in ICP values in larger rats at any orientation. Furthermore, when side-ICP values were compared to the other orientations, the peak pressures were significantly lower suggesting a relation between ICP and orientation of the head due to geometry of the skull and location of sutures. This finding accentuates the importance of skull dynamics in explaining possible injury mechanisms during blast. Also, the rate of pressure change was measured and indicated that the rate was significantly higher when the top of the head was facing the shock front. The results confirm that the biomechanical response of the superior rat skull is distinctive compared to other areas of the skull, suggesting a skull flexure mechanism. These results not only present insights into the mechanism of brain injury, but also provide information which can be used for designing more effective protective head gear. PMID:22947434

  11. Evolution of star cluster systems in isolated galaxies: first results from direct N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, L. J.; Bekki, K.; Hurley, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of star clusters is largely affected by the tidal field generated by the host galaxy. It is thus in principle expected that under the assumption of a `universal' initial cluster mass function the properties of the evolved present-day mass function of star cluster systems should show a dependence on the properties of the galactic environment in which they evolve. To explore this expectation, a sophisticated model of the tidal field is required in order to study the evolution of star cluster systems in realistic galaxies. Along these lines, in this work we first describe a method developed for coupling N-body simulations of galaxies and star clusters. We then generate a data base of galaxy models along the Hubble sequence and calibrate evolutionary equations to the results of direct N-body simulations of star clusters in order to predict the clusters' mass evolution as function of the galactic environment. We finally apply our methods to explore the properties of evolved `universal' initial cluster mass functions and any dependence on the host galaxy morphology and mass distribution. The preliminary results show that an initial power-law distribution of the masses `universally' evolves into a lognormal distribution, with the properties correlated with the stellar mass and stellar mass density of the host galaxy.

  12. Newest Results from the Investigation of Polymer-Induced Drag Reduction through Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Costas D.; Beris, Antony N.; Sureshkumar, R.; Handler, Robert A.

    1998-11-01

    This work continues our attempts to elucidate theoretically the mechanism of polymer-induced drag reduction through direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow, using an independently evaluated rheological model for the polymer stress. Using appropriate scaling to accommodate effects due to viscoelasticity reveals that there exists a great consistency in the results for different combinations of the polymer concentration and chain extension. This helps demonstrate that our obervations are applicable to very dilute systems, currently not possible to simulate. It also reinforces the hypothesis that one of the prerequisites for the phenomenon of drag reduction is sufficiently enhanced extensional viscosity, corresponding to the level of intensity and duration of extensional rates typically encountered during the turbulent flow. Moreover, these results motivate a study of the turbulence structure at larger Reynolds numbers and for different periodic computational cell sizes. In addition, the Reynolds stress budgets demonstrate that flow elasticity adversely affects the activities represented by the pressure-strain correlations, leading to a redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy amongst all directions. Finally, we discuss the influence of viscoelasticity in reducing the production of streamwise vorticity.

  13. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): Results of the Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are two large-scale structures that originate from the Sun and affect the heliosphere in general and Earth in particular. While CIRs are generally detected by in-situ plasma signatures, CMEs are remote-sensed when they are still close to the Sun. The current understanding of CMEs primarily come from the SOHO and STEREO missions. In spite of the enormous progress made, there are some serious deficiencies in these missions. For example, these missions did not carry all the necessary instruments (STEREO did not have a magnetograph; SOHO did not have in-situ magnetometer). From the Sun-Earth line, SOHO was not well-suited for observing Earth-directed CMEs because of the occulting disk. STEREO's angle with the Sun-Earth line is changing constantly, so only a limited number of Earth-directed CMEs were observed in profile. In order to overcome these difficulties, we proposed a news L5 mission concept known as the Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO). The mission concept was recently studied at the Mission Design Laboratory (MDL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The aim of the MDL study was to see how the scientific payload consisting of ten instruments can be accommodated in the spacecraft bus, what propulsion system can transfer the payload to the Sun-Earth L5, and what launch vehicles are appropriate. The study found that all the ten instruments can be readily accommodated and can be launched using an intermediate size vehicle such as Taurus II with enhanced faring. The study also found that a hybrid propulsion system consisting of an ion thruster (using approximately 55 kg of Xenon) and hydrazine (approximately 10 kg) is adequate to place the payload at L5. The transfer will take about 2 years and the science mission will last for 4 years around the next solar maximum in 2025. The mission can be readily extended for another solar cycle to get a solar-cycle worth of data on Earth-affecting

  14. Experimental Parameters Affecting Stripping of Rare Earth Elements from Loaded Sorptive Media in Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    Experimental results from several studies exploring the impact of pH and acid volume on the stripping of rare earth elements (REEs) loaded onto ligand-based media via an active column. The REEs in this experiment were loaded onto the media through exposure to a simulated geothermal brine with known mineral concentrations. The data include the experiment results, rare earth element concentrations, and the experimental parameters varied.

  15. Foreclosure and Health in Southern Europe: Results from the Platform for People Affected by Mortgages.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Vera, Hugo; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Palència, Laia; Borrell, Carme

    2016-04-01

    Housing instability has been shown to be related to poorer health outcomes in various studies, mainly in the USA and UK. Affected individuals are more prone to psychiatric (e.g., major depression, anxiety) and physical disorders (e.g., hypertension). This situation has deteriorated with the onset of the economic crisis. One of the most affected countries is Spain, which has high rates of foreclosure and eviction that continue to rise. In response, a civil movement, The Platform for People Affected by Mortgages (PAH), works to provide solutions to its members affected by foreclosure and advocates for the right to decent housing. The aims of this study ware to describe and compare the health status of PAH members from Catalonia to a sample of the general population and to analyze the association between health status and mortgage status, foreclosure stage, and other socioeconomic variables, among members of the PAH. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a self-administered online questionnaire (2014) administered to 905 PAH members in Catalonia (>18 years; 559 women and 346 men). Results were compared with health indicators from The Health Survey of Catalonia 2013 (n = 4830). The dependent variables were poor mental health (GHQ 12 ≥ 3), and poor self-reported health (fair or poor). All analyses were stratified by sex. We computed age-standardized prevalence and prevalence ratios of poor mental and self-reported health in both samples. We also analyzed health outcomes among PAH members according to mortgage status (mortgage holders or guarantors), stage of foreclosure, and other socioeconomic variables by computing prevalence ratios from robust Poisson regression models. The prevalence of poor mental health among PAH members was 90.6 % in women and 84.4 % in men, and 15.5 and 10.2 % in the general population, respectively. The prevalence of poor self-reported health was 55.6 % in women and 39.4 % in men from the PAH, and 19.2 and 16.1 % in the general

  16. Delivering high-quality family planning services in crisis-affected settings II: results.

    PubMed

    Curry, Dora Ward; Rattan, Jesse; Huang, Shuyuan; Noznesky, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    An estimated 43 million women of reproductive age experienced the effects of conflict in 2012. Already vulnerable from the insecurity of the emergency, women must also face the continuing risk of unwanted pregnancy but often are unable to obtain family planning services. The ongoing Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post-Abortion Care (SAFPAC) initiative, led by CARE, has provided contraceptives, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), to refugees, internally displaced persons, and conflict-affected resident populations in Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan. The project works through the Ministry of Health in 4 key areas: (1) competency-based training, (2) supply chain management, (3) systematic supervision, and (4) community mobilization to raise awareness and shift norms related to family planning. This article presents data on program results from July 2011 to December 2013 from the 5 countries. Project staff summarized monthly data from client registers using hard-copy forms and recorded the data electronically in Microsoft Excel for compilation and analysis. The initiative reached 52,616 new users of modern contraceptive methods across the 5 countries, ranging from 575 in Djibouti to 21,191 in Chad. LARCs have predominated overall, representing 61% of new modern method users. The percentage of new users choosing LARCs varied by country: 78% in the DRC, 72% in Chad, and 51% in Mali, but only 29% in Pakistan. In Djibouti, those methods were not offered in the country through SAFPAC during the period discussed here. In Chad, the DRC, and Mali, implants have been the most popular LARC method, while in Pakistan the IUD has been more popular. Use of IUDs, however, has comprised a larger share of the method mix over time in all 4 of these countries. These results to date suggest that it is feasible to work with the public sector in fragile, crisis-affected states to deliver a wide range of quality

  17. Delivering high-quality family planning services in crisis-affected settings II: results.

    PubMed

    Curry, Dora Ward; Rattan, Jesse; Huang, Shuyuan; Noznesky, Elizabeth

    2015-02-04

    An estimated 43 million women of reproductive age experienced the effects of conflict in 2012. Already vulnerable from the insecurity of the emergency, women must also face the continuing risk of unwanted pregnancy but often are unable to obtain family planning services. The ongoing Supporting Access to Family Planning and Post-Abortion Care (SAFPAC) initiative, led by CARE, has provided contraceptives, including long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), to refugees, internally displaced persons, and conflict-affected resident populations in Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Djibouti, Mali, and Pakistan. The project works through the Ministry of Health in 4 key areas: (1) competency-based training, (2) supply chain management, (3) systematic supervision, and (4) community mobilization to raise awareness and shift norms related to family planning. This article presents data on program results from July 2011 to December 2013 from the 5 countries. Project staff summarized monthly data from client registers using hard-copy forms and recorded the data electronically in Microsoft Excel for compilation and analysis. The initiative reached 52,616 new users of modern contraceptive methods across the 5 countries, ranging from 575 in Djibouti to 21,191 in Chad. LARCs have predominated overall, representing 61% of new modern method users. The percentage of new users choosing LARCs varied by country: 78% in the DRC, 72% in Chad, and 51% in Mali, but only 29% in Pakistan. In Djibouti, those methods were not offered in the country through SAFPAC during the period discussed here. In Chad, the DRC, and Mali, implants have been the most popular LARC method, while in Pakistan the IUD has been more popular. Use of IUDs, however, has comprised a larger share of the method mix over time in all 4 of these countries. These results to date suggest that it is feasible to work with the public sector in fragile, crisis-affected states to deliver a wide range of quality

  18. Investigation of factors affecting hypothermic pelvic tissue cooling using bio-heat simulation based on MRI-segmented anatomic models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; Lin, Wei-Ching; Fwu, Peter T; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Su, Min-Ying; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-10-01

    This study applied a simulation method to map the temperature distribution based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of individual patients, and investigated the influence of different pelvic tissue types as well as the choice of thermal property parameters on the efficiency of endorectal cooling balloon (ECB). MR images of four subjects with different prostate sizes and pelvic tissue compositions, including fatty tissue and venous plexus, were analyzed. The MR images acquired using endorectal coil provided a realistic geometry of deformed prostate that resembled the anatomy in the presence of ECB. A single slice with the largest two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional area of the prostate gland was selected for analysis. The rectal wall, prostate gland, peri-rectal fatty tissue, peri-prostatic fatty tissue, peri-prostatic venous plexus, and urinary bladder were manually segmented. Pennes' bioheat thermal model was used to simulate the temperature distribution dynamics, by using an in-house finite element mesh based solver written in MATLAB. The results showed that prostate size and periprostatic venous plexus were two major factors affecting ECB cooling efficiency. For cases with negligible amount of venous plexus and small prostate, the average temperature in the prostate and neurovascular bundles could be cooled down to 25 °C within 30 min. For cases with abundant venous plexus and large prostate, the temperature could not reach 25 °C at the end of 3 h cooling. Large prostate made the cooling difficult to propagate through. The impact of fatty tissue on cooling effect was small. The filling of bladder with warm urine during the ECB cooling procedure did not affect the temperature in the prostate or NVB. In addition to the 2D simulation, in one case a 3D pelvic model was constructed for volumetric simulation. It was found that the 2D slice with the largest cross-sectional area of prostate had the most abundant venous plexus, and was the most difficult slice to

  19. Identifying how the strategies used to evaluate flood damages can affect the results of the evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleutério, Julian; Rozan, Anne; Mosé, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of flood damages is a complex interdisciplinary task which demands great efforts on assessment and modelling processes. Several methods and models can be used in practice to evaluate flood damages. On the one hand, hydrological and hydrodynamic aspects of floods shall be modelled in order to forecast different characteristics of floods, e.g. return period, flood extent, water depth, duration of submersion and flow speed. Different hydrological assumptions can take place when determining return periods of extreme events. Several hydrodynamic models can be used to simulate floods. These models have different levels of complexity and different acquisition, implementation and maintenance costs. On the other hand, geographic, engineering, social and economic aspects of the system exposed to floods shall be assessed, e.g. assets location, vulnerability characteristics, susceptibility to suffer damages. Once again, several methods and datasets with different liability and different levels of feasibility can be used to assess these characteristics. Uncertainty exists all over the evaluation process. When reducing uncertainty on the evaluation results by improving the strategies used, we could generate the elevation of the costs of the evaluation and compromise its feasibility. To deal with feasibility of the evaluation process and with uncertainty on the evaluation results is a big scientific and operational challenge. The aim of this paper is to develop a research framework to analyze the impact of different strategies used to evaluate flood damages on the feasibility of the evaluation and on the liability of its results. The two main parts of the evaluation process are discussed: (1) the hydrodynamic simulation of flood events and its hydrological components and (2) the assessment of assets vulnerability to floods. The framework compares two aspects of the evaluation: uncertainty - variability of the evaluation results according to the choice of models and

  20. May tropospheric noise in satellite radar data affect decision making results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloutsos, Aristeidis; Bekri, Eleni; Moschas, Fanis; Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis; Yannopoulos, Panayotis

    2015-04-01

    Meteorological and air pollution conditions affect the satellite positioning signals. To investigate the uncertainty introduced in these signals in various meteorological and air pollution conditions, an array of GPS/GNSS stations and another of meteorological and air pollution stations has been established. The study area is expanded next to Patraikos and Corinth Gulf (NW Peloponnisos, Greece), which is characterized by high variability sequences from hot to cold weather, low to high relative humidity and clear to cloudy or/and Sahara dusty atmosphere, as a result of the particular geographical and topographical features of the study area. The GNSS recordings from several stations with very high vertical separation (with altitude up to 1600m and with a gradient of up to 20%) are analyzed in order to control in some extend both the vertical and the horizontal variability of the atmospheric effects, as well as the noise of geodetic recordings. Then, the GPS results will be combined with meteorological and atmospheric pollution data, as well as satellite radar data, in order to evaluate the enhanced troposphere noise in satellite radar and to estimate the magnitude of uncertainty that may cause alterations to decision making results in the management of water and other natural resources. This project takes advantage of GPS stations established in wider study area in the framework of the Corinth Rift Laboratory (http://crlab.eu/) in conjunction to the air pollution and meteorological monitoring stations of the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Patras. Regarding GPS stations, the project has been partly funded by the PLATO Project of the Greek Secretariat for Research and Technology.

  1. The Formation of Asteroid Satellites in Catastrophic Impacts: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, D. D.; Bottke, W. F., Jr.; Enke, B. L.; Asphaug, E.; Richardson, D. C.; Leinhardt, Z. M.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed new simulations of the formation of asteroid satellites by collisions, using a combination of hydrodynamical and gravitational dynamical codes. This initial work shows that both small satellites and ejected, co-orbiting pairs are produced most favorably by moderate-energy collisions at more direct, rather than oblique, impact angles. Simulations so far seem to be able to produce systems qualitatively similar to known binaries. Asteroid satellites provide vital clues that can help us understand the physics of hypervelocity impacts, the dominant geologic process affecting large main belt asteroids. Moreover, models of satellite formation may provide constraints on the internal structures of asteroids beyond those possible from observations of satellite orbital properties alone. It is probable that most observed main-belt asteroid satellites are by-products of cratering and/or catastrophic disruption events. Several possible formation mechanisms related to collisions have been identified: (i) mutual capture following catastrophic disruption, (ii) rotational fission due to glancing impact and spin-up, and (iii) re-accretion in orbit of ejecta from large, non-catastrophic impacts. Here we present results from a systematic investigation directed toward mapping out the parameter space of the first and third of these three collisional mechanisms.

  2. Team Regulation in a Simulated Medical Emergency: An In-Depth Analysis of Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Affective Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Melissa C.; Azevedo, Roger; Sun, Ning-Zi; Griscom, Sophia E.; Stead, Victoria; Crelinsten, Linda; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Maniatis, Thomas; Lachapelle, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of cognitive, metacognitive, and affective processes among a medical team experiencing difficulty managing a challenging simulated medical emergency case by conducting in-depth analysis of process data. Medical residents participated in a simulation exercise designed to help trainees to develop medical expertise,…

  3. Immunoaffinity chromatography in antivenomics studies: Various parameters that can affect the results.

    PubMed

    Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Chaisuriya, Papada; Watcharatanyatip, Kamolwan; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2016-09-01

    Antivenomics is a recently developed powerful method for the study of antivenom antibody profiles when bound to homologous and heterologous snake venoms. The information obtained is useful in gaining an understanding of venom protein immunogenicity, antivenom potency and also for the improvement of antivenom potency and paraspecificity. The preferred method used in this type of study is immunoaffinity chromatography of the venom proteins on an antivenom IgG (or F(ab')2) column where the bound and unbound proteins can be separated and identified. However, there are some parameters of the immunochromatography that can significantly affect the binding of the proteins to the immunoaffinity matrix and lead to imprecise results in antivenom immunoprofiling. The present study demonstrated that the ligand density (mg IgG/ml of the matrix), the buffers used for binding and washing the venom proteins, the amount of venom loaded, the abundance of some venom protein(s) and the eluting buffers can significantly alter the binding of the proteins to the matrix and consequently the conclusions drawn from antivenomics studies. Furthermore, the immunochromatographic procedure can be extended to include the estimation of the relative affinity of venom protein-antibody interactions that can provide additional information useful to antivenomics study. PMID:27256919

  4. How the amyloid-β peptide and membranes affect each other: an extensive simulation study.

    PubMed

    Poojari, Chetan; Kukol, Andreas; Strodel, Birgit

    2013-02-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is thought to be linked to interactions between amyloid-β (Aβ) and neural cell membranes, causing membrane disruption and increased ion conductance. The effects of Aβ on lipid behavior have been characterized experimentally, but structural and causal details are lacking. We used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations totaling over 6 μs in simulation time to investigate the behavior of Aβ(42) in zwitterionic and anionic lipid bilayers. We simulated transmembrane β-sheets (monomer and tetramer) resulting from a global optimization study and a helical structure obtained from an NMR study. In all simulations Aβ(42) remained embedded in the bilayer. It was found that the surface charge and the lipid tail type are determinants for transmembrane stability of Aβ(42) with zwitterionic surfaces and unsaturated lipids promoting stability. From the considered structures, the β-sheet tetramer is most stable as a result of interpeptide interactions. We performed an in-depth analysis of the translocation of water in the Aβ(42)-bilayer systems. We observed that this process is generally fast (within a few nanoseconds) yet generally slower than in the peptide-free bilayers. It is mainly governed by the lipid type, simulation temperature and Aβ(42) conformation. The rate limiting step is the permeation through the hydrophobic core, where interactions between Aβ(42) and permeating H(2)O molecules slow the translocation process. The β-sheet tetramer allows more water molecules to pass through the bilayer compared to monomeric Aβ, allowing us to conclude that the experimentally observed permeabilization of membranes must be due to membrane-bound Aβ oligomers, and not monomers.

  5. Vessel noise affects beaked whale behavior: results of a dedicated acoustic response study.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Milor, Rachael; Quick, Nicola; Moretti, David; Di Marzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter; Boyd, Ian; Hastie, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise) may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas). A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement.

  6. Vessel Noise Affects Beaked Whale Behavior: Results of a Dedicated Acoustic Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Milor, Rachael; Quick, Nicola; Moretti, David; Di Marzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter; Boyd, Ian; Hastie, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise) may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville’s beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas). A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement. PMID:22880022

  7. Preliminary capillary hysteresis simulations for fractured rocks -- model development and results of simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, A.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    As part of the code development and modeling work being carried out to characterize the flow in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, capillary hysteresis models simulating the history-dependence of the characteristic curves have been developed. The objective of the work has been both to develop the hysteresis models, as well as to obtain some preliminary estimates of the possible hysteresis effects in the fractured rocks at Yucca Mountain given the limitations of presently available data. Altogether three different models were developed based on work of other investigators reported in the literature. In these three models different principles are used for determining the scanning paths: in model (1) the scanning paths are interpolated from tabulated first-order scanning curves, in model (2) simple interpolation functions are used for scaling the scanning paths from the expressions of the main wetting and main drying curves and in model (3) the scanning paths are determined from expressions derived based on the dependent domain theory of hysteresis.

  8. Role of dayside transients in a substorm process: Results from the global kinetic simulation Vlasiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, M.; Hoilijoki, S.; Pfau-Kempf, Y.; Hietala, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Ganse, U.; Hannuksela, O.; von Alfthan, S.; Battarbee, M. C.; Vainio, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dayside-nightside coupling of the magnetospheric dynamics in a global kinetic simulation displaying the entire magnetosphere. We use the newly developed Vlasiator (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi), which is the world's first global hybrid-Vlasov simulation modelling the ions as distribution functions, while electrons are treated as a charge-neutralising fluid. Here, we run Vlasiator in the 5-dimensional (5D) setup, where the ordinary space is presented in the 2D noon-midnight meridional plane, embedding in each grid cell the 3D velocity space. This approach combines the improved physical solution with fine resolution, allowing to investigate kinetic processes as a consequence of the global magnetospheric evolution. The simulation is during steady southward interplanetary magnetic field. We observe dayside reconnection and the resulting 2D representations of flux transfer events (FTE). FTE's move tailwards and distort the magnetopause, while the largest of them even modify the plasma sheet location. In the nightside, the plasma sheet shows bead-like density enhancements moving slowly earthward. The tailward side of the dipolar field stretches. Strong reconnection initiates first in the near-Earth region, forming a tailward-moving magnetic island that cannibalises other islands forming further down the tail, increasing the island's volume and complexity. After this, several reconnection lines are formed again in the near-Earth region, resulting in several magnetic islands. At first, none of the earthward moving islands reach the closed field region because just tailward of the dipolar region exists a relatively stable X-line, which is strong enough to push most of the magnetic islands tailward. However, finally one of the tailward X-lines is strong enough to overcome the X-line nearest to Earth, forming a strong surge into the dipolar field region as there is nothing anymore to hold back the propagation of the structure. We investigate this substorm

  9. Analysis procedures and subjective flight results of a simulator validation and cue fidelity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Peter C.; Mckissick, Burnell T.

    1988-01-01

    A joint experiment to investigate simulator validation and cue fidelity was conducted by the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center (Ames-Dryden) and NASA Langley Research Center. The primary objective was to validate the use of a closed-loop pilot-vehicle mathematical model as an analytical tool for optimizing the tradeoff between simulator fidelity requirements and simulator cost. The validation process includes comparing model predictions with simulation and flight test results to evaluate various hypotheses for differences in motion and visual cues and information transfer. A group of five pilots flew air-to-air tracking maneuvers in the Langley differential maneuvering simulator and visual motion simulator and in an F-14 aircraft at Ames-Dryden. The simulators used motion and visual cueing devices including a g-seat, a helmet loader, wide field-of-view horizon, and a motion base platform.

  10. The effects of bed rest on crew performance during simulated shuttle reentry. Volume 1: Study overview and physiological results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, A.; Vykukal, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    A centrifuge study was carried out to measure physiological stress and control task performance during simulated space shuttle orbiter reentry. Jet pilots were tested with, and without, anti-g-suit protection. The pilots were exposed to simulated space shuttle reentry acceleration profiles before, and after, ten days of complete bed rest, which produced physiological deconditioning similar to that resulting from prolonged exposure to orbital zero g. Pilot performance in selected control tasks was determined during simulated reentry, and before and after each simulation. Physiological stress during reentry was determined by monitoring heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rate. Study results indicate: (1) heart rate increased during the simulated reentry when no g protection was given, and remained at or below pre-bed rest values when g-suits were used; (2) pilots preferred the use of g-suits to muscular contraction for control of vision tunneling and grayout during reentry; (3) prolonged bed rest did not alter blood pressure or respiration rate during reentry, but the peak reentry acceleration level did; and (4) pilot performance was not affected by prolonged bed rest or simulated reentry.

  11. Personality Traits Affect Teaching Performance of Attending Physicians: Results of a Multi-Center Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied effects of personality traits on job performance and academic performance in medicine. However, up till date, research in clinical teaching practice did not use quantitative methods and did not account for specialty differences. We empirically studied the relationship of attending physicians' personality traits with their teaching performance across surgical and non-surgical specialties. Method We conducted a survey across surgical and non-surgical specialties in eighteen medical centers in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated attending physicians' overall teaching performance, as well as the specific domains learning climate, professional attitude, communication, evaluation, and feedback, using the validated 21-item System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ). Attending physicians self-evaluated their personality traits on a 5-point scale using the validated 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI), yielding the Five Factor model: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness and openness. Results Overall, 622 (77%) attending physicians and 549 (68%) residents participated. Extraversion positively related to overall teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.02). Openness was negatively associated with scores on feedback for surgical specialties only (B: −0.10, 95% CI: −0.15 to −0.05, P<0.001) and conscientiousness was positively related to evaluation of residents for non-surgical specialties only (B: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.22, p = 0.01). Conclusions Extraverted attending physicians were consistently evaluated as better supervisors. Surgical attending physicians who display high levels of

  12. Reference Valence Effects of Affective S–R Compatibility: Are Visual and Auditory Results Consistent?

    PubMed Central

    Xiaojun, Zhao; Xuqun, You; Changxiu, Shi; Shuoqiu, Gan; Chaoyi, Hu

    2014-01-01

    Humans may be faster to avoid negative words than to approach negative words, and faster to approach positive words than to avoid positive words. That is an example of affective stimulus–response (S–R) compatibility. The present study identified the reference valence effects of affective stimulus–response (S–R) compatibility when auditory stimulus materials are used. The researchers explored the reference valence effects of affective S–R compatibility using a mixed-design experiment based on visual words, visual pictures and audition. The study computed the average compatibility effect size. A t-test based on visual pictures showed that the compatibility effect size was significantly different from zero, t (22) = 2.43, p<.05 (M = 485 ms). Smaller compatibility effects existed when switching the presentation mode from visual stimuli to auditory stimuli. This study serves as an important reference for the auditory reference valence effects of affective S–R compatibility. PMID:24743797

  13. An agent-based epidemic simulation of social behaviors affecting HIV transmission among Taiwanese homosexuals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations are currently used to identify epidemic dynamics, to test potential prevention and intervention strategies, and to study the effects of social behaviors on HIV transmission. The author describes an agent-based epidemic simulation model of a network of individuals who participate in high-risk sexual practices, using number of partners, condom usage, and relationship length to distinguish between high- and low-risk populations. Two new concepts-free links and fixed links-are used to indicate tendencies among individuals who either have large numbers of short-term partners or stay in long-term monogamous relationships. An attempt was made to reproduce epidemic curves of reported HIV cases among male homosexuals in Taiwan prior to using the agent-based model to determine the effects of various policies on epidemic dynamics. Results suggest that when suitable adjustments are made based on available social survey statistics, the model accurately simulates real-world behaviors on a large scale.

  14. Results and Lessons Learned from Performance Testing of Humans in Spacesuits in Simulated Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program has plans to return to the Moon within the next 10 years. Although reaching the Moon during the Apollo Program was a remarkable human engineering achievement, fewer than 20 extravehicular activities (EVAs) were performed. Current projections indicate that the next lunar exploration program will require thousands of EVAs, which will require spacesuits that are better optimized for human performance. Limited mobility and dexterity, and the position of the center of gravity (CG) are a few of many features of the Apollo suit that required significant crew compensation to accomplish the objectives. Development of a new EVA suit system will ideally result in performance close to or better than that in shirtsleeves at 1 G, i.e., in "a suit that is a pleasure to work in, one that you would want to go out and explore in on your day off." Unlike the Shuttle program, in which only a fraction of the crew perform EVA, the Constellation program will require that all crewmembers be able to perform EVA. As a result, suits must be built to accommodate and optimize performance for a larger range of crew anthropometry, strength, and endurance. To address these concerns, NASA has begun a series of tests to better understand the factors affecting human performance and how to utilize various lunar gravity simulation environments available for testing.

  15. Instability of surface lenticular vortices: results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Noé; Paci, Alexandre; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2016-04-01

    We examine the instability of lenticular vortices -- or lenses -- in a stratified rotating fluid. The simplest configuration is one in which the lenses overlay a deep layer and have a free surface, and this can be studied using a two-layer rotating shallow water model. We report results from laboratory experiments and high-resolution direct numerical simulations of the destabilization of vortices with constant potential vorticity, and compare these to a linear stability analysis. The stability properties of the system are governed by two parameters: the typical upper-layer potential vorticity and the size (depth) of the vortex. Good agreement is found between analytical, numerical and experimental results for the growth rate and wavenumber of the instability. The nonlinear saturation of the instability is associated with conversion from potential to kinetic energy and weak emission of gravity waves, giving rise to the formation of coherent vortex multipoles with trapped waves. The impact of flow in the lower layer is examined. In particular, it is shown that the growth rate can be strongly affected and the instability can be suppressed for certain types of weak co-rotating flow.

  16. Factors affecting air sparging remediation systems using field data and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Benner, Michael L; Mohtar, Rabi H; Lee, Linda S

    2002-12-01

    Field data from five air sparging sites were used to assess the effect of several soil, contaminant, and air sparging system factors on the removal time and associated costs required to reach specified clean-up criteria. Numerical simulations were also performed to better assess the field data and to expand the data sets beyond the five field sites. Ten factors were selected and evaluated individually over a range of values based on information from practitioners and the literature. Trends in removal time and removal cost to reach a specified clean-up criterion were analyzed to ascertain the conditions controlling contaminant removal with variations in each factors' value. A linear sensitivity equation was used to quantify system dynamics controlling the observed contaminant removal trends for each factor. Factors found most critical across all field sites in terms of removal time and/or cost were contaminant type, sparge pulsing schedule, number of wells, maximum biodecay rate, total soil porosity, and aquifer organic carbon content. Factors showing moderate to low effect included the depth of the sparge point below the water table, air injection rate/pressure, horizontal air conductivity, and anisotropy ratio. At each field site, subsurface coverage of sparged air, sparged air residence time, contaminant equilibrium in the system, contaminant phase distribution, oxygen availability to microbes, and contaminant volatility seem to control the system responses and were affected by one or more of the 10 factors evaluated.

  17. Refining in silico simulation to study digestion parameters affecting the bioaccessibility of lipophilic nutrients and micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Marze, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable number of in vivo and in vitro studies on the digestive fate of lipophilic nutrients, micronutrients, and bioactives, the effects of the structure and composition of foods on the physicochemical mechanisms of luminal digestion are still poorly understood. Studying them is indeed complex because the number of parameters is high and many of them are interdependent. To solve this problem, an in silico simulation based on a multi-agent system was recently proposed to study the intestinal bioaccessibility of lipophilic nutrients and micronutrients from a single oil droplet. The roles of lipolysis and solubilization in bile salt were included. The effects of several food and digestion parameters were in line with those reported in the experimental literature. The goal of the research reported in this new article was to include more digestion parameters in the simulation in order to make it more realistic against complex cases. This was done in one specific digestion condition reflecting in vitro experiments, using droplets of tricaprylin or triolein containing vitamin A. The structure and principles of the original model were kept, with independent local modifications in order to study each factor separately. First, a gastric step was added where lipolysis took place, and only a marginal effect on the following intestinal step was found. Then, the chemical form of vitamin A, either non-hydrolyzed retinyl ester or retinyl ester instantly hydrolyzed into retinol, was investigated by considering different localizations in the droplet, resulting in a higher bioaccessibility for the retinol. The case of a mixture of tricaprylin and triolein indicated an influence of the oil phase viscosity. The consideration of mixed micelles compared to simple bile salt micelles was also investigated, and resulted in a higher vitamin A bioaccessibility, especially with triolein. Finally, a full model including the most influential parameters was tested to simulate

  18. Preliminary results of column experiments simulating nutrients transport in artificial recharge by treated wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, María; Meffe, Raffaella; Lillo, Javier

    2013-04-01

    the field site. Wastewater synthesized in the laboratory simulates the secondary effluent used for recharge activities in the Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes, Experimental results showed that ammonium and phosphates are clearly retarded when infiltrating through both materials (zeolite and palygorskite) as consequence of cation exchange and surface complexation processes. Indeed, after about 14 days from the beginning of the experiments the two compounds do not appear at the column effluent exhibiting a very strong retardation. Concerning nitrites and nitrates, no retardation is observed. Preliminary interpretation of the experimental results by means of the geochemical modeling code PHREEQ-C confirmed and quantified the importance of specific reactive processes affecting transport of nutrients through the applied reactive materials.

  19. Three-dimensional Simulations of Thermonuclear Detonation with α-Network: Numerical Method and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlov, A.; Domínguez, I.; Bacon, C.; Clifford, B.; Baron, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Wang, L.

    2012-07-01

    We describe a new astrophysical version of a cell-based adaptive mesh refinement code ALLA for reactive flow fluid dynamic simulations, including a new implementation of α-network nuclear kinetics, and present preliminary results of first three-dimensional simulations of incomplete carbon-oxygen detonation in Type Ia Supernovae.

  20. Results of GEANT simulations and comparison with first experiments at DANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Browne, J. C.; Esch, E. I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2003-07-29

    This report describes intensive Monte Carlo simulations carried out to be compared with the results of the first run cycle with DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments). The experimental results were gained during the commissioning phase 2002/2003 with only a part of the array. Based on the results of these simulations the most important items to be improved before the next experiments will be addressed.

  1. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, Alin; Muntean, Sebastian

    2015-12-31

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit{sup ®}[1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms.

  2. Historical contingency affects signaling strategies and competitive abilities in evolving populations of simulated robots.

    PubMed

    Wischmann, Steffen; Floreano, Dario; Keller, Laurent

    2012-01-17

    One of the key innovations during the evolution of life on earth has been the emergence of efficient communication systems, yet little is known about the causes and consequences of the great diversity within and between species. By conducting experimental evolution in 20 independently evolving populations of cooperatively foraging simulated robots, we found that historical contingency in the occurrence order of novel phenotypic traits resulted in the emergence of two distinct communication strategies. The more complex foraging strategy was less efficient than the simpler strategy. However, when the 20 populations were placed in competition with each other, the populations with the more complex strategy outperformed the populations with the less complex strategy. These results demonstrate a tradeoff between communication efficiency and robustness and suggest that stochastic events have important effects on signal evolution and the outcome of competition between distinct populations.

  3. The Plasma Wake Downstream of Lunar Topographic Obstacles: Preliminary Results from 2D Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.; Farrell, W. M.; Snubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Anticipating the plasma and electrical environments in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) of the moon is critical in understanding local processes of space weathering, surface charging, surface chemistry, volatile production and trapping, exo-ion sputtering, and charged dust transport. In the present study, we have employed the open-source XOOPIC code [I] to investigate the effects of solar wind conditions and plasma-surface interactions on the electrical environment in PSRs through fully two-dimensional pattic1e-in-cell simulations. By direct analogy with current understanding of the global lunar wake (e.g., references) deep, near-terminator, shadowed craters are expected to produce plasma "mini-wakes" just leeward of the crater wall. The present results (e.g., Figure I) are in agreement with previous claims that hot electrons rush into the crater void ahead of the heavier ions, fanning a negative cloud of charge. Charge separation along the initial plasma-vacuum interface gives rise to an ambipolar electric field that subsequently accelerates ions into the void. However, the situation is complicated by the presence of the dynamic lunar surface, which develops an electric potential in response to local plasma currents (e.g., Figure Ia). In some regimes, wake structure is clearly affected by the presence of the charged crater floor as it seeks to achieve current balance (i.e. zero net current to the surface).

  4. Precarious employment conditions affect work content in education and social work: results of work analyses.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Ana Maria; Messing, Karen; Riel, Jessica; Chatigny, Céline

    2007-01-01

    Work content is adversely affected by precarious employment conditions, with consequences for workers and clients/customers. Three examples are taken from professions involving long-term relations between workers and clients. Adult education teachers hired on short-term contracts to teach primarily immigrant populations prepare their courses under less favorable conditions than regular teachers and their employment context foments hostility among teachers. Special education technicians are hired on a seasonal basis which interferes with their ability to coordinate and plan their efforts in collaboration with teachers. Workers in shelters for women suffering conjugal violence who were hired on a casual or on-call basis were unable to follow up with women they helped during their shifts and more rarely engaged in one-on-one counseling. Precarious work contracts can affect mental health not only through employment insecurity but also through negative effects on the ability to do one's job and take pride in one's work, as well as weakening the interpersonal relationships on which successful, productive work depends. PMID:17631963

  5. Simulation loop between cad systems, GEANT-4 and GeoModel: Implementation and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharmazanashvili, A.; Tsutskiridze, Niko

    2016-09-01

    Compare analysis of simulation and as-built geometry descriptions of detector is important field of study for data_vs_Monte-Carlo discrepancies. Shapes consistency and detalization is not important while adequateness of volumes and weights of detector components are essential for tracking. There are 2 main reasons of faults of geometry descriptions in simulation: (1) Difference between simulated and as-built geometry descriptions; (2) Internal inaccuracies of geometry transformations added by simulation software infrastructure itself. Georgian Engineering team developed hub on the base of CATIA platform and several tools enabling to read in CATIA different descriptions used by simulation packages, like XML->CATIA; VP1->CATIA; Geo-Model->CATIA; Geant4->CATIA. As a result it becomes possible to compare different descriptions with each other using the full power of CATIA and investigate both classes of reasons of faults of geometry descriptions. Paper represents results of case studies of ATLAS Coils and End-Cap toroid structures.

  6. Does aspiration of bones and joints affect results of later bone scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Canale, S.T.; Harkness, R.M.; Thomas, P.A.; Massie, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect, if any, of needle aspiration on /sup 99m/Tc bone scanning, three different areas of 15 dogs were first aspirated and then imaged with technetium bone scintigraphy. The hip joint was aspirated, the distal femoral metaphysis was drilled and aspirated, and the tibial periosteum was scraped with an 18- or 20-gauge needle. Varying amounts of trauma were inflicted to simulate varying difficulties at aspiration. /sup 99m/Tc bone scans were obtained from 5 h to 10 days later. There was no evidence of focal technetium uptake after any hip joint aspiration. This was consistent regardless of the amount of trauma inflicted or the time from aspiration to bone scanning. Metaphyseal cortical drilling and tibial periosteal scraping occasionally caused some focal uptake when scanning was delayed greater than 2 days. When osteomyelitis or pyarthrosis is clinically suspected, joint aspiration can be performed without fear of producing a false- positive bone scan.

  7. Self-cleaning in an estuarine area formerly affected by 226Ra anthropogenic enhancements: numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Periáñez, R; Absi, A; Villa, M; Moreno, H P; Manjón, G

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model of the Odiel-Tinto estuary (Spain) has been developed to study the self-cleaning process that was evidenced from 226Ra measurements in water and sediments collected in the period 1999-2002, after direct releases from a fertilizer complex ceased (in 1998). The hydrodynamic model is first calibrated, and standard tidal analysis is carried out to calculate tidal constants required by the dispersion code to determine instantaneous water currents and elevations over the estuary. In this way, long-term simulations may be carried out. The dispersion code includes advective/diffusive transport of radionuclides plus exchanges with bottom sediments described through a kinetic approach. The dispersion model is first tested by comparing computed and measured 226Ra concentrations over the estuary resulting after releases in the Odiel and Tinto rivers. Next, it is applied to simulate the self-cleaning process of the estuary. The time evolution of radium concentrations in bed sediments is in generally good agreement with observations. The computed sediment halving time of the estuary is 510 days, which also is in good agreement with that estimated from measurements.

  8. Simulated browsing affects leaf shedding phenology and litter quality of oak and birch saplings.

    PubMed

    Palacio, S; Hester, A J; Maestro, M; Millard, P

    2013-04-01

    Herbivore effects on leaf litter can have a strong impact on ecosystem nutrient cycling. Although such effects are well described for insect herbivory, research on the impacts of browsing by mammalian herbivores on leaf litter dynamics and nutrient cycling has been more limited, particularly at the level of the individual plant. Clipping treatments (66% shoot removal twice, plus unclipped) were applied to analyse the effect of browsing on the phenology (start date and pattern of leaf shedding) and leaf litter quality (nitrogen (N), soluble sugars, starch and total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations, plus C : N ratios) of Betula pubescens Ehrh. and Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl. saplings. Clipping decreased leaf litter biomass and delayed leaf senescence and shedding, but did not change the phenological timing of litterfall between senescence and shedding. The quality of leaf litter of both species was increased by simulated browsing, through an increase in N and carbohydrate concentrations (mainly soluble sugars) and a decreased C : N ratio. This is the first evidence we are aware of that browsing may cause changes in leaf shedding phenology, delaying the process without altering its pattern. Our results also indicate that simulated browsing increases the quality of leaf litter. However, the potential positive effect of browsing on N cycling through litter quality may be offset by its negative impact on the amount of N shed per tree.

  9. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  10. Intervention effects on negative affect of CPS-referred children: results of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lind, Teresa; Bernard, Kristin; Ross, Emily; Dozier, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to early adversity places young children at risk for behavioral, physiological, and emotional dysregulation, predisposing them to a range of long-term problematic outcomes. Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) is a 10-session intervention designed to enhance children's self-regulatory capabilities by helping parents to behave in nurturing, synchronous, and non-frightening ways. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in a randomized clinical trial, with parents who had been referred to Child Protective Services (CPS) for allegations of maltreatment. Parent-child dyads received either the ABC intervention or a control intervention. Following the intervention, children from the ABC intervention (n=56) expressed lower levels of negative affect during a challenging task compared to children from the control intervention (n=61). PMID:24814751

  11. Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): Results of the Mission Concept Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; EASCO Team

    2011-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are two large-scale structures that originate from the Sun and affect the heliosphere in general and Earth in particular. While CIRs are generally detected by in-situ plasma signatures, CMEs are remote-sensed when they are still close to the Sun. The current understanding of CMEs primarily come from the SOHO and STEREO missions. In spite of the enormous progress made, there are some serious deficiencies in these missions. For example, these missions did not carry all the necessary instruments (STEREO did not have a magnetograph; SOHO did not have in-situ magnetometer). From the Sun-Earth line, SOHO was not well-suited for observing Earth-directed CMEs because of the occulting disk. STEREO's angle with the Sun-Earth line is changing constantly, so only a limited number of Earth-directed CMEs were observed in profile. In order to overcome these difficulties, we proposed a news L5 mission concept known as the Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO). The mission concept was recently studied at the Mission Design Laboratory (MDL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The aim of the MDL study was to see how the scientific payload consisting of ten instruments can be accommodated in the spacecraft bus, what propulsion system can transfer the payload to the Sun-Earth L5, and what launch vehicles are appropriate. The study found that all the ten instruments can be readily accommodated and can be launched using an intermediate size vehicle such as Taurus II with enhanced faring. The study also found that a hybrid propulsion system consisting of an ion thruster (using 55 kg of Xenon) and hydrazine ( 10 kg) is adequate to place the payload at L5. The transfer will take about 2 years and the science mission will last for 4 years around the next solar maximum in 2025.

  12. Simulation of plasma turbulence in scrape-off layer conditions: the GBS code, simulation results and code validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Halpern, F. D.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Theiler, C.

    2012-12-01

    Based on the drift-reduced Braginskii equations, the Global Braginskii Solver, GBS, is able to model the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma turbulence in terms of the interplay between the plasma outflow from the tokamak core, the turbulent transport, and the losses at the vessel. Model equations, the GBS numerical algorithm, and GBS simulation results are described. GBS has been first developed to model turbulence in basic plasma physics devices, such as linear and simple magnetized toroidal devices, which contain some of the main elements of SOL turbulence in a simplified setting. In this paper we summarize the findings obtained from the simulation carried out in these configurations and we report the first simulations of SOL turbulence. We also discuss the validation project that has been carried out together with the GBS development.

  13. Results of computer calculations for a simulated distribution of kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micale, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of computer calculations for a simulated distribution of kidney cells are given. The calculations were made for different values of electroosmotic flow, U sub o, and the ratio of sample diameter to channel diameter, R.

  14. Relationships between changes in sustained fronto-striatal connectivity and positive affect in major depression resulting from antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Heller, Aaron S; Johnstone, Tom; Light, Sharee N; Peterson, Michael J; Kolden, Gregory G; Kalin, Ned H; Davidson, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Deficits in positive affect and their neural bases have been associated with major depression. However, whether reductions in positive affect result solely from an overall reduction in nucleus accumbens activity and fronto-striatal connectivity or the additional inability to sustain engagement of this network over time is unknown. The authors sought to determine whether treatment-induced changes in the ability to sustain nucleus accumbens activity and fronto-striatal connectivity during the regulation of positive affect are associated with gains in positive affect. METHOD Using fMRI, the authors assessed the ability to sustain activity in reward-related networks when attempting to increase positive emotion during performance of an emotion regulation paradigm in 21 depressed patients before and after 2 months of antidepressant treatment. Over the same interval, 14 healthy comparison subjects underwent scanning as well. RESULTS After 2 months of treatment, self-reported positive affect increased. The patients who demonstrated the largest increases in sustained nucleus accumbens activity over the 2 months were those who demonstrated the largest increases in positive affect. In addition, the patients who demonstrated the largest increases in sustained fronto-striatal connectivity were also those who demonstrated the largest increases in positive affect when controlling for negative affect. None of these associations were observed in healthy comparison subjects. CONCLUSIONS Treatment-induced change in the sustained engagement of fronto-striatal circuitry tracks the experience of positive emotion in daily life. Studies examining reduced positive affect in a variety of psychiatric disorders might benefit from examining the temporal dynamics of brain activity when attempting to understand changes in daily positive affect.

  15. Flosequinan does not affect systemic and regional vascular responses to simulated orthostatic stress in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Duranteau, J; Pussard, E; Edouard, A; Samii, K; Berdeaux, A; Giudicelli, J F

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of a single oral dose (100 mg) of flosequinan on systemic and regional (forearm, splanchnic and renal) vascular responses to simulated orthostatic stress (lower body negative pressure, LBNP) were investigated in nine healthy male volunteers, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. 2. Forty-five minutes after its administration and before LBNP, flosequinan induced a significant decrease in total peripheral and in forearm vascular resistances without any concomitant change in arterial pressure, in heart rate and in the investigated biological parameters (plasma catecholamines, arginine vasopressin and renin activity). 3. After flosequinan and placebo, LBNP induced similar decreases in central venous pressure at all levels of LBNP (-10, -20 and -40 mm Hg) and in pulse pressure at LBNP -40 mm Hg. LBNP-induced increase in forearm vascular resistance was significantly more marked after flosequinan than after placebo at all levels of LBNP, and this was also true for splanchnic vascular resistance but at LBNP -40 mm Hg only. However, inasmuch as the basal values of these two parameters before LBNP were lower after flosequinan than after placebo, their final values after LBNP -40 mm Hg were similar. Finally, LBNP-induced changes in renal vascular resistance, glomerular filtration rate and filtration fraction as well as in plasma catecholamines, arginine vasopressin and renin activity were similar after flosequinan and placebo at all levels of LBNP. 4. Flosequinan affected neither reflex control of heart rate (phenylephrine test) nor non-specific vasoconstrictor responses (cold pressor test). (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1389945

  16. [Improvement of root parameters in land surface model (LSM )and its effect on the simulated results].

    PubMed

    Cai, Kui-ye; Liu, Jing-miao; Zhang, Zheng-qiu; Liang, Hong; He, Xiao-dong

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve root parameterization in land surface model, the sub-model for root in CERES-Maize was coupled in the SSiB2 after calibrating of maize parameters in SSiB2. The effects of two improved root parameterization schemes on simulated results of land surface flux were analyzed. Results indicated that simulation accuracy of land surface flux was enhanced when the root module provided root depth only with the SSiB2 model (scheme I). Correlation coefficients between observed and simulated values of latent flux and sensible flux increased during the whole growing season, and RMSE of linear fitting decreased. Simulation accuracy of CO2 flux was also enhanced from 121 days after sowing to mature period. On the other hand, simulation accuracy of the flux was enhanced when the root module provided root depth and root length density simultaneously for the SSiB2 model (scheme II). Compared with the scheme I, the scheme II was more comprehensive, while its simulation accuracy of land surface flux decreased. The improved root parameterization in the SSiB2 model was better than the original one, which made simulated accuracy of land-atmospheric flux improved. The scheme II overestimated root relative growth in the surface layer soil, so its simulated accuracy was lower than that of the scheme I. PMID:26995920

  17. Growth and xylem water potential of white oak and loblolly pine seedlings as affected by simulated acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F. ); McLaughlin, S.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Effects of simulated acidic rainfall on the growth and water relations of white oak (Quercus albya L.) and loblolly pin (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings grown under two fertility regimes were examined. Seedling of each species grown in a loam soil were exposed to two simulated rains per week of pH 4.8, 4.2 or 3.6 for 26 wk. High and low fertility regimes were imposed by monthly application of one-half and one-quarter concentration, respectively, of Hoagland's solution No. 2. Diameter growth of both species was reduced by exposure to rains of the higher acidities regardless of fertility treatment, and seedlings that received pH 4.2 and 3.6 rains also exhibited greater foliar chlorosis and necrosis than those that received rains of pH 4.8. The high fertility treatment stimulated diameter growth of white oak, but height growth, shoot and root dry weights and total root length were no substantially affected b acid rain or fertility treatments in either species. Following the final rain applications, drought was simulated by withholding irrigation for 2 wk, and seedling xylem pressure potential was then measured using the pressure chamber technique. Xylem pressure potential of white oak seedlings which had received rains of pH 3.6 was significantly lower than that of seedlings which had received rains of higher pH, a result that became more pronounced as soil water potential decreased. Rain acidity had little effect on the xylem pressure potential of loblolly pine, however. Soil pH analyses before initiation and after completion of the rain applications indicated that rainfall of pH 3.6 increased soil acidity more than rains of pH 4.2 or 4.8, although changes in soil pH were small overall. 26 refs., 1 fig. 2 tabs.

  18. Contraceptive counselling and factors affecting women's contraceptive choices: results of the CHOICE study in Austria.

    PubMed

    Egarter, Christian; Grimm, Christoph; Nouri, Kazem; Ahrendt, Hans-Joachim; Bitzer, Johannes; Cermak, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Empirical evidence of the impact of contraceptive counselling and factors affecting women's contraceptive choices are limited. CHOICE (Contraceptive Health Research Of Informed Choice Experience) was a large-scale study in 11 European countries. Women in Austria aged 15-40 years considering a short-acting, reversible form of combined hormonal contraceptive were eligible to participate. The choices included the combined daily pill, weekly transdermal patch, and monthly vaginal ring. This study assessed and compared 2478 women's original preferences with their post-counselling choices and evaluated their perceptions and criteria for their choice. Women who were 'undecided' decreased from 18.1% pre-counselling to 3.2% post-counselling; significantly more women post-counselling chose the monthly ring (8.7% to 23.8%; difference 15.1%, 95% CI 13.3-16.8%; P<0.0001) or the weekly patch (6.2% to 7.8%; difference 1.7%, 95% CI 0.5-2.9%; P=0.0014). Women's primary reasons for choosing a method included 'easy to use' (daily pill, weekly patch and monthly ring) and 'still effective if I experience vomiting, diarrhoea' (weekly patch and monthly ring). Structured and balanced counselling led to changes in the method chosen.

  19. An Analysis of the Usefulness of Simulation Games in Affecting Attitudinal Changes and Skill-Type Learning. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, William K.

    This study determines whether a simulation game affects attitudes, and increases motivation and cognitive learning. Seventy-six college students in four sections of a political science course were the subjects. Random selection placed them in two treatment groups and two control groups. Both groups received the game, and one treatment group and…

  20. FFTF thermal-hydraulic testing results affecting piping and vessel component design in LMFBR's

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, R.L.; Beaver, T.R.; Chang, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility completed four years of pre-operational testing in April 1982. This paper describes thermal-hydraulic testing results from this period which impact piping and vessel component design in LMFBRs. Data discussed are piping flow oscillations, piping thermal stratification and vessel upper plenum stratification. Results from testing verified that plant design limits were met.

  1. Optimization of factors affecting hexavalent chromium removal from simulated electroplating wastewater by synthesized magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ataabadi, Mitra; Hoodaji, Mehran; Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Kalbasi, Mahmoud; Abdouss, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a mutagen and carcinogen that is of significant concern in water and wastewater. In the present study, magnetite nanoparticles (n-Mag) were investigated as a potential remediation technology for the decontamination of Cr (VI)-contaminated wastewater. Synthesized n-Mag was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and BET-N2 technology. To screen and optimize the factors affecting Cr (VI) removal efficiency by synthesized nanoparticles, Plackett-Burman (PB) and Taguchi experimental designs were used respectively. The crystalline produced n-Mag was in the size range of 60-70 nm and had a specific surface area (SSA) of 31.55 m(2) g(-1). Results of PB design showed that the most significant factors affecting Cr (VI) removal efficiency were initial Cr (VI) concentration, pH, n-Mag dosage, and temperature. In a pH of 2, 20 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) concentration, 4 g L(-1)of n-Mag, temperature of 40 °C, 220 rpm of shaking speed, and 60 min of contact time, the complete removal efficiency of Cr (VI) was achieved. Batch experiments revealed that the removal of Cr (VI) by n-Mag was consistent with pseudo-second order reaction kinetics. The competition from common coexisting ions such as NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), and Cl(-) were not considerable, unless in the higher concentration of SO₄(2-). These results indicated that the readily synthesized magnetite nanoparticles have promising applications for the removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution.

  2. Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in an incident ALS cohort: results from the Apulia registry (SLAP).

    PubMed

    Tortelli, Rosanna; Copetti, Massimiliano; Arcuti, Simona; Tursi, Marianna; Iurillo, Annalisa; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Cortese, Rosa; Capozzo, Rosa; D'Errico, Eustachio; Marin, Benoit; Simone, Isabella Laura; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and the clinical correlations of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in a population-based incident cohort of ALS patients. Incident ALS cases, diagnosed in 2011 and 2012, according to El Escorial criteria were enrolled from a prospective population-based registry in Apulia, Southern Italy. Neurological status was assessed using a standard neurological examination and the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRSr). The Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), a self-administered questionnaire, was used to evaluate the presence and severity of PBA. Total scores range from 7 to 35. A score ≥13 was used to identify the presence of PBA. One-hundred thirty-two sporadic incident ALS cases were enrolled. Median disease duration was 20 months (range 2-143), median onset-diagnosis interval (ODI) 12 months (range 2-131), median ALSFRSr at baseline 36/48 (range 2-47) and median ALSFRSr bulbar sub-score 10/12 (range 0-12). Neurological examination revealed presence of PBA in 34/132 patients (26%). Pathological CNS-LS score was found in 45/132 patients (34%). Median total CNS-LS score was 9/35 (range 7-29). The subgroup with pathological CNS-LS was characterized by a short disease duration from symptom onset, ODI, time to diffusion to a second region, time to generalization and ALSFRSr bulbar sub-score, bulbar onset, "definite" diagnostic category, bulbar upper motor-neuron involvement and presence of PBA at neurological examination. In population-based setting, one-third of ALS patients present PBA at diagnosis. The presence of PBA is associated with bulbar UMN involvement and markers of a more severe phenotype.

  3. Factors affecting ozone removal rates in a simulated aircraft cabin environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamás, Gyöngyi; Weschler, Charles J.; Bakó-Biró, Zsolt; Wyon, David P.; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter

    Ozone concentrations were measured concurrently inside a simulated aircraft cabin and in the airstream providing ventilation air to the cabin. Ozone decay rates were also measured after cessation of ozone injection into the supply airstream. By systematically varying the presence or absence of people, soiled T-shirts, aircraft seats and a used HEPA filter, we have been able in the course of 24 experiments to isolate the contributions of these and other factors to the removal of ozone from the cabin air. In the case of this simulated aircraft, people were responsible for almost 60% of the ozone removal occurring within the cabin and recirculation system; respiration can only have been responsible for about 4% of this removal. The aircraft seats removed about 25% of the ozone; the loaded HEPA filter, 7%; and the other surfaces, 10%. A T-shirt that had been slept in overnight removed roughly 70% as much ozone as a person, indicating the importance of skin oils in ozone removal. The presence of the used HEPA filter in the recirculated airstream reduced the perceived air quality. Over a 5-h period, the overall ozone removal rate by cabin surfaces decreased at ˜3% h -1. With people present, the measured ratio of ozone's concentration in the cabin versus that outside the cabin was 0.15-0.21, smaller than levels reported in the literature. The results reinforce the conclusion that the optimal way to reduce people's exposure to both ozone and ozone oxidation products is to efficiently remove ozone from the air supply system of an aircraft.

  4. Testosterone Affects Song Modulation during Simulated Territorial Intrusions in Male Black Redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros)

    PubMed Central

    Goymann, Wolfgang; Kipper, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that testosterone plays an important role in resource allocation for competitive behavior, details of the interplay between testosterone, territorial aggression and signal plasticity are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated if testosterone acts specifically on signals that communicate the motivation or ability of individuals to engage in competitive situations in a natural context. We studied the black redstart, a territorial songbird species, during two different life-cycle stages, the early breeding phase in spring and the non-breeding phase in fall. Male territory holders were implanted with the androgen receptor blocker flutamide (Flut) and the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (Let) to inhibit the action of testosterone and its estrogenic metabolites. Controls received a placebo treatment. Three days after implantation birds were challenged with a simulated territorial intrusion (STI). Song was recorded before, during and after the challenge. In spring, both treatment groups increased the number of elements sung in parts of their song in response to the STI. However, Flut/Let-implanted males reacted to the STI with a decreased maximum acoustic frequency of one song part, while placebo-implanted males did not. Instead, placebo-implanted males sang the atonal part of their song with a broader frequency range. Furthermore, placebo-, but not Flut/Let-implanted males, sang shorter songs with shorter pauses between parts in the STIs. During simulated intrusions in fall, when testosterone levels are naturally low in this species, males of both treatment groups sang similar to Flut/Let-implanted males during breeding. The results suggest that song sung during a territorial encounter is of higher competitive value than song sung in an undisturbed situation and may, therefore, convey information about the motivation or quality of the territory holder. We conclude that testosterone facilitates context-dependent changes in song structures

  5. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE - WANG,J.; LUCCIO,A.U.; D IMPERIO,N.; MACHIDA,S.

    2002-06-03

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  6. Wave spectra of a shoaling wave field: A comparison of experimental and simulated results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. D.; Grosch, C. E.; Poole, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Wave profile measurements made from an aircraft crossing the North Carolina continental shelf after passage of Tropical Storm Amy in 1975 are used to compute a series of wave energy spectra for comparison with simulated spectra. Results indicate that the observed wave field experiences refraction and shoaling effects causing statistically significant changes in the spectral density levels. A modeling technique is used to simulate the spectral density levels. Total energy levels of the simulated spectra are within 20 percent of those of the observed wave field. The results represent a successful attempt to theoretically simulate, at oceanic scales, the decay of a wave field which contains significant wave energies from deepwater through shoaling conditions.

  7. Simulated predator extinctions: predator identity affects survival and recruitment of oysters.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Nessa E; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Ladwig, Laura M; Bruno, John F

    2008-02-01

    The rate of species loss is increasing at a global scale, and human-induced extinctions are biased toward predator species. We examined the effects of predator extinctions on a foundation species, the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). We performed a factorial experiment manipulating the presence and abundance of three of the most common predatory crabs, the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), stone crab (Menippe mercenaria), and mud crab (Panopeus herbstii) in estuaries in the eastern United States. We tested the effects of species richness and identity of predators on juvenile oyster survival, oyster recruitment, and organic matter content of sediment. We also manipulated the density of each of the predators and controlled for the loss of biomass of species by maintaining a constant mass of predators in one set of treatments and simultaneously using an additive design. This design allowed us to test the density dependence of our results and test for functional compensation by other species. The identity of predator species, but not richness, affected oyster populations. The loss of blue crabs, alone or in combination with either of the other species, affected the survival rate of juvenile oysters. Blue crabs and stone crabs both affected oyster recruitment and sediment organic matter negatively. Mud crabs at higher than ambient densities, however, could fulfill some of the functions of blue and stone crabs, suggesting a level of ecological redundancy. Importantly, the strong effects of blue crabs in all processes measured no longer occurred when individuals were present at higher-than-ambient densities. Their role as dominant predator is, therefore, dependent on their density within the system and the density of other species within their guild (e.g., mud crabs). Our findings support the hypothesis that the effects of species loss at higher trophic levels are determined by predator identity and are subject to complex intraguild interactions that are largely

  8. Erroneous Knowledge of Results Affects Decision and Memory Processes on Timing Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Lawrence J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2007-01-01

    On mental timing tasks, erroneous knowledge of results (KR) leads to incorrect performance accompanied by the subjective judgment of accurate performance. Using the start-stop technique (an analogue of the peak interval procedure) with both reproduction and production timing tasks, the authors analyze what processes erroneous KR alters. KR…

  9. Gastric emptying scintigraphy results in children are affected by age, anthropometric factors, and study duration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A standardized 4-hour adult-based gastric emptying scintigraphy (GES) protocol is increasingly being used in children to evaluate for gastroparesis. We sought to determine the effect of age, anthropometrics, and study duration on GES results using this protocol in children. Retrospective review of c...

  10. Incentive Pay Programs Do Not Affect Teacher Motivation or Reported Practices: Results from Three Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Kun; Le, Vi-Nhuan; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Springer, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    This study drew on teacher survey responses from randomized experiments exploring three different pay-for-performance programs to examine the extent to which these programs motivated teachers to improve student achievement and the impact of such programs on teachers' instruction, number of hours worked, job stress, and collegiality. Results showed…

  11. School-Based Approaches to Affect Adolescents' Diets: Results from the TEENS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Varnell, Sherri

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the outcomes of the Teens Eating for Energy and Nutrition at School (TEENS) study, a 2-year intervention study conducted in 16 middle schools with a goal of increasing students' intakes of fruits, vegetables, and lower fat foods. Despite positive interim results for students randomized to intervention schools, the positive…

  12. Columbus meteoroid/debris protection study - Experimental simulation techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E.; Kitta, K.; Stilp, A.; Lambert, M.; Reimerdes, H. G.

    1992-08-01

    The methods and measurement techniques used in experimental simulations of micrometeoroid and space debris impacts with the ESA's laboratory module Columbus are described. Experiments were carried out at the two-stage light gas gun acceleration facilities of the Ernst-Mach Institute. Results are presented on simulations of normal impacts on bumper systems, oblique impacts on dual bumper systems, impacts into cooled targets, impacts into pressurized targets, and planar impacts of low-density projectiles.

  13. Design and CFD Simulation of the Drift Eliminators in Comparison with PIV Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stodůlka, Jiří; Vitkovičová, Rut

    2015-05-01

    Drift eliminators are the essential part of all modern cooling towers preventing significant losses of liquid water escaping to the enviroment. These eliminators need to be effective in terms of water capture but on the other hand causing only minimal pressure loss as well. A new type of such eliminator was designed and numerically simulated using CFD tools. Results of the simulation are compared with PIV visulisation on the prototype model.

  14. Results of NASA/FAA ground and flight simulation experiments concerning helicopter IFR airworthiness criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebacqz, J. V.; Chen, R. T. N.; Gerdes, R. M.; Weber, J. M.; Forrest, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A sequence of ground and flight simulation experiments was conducted to investigate helicopter instrument-flight-rules airworthiness criteria. The first six of these experiments and major results are summarized. Five of the experiments were conducted on large-amplitude motion base simulators. The NASA-Army V/STOLAND UH-1H variable-stability helicopter was used in the flight experiment. Artificial stability and control augmentation, longitudinal and lateral control, and in pitch and roll attitude augmentation were investigated.

  15. How does floodplain width affect floodplain river ecology? A preliminary exploration using simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Mary E.; Parker, Gary; Dietrich, William E.; Sun, Adrian

    1995-09-01

    Hydraulic food chain models allow us to explore the linkages of river discharge regimes and river-floodplain morphology to the structure and dynamics of modeled food webs. Physical conditions (e.g. depth, width, velocity) that vary with river discharge affect the performance (birth, growth, feeding, movement, or death rates) of organisms or trophic groups. Their performances in turn affect their impacts on food webs and ecosystems in channel and floodplain habitats. Here we explore the impact of floodplain width (modeled as 1 ×, 10× and 40× the channel width) on a food web with two energy sources (detritus and vegetation), invertebrates that consume these, a size structured fish population which consumes invertebrates and in which larger fish cannibalize small fish, and birds which feed on large fish. Hydraulic linkages to trophic dynamics are assumed to be mediated in three ways: birds feed efficiently only in shallow water; plant carrying capacity varies non-linearly with water velocity, and mobile and drifting organisms are diluted and concentrated with spillover of river discharge to the floodplain, and its reconfinement to the channel. Aspects of this model are based on field observations of Junk and Bailey from the Amazon, of Sparks from the Mississippi, and on our observations of the Fly River in Papua New Guinea. The model produced several counter-intuitive results. Biomass of invertebrates and fish increased with floodplain width, but much more rapidly from 1 × to 10 × floodplains than from 10 × to 40 × floodplains. For birds, maximum biomass occurred on the 10× floodplain. Initially high bird biomass on the 40 × floodplain declined to extinction over time, because although favorable fishing conditions (shallow water) were most prolonged on the widest floodplain, this advantage was more than offset by the greater dilution of prey after spillover. Bird predation on large fish sometimes increased their biomass, by reducing cannibalism and thereby

  16. Affects of Age and GPA on Learning Electronics via Computer Simulation-Based and Traditional Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nejad, Mahmoud Arshadi

    With the advent of the microcomputer has come an increase in the use of educational simulations. Distinct from software used for drill and practice, tutorials, or problem-solving, simulation software recreates events, devices, or phenomena and can provide the student with a scientific experience which might otherwise be too expensive, dangerous,…

  17. Factors affecting the comparability of meta-analyses and largest trials results in perinatology.

    PubMed

    Villar, J; Piaggio, G; Carroli, G; Donner, A

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a new methodology for evaluating the performance of meta-analysis (MA) in corroborating results of large trials (LT) and to identify factors that could explain lack of similarity in the results. We used two criteria to judge the degree of similarity between a MA and the LT: (a) the ratio of the relative risk of the MA to the relative risk of the LT; and (b) the 95% confidence interval about this ratio. Furthermore, this degree of similarity was cross-tabulated with the presence or not of evidence of selective inclusion of positive studies (e.g., publication bias) as judged from "funnel plots" and statistical indicators. Depending on which of our two criteria was used, we found that between 20% and 53% of the 30 MAs studied have high or very high degree of similarity with the LT. We also found strong evidence that factors influencing asymmetrical funnel plots of MA, such as publication bias, may play an important role in this degree of similarity. There was a sizeable proportion of meta-analyses that did not agree with large trial results. We recommend that funnel plots be used as a tool for identifying which MAs can mislead. However, the statistical indicators at hand are unlikely to be of use in many area of medicine considering the regrettably small number of randomized controlled trials per topic available. PMID:9363033

  18. Methodological variables in Web-based research that may affect results: sample type, monetary incentives, and personal information.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, K M; Penrod, S D

    2001-05-01

    There are many methodological differences between Web-based studies, differences that could substantially affect the results. The present study investigated whether sample type, offering payment through a lottery, and requiring participants to enter personal information would affect dropout rates and/or the substantive results in a study of jury decision making in capital cases. Asking participants to enter their e-mail addresses increased dropout rates, and offering payment through a lottery tended to do so as well. Participants offered payment tended to be less likely to give death sentences, and sample type moderated the influence of attitudes toward the death penalty on verdicts.

  19. The Affect of Realistic Geologic Heterogeneity on Local and Regional P/S Amplitude Ratios Based on Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Wagoner, J L; Preston, L; Smith, K; Larsen, S C

    2005-07-11

    Regional seismic discriminants based on high-frequency P/S ratios reliably distinguish between earthquakes and explosions. However, P/S discriminants in the 0.5 to 3 Hz band (where SNR can be highest) rarely perform well, with similar ratios for earthquake and explosion populations. Variability in discriminant performance has spawned numerous investigations into the generation of S-waves from explosions. Several viable mechanisms for the generation of S-waves from explosions have been forwarded, but most of these mechanisms do not explain observations of frequency-dependant S-wave generation. Recent studies have focused on the affect of near-source scattering to explain the frequency-dependence of both S-wave generation and P/S discriminant performance. In this study we investigate near-source scatter through numerical simulation with a realistic geological model We have constructed a realistic, 3-dimensional earth model of the southern Basin and Range. This regional model includes detailed constraints at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) based on extensive geologic and geophysical studies. Gross structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface-wave studies. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a compilation of reflection/refraction studies. Upper-crustal constraints are derived from geologic maps and detailed studies of sedimentary basin geometry throughout the study area. The free surface is based on a 10-meter digital elevation model (DEM) at NTS, and a 60-meter DEM elsewhere. The model extends to a depth of 150km, making it suitable for simulations at local and regional distances. Our simulation source is based on the 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment explosion at the NTS. This shot was well recorded, offering ample validation data. Our validation tests include measures of long-period waveform fit and relative amplitude measurements for P and S phases. Our primary conclusion is that near-source topography

  20. Study on some factors affecting the results in the use of MIP method in concrete research

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhattacharjee, B

    2003-03-01

    Effects of rate of pressure application and forms and type of sample on porosity and pore size distribution of concrete estimated through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) are presented in this experimental work. Two different forms of concrete sample, namely, crushed chunks of concrete and small core drilled out from the concrete beam specimens, were used for this study. The results exhibit that the rate of pressure application in mercury porosimetry has little effect on porosity and pore size distribution of concrete. It is also demonstrated that small cores drilled out from large concrete specimens are preferable as samples for performing porosimetry test on concrete.

  1. Simulation shows hospitals that cooperate on infection control obtain better results than hospitals acting alone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Bartsch, Sarah M; Wong, Kim F; Yilmaz, S Levent; Avery, Taliser R; Singh, Ashima; Song, Yeohan; Kim, Diane S; Brown, Shawn T; Potter, Margaret A; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2012-10-01

    Efforts to control life-threatening infections, such as with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), can be complicated when patients are transferred from one hospital to another. Using a detailed computer simulation model of all hospitals in Orange County, California, we explored the effects when combinations of hospitals tested all patients at admission for MRSA and adopted procedures to limit transmission among patients who tested positive. Called "contact isolation," these procedures specify precautions for health care workers interacting with an infected patient, such as wearing gloves and gowns. Our simulation demonstrated that each hospital's decision to test for MRSA and implement contact isolation procedures could affect the MRSA prevalence in all other hospitals. Thus, our study makes the case that further cooperation among hospitals--which is already reflected in a few limited collaborative infection control efforts under way--could help individual hospitals achieve better infection control than they could achieve on their own.

  2. How new fault data and models affect seismic hazard results? Examples from southeast Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.; Staller, Alejandra; Ruiz Barajas, Sandra; Quirós, Ligia E.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we study the impact of different approaches to incorporate faults in a seismic hazard assessment analysis. Firstly, we consider two different methods to distribute the seismicity of the study area into faults and area-sources, based on magnitude partitioning and on moment rate distribution. We use two recurrence models to characterize fault activity: the characteristic earthquake model and the modified Gutenberg-Richter exponential frequency-magnitude distribution. An application of the work is developed in the region of Murcia (southeastern Spain), due to the availability of fault data and because is one of the areas in Spain with higher seismic hazard. The parameters used to model fault sources are derived from paleoseismological and field studies obtained from the literature and online repositories. Additionally, for some significant faults only, geodetically-derived slip rates are used to compute recurrence periods. The results of all the seismic hazard computations carried out using different models and data are represented in maps of expected peak ground accelerations for a return period of 475 years. Maps of coefficients of variation are presented to constraint the variability of the end-results to different input models and values. Additionally, the different hazard maps obtained in this study are compared with the seismic hazard maps obtained in previous work for the entire Spanish territory and more specifically for the region of Murcia. This work is developed in the context of the MERISUR project (ref. CGL2013-40492-R), with funding from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness.

  3. SimTracker - Using the Web to track computer simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.; Spencer, P.; Springmeyer, R.

    1998-08-26

    Large-scale computer simulations, a hallmark of computing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), often take days to run and can produce massive amounts of output. The typical environment of many LLNL scientists includes multiple hardware platforms, a large collection of eclectic software applications, data stored on many devices in many formats, and little standard metadata, which is accessible documentation about the data. The exploration of simulation results typically proceeds as a laborious process requiring knowledge of this complex environment and many application programs. We have addressed this problem by developing a web-based approach for exploring simulation results via the automatic generation of metadata summaries which provide convenient access to the data sets and associated analysis tools. In this paper we will describe the SimTracker tool for automatically generating metadata that serves as a quick overview and index to the archived results of simulations. The SimTracker application consists of two parts - a generation component and a viewing component. The generation component captures and generates calculation metadata from a simulation. These metadata include graphical snapshots from various stages of the run, pointers to the input and output files from the simulation, and assorted annotations describing the run. SimTracker generation can be done either during a simulation or afterwards. When integrated with a code system, SimTracker does its work on the fly, allowing the user to monitor a calculation while it is running. The viewing component of SimTracker provides a web-based mechanism for both quick perusing and careful analysis of simulation results. HTML is created on the fly from a series of Perl CGI scripts and metadata extracted from a database. A variety of views are provided, ranging from a high-level table of contents showing all of one's simulations, to an in-depth results page from which numeric values can be extracted

  4. Comdisco Simulation Results for PCM/PM Receivers in Non-Ideal Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anabtawi, A.; Nguyen, T. M.; Hinedi, S. M.; Million, S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper studies, by computer simulations, the performance of a PCM/PM/NRZ receiver in the presence of two separate effects: unbalanced data stream and band-limited channel. The results obtained are then compared to the theoretical results presented in a previous report.

  5. Simulation of Tsunami Hazards Affecting the East Cape Region, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberopoulou, Aggeliki; Wang, X.; Power, W.; Lukovic, B.

    2015-08-01

    The east coast of New Zealand is known for being exposed to a variety of tsunami sources, both those arising from the nearby Hikurangi subduction zone and its associated crustal faults, and those arising from more distant parts of the Pacific. Using numerical simulations with a parallelized computer model, we assess the tsunami inundation hazard posed to the most populated coastal communities on the east coast of the East Cape region, New Zealand, which had not been evaluated before. Our tsunami inundation hazard study is based on severe but realistic scenario events from a selection of local and distant earthquake tsunami sources. Such modelling covers a gap in knowledge caused by the short historical record of tsunamis in this region (covering <200 years), and the sparse observations of historical tsunamis due to a largely rural population. We identify that the worst flooding is often not associated with the first wave arrivals, and that coastal oscillations can last a long time in distant events. The modelling results allow us to determine typical characteristics of the pattern of flooding, specific to an area. This information is important for emergency planning and preparedness.

  6. Spinal muscle activity in simulated rugby union scrummaging is affected by different engagement conditions.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, D; Stone, B; Holsgrove, T P; Trewartha, G; Preatoni, E

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical studies of rugby union scrummaging have focused on kinetic and kinematic analyses, while muscle activation strategies employed by front-row players during scrummaging are still unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the activity of spinal muscles during machine and live scrums. Nine male front-row forwards scrummaged as individuals against a scrum machine under "crouch-touch-set" and "crouch-bind-set" conditions, and against a two-player opposition in a simulated live condition. Muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, and erector spinae were measured over the pre-engagement, engagement, and sustained-push phases. The "crouch-bind-set" condition increased muscle activity of the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid before and during the engagement phase in machine scrummaging. During the sustained-push phase, live scrummaging generated higher activities of the erector spinae than either machine conditions. These results suggest that the pre-bind, prior to engagement, may effectively prepare the cervical spine by stiffening joints before the impact phase. Additionally, machine scrummaging does not replicate the muscular demands of live scrummaging for the erector spinae, and for this reason, we advise rugby union forwards to ensure scrummaging is practiced in live situations to improve the specificity of their neuromuscular activation strategies in relation to resisting external loads. PMID:25818526

  7. Nitric oxide affects preimplantation embryonic development in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor simulating microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu-jing; Fan, Xun-jun; Shen, Zheng; Ma, Bao-hua; Duan, En-kui

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity was simulated with a rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) in order to study its effect on pre-implantation embryonic development in mice. Three experimental groups were used: stationary control, rotational control and clinostat rotation. Three experiments were performed as follows. The first experiment showed that compared with the other two (control) groups, embryonic development was significantly retarded after 72 h in the clinostat rotation group. The second experiment showed that more nitric oxide (NO) was produced in the culture medium in the clinostat rotation group after 72 h (P<0.05), and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in this group was significantly higher than in the controls (P<0.01). In the third experiment, we studied apoptosis in the pre-implantation mouse embryos after 72 h in culture and found that Annexin-V staining was negative in the normal (stationary and rotational control) embryos, but the developmentally retarded (clinostat rotation) embryos showed a strong green fluorescence. These results indicate that microgravity induced developmental retardation and cell apoptosis in the mouse embryos. We presume that these effects are related to the higher concentration of NO in the embryos under microgravity, which have cause cytotoxic consequences.

  8. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  9. Ride qualities criteria validation/pilot performance study: Flight simulator results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, L. U.; Kawana, H. Y.; Borland, C. J.; Lefritz, N. M.

    1976-01-01

    Pilot performance was studied during simulated manual terrain following flight for ride quality criteria validation. An existing B-1 simulation program provided the data for these investigations. The B-1 simulation program included terrain following flights under varying controlled conditions of turbulence, terrain, mission length, and system dynamics. The flight simulator consisted of a moving base cockpit which reproduced motions due to turbulence and control inputs. The B-1 aircraft dynamics were programmed with six-degrees-of-freedom equations of motion with three symmetric and two antisymmetric structural degrees of freedom. The results provided preliminary validation of existing ride quality criteria and identified several ride quality/handling quality parameters which may be of value in future ride quality/criteria development.

  10. Development of capability for microtopography-resolving simulations of hydrologic processes in permafrost affected regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.; Moulton, J. D.; Berndt, M.; Coon, E.; Garimella, R.; Lewis, K. C.; Manzini, G.; Mishra, P.; Travis, B. J.; Wilson, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The frozen soils of the Arctic and subarctic regions contain vast amounts of stored organic carbon. This carbon is vulnerable to release to the atmosphere as temperatures warm and permafrost degrades. Understanding the response of the subsurface and surface hydrologic system to degrading permafrost is key to understanding the rate, timing, and chemical form of potential carbon releases to the atmosphere. Simulating the hydrologic system in degrading permafrost regions is challenging because of the potential for topographic evolution and associated drainage network reorganization as permafrost thaws and massive ground ice melts. The critical process models required for simulating hydrology include subsurface thermal hydrology of freezing/thawing soils, thermal processes within ice wedges, mechanical deformation processes, overland flow, and surface energy balances including snow dynamics. A new simulation tool, the Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is being developed to simulate these coupled processes. The computational infrastructure must accommodate fully unstructured grids that track evolving topography, allow accurate solutions on distorted grids, provide robust and efficient solutions on highly parallel computer architectures, and enable flexibility in the strategies for coupling among the various processes. The ATS is based on Amanzi (Moulton et al. 2012), an object-oriented multi-process simulator written in C++ that provides much of the necessary computational infrastructure. Status and plans for the ATS including major hydrologic process models and validation strategies will be presented. Highly parallel simulations of overland flow using high-resolution digital elevation maps of polygonal patterned ground landscapes demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Simulations coupling three-phase subsurface thermal hydrology with a simple thaw-induced subsidence model illustrate the strong feedbacks among the processes. D. Moulton, M. Berndt, M. Day, J

  11. French field results (1985-2005) on factors affecting fertility of frozen stallion semen.

    PubMed

    Vidament, M

    2005-10-01

    Results on procedures for freezing stallion semen and the subsequent fertility during 20 years are presented. The present system applied in French National Stud includes: (1) a freezing protocol (dilution in milk, centrifugation and addition of freezing extender (INRA82+egg yolk (2%, v/v)+glycerol (2.5%, v/v) at 22 degrees C, a moderate cooling rate to 4 degrees C and freezing at -60 degrees C/min in 0.5-ml straws); (2) selection of ejaculates showing post-thaw rapid motility >35%; and (3) an insemination protocol (mares examined once daily, two AI of 400 x 10(6) spermatozoa 24 h apart before ovulation, sufficient number of straws to have the possibility to perform six AI of 400 x 10(6) total spermatozoa, i.e. 2.4 x 10(9) total spermatozoa available per mare per season). This system was applied to >110 stallions per year, the average post-thaw motility of ejaculates was 50% (>1800 ejaculates) before selection. The semen freezability was defined as the number of selected ejaculates divided by the total number of ejaculates frozen. Of the stallions, 5, 4, 5, 21 and 64% had semen freezability of 0-10, 10-33, 33-60, 60-90 and over 90%, respectively. Per-cycle pregnancy rate was 45-48% (>1500 mares per year, 1.8 cycles per mare) and foaling rate 64%. In comparison, per-cycle pregnancy rate and foaling rate of mares hand-mated to stallions were 57-59% and 64%, respectively. The average number of straws used was 32-35 (1.75 x 10(9) total spermatozoa) per mare per season. According to our results and the literature, the most important factors for improving fertility of frozen equine semen include: (1) a low concentration of glycerol (2-3.5% final concentration); (2) a suitable base extender for freezing like Lactose-Glucose EDTA or INRA82; (3) a post-thaw motility >30-35%; and (4) a sufficient number of spermatozoa per mare per season (1.5-2 x 10(9) total spermatozoa for two to three cycles) divided into small units. Numbers of spermatozoa, lower than 750.10(6) total

  12. Factors affecting the profitability of surgical procedures under 'Payment by Results'.

    PubMed

    Abbott, T; White, S M; Pandit, J J

    2011-04-01

    We wished to analyse the factors influencing the potential profitability of surgical operations under the National Health Service 'Payment by Results' scheme. First, we planned to develop a generic theoretical model describing the relationships between 'profit', 'procedure duration' and 'costs'. Second, for a group of specific operations, we planned to investigate (using analysis of hypothetical lists) whether it was possible for hospitals to make a profit when lists were maximally efficient. 'Efficient' meant full utilisation of the list time, with no gaps between cases and no case cancellations. We assumed that operating theatres cost a median of £16.min(-1) (range £12-20.min(-1) or ~£7680 for an 8-h list), and we used published mean (SD) times for seven common day-case operations (varicose veins, inguinal hernia, cataract, circumcision, hydrocoele, cystoscopy, breast biopsy). We found that even when conducted perfectly efficiently, some operations (notably varicose veins) were always unprofitable. Conversely, other operations (notably cataracts) would be likely to be profitable even if conducted inefficiently. We conclude that current tariffs do not properly reward efficiency. As tariffs are based in large part on hospitals' reporting their own costs, flaws in the tariffs are likely to be due to inaccurate reporting. Even for this imperfect funding system, our theoretical model may help to develop strategies to maximise profit. Our analysis suggests alternative ways in which reimbursement systems could be designed to avoid creating perverse incentives and instead properly reward efficient practices. PMID:21401542

  13. Should the results of TROPHY affect the JNC 7 definition of prehypertension?

    PubMed

    Julius, Stevo

    2007-06-01

    In the Trial of Preventing Hypertension (TROPHY), volunteers with "high normal blood pressure" were randomized to 4 years of placebo (n = 381) or 2 years of 16 mg/d of candesartan (n = 391) followed by 2 years of placebo. At 2 years, there was a 26.8% absolute and a 66.3% relative risk reduction (P < 0.0001) of hypertension in the candesartan group. At study end, the former candesartan group had a 9.8% absolute and a 15.6% relative risk reduction (P < 0.007) of hypertension. The treatment was well tolerated. The Seventh Joint National Committee (JNC 7) changed the nomenclature from "high normal blood pressure" to "prehypertension" and widened the range to 120 to 139 and/or 80 to 89 mm Hg. Our results support the term "prehypertension" only for the 130 to 139 and/or 85 to 89 mm Hg group; in 4 years two thirds of the placebo group developed hypertension. We suggest stratifying the JNC classification into "prehypertension" (130-139 and/or 85-89 mm Hg) and "high normal blood pressure" (120-129 and/or 80-84 mm Hg). By the present JNC definition, only one quarter of adult men have normal blood pressure. Removing the disease label from another 28% would appropriately focus attention on high-risk prehypertension. PMID:17519125

  14. Does Displaying the Class Results Affect Student Discussion during Peer Instruction?

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Eric A.; Downey, Nicholas; Galbraith, Anne; Jeanne, Robert; Cooper, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The use of personal response systems, or clickers, is increasingly common in college classrooms. Although clickers can increase student engagement and discussion, their benefits also can be overstated. A common practice is to ask the class a question, display the responses, allow the students to discuss the question, and then collect the responses a second time. In an introductory biology course, we asked whether showing students the class responses to a question biased their second response. Some sections of the course displayed a bar graph of the student responses and others served as a control group in which discussion occurred without seeing the most common answer chosen by the class. If students saw the bar graph, they were 30% more likely to switch from a less common to the most common response. This trend was more pronounced in true/false questions (38%) than multiple-choice questions (28%). These results suggest that observing the most common response can bias a student's second vote on a question and may be misinterpreted as an increase in performance due to student discussion alone. PMID:20516358

  15. Comparing Simulation Results with Traditional PRA Model on a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhegang Ma; Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    A previous study used RELAP and RAVEN to conduct a boiling water reactor station black-out (SBO) case study in a simulation based environment to show the capabilities of the risk-informed safety margin characterization methodology. This report compares the RELAP/RAVEN simulation results with traditional PRA model results. The RELAP/RAVEN simulation run results were reviewed for their input parameters and output results. The input parameters for each simulation run include various timing information such as diesel generator or offsite power recovery time, Safety Relief Valve stuck open time, High Pressure Core Injection or Reactor Core Isolation Cooling fail to run time, extended core cooling operation time, depressurization delay time, and firewater injection time. The output results include the maximum fuel clad temperature, the outcome, and the simulation end time. A traditional SBO PRA model in this report contains four event trees that are linked together with the transferring feature in SAPHIRE software. Unlike the usual Level 1 PRA quantification process in which only core damage sequences are quantified, this report quantifies all SBO sequences, whether they are core damage sequences or success (i.e., non core damage) sequences, in order to provide a full comparison with the simulation results. Three different approaches were used to solve event tree top events and quantify the SBO sequences: “W” process flag, default process flag without proper adjustment, and default process flag with adjustment to account for the success branch probabilities. Without post-processing, the first two approaches yield incorrect results with a total conditional probability greater than 1.0. The last approach accounts for the success branch probabilities and provides correct conditional sequence probabilities that are to be used for comparison. To better compare the results from the PRA model and the simulation runs, a simplified SBO event tree was developed with only four

  16. High Fidelity Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing: Analysis and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system, providing system characterization data and allowing one to work through various fabrication, assembly and integration issues without the cost and time associated with a full ground nuclear test. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Testing with non-optimized heater elements allows one to assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. High fidelity thermal simulators that match both the static and the dynamic fuel pin performance that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor can vastly increase the value of non-nuclear test results. With optimized simulators, the integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronie response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing, providing a better assessment of system integration issues, characterization of integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assessment of potential design improvements' at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial conceptual thermal simulator designs are determined by simple one-dimensional analysis at a single axial location and at steady state conditions; feasible concepts are then input into a detailed three-dimensional model for comparison to expected fuel pin performance. Static and dynamic fuel pin performance for a proposed reactor design is determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and comparison is made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analyses, a conceptual high fidelity design can developed. Test results presented in this paper correspond to a "first cut" simulator design for a potential

  17. Geometry and Simulation Results for a Gas Turbine Representative of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.; Beach, Tim; Turner, Mark; Siddappaji, Kiran; Hendricks, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the geometry and simulation results of a gas-turbine engine based on the original EEE engine developed in the 1980s. While the EEE engine was never in production, the technology developed during the program underpins many of the current generation of gas turbine engines. This geometry is being explored as a potential multi-stage turbomachinery test case that may be used to develop technology for virtual full-engine simulation. Simulation results were used to test the validity of each component geometry representation. Results are compared to a zero-dimensional engine model developed from experimental data. The geometry is captured in a series of Initial Graphical Exchange Specification (IGES) files and is available on a supplemental DVD to this report.

  18. Field-simulated droughts affect elemental leaf stoichiometry in Mediterranean forests and shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardans, Jordi; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Estiarte, Marc; Ogaya, Romà; Peñuelas, Josep

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the change induced by the year season and by experimentally induced drought on foliar element stoichiometry of the predominant woody species (Quercus ilex and Erica multiflora) in two Mediterranean ecosystems, a forest and a shrubland. This study is based in two long-term (11 yr) field experiments that simulated drought throughout the annual cycle. The effects of experimental droughts were significant but weaker than the changes produced by ontogeny and seasonality. Leaf N and P concentrations were higher in spring (the main growing season) in E. multiflora and, in Q. ilex in autumn (a period of additional growth). Leaf N:P ratios were lower in spring. In Q. ilex, the highest leaf K concentrations and leaf K:P ratios, and the lowest leaf C:K and N:K ratios, occurred in summer, the season when water stress was greatest. In E. multiflora, leaf K concentrations and K:P ratios were highest, and leaf C:K and N:K ratios were lowest in the plants from the drought-treated plots. The plant capacity to change K concentrations in response to seasonality and to drought is at least as great as the capacity to change N and P concentrations. The results underscore the importance of K and its stoichiometry relative to C, N and P in dry environments. These results indicate first, that N:P ratio shifts are not uniquely related to growth rate in Mediterranean plants but also to drought, and second, that there is a need to take into account K in ecological stoichiometry studies of terrestrial plants.

  19. Simulation and investigation of factors affecting high aspect ratio UV embossing.

    PubMed

    Chan-Park, Mary B; Lam, Y C; Laulia, P; Joshi, S C

    2005-03-01

    UV embossing is a replication method whereby an UV-curable polymer is pressed against a patterned mold and cured with UV irradiation, resulting in a patterned polymeric substrate. High aspect ratio UV embossing will find diverse applications in tissue engineering, micro-optics, display technologies, and sensors. Demolding of an UV-embossed polymer pattern with aspect ratio of 5 from the mold has previously been demonstrated experimentally. In this paper, parameters that affect the demolding process have been identified and investigated. They include cross-linking shrinkage during curing by UV irradiation, modulus of cured polymer, interfacial fracture strength and toughness, and loading method during demolding. Shrinkage is an important parameter, and an optimum level of shrinkage to avoid breakage of the embossing during demolding was found to exist. This optimum level is that at which the maximum stress (sigma(1)max) experienced by the polymer during demolding is minimized. The micromechanics of demolding was found to be different for shrinkage values lower or larger than the optimum value. PMID:15723501

  20. Factors affecting Fontan length of stay: Results from the Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Chitra; Gerstenberger, Eric; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Atz, Andrew M.; Affolter, Jeremy T.; Bradley, Timothy J.; Gaynor, J. William; Goldstein, Bryan H.; Henderson, Heather T.; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Lewis, Alan B.; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Menon, Shaji C.; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Petit, Christopher J.; Pike, Nancy A.; Pizarro, Christian; Schumacher, Kurt R.; Williams, Ismee A.; Newburger, Jane W.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial, infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) who received a right-ventricle-to-pulmonary-artery shunt (RVPAS) versus a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (MBTS) had lower early postoperative mortality, but more complications at 14 months. We explored the effect of shunt type and other patient, medical, and surgical factors on postoperative length of stay (LOS) after the Fontan operation. Methods Fontan postoperative course was ascertained from medical record review. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify factors associated with LOS. Results Of 327 subjects who underwent Fontan, 323 were analyzed (1 death, 1 biventricular repair, 2 with missing data). Median age and weight at Fontan were 2.8 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 2.3, 3.4) and 12.7 kg (IQR: 11.4, 14.1), respectively. Fontan type was extracardiac in 55% and lateral tunnel in 45%; 87% were fenestrated. The RVPAS and MBTS subjects had similar LOS (median 11 days [IQR: 9, 18] vs 10 days [IQR: 9, 13]; P = .23). Independent risk factors for longer LOS were treatment center (P < .01), LOS at stage II (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02 for each additional day; P < .01), and pre-Fontan complications (HR 1.03 for each additional complication; P = .04). Use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at Fontan (HR 0.64; P = .02) was independently associated with shorter LOS. When center was excluded from the model, pre-Fontan complications and use of circulatory arrest were no longer significant; instead, older age at stage II (HR 1.08 for each additional month; P = .01) predicted longer LOS. In 254 subjects who had a pre-Fontan echocardiogram, at least moderate tricuspid regurgitation was independently associated with longer LOS, both with center (HR 1.72; P <.01) and without center in the model (HR 1.49; P = .02). Conclusions In this multicenter prospective cohort of subjects with HLHS, Norwood shunt type was not associated with Fontan LOS. Rather

  1. SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF MICROWAVE TRANSMISSION THROUGH ANELECTRON CLOUD, A COMPARISON OF RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel; Veitzer, Seth A.; Cary, John

    2006-04-15

    Simulation studies for transmission of microwaves through electron clouds show good agreement with analytic results. The electron cloud produces a shift in phase of the microwave. Experimental observation of this phenomena would lead to a useful diagnostic tool for accessing the local density of electron clouds in an accelerator. These experiments are being carried out at the CERN SPS and the PEP-II LER at SLAC and is proposed to be done at the Fermilab main injector. In this study, a brief analysis of the phase shift is provided and the results are compared with that obtained from simulations.

  2. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress.

  3. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress. PMID:25893616

  4. Comparison of CFD simulations and measurements of flow affected by coanda effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, Jan; Jedelský, Jan; Vach, Tomáš; Forman, Matěj; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with experimental research and numerical simulations of specific phenomena in fluid flows called Coanda effect (CE), which has numerous important engineering applications. Although many researchers have concerned with wall jets, the physics of this flow still remains not well understood. This study is focused on analysis of behaviour of jet flow close to the wall and influence of its inclination. The flow has been visualized using smoke and velocity was measured by means of Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA). CFD simulations have been performed on the same geometry and compared with experiments in order to find a tool for correct prediction of the CE.

  5. An outcome-based learning model to identify emerging threats : experimental and simulation results.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.; Decision and Information Sciences; SNL; Univ. at Albany

    2007-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model as it applies to the identification of emerging threats. This model integrates judgment, decision making, and learning theories to provide an integrated framework for the behavioral study of emerging threats.

  6. Simulation and experimental results of kaleidoscope homogenizers for longitudinal diode pumping.

    PubMed

    Bartnicki, Eric; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2010-03-20

    With the goal to set a homogenizer to allow coupling of a stack of diodes with a disk amplifier medium for a longitudinally pumped laser or amplifier, we report simulation and experimental results on homogenization of the light supplied by a large stack of diodes. We investigate various kaleidoscope cross-section shapes and various optical coupling configurations.

  7. Lifetime prevalence of suicide symptoms and affective disorders among men reporting same-sex sexual partners: results from NHANES III.

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, S D; Mays, V M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined lifetime prevalence of suicide symptoms and affective disorders among men reporting a history of same-sex sexual partners. METHODS: In the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, men aged 17 to 39 years were assessed for lifetime history of affective disorders and sexual behavior patterns. The study classified this subset of men into 3 groups: those reporting same-sex sexual partners, those reporting only female sexual partners, and those reporting no sexual partners. Groups were compared for histories of suicide symptoms and affective disorders. RESULTS: A total of 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3%, 3.1%) of men reported same-sex sexual partners. These men evidenced greater lifetime prevalence rates of suicide symptoms than men reporting only female partners. However, homosexually/bisexually experienced men were no more likely than exclusively heterosexual men to meet criteria for lifetime diagnosis of other affective disorders. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide further evidence of an increased risk for suicide symptoms among homosexually experienced men. Results also hint at a small, increased risk of recurrent depression among gay men, with symptom onset occurring, on average, during early adolescence. PMID:10754972

  8. The Vascular Model Repository: A Public Resource of Medical Imaging Data and Blood Flow Simulation Results.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nathan M; Ortiz, Ana K; Johnson, Allison B

    2013-12-01

    Patient-specific blood flow simulations may provide insight into disease progression, treatment options, and medical device design that would be difficult or impossible to obtain experimentally. However, publicly available image data and computer models for researchers and device designers are extremely limited. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored Open Source Medical Software Corporation (contract nos. HHSN268200800008C and HHSN268201100035C) and its university collaborators to build a repository (www.vascularmodel.org) including realistic, image-based anatomic models and related hemodynamic simulation results to address this unmet need.

  9. Late stage spinodal decomposition in binary fluids: comparison between computer simulation and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tsuyoshi; Kawasaki, Kyozi; Takenaka, Mikihito; Hashimoto, Takeji

    1993-09-01

    We present detailed comparisons of results on the late stage dynamics of spinodal decomposition obtained by the computer simulation of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation with hydrodynamic interaction and experiments of a polymer mixture of polybutadiene and polyisoprene. We show that the temporally linear domain growth law, which is characteristic for viscous fluids, is observed in both simulation and experiment in the late stage. Some quantities obtained in such a hydrodynamic domain growth region, such as the interface area density and the scaling function, are compared in detail. Especially, we show that the scaling functions for the two systems are in quantitative agreement.

  10. Analysis Results for Lunar Soil Simulant Using a Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Lunar soil will potentially be used for oxygen generation, water generation, and as filler for building blocks during habitation missions on the Moon. NASA s in situ fabrication and repair program is evaluating portable technologies that can assess the chemistry of lunar soil and lunar soil simulants. This Technical Memorandum summarizes the results of the JSC 1 lunar soil simulant analysis using the TRACeR III IV handheld x-ray fluorescence analyzer, manufactured by KeyMaster Technologies, Inc. The focus of the evaluation was to determine how well the current instrument configuration would detect and quantify the components of JSC-1.

  11. A global index of acoustic assessment of machines-results of experimental and simulation tests.

    PubMed

    Pleban, Dariusz

    2011-01-01

    A global index of machines was developed to assess noise emitted by machines and to predict noise levels at workstations. The global index is a function of several partial indices: sound power index, index of distance between the workstation and the machine, radiation directivity index, impulse and impact noise index and noise spectrum index. Tests were carried out to determine values of the global index for engine-generator; the inversion method for determining sound power level was used. It required modelling each tested generator with one omnidirectional substitute source. The partial indices and the global index were simulated, too. The results of the tests confirmed the correctness of the simulations. PMID:21939600

  12. Results of intravehicular manned cargo-transfer studies in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, A. A., Jr.; Beasley, G. P.; Yenni, K. R.; Eisele, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    A parametric investigation was conducted in a water immersion simulator to determine the effect of package mass, moment of inertia, and size on the ability of man to transfer cargo in simulated weightlessness. Results from this study indicate that packages with masses of at least 744 kg and moments of inertia of at least 386 kg-m2 can be manually handled and transferred satisfactorily under intravehicular conditions using either one- or two-rail motion aids. Data leading to the conclusions and discussions of test procedures and equipment are presented.

  13. Factors Affecting Mineral Nitrogen Transformations by Soil Heating: A Laboratory Simulated Fire Study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two forest soils from the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California were brought into the laboratory and subjected to simulated burning in a muffle furnace at several durations, oven temperatures, and water contents. Soils were analyzed for NO3-, NH4+, mineral N, total N, total C, and C:N responses to t...

  14. Factors Affecting Perceived Learning of Engineering Students in Problem Based Learning Supported by Business Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparro-Pelaez, Julian; Iglesias-Pradas, Santiago; Pascual-Miguel, Felix J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Although literature about problem based learning (PBL) is not scarce, there is little research on experiences about learning methodologies that combine PBL and the use of simulation tools. This lack of studies is even more notable in the case of engineering courses. The motivation for this study is to show how such a combination of PBL and…

  15. Ca-Pri a Cellular Automata Phenomenological Research Investigation: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, G.; Troisi, A.

    2013-05-01

    Following the introduction of a phenomenological cellular automata (CA) model capable to reproduce city growth and urban sprawl, we develop a toy model simulation considering a realistic framework. The main characteristic of our approach is an evolution algorithm based on inhabitants preferences. The control of grown cells is obtained by means of suitable functions which depend on the initial condition of the simulation. New born urban settlements are achieved by means of a logistic evolution of the urban pattern while urban sprawl is controlled by means of the population evolution function. In order to compare model results with a realistic urban framework we have considered, as the area of study, the island of Capri (Italy) in the Mediterranean Sea. Two different phases of the urban evolution on the island have been taken into account: a new born initial growth as induced by geographic suitability and the simulation of urban spread after 1943 induced by the population evolution after this date.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate detectors I: steady-state voltage bias results

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Dane Morgan, Jiaming Morgan

    2008-07-01

    X-ray detectors based on straight-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) are a powerful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and timeresolved x-ray spectroscopy in the fields of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and fast z-pinch experiments. Understanding the behavior of microchannel plates as used in such detectors is critical to understanding the data obtained. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code we have developed to simulate the electron cascade in a microchannel plate under a static applied voltage. Also included in the simulation is elastic reflection of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, which is important at lower voltages. When model results were compared to measured microchannel plate sensitivities, good agreement was found. Spatial resolution simulations of MCP-based detectors were also presented and found to agree with experimental measurements.

  17. Computer simulation of shelf and stream profile geomorphic evolution resulting from eustasy and uplift

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A two-dimensional computer simulation of shelf and stream profile evolution with sea level oscillation has been developed to illustrate the interplay of coastal and fluvial processes on uplifting continental margins. The shelf evolution portion of the simulation is based on the erosional model of Trenhaile (1989). The rate of high tide cliff erosion decreases as abrasion platform gradient decreases the sea cliff height increases. The rate of subtidal erosion decreases as the subtidal sea floor gradient decreases. Values are specified for annual wave energy, energy required to erode a cliff notch 1 meter deep, nominal low tidal erosion rate, and rate of removal of cliff debris. The values were chosen arbitrarily to yield a geomorphic evolution consistent with the present coast of northern California, where flights of uplifted marine terraces are common. The stream profile evolution simulation interfaces in real time with the shelf simulation. The stream profile consists of uniformly spaced cells, each representing the median height of a profile segment. The stream simulation results show that stream response to sea level change on an uplifting coast is dependent on the profile gradient near the stream mouth, relative to the shelf gradient. Small streams with steep gradients aggrade onto the emergent shelf during sea level fall and incise at the mountain front during sea level rise. Large streams with low gradients incise the emergent shelf during sea level fall and aggrade in their valleys during sea level rise.

  18. Water Vapor and Cloud Formation in the TTL: Simulation Results vs. Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Driven by analyzed winds and temperatures, a domain-filling forward trajectory model is used to simulate water vapor and clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). During this Lagrangian model calculations, excess water vapor is instantaneously removed from the parcel to keep the relative humidity with respect to ice from exceeding a specified (super) saturation level. The occurrences of dehydration serve as an indication of where and when clouds form. During the simulation, simple parameterizations for convective moistening through ice lofting and temperature perturbations from gravity waves are also included. Our simulations produce water vapor mixing ratios close to that observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The results are consistent with the biases of reanalysis tropical tropopause temperature, which confirms the dominant role of the cold-point temperatures for regulating the water vapor abundances in the stratosphere. The simulation of cloud formation agrees with the patterns of cirrus distributions from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). It demonstrates that trajectory calculations driven by analyzed winds and temperatures can produce reasonable simulations of water vapor and cloud formation in the TTL.

  19. Towards Regional Lunar Gravity Fields Using Lunar Prospector Extended Mission Data - Simulations and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, S.; Visser, P.; Floberghagen, R.; Koop, R.; Ambrosius, B.

    2002-12-01

    Until this date, the lunar gravimetric inverse problem has mainly been posed as a global problem, solving for gravity fields over the whole of the Moon. The asymmetric sampling of the force field requires that some sort of regularisation be applied in order to have a meaningful global solution that does not provide spurious information on the far side. On one hand these global solutions work very well in terms of overall orbit quality and consistency, despite the fact that roughly one half of the surface lacks sampling. On the other hand, excellently sampled regions cannot be determined at maximum spatial resolution without affecting too much the solution on the far side, which in itself is highly unstable. Since the Lunar Prospector mission, there are many of such excellently sampled regions on the near side of the Moon. In order to exhaust the information present in the tracking data of this satellite, regional methods for solving the gravity field of well-sampled areas become interesting. We present a method to extract regional gravity information from Doppler and Range tracking of the Lunar Prospector spacecraft. The method incorporates the GEODYN II software package for tracking data processing and orbit determination, and a software package to analyse the residuals from the orbit determination process, and to transform these residuals into gravity anomalies on the lunar surface by means of a Stokes method. Simulations will show how well a gravity signal in the residuals can be recovered. Results from orbit determination using 20 days of Lunar Prospector Extended Mission data will be shown, to demonstrate the readiness of the method to process real-life satellite data. With missions in the future such as SELENE, which will provide the first global tracking data set of the Moon ever, global and regional methods to solve for gravity field products will remain equally of interest, since they both can give complementary insight into the low and high resolution

  20. Simulation Results for PCM/PM/NRZ Receivers in Non-Ideal Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anabtawi, Aseel

    1995-01-01

    This paper studies, by computer simulations, the performance of deep space telemetry signals that employ PCM/PM/NRZ modulation technique under the separate and combined effects of an unbalanced data stream, data asymmetry, and band-limited channel. The study is based on measuring the Symbol Error Rate (SER) performance and comparing the results to the theoretical results presented in previous reports [1,2]. Only the effects of imperfect carrier tracking due to an imperfect data stream are considered.

  1. The representation of self reported affect in body posture and body posture simulation.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Karl; Fink, Bernhard; Oberzaucher, Elisabeth; Atzmüller, Michaela; Blantar, Ines; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2004-01-01

    It is taken for granted that the non-verbal information we acquire from a person's body posture and position affects our perception of others. However, to date human postures have never been described on an empirical level. This study is the first approach to tackle the unexplored topic of human postures. We combined two approaches: traditional behavior observation and modern anthropometric analysis. Photographs of 100 participants were taken, their body postures were transferred to a three dimensional virtual environment and the occurring body angles were measured. The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire about their current affective state. A principal component analysis with the items of the affect questionnaire (Positive Negative Affect Scales, PANAS) revealed five main factors: aversion, openness, irritation, happiness, and self-confidence. The body angles were then regressed on these factors and the respective postures were reconstructed within a virtual environment. 50 different subjects rated the reconstructed postures from the positive and negative end of the regression. We found the ratings to be valid and accurate in respect to the five factors. PMID:15571090

  2. Soccer results affect subjective well-being, but only briefly: a smartphone study during the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Stefan; Götz, Friedrich M; Gehrig, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    The current research examined the effects of soccer match results on spectators' subjective well-being. Across the group stage of the soccer World Cup 2014, German-speaking participants indicated their well-being three times per day through a smartphone-based science app. In line with proposed hypotheses, comparisons of data taken after the three matches of the German national team showed robust effects, revealing that well-being was higher among spectators than non-spectators, with effects increasing as a function of goal difference. Moreover, this gain in well-being was only found in spectators supporting the German soccer team, allowing us to rule out a general emotional contagion effect affecting all spectators. Although soccer results are associated with national identity and pride, their effects on subjective well-being were short-lived and only affected supporters.

  3. Soccer results affect subjective well-being, but only briefly: a smartphone study during the 2014 FIFA World Cup

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Stefan; Götz, Friedrich M.; Gehrig, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    The current research examined the effects of soccer match results on spectators’ subjective well-being. Across the group stage of the soccer World Cup 2014, German-speaking participants indicated their well-being three times per day through a smartphone-based science app. In line with proposed hypotheses, comparisons of data taken after the three matches of the German national team showed robust effects, revealing that well-being was higher among spectators than non-spectators, with effects increasing as a function of goal difference. Moreover, this gain in well-being was only found in spectators supporting the German soccer team, allowing us to rule out a general emotional contagion effect affecting all spectators. Although soccer results are associated with national identity and pride, their effects on subjective well-being were short-lived and only affected supporters. PMID:26029124

  4. Retained gas sampler extractor mixing and mass transfer rate study: Experimental and simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, K.P.; Bates, J.M.; Shekarriz, A.

    1997-11-01

    Research staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted experimental testing and computer simulations of the impeller-stirred Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) gas extractor system. This work was performed to verify experimentally the effectiveness of the extractor at mixing viscous fluids of both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology representative of Hanford single- and double-shell wastes, respectively. Developing the computational models and validating their results by comparing them with experimental results would enable simulations of the mixing process for a range of fluid properties and mixing speeds. Five tests were performed with a full-scale, optically transparent model extractor to provide the data needed to compare mixing times for fluid rheology, mixer rotational direction, and mixing speed variation. The computer model was developed and exercised to simulate the tests. The tests demonstrated that rotational direction of the pitched impeller blades was not as important as fluid rheology in determining mixing time. The Newtonian fluid required at least six hours to mix at the hot cell operating speed of 3 rpm, and the non-Newtonian fluid required at least 46 hours at 3 rpm to become significantly mixed. In the non-Newtonian fluid tests, stagnant regions within the fluid sometimes required days to be fully mixed. Higher-speed (30 rpm) testing showed that the laminar mixing time was correlated to mixing speed. The tests demonstrated that, using the RGS extractor and current procedures, complete mixing of the waste samples in the hot cell should not be expected. The computer simulation of Newtonian fluid mixing gave results comparable to the test while simulation of non-Newtonian fluid mixing would require further development. In light of the laboratory test results, detailed parametric analysis of the mixing process was not performed.

  5. Improving the trust in results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Cappello, Franck; Constantinescu, Emil; Hovland, Paul; Peterka, Tom; Phillips, Carolyn; Snir, Marc; Wild, Stefan

    2015-04-30

    This white paper investigates several key aspects of the trust that a user can give to the results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics. In this document, the notion of trust is related to the integrity of numerical simulations and data analytics applications. This white paper complements the DOE ASCR report on Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity by (1) exploring the sources of trust loss; (2) reviewing the definitions of trust in several areas; (3) providing numerous cases of result alteration, some of them leading to catastrophic failures; (4) examining the current notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics; (5) providing a gap analysis; and (6) suggesting two important research directions and their respective research topics. To simplify the presentation without loss of generality, we consider that trust in results can be lost (or the results’ integrity impaired) because of any form of corruption happening during the execution of the numerical simulation or the data analytics application. In general, the sources of such corruption are threefold: errors, bugs, and attacks. Current applications are already using techniques to deal with different types of corruption. However, not all potential corruptions are covered by these techniques. We firmly believe that the current level of trust that a user has in the results is at least partially founded on ignorance of this issue or the hope that no undetected corruptions will occur during the execution. This white paper explores the notion of trust and suggests recommendations for developing a more scientifically grounded notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics. We first formulate the problem and show that it goes beyond previous questions regarding the quality of results such as V&V, uncertainly quantification, and data assimilation. We then explore the complexity of this difficult problem, and we sketch complementary general

  6. Chronic exposure to simulated space conditions predominantly affects cytoskeleton remodeling and oxidative stress response in mouse fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michaël; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; El-Saghire, Hussein; Tabury, Kevin; Michaux, Arlette; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; De Vos, Winnok H; Baatout, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity and cosmic rays as found in space are difficult to recreate on earth. However, ground-based models exist to simulate space flight experiments. In the present study, an experimental model was utilized to monitor gene expression changes in fetal skin fibroblasts of murine origin. Cells were continuously subjected for 65 h to a low dose (55 mSv) of ionizing radiation (IR), comprising a mixture of high‑linear energy transfer (LET) neutrons and low-LET gamma-rays, and/or simulated microgravity using the random positioning machine (RPM), after which microarrays were performed. The data were analyzed both by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and single gene analysis (SGA). Simulated microgravity affected fetal murine fibroblasts by inducing oxidative stress responsive genes. Three of these genes are targets of the nuclear factor‑erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which may play a role in the cell response to simulated microgravity. In addition, simulated gravity decreased the expression of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, which may have been caused by the downregulation of the serum response factor (SRF), possibly through the Rho signaling pathway. Similarly, chronic exposure to low-dose IR caused the downregulation of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, as well as in cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response pathways. Many of the genes or gene sets that were altered in the individual treatments (RPM or IR) were not altered in the combined treatment (RPM and IR), indicating a complex interaction between RPM and IR.

  7. Simulation Results for the New NSTX HHFW Antenna Straps Design by Using Microwave Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C C; Brunkhorst, C; Greenough, N; Fredd, E; Castano, A; Miller, D; D'Amico, G; Yager, R; Hosea, J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P

    2009-05-26

    Experimental results have shown that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) at 30 MHz can provide substantial plasma heating and current drive for the NSTX spherical tokamak operation. However, the present antenna strap design rarely achieves the design goal of delivering the full transmitter capability of 6 MW to the plasma. In order to deliver more power to the plasma, a new antenna strap design and the associated coaxial line feeds are being constructed. This new antenna strap design features two feedthroughs to replace the old single feed-through design. In the design process, CST Microwave Studio has been used to simulate the entire new antenna strap structure including the enclosure and the Faraday shield. In this paper, the antenna strap model and the simulation results will be discussed in detail. The test results from the new antenna straps with their associated resonant loops will be presented as well.

  8. Results of aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has developed a large-scale ground testing capability for evaluating the effect of heavy rain on airfoil lift. The paper presents the results obtained at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility on a 10-foot cord NACA 64-210 wing section equipped with a leading-edge slat and double-slotted trailing-edge flap deflected to simulate landing conditions. Aerodynamic lift data were obtained with and without the rain simulation system turned on for an angle-of-attack range of 7.5 to 19.5 deg and for two rainfall conditions: 9 in/hr and 40 in/hr. The results are compared to and correlated with previous small-scale wind tunnel results for the same airfoil section. It appears that to first order, scale effects are not large and the wind tunnel research technique can be used to predict rain effects on airplane performance.

  9. High-Alpha Research Vehicle Lateral-Directional Control Law Description, Analyses, and Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Bacon, Barton J.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains a description of a lateral-directional control law designed for the NASA High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The HARV is a F/A-18 aircraft modified to include a research flight computer, spin chute, and thrust-vectoring in the pitch and yaw axes. Two separate design tools, CRAFT and Pseudo Controls, were integrated to synthesize the lateral-directional control law. This report contains a description of the lateral-directional control law, analyses, and nonlinear simulation (batch and piloted) results. Linear analysis results include closed-loop eigenvalues, stability margins, robustness to changes in various plant parameters, and servo-elastic frequency responses. Step time responses from nonlinear batch simulation are presented and compared to design guidelines. Piloted simulation task scenarios, task guidelines, and pilot subjective ratings for the various maneuvers are discussed. Linear analysis shows that the control law meets the stability margin guidelines and is robust to stability and control parameter changes. Nonlinear batch simulation analysis shows the control law exhibits good performance and meets most of the design guidelines over the entire range of angle-of-attack. This control law (designated NASA-1A) was flight tested during the Summer of 1994 at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center.

  10. Sensitivity and other factors affecting biospecific desorption in chromatography of proteins. A study by computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Yon, R J

    1980-01-01

    Some theoretical aspects of the desorption of a column-bound protein by elution with its biospecific ligand are considered in cases where, in comparison with the unliganded protein, the protein-ligand complex has a diminished but finite affinity for the adsorbent. A quantity termed the biospecific sensitivity, B, is introduced to facilitate comparison between different systems. Biospecific sensitivity may be defined as the fractional change in standard free energy of adsorption on formation of the protein-ligand complex. The effects of a moderate-to-low biospecific sensitivity on theoretical desorption profiles have been examined by using a computer simulation of the classical multiple-plate column model. Desorption was simulated under various boundary conditions involving protein-adsorbent and protein-ligand affinities and the initial concentrations of adsorption sites, protein and ligand. These simulations suggest that, when the biospecific sensitivity is low, desorption is optimized if (a) the unliganded protein is adsorbed as weakly as possible, (b) the column is loaded to near-saturation with the required protein, (c) the free ligand concentration is many times greater than that giving near-saturation of the protein in free solution, and (d) protein contaminants with high affinity for the adsorbent, and present in large amount, are removed in preliminary purification steps. PMID:7378048

  11. Parameters affecting drug release from inert matrices. 1: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Rafael; Viquez, Hugo; Hernández, Beatriz; Ganem, Adriana; Melgoza, Luz María; Young, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the use of Monte Carlo simulation for the determination of release properties from cubic inert matrices. Specifically, the study has focused on factors including porosity, surface area and tortuosity. The release platform was formed by simulating matrices with different ratios of drug and excipient, which undergo drug release in a uni-directional (two-face) or omni-directional (six-face) process. Upon completion of each simulation the matrix 'carcass' was examined and porosity and tortuosity of the medium evaluated. The tortuosity of the medium was evaluated directly by a blind random walk algorithm. These parameters as well as the release profile were then studied with respect to common mathematical models describing drug diffusion (the square-root, power and Weibull models). It was found that, depending on their composition, the matrices systems were either homogeneous or heterogeneous in nature. Furthermore, it was found that the physical parameters could be successfully fitted to the a and b constants of the Weibull model. This approach allows the prediction of drug release from an inert matrix system with the knowledge of a few physical parameters.

  12. Laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds: experimental and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Zaccanti, G; Bruscaglioni, P; Gurioli, M; Sansoni, P

    1993-03-20

    The experimental results of laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds are presented. Measurements were carried out on laboratory-scaled cloud models by using a picosecond laser and a streak-camera system. The turbid structures simulating clouds were suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. The geometrical situation was similar to that of an actual lidar sounding a cloud 1000 m distant and with a thickness of 300 m. Measurements were repeated for different concentrations and different sizes of spheres. The results show how the effect of multiple scattering depends on the scattering coefficient and on the phase function of the diffusers. The depolarization introduced by multiple scattering was also investigated. The results were also compared with numerical results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Substantially good agreement between numerical and experimental results was found. The measurements showed the adequacy of modern electro-optical systems to study the features of multiple-scattering effects on lidar echoes from atmosphere or ocean by means of experiments on well-controlled laboratory-scaled models. This adequacy provides the possibility of studying the influence of different effects in the laboratory in well-controlled situations.

  13. Rheology of Entangled Polymer Melts: Recent Results from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald G.

    2010-03-01

    Models for the rheology of entangled polymers, based on the ``tube" model are now open to investigation by molecular dynamics simulations using the Kremer-Grest ``pearl necklace" model of polymers. Here, we present extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamics and stress in entangled melts of branched polymers and of ``binary blends" of diluted long probe chains entangled with a matrix of shorter chains. Direct evidence of ``hierarchical relaxation" is obtained in diffusion of asymmetric star polymers, wherein the rate of slow diffusion of the branch point is controlled by the much faster motion of the attached arm. In studies of binary blends, the ratio of their lengths is varied over a wide range to cover the crossover from the chain reptation regime to tube Rouse motion regime of the long probe chains. Reducing the matrix chain length results in a faster decay of the dynamic structure factor of the probe chains, in good agreement with recent Neutron Spin Echo experiments. The diffusion of the long chains, measured by the mean square displacements of the monomers and the centers of mass of the chains, demonstrates a systematic speed-up relative to the pure reptation behavior expected for monodisperse melts of sufficiently long polymers. On the other hand, the diffusion of the matrix chains is only weakly perturbed by the diluted long probe chains. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with the theoretical predictions based on constraint release Rouse model, but a detailed comparison reveals the existence of a broad distribution of the disentanglement rates, which is partly confirmed by an analysis of the packing and diffusion of the matrix chains in the tube region of the probe chains. A coarse-grained simulation model based on the tube Rouse motion model with incorporation of the probability distribution of the tube segment jump rates is developed and shows results qualitatively consistent with the fine scale molecular dynamics

  14. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  15. Do sediment type and test durations affect results of laboratory-based, accelerated testing studies of permeable pavement clogging?

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter W B; White, Richard; Lucke, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have attempted to quantify the clogging processes of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICPs) using accelerated testing methods. However, the results have been variable. This study investigated the effects that three different sediment types (natural and silica), and different simulated rainfall intensities, and testing durations had on the observed clogging processes (and measured surface infiltration rates) of laboratory-based, accelerated PICP testing studies. Results showed that accelerated simulated laboratory testing results are highly dependent on the type, and size of sediment used in the experiments. For example, when using real stormwater sediment up to 1.18 mm in size, the results showed that neither testing duration, nor stormwater application rate had any significant effect on PICP clogging. However, the study clearly showed that shorter testing durations generally increased clogging and reduced the surface infiltration rates of the models when artificial silica sediment was used. Longer testing durations also generally increased clogging of the models when using fine sediment (<300 μm). Results from this study will help researchers and designers better anticipate when and why PICPs are susceptible to clogging, reduce maintenance and extend the useful life of these increasingly common stormwater best management practices.

  16. Can interface features affect aggression resulting from violent video game play? An examination of realistic controller and large screen size.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Sundar, S Shyam

    2013-05-01

    Aggressiveness attributed to violent video game play is typically studied as a function of the content features of the game. However, can interface features of the game also affect aggression? Guided by the General Aggression Model (GAM), we examine the controller type (gun replica vs. mouse) and screen size (large vs. small) as key technological aspects that may affect the state aggression of gamers, with spatial presence and arousal as potential mediators. Results from a between-subjects experiment showed that a realistic controller and a large screen display induced greater aggression, presence, and arousal than a conventional mouse and a small screen display, respectively, and confirmed that trait aggression was a significant predictor of gamers' state aggression. Contrary to GAM, however, arousal showed no effects on aggression; instead, presence emerged as a significant mediator.

  17. Can interface features affect aggression resulting from violent video game play? An examination of realistic controller and large screen size.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Sundar, S Shyam

    2013-05-01

    Aggressiveness attributed to violent video game play is typically studied as a function of the content features of the game. However, can interface features of the game also affect aggression? Guided by the General Aggression Model (GAM), we examine the controller type (gun replica vs. mouse) and screen size (large vs. small) as key technological aspects that may affect the state aggression of gamers, with spatial presence and arousal as potential mediators. Results from a between-subjects experiment showed that a realistic controller and a large screen display induced greater aggression, presence, and arousal than a conventional mouse and a small screen display, respectively, and confirmed that trait aggression was a significant predictor of gamers' state aggression. Contrary to GAM, however, arousal showed no effects on aggression; instead, presence emerged as a significant mediator. PMID:23505967

  18. Theoretical simulation of tumour oxygenation and results from acute and chronic hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasu, Alexandru; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Karlsson, Mikael

    2003-09-01

    The tumour microenvironment is considered to be responsible for the outcome of cancer treatment and therefore it is extremely important to characterize and quantify it. Unfortunately, most of the experimental techniques available now are invasive and generally it is not known how this influences the results. Non-invasive methods on the other hand have a geometrical resolution that is not always suited for the modelling of the tumour response. Theoretical simulation of the microenvironment may be an alternative method that can provide quantitative data for accurately describing tumour tissues. This paper presents a computerized model that allows the simulation of the tumour oxygenation. The model simulates numerically the fundamental physical processes of oxygen diffusion and consumption in a two-dimensional geometry in order to study the influence of the different parameters describing the tissue geometry. The paper also presents a novel method to simulate the effects of diffusion-limited (chronic) hypoxia and perfusion-limited (acute) hypoxia. The results show that all the parameters describing tissue vasculature are important for describing tissue oxygenation. Assuming that vascular structure is described by a distribution of inter-vessel distances, both the average and the width of the distribution are needed in order to fully characterize the tissue oxygenation. Incomplete data, such as distributions measured in a non-representative region of the tissue, may not give relevant tissue oxygenation. Theoretical modelling of tumour oxygenation also allows the separation between acutely and chronically hypoxic cells, a distinction that cannot always be seen with other methods. It was observed that the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells depends not only on the fraction of collapsed blood vessels at any particular moment, but also on the distribution of vessels in space as well. All these suggest that theoretical modelling of tissue oxygenation starting from the basic

  19. Humidity distribution affected by freely exposed water surfaces: Simulations and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hygum, M. A.; Popok, V. N.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate models for the water vapor flux at a water-air interface are required in various scientific, reliability and civil engineering aspects. Here, a study of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed water is presented. A model predicting a spatial distribution and time evolution of relative humidity based on statistical rate theory and computational fluid dynamics is developed. In our approach we use short-term steady-state steps to simulate the slowly evolving evaporation in the system. Experiments demonstrate considerably good agreement with the computer modeling and allow one to distinguish the most important parameters for the model.

  20. Examining the results of certain effects of high altitude on soldiers using modeling and simulation.

    PubMed

    von Tersch, Robert; Birch, Harry

    2009-10-01

    Operation Enduring Freedom conducted in the high mountains of Afghanistan posed new challenges for U.S. and coalition forces. The high mountains with elevations up to 25,000 feet and little to no road access limited the use of combat vehicles and some advanced weaponry. Small unit actions became the norm and soldiers experienced the effect of high elevation, where limited oxygen and its debilitating effects negatively impacted unacclimated soldiers. While the effects of high altitude on unacclimated soldiers are well documented, the results of those effects in a combat setting are not as well known. For this study, the authors focused on 3 areas: movement speed, response time, and judgment; used a state-of-the-art constructive modeling and simulation (M&S) tool; simulated a combat engagement with less capable unacclimated and fully capable acclimated soldiers; and captured the results, which scaled increased casualties for unacclimated and decreased casualties for acclimated soldiers. PMID:19891222

  1. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Simulating Late Ordovician deep ocean O2 with an earth system climate model. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Daniel F.; Montenegro, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    The geological record provides several lines of evidence that point to the occurrence of widespread and long lasting deep ocean anoxia during the Late Ordovician, between about 460-440 million years ago (ma). While a series of potential causes have been proposed, there is still large uncertainty regarding how the low oxygen levels came about. Here we use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) with Late Ordovician paleogeography to verify the impacts of paleogeography, bottom topography, nutrient loading and cycling and atmospheric concentrations of O2 and CO2 on deep ocean oxygen concentration during the period of interest. Preliminary results so far are based on 10 simulations (some still ongoing) covering the following parameter space: CO2 concentrations of 2240 to 3780 ppmv (~8x to 13x pre-industrial), atmospheric O2 ranging from 8% to 12% per volume, oceanic PO4 and NO3 loading from present day to double present day, reductions in wind speed of 50% and 30% (winds are provided as a boundary condition in the UVic ESCM). For most simulations the deep ocean remains well ventilated. While simulations with higher CO2, lower atmospheric O2 and greater nutrient loading generate lower oxygen concentration in the deep ocean, bottom anoxia - here defined as concentrations <10 μmol L-1 - in these cases is restricted to the high-latitue northern hemisphere. Further simulations will address the impact of greater nutrient loads and bottom topography on deep ocean oxygen concentrations.

  3. Recent results from the GISS model of the global atmosphere. [circulation simulation for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Large numerical atmospheric circulation models are in increasingly widespread use both for operational weather forecasting and for meteorological research. The results presented here are from a model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and described in detail by Somerville et al. (1974). This model is representative of a class of models, recently surveyed by the Global Atmospheric Research Program (1974), designed to simulate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, large-scale dynamics of the earth's atmosphere.

  4. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP) - Recent Results from an Airborne Simulator for SMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP) is a recently-developed NASA airborne instrument specially tailored to simulate the new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite instrument suite. SLAP conducted its first test flights in December, 2013 and participated in its first science campaign-the IPHEX ground validation campaign of the GPM mission-in May, 2014. This paper will present results from additional test flights and science observations scheduled for 2015.

  5. PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM A SIMULATION OF QUENCHED QCD WITH OVERL AP FERMIONS ON A LARGE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    BERRUTO,F.GARRON,N.HOELBLING,D.LELLOUCH,L.REBBI,C.SHORESH,N.

    2003-07-15

    We simulate quenched QCD with the overlap Dirac operator. We work with the Wilson gauge action at {beta} = 6 on an 18{sup 3} x 64 lattice. We calculate quark propagators for a single source point and quark mass ranging from am{sub 4} = 0.03 to 0.75. We present here preliminary results based on the propagators for 60 gauge field configurations.

  6. An Examination of Parameters Affecting Large Eddy Simulations of Flow Past a Square Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, M. R.; Georgiadis, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Separated flow over a bluff body is analyzed via large eddy simulations. The turbulent flow around a square cylinder features a variety of complex flow phenomena such as highly unsteady vortical structures, reverse flow in the near wall region, and wake turbulence. The formation of spanwise vortices is often times artificially suppressed in computations by either insufficient depth or a coarse spanwise resolution. As the resolution is refined and the domain extended, the artificial turbulent energy exchange between spanwise and streamwise turbulence is eliminated within the wake region. A parametric study is performed highlighting the effects of spanwise vortices where the spanwise computational domain's resolution and depth are varied. For Re=22,000, the mean and turbulent statistics computed from the numerical large eddy simulations (NLES) are in good agreement with experimental data. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the wake of the cylinder. Mesh independence is illustrated by comparing a mesh resolution of 2 million to 16 million. Sensitivities to time stepping were minimized and sampling frequency sensitivities were nonpresent. While increasing the spanwise depth and resolution can be costly, this practice was found to be necessary to eliminating the artificial turbulent energy exchange.

  7. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  8. Femtosecond laser for glaucoma treatment: the comparison between simulation and experimentation results on ocular tissue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dong Xia; Ngoi, Bryan K. A.; Hoh, Sek Tien; Koh, Lee Huat K.; Deng, Yuan Zi

    2005-04-01

    In ophthalmology, the use of femtosecond lasers is receiving more attention than ever due to its extremely high intensity and ultra short pulse duration. It opens the highly beneficial possibilities for minimized side effects during surgery process, and one of the specific areas is laser surgery in glaucoma treatment. However, the sophisticated femtosecond laser-ocular tissue interaction mechanism hampers the clinical application of femtosecond laser to treat glaucoma. The potential contribution in this work lies in the fact, that this is the first time a modified moving breakdown theory is applied, which is appropriate for femtosecond time scale, to analyze femtosecond laser-ocular tissue interaction mechanism. Based on this theory, energy deposition and corresponding thermal increase are studied by both simulation and experimentation. A simulation model was developed using Matlab software, and the simulation result was validated through in-vitro laser-tissue interaction experiment using pig iris. By comparing the theoretical and experimental results, it is shown that femtosecond laser can obtain determined ocular tissue removal, and the thermal damage is evidently reduced. This result provides a promising potential for femtosecond laser in glaucoma treatment.

  9. Global Carbon Cycle Inside GISS ModelE GCM: Results of Equilibrium and Transient Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinov, I.; Kiang, N. Y.; Romanou, A.; Puma, M. J.; Kharecha, P.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Kim, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We present simulation results for a fully coupled carbon cycle inside the ModelE General Circulation Model (GCM) developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The current implementation utilizes the GISS dynamical atmospheric core coupled to the HYCOM ocean model. The atmospheric core uses a Quadratic Upstream Scheme (QUS) for advection of gas tracers, while HYCOM has its own built-in algorithm for advection of ocean tracers. The land surface part of the model consists of the GISS ground hydrology model coupled to the Ent dynamic global terrestrial ecosystem model. The ocean biogeochemistry model based on Watson Gregg's model was implemented inside the HYCOM ocean model. Together with ocean tracer transport, it describes all aspects of the carbon cycle inside the ocean and provides CO2 fluxes for exchange with the atmosphere. CO2 fluxes from land vegetation are provided by the Ent model, which employs well-known photosynthesis relationships of Farquhar, von Caemmerer, and Berry and stomatal conductance of Ball and Berry. Soil CO2 fluxes are also computed by the Ent model according to the CASA soil biogeochemistry model. We present results of fully coupled GCM simulations as well as off-line tests for different components. For GCM simulations, we present results of both equilibrium and transient runs and discuss implications of biases in GCM-predicted climate for accurate modeling of the carbon cycle.

  10. Molecular simulation of aqueous electrolytes: water chemical potential results and Gibbs-Duhem equation consistency tests.

    PubMed

    Moučka, Filip; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, William R

    2013-09-28

    This paper deals with molecular simulation of the chemical potentials in aqueous electrolyte solutions for the water solvent and its relationship to chemical potential simulation results for the electrolyte solute. We use the Gibbs-Duhem equation linking the concentration dependence of these quantities to test the thermodynamic consistency of separate calculations of each quantity. We consider aqueous NaCl solutions at ambient conditions, using the standard SPC/E force field for water and the Joung-Cheatham force field for the electrolyte. We calculate the water chemical potential using the osmotic ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm by varying the number of water molecules at a constant amount of solute. We demonstrate numerical consistency of these results in terms of the Gibbs-Duhem equation in conjunction with our previous calculations of the electrolyte chemical potential. We present the chemical potential vs molality curves for both solvent and solute in the form of appropriately chosen analytical equations fitted to the simulation data. As a byproduct, in the context of the force fields considered, we also obtain values for the Henry convention standard molar chemical potential for aqueous NaCl using molality as the concentration variable and for the chemical potential of pure SPC/E water. These values are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values.

  11. Molecular simulation of aqueous electrolytes: Water chemical potential results and Gibbs-Duhem equation consistency tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moučka, Filip; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, William R.

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with molecular simulation of the chemical potentials in aqueous electrolyte solutions for the water solvent and its relationship to chemical potential simulation results for the electrolyte solute. We use the Gibbs-Duhem equation linking the concentration dependence of these quantities to test the thermodynamic consistency of separate calculations of each quantity. We consider aqueous NaCl solutions at ambient conditions, using the standard SPC/E force field for water and the Joung-Cheatham force field for the electrolyte. We calculate the water chemical potential using the osmotic ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm by varying the number of water molecules at a constant amount of solute. We demonstrate numerical consistency of these results in terms of the Gibbs-Duhem equation in conjunction with our previous calculations of the electrolyte chemical potential. We present the chemical potential vs molality curves for both solvent and solute in the form of appropriately chosen analytical equations fitted to the simulation data. As a byproduct, in the context of the force fields considered, we also obtain values for the Henry convention standard molar chemical potential for aqueous NaCl using molality as the concentration variable and for the chemical potential of pure SPC/E water. These values are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values.

  12. El Niño and Greenhouse Warming: Results from Ensemble Simulations with the NCAR CCSM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelle, Hein; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; Burgers, Gerrit; Dijkstra, Henk

    2005-11-01

    The changes in model ENSO behavior due to an increase in greenhouse gases, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Business-As-Usual scenario, are investigated using a 62-member ensemble 140-yr simulation (1940 2080) with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model (CCSM; version 1.4). Although the global mean surface temperature increases by about 1.2 K over the period 2000 80, there are no significant changes in the ENSO period, amplitude, and spatial patterns. To explain this behavior, an analysis of the simulation results is combined with results from intermediate complexity coupled ocean atmosphere models. It is shown that this version of the CCSM is incapable of simulating a correct meridional extension of the equatorial wind stress response to equatorial SST anomalies. The wind response pattern is too narrow and its strength is insensitive to background SST. This leads to a more stable Pacific climate system, a shorter ENSO period, and a reduced sensitivity of ENSO to global warming.

  13. Ozone pollution affects flower numbers and timing in a simulated BAP priority calcareous grassland community.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Felicity; Williamson, Jennifer; Mills, Gina

    2012-04-01

    Mesocosms representing the BAP Priority habitat 'Calcareous Grassland' were exposed to eight ozone profiles for twelve-weeks in two consecutive years. Half of the mesocosms received a reduced watering regime during the exposure periods. Numbers and timing of flowering in the second exposure period were related to ozone concentration and phytotoxic ozone dose (accumulated stomatal flux). For Lotus corniculatus, ozone accelerated the timing of the maximum number of flowers. An increase in mean ozone concentration from 30ppb to 70ppb corresponded with an advance in the timing of maximum flowering by six days. A significant reduction in flower numbers with increasing ozone was found for Campanula rotundifolia and Scabiosa columbaria and the relationship with ozone was stronger for those that were well-watered than for those with reduced watering. These changes in flowering timing and numbers could have large ecological impacts, affecting plant pollination and the food supply of nectar feeding insects.

  14. Chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects multiple protein-coding genes and can result in severe congenital abnormalities in offspring.

    PubMed

    de Pagter, Mirjam S; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Baas, Annette F; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Hochstenbach, Ron; van der Veken, Lars T; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P

    2015-04-01

    Chromothripsis represents an extreme class of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) with major effects on chromosomal architecture. Although recent studies have associated chromothripsis with congenital abnormalities, the incidence and pathogenic effects of this phenomenon require further investigation. Here, we analyzed the genomes of three families in which chromothripsis rearrangements were transmitted from a mother to her child. The chromothripsis in the mothers resulted in completely balanced rearrangements involving 8-23 breakpoint junctions across three to five chromosomes. Two mothers did not show any phenotypic abnormalities, although 3-13 protein-coding genes were affected by breakpoints. Unbalanced but stable transmission of a subset of the derivative chromosomes caused apparently de novo complex copy-number changes in two children. This resulted in gene-dosage changes, which are probably responsible for the severe congenital phenotypes of these two children. In contrast, the third child, who has a severe congenital disease, harbored all three chromothripsis chromosomes from his healthy mother, but one of the chromosomes acquired de novo rearrangements leading to copy-number changes. These results show that the human genome can tolerate extreme reshuffling of chromosomal architecture, including breakage of multiple protein-coding genes, without noticeable phenotypic effects. The presence of chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects reproduction and is expected to substantially increase the risk of miscarriages, abortions, and severe congenital disease.

  15. Information and decision-making needs among people with affective disorders – results of an online survey

    PubMed Central

    Liebherz, Sarah; Tlach, Lisa; Härter, Martin; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient decision aids are one possibility for enabling and encouraging patients to participate in medical decisions. Objective This paper aims to describe patients’ information and decision-making needs as a prerequisite for the development of high-quality, web-based patient decision aids for affective disorders. Design We conducted an online cross-sectional survey by using a self-administered questionnaire including items on Internet use, online health information needs, role in decision making, and important treatment decisions, performing descriptive and comparative statistical analyses. Participants A total of 210 people with bipolar disorder/mania as well as 112 people with unipolar depression participated in the survey. Results Both groups specified general information search as their most relevant information need and decisions on treatment setting (inpatient or outpatient) as well as decisions on pharmacological treatment as the most difficult treatment decisions. For participants with unipolar depression, decisions concerning psychotherapeutic treatment were also especially difficult. Most participants of both groups preferred shared decisions but experienced less shared decisions than desired. Discussion and conclusion Our results show the importance of information for patients with affective disorders, with a focus on pharmacological treatment and on the different treatment settings, and highlight patients’ requirements to be involved in the decision-making process. Since our sample reported a chronic course of disease, we do not know if our results are applicable for newly diagnosed patients. Further studies should consider how the reported needs could be addressed in health care practice. PMID:25999698

  16. Preliminary Analysis and Simulation Results of Microwave Transmission Through an Electron Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad, Kiran; Sonnad, Kiran; Furman, Miguel; Veitzer, Seth; Stoltz, Peter; Cary, John

    2007-01-12

    The electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code VORPAL is being used to simulate the interaction of microwave radiation through an electron cloud. The results so far showgood agreement with theory for simple cases. The study has been motivated by previous experimental work on this problem at the CERN SPS [1], experiments at the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC [4], and proposed experiments at the Fermilab Main Injector (MI). With experimental observation of quantities such as amplitude, phase and spectrum of the output microwave radiation and with support from simulations for different cloud densities and applied magnetic fields, this technique can prove to be a useful probe for assessing the presence as well as the densityof electron clouds.

  17. Simulated cosmic microwave background maps at 0.5 deg resolution: Basic results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have simulated full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy expected from cold dark matter (CDM) models at 0.5 deg and 1.0 deg angular resolution. Statistical properties of the maps are presented as a function of sky coverage, angular resolution, and instrument noise, and the implications of these results for observability of the Doppler peak are discussed. The rms fluctuations in a map are not a particularly robust probe of the existence of a Doppler peak; however, a full correlation analysis can provide reasonable sensitivity. We find that sensitivity to the Doppler peak depends primarily on the fraction of sky covered, and only secondarily on the angular resolution and noise level. Color plates of the simulated maps are presented to illustrate the anisotropies.

  18. Simulation and experimental results of optical and thermal modeling of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Lida; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of synthesized magneto-optical nanoshells (MNSs) for biomedical applications. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with diameter of 9.5 ± 1.4 nm are fabricated using co-precipitation method and subsequently covered by a thin layer of gold to obtain 15.8 ± 3.5 nm MNSs. In this paper, simulations and detailed analysis are carried out for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of MNSs are assessed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Magnetic saturation of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles are reduced from 46.94 to 11.98 emu/g after coating with gold. The performance of the proposed optical-thermal modeling technique is verified by simulation and experimental results. PMID:25063109

  19. Experimental and computer simulation results of the spot welding process using SORPAS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jader, M. A.; Cullen, J. D.; Athi, N.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2009-07-01

    The highly competitive nature of the automotive industry drives demand for improvements and increased precision engineering in resistance spot welding. Currently there are about 4300 weld points on the average steel vehicle. Current industrial monitoring systems check the quality of the nugget after processing 15 cars, once every two weeks. The nuggets are examined off line using a destructive process, which takes approximately 10 days to complete causing a long delay in the production process. This paper presents a simulation of the spot welding growth curves, along with a comparison to growth curves performed on an industrial spot welding machine. The correlation of experimental results shows that SORPAS simulations can be used as an off line measurement to reduce factory energy usage. The first section in your paper

  20. Computer simulation applied to jewellery casting: challenges, results and future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberto, Dario; Klotz, Ulrich E.

    2012-07-01

    Computer simulation has been successfully applied in the past to several industrial processes (such as lost foam and die casting) by larger foundries and direct automotive suppliers, while for the jewelry sector it is a procedure which is not widespread, and which has been tested mainly in the context of research projects. On the basis of a recently concluded EU project, the authors here present the simulation of investment casting, using two different softwares: one for the filling step (Flow-3D®), the other one for the solidification (PoligonSoft®). A work on material characterization was conducted to obtain the necessary physical parameters for the investment (used for the mold) and for the gold alloys (through thermal analysis). A series of 18k and 14k gold alloys were cast in standard set-ups to have a series of benchmark trials with embedded thermocouples for temperature measurement, in order to compare and validate the software output in terms of the cooling curves for definite test parts. Results obtained with the simulation included the reduction of micro-porosity through an optimization of the feeding channels for a controlled solidification of the metal: examples of the predicted porosity in the cast parts (with metallographic comparison) will be shown. Considerations on the feasibility of applying the casting simulation in the jewelry sector will be reached, underlining the importance of the software parametrization necessary to obtain reliable results, and the discrepancies found with the experimental comparison. In addition an overview on further possibilities of application for the CFD in jewellery casting, such as the modeling of the centrifugal and tilting processes, will be presented.

  1. A limited assessment of the ASEP human reliability analysis procedure using simulator examination results

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, B.R.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.; Mitts, T.M.; Nicholson, W.L.

    1995-10-01

    This report presents a limited assessment of the conservatism of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) human reliability analysis (HRA) procedure described in NUREG/CR-4772. In particular, the, ASEP post-accident, post-diagnosis, nominal HRA procedure is assessed within the context of an individual`s performance of critical tasks on the simulator portion of requalification examinations administered to nuclear power plant operators. An assessment of the degree to which operator perforn:Lance during simulator examinations is an accurate reflection of operator performance during actual accident conditions was outside the scope of work for this project; therefore, no direct inference can be made from this report about such performance. The data for this study are derived from simulator examination reports from the NRC requalification examination cycle. A total of 4071 critical tasks were identified, of which 45 had been failed. The ASEP procedure was used to estimate human error probability (HEP) values for critical tasks, and the HEP results were compared with the failure rates observed in the examinations. The ASEP procedure was applied by PNL operator license examiners who supplemented the limited information in the examination reports with expert judgment based upon their extensive simulator examination experience. ASEP analyses were performed for a sample of 162 critical tasks selected randomly from the 4071, and the results were used to characterize the entire population. ASEP analyses were also performed for all of the 45 failed critical tasks. Two tests were performed to assess the bias of the ASEP HEPs compared with the data from the requalification examinations. The first compared the average of the ASEP HEP values with the fraction of the population actually failed and it found a statistically significant factor of two bias on the average.

  2. RESULTS OF CESIUM MASS TRANSFER TESTING FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT WITH HANFORD WASTE SIMULANT AP-101

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-27

    SRNL has performed an Extraction, Scrub, Strip (ESS) test using the next generation solvent and AP-101 Hanford Waste simulant. The results indicate that the next generation solvent (MG solvent) has adequate extraction behavior even in the face of a massive excess of potassium. The stripping results indicate poorer behavior, but this may be due to inadequate method detection limits. SRNL recommends further testing using hot tank waste or spiked simulant to provide for better detection limits. Furthermore, strong consideration should be given to performing an actual waste, or spiked waste demonstration using the 2cm contactor bank. The Savannah River Site currently utilizes a solvent extraction technology to selectively remove cesium from tank waste at the Multi-Component Solvent Extraction unit (MCU). This solvent consists of four components: the extractant - BoBCalixC6, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - trioctylamine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. This solvent has been used to successfully decontaminate over 2 million gallons of tank waste. However, recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a basis to implement an improved solvent blend. This new solvent blend - referred to as Next Generation Solvent (NGS) - is similar to the current solvent, and also contains four components: the extractant - MAXCalix, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - LIX-79{trademark} guanidine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. Testing to date has shown that this 'Next Generation' solvent promises to provide far superior cesium removal efficiencies, and furthermore, is theorized to perform adequately even in waste with high potassium concentrations such that it could be used for processing Hanford wastes. SRNL has performed a cesium mass transfer test in to confirm this behavior, using a simulant designed to simulate Hanford AP-101 waste.

  3. Integrated friction measurements in hip wear simulations: short-term results.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, M; Affatato, S; Tiberi, L; Carmignato, S; Viceconti, M

    2010-01-01

    Hip joint wear simulators are used extensively to simulate the dynamic behaviour of the human hip joint and, through the wear rate, gain a concrete indicator about the overall wear performance of different coupled bearings. Present knowledge of the dynamic behaviour of important concurrent indicators, such as the coefficient of friction, could prove helpful for the continuing improvement in applied biomaterials. A limited number of commercial or custom-made simulators have been designed specifically for friction studies but always separately from wear tests; thus, analysis of these two important parameters has remained unconnected. As a result, a new friction sensor has been designed, built, and integrated in a commercial biaxial rocking motion hip simulator. The aim of this study is to verify the feasibility of an experimental set-up in which the dynamic measurement of the friction factor could effectively be implemented in a standard wear test without compromising its general accuracy and repeatability. A short wear test was run with the new set-up for 1 x 10(6) cycles. In particular, three soft-bearings (metal-on-polyethylene, phi = 28 mm) were tested; during the whole test, axial load and frictional torque about the vertical loading axis were synchronously recorded in order to calculate the friction factor. Additional analyses were performed on the specimens, before and after the test, in order to verify the accuracy of the wear test. The average friction factor was 0.110 +/- 0.025. The friction sensors showed good accuracy and repeatability throughout. This innovative set-up was able to reproduce stable and reliable measurements. The results obtained encourage further investigations of this set-up for long-term assessment and using different combinations of materials.

  4. Computer Simulation Results and Analysis for a Root-Raised Cosine Filter Design using Canonical Signed Digits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Heechul

    1996-01-01

    Filters implemented using Canonical Signed-Digit (CSD) number representation for the coefficients have been studied for many years as an efficient way to increase the speed and reduce the hardware complexity. A simple and very effective method for designing a CSD filter with a specific set of filter parameters has been investigated and its simulation results are presented here. In order to optimize filter coefficients into the corresponding CSD numbers, the Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) criterion is used. Furthermore, an attempt is made to improve frequency response of the CSD filter by allocating an extra non-zero digit for normalized coefficients exceeding one-half. Due to limited filter aperture width in examples presented here, the frequency response of CSD filter as the number of non-zero digits in a CSD code increases is not affected much. A root-raised cosine filter model is employed as a base line for this design approach. Finally, the CSD filter simulation results and a hardware complexity comparison with a conventional filter are also shown along with the eye diagrams an Bit-Error-Rate (BER) performance curves.

  5. Testing Friction Laws by Comparing Simulation Results With Experiments of Spontaneous Dynamic Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Lapusta, N.; Rosakis, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    Friction laws are typically introduced either based on theoretic ideas or by fitting laboratory experiments that reproduce only a small subset of possible behaviors. Hence it is important to validate the resulting laws by modeling experiments that produce spontaneous frictional behavior. Here we simulate experiments of spontaneous rupture transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear done by Xia et al. (Science, 2004). In the experiments, two thin Homalite plates are pressed together along an inclined interface. Compressive load P is applied to the edges of the plates and the rupture is triggered by an explosion of a small wire. Xia et al. (2004) link the transition in their experiments to the Burridge-Andrews mechanism (Andrews, JGR, 1976) which involves initiation of a daughter crack in front of the main rupture. Xia et al. have measured transition lengths for different values of the load P and compared their results with numerical simulations of Andrews who used linear slip-weakening friction. They conclude that to obtain a good fit they need to assume that the critical slip of the slip-weakening law scales as P-1/2, as proposed by Ohnaka (JGR, 2003). Hence our first goal is to verify whether the dependence of the critical slip on the compressive load P is indeed necessary for a good fit to experimental measurements. To test that, we conducted simulations of the experiments by using boundary integral methodology in its spectral formulation (Perrin et al., 1995; Geubelle and Rice, 1995). We approximately model the wire explosion by temporary normal stress decrease in the region of the interface comparable to the size of the exploding wire. The simulations show good agreement of the transition length with the experimental results for different values of the load P, even though we keep the critical slip constant. Hence the dependence of the critical slip on P is not necessary to fit the experimental measurements. The inconsistency between Andrews' numerical results

  6. Simulation of dye adsorption by beech sawdust as affected by pH.

    PubMed

    Batzias, F A; Sidiras, D K

    2007-03-22

    The effect of pH on the batch kinetics of methylene blue adsorption on beech sawdust was simulated, in order to evaluate sawdust potential use as low cost adsorbent for wastewater dye removal. The zero point of charge pH(pzc) of the sawdust, in order to explain the effect of pH in terms of pH(pzc), was measured by the mass titration and the automatic titration methods. The adsorption capacity, estimated according to Freundlich's model, indicate that increase of the pH enhances the adsorption behaviour of the examined material. The lower adsorption of methylene blue at acidic pH is due to the presence of excess H(+) ions that compete with the dye cation for adsorption sites. As the pH of the system increases, the number of positively charged sites decreases while the number of the negatively charged sites increases. The negatively charged sites favour the adsorption of dye cation due to electrostatic attraction. The increase in initial pH from 8.0 to 11.5 increases the amount of dye adsorbed. PMID:16934396

  7. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Vicente J.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Callahan, John

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical RPS launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources was designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  8. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Callahan, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical radioisotope power system (RPS) launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources were designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  9. Chronic exposure to simulated space conditions predominantly affects cytoskeleton remodeling and oxidative stress response in mouse fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michaël; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; El-Saghire, Hussein; Tabury, Kevin; Michaux, Arlette; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; De Vos, Winnok H; Baatout, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity and cosmic rays as found in space are difficult to recreate on earth. However, ground-based models exist to simulate space flight experiments. In the present study, an experimental model was utilized to monitor gene expression changes in fetal skin fibroblasts of murine origin. Cells were continuously subjected for 65 h to a low dose (55 mSv) of ionizing radiation (IR), comprising a mixture of high‑linear energy transfer (LET) neutrons and low-LET gamma-rays, and/or simulated microgravity using the random positioning machine (RPM), after which microarrays were performed. The data were analyzed both by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and single gene analysis (SGA). Simulated microgravity affected fetal murine fibroblasts by inducing oxidative stress responsive genes. Three of these genes are targets of the nuclear factor‑erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which may play a role in the cell response to simulated microgravity. In addition, simulated gravity decreased the expression of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, which may have been caused by the downregulation of the serum response factor (SRF), possibly through the Rho signaling pathway. Similarly, chronic exposure to low-dose IR caused the downregulation of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, as well as in cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response pathways. Many of the genes or gene sets that were altered in the individual treatments (RPM or IR) were not altered in the combined treatment (RPM and IR), indicating a complex interaction between RPM and IR. PMID:24859186

  10. Factors affecting the functional results of open reduction and internal fixation for fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Kino, Yoshitake; Yajima, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the factors affecting functional results of fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint treated by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), 60 patients, including 38 patients with a dorsal fracture-dislocation and 22 with a pilon fracture, were analysed. The mean ratio of articular surface involvement was 48.5% and a depressed central fragment existed in 75.3% of the cases. ORIF was performed in 47 patients through a lateral approach using Kirschner wires and in 13 through a palmar approach using a plate or screws. The mean flexion, extension and range of motion (ROM) of the PIP joint was 89.5°, 11.5° and 78.0°, respectively. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that a delayed start of active motion exercise after surgery, elderly age and ulnar ray digit were factors affecting functional outcomes. Although ORIF allows accurate restoration of the articular surfaces, an early start of motion exercise is essential for good results.

  11. Development of ADOCS controllers and control laws. Volume 3: Simulation results and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Kenneth H.; Glusman, Steven I.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Cockpit Controls/Advanced Flight Control System (ACC/AFCS) study was conducted by the Boeing Vertol Company as part of the Army's Advanced Digital/Optical Control System (ADOCS) program. Specifically, the ACC/AFCS investigation was aimed at developing the flight control laws for the ADOCS demonstator aircraft which will provide satisfactory handling qualities for an attack helicopter mission. The three major elements of design considered are as follows: Pilot's integrated Side-Stick Controller (SSC) -- Number of axes controlled; force/displacement characteristics; ergonomic design. Stability and Control Augmentation System (SCAS)--Digital flight control laws for the various mission phases; SCAS mode switching logic. Pilot's Displays--For night/adverse weather conditions, the dynamics of the superimposed symbology presented to the pilot in a format similar to the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) Pilot Night Vision System (PNVS) for each mission phase is a function of SCAS characteristics; display mode switching logic. Results of the five piloted simulations conducted at the Boeing Vertol and NASA-Ames simulation facilities are presented in Volume 3. Conclusions drawn from analysis of pilot rating data and commentary were used to formulate recommendations for the ADOCS demonstrator flight control system design. The ACC/AFCS simulation data also provide an extensive data base to aid the development of advanced flight control system design for future V/STOL aircraft.

  12. Flow-driven cloud formation and fragmentation: results from Eulerian and Lagrangian simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitsch, Fabian; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie

    2011-07-01

    The fragmentation of shocked flows in a thermally bistable medium provides a natural mechanism to form turbulent cold clouds as precursors to molecular clouds. Yet because of the large density and temperature differences and the range of dynamical scales involved, following this process with numerical simulations is challenging. We compare two-dimensional simulations of flow-driven cloud formation without self-gravity, using the Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code VINE and the Eulerian grid code PROTEUS. Results are qualitatively similar for both methods, yet the variable spatial resolution of the SPH method leads to smaller fragments and thinner filaments, rendering the overall morphologies different. Thermal and hydrodynamical instabilities lead to rapid cooling and fragmentation into cold clumps with temperatures below 300 K. For clumps more massive than 1 M⊙ pc-1, the clump mass function has an average slope of -0.8. The internal velocity dispersion of the clumps is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than their relative motion, rendering it subsonic with respect to the internal sound speed of the clumps but supersonic as seen by an external observer. For the SPH simulations most of the cold gas resides at temperatures below 100 K, while the grid-based models show an additional, substantial component between 100 and 300 K. Independent of the numerical method, our models confirm that converging flows of warm neutral gas fragment rapidly and form high-density, low-temperature clumps as possible seeds for star formation.

  13. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  14. Simulated and experimental evaluation of factors affecting the rate and extent of reductive dehalogenation of chloroethenes with glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Il-Su; Bae, Jae-Ho; Yang, Yanru; McCarty, Perry L.

    2004-10-01

    Carbohydrates such as molasses are being added to aquifers to serve as electron donors for reductive dehalogenation of chloroethenes. Glucose, as a model carbohydrate, was studied to better understand the processes involved and to evaluate the effectiveness for dehalogenation of different approaches for carbohydrate addition. A simulation model was developed and calibrated with experimental data for the reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene to ethene via cis-1,2-dichloroethene. The model included fermentors that convert the primary donor (glucose) into butyrate, acetate and hydrogen, methanogens, and two separate dehalogenator groups. The dehalogenation groups use the hydrogen intermediate as an electron donor and the different haloethenes as electron acceptors through competitive inhibition. Model simulations suggest first that the initial relative population size of dehalogenators and H2-utilizing methanogens greatly affects the degree of dehalogenation achieved. Second, the growth and decay of biomass from soluble carbohydrate plays a significant role in reductive dehalogenation. Finally, the carbohydrate delivery strategies used (periodic versus batch addition and the time interval between periodic addition) greatly affect the degree of dehalogenation that can be obtained with a given amount of added carbohydrate.

  15. Nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection: Results from magnetospheric observations and particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Mariko; Hoshino, Masahiro

    Nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection is investigated by using spacecraft ob-servations in the Earth's magnetotail and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Magnetic recon-nection is believed to be an efficient particle accelerator in various environments in space, such as the pulsar magnetosphere, the solar corona and the Earth's magnetosphere. The Earth's magnetosphere particularly gives crucial clues to understand particle acceleration in magnetic reconnection since precise information on both fields and particles is available from spacecraft observations. Several nonthermal electron acceleration mechanisms, including the acceleration around the X-point and the magnetic pile-up region in the downstream, have been proposed and tested by recent PIC simulations as well as spacecraft observations. However nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection still remains to be poorly understood in both ob-servational and simulation studies. We report on the first ever direct observational evidence of nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail based on the Geotail observations. Nonthermal protons accelerated up to several hundreds keV exhibit a power-law energy spectrum with a typical spectrum index 3-5. By conducting a statistical study on reconnection events in the Earth's magnetotail, we found efficient ion acceleration when the reconnection electric field is strong. On the other hand, the statistical study indicates that the efficiency of electron acceleration is rather controlled by the thickness of the reconnec-tion current sheet. We also performed PIC simulations of driven reconnection to investigate in detail acceleration mechanisms of both ions and electrons. Acceleration mechanisms as well as conditions necessary for the efficient particle acceleration are discussed based on these results.

  16. A comparison of results obtained with two subsurface non-isothermal multiphase reactive transport simulators, FADES-CORE and TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect

    Juncosa Rivera, Ricardo; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    FADES-CORE and TOUGHREACT are codes used to model the non-isothermal multiphase flow with multicomponent reactive transport in porous media. Different flow and reactive transport problems were used to compare the FADES-CORE and TOUGHREACT codes. These problems take into account the different cases of multiphase flow with and without heat transport, conservative transport, and reactive transport. Consistent results were obtained from both codes, which use different numerical methods to solve the differential equations resulting from the various physicochemical processes. Here we present the results obtained from both codes for various cases. Some results are slightly different with minor discrepancies, which have been remedied, so that both codes would be able to reproduce the same processes using the same parameters. One of the discrepancies found is related to the different calculation for thermal conductivity in heat transport, which affects the calculation of the temperatures, as well as the pH of the reaction of calcite dissolution problem modeled. Therefore it is possible to affirm that the pH is highly sensitive to temperature. Generally speaking, the comparison was concluded to be highly satisfactory, leading to the complete verification of the FADES-CORE code. However, we must keep in mind that, as there are no analytical solutions available with which to verify the codes, the TOUGHREACT code has been thoroughly corroborated, given that the only possible way to prove that the code simulation is correct, is by comparing the results obtained with both codes for the identical problems, or to validate the simulation results with actual measured data.

  17. Large Area Mountain Permafrost Simulation at DEM Resolution. Results from the European Alps and Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddes, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a system that is able to simulate land-surface conditions at continental scales while accounting for parameters that vary on order of 10's of metres (e.g., topography or surface cover) by using a statistical subgrid scheme (Fiddes and Gruber 2012). The model chain is driven by output from atmospheric datasets with a simple in-house downscaling scheme which uses only data on atmospheric pressure-levels and a DEM (Fiddes and Gruber 2014). The scheme has been tested in the case of mountain permafrost in the European Alps (Fiddes and Gruber 2015) with good results. However the strength of the scheme is application to remote data-sparse regions. Recently we have applied the scheme to simulate permafrost conditions in the Western Himalaya. This included a simple approach to correct snow mass balance using MODIS products, as input precipitation from atmospheric models may often have bias. The scheme is flexible in choice of atmospheric model input data, numerical surface model and surface data. In this abstract we will (1) present the model chain, (2) show the results of simulating permafrost conditions over large areas using only global datasets as input and (3) give an outlook to simulating future conditions. Fiddes, J., Endrizzi, S., and Gruber, S. 2015: Large-area land surface simulations in heterogeneous terrain driven by global data sets: application to mountain permafrost, The Cryosphere, 9, 411-426, doi:10.5194/tc-9-411-2015, 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-411-2015Fiddes, J. & Gruber, S. 2014: TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain, Geoscientific Model Development, 7, 387-405, http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/gmd-7-387-2014Fiddes, J. & Gruber, S. 2012: TopoSUB: a tool for efficient large area numerical modelling in complex topography at sub-grid scales, Geoscientific Model Development, 5, 1245-1257,http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/gmd-5-1245-2012

  18. The Ten Commandments for Translating Simulation Results into Real-Life Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzler, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Simulation designers are continuously facing the challenge of determining how much of the expected value the simulation has delivered to the client. Addressing this challenge is not easy, and it requires simulation designers to stretch their comfort zones. This article presents a ten-step approach for meeting simulation objectives and translating…

  19. Optical imaging of alpha emitters: simulations, phantom, and in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, Federico; Meo, Sergio Lo; Rossi, Pier Luca; Calandrino, Riccardo; Sbarbati, Andrea; Spinelli, Antonello E.

    2011-12-01

    There has been growing interest in investigating both the in vitro and in vivo detection of optical photons from a plethora of beta emitters using optical techniques. In this paper we have investigated an alpha particle induced fluorescence signal by using a commercial CCD-based small animal optical imaging system. The light emission of a 241Am source was simulated using GEANT4 and tested in different experimental conditions including the imaging of in vivo tissue. We believe that the results presented in this work can be useful to describe a possible mechanism for the in vivo detection of alpha emitters used for therapeutic purposes.

  20. The Mayfield method of estimating nesting success: A model, estimators and simulation results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hensler, G.L.; Nichols, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Using a nesting model proposed by Mayfield we show that the estimator he proposes is a maximum likelihood estimator (m.l.e.). M.l.e. theory allows us to calculate the asymptotic distribution of this estimator, and we propose an estimator of the asymptotic variance. Using these estimators we give approximate confidence intervals and tests of significance for daily survival. Monte Carlo simulation results show the performance of our estimators and tests under many sets of conditions. A traditional estimator of nesting success is shown to be quite inferior to the Mayfield estimator. We give sample sizes required for a given accuracy under several sets of conditions.

  1. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  2. Two-dimensional copolymers and multifractality: comparing perturbative expansions, Monte Carlo simulations, and exact results.

    PubMed

    von Ferber, C; Holovatch, Yu

    2002-04-01

    We analyze the scaling laws for a set of two different species of long flexible polymer chains joined together at one of their extremities (copolymer stars) in space dimension D=2. We use a formerly constructed field-theoretic description and compare our perturbative results for the scaling exponents with recent conjectures for exact conformal scaling dimensions derived by a conformal invariance technique in the context of D=2 quantum gravity. A simple Monte Carlo simulation brings about reasonable agreement with both approaches. We analyze the remarkable multifractal properties of the spectrum of scaling exponents. PMID:12005898

  3. Results from simulated upper-plenum aerosol transport and aerosol resuspension experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.; Pattison, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Recent calculational results published as part of the Battelle-Columbus BMI-2104 source term study indicate that, for some LWR accident sequences, aerosol deposition in the reactor primary coolant system (PCS) can lead to significant reductions in the radionuclide source term. Aerosol transport and deposition in the PCS have been calculated in this study using the TRAP-MELT 2 computer code, which was developed at Battelle-Columbus; the status of validation of the TRAP-MELT 2 code has been described in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report. The objective of the ORNL TRAP-MELT Validation Project, which is sponsored by the Fuel Systems Behavior Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is to conduct simulated reactor-vessel upper-plenum aerosol deposition and transport tests. The results from these tests will be used in the ongoing effort to validate TRAP-MELT 2. The TRAP-MELT Validation Project includes two experimental subtasks. In the Aerosol Transport Tests, aerosol transport in a vertical pipe is being studied; this geometry was chosen to simulate aerosol deposition and transport in the reactor-vessel upper-plenum. To date, four experiments have been performed; the results from these tests are presented in this paper. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Results from the simulations of geopotential coefficient estimation from gravity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, S.; Schutz, B. E.; Lundberg, J. B.

    New information of the short and medium wavelength components of the geopotential is expected from the measurements of gravity gradients made by the future ESA Aristoteles and the NASA Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer missions. In this paper, results are presented from preliminary simulations concerning the estimation of the spherical harmonic coefficients of the geopotential expansion from gravity gradients data. Numerical issues in the brute-force inversion (BFI) of the gravity gradients data are examined, and numerical algorithms are developed that substantially speed up the computation of the potential, acceleration, and gradients, as well as the mapping from the gravity gradients to the geopotential coefficients. The solution of a large least squares problem is also examined, and computational requirements are determined for the implementation of a large scale inversion. A comparative analysis of the results from the BFI and a symmetry method is reported for the test simulations of the estimation of a degree and order 50 gravity field. The results from the two, in the presence of white noise, are seen to compare well. The latter method is implemented on a special, axially symmetric surface that fits the orbit within 380 meters.

  5. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance are presented. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  6. Finite difference model for aquifer simulation in two dimensions with results of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trescott, Peter C.; Pinder, George Francis; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The model will simulate ground-water flow in an artesian aquifer, a water-table aquifer, or a combined artesian and water-table aquifer. The aquifer may be heterogeneous and anisotropic and have irregular boundaries. The source term in the flow equation may include well discharge, constant recharge, leakage from confining beds in which the effects of storage are considered, and evapotranspiration as a linear function of depth to water. The theoretical development includes presentation of the appropriate flow equations and derivation of the finite-difference approximations (written for a variable grid). The documentation emphasizes the numerical techniques that can be used for solving the simultaneous equations and describes the results of numerical experiments using these techniques. Of the three numerical techniques available in the model, the strongly implicit procedure, in general, requires less computer time and has fewer numerical difficulties than do the iterative alternating direction implicit procedure and line successive overrelaxation (which includes a two-dimensional correction procedure to accelerate convergence). The documentation includes a flow chart, program listing, an example simulation, and sections on designing an aquifer model and requirements for data input. It illustrates how model results can be presented on the line printer and pen plotters with a program that utilizes the graphical display software available from the Geological Survey Computer Center Division. In addition the model includes options for reading input data from a disk and writing intermediate results on a disk.

  7. Simulated microgravity affects ciprofloxacin susceptibility and expression of acrAB-tolC genes in E. coli ATCC25922

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingxin; Li, Chenglin; Zheng, Yanhua; Si, Shaoyan; Shi, Yuhua; Huang, Yuling; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cui, Yan; Cui, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    As a representative fluoroquinolone antibacterial, ciprofloxacin is frequently used to treat infections caused by bacteria such as E. coli. It is much meaningful to explore ciprofloxacin susceptibility and investigate a possible mechanism of drug susceptibility changes in E. coli ATCC25922 exposed to the environmental stress of simulated microgravity. The subculture of E. coli lasted for 7 days under simulated microgravity conditions (SMG) and normal microgravity (NG) conditions. On the 8th day, the cultures were divided into three groups: (1) NG group (continuous NG cultures); (2) SMG group (continuous SMG cultures); (3) SMCNG group (simulated microgravity change into normal gravity cultures). Ciprofloxacin (a final concentration of 0.125 μg/ml) sensitivity and expression of acrAB-tolC genes were detected in E. coli cells. The count and percentage of viable cells in the SMG cultures bacteria exposed to ciprofloxacin were higher than that in NG cultures and reduced to the levels of NG group when they were subcultivated from SMG to NG. The expressions of efflux pump genes (acrA, acrB and tolC) were upregulated in SMG culture and downregulated to the levels of NG group when they were subcultivated from SMG to NG. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and expression of acrAB-tolC genes in E. coli could be reversibly affected by SMG conditions. Over expression of efflux pump genes acrAB-tolC perhaps played an important role in decreased CIP susceptibility under SMG. PMID:26339360

  8. Influence of land use on rainfall simulation results in the Souss basin, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Klaus Daniel; Ries, Johannes B.; Hssaine, Ali Ait

    2013-04-01

    Situated between the High and Anti-Atlas, the Souss basin is characterized by a dynamic land use change. It is one of the fastest growing agricultural regions of Morocco. Traditional mixed agriculture is replaced by extensive plantations of citrus fruits, bananas and vegetables in monocropping, mainly for the European market. For the implementation of the land use change and further expansion of the plantations into marginal land which was former unsuitable for agriculture, land levelling by heavy machinery is used to plane the fields and close the widespread gullies. These gully systems are cutting deep between the plantations and other arable land. Their development started already over 400 years ago with the introduction of sugar production. Heavy rainfall events lead to further strong soil and gully erosion in this with 200 mm mean annual precipitation normally arid region. Gullies are cutting into the arable land or are re-excavating their old stream courses. On the test sites around the city of Taroudant, a total of 122 rainfall simulations were conducted to analyze the susceptibility of soils to surface runoff and soil erosion under different land use. A small portable nozzle rainfall simulator is used for the rainfall simulation experiments, quantifying runoff and erosion rates on micro-plots with a size of 0.28 m2. A motor pump boosts the water regulated by a flow metre into the commercial full cone nozzle at a height of 2 m. The rainfall intensity is maintained at about 40 mm h-1 for each of the 30 min lasting experiments. Ten categories of land use are classified for different stages of levelling, fallow land, cultivation and rangeland. Results show that mean runoff coefficients and mean sediment loads are significantly higher (1.4 and 3.5 times respectively) on levelled study sites compared to undisturbed sites. However, the runoff coefficients of all land use types are relatively equal and reach high median coefficients from 39 to 56 %. Only the

  9. Gender differences in Salix myrsinifolia at the pre-reproductive stage are little affected by simulated climatic change.

    PubMed

    Nybakken, Line; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2013-04-01

    Females of dioecious species are known often to prioritize defense, while males grow faster. As climatic change is known to influence both growth and defense in plants, it would be important to know whether it affects the sexes of dioecious species differently. This could have impacts on future sex ratios in nature. We grew four clones of each sex of Salix myrsinifolia in greenhouse chambers under ambient conditions, enhanced temperature, enhanced CO2 or enhanced temperature  +  enhanced CO2 . The females had the greatest growth and also the highest levels of phenolic compounds in twigs, while in leaves some compounds were higher in males, some in females. Enhanced CO2 increased growth equally in both sexes, while growth was not affected by elevated temperature. Phenolic compounds in twigs were, however, lowered under elevated temperature. The gender differences were not strongly affected by the simulated climatic changes, but the effects seen on some highly concentrated compounds may be important. We interpret the intensive growth at pre-reproductive phase as a strategy in females to get an initial advantage before later periods with fewer resources available for growth.

  10. Simulation of normal, carrier and affected controls for large-scale genotyping of cattle for factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyaya, P N; Jha, M; Muraleedharan, P; Gupta, R R; Rathod, R N; Mehta, H H; Khoda, V K

    2006-01-01

    An insertion mutation within exon 12 of the factor XI gene has been described in Holstein cattle. This has opened the prospect for large-scale screening of cattle using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for the rapid identification of heterozygous animals. To facilitate such a screening process, the mutant and normal alleles of factor XI gene, represented by 244- and 320-bp PCR amplified fragments, were individually cloned in Escherichia coli using a multicopy plasmid cloning vehicle to generate pFXI-N and pFXI-M, respectively. The authenticity of the inserts was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A nested PCR method was developed, by which PCR amplicons generated from primers with annealing sites on the recombinant plasmids and by flanking the insert were used as templates for amplification of the diagnostic products using factor XI gene-specific primers. An equimolar mixture of both PCR amplicons, originating from pFXI-N and pFXI-M, constituted the carrier control while the individual amplicons were the affected and normal controls. The controls were used as references for in-gel comparison to screen a population of 307 cattle and 259 water buffaloes; the frequency of the mutant allele was found to be 0. No DNA size standards were required in this study. The simulated control DNA samples representing normal, carrier and affected cattle have the potential to help in large-scale screening of a cattle population for individuals that are carriers or affected by factor XI deficiency.

  11. SZ effects in the Magneticum Pathfinder Simulation: Comparison with the Planck, SPT, and ACT results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolag, K.; Komatsu, E.; Sunyaev, R.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the one-point probability density distribution functions (PDF) and the power spectra of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ and kSZ) effects and the mean Compton Y parameter using the Magneticum Pathfinder simulations, state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a large cosmological volume of (896 Mpc/h)3. These simulations follow in detail the thermal and chemical evolution of the intracluster medium as well as the evolution of super-massive black holes and their associated feedback processes. We construct full-sky maps of tSZ and kSZ from the light-cones out to z = 0.17, and one realisation of 8°.8 × 8°.8 deep light-cone out to z = 5.2. The local universe at z < 0.027 is simulated by a constrained realisation. The tail of the one-point PDF of tSZ from the deep light-cone follows a power-law shape with an index of -3.2. Once convolved with the effective beam of Planck, it agrees with the PDF measured by Planck. The predicted tSZ power spectrum agrees with that of the Planck data at all multipoles up to l ≈ 1000, once the calculations are scaled to the Planck 2015 cosmological parameters with Ωm = 0.308 and σ8 = 0.8149. Consistent with the results in the literature, however, we continue to find the tSZ power spectrum at l = 3000 that is significantly larger than that estimated from the high-resolution ground-based data. The simulation predicts the mean fluctuating Compton Y value of bar{Y}=1.18× 10^{-6} for Ωm = 0.272 and σ8 = 0.809. Nearly half (≈5 × 10-7) of the signal comes from halos below a virial mass of 1013 M⊙/h. Scaling this to the Planck 2015 parameters, we find bar{Y}=1.57× {}10^{-6}.

  12. RESULTS OF COPPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CCPO) OF TANK 48H SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Pareizs, J.; Newell, J.; Fondeur, F.; Nash, C.; White, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-08-14

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed a series of laboratory-scale experiments that examined copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) aided destruction of organic components, most notably tetraphenylborate (TPB), in Tank 48H simulant slurries. The experiments were designed with an expectation of conducting the process within existing vessels of Building 241-96H with minimal modifications to the existing equipment. Results of the experiments indicate that TPB destruction levels exceeding 99.9% are achievable, dependent on the reaction conditions. The following observations were made with respect to the major processing variables investigated. A lower reaction pH provides faster reaction rates (pH 7 > pH 9 > pH 11); however, pH 9 reactions provide the least quantity of organic residual compounds within the limits of species analyzed. Higher temperatures lead to faster reaction rates and smaller quantities of organic residual compounds. Higher concentrations of the copper catalyst provide faster reaction rates, but the highest copper concentration (500 mg/L) also resulted in the second highest quantity of organic residual compounds. Faster rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition lead to faster reaction rates and lower quantities of organic residual compounds. Testing with simulated slurries continues. Current testing is examining lower copper concentrations, refined peroxide addition rates, and alternate acidification methods. A revision of this report will provide updated findings with emphasis on defining recommended conditions for similar tests with actual waste samples.

  13. Ion cyclotron instability at Io: Hybrid simulation results compared to in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šebek, Ondřej; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Walker, Raymond J.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-08-01

    We present analysis of global three-dimensional hybrid simulations of Io's interaction with Jovian magnetospheric plasma. We apply a single-species model with simplified neutral-plasma chemistry and downscale Io in order to resolve the ion kinetic scales. We consider charge exchange, electron impact ionization, and photoionization by using variable rates of these processes to investigate their impact. Our results are in a good qualitative agreement with the in situ magnetic field measurements for five Galileo flybys around Io. The hybrid model describes ion kinetics self-consistently. This allows us to assess the distribution of temperature anisotropies around Io and thereby determine the possible triggering mechanism for waves observed near Io. We compare simulated dynamic spectra of magnetic fluctuations with in situ observations made by Galileo. Our results are consistent with both the spatial distribution and local amplitude of magnetic fluctuations found in the observations. Cyclotron waves, triggered probably by the growth of ion cyclotron instability, are observed mainly downstream of Io and on the flanks in regions farther from Io where the ion pickup rate is relatively low. Growth of the ion cyclotron instability is governed mainly by the charge exchange rate.

  14. Modelled air pollution levels versus EC air quality legislation - results from high resolution simulation.

    PubMed

    Chervenkov, Hristo

    2013-12-01

    An appropriate method for evaluating the air quality of a certain area is to contrast the actual air pollution levels to the critical ones, prescribed in the legislative standards. The application of numerical simulation models for assessing the real air quality status is allowed by the legislation of the European Community (EC). This approach is preferable, especially when the area of interest is relatively big and/or the network of measurement stations is sparse, and the available observational data are scarce, respectively. Such method is very efficient for similar assessment studies due to continuous spatio-temporal coverage of the obtained results. In the study the values of the concentration of the harmful substances sulphur dioxide, (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter - coarse (PM10) and fine (PM2.5) fraction, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) in the surface layer obtained from modelling simulations with resolution 10 km on hourly bases are taken to calculate the necessary statistical quantities which are used for comparison with the corresponding critical levels, prescribed in the EC directives. For part of them (PM2.5, CO and NH3) this is done for first time with such resolution. The computational grid covers Bulgaria entirely and some surrounding territories and the calculations are made for every year in the period 1991-2000. The averaged over the whole time slice results can be treated as representative for the air quality situation of the last decade of the former century.

  15. Model uncertainties affecting satellite-based inverse modeling of nitrogen oxides emissions and implications for surface ozone simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-T.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, H.; Mao, J.; Zhuang, G.

    2012-06-01

    Errors in chemical transport models (CTMs) interpreting the relation between space-retrieved tropospheric column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) have important consequences on the inverse modeling. They are however difficult to quantify due to lack of adequate in situ measurements, particularly over China and other developing countries. This study proposes an alternate approach for model evaluation over East China, by analyzing the sensitivity of modeled NO2 columns to errors in meteorological and chemical parameters/processes important to the nitrogen abundance. As a demonstration, it evaluates the nested version of GEOS-Chem driven by the GEOS-5 meteorology and the INTEX-B anthropogenic emissions and used with retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to constrain emissions of NOx. The CTM has been used extensively for such applications. Errors are examined for a comprehensive set of meteorological and chemical parameters using measurements and/or uncertainty analysis based on current knowledge. Results are exploited then for sensitivity simulations perturbing the respective parameters, as the basis of the following post-model linearized and localized first-order modification. It is found that the model meteorology likely contains errors of various magnitudes in cloud optical depth, air temperature, water vapor, boundary layer height and many other parameters. Model errors also exist in gaseous and heterogeneous reactions, aerosol optical properties and emissions of non-nitrogen species affecting the nitrogen chemistry. Modifications accounting for quantified errors in 10 selected parameters increase the NO2 columns in most areas with an average positive impact of 22% in July and 10% in January. This suggests a possible systematic model bias such that the top-down emissions will be overestimated by the same magnitudes if the model is used for emission inversion without corrections. The modifications however

  16. Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

    2012-05-20

    The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

  17. Computer simulation results for PCM/PM/NRZ receivers in nonideal channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anabtawi, A.; Nguyen, T. M.; Million, S.

    1995-01-01

    This article studies, by computer simulations, the performance of deep-space telemetry signals that employ the pulse code modulation/phase modulation (PCM/PM) technique, using nonreturn-to-zero data, under the separate and combined effects of unbalanced data, data asymmetry, and a band-limited channel. The study is based on measuring the symbol error rate performance and comparing the results to the theoretical results presented in previous articles. Only the effects of imperfect carrier tracking due to an imperfect data stream are considered. The presence of an imperfect data stream (unbalanced and/or asymmetric) produces undesirable spectral components at the carrier frequency, creating an imperfect carrier reference that will degrade the performance of the telemetry system. Further disturbance to the carrier reference is caused by the intersymbol interference created by the band-limited channel.

  18. Simulated heat waves affected alpine grassland only in combination with drought.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Hans J; Bassin, Seraina; Verlinden, Maya; Zeiter, Michaela; Hiltbrunner, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The Alpine region is warming fast, and concurrently, the frequency and intensity of climate extremes are increasing. It is currently unclear whether alpine ecosystems are sensitive or resistant to such extremes. We subjected Swiss alpine grassland communities to heat waves with varying intensity by transplanting monoliths to four different elevations (2440-660 m above sea level) for 17 d. Half of these were regularly irrigated while the other half were deprived of irrigation to additionally induce a drought at each site. Heat waves had no significant impacts on fluorescence (Fv /Fm , a stress indicator), senescence and aboveground productivity if irrigation was provided. However, when heat waves coincided with drought, the plants showed clear signs of stress, resulting in vegetation browning and reduced phytomass production. This likely resulted from direct drought effects, but also, as measurements of stomatal conductance and canopy temperatures suggest, from increased high-temperature stress as water scarcity decreased heat mitigation through transpiration. The immediate responses to heat waves (with or without droughts) recorded in these alpine grasslands were similar to those observed in the more extensively studied grasslands from temperate climates. Responses following climate extremes may differ in alpine environments, however, because the short growing season likely constrains recovery.

  19. Simulated heat waves affected alpine grassland only in combination with drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boeck, Hans J.; Bassin, Seraina; Verlinden, Maya; Zeiter, Michaela; Hiltbrunner, Erika

    2016-04-01

    The Alpine region is warming fast, leading to an increase in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Currently, it is unclear whether alpine ecosystems are sensitive or resistant to such extremes. In an experiment carried out in the Swiss Alps, we subjected Swiss alpine grassland communities to heat waves with varying intensity (5-10 °C warming) by transplanting monoliths to four different elevations (2440-660 m a.s.l.) for 17 days. Half of the monoliths were regularly irrigated while the other half were deprived of irrigation to additionally induce a drought at each site. We found that heat waves had no significant short-term impacts on fluorescence (Fv/Fm, a stress indicator), senescence and aboveground productivity if irrigation was provided. However, when heat waves coincided with drought, plants showed clear signs of stress, resulting in vegetation browning and reduced phytomass production. This likely resulted from direct drought effects, but also, as measurements of stomatal conductance and canopy temperatures suggest, from increased high-temperature stress as water scarcity decreased heat mitigation through transpiration. The immediate responses to heat waves (with or without droughts) recorded in these alpine grasslands were similar to those observed in the more extensively studied grasslands from temperate climates. Climate extreme impacts may differ in the longer run, however, because the short growing season in alpine environments likely constrains recovery.

  20. Free space optical communication flight mission: simulations and experimental results on ground level demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata Calvo, Ramon; Ferrero, Valter; Camatel, Stefano; Catalano, Valeria; Bonino, Luciana; Toselli, Italo

    2009-05-01

    In the context of the increasing demand in high-speed data link for scientific, planetary exploration and earth observation missions, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), involving Thales Alenia Space as prime, the Polytechnic of Turin and other Italian partners, is developing a program for feasibility demonstration of optical communication system with the goal of a prototype flight mission in the next future. We have designed and analyzed a ground level bidirectional Free Space Optical Communication (FSOC) Breadboard at 2.5Gbit/s working at 1550nm as an emulator of slant path link. The breadboard is full-working and we tested it back-toback, at 500m and 2.3km during one month. The distances were chosen in order to get an equivalent slant path cumulative turbulence in a ground level link. The measurements campaign was done during the day and the night time and under several weather conditions, from sunny, rainy or windy. So we could work under very different turbulence conditions from weak to strong turbulence. We measured the scintillation both, on-axis and off-axis by introducing known misalignments at the terminals, transmission losses at both path lengths and BER at both receivers. We present simulations results considering slant and ground level links, where we took into account the atmospheric effects; scintillation, beam spread, beam wander and fade probability, and comparing them with the ground level experimental results, we find a good agreement between them. Finally we discuss the results obtained in the experimentation and in the flight mission simulations in order to apply our experimental results in the next project phases.

  1. ULF foreshock under radial IMF: THEMIS observations and global kinetic simulation Vlasiator results compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, Minna; Rami, Vainio; Archer, Martin; Hietala, Heli; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    For decades, a certain type of ultra low frequency waves with a period of about 30 seconds have been observed in the Earth's quasi-parallel foreshock. These waves, with a wavelength of about an Earth radius, are compressive and propagate with an average angle of 20 degrees with respect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The latter property has caused trouble to scientists as the growth rate for the instability causing the waves is maximized along the magnetic field. So far, these waves have been characterized by single or multi-spacecraft methods and 2-dimensional hybrid-PIC simulations, which have not fully reproduced the wave properties. Vlasiator is a newly developed, global hybrid-Vlasov simulation, which solves the six-dimensional phase space utilising the Vlasov equation for protons, while electrons are a charge-neutralising fluid. The outcome of the simulation is a global reproduction of ion-scale physics in a holistic manner where the generation of physical features can be followed in time and their consequences can be quantitatively characterised. Vlasiator produces the ion distribution functions and the related kinetic physics in unprecedented detail, in the global scale magnetospheric scale with a resolution of a couple of hundred kilometres in the ordinary space and 20 km/s in the velocity space. We run Vlasiator under a radial IMF in five dimensions consisting of the three-dimensional velocity space embedded in the ecliptic plane. We observe the generation of the 30-second ULF waves, and characterize their evolution and physical properties in time. We compare the results both to THEMIS observations and to the quasi-linear theory. We find that Vlasiator reproduces the foreshock ULF waves in all reported observational aspects, i.e., they are of the observed size in wavelength and period, they are compressive and propagate obliquely to the IMF. In particular, we discuss the issues related to the long-standing question of oblique propagation.

  2. Tank 241-AZ-101 criticality assessment resulting from pump jet mixing: Sludge mixing simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Recknagle, K.

    1997-04-01

    Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) is one of 28 double-shell tanks located in the AZ farm in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. The tank contains a significant quantity of fissile materials, including an estimated 9.782 kg of plutonium. Before beginning jet pump mixing for mitigative purposes, the operations must be evaluated to demonstrate that they will be subcritical under both normal and credible abnormal conditions. The main objective of this study was to address a concern about whether two 300-hp pumps with four rotating 18.3-m/s (60-ft/s) jets can concentrate plutonium in their pump housings during mixer pump operation and cause a criticality. The three-dimensional simulation was performed with the time-varying TEMPEST code to determine how much the pump jet mixing of Tank AZ-101 will concentrate plutonium in the pump housing. The AZ-101 model predicted that the total amount of plutonium within the pump housing peaks at 75 g at 10 simulation seconds and decreases to less than 10 g at four minutes. The plutonium concentration in the entire pump housing peaks at 0.60 g/L at 10 simulation seconds and is reduced to below 0.1 g/L after four minutes. Since the minimum critical concentration of plutonium is 2.6 g/L, and the minimum critical plutonium mass under idealized plutonium-water conditions is 520 g, these predicted maximums in the pump housing are much lower than the minimum plutonium conditions needed to reach a criticality level. The initial plutonium maximum of 1.88 g/L still results in safety factor of 4.3 in the pump housing during the pump jet mixing operation.

  3. Ionizing irradiation affects the microtensile resin dentin bond strength under simulated clinical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Suman; Yadav, Harish

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of ionizing radiations on resin–dentin interface in terms of marginal adaptation and micro-tensile bond strength under thermocycling and mechanical loading. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into four groups. GR I: No Irradiation and Class II MO cavities were prepared that were restored with composite restorations; GR II: Teeth were irradiated and restored; GR III: Teeth were restored and irradiated; GR IV: Teeth were restored during irradiation dosage fractions. All samples were thermal and mechanical loaded with 5000 cycles, 5 ± 2-55 ± 2°C, dwell time 30 s and 150,000 cycles at 60N. Resin–dentin slabs were trimmed into dumbbell-shaped slabs and microtensile bond strength was measured. The bond strength data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance test. Results and Conclusions: Irradiation before tooth preparation deteriorated the microtensile bond strength. PMID:23716968

  4. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  5. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O’Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (i) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (ii) strong Lyman–Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  6. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6). Simulation Design and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, Olivier; English, J.; Irvine, Peter; Jones, Andrew; Lawrence, M. G.; Maccracken, Michael C.; Muri, Helene O.; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Phipps, Steven; Sillmann, Jana; Storelvmo, Trude; Wang, Hailong; Watanabe, Shingo

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  7. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (i) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (ii) strong Lyman-Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  8. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): Simulation design and preliminary results

    DOE PAGES

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, Olivier; English, J. M.; Irvine, Peter J.; Jones, Andrew; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, Michael C.; Muri, Helene O.; et al

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more long wave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale formore » those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. In conclusion, this is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.« less

  9. Results of transient simulations of a digital model of the Arikaree Aquifer near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoxie, Dwight T.

    1979-01-01

    Revised ground-water pumpage data have been imposed on a ground-water flow model previously developed for the Arikaree aquifer in a 400 square-mile area in central Platte County, Wyo. Maximum permitted annual ground-water withdrawals of 750 acre-feet for industrial use were combined with three irrigation-pumping scenarios to predict the long-term effects on ground-water levels and streamflows. Total annual ground-water withdrawals of 8,806 acre-feet, 8,033 acre-feet, and 5,045 acre-feet were predicted to produce average water-level declines of 5 feet or more over areas of 99, 96, and 68 square miles, respectively, at the end of a 40-year simulation period. The first two pumping scenarios were predicted to produce average drawdowns of more than 50 feet over areas of 1.5 and 0.8 square miles, respectively, while the third scenario resulted in average drawdowns of less than 50 feet throughout the study area. In addition, these three pumping scenarios were predicted to cause streamflow reductions of 2.6, 2.0, and 1.4 cubic feet per second, respectively, in the Laramie River and 4.9, 4.7, and 3.7 cubic feet per second, respectively, in the North Laramie River at the end of the 40-year simulation period. (Kosco-USGS)

  10. Statistics of dark matter substructure - II. Comparison of model with simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Jiang, Fangzhou

    2016-05-01

    We compare subhalo mass and velocity functions obtained from different simulations with different subhalo finders among each other, and with predictions from the new semi-analytical model presented in Paper I. We find that subhalo mass functions (SHMFs) obtained using different subhalo finders agree with each other at the level of ˜20 per cent, but only at the low-mass end. At the massive end, subhalo finders that identify subhaloes based purely on density in configuration space dramatically underpredict the subhalo abundances by more than an order of magnitude. These problems are much less severe for subhalo velocity functions (SHVFs), indicating that they arise from issues related to assigning masses to the subhaloes, rather than from detecting them. Overall the predictions from the semi-analytical model are in excellent agreement with simulation results obtained using the more advanced subhalo finders that use information in six-dimensional phase-space. In particular, the model accurately reproduces the slope and host-mass-dependent normalization of both the subhalo mass and velocity functions. We find that the SHMFs and SHVFs have power-law slopes of 0.86 and 2.77, respectively, significantly shallower than what has been claimed in several studies in the literature.

  11. Simulation and Laboratory results of the Hard X-ray Polarimeter: X-Calibur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qingzhen; Beilicke, M.; Kislat, F.; Krawczynski, H.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry promises to give qualitatively new information about high-energy sources, such as binary black hole (BH) systems, Microquasars, active galactic nuclei (AGN), GRBs, etc. We designed, built and tested a hard X-ray polarimeter 'X-Calibur' to be flown in the focal plane of the InFOCuS grazing incidence hard X-ray telescope in 2014. X-Calibur combines a low-Z Compton scatterer with a CZT detector assembly to measure the polarization of 20- 80 keV X-rays making use of the fact that polarized photons Compton scatter preferentially perpendicular to the E field orientation. X-Calibur achieves a high detection efficiency of order unity. We optimized of the design of the instrument based on Monte Carlo simulations of polarized and unpolarized X-ray beams and of the most important background components. We have calibrated and tested X-Calibur extensively in the laboratory at Washington University and at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Measurements using the highly polarized synchrotron beam at CHESS confirm the polarization sensitivity of the instrument. In this talk we report on the optimization of the design of the instrument based on Monte Carlo simulations, as well as results of laboratory calibration measurements characterizing the performance of the instrument.

  12. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): Simulation design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Robock, Alan; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, Olivier; English, J. M.; Irvine, Peter J.; Jones, Andrew; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, Michael C.; Muri, Helene O.; Moore, John C.; Niemeier, Ulrike; Phipps, Steven J.; Sillmann, Jana; Storelvmo, Trude; Wang, Hailong; Watanabe, Shingo

    2015-10-27

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more long wave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. In conclusion, this is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  13. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (GeoMIP6): simulation design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Boucher, O.; English, J. M.; Irvine, P. J.; Jones, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; MacCracken, M.; Muri, H.; Moore, J. C.; Niemeier, U.; Phipps, S. J.; Sillmann, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a suite of new climate model experiment designs for the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). This set of experiments, named GeoMIP6 (to be consistent with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6), builds on the previous GeoMIP project simulations, and has been expanded to address several further important topics, including key uncertainties in extreme events, the use of geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change, and the relatively new idea of cirrus cloud thinning to allow more longwave radiation to escape to space. We discuss experiment designs, as well as the rationale for those designs, showing preliminary results from individual models when available. We also introduce a new feature, called the GeoMIP Testbed, which provides a platform for simulations that will be performed with a few models and subsequently assessed to determine whether the proposed experiment designs will be adopted as core (Tier 1) GeoMIP experiments. This is meant to encourage various stakeholders to propose new targeted experiments that address their key open science questions, with the goal of making GeoMIP more relevant to a broader set of communities.

  14. HIV-1 adaptation to antigen processing results in population-level immune evasion and affects subtype diversification.

    PubMed

    Tenzer, Stefan; Crawford, Hayley; Pymm, Phillip; Gifford, Robert; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Weimershaus, Mirjana; de Oliveira, Tulio; Burgevin, Anne; Gerstoft, Jan; Akkad, Nadja; Lunn, Daniel; Fugger, Lars; Bell, John; Schild, Hansjörg; van Endert, Peter; Iversen, Astrid K N

    2014-04-24

    The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8(+) T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when these regions encode epitopes presented by ~30 more common HLA variants. By combining epitope processing and computational analyses of the two HIV subtypes responsible for ~60% of worldwide infections, we identified a hitherto unrecognized adaptation to the antigen-processing machinery through substitutions at subtype-specific motifs. Multiple HLA variants presenting epitopes situated next to a given subtype-specific motif drive selection at this subtype-specific position, and epitope abundances correlate inversely with the HLA frequency distribution in affected populations. This adaptation reflects the sum of intrapatient adaptations, is predictable, facilitates viral subtype diversification, and increases global HIV diversity. Because low epitope abundance is associated with infrequent and weak T cell responses, this most likely results in both population-level immune evasion and inadequate responses in most people vaccinated with natural HIV-1 sequence constructs. Our results suggest that artificial sequence modifications at subtype-specific positions in vitro could refocus and reverse the poor immunogenicity of HIV proteins.

  15. Comparison of simulations and experimental results from ICF implosions using capsules of varying surface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. E.; Glebov, V.

    2005-10-01

    We have conducted a series of indirect-drive ICF implosion experiments at Omega, using capsules with deliberately roughened surfaces. The 10 atm DD fill capsules had a convergence ratio of 18, higher than previous Nova experiments [M. Marinak et al, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]; the pre-heat shielded, Ge-doped CH ablators had moderately high (˜200) Raleigh-Taylor growth factors. Each capsule's surface quality was measured using atomic force microscopy. Gated x-ray imaging of the imploded core was used to assure that basic symmetry was maintained, while `best-surface' capsules were used as controls with every experimental run. Neutron yields were observed to decrease as surface roughness increased. Integrated simulations, including mix modeling, have been performed, and are compared to the experimental results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  16. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  17. Inverse Comptonization in a Two Component Advective Flow: Results of a Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Himadri; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-10-08

    We compute the resultant spectrum due to multiple scattering of soft photons emitted from a Keplerian disk by thermal electrons inside a torus axisymmetrically placed around a black hole. In a two component advective flow model, the post-shock region is similar to a thick accretion disk and the pre-shock sub-keplerian flow is highly optically thin. As a preliminary run of the Monte Carlo simulation of the system, we assume the CENBOL to be a small (2-14r{sub g}) thick accretion disk without a cusp to allow bulk motion of the flow. Bulk Motion Comptonization (BMC) has also been added. We show that the spectral behaviour is very similar to what is predicted in Chakrabarti and Titarchuk (1995)

  18. AeroMACS C-Band Interference Modeling and Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A new C-band (5091-5150 MHz) airport communications system designated as Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being planned under the Federal Aviation Administration s NextGen program. It is necessary to establish practical limits on AeroMACS transmission power from airports so that the threshold of interference into the Mobile Satellite Service (Globalstar) feeder uplinks is not exceeded. To help provide guidelines for these limits, interference models have been created with the commercial software Visualyse Professional. In this presentation, simulation results were shown for the aggregate interference power at low earth orbit from AeroMACS transmitters at each of up to 757 airports in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the surrounding area. Both omni-directional and sectoral antenna configurations were modeled. Effects of antenna height, beamwidth, and tilt were presented.

  19. Comparison of road load simulator test results with track tests on electric vehicle propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    A special-purpose dynamometer, the road load simulator (RLS), is being used at NASA's Lewis Research Center to test and evaluate electric vehicle propulsion systems developed under DOE's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. To improve correlation between system tests on the RLS and track tests, similar tests were conducted on the same propulsion system on the RLS and on a test track. These tests are compared in this report. Battery current to maintain a constant vehicle speed with a fixed throttle was used for the comparison. Scatter in the data was greater in the track test results. This is attributable to variations in tire rolling resistance and wind effects in the track data. It also appeared that the RLS road load, determined by coastdown tests on the track, was lower than that of the vehicle on the track. These differences may be due to differences in tire temperature.

  20. Solar flare model: Comparison of the results of numerical simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Vashenyuk, E. V.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    The electrodynamic flare model is based on numerical 3D simulations with the real magnetic field of an active region. An energy of ˜1032 erg necessary for a solar flare is shown to accumulate in the magnetic field of a coronal current sheet. The thermal X-ray source in the corona results from plasma heating in the current sheet upon reconnection. The hard X-ray sources are located on the solar surface at the loop foot-points. They are produced by the precipitation of electron beams accelerated in field-aligned currents. Solar cosmic rays appear upon acceleration in the electric field along a singular magnetic X-type line. The generation mechanism of the delayed cosmic-ray component is also discussed.

  1. Biofilm formation and control in a simulated spacecraft water system - Two-year results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, John R.; Taylor, Robert D.; Flanagan, David T.; Carr, Sandra E.; Bruce, Rebekah J.; Svoboda, Judy V.; Huls, M. H.; Sauer, Richard L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of iodine to maintain microbial water quality in a simulated spacecraft water system is being studied. An iodine level of about 2.0 mg/L is maintained by passing ultrapure influent water through an iodinated ion exchange resin. Six liters are withdrawn daily and the chemical and microbial quality of the water is monitored regularly. Stainless steel coupons used to monitor biofilm formation are being analyzed by culture methods, epifluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results from the first two years of operation show a single episode of high bacterial colony counts in the iodinated system. This growth was apparently controlled by replacing the iodinated ion exchange resin. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the iodine has limited but not completely eliminated the formation of biofilm during the first two years of operation. Significant microbial contamination has been present continuously in a parallel noniodinated system since the third week of operation.

  2. Test Results From a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) located at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a closed cycle system incorporating a turboaltemator, recuperator, and gas cooler connected by gas ducts to an external gas heater. For this series of tests, the BPCU was modified by replacing the gas heater with the Direct Drive Gas heater or DOG. The DOG uses electric resistance heaters to simulate a fast spectrum nuclear reactor similar to those proposed for space power applications. The combined system thermal transient behavior was the focus of these tests. The BPCU was operated at various steady state points. At each point it was subjected to transient changes involving shaft rotational speed or DOG electrical input. This paper outlines the changes made to the test unit and describes the testing that took place along with the test results.

  3. Experimental and simulation study results for video landmark acquisition and tracking technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Tietz, J. C.; Thomas, H. M.; Lowrie, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A synopsis of related Earth observation technology is provided and includes surface-feature tracking, generic feature classification and landmark identification, and navigation by multicolor correlation. With the advent of the Space Shuttle era, the NASA role takes on new significance in that one can now conceive of dedicated Earth resources missions. Space Shuttle also provides a unique test bed for evaluating advanced sensor technology like that described in this report. As a result of this type of rationale, the FILE OSTA-1 Shuttle experiment, which grew out of the Video Landmark Acquisition and Tracking (VILAT) activity, was developed and is described in this report along with the relevant tradeoffs. In addition, a synopsis of FILE computer simulation activity is included. This synopsis relates to future required capabilities such as landmark registration, reacquisition, and tracking.

  4. Simulated microgravity inhibits the proliferation of K562 erythroleukemia cells but does not result in apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Xia, Bing; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Guang-Yao; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Hui-Min; Sun, Yan; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    Astronauts and experimental animals in space develop the anemia of space flight, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, the impact of simulated microgravity on proliferation, cell death, cell cycle progress and cytoskeleton of erythroid progenitor-like K562 leukemia cells was observed. K562 cells were cultured in NASA Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS) that was used to simulate microgravity (at 15 rpm). After culture for 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h, the cell densities cultured in RCCS were only 55.5%, 54.3%, 67.2% and 66.4% of the flask-cultured control cells, respectively. The percentages of trypan blue-stained dead cells and the percentages of apoptotic cells demonstrated no difference between RCCS-cultured cells and flask-cultured cells at every time points (from 12 h to 96 h). Compared with flask-cultured cells, RCCS culture induced an accumulation of cell number at S phase concomitant with a decrease at G0/G1 and G2/M phases at 12 h. But 12 h later (from 24 h to 60 h), the distribution of cell cycle phases in RCCS-cultured cells became no difference compared to flask-cultured cells. Consistent with the changes of cell cycle distribution, the levels of intercellular cyclins in RCCS-cultured cells changed at 12 h, including a decrease in cyclin A, and the increasing in cyclin B, D1 and E, and then (from 24 h to 36 h) began to restore to control levels. After RCCS culture for 12-36 h, the microfilaments showed uneven and clustered distribution, and the microtubules were highly disorganized. These results indicated that RCCS-simulated microgravity could induce a transient inhibition of proliferation, but not result in apoptosis, which could involve in the development of space flight anemia. K562 cells could be a useful model to research the effects of microgravity on differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic cells.

  5. Results of Aging Tests of Vendor-Produced Blended Feed Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Buchmiller, William C.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2009-04-21

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is procuring through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) a minimum of five 3,500 gallon batches of waste simulant for Phase 1 testing in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). To make sure that the quality of the simulant is acceptable, the production method was scaled up starting from laboratory-prepared simulant through 15-gallon vendor prepared simulant and 250-gallon vendor prepared simulant before embarking on the production of the 3500-gallon simulant batch by the vendor. The 3500-gallon PEP simulant batches were packaged in 250-gallon high molecular weight polyethylene totes at NOAH Technologies. The simulant was stored in an environmentally controlled environment at NOAH Technologies within their warehouse before blending or shipping. For the 15-gallon, 250-gallon, and 3500-gallon batch 0, the simulant was shipped in ambient temperature trucks with shipment requiring nominally 3 days. The 3500-gallon batch 1 traveled in a 70-75°F temperature controlled truck. Typically the simulant was uploaded in a PEP receiving tank within 24-hours of receipt. The first uploading required longer with it stored outside. Physical and chemical characterization of the 250-gallon batch was necessary to determine the effect of aging on the simulant in transit from the vendor and in storage before its use in the PEP. Therefore, aging tests were conducted on the 250-gallon batch of the vendor-produced PEP blended feed simulant to identify and determine any changes to the physical characteristics of the simulant when in storage. The supernate was also chemically characterized. Four aging scenarios for the vendor-produced blended simulant were studied: 1) stored outside in a 250-gallon tote, 2) stored inside in a gallon plastic bottle, 3) stored inside in a well mixed 5-L tank, and 4) subject to extended temperature cycling under summer temperature conditions in a gallon plastic bottle. The following

  6. Research on an expert system for database operation of simulation-emulation math models. Volume 1, Phase 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Beale, G. O.; Schaffer, J. D.; Hsieh, B. J.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first phase of Research on an Expert System for Database Operation of Simulation/Emulation Math Models, is described. Techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) were to bear on task domains of interest to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. One such domain is simulation of spacecraft attitude control systems. Two related software systems were developed to and delivered to NASA. One was a generic simulation model for spacecraft attitude control, written in FORTRAN. The second was an expert system which understands the usage of a class of spacecraft attitude control simulation software and can assist the user in running the software. This NASA Expert Simulation System (NESS), written in LISP, contains general knowledge about digital simulation, specific knowledge about the simulation software, and self knowledge.

  7. Non-hazardous pesticide concentrations in surface waters: An integrated approach simulating application thresholds and resulting farm income effects.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, M A; Grovermann, C; Schreinemachers, P; Ingwersen, J; Lamers, M; Berger, T; Streck, T

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide application rates are high and increasing in upland agricultural systems in Thailand producing vegetables, fruits and ornamental crops, leading to the pollution of stream water with pesticide residues. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum per hectare application rates of two widely used pesticides that would achieve non-hazardous pesticide concentrations in the stream water and to evaluate how farm household incomes would be affected if farmers complied with these restricted application rates. For this purpose we perform an integrated modeling approach of a hydrological solute transport model (the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, SWAT) and an agent-based farm decision model (Mathematical Programming-based Multi-Agent Systems, MPMAS). SWAT was used to simulate the pesticide fate and behavior. The model was calibrated to a 77 km(2) watershed in northern Thailand. The results show that to stay under a pre-defined eco-toxicological threshold, the current average application of chlorothalonil (0.80 kg/ha) and cypermethrin (0.53 kg/ha) would have to be reduced by 80% and 99%, respectively. The income effect of such reductions was simulated using MPMAS. The results suggest that if farm households complied with the application thresholds then their income would reduce by 17.3% in the case of chlorothalonil and by 38.3% in the case of cypermethrin. Less drastic income effects can be expected if methods of integrated pest management were more widely available. The novelty of this study is to combine two models from distinctive disciplines to evaluate pesticide reduction scenarios based on real-world data from a single study site.

  8. Free-Flight Test Results of Scale Models Simulating Viking Parachute/Lander Staging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, Robert J.

    1973-01-01

    This report presents the results of Viking Aerothermodynamics Test D4-34.0. Motion picture coverage of a number of Scale model drop tests provides the data from which time-position characteristics as well as canopy shape and model system attitudes are measured. These data are processed to obtain the instantaneous drag during staging of a model simulating the Viking decelerator system during parachute staging at Mars. Through scaling laws derived prior to test (Appendix A and B) these results are used to predict such performance of the Viking decelerator parachute during staging at Mars. The tests were performed at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vertical Assembly Building (VAB). Model assemblies were dropped 300 feet to a platform in High Bay No. 3. The data consist of an edited master film (negative) which is on permanent file in the NASA/LRC Library. Principal results of this investigation indicate that for Viking parachute staging at Mars: 1. Parachute staging separation distance is always positive and continuously increasing generally along the descent path. 2. At staging, the parachute drag coefficient is at least 55% of its prestage equilibrium value. One quarter minute later, it has recovered to its pre-stage value.

  9. Elastodynamic analysis of a gear pump. Part II: Meshing phenomena and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.

    2010-10-01

    A non-linear lumped kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps is presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machines. Two main sources of noise and vibration can be considered: pressure and gear meshing. Fluid pressure distribution on gears, which is time-varying, is computed and included as a resultant external force and torque acting on the gears. Parametric excitations due to time-varying meshing stiffness, the tooth profile errors (obtained by a metrological analysis), the backlash effects between meshing teeth, the lubricant squeeze and the possibility of tooth contact on both lines of action were also included. Finally, the torsional stiffness and damping of the driving shaft and the non-linear behaviour of the hydrodynamic journal bearings were also taken into account. Model validation was carried out on the basis of experimental data concerning case accelerations and force reactions. The model can be used in order to analyse the pump dynamic behaviour and to identify the effects of modifications in design and operation parameters, in terms of vibration and dynamic forces. Part I is devoted to the calculation of the gear eccentricity in the steady-state condition as result of the balancing between mean pressure loads, mean meshing force and bearing reactions, while in Part II the meshing phenomena are fully explained and the main simulation results are presented.

  10. Ultraviolet radiation affects emission of ozone-depleting substances by marine macroalgae: results from a laboratory incubation study.

    PubMed

    Laturnus, Frank; Svensson, Teresia; Wiencke, Christian; Oberg, Gunilla

    2004-12-15

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone due to the effects of ozone-depleting substances, such as volatile organohalogens, emitted into the atmosphere from industrial and natural sources has increased the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface. Especially in the subpolar and polar regions, where stratospheric ozone destruction is the highest, individual organisms and whole ecosystems can be affected. In a laboratory study, several species of marine macroalgae occurring in the polar and northern temperate regions were exposed to elevated levels of ultraviolet radiation. Most of the macroalgae released significantly more chloroform, bromoform, dibromomethane, and methyl iodide-all volatile organohalogens. Calculating on the basis of the release of total chlorine, bromine, and iodine revealed that, except for two macroalgae emitting chlorine and one alga emitting iodine, exposure to ultraviolet radiation caused macroalgae to emit significantly more total chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Increasing levels of ultraviolet radiation due to possible further destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer as a result of ongoing global atmospheric warming may thus increase the future importance of marine macroalgae as a source for the global occurrence of reactive halogen-containing compounds.

  11. Precipitate microstructures and resulting properties of Al-Zn-Mg metal inert gas-weld heat-affected zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, M.; Deschamps, A.

    2004-05-01

    Using the combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the precipitate microstructure is quantitatively investigated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Al-Zn-Mg metal inert gas (MIG)-welds, and the resulting mechanical properties are determined by hardness measurements. Three initial states prior to welding (T4, T6, and T7) are investigated, and the subsequent microstructure evolution during natural aging and postwelding heat treatments (PWHTs) is assessed. The critical part of the HAZ is shown to be the transition region where partial dissolution of the initially present precipitates occurs. In this transition zone, precipitate coarsening is shown to occur for the T6 and T7 initial states, contrarily to the T4 material. After PWHT, the T6 and T7 materials experience a weak region related to this coarsening behavior, whereas the T4 material HAZ is able to recover a homogeneous microstructure after a suitably chosen PWHT. Simple model ramp heat treatments are shown to describe the main phenomena involved in the HAZ. Finally, a precipitation hardening model is successfully applied to the microstructural data to describe the hardness profiles in the various HAZs.

  12. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Measurements of Calf Muscle during Walking at Simulated Reduced Gravity - Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stroud, Leah; Norcross, Jason; Gernhardt, Michael; Soller, Babs R.

    2008-01-01

    Consideration for lunar and planetary exploration space suit design can be enhanced by investigating the physiologic responses of individual muscles during locomotion in reduced gravity. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method to study the physiology of individual muscles in ambulatory subjects during reduced gravity simulations. PURPOSE: To investigate calf muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) and pH during reduced gravity walking at varying treadmill inclines and added mass conditions using NIRS. METHODS: Four male subjects aged 42.3 +/- 1.7 years (mean +/- SE) and weighing 77.9 +/- 2.4 kg walked at a moderate speed (3.2 +/- 0.2 km/h) on a treadmill at inclines of 0, 10, 20, and 30%. Unsuited subjects were attached to a partial gravity simulator which unloaded the subject to simulate body weight plus the additional weight of a space suit (121 kg) in lunar gravity (0.17G). Masses of 0, 11, 23, and 34 kg were added to the subject and then unloaded to maintain constant weight. Spectra were collected from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and SmO2 and pH were calculated using previously published methods (Yang et al. 2007 Optics Express ; Soller et al. 2008 J Appl Physiol). The effects of incline and added mass on SmO2 and pH were analyzed through repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: SmO2 and pH were both unchanged by added mass (p>0.05), so data from trials at the same incline were averaged. LG SmO2 decreased significantly with increasing incline (p=0.003) from 61.1 +/- 2.0% at 0% incline to 48.7 +/- 2.6% at 30% incline, while pH was unchanged by incline (p=0.12). CONCLUSION: Increasing the incline (and thus work performed) during walking causes the LG to extract more oxygen from the blood supply, presumably to support the increased metabolic cost of uphill walking. The lack of an effect of incline on pH may indicate that, while the intensity of exercise has increased, the LG has not reached a level of work above the anaerobic threshold. In these

  13. CZT detectors used in different irradiation geometries: Simulations and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Shannon G.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2009-04-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate potential advantages and limitations of CZT detectors used in surface-on, edge-on, and tilted angle irradiation geometries. Simulations and experimental investigations of the energy spectrum measured by a CZT detector have been performed using different irradiation geometries of the CZT. Experiments were performed using a CZT detector with 10x10 mm{sup 2} size and 3 mm thickness. The detector was irradiated with collimated photon beams from Am-241 (59.5 keV) and Co-57 (122 keV). The edge-scan method was used to measure the detector response function in edge-on illumination mode. The tilted angle mode was investigated with the radiation beam directed to the detector surface at angles of 90 degree sign , 15 degree sign , and 10 degree sign . The Hecht formalism was used to simulate theoretical energy spectra. The parameters used for simulations were matched to experiment to compare experimental and theoretical results. The tilted angle CZT detector suppressed the tailing of the spectrum and provided an increase in peak-to-total ratio from 38% at 90 degree sign to 83% at 10 degree sign tilt angle for 122 keV radiation. The corresponding increase for 59 keV radiation was from 60% at 90 degree sign to 85% at 10 degree sign tilt angle. The edge-on CZT detector provided high energy resolution when the beam thickness was much smaller than the thickness of CZT. The FWHM resolution in edge-on illumination mode was 4.2% for 122 keV beam with 0.3 mm thickness, and rapidly deteriorated when the thickness of the beam was increased. The energy resolution of surface-on geometry suffered from strong tailing effect at photon energies higher than 60 keV. It is concluded that tilted angle CZT provides high energy resolution but it is limited to a 1D linear array configuration. The surface-on CZT provides 2D pixel arrays but suffers from tailing effect and charge build up. The edge-on CZT is considered suboptimal as it requires small beam

  14. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    code, (5) description of the modeling code, (6) the results of a number of preliminary imaging simulations, and (7) recommendations for future Wolter designs and for further modeling studies.

  15. A rainfall simulation experiment on soil and water conservation measures - Undesirable results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hösl, R.; Strauss, P.

    2012-04-01

    Sediment and nutrient inputs from agriculturally used land into surface waters are one of the main problems concerning surface water quality. On-site soil and water conservation measures are getting more and more popular throughout the last decades and a lot of research has been done within this issue. Numerous studies can be found about rainfall simulation experiments with different conservation measures tested like no till, mulching employing different types of soil cover, as well as sub soiling practices. Many studies document a more or less great success in preventing soil erosion and enhancing water quality by implementing no till and mulching techniques on farmland but few studies also indicate higher erosion rates with implementation of conservation tillage practices (Strauss et al., 2003). In May 2011 we conducted a field rainfall simulation experiment in Upper Austria to test 5 different maize cultivation techniques: no till with rough seedbed, no till with fine seedbed, mulching with disc harrow and rotary harrow, mulching with rotary harrow and conventional tillage using plough and rotary harrow. Rough seedbed refers to the seedbed preparation at planting of the cover crops. On every plot except on the conventionally managed one cover crops (a mix of Trifolium alexandrinum, Phacelia, Raphanus sativus and Herpestes) were sown in August 2010. All plots were rained three times with deionised water (<50 μS.cm-1) for one hour with 50mm.h-1 rainfall intensity. Surface runoff and soil erosion were measured. Additionally, soil cover by mulch was measured as well as soil texture, bulk density, penetration resistance, surface roughness and soil water content before and after the simulation. The simulation experiments took place about 2 weeks after seeding of maize in spring 2011. The most effective cultivation techniques for soil prevention expectedly proved to be the no till variants, mean erosion rate was about 0.1 kg.h-1, mean surface runoff was 29 l.h-1

  16. A comparison of results from two simulators used for studies of astronaut maneuvering units. [with application to Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Cannaday, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A comparison of the results from a fixed-base, six-degree-of -freedom simulator and a moving-base, three-degree-of-freedom simulator was made for a close-in, EVA-type maneuvering task in which visual cues of a target spacecraft were used for guidance. The maneuvering unit (the foot-controlled maneuvering unit of Skylab Experiment T020) employed an on-off acceleration command control system operated entirely by the feet. Maneuvers by two test subjects were made for the fixed-base simulator in six and three degrees of freedom and for the moving-base simulator in uncontrolled and controlled, EVA-type visual cue conditions. Comparisons of pilot ratings and 13 different quantitative parameters from the two simulators are made. Different results were obtained from the two simulators, and the effects of limited degrees of freedom and uncontrolled visual cues are discussed.

  17. Prediction Markets and Beliefs about Climate: Results from Agent-Based Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, J. M.; John, N. J.; van der Linden, M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate scientists have long been frustrated by persistent doubts a large portion of the public expresses toward the scientific consensus about anthropogenic global warming. The political and ideological polarization of this doubt led Vandenbergh, Raimi, and Gilligan [1] to propose that prediction markets for climate change might influence the opinions of those who mistrust the scientific community but do trust the power of markets.We have developed an agent-based simulation of a climate prediction market in which traders buy and sell future contracts that will pay off at some future year with a value that depends on the global average temperature at that time. The traders form a heterogeneous population with different ideological positions, different beliefs about anthropogenic global warming, and different degrees of risk aversion. We also vary characteristics of the market, including the topology of social networks among the traders, the number of traders, and the completeness of the market. Traders adjust their beliefs about climate according to the gains and losses they and other traders in their social network experience. This model predicts that if global temperature is predominantly driven by greenhouse gas concentrations, prediction markets will cause traders' beliefs to converge toward correctly accepting anthropogenic warming as real. This convergence is largely independent of the structure of the market and the characteristics of the population of traders. However, it may take considerable time for beliefs to converge. Conversely, if temperature does not depend on greenhouse gases, the model predicts that traders' beliefs will not converge. We will discuss the policy-relevance of these results and more generally, the use of agent-based market simulations for policy analysis regarding climate change, seasonal agricultural weather forecasts, and other applications.[1] MP Vandenbergh, KT Raimi, & JM Gilligan. UCLA Law Rev. 61, 1962 (2014).

  18. Democratic Population Decisions Result in Robust Policy-Gradient Learning: A Parametric Study with GPU Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Paul; Buesing, Lars; Giugliano, Michele; Vasilaki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    High performance computing on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is an emerging field driven by the promise of high computational power at a low cost. However, GPU programming is a non-trivial task and moreover architectural limitations raise the question of whether investing effort in this direction may be worthwhile. In this work, we use GPU programming to simulate a two-layer network of Integrate-and-Fire neurons with varying degrees of recurrent connectivity and investigate its ability to learn a simplified navigation task using a policy-gradient learning rule stemming from Reinforcement Learning. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we want to support the use of GPUs in the field of Computational Neuroscience. Second, using GPU computing power, we investigate the conditions under which the said architecture and learning rule demonstrate best performance. Our work indicates that networks featuring strong Mexican-Hat-shaped recurrent connections in the top layer, where decision making is governed by the formation of a stable activity bump in the neural population (a “non-democratic” mechanism), achieve mediocre learning results at best. In absence of recurrent connections, where all neurons “vote” independently (“democratic”) for a decision via population vector readout, the task is generally learned better and more robustly. Our study would have been extremely difficult on a desktop computer without the use of GPU programming. We present the routines developed for this purpose and show that a speed improvement of 5x up to 42x is provided versus optimised Python code. The higher speed is achieved when we exploit the parallelism of the GPU in the search of learning parameters. This suggests that efficient GPU programming can significantly reduce the time needed for simulating networks of spiking neurons, particularly when multiple parameter configurations are investigated. PMID:21572529

  19. Initial quality performance results using a phantom to simulate chest computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, Wilbroad; Padovani, Renato; Msaki, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a homemade phantom for quantitative quality control in chest computed radiography (CR). The phantom was constructed from copper, aluminium, and polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA) plates as well as Styrofoam materials. Depending on combinations, the literature suggests that these materials can simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of lung, heart, and mediastinum. The lung, heart, and mediastinum regions were simulated by 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm, 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm and 10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm copper plates, respectively. A test object of 100 mm x 100 mm and 0.2 mm thick copper was positioned to each region for CNR measurements. The phantom was exposed to x-rays generated by different tube potentials that covered settings in clinical use: 110-120 kVp (HVL=4.26-4.66 mm Al) at a source image distance (SID) of 180 cm. An approach similar to the recommended method in digital mammography was applied to determine the CNR values of phantom images produced by a Kodak CR 850A system with post-processing turned off. Subjective contrast-detail studies were also carried out by using images of Leeds TOR CDR test object acquired under similar exposure conditions as during CNR measurements. For clinical kVp conditions relevant to chest radiography, the CNR was highest over 90-100 kVp range. The CNR data correlated with the results of contrast detail observations. The values of clinical tube potentials at which CNR is the highest are regarded to be optimal kVp settings. The simplicity in phantom construction can offer easy implementation of related quality control program. PMID:21430855

  20. Democratic population decisions result in robust policy-gradient learning: a parametric study with GPU simulations.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Paul; Buesing, Lars; Giugliano, Michele; Vasilaki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    High performance computing on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is an emerging field driven by the promise of high computational power at a low cost. However, GPU programming is a non-trivial task and moreover architectural limitations raise the question of whether investing effort in this direction may be worthwhile. In this work, we use GPU programming to simulate a two-layer network of Integrate-and-Fire neurons with varying degrees of recurrent connectivity and investigate its ability to learn a simplified navigation task using a policy-gradient learning rule stemming from Reinforcement Learning. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we want to support the use of GPUs in the field of Computational Neuroscience. Second, using GPU computing power, we investigate the conditions under which the said architecture and learning rule demonstrate best performance. Our work indicates that networks featuring strong Mexican-Hat-shaped recurrent connections in the top layer, where decision making is governed by the formation of a stable activity bump in the neural population (a "non-democratic" mechanism), achieve mediocre learning results at best. In absence of recurrent connections, where all neurons "vote" independently ("democratic") for a decision via population vector readout, the task is generally learned better and more robustly. Our study would have been extremely difficult on a desktop computer without the use of GPU programming. We present the routines developed for this purpose and show that a speed improvement of 5x up to 42x is provided versus optimised Python code. The higher speed is achieved when we exploit the parallelism of the GPU in the search of learning parameters. This suggests that efficient GPU programming can significantly reduce the time needed for simulating networks of spiking neurons, particularly when multiple parameter configurations are investigated. PMID:21572529

  1. SIMULATION RESULTS OF RUNNING THE AGS MMPS, BY STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MARNERIS, I.

    2006-09-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to equivalent maximum proton energy of 29 GeV. The AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-go00 Volts. The peak magnet power is 49.5 Mwatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The motor is rated at 9 MW, input voltage 3 phase 13.8 KV 60 Hz. The generator is rated at 50 MVA its output voltage is 3 phase 7500 Volts. Thus the peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The rotor changes speed by about +/-2.5% of its nominal speed of 1200 Revolutions per Minute. The reason the power supply is powered by the Generator is that the local power company (LIPA) can not sustain power swings of +/- 50 MW in 0.5 sec if the power supply were to be interfaced directly with the AC lines. The Motor Generator is about 45 years old and Siemens is not manufacturing similar machines in the future. As a result we are looking at different ways of storing energy and being able to utilize it for our application. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. The simulation program used is called PSIM Version 6.1. The control system of the power supply will also be presented. The average power from LIPA into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  2. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kosinová, Lucie; Cahová, Monika; Fábryová, Eva; Týcová, Irena; Koblas, Tomáš; Leontovyč, Ivan; Saudek, František; Kříž, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3) in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0–120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48–120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information from 48 hrs

  3. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Kosinová, Lucie; Cahová, Monika; Fábryová, Eva; Týcová, Irena; Koblas, Tomáš; Leontovyč, Ivan; Saudek, František; Kříž, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3) in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0-120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48-120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information from 48 hrs onwards.

  4. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Kosinová, Lucie; Cahová, Monika; Fábryová, Eva; Týcová, Irena; Koblas, Tomáš; Leontovyč, Ivan; Saudek, František; Kříž, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3) in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0-120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48-120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information from 48 hrs onwards

  5. From Simulation to Real Robots with Predictable Results: Methods and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakirsky, S.; Carpin, S.; Dimitoglou, G.; Balaguer, B.

    From a theoretical perspective, one may easily argue (as we will in this chapter) that simulation accelerates the algorithm development cycle. However, in practice many in the robotics development community share the sentiment that “Simulation is doomed to succeed” (Brooks, R., Matarić, M., Robot Learning, Kluwer Academic Press, Hingham, MA, 1993, p. 209). This comes in large part from the fact that many simulation systems are brittle; they do a fair-to-good job of simulating the expected, and fail to simulate the unexpected. It is the authors' belief that a simulation system is only as good as its models, and that deficiencies in these models lead to the majority of these failures. This chapter will attempt to address these deficiencies by presenting a systematic methodology with examples for the development of both simulated mobility models and sensor models for use with one of today's leading simulation engines. Techniques for using simulation for algorithm development leading to real-robot implementation will be presented, as well as opportunities for involvement in international robotics competitions based on these techniques.

  6. Multiobjective Decision Making Policies and Coordination Mechanisms in Hierarchical Organizations: Results of an Agent-Based Simulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses how different coordination modes and different multiobjective decision making approaches interfere with each other in hierarchical organizations. The investigation is based on an agent-based simulation. We apply a modified NK-model in which we map multiobjective decision making as adaptive walk on multiple performance landscapes, whereby each landscape represents one objective. We find that the impact of the coordination mode on the performance and the speed of performance improvement is critically affected by the selected multiobjective decision making approach. In certain setups, the performances achieved with the more complex multiobjective decision making approaches turn out to be less sensitive to the coordination mode than the performances achieved with the less complex multiobjective decision making approaches. Furthermore, we present results on the impact of the nature of interactions among decisions on the achieved performance in multiobjective setups. Our results give guidance on how to control the performance contribution of objectives to overall performance and answer the question how effective certain multiobjective decision making approaches perform under certain circumstances (coordination mode and interdependencies among decisions). PMID:25152926

  7. Urban Surface Network In Marseille: Network Optimization Using Numerical Simulations and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, G.; Lemonsu, A.; Durand, P.; Masson, V.

    During the ESCOMPTE program (Field experiment to constrain models of atmo- spheric pollution and emissions transport) in Marseille between june and july 2001 an important device has been set up to describe the urban boundary layer over the built-up aera of Marseille. There was notably a network of 20 temperature and humid- ity sensors which has mesured the spatial and temporal variability of these parameters. Before the experiment the arrangement of the network had been optimized to get the maximum of information about these two varaibilities. We have worked on results of high resolution simulations containing the TEB scheme which represents the energy budgets associated with the gobal street geometry of the mesh. First, a qualitative analysis had enabled the identification of the characteristical phenomenons over the town of Marseille. There are narrows links beetween urban effects and local effects : marine advection and orography. Then, a quantitative analysis of the field has been developped. EOF (empirical orthogonal functions) have been used to characterised the spatial and temporal structures of the field evolution. Instrumented axis have been determined with all these results. Finally, we have choosen very carefully the locations of the instruments at the scale of the street to avoid that micro-climatic effects interfere with the meso-scale effect of the town. The recording of the mesurements, every 10 minutes, had started on the 12th of june and had finished on the 16th of july. We did not get any problem with the instrument and so all the period has been recorded every 10 minutes. The analysis of the datas will be led on different way. First, will be done a temporal study. We want to determine if the times when occur phenomenons are linked to the location in the town. We will interest particulary to the warming during the morning and the cooling during the evening. Then, we will look for correlation between the temperature and mixing ratio with the wind

  8. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  9. Mobility and speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in two acidic soils affected by simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhao-hui; Liao, Bo-han; Huang, Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Through a batch experiment, the mobility and speciation of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Zn) in two acidic forest soils from Hunan Province were studied. The results showed that the release and potential active speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tested contaminated red soil (CRS) and yellow red soil (CYRS) increased significantly with pH decreasing and ion concentrations increasing of simulated acid rain, and these effects were mainly decided by the pH value of simulated acid rain. Cd had the highest potential risk on the environment compared with Cu and Zn. Cd existed mainly in exchangeable form in residual CRS and CYRS, Cu in organically bound and Mn-oxide occluded forms, and Zn in mineral forms due to the high background values.

  10. Mobility and speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in two acidic soils affected by simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhao-hui; Liao, Bo-han; Huang, Chang-yong

    2005-01-01

    Through a batch experiment, the mobility and speciation of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Zn) in two acidic forest soils from Hunan Province were studied. The results showed that the release and potential active speciation of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the tested contaminated red soil (CRS) and yellow red soil (CYRS) increased significantly with pH decreasing and ion concentrations increasing of simulated acid rain, and these effects were mainly decided by the pH value of simulated acid rain. Cd had the highest potential risk on the environment compared with Cu and Zn. Cd existed mainly in exchangeable form in residual CRS and CYRS, Cu in organically bound and Mn-oxide occluded forms, and Zn in mineral forms due to the high background values. PMID:16295916

  11. Simulated changes in potentiometric levels resulting from groundwater development for phosphate mines, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, W.E.; Gerhart, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model of two-dimensional groundwater flow was used to predict changes in the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer resulting from groundwater development for proposed and existing phosphate mines during 1976-2000. The modeled area covers 15,379 km2 in west-central Florida. In 1975, groundwater withdrawn from the Floridan aquifer for irrigation, phosphate mines, other industries and municipal supplies averaged about 28,500 l/s. Withdrawals for phosphate mines are expected to shift from Polk County to adjacent counties to the south and west, and to decline from about 7,620 l/s in 1975 to about 7,060 l/s in 2000. The model was calibrated under steady-state and transient conditions. Input parameters included aquifer transmissivity and storage coefficient; thickness, vertical hydraulic conductivity, and storage coefficient of the upper confining bed; altitudes of the water table and potentiometric surface; and groundwater withdrawals. Simulation of November 1976 to October 2000, using projected combined pumping rates for existing and proposed phosphate mines, resulted in a rise in the potentiometric surface of about 6 m in Polk County, and a decline of about 4 m in parts of Manatee and Hardee counties. ?? 1979.

  12. Simulation results of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) for background reduction in INTEGRAL Spectrometer (SPI) germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slassi-Sennou, S. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Feffer, P. T.; Lin, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) for background reduction will be used in the INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) imaging spectrometer (SPI) to improve the sensitivity from 200 keV to 2 MeV. The observation of significant astrophysical gamma ray lines in this energy range is expected, where the dominant component of the background is the beta(sup -) decay in the Ge detectors due to the activation of Ge nuclei by cosmic rays. The sensitivity of the SPI will be improved by rejecting beta(sup -) decay events while retaining photon events. The PSD technique will distinguish between single and multiple site events. Simulation results of PSD for INTEGRAL-type Ge detectors using a numerical model for pulse shape generation are presented. The model was shown to agree with the experimental results for a narrow inner bore closed end cylindrical detector. Using PSD, a sensitivity improvement factor of the order of 2.4 at 0.8 MeV is expected.

  13. Simulation Results of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory Reconstruction Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminejad, B.; Atkinson, D. H.; Perez-Ayucar, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cassini/Huygens is a joint NASA/ESA mission to explore the Saturnian system. The ESA Huygens probe is scheduled to be released from the Cassini spacecraft on December 25, 2004, enter the atmosphere of Titan in January, 2005, and descend to Titan s surface using a sequence of different parachutes. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for "ground-truthing" Orbiter remote sensing measurements, it is essential that the probe entry and descent trajectory reconstruction be performed as early as possible in the postflight data analysis phase. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG), a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team (HSWT), is responsible for developing a methodology and performing the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction. This paper provides an outline of the trajectory reconstruction methodology, preliminary probe trajectory retrieval test results using a simulated synthetic Huygens dataset developed by the Huygens Project Scientist Team at ESA/ESTEC, and a discussion of strategies for recovery from possible instrument failure.

  14. LSP Simulation and Analytical Results on Electromagnetic Wave Scattering on Coherent Density Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics (HEDP) and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present PIC simulation results on EM scattering on vortex type density structures using the LSP code and compare them with analytical results. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Air Force Research laboratory, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Naval Research Laboratory and NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616 at the University of Nevada at Reno.

  15. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  16. [Implementation results of emission standards of air pollutants for thermal power plants: a numerical simulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan-Shan; Pan, Li-Bo

    2014-03-01

    The emission inventory of air pollutants from the thermal power plants in the year of 2010 was set up. Based on the inventory, the air quality of the prediction scenarios by implementation of both 2003-version emission standard and the new emission standard were simulated using Models-3/CMAQ. The concentrations of NO2, SO2, and PM2.5, and the deposition of nitrogen and sulfur in the year of 2015 and 2020 were predicted to investigate the regional air quality improvement by the new emission standard. The results showed that the new emission standard could effectively improve the air quality in China. Compared with the implementation results of the 2003-version emission standard, by 2015 and 2020, the area with NO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 53.9% and 55.2%, the area with SO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 40.0%, the area with nitrogen deposition higher than 1.0 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 75.4% and 77.9%, and the area with sulfur deposition higher than 1.6 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 37.1% and 34.3%, respectively.

  17. Results from simulated remote-handled transuranic waste experiments at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M A

    1992-01-01

    Multi-year, simulated remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU, nonradioactive) experiments are being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot-Plant (WIPP) facility. These experiments involve the near-reference (thermal and geometrical) testing of eight full size RH TRU test containers emplaced into horizontal, unlined rock salt boreholes. Half of the test emplacements are partially filled with bentonite/silica-sand backfill material. All test containers were electrically heated at about 115 W/each for three years, then raised to about 300 W/each for the remaining time. Each test borehole was instrumented with a selection of remote-reading thermocouples, pressure gages, borehole vertical-closure gages, and vertical and horizontal borehole-diameter closure gages. Each test emplacements was also periodically opened for visual inspections of brine intrusions and any interactions with waste package materials, materials sampling, manual closure measurements, and observations of borehole changes. Effects of heat on borehole closure rates and near-field materials (metals, backfill, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored as a function of time. This paper summarizes results for the first five years of in situ test operation with supporting instrumentation and laboratory data and interpretations. Some details of RH TRU waste package materials, designs, and assorted underground test observations are also discussed. Based on the results, the tested RH TRU waste packages, materials, and emplacement geometry in unlined salt boreholes appear to be quite adequate for initial WIPP repository-phase operations.

  18. Comparisons of EOS MLS cloud ice measurements with ECMWF analyses and GCM simulations : initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J. - L.; Waliser, D. E.; Jiang, J. H.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W.; Waters, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the status of global climate models (GCMs) in simulating upper-tropospheric ice water content (IWC), a new set of IWC measurements from the Earth Observing System's Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are used. Comparisons are made with ECMWF analyses and simulations from several GCMs, including two with multi-scale-modeling framework.

  19. Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis, Phase 2 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to establish the Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis assessment, which involved development of an enhanced simulation architecture using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II simulation tool. The assessment was requested to enhance the capability of the Agency to provide rapid evaluation of EDL characteristics in systems analysis studies, preliminary design, mission development and execution, and time-critical assessments. Many of the new simulation framework capabilities were developed to support the Agency EDL-Systems Analysis (SA) team that is conducting studies of the technologies and architectures that are required to enable human and higher mass robotic missions to Mars. The findings, observations, and recommendations from the NESC are provided in this report.

  20. How Different Methodologies of Harvesting and Analysing the Samples Affect the Test Results in Determining Joint Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Bircan, Rifat; Saracoglu, Gamze V.; Dervisoglu, Sergulen; Gokce, Alper

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study has researched the affect of different methodologies of harvesting and analysing the samples in determining the mediators emerging after the rat articular cartilage injury. Materials and Methods. One hundred and forty-four male wistar rats were divided into 2 groups. Synovial fluid samples were taken from all of the rats. We entered into the right knees of the rats in group I (n = 36) under anaesthesia and took cartilage tissue samples from their distal femur. Samples were taken as reference values for enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and histopathological evaluations. We entered into the right knees of the rats in group II (n = 108) and formed complete layer of cartilage injury in their medial femoral condyles. At the end of the 15th day, the rats were sacrificed after taking synovial fluid samples from their right knees creating defect in the rats in group II. The molecular markers in the synovial fluid and cartilage tissue samples which were taken from the experimental and control groups (MMP-9, MMP-13, TIMP-1, TNF-α, and NO) were analysed by direct or indirect methodologies. SPSS 18.0 Package program was used in the statistical evaluation. Students t-test where the measurement variables between the experimental and control groups were compared was applied. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves were used in the determination of the diagnostic sufficiency from the tissue. Results. No difference was found between TIMP-1 (P = 0.67) and MMP-9 (P = 0.28) levels in synovial fluid and cartilage tissue. From the molecular markers, when MMP-9, MMP-13, NO, TIMP-1, TNF-α′, the area under ROC curve, and P values were examined, MMP-13 (P < 0.0001, 95% CI: 0.70–0.85), NO (P < 0.0001, 95% CI: 0.72–0.86), and TNF-α (P < 0.0001, 95% CI: 0.91–0.98) results were found to be statistically significant. Inferences. The indirect ELISA protocol which we apply for the cartilage tissue as an alternative to synovial lavage fluid is a

  1. Feature Extraction from Simulations and Experiments: Preliminary Results Using a Fluid Mix Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Nguyen, T

    2005-01-04

    Code validation, or comparing the output of computer simulations to experiments, is necessary to determine which simulation is a better approximation to an experiment. It can also be used to determine how the input parameters in a simulation can be modified to yield output that is closer to the experiment. In this report, we discuss our experiences in the use of image processing techniques for extracting features from 2-D simulations and experiments. These features can be used in comparing the output of simulations to experiments, or to other simulations. We first describe the problem domain and the data. We next explain the need for cleaning or denoising the experimental data and discuss the performance of different techniques. Finally, we discuss the features of interest and describe how they can be extracted from the data. The focus in this report is on extracting features from experimental and simulation data for the purpose of code validation; the actual interpretation of these features and their use in code validation is left to the domain experts.

  2. Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  3. Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Initial results and comparison with simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, R.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Datte, P. S.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Michel, P. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Olson, R. E.; Pollaine, S.; Town, R. P. J.; Haan, S.; Callahan, D.; Clark, D.; Edwards, J.; Kline, J. L.; Dixit, S.; Schneider, M. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Widmann, K.; Moody, J. D.; Döppner, T.; Radousky, H. B.; Throop, A.; Kalantar, D.; DiNicola, P.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Hamza, A. V.; Horner, J. B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Dzenitis, E.; Alger, E.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Moreno, K.; Haynam, C.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Shaw, M.; Jancaitis, K.; Parham, T.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J.; Gibson, C. R.; Malsbury, T.; Fair, J.; Trummer, D.; Coffee, K. R.; Burr, B.; Berzins, L. V.; Choate, C.; Brereton, S. J.; Azevedo, S.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Eder, D. C.; Masters, N. D.; Fisher, A. C.; Sterne, P. A.; Young, B. K.; Landen, O. L.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, J.; Lindl, J. D.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moses, E.

    2012-04-01

    Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are underway with the goal of compressing deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain a self-propagating burn wave required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat. Initial experiments to measure the strength and relative timing of these shocks have been conducted on NIF in a specially designed surrogate target platform known as the keyhole target. This target geometry and the associated diagnostics are described in detail. The initial data are presented and compared with numerical simulations. As the primary goal of these experiments is to assess and minimize the adiabat in related DT implosions, a methodology is described for quantifying the adiabat from the shock velocity measurements. Results are contrasted between early experiments that exhibited very poor shock timing and subsequent experiments where a modified target geometry demonstrated significant improvement.

  4. Preliminary Experimental Results of Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Operation Using Hardware Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Traverso, Alberto; Tucker, David; Haynes, Comas L.

    2012-07-01

    A newly developed integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) hybrid system concept has been tested using the Hybrid Performance (Hyper) project hardware-based simulation facility at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. The cathode-loop hardware facility, previously connected to the real-time fuel cell model, was integrated with a real-time model of a gasifier of solid (biomass and fossil) fuel. The fuel cells are operated at the compressor delivery pressure, and they are fueled by an updraft atmospheric gasifier, through the syngas conditioning train for tar removal and syngas compression. The system was brought to steady state; then several perturbations in open loop (variable speed) and closed loop (constant speed) were performed in order to characterize the IGFC behavior. Coupled experiments and computations have shown the feasibility of relatively fast control of the plant as well as a possible mitigation strategy to reduce the thermal stress on the fuel cells as a consequence of load variation and change in gasifier operating conditions. Results also provided an insight into the different features of variable versus constant speed operation of the gas turbine section.

  5. Do tanning salons adhere to new legal regulations? Results of a simulated client trial in Germany.

    PubMed

    Möllers, Tobias; Pischke, Claudia R; Zeeb, Hajo

    2016-03-01

    In August 2009 and January 2012, two regulations were passed in Germany to limit UV exposure in the general population. These regulations state that no minors are allowed to use tanning devices. Personnel of tanning salons is mandated to offer counseling regarding individual skin type, to create a dosage plan with the customer and to provide a list describing harmful effects of UV radiation. Furthermore, a poster of warning criteria has to be visible and readable at all times inside the tanning salon. It is unclear whether these regulations are followed by employees of tanning salons in Germany, and we are not aware of any studies examining the implementation of the regulations at individual salons. We performed a simulated client study visiting 20 tanning salons in the city-state of Bremen in the year 2014, using a short checklist of criteria derived from the legal requirements, to evaluate whether legal requirements were followed or not. We found that only 20 % of the tanning salons communicated adverse health effects of UV radiation in visible posters and other materials and that only 60 % of the salons offered the required determination of the skin type to customers. In addition, only 60 % of the salons offered to complete the required dosage plan with their customers. To conclude, our results suggest that the new regulations are insufficiently implemented in Bremen. Additional control mechanisms appear necessary to ensure that consumers are protected from possible carcinogenic effects of excessive UV radiation.

  6. The relativity experiment of MORE: Global full-cycle simulation and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Giulia

    2015-07-01

    BepiColombo is a joint ESA/JAXA mission to Mercury with challenging objectives regarding geophysics, geodesy and fundamental physics. In particular, the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) intends, as one of its goals, to perform a test of General Relativity. This can be done by measuring and constraining the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters to an accuracy significantly better than current one. In this work we perform a global numerical full-cycle simulation of the BepiColombo Radio Science Experiments (RSE) in a realistic scenario, focussing on the relativity experiment, solving simultaneously for all the parameters of interest for RSE in a global least squares fit within a constrained multiarc strategy. The results on the achievable accuracy for each PPN parameter will be presented and discussed, confirming the significant improvement to the actual knowledge of gravitation theory expected for the MORE relativity experiment. In particular, we will show that, including realistic systematic effects in the range observables, an accuracy of the order of 10-6 can still be achieved in the Eddington parameter β and in the parameter α1, which accounts for preferred frame effects, while the only poorly determined parameter turns out to be ζ, which describes the temporal variations of the gravitational constant and the Sun mass.

  7. Wide Bandpass and Narrow Bandstop Microstrip Filters Based on Hilbert Fractal Geometry: Design and Simulation Results

    PubMed Central

    Mezaal, Yaqeen S.; Eyyuboglu, Halil T.; Ali, Jawad K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents new Wide Bandpass Filter (WBPF) and Narrow Bandstop Filter (NBSF) incorporating two microstrip resonators, each resonator is based on 2nd iteration of Hilbert fractal geometry. The type of filter as pass or reject band has been adjusted by coupling gap parameter (d) between Hilbert resonators using a substrate with a dielectric constant of 10.8 and a thickness of 1.27 mm. Numerical simulation results as well as a parametric study of d parameter on filter type and frequency responses are presented and studied. WBPF has designed at resonant frequencies of 2 and 2.2 GHz with a bandwidth of 0.52 GHz, −28 dB return loss and −0.125 dB insertion loss while NBSF has designed for electrical specifications of 2.37 GHz center frequency, 20 MHz rejection bandwidth, −0.1873 dB return loss and 13.746 dB insertion loss. The proposed technique offers a new alternative to construct low-cost high-performance filter devices, suitable for a wide range of wireless communication systems. PMID:25536436

  8. Preliminary results for a two-dimensional simulation of the working process of a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1998-07-01

    Stirling engines have several potential advantages over existing types of engines, in particular they can use renewable energy sources for power production and their performance meets the demands on the environmental security. In order to design Stirling Engines properly, and to put into effect their potential performance, it is important to more accurately mathematically simulate its working process. At present, a series of very important mathematical models are used for describing the working process of Stirling Engines and these are, in general, classified as models of three levels. All the models consider one-dimensional schemes for the engine and assume a uniform fluid velocity, temperature and pressure profiles at each plane of the internal gas circuit of the engine. The use of two-dimensional CFD models can significantly extend the capabilities for the detailed analysis of the complex heat transfer and gas dynamic processes which occur in the internal gas circuit, as well as in the external circuit of the engine. In this paper a two-dimensional simplified frame (no construction walls) calculation scheme for the Stirling Engine has been assumed and the standard {kappa}-{var{underscore}epsilon} turbulence model has been used for the analysis of the engine working process. The results obtained show that the use of two-dimensional CFD models gives the possibility of gaining a much greater insight into the fluid flow and heat transfer processes which occur in Stirling Engines.

  9. Optimal piezoelectric beam shape for single and broadband vibration energy harvesting: Modeling, simulation and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Nordin, N. H. Diyana

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surroundings has become a new trend in saving our environment. Among the established ones are solar panels, wind turbines and hydroelectric generators which have successfully grown in meeting the world's energy demand. However, for low powered electronic devices; especially when being placed in a remote area, micro scale energy harvesting is preferable. One of the popular methods is via vibration energy scavenging which converts mechanical energy (from vibration) to electrical energy by the effect of coupling between mechanical variables and electric or magnetic fields. As the voltage generated greatly depends on the geometry and size of the piezoelectric material, there is a need to define an optimum shape and configuration of the piezoelectric energy scavenger. In this research, mathematical derivations for unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester are presented. Simulation is done using MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics software to study the effect of varying the length and shape of the beam to the generated voltage. Experimental results comparing triangular and rectangular shaped piezoelectric beam are also presented.

  10. Wide Bandpass and Narrow Bandstop Microstrip Filters based on Hilbert fractal geometry: design and simulation results.

    PubMed

    Mezaal, Yaqeen S; Eyyuboglu, Halil T; Ali, Jawad K

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents new Wide Bandpass Filter (WBPF) and Narrow Bandstop Filter (NBSF) incorporating two microstrip resonators, each resonator is based on 2nd iteration of Hilbert fractal geometry. The type of filter as pass or reject band has been adjusted by coupling gap parameter (d) between Hilbert resonators using a substrate with a dielectric constant of 10.8 and a thickness of 1.27 mm. Numerical simulation results as well as a parametric study of d parameter on filter type and frequency responses are presented and studied. WBPF has designed at resonant frequencies of 2 and 2.2 GHz with a bandwidth of 0.52 GHz, -28 dB return loss and -0.125 dB insertion loss while NBSF has designed for electrical specifications of 2.37 GHz center frequency, 20 MHz rejection bandwidth, -0.1873 dB return loss and 13.746 dB insertion loss. The proposed technique offers a new alternative to construct low-cost high-performance filter devices, suitable for a wide range of wireless communication systems. PMID:25536436

  11. Biofilm formation and control in a simulated spacecraft water system - Three year results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, John R.; Flanagan, David T.; Bruce, Rebekah J.; Mudgett, Paul D.; Carr, Sandra E.; Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Huls, M. H.; Sauer, Richard L.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    Two simulated spacecraft water systems are being used to evaluate the effectiveness of iodine for controlling microbial contamination within such systems. An iodine concentration of about 2.0 mg/L is maintained in one system by passing ultrapure water through an iodinated ion exchange resin. Stainless steel coupons with electropolished and mechanically-polished sides are being used to monitor biofilm formation. Results after three years of operation show a single episode of significant bacterial growth in the iodinated system when the iodine level dropped to 1.9 mg/L. This growth was apparently controlled by replacing the iodinated ion exchange resin, thereby increasing the iodine level. The second batch of resin has remained effective in controlling microbial growth down to an iodine level of 1.0 mg/L. SEM indicates that the iodine has impeded but may have not completely eliminated the formation of biofilm. Metals analyses reveal some corrosion in the iodinated system after 3 years of continuous exposure. Significant microbial contamination has been present continuously in a parallel noniodinated system since the third week of operation.

  12. What We Call What We Do Affects How We Do It: A New Nomenclature for Simulation Research in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haji, Faizal A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Morin, Marie-Paule; Giannoulakis, Konstantine; Koh, Jansen; Rojas, David; Cheung, Jeffrey J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid technological advances and concern for patient safety have increased the focus on simulation as a pedagogical tool for educating health care providers. To date, simulation research scholarship has focused on two areas; evaluating instructional designs of simulation programs, and the integration of simulation into a broader educational…

  13. Soil nitrogen balance under wastewater management: Field measurements and simulation results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Townsend, M.A.; Vocasek, F.; Ma, L.; KC, A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of treated wastewater for irrigation of crops could result in high nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in the vadose zone and ground water. The goal of this 2-yr field-monitoring study in the deep silty clay loam soils south of Dodge City, Kansas, was to assess how and under what circumstances N from the secondary-treated, wastewater-irrigated corn reached the deep (20-45 m) water table of the underlying High Plains aquifer and what could be done to minimize this problem. We collected 15.2-m-deep soil cores for characterization of physical and chemical properties; installed neutron probe access tubes to measure soil-water content and suction lysimeters to sample soil water periodically; sampled monitoring, irrigation, and domestic wells in the area; and obtained climatic, crop, irrigation, and N application rate records for two wastewater-irrigated study sites. These data and additional information were used to run the Root Zone Water Quality Model to identify key parameters and processes that influence N losses in the study area. We demonstrated that NO3-N transport processes result in significant accumulations of N in the vadose zone and that NO3-N in the underlying ground water is increasing with time. Root Zone Water Quality Model simulations for two wastewater-irrigated study sites indicated that reducing levels of corn N fertilization by more than half to 170 kg ha-1 substantially increases N-use efficiency and achieves near-maximum crop yield. Combining such measures with a crop rotation that includes alfalfa should further reduce the accumulation and downward movement of NO3-N in the soil profile. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  14. Velocity structure of a bottom simulating reflector offshore Peru: Results from full waveform inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pecher, I.A.; Minshull, T.A.; Singh, S.C.; Von Huene, R.

    1996-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of the worldwide distribution of submarine gas hydrates comes from seismic observations of Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs). Full waveform inversion has proven to be a reliable technique for studying the fine structure of BSRs using the compressional wave velocity. We applied a non-linear full waveform inversion technique to a BSR at a location offshore Peru. We first determined the large-scale features of seismic velocity variations using a statistical inversion technique to maximise coherent energy along travel-time curves. These velocities were used for a starting velocity model for the full waveform inversion, which yielded a detailed velocity/depth model in the vicinity of the BSR. We found that the data are best fit by a model in which the BSR consists of a thin, low-velocity layer. The compressional wave velocity drops from 2.15 km/s down to an average of 1.70 km/s in an 18m thick interval, with a minimum velocity of 1.62 km/s in a 6 m interval. The resulting compressional wave velocity was used to estimate gas content in the sediments. Our results suggest that the low velocity layer is a 6-18 m thick zone containing a few percent of free gas in the pore space. The presence of the BSR coincides with a region of vertical uplift. Therefore, we suggest that gas at this BSR is formed by a dissociation of hydrates at the base of the hydrate stability zone due to uplift and subsequently a decrease in pressure.

  15. Test Results from a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Component level testing of power conversion units proposed for use in fission surface power systems has typically been done using relatively simple electric heaters for thermal input. These heaters do not adequately represent the geometry or response of proposed reactors. As testing of fission surface power systems transitions from the component level to the system level it becomes necessary to more accurately replicate these reactors using reactor simulators. The Direct Drive Gas-Brayton Power Conversion Unit test activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates a reactor simulator with an existing Brayton test rig. The response of the reactor simulator to a change in Brayton shaft speed is shown as well as the response of the Brayton to an insertion of reactivity, corresponding to a drum reconfiguration. The lessons learned from these tests can be used to improve the design of future reactor simulators which can be used in system level fission surface power tests.

  16. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY SIMULATION USING THE CMAQ MODEL: FORMULATION DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF WET DEPOSITION RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system has recently been adapted to simulate the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury in three distinct forms; elemental mercury gas, reactive gaseous mercury, and particulate mercury. Emis...

  17. Results of two-dimensional time-evolved phase screen computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Kevin J.; Weeks, Arthur R.; Myler, Harley R.; Rabadi, Wissam A.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents a 2D computer simulation of observed intensity and phase behind a time evolved phase screen. Both spatial and temporal statistics of the observed intensity is compared to theoretical predictions. In particular, the intensity statistics as a function of detector position within the propagated laser beam are investigated. The computer simulation program was written using the C-programming language running on a SUN SPARC-5 workstation.

  18. Measuring human rights violations in a conflict-affected country: results from a nationwide cluster survey in Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Measuring human rights violations is particularly challenging during or after armed conflict. A recent nationwide survey in the Central African Republic produced estimates of rates of grave violations against children and adults affected by armed conflict, using an approach known as the "Neighborhood Method". Methods In June and July, 2009, a random household survey was conducted based on population estimates from the 2003 national census. Clusters were assigned systematically proportional to population size. Respondents in randomly selected households were interviewed regarding incidents of killing, intentional injury, recruitment into armed groups, abduction, sexual abuse and rape between January 1, 2008 and the date of interview, occurring in their homes' and those of their three closest neighbors. Results Sixty of the selected 69 clusters were surveyed. In total, 599 women were interviewed about events in 2,370 households representing 13,669 persons. Estimates of annual rates of each violation occurring per 1000 people in each of two strata are provided for children between the ages of five and 17, adults 18 years of age and older and the entire population five years and older, along with a combined and weighted national rate. The national rates for children age five to 17 were estimated to be 0.98/1000/year (95% CI: 0.18 - 1.78) for recruitment, 2.56/1000/year (95% CI: 1.50 - 3.62) for abduction, 1.13/1000/year (95% CI: 0.33 - 1.93) for intentional injury, 10.72/1000 girls/year (95% CI: 7.40 - 14.04) for rape, and 4.80/1000 girls/year (95% CI: 2.61 - 6.00) for sexual abuse. No reports of any violation against a person under the age of five were recorded and there were no reports of rape or sexual abuse of males. No children were reported to have been killed during the recall period. Rape and abduction were the most frequently reported events. Conclusions The population-based figures greatly augment existing information on human rights violations in

  19. NPE 2010 results - Independent performance assessment by simulated CTBT violation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, O.; Bönnemann, C.; Ceranna, L.; Gestermann, N.; Hartmann, G.; Plenefisch, T.

    2012-04-01

    earthquakes by seismological analysis. The remaining event at Black Thunder Mine, Wyoming, on 23 Oct at 21:15 UTC showed clear explosion characteristics. It caused also Infrasound detections at one station in Canada. An infrasonic one station localization algorithm led to event localization results comparable in precision to the teleseismic localization. However, the analysis of regional seismological stations gave the most accurate result giving an error ellipse of about 60 square kilometer. Finally a forward ATM simulation was performed with the candidate event as source in order to reproduce the original detection scenario. The ATM results showed a simulated station fingerprint in the IMS very similar to the fictitious detections given in the NPE 2010 scenario which is an additional confirmation that the event was correctly identified. The shown event analysis of the NPE 2010 serves as successful example for Data Fusion between the technology of radionuclide detection supported by ATM and seismological methodology as well as infrasound signal processing.

  20. Exploring Individual and Item Factors that Affect Assessment Validity for Diverse Learners: Results from a Large-Scale Cognitive Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Phoebe C.; Kopriva, Rebecca J.; Chen, Chen-Su; Emick, Jessica E.

    2006-01-01

    A cognitive lab technique (n=156) was used to investigate interactions between individual factors and item factors presumed to affect assessment validity for diverse students, including English language learners. Findings support the concept of "access"--an interaction between specific construct-irrelevant item features and individual…

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of Liquid Nozzle Spray with Comparison to Shadowgraphy and X-Ray Computed Tomography Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Poppel, Bret; Owkes, Mark; Nelson, Thomas; Lee, Zachary; Sowell, Tyler; Benson, Michael; Vasquez Guzman, Pablo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Eaton, John; Kurman, Matthew; Kweon, Chol-Bum; Bravo, Luis

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we present high-fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results of liquid fuel injection from a pressure-swirl atomizer and compare the simulations to experimental results obtained using both shadowgraphy and phase-averaged X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The CFD and experimental results focus on the dense near-nozzle region to identify the dominant mechanisms of breakup during primary atomization. Simulations are performed using the NGA code of Desjardins et al (JCP 227 (2008)) and employ the volume of fluid (VOF) method proposed by Owkes and Desjardins (JCP 270 (2013)), a second order accurate, un-split, conservative, three-dimensional VOF scheme providing second order density fluxes and capable of robust and accurate high density ratio simulations. Qualitative features and quantitative statistics are assessed and compared for the simulation and experimental results, including the onset of atomization, spray cone angle, and drop size and distribution.

  2. Lipid peroxidation by "free" iron ions and myoglobin as affected by dietary antioxidants in simulated gastric fluids.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Tair; Granit, Rina; Kanner, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Grilled red turkey muscle (Doner Kabab) is a real "fast food" containing approximately 200 microM hydroperoxides, homogenized in simulated gastric fluid and oxidized more rapidly at pH 3.0 than at pH 5.0, after 180 min, producing 1200 and 600 microM hydroperoxides, respectively. The effects of "free" iron ions and metmyoglobin, two potential catalyzers of lipid peroxidation in muscle foods, were evaluated for linoleic acid peroxidation at pH 3.0 of simulated gastric fluid. The prooxidant effects of free iron ions on linoleic acid peroxidation in simulated gastric fluid was evaluated in the presence of ascorbic acid. At low concentrations of ascorbic acid, the effects were prooxidative, which was reversed at high concentrations. In the presence of metmyoglobin, ascorbic acid with or without free iron enhanced the antioxidative effect. Lipid peroxidation by an iron-ascorbic acid system was inhibited totally by 250-500 microM catechin at pH 3.0. The catechin antioxidant effect was determined also in the iron-ascorbic acid system containing metmyoglobin. In this system, catechin totally inhibited lipid peroxidation at a concentration 20-fold lower than without metmyoglobin. The ability of catechin to inhibit lipid peroxidation was also determined at a low pH with beta-carotene as a sensitive target molecule for oxidation. The results show that a significant protection was achieved only with almost 100-fold higher antioxidant concentration. Polyphenols from different groups were determined for the antioxidant activity at pH 3.0. The results show a high antioxidant activity of polyphenols with orthodihydroxylated groups at the B ring, unsaturation, and the presence of a 4-oxo group in the heterocyclic ring, as demonstrated by quercetin. PMID:15853376

  3. Lipid peroxidation by "free" iron ions and myoglobin as affected by dietary antioxidants in simulated gastric fluids.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Tair; Granit, Rina; Kanner, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Grilled red turkey muscle (Doner Kabab) is a real "fast food" containing approximately 200 microM hydroperoxides, homogenized in simulated gastric fluid and oxidized more rapidly at pH 3.0 than at pH 5.0, after 180 min, producing 1200 and 600 microM hydroperoxides, respectively. The effects of "free" iron ions and metmyoglobin, two potential catalyzers of lipid peroxidation in muscle foods, were evaluated for linoleic acid peroxidation at pH 3.0 of simulated gastric fluid. The prooxidant effects of free iron ions on linoleic acid peroxidation in simulated gastric fluid was evaluated in the presence of ascorbic acid. At low concentrations of ascorbic acid, the effects were prooxidative, which was reversed at high concentrations. In the presence of metmyoglobin, ascorbic acid with or without free iron enhanced the antioxidative effect. Lipid peroxidation by an iron-ascorbic acid system was inhibited totally by 250-500 microM catechin at pH 3.0. The catechin antioxidant effect was determined also in the iron-ascorbic acid system containing metmyoglobin. In this system, catechin totally inhibited lipid peroxidation at a concentration 20-fold lower than without metmyoglobin. The ability of catechin to inhibit lipid peroxidation was also determined at a low pH with beta-carotene as a sensitive target molecule for oxidation. The results show that a significant protection was achieved only with almost 100-fold higher antioxidant concentration. Polyphenols from different groups were determined for the antioxidant activity at pH 3.0. The results show a high antioxidant activity of polyphenols with orthodihydroxylated groups at the B ring, unsaturation, and the presence of a 4-oxo group in the heterocyclic ring, as demonstrated by quercetin.

  4. High-resolution Monte Carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 2. Transport results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the second of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, results from the transport aspect of these simulations are reported on. Transport simulations contained herein assume a finite pulse input of conservative tracer, and the numerical technique endeavors to realistically simulate tracer spreading as the cloud moves through a heterogeneous medium. Medium heterogeneity is limited to the hydraulic conductivity field, and generation of this field assumes that the hydraulic- conductivity process is second-order stationary. Methods of estimating cloud moments, and the interpretation of these moments, are discussed. Techniques for estimation of large-time macrodispersivities from cloud second-moment data, and for the approximation of the standard errors associated with these macrodispersivities, are also presented. These moment and macrodispersivity estimation techniques were applied to tracer clouds resulting from transport scenarios generated by specific Monte Carlo simulations. Where feasible, moments and macrodispersivities resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations are compared with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. Some limited results concerning the possible ergodic nature of these simulations, and the presence of non- Gaussian behavior of the mean cloud, are reported on as well.

  5. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results and comparison with theory scaling laws for photoelectron-generated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M. |

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface was explored using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code computer simulations. Using the MAGIC PIC code, the simulations were performed in one dimension to handle the diverse scale lengths of the particles and fields in the problem. The simulations involved monoenergetic, nonrelativistic photoelectrons emitted normal to the illuminated conducting surface. A sinusoidal, 100% modulated, 6.3263 ns pulse train, as well as unmodulated emission, were used to explore the behavior of the particles, fields, and generated radiation. A special postprocessor was written to convert the PIC code simulated electron sheath into far-field radiation parameters by means of rigorous retarded time calculations. The results of the small-spot PIC simulations were used to generate various graphs showing resonance and nonresonance radiation quantities such as radiated lobe patterns, frequency, and power. A database of PIC simulation results was created and, using a nonlinear curve-fitting program, compared with theoretical scaling laws. Overall, the small-spot behavior predicted by the theoretical scaling laws was generally observed in the PIC simulation data, providing confidence in both the theoretical scaling laws and the PIC simulations.

  6. Results Of Copper Catalyzed Peroxide Oxidation (CCPO) Of Tank 48H Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Pareizs, J. M.; Newell, J. D.; Fondeur, F. F.; Nash, C. A.; White, T. L.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed a series of laboratory-scale experiments that examined copper-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) aided destruction of organic components, most notably tetraphenylborate (TPB), in Tank 48H simulant slurries. The experiments were designed with an expectation of conducting the process within existing vessels of Building 241-96H with minimal modifications to the existing equipment. Results of the experiments indicate that TPB destruction levels exceeding 99.9% are achievable, dependent on the reaction conditions. A lower reaction pH provides faster reaction rates (pH 7 > pH 9 > pH 11); however, pH 9 reactions provide the least quantity of organic residual compounds within the limits of species analyzed. Higher temperatures lead to faster reaction rates and smaller quantities of organic residual compounds. A processing temperature of 50°C as part of an overall set of conditions appears to provide a viable TPB destruction time on the order of 4 days. Higher concentrations of the copper catalyst provide faster reaction rates, but the highest copper concentration (500 mg/L) also resulted in the second highest quantity of organic residual compounds. The data in this report suggests 100-250 mg/L as a minimum. Faster rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition lead to faster reaction rates and lower quantities of organic residual compounds. An addition rate of 0.4 mL/hour, scaled to the full vessel, is suggested for the process. SRNL recommends that for pH adjustment, an acid addition rate 42 mL/hour, scaled to the full vessel, is used. This is the same addition rate used in the testing. Even though the TPB and phenylborates can be destroyed in a relative short time period, the residual organics will take longer to degrade to <10 mg/L. Low level leaching on titanium occurred, however, the typical concentrations of released titanium are very low (~40 mg/L or less). A small amount of leaching under these conditions is not

  7. Results from simulated contact-handled transuranic waste experiments at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R.; Krumhansl, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    We conducted in situ experiments with nonradioactive, contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste drums at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility for about four years. We performed these tests in two rooms in rock salt, at WIPP, with drums surrounded by crushed salt or 70 wt % salt/30 wt % bentonite clay backfills, or partially submerged in a NaCl brine pool. Air and brine temperatures were maintained at {approximately}40C. These full-scale (210-L drum) experiments provided in situ data on: backfill material moisture-sorption and physical properties in the presence of brine; waste container corrosion adequacy; and, migration of chemical tracers (nonradioactive actinide and fission product simulants) in the near-field vicinity, all as a function of time. Individual drums, backfill, and brine samples were removed periodically for laboratory evaluations. Waste container testing in the presence of brine and brine-moistened backfill materials served as a severe overtest of long-term conditions that could be anticipated in an actual salt waste repository. We also obtained relevant operational-test emplacement and retrieval experience. All test results are intended to support both the acceptance of actual TRU wastes at the WIPP and performance assessment data needs. We provide an overview and technical data summary focusing on the WIPP CH TRU envirorunental overtests involving 174 waste drums in the presence of backfill materials and the brine pool, with posttest laboratory materials analyses of backfill sorbed-moisture content, CH TRU drum corrosion, tracer migration, and associated test observations.

  8. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, V. De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliò, F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  9. CORRECTING FOR INTERSTELLAR SCATTERING DELAY IN HIGH-PRECISION PULSAR TIMING: SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; McLaughlin, Maura; Stinebring, Daniel; Demorest, Paul; Jones, Glenn E-mail: maura.mclaughlin@mail.wvu.edu E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu

    2015-12-20

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves (GWs) may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a GW. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potentially powerful tool to assist in this multi-frequency decomposition. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover impulse response functions (IRFs), such as those that would be introduced by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We demonstrate that timing precision is improved when scatter-corrected TOAs are used, under the assumptions of a high S/N and highly scattered signal. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse “jitter” is not a serious problem for IRF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  10. Correcting for Interstellar Scattering Delay in High-precision Pulsar Timing: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; Stinebring, Daniel; McLaughlin, Maura; Demorest, Paul; Jones, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves (GWs) may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a GW. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potentially powerful tool to assist in this multi-frequency decomposition. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover impulse response functions (IRFs), such as those that would be introduced by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We demonstrate that timing precision is improved when scatter-corrected TOAs are used, under the assumptions of a high S/N and highly scattered signal. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse “jitter” is not a serious problem for IRF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  11. Testing and Results of Human Metabolic Simulation Utilizing Ultrasonic Nebulizer Technology for Water Vapor Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbe, Matthew; Curley, Su

    2010-01-01

    Life support technology must be evaluated thoroughly before ever being implemented into a functioning design. A major concern during that evaluation is safety. The ability to mimic human metabolic loads allows test engineers to evaluate the effectiveness of new technologies without risking injury to any actual humans. The main function of most life support technologies is the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor. As such any good human metabolic simulator (HMS) will mimic the human body s ability to produce these items. Introducing CO2 into a test chamber is a very straightforward process with few unknowns so the focus of this particular new HMS design was on the much more complicated process of introducing known quantities of H2O vapor on command. Past iterations of the HMS have utilized steam which is very hard to keep in vapor phase while transporting and injecting into a test chamber. Also steam adds large quantities of heat to any test chamber, well beyond what an actual human does. For the new HMS an alternative approach to water vapor generation was designed utilizing ultrasonic nebulizers as a method for creating water vapor. Ultrasonic technology allows water to be vibrated into extremely tiny pieces (2-5 microns) and evaporate without requiring additional heating. Doing this process inside the test chamber itself allows H2O vapor generation without the unwanted heat and the challenging process of transporting water vapor. This paper presents the design details as well as results of all initial and final acceptance system testing. Testing of the system was performed at a range of known human metabolic rates in both sea-level and reduced pressure environments. This multitude of test points fully defines the systems capabilities as they relate to actual environmental systems testing.

  12. Isotonic contraction as a result of cooperation of sarcomeres--a model and simulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Wünsch, Z

    1996-01-01

    The molecular level of the functional structure of the contractile apparatus of cross-striated muscle has been mapped out almost minutely. Most authors accept the basic principles of the theory of sliding filaments and the theory of operation of molecular generators of force which, of course, are progressively updated by integrating new knowledge. The idea of the model delineated below does not contradict these theories, for it refers to another level of the system's hierarchy. The definition of the system, hereafter referred to Ideal Sarcomere (IS), takes into account the fact that, during isotonic contraction, a large number of not wholly independently working sarcomeres and molecular generators of force is active in a synergistic way. The shortening velocity of isotonically contracting IS is determined by the relation between quantities conveying different tasks of active generators of force and the influence of the system parameters. Although IS is derived from simple axiomatic predicates, it has properties which were not premediated in defining the system and which, in spite of this, correspond to some properties of the biological original. The equations of the system allow us to calculate the shortening velocity of 'isotonic contraction' and other variables and parameters and show, inter alia, an alternative way to derive and interpret the relations stated in Hill's force-velocity equation. The simulation results indicate that the macroscopic manifestations of isotonic contraction may be also contingent on the properties of the cooperating system of the multitude of sarcomeres, which also constitutes one part of the functional structure of muscle. PMID:8924648

  13. Design, Results, Evolution and Status of the ATLAS Simulation at Point1 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrero, S.; Batraneanu, S. M.; Brasolin, F.; Contescu, C.; Fazio, D.; Di Girolamo, A.; Lee, C. J.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Sedov, A.; Twomey, M. S.; Wang, F.; Zaytsev, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the LHC Long Shutdown 1 (LSI) period, that started in 2013, the Simulation at Point1 (Sim@P1) project takes advantage, in an opportunistic way, of the TDAQ (Trigger and Data Acquisition) HLT (High-Level Trigger) farm of the ATLAS experiment. This farm provides more than 1300 compute nodes, which are particularly suited for running event generation and Monte Carlo production jobs that are mostly CPU and not I/O bound. It is capable of running up to 2700 Virtual Machines (VMs) each with 8 CPU cores, for a total of up to 22000 parallel jobs. This contribution gives a review of the design, the results, and the evolution of the Sim@P1 project, operating a large scale OpenStack based virtualized platform deployed on top of the ATLAS TDAQ HLT farm computing resources. During LS1, Sim@P1 was one of the most productive ATLAS sites: it delivered more than 33 million CPU-hours and it generated more than 1.1 billion Monte Carlo events. The design aspects are presented: the virtualization platform exploited by Sim@P1 avoids interferences with TDAQ operations and it guarantees the security and the usability of the ATLAS private network. The cloud mechanism allows the separation of the needed support on both infrastructural (hardware, virtualization layer) and logical (Grid site support) levels. This paper focuses on the operational aspects of such a large system during the upcoming LHC Run 2 period: simple, reliable, and efficient tools are needed to quickly switch from Sim@P1 to TDAQ mode and back, to exploit the resources when they are not used for the data acquisition, even for short periods. The evolution of the central OpenStack infrastructure is described, as it was upgraded from Folsom to the Icehouse release, including the scalability issues addressed.

  14. Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

    2005-12-01

    This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and sensible

  15. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of the Caltech plasma jet experiment: first results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai E-mail: pbellan@caltech.edu E-mail: sli@lanl.gov

    2014-08-10

    Magnetic fields are believed to play an essential role in astrophysical jets with observations suggesting the presence of helical magnetic fields. Here, we present three-dimensional (3D) ideal MHD simulations of the Caltech plasma jet experiment using a magnetic tower scenario as the baseline model. Magnetic fields consist of an initially localized dipole-like poloidal component and a toroidal component that is continuously being injected into the domain. This flux injection mimics the poloidal currents driven by the anode-cathode voltage drop in the experiment. The injected toroidal field stretches the poloidal fields to large distances, while forming a collimated jet along with several other key features. Detailed comparisons between 3D MHD simulations and experimental measurements provide a comprehensive description of the interplay among magnetic force, pressure, and flow effects. In particular, we delineate both the jet structure and the transition process that converts the injected magnetic energy to other forms. With suitably chosen parameters that are derived from experiments, the jet in the simulation agrees quantitatively with the experimental jet in terms of magnetic/kinetic/inertial energy, total poloidal current, voltage, jet radius, and jet propagation velocity. Specifically, the jet velocity in the simulation is proportional to the poloidal current divided by the square root of the jet density, in agreement with both the experiment and analytical theory. This work provides a new and quantitative method for relating experiments, numerical simulations, and astrophysical observation, and demonstrates the possibility of using terrestrial laboratory experiments to study astrophysical jets.

  16. Some Results of Weak Anticipative Concept Applied in Simulation Based Decision Support in Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kljajić, Miroljub; Kofjač, Davorin; Kljajić Borštnar, Mirjana; Škraba, Andrej

    2010-11-01

    The simulation models are used as for decision support and learning in enterprises and in schools. Tree cases of successful applications demonstrate usefulness of weak anticipative information. Job shop scheduling production with makespan criterion presents a real case customized flexible furniture production optimization. The genetic algorithm for job shop scheduling optimization is presented. Simulation based inventory control for products with stochastic lead time and demand describes inventory optimization for products with stochastic lead time and demand. Dynamic programming and fuzzy control algorithms reduce the total cost without producing stock-outs in most cases. Values of decision making information based on simulation were discussed too. All two cases will be discussed from optimization, modeling and learning point of view.

  17. Improving traffic noise simulations using space syntax: preliminary results from two roadway systems.

    PubMed

    M Dzhambov, Angel; D Dimitrova, Donka; H Turnovska, Tanya

    2014-09-01

    Noise pollution is one of the four major pollutions in the world. In order to implement adequate strategies for noise control, assessment of traffic-generated noise is essential in city planning and management. The aim of this study was to determine whether space syntax could improve the predictive power of noise simulation. This paper reports a record linkage study which combined a documentary method with space syntax analysis. It analyses data about traffic flow as well as field-measured and computer-simulated traffic noise in two Bulgarian agglomerations. Our findings suggest that space syntax might have a potential in predicting traffic noise exposure by improving models for noise simulations using specialised software or actual traffic counts. The scientific attention might need to be directed towards space syntax in order to study its further application in current models and algorithms for noise prediction. PMID:25222575

  18. Comparison of preliminary results from Airborne Aster Simulator (AAS) with TIMS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannari, Yoshiaki; Mills, Franklin; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ezaka, Teruya; Narita, Tatsuhiko; Chang, Sheng-Huei

    1992-01-01

    The Japanese Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER), being developed for a NASA EOS-A satellite, will have 3 VNIR, 6 SWIR, and 5 TIR (8-12 micron) bands. An Airborne ASTER Simulator (AAS) was developed for Japan Resources Observation System Organization (JAROS) by the Geophysical Environmental Research Group (GER) Corp. to research surface temperature and emission features in the MWIR/TIR, to simulate ASTER's TIR bands, and to study further possibility of MWIR/TIR bands. ASTER Simulator has 1 VNIR, 3 MWIR (3-5 microns), and 20 (currently 24) TIR bands. Data was collected over 3 sites - Cuprite, Nevada; Long Valley/Mono Lake, California; and Death Valley, California - with simultaneous ground truth measurements. Preliminary data collected by AAS for Cuprite, Nevada is presented and AAS data is compared with Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data.

  19. Factors affecting the process of CO2 replacement of CH4 from methane hydrate in sediments - Constrained from experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Hu, G.; Vanderveen, J.; Liu, C.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 replacement of CH4 from methane hydrate has been proposed as a method to produce gas from natural gas hydrate by taking advantage of both the production of natural gas and the sequestration of CO2. To examine the validity of this method DOE/Conoco-Philips is considering having a field test in Alaska. The reaction of CO2 replacing CH4 from methane hydrate has been confirmed to be thermodynamically feasible, but concern is always raised about the reaction kinetics. Some kinetic studies in the system of methane hydrate and liquid or gaseous CO2 have found that the reaction proceeds at a very low rate. Natural gas hydrate occurs in sediments with multi-components and complex structure, so matters will be even more complicated. Up to now, few investigations have been carried out concerning the factors affecting the reaction process of CO2 replacing CH4 from methane hydrate. Experiments were implemented with sands, which were recovered from Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territory, Canada, sediment that previously contained hydrate although it had been dried completely before our experiments. The water-saturated sands were tightly charged into a plastic bottle (90 mm deep and 60 mm wide), and then this test specimen was sealed in a pressure cell. After methane hydrate was synthesized in the test specimen for 108 days under a pressure of 11 to 8 MPa and a temperature of 3 degrees Celsius, liquid CO2 was introduced into the pressure cell. The conditions under which CO2 was reacted with methane hydrate were ~5.3 MPa and 5 degrees Celsius. After reacting for 15 days, the test specimen was recovered. The test specimen was cut into ~10 mm thick discs, and sub-samples were further taken from each of the discs. In addition to the determination of hydrate saturation and the gas composition, Raman spectroscopic studies were carried out for the sub-samples obtained. The results revealed: 1) less CO2 replacement in the bottom disc of the test specimen as compared

  20. Summary of results of January climate simulations with the GISS coarse-mesh model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Cohen, C.; Wu, P.

    1981-01-01

    The large scale climates generated by extended runs of the model are relatively independent of the initial atmospheric conditions, if the first few months of each simulation are discarded. The perpetual January simulations with a specified SST field produced excessive snow accumulation over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. Mass exchanges between the cold (warm) continents and the warm (cold) adjacent oceans produced significant surface pressure changes over the oceans as well as over the land. The effect of terrain and terrain elevation on the amount of precipitation was examined. The evaporation of continental moisture was calculated to cause large increases in precipitation over the continents.

  1. Test Results From a Simulated High-Voltage Lunar Power Transmission Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

    2008-01-01

    The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio was modified to simulate high-voltage transmission capability. The testbed simulated a 1 km transmission cable length from the ATU to the LPSF using resistors and inductors installed between the distribution transformers. Power factor correction circuitry was used to compensate for the reactance of the distribution system to improve the overall power factor. This test demonstrated that a permanent magnet alternator can successfully provide high-frequency ac power to a lunar facility located at a distance.

  2. Test Results from a Simulated High Voltage Lunar Power Transmission Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur; Hervol, David

    2008-01-01

    The Alternator Test Unit (ATU) in the Lunar Power System Facility (LPSF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH was modified to simulate high voltage transmission capability. The testbed simulated a 1 km transmission cable length from the ATU to the LPSF using resistors and inductors installed between the distribution transformers. Power factor correction circuitry was used to compensate for the reactance of the distribution system to improve the overall power factor. This test demonstrated that a permanent magnet alternator can successfully provide high frequency AC power to a lunar facility located at a distance.

  3. Simulation of the geomagnetic field experienced by the International Space Station in its revolution around the Earth: effects on psychophysiological responses to affective picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Del Seppia, Cristina; Mezzasalma, Lorena; Messerotti, Mauro; Cordelli, Alessandro; Ghione, Sergio

    2006-06-12

    There is evidence suggesting that exposure to an abnormal magnetic environment may produce psychophysiological effects related to abnormalities in responses to stress. This may be of relevance for space medicine where astronauts are exposed to a magnetic field different from that exerted by the Earth. Aim of this study was to assess how the exposure of the head to a magnetic field simulating the one encountered by the International Space Station (ISS) during a single orbit (90 min) around the Earth affects the cardiovascular and psychophysiological parameters. Twenty-four human volunteers were studied double blindly in random order under sham and magnetic exposure. During exposure, the persons were shown a set of pictures of different emotional content while subjective self-rating, skin conductance (SC), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured. In addition, BP, HR, and tooth pain threshold were assessed before and after exposure. While subjects were under magnetic exposure, skin conductance was strongly differentiated (F(2,36)=22.927; p=0.0001), being high during emotionally involving (positive and negative) pictures and low during neutral pictures. Conversely, when subjects were under sham exposure, no significant differences were observed. There was, however, a trend for higher heart rate during picture viewing under magnetic exposure as compared to sham exposure. No effects were found for the other variables. These results suggest that an abnormal magnetic field that simulates the one encountered by ISS orbiting around the Earth may enhance autonomic response to emotional stimuli.

  4. Simulation of the geomagnetic field experienced by the International Space Station in its revolution around the Earth: Effects on psychophysiological responses to affective picture viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Seppia, C.; Mezzasalma, L.; Messerotti, M.; Cordelli, A.; Ghione, S.

    2006-02-01

    There is evidence suggesting that exposure to an abnormal magnetic environment may produce psychophysiological effects related to abnormalities in responses to stress. This may be of relevance for space medicine where astronauts are exposed to a magnetic field different from that exerted by the Earth. Aim of this study was to assess how the exposure of the head to a magnetic field simulating the one encountered by the International Space Station (ISS) during a single orbit (90 min) around the Earth affects the cardiovascular and psychophysiological parameters. Twenty-four human volunteers were studied double blindly in random order under sham and magnetic exposure. During exposure, the persons were shown a set of pictures of different emotional content while subjective self-rating, skin conductance (SC), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured. In addition, BP, HR, and tooth pain threshold were assessed before and after exposure. While subjects were under magnetic exposure, skin conductance was strongly differentiated (F|2,36 = 22.927; p = 0.0001), being high during emotionally involving (positive and negative) pictures and low during neutral pictures. Conversely, when subjects were under sham exposure, no significant differences were observed. There was, however, a trend for higher heart rate during picture viewing under magnetic exposure as compared to sham exposure. No effects were found for the other variables. These results suggest that an abnormal magnetic field that simulates the one encountered by ISS orbiting around the Earth may enhance autonomic response to emotional stimuli.

  5. Simulation of Anxiety Situations and Its Resultant Effect on Anxiety and Classroom Interaction of Student Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Kent L.

    The purpose of this research experiment was to investigate the effectiveness of one type of simulation (consisting of a series of anxiety-inducing motion picture vignettes, split-screen video tape recording, and a trained recall worker) in reducing anxiety and thereby increasing the subsequent classroom interaction of student teachers. A secondary…

  6. Simulation and Gaming to Promote Health Education: Results of a Usability Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albu, Mihai; Atack, Lynda; Srivastava, Ishaan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Motivating clients to change the health behaviour, and maintaining an interest in exercise programmes, is an ongoing challenge for health educators. With new developments in technology, simulation and gaming are increasingly being considered as ways to motivate users, support learning and promote positive health behaviours. The purpose…

  7. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 2: Analysis and simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An approach to remote sensing that meets future mission requirements was investigated. The deterministic acquisition of data and the rapid correction of data for radiometric effects and image distortions are the most critical limitations of remote sensing. The following topics are discussed: onboard image correction systems, GCP navigation system simulation, GCP analysis, and image correction analysis measurement.

  8. Orbiter/shuttle carrier aircraft separation: Wind tunnel, simulation, and flight test overview and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, D. J.; Denison, D. E.; Elchert, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the approach and landing test phase of the space shuttle program is given from the orbiter/shuttle carrier aircraft separation point of view. The data and analyses used during the wind tunnel testing, simulation, and flight test phases in preparation for the orbiter approach and landing tests are reported.

  9. Simulation results of liquid and plastic scintillator detectors for reactor antineutrino detection - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V. K. S.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation study of two kinds of scintillation detectors has been done using GEANT4. We compare plastic scintillator and liquid scintillator based designs for detecting electron antineutrinos emitted from the core of reactors. The motivation for this study is to set up an experiment at the research reactor facility at BARC for very short baseline neutrino oscillation study and remote reactor monitoring.

  10. Jovian Plasma Torus Interaction with Europa: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation. First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa-moon-magnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements, (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy etal.,2007;Shematovichetal.,2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyro radius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions).Non-thermal distributions of upstream plasma will be addressed in future work. Photoionization,electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider two models for background plasma:(a) with O(++) ions; (b) with O(++) and S(++) ions. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended cold population (Cassidyetal.,2007). A few first simulations already include an induced magnetic dipole; however, several important effects of induced magnetic fields arising from oceanic shell conductivity will be addressed in later work.

  11. Children's nutrient intake variability is affected by age and body weight status according to results from a Brazilian multicenter study.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Michelle A; Verly, Eliseu; Fisberg, Mauro; Fisberg, Regina M

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in nutritional studies focusing on children is estimating "true" intake because the type and amount of foods eaten change throughout growth and development, thereby affecting the variability of intake. The present study investigated the hypothesis that age and body weight status affect the ratio of the within- and between-subject variation of intakes (VR) as well as the number of days of dietary assessment (D) of energy and nutrients. A total of 2,981 Brazilian preschoolers aged 1-6 years were evaluated in a cross-sectional study. Weighed food records and estimated food records were used to assess dietary intake inside and outside of school. Within- and between-subject variations of intakes were estimated by multilevel regression models. VR and D were calculated according to age group and body weight status. VR ranged from 1.17 (calcium) to 8.70 (fat) in the 1- to 2-year-old group, and from 1.47 (calcium) to 8.95 (fat) in the 3- to 6-year-old group. Fat, fiber, riboflavin, folate, calcium, phosphorus, and iron exhibited greater VR and D in the 3- to 6-year-old group. For energy, carbohydrates, and protein, both within- and between-subject variation increased with increasing age. In both body weight groups, calcium showed the lowest VR. Fat showed the highest VR in nonoverweight/obese children (9.47), and fiber showed the highest VR in overweight/obese children (8.74). For most nutrients, D = 7 was sufficient to correctly rank preschoolers into tertiles of intake. In conclusion, age and body weight status affected the within- and between-subject variation and the VR of energy and nutrient intakes among Brazilian preschool children.

  12. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes – Results from Simulated Training Camps

    PubMed Central

    Hecksteden, Anne; Skorski, Sabrina; Schwindling, Sascha; Hammes, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover) have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength) at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1), after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8) and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11). Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue) which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery). With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l), urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl), free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml) and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml). For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l) only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling and by CK

  13. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes - Results from Simulated Training Camps.

    PubMed

    Hecksteden, Anne; Skorski, Sabrina; Schwindling, Sascha; Hammes, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover) have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength) at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1), after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8) and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11). Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue) which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery). With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l), urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl), free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml) and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml). For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l) only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling and by CK

  14. Degradation and aquatic toxicity of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using simulated wetlands.

    PubMed

    Toor, Navdeep S; Franz, Eric D; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Michael D; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) produced during the extraction of bitumen at the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, are toxic to many aquatic organisms. Much of this toxicity is related to a group of dissolved organic acids known as naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are a natural component of bitumen and are released into process water during the separation of bitumen from the oil sand ore by a caustic hot water extraction process. Using laboratory microcosms as an analogue of a proposed constructed wetland reclamation strategy for OSPW, we evaluated the effectiveness of these microcosms in degrading NAs and reducing the aquatic toxicity of OSPW over a 52-week test period. Experimental manipulations included two sources of OSPW (one from Syncrude Canada Ltd. and one from Suncor Energy Inc.), two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs; 40 and 400 d), and increased nutrient availability (added nitrate and phosphate). Microcosms with a longer HRT (for both OSPWs) showed higher reductions in total NAs concentrations (64-74% NAs reduction, p<0.05) over the test period, while nutrient enrichment appeared to have little effect. A 96 h static acute rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioassay showed that the initial acute toxicity of Syncrude OSPW (LC50=67% v/v) was reduced (LC50>100% v/v) independent of HRT. However, EC20s from separate Microtox® bioassays were relatively unchanged when comparing the input and microcosm waters at both HRTs over the 52-week study period (p>0.05), indicating that some sub-lethal toxicity persisted under these experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that given sufficiently long HRTs, simulated wetland microcosms containing OSPW significantly reduced total NAs concentrations and acute toxicity, but left behind a persistent component of the NAs mixture that appeared to be associated with residual chronic toxicity.

  15. A SYNCHROTRON DIFFRACTION STUDY OF TRANSFORMATION BEHAVIOUR IN 9 CR STEELS USING SIMULATED WELD HEAT-AFFECTED ZONE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Specht, Eliot D; Shingledecker, John P; Abe, Fujio

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron diffraction experiments were conducted to examine the real-time transformation behaviours of an ex-perimental 9Cr-3W-3Co-NbV steel with high B and low N (N130B), and the commercial P92 steel under simulated weld heat-affected zone thermal cycles. When heated to peak temperatures near 1100 C, both steels rapidly trans-formed from ferrite to 100% austenite. During cooling, both transformed to martensite near 400 C. Both steels also retained untransformed austenite: 1.7% in N130B, and 5.8% in P92. The N130B was also heated to about 60 C above its A3 of 847 C. About 56% of the original ferrite never transformed to austenite. During cooling an additional 21% of ferrite and 23% of martensite formed. It retained no austenite. The P92 was heated to just above its A3 of 889 C. About 15% of the original ferrite never transformed to austenite. During cooling an additional 22% of ferrite and 60% of martensite formed. This steel retained about 2.3% austenite. Metallographic examina-tions indicated that the M23C6 in N130B was much more stable than that in P92 for heating to the lower peak tem-peratures. Analysis using equilibrium thermodynamics suggested that the more stable M23C6 in N130B could raise its apparent A3 by sequestering C. This could cause the ferrite-austenite transformation to appear sluggish. Ther-modynamic analysis also indicated that the M23C6 in N130B contained about 3.9 at% B compared to about 0.08 at% B in that of P92. In contrast, the refractory metal element content of the M23C6 was predicted to be higher in P92.

  16. A STOL airworthiness investigation using a simulation of an augmentor wing transport. Volume 1: Summary of results and airworthiness implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleford, R. L.; Heffley, R. K.; Hynes, C. S.; Scott, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    A simulator study of STOL airworthiness criteria was conducted using a model of an augmentor wing transport. The approach, flare and landing, go-around, and takeoff phases of flight were investigated. The results are summarized and possible implications with regard to airworthiness criteria are discussed. The results provide a data base for future STOL airworthiness requirements and a preliminary indication of potential problem areas. The results are also compared to the results from an earlier simulation of the Breguet 941S. Where possible, airworthiness criteria are proposed for consideration.

  17. Recent results and future challenges for large scale Particle-In-Cell simulations of plasma-based accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; An, W.; Decyk, V.K.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.S.; Tzoufras, M.; Morshed, S.; Antomsen, T.; Feng, B.; Katsouleas, T; Fonseca, R.A.; Martins, S.F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L.O.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E; Vay, J.-L.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cowan, B.; Cary, J.R.; Paul, K.

    2009-05-01

    The concept and designs of plasma-based advanced accelerators for high energy physics and photon science are modeled in the SciDAC COMPASS project with a suite of Particle-In-Cell codes and simulation techniques including the full electromagnetic model, the envelope model, the boosted frame approach and the quasi-static model. In this paper, we report the progress of the development of these models and techniques and present recent results achieved with large-scale parallel PIC simulations. The simulation needs for modeling the plasma-based advanced accelerator at the energy frontier is discussed and a path towards this goal is outlined.

  18. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases.

  19. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases. PMID:23754472

  20. Additional road markings as an indication of speed limits: results of a field experiment and a driving simulator study.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stijn; Vanrie, Jan; Dreesen, An; Brijs, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Although speed limits are indicated by road signs, road users are not always aware, while driving, of the actual speed limit on a given road segment. The Roads and Traffic Agency developed additional road markings in order to support driver decisions on speed on 70 km/h roads in Flanders-Belgium. In this paper the results are presented of two evaluation studies, both a field study and a simulator study, on the effects of the additional road markings on speed behaviour. The results of the field study showed no substantial effect of the markings on speed behaviour. Neither did the simulator study, with slightly different stimuli. Nevertheless an effect on lateral position was noticed in the simulator study, showing at least some effect of the markings. The role of conspicuity of design elements and expectations towards traffic environments is discussed. Both studies illustrate well some strengths and weaknesses of observational field studies compared to experimental simulator studies.

  1. Performance simulation of a combustion engine charged by a variable geometry turbocharger. I - Prerequirements, boundary conditions and model development. II - Simulation algorithm, computed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malobabic, M.; Buttschardt, W.; Rautenberg, M.

    The paper presents a theoretical derivation of the relationship between a variable geometry turbocharger and the combustion engine, using simplified boundary conditions and model restraints and taking into account the combustion process itself as well as the nonadiabatic operating conditions for the turbine and the compressor. The simulation algorithm is described, and the results computed using this algorithm are compared with measurements performed on a test engine in combination with a controllable turbocharger with adjustable turbine inlet guide vanes. In addition, the results of theoretical parameter studies are presented, which include the simulation of a given turbocharger with variable geometry in combination with different sized combustion engines and the simulation of different sized variable-geometry turbochargers in combination with a given combustion engine.

  2. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  3. RUSICA initial implementations: Simulation results of sandy shore evolution in Porto Cesareo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Di Gregorio, Salvatore; Gullace, Francesco; Gullı, Daniel; Lupiano, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    Beach recession is spreading in Mediterranean by effects of climatic change. RUSICA is a Cellular Automata model, that is in developing phase for simulating such a complex phenomenon, considering its main mechanisms: loose particles (sand, gravel, silt, clay, etc.) mobilization, suspension, deposit and transport, triggered by waves and currents. A simplified version of the model was implemented and applied to data, related to the sandy shore of Torre Lapillo (Porto Cesareo, Italy), in August 2010, where shore evolution was monitored, even if data quality and quantity aren't ideal in order to feed RUSICA. Simulations of different scenarios of stormy sea in that area evidenced the adequate performance of the model in capturing the main emergent features of the phenomenon in despite of the simplified approach.

  4. Open Cherry Picker simulation results. [manned platform for satellite servicing from Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform, mounted at the end of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), which is used to enhance extravehicular activities. The objective of the simulation program described was to reduce the existing complexity of those OCP design features that are mandatory for initial Space Shuttle applications. The OCP development test article consists of a torque box, a rotating foot restraint, a rotating stanchion that houses handholds, and a tool storage section with an interface with payload modules. If the size or complexity of the payload increases, payload handling devices may be added at a later data. The simulations have shown that the crew can control the RMS from the Aft Flight Deck of the Shuttle, using voice commands from the EVA crewman. No need for a stabilizer was evident, and RMS dynamics due to crew-induced workloads were found to be minor.

  5. RHF RELAP5 model and preliminary loss-of-offsite-power simulation results for LEU conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, J. R.; Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Thomas, F.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  6. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Equatorial Spread F: Results and Observations in the Pacific Sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveiro, H. C.; Hysell, D. L.; Caton, R. G.; Groves, K. M.; Klenzing, J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of plasma density irregularities in the postsunset equatorial F region ionosphere leading to equatorial spread F (ESF) is described. The simulation evolves under realistic background conditions including bottomside plasma shear flow and vertical current. It also incorporates C/NOFS satellite data which partially specify the forcing. A combination of generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability (GRT) and collisional shear instability (CSI) produces growing waveforms with key features that agree with C/NOFS satellite and ALTAIR radar observations in the Pacific sector, including features such as gross morphology and rates of development. The transient response of CSI is consistent with the observation of bottomside waves with wavelengths close to 30 km, whereas the steady state behavior of the combined instability can account for the 100+ km wavelength waves that predominate in the F region.

  7. Dispersion curves from short-time molecular dynamics simulation. 1. Diatomic chain results

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Broocks, B.T.; Gray, S.K.; Marple, S.L.

    1988-06-16

    The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) for frequency estimation is used to compute the frequency dispersion curves of a diatomic chain from the time-dependent structure factor. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that MUSIC can accurately determine the frequencies from very short time trajectories. MUSIC is also used to show how the frequencies can vary in time, i.e., along a trajectory. The method is ideally suited for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of large systems.

  8. Some results from two-dimensional simulation of neutrino-dominated universes

    SciTech Connect

    Melott, A.L.

    1984-12-01

    Numerical methods for simulating a neutrino-dominated universe are discussed. A calculation of microwave-background perturbations, normalized to the numerical models, predicts effects just beyond the reach of current experiments. Since the angular correlation W(theta) varies significantly with the observer's position, global inferences from local observations may not be valid in universes dominated by massive neutrinos. Flat structures will form throughout the distribution. 35 references.

  9. Recent results and proposed observing system simulation experiments (OSSE) to link research and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masutani, Michiko

    2016-05-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE)s are a challenge to operational weather services, because many of the efforts offer long-term rather than short-term benefits. Effective interaction between Research and Operation (R2O and O2R) is required for successful OSSE. First concept and procedures of OSSE are describer. Overview of OSSEs accomplished at NOAA/NCEP and JCSDA in recent years will be presented. Further proposed OSSEs are also presented.

  10. Diffusion of Nutrients in an Isolated Wetland Resulting From Shallow Pore Water Gradients Affected by Antecedent Soil Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, J. H.; Jawitz, J. W.; Dunne, E. J.; Perkins, D. B.

    2007-05-01

    Historically sequestered nutrients in wetland soils may be gradually released to the water column through the process commonly referred to as internal loading. The watershed for Lake Okeechobee, FL (USA) is heavily agricultural and excess nutrients in this area are drained to the Lake by ditches and canals. Formerly isolated, wetlands in this area have also been extensively ditched and drained. In this study, diffusive fluxes of nutrients were calculated using Fick's First Law from shallow pore water gradients, and later compared to fluxes measured by an incubated laboratory experiment on 10-cm intact soil cores from the same sites. Three intact soil cores from a wetland located on an operational beef farm were used to measure total phosphorus (TP), along with soil properties such as porosity, bulk density, and pH. Simultaneously, pore water concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) were also measured at the same three sites for a period of twelve months, and compared to surface water concentrations during flooded periods. A strong correlation between concentration gradients in pore water SRP and those observed in soil TP, suggests that shallow pore water concentrations reflect antecedent soil conditions. If this is true, then fluxes associated with diffusion and advection could greatly affect the total ground water fluxes across the soil-water interface. Fickian diffusive fluxes, estimated six times over a twelve month sampling period, were found to vary between 7-38 mg.m-2.d-1 for TOC, 1-18 mg.m-2.d-1 for TKN, and 0.04-0.86 mg.m-2.d-1 for SRP. While factors such as wetland stage and hydroperiod may have affected the fluxes, it is ultimately the concentration gradients across the soil-water interface that drives diffusive fluxes.

  11. Evaluation of automated decision making methodologies and development of an integrated robotic system simulation: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, D. C.; Almand, B. J.; Thomas, M. M.; Krauze, L. D.; Gremban, K. D.; Sanborn, J. C.; Kelley, J. H.; Depkovich, T. M.; Wolfe, W. J.; Nguyen, T.

    1986-01-01

    The implementation of a generic computer simulation for manipulator systems (ROBSIM) is described. The program is written in FORTRAN, and allows the user to: (1) Interactively define a manipulator system consisting of multiple arms, load objects, targets, and an environment; (2) Request graphic display or replay of manipulator motion; (3) Investigate and simulate various control methods including manual force/torque and active compliance control; and (4) Perform kinematic analysis, requirements analysis, and response simulation of manipulamotion. Previous reports have described the algorithms and procedures for using ROBSIM. These reports are superseded and additional features which were added are described. They are: (1) The ability to define motion profiles and compute loads on a common base to which manipulator arms are attached; (2) Capability to accept data describing manipulator geometry from a Computer Aided Design data base using the Initial Graphics exchange Specification format; (3) A manipulator control algorithm derived from processing the TV image of known reference points on a target; and (4) A vocabulary of simple high level task commands which can be used to define task scenarios.

  12. Experimental and computational results on exciton/free-carrier ratio, hot/thermalized carrier diffusion, and linear/nonlinear rate constants affecting scintillator proportionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. T.; Grim, Joel Q.; Li, Qi; Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G. A.; Kerisit, S.; Gao, Fei; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E.; Rowe, E.; Buliga, V. M.; Burger, A.

    2013-09-01

    Models of nonproportional response in scintillators have highlighted the importance of parameters such as branching ratios, carrier thermalization times, diffusion, kinetic order of quenching, associated rate constants, and radius of the electron track. For example, the fraction ηeh of excitations that are free carriers versus excitons was shown by Payne and coworkers to have strong correlation with the shape of electron energy response curves from Compton-coincidence studies. Rate constants for nonlinear quenching are implicit in almost all models of nonproportionality, and some assumption about track radius must invariably be made if one is to relate linear energy deposition dE/dx to volume-based excitation density n (eh/cm3) in terms of which the rates are defined. Diffusion, affecting time-dependent track radius and thus density of excitations, has been implicated as an important factor in nonlinear light yield. Several groups have recently highlighted diffusion of hot electrons in addition to thermalized carriers and excitons in scintillators. However, experimental determination of many of these parameters in the insulating crystals used as scintillators has seemed difficult. Subpicosecond laser techniques including interband z scan light yield, fluence-dependent decay time, and transient optical absorption are now yielding experimental values for some of the missing rates and ratios needed for modeling scintillator response. First principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations can fill in additional parameters still unavailable from experiment. As a result, quantitative modeling of scintillator electron energy response from independently determined material parameters is becoming possible on an increasingly firmer data base. This paper describes recent laser experiments, calculations, and numerical modeling of scintillator response.

  13. Basin scale reactive-transport simulations of CO2 leakage and resulting metal transport in a shallow drinking water aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Maxwell, R. M.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Leakage of CO2 from underground storage formations into overlying aquifers will decrease groundwater pH resulting in a geochemical response of the aquifer. If metal containing aquifer minerals dissolve as a part of this response, there is a risk of exceeding regulatory limits set by the EPA. Risk assessment methods require a realistic prediction of the maximum metal concentration at wells or other points of exposure. Currently, these predictions are based on numerical reactive transport simulations of CO2 leaks. While previous studies have simulated galena dissolution as a source of lead to explore the potential for contamination of drinking water aquifers, it may be more realistic to simulate lead release from more common minerals that are known to contain trace amounts of metals, e.g. calcite. Model domains for these previous studies are often sub-km in scale or have very coarse grid resolution, due to computation limitations. In this study we simulate CO2 leakage into a drinking water aquifer using the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport code PFLOTRAN. The regional model domain is 4km x 1km x 0.1 km. Even with fairly coarse grid spacing (~ 9 m x 9 m x 0.9 m), the simulations have > 49 million degrees of freedom, requiring the use of High-Performance Computing (HPC). Our simulations are run on Jaguar at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Lead concentrations in extraction wells 3 km down gradient from a CO2 leak increase above background concentrations due to kinetic mineral dissolution along the flow path. Increases in aqueous concentrations are less when lead is allowed to sorb onto mineral surfaces. Surprisingly, lead concentration increases are greater in simulations where lead is present as a trace constituent in calcite (5% by volume) relative to simulations with galena (0.001% by volume) as the lead source. It appears that galena becomes oversaturated and begins to precipitate, a result observed in previous modeling studies, and its low

  14. Factors that affect postdialysis rebound in serum urea concentration, including the rate of dialysis: results from the HEMO Study.

    PubMed

    Daugirdas, John T; Greene, Tom; Depner, Thomas A; Leypoldt, John; Gotch, Frank; Schulman, Gerald; Star, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that postdialysis urea rebound is related to K/V, the rate of dialysis, but a systematic analysis of factors that affect rebound has not been reported. With the use of 30-min and, in a subset, 60-min postdialysis samples, postdialysis urea rebound was measured to (1) determine how well previously proposed equations based on the rate of dialysis (K/V) predict rebound in a large sample of patients with varying characteristics, (2) determine whether other factors besides K/V affect rebound, and (3) estimate more precise values for coefficients in prediction equations for rebound. Rebound was calculated relative to both immediate and 20-s postdialysis samples to study early components of rebound unrelated to access recirculation. The equilibrated Kt/V (eKt/V) computed by fitting the two-pool variable volume model to the 30-min postdialysis sample agreed well with eKt/V based on the 60-min postdialysis sample. Using the pre-, post-, and 30-min postdialysis samples for 1245 patients with arteriovenous (AV) accesses, the median intercompartmental mass transfer coefficient (Kc) was 797 ml/min for rebound computed relative to the 20-s postdialysis samples and 592 ml/min relative to the immediate postdialysis samples. K/V was the strongest predictor of rebound among 22 factors considered. Other factors associated with greater rebound for 1331 patients using AV accesses or venous catheters included access type, black race, male gender, absence of congestive heart failure, greater age, ultrafiltration rate, and low predialysis or intradialysis systolic BP. Equations of the form eKt/V = single-pool Kt/V - B x (K/V) were fit to the data. With AV access, the optimum values for the slope term (B) were 0.39 and 0.46 (in h(-1)) for single-pool Kt/V calculated based on 20-s postdialysis or immediate postdialysis samples, respectively. For patients using venous catheters, the respective values for B were 0.22 and 0.29. Postdialysis urea rebound can be

  15. Using interpersonal affect regulation in simulated healthcare consultations: an experimental investigation of self-control resource depletion.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Íñigo, David; Mercado, Francisco; Totterdell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Controlled Interpersonal Affect Regulation -the process of deliberately influencing the internal feeling states of others- occurs in a variety of interpersonal relationships and contexts. An incipient corpus of research shows that interpersonal affect regulation can be characterized as a goal-directed behavior that uses self-control processes which, according to the strength model of self-regulation, consumes a limited resource that is also used by other self-control processes. Using interpersonal affect-improving and affect-worsening regulation strategies can increase agent's resource depletion but there is reason to think that effects will partially rely on target's feedback in response to the regulation. Using a healthcare paradigm, an experiment was conducted to test the combined effects of interpersonal affect regulation use and patient feedback on healthcare workers' resource depletion, measured as self-reported experienced and expected emotional exhaustion, and persistence on a self-regulation task. Medical students (N = 78) were randomly assigned to a 2(interpersonal affect regulation: affect-worsening vs. affect-improving) × 2(patients' feedback: positive vs. negative) factorial between-subjects design and given instructions to play the role of doctors in interactions with two professional actors trained to act as patients. Analysis of covariance showed that affect-worsening was more depleting than affect-improving for all measures, whereas the recovery effects of positive feedback varied depending on strategy type and measure. The findings confirm the characterization of interpersonal affect regulation as potentially depleting, but suggest that the correspondence between the agent's strategy and the target's response needs to be taken into consideration. Use of affect-improving and positive feedback showed positive effects on self-rated performance, indicating that interpersonal affect regulation is relevant for organizational as well as personal

  16. Using interpersonal affect regulation in simulated healthcare consultations: an experimental investigation of self-control resource depletion

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Íñigo, David; Mercado, Francisco; Totterdell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Controlled Interpersonal Affect Regulation –the process of deliberately influencing the internal feeling states of others– occurs in a variety of interpersonal relationships and contexts. An incipient corpus of research shows that interpersonal affect regulation can be characterized as a goal-directed behavior that uses self-control processes which, according to the strength model of self-regulation, consumes a limited resource that is also used by other self-control processes. Using interpersonal affect-improving and affect-worsening regulation strategies can increase agent’s resource depletion but there is reason to think that effects will partially rely on target’s feedback in response to the regulation. Using a healthcare paradigm, an experiment was conducted to test the combined effects of interpersonal affect regulation use and patient feedback on healthcare workers’ resource depletion, measured as self-reported experienced and expected emotional exhaustion, and persistence on a self-regulation task. Medical students (N = 78) were randomly assigned to a 2(interpersonal affect regulation: affect-worsening vs. affect-improving) × 2(patients’ feedback: positive vs. negative) factorial between-subjects design and given instructions to play the role of doctors in interactions with two professional actors trained to act as patients. Analysis of covariance showed that affect-worsening was more depleting than affect-improving for all measures, whereas the recovery effects of positive feedback varied depending on strategy type and measure. The findings confirm the characterization of interpersonal affect regulation as potentially depleting, but suggest that the correspondence between the agent’s strategy and the target’s response needs to be taken into consideration. Use of affect-improving and positive feedback showed positive effects on self-rated performance, indicating that interpersonal affect regulation is relevant for organizational as well as

  17. Depletion potentials in highly size-asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures: Comparison of simulation results with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Wilding, Nigel B.; Roth, Roland; Evans, Robert

    2011-12-01

    We report a detailed study, using state-of-the-art simulation and theoretical methods, of the effective (depletion) potential between a pair of big hard spheres immersed in a reservoir of much smaller hard spheres, the size disparity being measured by the ratio of diameters q≡σs/σb. Small particles are treated grand canonically, their influence being parameterized in terms of their packing fraction in the reservoir ηsr. Two Monte Carlo simulation schemes—the geometrical cluster algorithm, and staged particle insertion—are deployed to obtain accurate depletion potentials for a number of combinations of q⩽0.1 and ηsr. After applying corrections for simulation finite-size effects, the depletion potentials are compared with the prediction of new density functional theory (DFT) calculations based on the insertion trick using the Rosenfeld functional and several subsequent modifications. While agreement between the DFT and simulation is generally good, significant discrepancies are evident at the largest reservoir packing fraction accessible to our simulation methods, namely, ηsr=0.35. These discrepancies are, however, small compared to those between simulation and the much poorer predictions of the Derjaguin approximation at this ηsr. The recently proposed morphometric approximation performs better than Derjaguin but is somewhat poorer than DFT for the size ratios and small-sphere packing fractions that we consider. The effective potentials from simulation, DFT, and the morphometric approximation were used to compute the second virial coefficient B2 as a function of ηsr. Comparison of the results enables an assessment of the extent to which DFT can be expected to correctly predict the propensity toward fluid-fluid phase separation in additive binary hard-sphere mixtures with q⩽0.1. In all, the new simulation results provide a fully quantitative benchmark for assessing the relative accuracy of theoretical approaches for calculating depletion potentials

  18. Urinary Microbiota Associated with Preterm Birth: Results from the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) Study.

    PubMed

    Ollberding, Nicholas J; Völgyi, Eszter; Macaluso, Maurizio; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Tylavsky, Frances A; Piyathilake, Chandrika J

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Genitourinary infection is implicated in the initiation of spontaneous PTB; however, examination of the urinary microbiota in relation to preterm delivery using next-generation sequencing technologies is lacking. In a case-control study nested within the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study, we examined associations between the urinary microbiota and PTB. A total of 49 cases (delivery < 37 weeks gestation) and 48 controls (delivery ≥ 37 weeks gestation) balanced on health insurance type were included in the present analysis. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V4 region was performed on urine samples collected during the second trimester. We observed no difference in taxa richness, evenness, or community composition between cases and controls or for gestational age modeled as a continuous variable. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified to Prevotella, Sutterella, L. iners, Blautia, Kocuria, Lachnospiraceae, and S.marcescens were enriched among cases (FDR corrected p≤ 0.05). A urinary microbiota clustering partition dominated by S. marcescens was also associated with PTB (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.19-13.24). These data suggest a limited role for the urinary microbiota in PTB when measured during the second trimester by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The enrichment among cases in several organisms previously reported to be associated with genitourinary pathology requires confirmation in future studies to rule out the potential for false positive findings. PMID:27611781

  19. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy.

  20. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:26445394

  1. Urinary Microbiota Associated with Preterm Birth: Results from the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Völgyi, Eszter; Macaluso, Maurizio; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Piyathilake, Chandrika J.

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Genitourinary infection is implicated in the initiation of spontaneous PTB; however, examination of the urinary microbiota in relation to preterm delivery using next-generation sequencing technologies is lacking. In a case-control study nested within the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study, we examined associations between the urinary microbiota and PTB. A total of 49 cases (delivery < 37 weeks gestation) and 48 controls (delivery ≥ 37 weeks gestation) balanced on health insurance type were included in the present analysis. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V4 region was performed on urine samples collected during the second trimester. We observed no difference in taxa richness, evenness, or community composition between cases and controls or for gestational age modeled as a continuous variable. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified to Prevotella, Sutterella, L. iners, Blautia, Kocuria, Lachnospiraceae, and S.marcescens were enriched among cases (FDR corrected p≤ 0.05). A urinary microbiota clustering partition dominated by S. marcescens was also associated with PTB (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.19–13.24). These data suggest a limited role for the urinary microbiota in PTB when measured during the second trimester by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The enrichment among cases in several organisms previously reported to be associated with genitourinary pathology requires confirmation in future studies to rule out the potential for false positive findings. PMID:27611781

  2. Geologic results of the TMS survey over Mt. Emmons, Colorado. [Thematic Mapper Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D. L.; Sadowski, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    In 1981, NASA conducted with an American company a cooperative study, involving the use of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data. The study was concerned with an area near Crested Butte, Colorado, which contains a known, but unmined, major molybdenum deposit. Detailed ground observations in the Mt. Emmons area demonstrated that the imagery was extremely effective for detection of geologically significant features. The imagery specifically delineated areas of ferric iron staining, seritization, and hornfelized rock. Attention is given to data acquisition and data processing, field work in 1982 and in 1983, the integration of gravity data, and costs.

  3. How context affects electronic health record-based test result follow-up: a mixed-methods evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Shailaja; Smith, Michael W; Sittig, Dean F; Petersen, Nancy J; Hysong, Sylvia J; Espadas, Donna; Modi, Varsha; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Electronic health record (EHR)-based alerts can facilitate transmission of test results to healthcare providers, helping ensure timely and appropriate follow-up. However, failure to follow-up on abnormal test results (missed test results) persists in EHR-enabled healthcare settings. We aimed to identify contextual factors associated with facility-level variation in missed test results within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. Design, setting and participants Based on a previous survey, we categorised VA facilities according to primary care providers’ (PCPs’) perceptions of low (n=20) versus high (n=20) risk of missed test results. We interviewed facility representatives to collect data on several contextual factors derived from a sociotechnical conceptual model of safe and effective EHR use. We compared these factors between facilities categorised as low and high perceived risk, adjusting for structural characteristics. Results Facilities with low perceived risk were significantly more likely to use specific strategies to prevent alerts from being lost to follow-up (p=0.0114). Qualitative analysis identified three high-risk scenarios for missed test results: alerts on tests ordered by trainees, alerts ‘handed off’ to another covering clinician (surrogate clinician), and alerts on patients not assigned in the EHR to a PCP. Test result management policies and procedures to address these high-risk situations varied considerably across facilities. Conclusions Our study identified several scenarios that pose a higher risk for missed test results in EHR-based healthcare systems. In addition to implementing provider-level strategies to prevent missed test results, healthcare organisations should consider implementing monitoring systems to track missed test results. PMID:25387758

  4. Prediction of SFL Interruption Performance from the Results of Arc Simulation during High-Current Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won-Ho; Kim, Woun-Jea

    2015-09-01

    The design and development procedures of SF6 gas circuit breakers are still largely based on trial and error through testing although the development costs go higher every year. The computation cannot cover the testing satisfactorily because all the real processes arc not taken into account. But the knowledge of the arc behavior and the prediction of the thermal-flow inside the interrupters by numerical simulations are more useful than those by experiments due to the difficulties to obtain physical quantities experimentally and the reduction of computational costs in recent years. In this paper, in order to get further information into the interruption process of a SF6 self-blast interrupter, which is based on a combination of thermal expansion and the arc rotation principle, gas flow simulations with a CFD-arc modeling are performed during the whole switching process such as high-current period, pre-current zero period, and current-zero period. Through the complete work, the pressure-rise and the ramp of the pressure inside the chamber before current zero as well as the post-arc current after current zero should be a good criterion to predict the short-line fault interruption performance of interrupters.

  5. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  6. Results of two-phase natural circulation in hot-leg U-bend simulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Lee, S.Y.; Abou El-Seoud, S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulation and flow termination during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed using two different thermal-hydraulic loops. The main focus of the experiment was the two-phase flow behavior in the hot-leg U-bend typical of BandW LWR systems. The first group of experiments was carried out in the nitrogen gas-water adiabatic simulation loop and the second in the Freon 113 boiling and condensation loop. Both of the loops have been designed as a flow visualization facility and built according to the two-phase flow scaling criteria developed under this program. The nitrogen gas-water system has been used to isolate key hydrodynamic phenomena such as the phase distribution, relative velocity between phases, two-phase flow regimes and flow termination mechanisms, whereas the Freon loop has been used to study the effect of fluid properties, phase changes and coupling between hydrodynamic and heat transfer phenomena. Significantly different behaviors have been observed due to the non-equilibrium phase change phenomena such as the flashing and condensation in the Freon loop. The phenomena created much more unstable hydrodynamic conditions which lead to cyclic or oscillatory flow behaviors.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations of Microchannel Plate Detectors II: Pulsed Voltage Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, Craig A.; Wu, Ming; Rochau, Greg A.

    2011-02-11

    This paper is part of a continuing study of straight-channel microchannel plate (MCP)–based x-ray detectors. Such detectors are a useful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy. To interpret the data from such detectors, it is critical to develop a better understanding of the behavior of MCPs biased with subnanosecond voltage pulses. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code that simulates the electron cascade in a MCP channel under an arbitrary pulsed voltage, particularly those pulses with widths comparable to the transit time of the electron cascade in the MCP under DC voltage bias. We use this code to study the gain as a function of time (also called the gate profile or optical gate) for various voltage pulse shapes, including pulses measured along the MCP. In addition, experimental data of MCP behavior in pulsed mode are obtained with a short-pulse UV laser. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental data show excellent agreement for both the gate profile and the peak relative sensitivity along the MCP strips. We report that the dependence of relative gain on peak voltage increases in sensitivity in pulsed mode when the width of the high-voltage waveform is smaller than the transit time of cascading electrons in the MCP.

  8. Study of silicon crystal surface formation based on molecular dynamics simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinovs, G.; Sabanskis, A.; Muiznieks, A.

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium shape of <110>-oriented single crystal silicon nanowire, 8 nm in cross-section, was found from molecular dynamics simulations using LAMMPS molecular dynamics package. The calculated shape agrees well to the shape predicted from experimental observations of nanocavities in silicon crystals. By parametrization of the shape and scaling to a known value of {111} surface energy, Wulff form for solid-vapor interface was obtained. The Wulff form for solid-liquid interface was constructed using the same model of the shape as for the solid-vapor interface. The parameters describing solid-liquid interface shape were found using values of surface energies in low-index directions known from published molecular dynamics simulations. Using an experimental value of the liquid-vapor interface energy for silicon and graphical solution of Herring's equation, we constructed angular diagram showing relative equilibrium orientation of solid-liquid, liquid-vapor and solid-vapor interfaces at the triple phase line. The diagram gives quantitative predictions about growth angles for different growth directions and formation of facets on the solid-liquid and solid-vapor interfaces. The diagram can be used to describe growth ridges appearing on the crystal surface grown from a melt. Qualitative comparison to the ridges of a Float zone silicon crystal cone is given.

  9. Progress in Modeling Global Atmospheric CO2 Fluxes and Transport: Results from Simulations with Diurnal Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collatz, G. James; Kawa, R.

    2007-01-01

    Progress in better determining CO2 sources and sinks will almost certainly rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. Use of advanced data requires improved modeling and analysis capability. Under NASA Carbon Cycle Science support we seek to develop and integrate improved formulations for 1) atmospheric transport, 2) terrestrial uptake and release, 3) biomass and 4) fossil fuel burning, and 5) observational data analysis including inverse calculations. The transport modeling is based on meteorological data assimilation analysis from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office. Use of assimilated met data enables model comparison to CO2 and other observations across a wide range of scales of variability. In this presentation we focus on the short end of the temporal variability spectrum: hourly to synoptic to seasonal. Using CO2 fluxes at varying temporal resolution from the SIB 2 and CASA biosphere models, we examine the model's ability to simulate CO2 variability in comparison to observations at different times, locations, and altitudes. We find that the model can resolve much of the variability in the observations, although there are limits imposed by vertical resolution of boundary layer processes. The influence of key process representations is inferred. The high degree of fidelity in these simulations leads us to anticipate incorporation of realtime, highly resolved observations into a multiscale carbon cycle analysis system that will begin to bridge the gap between top-down and bottom-up flux estimation, which is a primary focus of NACP.

  10. A STOL airworthiness investigation using a simulation of a deflected slipstream transport. Volume 1: Summary of results and airworthiness implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleford, R. L.; Heffley, R. K.; Rumold, R. C.; Hynes, C. S.; Scott, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    A simulator study of short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft was conducted using a model of a deflected slipstream transport aircraft. The subjects considered are: (1) the approach, (2) flare and landing, (3) go-around, and (4) takeoff phases of flight. The results are summarized and possible implications with regard to airworthiness criteria are discussed. A data base is provided for future STOL airworthiness requirements and a preliminary indication of potential problem areas is developed. Comparison of the simulation results with various proposed STOL criteria indicates significant deficiencies in many of these criteria.

  11. 222Rn transport in a fractured crystalline rock aquifer: Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folger, P.F.; Poeter, E.; Wanty, R.B.; Day, W.; Frishman, D.

    1997-01-01

    Dissolved 222Rn concentrations in ground water from a small wellfield underlain by fractured Middle Proterozoic Pikes Peak Granite southwest of Denver, Colorado range from 124 to 840 kBq m-3 (3360-22700 pCi L-1). Numerical simulations of flow and transport between two wells show that differences in equivalent hydraulic aperture of transmissive fractures, assuming a simplified two-fracture system and the parallel-plate model, can account for the different 222Rn concentrations in each well under steady-state conditions. Transient flow and transport simulations show that 222Rn concentrations along the fracture profile are influenced by 222Rn concentrations in the adjoining fracture and depend on boundary conditions, proximity of the pumping well to the fracture intersection, transmissivity of the conductive fractures, and pumping rate. Non-homogeneous distribution (point sources) of 222Rn parent radionuclides, uranium and 226Ra, can strongly perturb the dissolved 222Rn concentrations in a fracture system. Without detailed information on the geometry and hydraulic properties of the connected fracture system, it may be impossible to distinguish the influence of factors controlling 222Rn distribution or to determine location of 222Rn point sources in the field in areas where ground water exhibits moderate 222Rn concentrations. Flow and transport simulations of a hypothetical multifracture system consisting of ten connected fractures, each 10 m in length with fracture apertures ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, show that 222Rn concentrations at the pumping well can vary significantly over time. Assuming parallel-plate flow, transmissivities of the hypothetical system vary over four orders of magnitude because transmissivity varies with the cube of fracture aperture. The extreme hydraulic heterogeneity of the simple hypothetical system leads to widely ranging 222Rn values, even assuming homogeneous distribution of uranium and 226Ra along fracture walls. Consequently, it is

  12. Secondary reconnection, energisation and turbulence in dipolarisation fronts: results of a 3D kinetic simulation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DF) are formed by reconnection outflows interacting with the pre-existing environment. These regions are host of important energy exchanges [1], particle acceleration [2] and a complex structure and evolution [3]. Our recent work has investigated these regions via fully kinetic 3D simulations [4]. As reported recently on Nature Physics [3], based on 3D fully kinetic simulations started with a well defined x-line, we observe that in the DF reconnection transitions towards a more chaotic regime. In the fronts an instability devel- ops caused by the local gradients of the density and by the unfavourable acceleration and field line curvature. The consequence is the break up of the fronts in a fashion similar to the classical fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the formation of "fingers" of plasma and embedded magnetic fields. These fingers interact and produce secondary reconnection sites. We present several different diagnostics that prove the existence of these secondary reconnection sites. Each site is surrounded by its own electron diffusion region. At the fronts the ions are generally not magnetized and considerable ion slippage is present. The discovery we present is that electrons are also slipping, forming localized diffusion regions near secondary reconnection sites [1]. The consequence of this discovery is twofold. First, the instability in the fronts has strong energetic implications. We observe that the energy transfer locally is very strong, an order of magnitude stronger than in the "X" line. However, this energy transfer is of both signs as it is natural for a wavy rippling with regions of magnetic to kinetic and regions of kinetic to magnetic energy conversion. Second, and most important for this session, is that MMS should not limit the search for electron diffusion regions to the location marked with X in all reconnection cartoons. Our simulations predict more numerous and perhaps more easily measurable electron diffusion

  13. Recent electron-cloud simulation results for the main damping rings of the NLC and TESLA linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-01

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  14. From the experimental simulation to integrated non-destructive analysis by means of optical and infrared techniques: results compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Lambiase, F.; Paoletti, D.; Di Ilio, A.; Maldague, X.

    2012-11-01

    In this work the possibility of modeling manufacturing ceramic products is analyzed through the application of transient thermography, holographic interferometry and digital speckle photography, in order to identify the subsurface defects characteristics. This integrated method could be used to understand the nature of heterogeneous materials (such as plastic, sponge simulating a void, wood, aluminum) potentially contained within ceramic materials, as well as to predict crack formation due to them. The paper presents the analysis of green ceramic tile containing defects of different types and sizes located at different depths. The finite element method is used for solving the problem of transient heat transfer occurring in experimental conditions. Unknown parameters of the numerical model (such as convective heat transfer coefficients and sample surface emissivity) were adjusted to obtain numerical simulation results as close as possible to those obtained experimentally. Similarities and differences between experimental and simulated data are analyzed and discussed. Possibilities for improving the results and further developments are proposed.

  15. Solvent extraction of methane from simulated geopressured-geothermal fluids: sub-pilot test results

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, R.; Otsuki, H.H.; Locke, F.E.

    1982-01-14

    The extraction of methane dissolved in 15 wt % sodium chloride solution at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi has been demonstrated using n-hexadecane as the solvent in a sub-pilot scale extraction column operated in a continuous, countercurrent flow mode. Greater than 90% recovery of methane was obtained with solvent/brine mass flow ratios in the range of .040 to .045. The height of an ideal stage in this experimental Elgin-type spray column is estimated to be 1.5 ft. Application of this process on actual geopressured fluids is technically feasible, and when combined with direct drive injection disposal is economically attractive. Design and operation of a methane saturated-brine supply system to provide simulated geopressured fluid continuously at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi are also described.

  16. Using a deformable mirror to generate custom laser guidestar asterisms: simulation and laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Andrew P.; Srinath, Srikar; Gavel, Donald; Kupke, Renate; Dillon, Daren

    2014-08-01

    It is possible to create custom laser guidestar (LGS) asterisms from a single beam by using a deformable mirror to pattern the phase of the outgoing laser guidestar beam. This avoids the need for multiple laser launch assemblies, and in principle would allow one to position the multiple LGS spots in any desired arrangement around the science target, as well as dynamically rotate the LGS pattern on-sky and control the distribution of intensity in each spot. Simulations and laboratory experiments indicate that a PTT111 and PTT489 IrisAO MEMS deformable mirror and a Hamamatsu X8267 spatial light modulator may have applications for creating small LGS asterisms for biological imaging with adaptive optics. For astronomy applications, the phase values required to produce the "3+1" laser guidestar asterism of Keck's Next Generation AO system is also investigated.

  17. Experimental and simulation study results of an Adaptive Video Guidance System /AVGS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Knickerbocker, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Studies relating to stellar-body exploration programs have pointed out the need for an adaptive guidance scheme capable of providing automatic real-time guidance and site selection capability. For the case of a planetary lander, without such guidance, targeting is limited to what are believed to be generally benign areas in order to ensure a reasonable landing-success probability. Typically, the Mars Viking Lander will be jeopardized by obstacles exceeding 22 centimers in diameter. The benefits of on-board navigation and real-time selection of a landing site and obstacle avoidance have been demonstrated by the Apollo lunar landings, in which man performed the surface sensing and steering functions. Therefore, an Adaptive Video Guidance System (AVGS) has been developed, bread-boarded, and flown on a six-degree-of-freedom simulator.

  18. Mirror modes in the Earth's magnetosheath: Results from a global hybrid-Vlasov simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoilijoki, Sanni; Palmroth, Minna; Walsh, Brian M.; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; von Alfthan, Sebastian; Ganse, Urs; Hannuksela, Otto; Vainio, Rami

    2016-05-01

    We investigate mirror mode structures in the Earth's magnetosheath using our global kinetic Vlasiator simulation, which models ion behavior through their distribution function and treats electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. We follow the evolution of waves as they advect along velocity streamlines through the magnetosheath. We find that mirror mode waves are observed preferentially in the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath along velocity streamlines that enter the sheath in the vicinity of the foreshock ULF wave boundary where there are enough initial perturbations in the plasma for the mirror modes to grow, and the plasma properties fulfill the mirror instability condition better than elsewhere in the magnetosheath. We test selection criteria defined by previous studies and show that the spatial extent over which mirror modes occur ranges from much of the magnetosheath on the quasi-perpendicular side of the subsolar point to very small isolated regions depending on the criteria.

  19. Modifications of comet materials by the sublimation process: Results from simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Lammerzahl, P.; Klinger, J.; Kochan, H.; Keller, H. U.; Neukum, G.; Roessler, K.; Stoeffler, D.; Spohn, T.

    1989-01-01

    An active comet like comet Halley loses by sublimation a surface layer of the order of 1 m thickness per perihelion passage. In situ measurements show that water ice is the main constituent which contributes to the gas emission although even more volatile species (CO, NH3, CH4, CO2 etc.) have been identified. Dust particles which were embedded in the ices are carried by the sublimating gases. Measurements of the chemical composition of cometary grains indicate that they are composed of silicates of approximate chondritic composition and refractory carbonaceous material. Comet simulation experiments show that significant modifications of cometary materials occur due to sublimation process in near surface layers which have to be taken into account in order to derive the original state of the material.

  20. The spectroscopic search for the trace aerosols in the planetary atmospheres - the results of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecka, Maria I.

    2010-05-01

    The passive remote spectrometric methods are important in examinations the atmospheres of planets. The radiance spectra inform us about values of thermodynamical parameters and composition of the atmospheres and surfaces. The spectral technology can be useful in detection of the trace aerosols like biological substances (if present) in the environments of the planets. We discuss here some of the aspects related to the spectroscopic search for the aerosols and dust in planetary atmospheres. Possibility of detection and identifications of biological aerosols with a passive InfraRed spectrometer in an open-air environment is discussed. We present numerically simulated, based on radiative transfer theory, spectroscopic observations of the Earth atmosphere. Laboratory measurements of transmittance of various kinds of aerosols, pollens and bacterias were used in modeling.

  1. Initial results of a full kinetic simulation of RF H- source including Coulomb collision process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Mattei, S.; Shibata, T.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-01

    In order to evaluate Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) more correctly for radio frequency inductively coupled plasma (RF-ICP) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) simulation code has been improved by taking into account electron-electron Coulomb collision. Binary collision model is employed to model Coulomb collision process and we have successfully modeled it. The preliminary calculation including Coulomb collision has been done and it is shown that Coulomb collision doesn't have significant effects under the condition: electron density ne ˜ 1018 m-3 and high gas pressure pH2 = 3 Pa, while it is necessary to include Coulomb collision under high electron density and low gas pressure conditions.

  2. Particle acceleration due to shocks in the interplanetary field: High time resolution data and simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, R. L.; Armstrong, T. P.; Nuber, R.; Bandle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data were examined from two experiments aboard the Explorer 50 (IMP 8) spacecraft. The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Lab Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) provides 10.12 second resolution ion and electron count rates as well as 5.5 minute or longer averages of the same, with data sampled in the ecliptic plane. The high time resolution of the data allows for an explicit, point by point, merging of the magnetic field and particle data and thus a close examination of the pre- and post-shock conditions and particle fluxes associated with large angle oblique shocks in the interplanetary field. A computer simulation has been developed wherein sample particle trajectories, taken from observed fluxes, are allowed to interact with a planar shock either forward or backward in time. One event, the 1974 Day 312 shock, is examined in detail.

  3. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

    2013-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  4. Saturn's periodicities: New results from an MHD simulation of magnetospheric response to rotating ionospheric vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M.; Jia, X.

    2013-12-01

    In previous work we demonstrated that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere in which periodicity is imposed by rotating vortical flows in the ionosphere reproduces many reported periodically varying properties of the system. Here we shall show that previously unreported features of the MHD simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere illuminate additional measured properties of the system. By averaging over a rotation period, we identify a global electric field whose magnitude is a few tenths of a mV/m (see Figure 1). The electric field intensity decreases with radial distance in the middle magnetosphere, consistent with drift speeds v=E/B of a few km/s towards the morning side and relatively independent of radial distance. The electric field within 10 RS in the equatorial plane is oriented from post-noon to post-midnight, in excellent agreement with observations [e.g., Thomsen et al., 2012; Andriopoulou et al., 2012, 2013; Wilson et al., 2013]. By following the electric field over a full rotation phase we identify oscillatory behavior whose magnitude is consistent with the reported fluctuations of measured electric fields. Of particular interest is the nature of the fast mode perturbations that produce periodic displacement of the magnetopause and flapping of the current sheet. Figure (2) shows the total perturbation pressure (the sum of magnetic and thermal pressure) in the equatorial plane at a rotation phase for which the ionospheric flow near noon is equatorward. By following the perturbations over a full rotation period, we demonstrate properties of the fast mode wave launched by the rotating flow structures and thereby characterize the 'cam' signal originally proposed by Espinosa et al. [2003].

  5. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  6. The acidification process under the cloud in southwest China: Observation results and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Heng-Chi; Tanner, Peter A.; Huang, Mei-Yuan; Shen, Zhi-Lai; Wu, Yu-Xia

    Mean ionic concentrations in rain water (RW) and cloud water (CW) for urban, suburban and rural locations in southwest (SW) and eastern (E) China, from sampling periods between 1985 and 1989 are reported. In SW China the ammonium, calcium and hydrogen cations, and the sulphate anion are present at elevated levels in urban RW. The mean concentrations of these ions are all lower in CW, so that washout is the predominant process leading to acidification. Washout is also important over suburban regions but rainout provides most of the acidity of precipitation in rural areas. Simultaneous observations of CW and RW concentrations over short time intervals have confirmed the dominance of washout processes in the large cities Chongqing and Guiyang. The chemical compositions of CW and RW exhibit changes with the weather system behaviour as well as with the sampling location. In E China the acidity of rainfall is largely neutralized by alkaline particulates. The mean ionic concentrations in RW show an increasing trend from 1985 to 1988. The ambient air quality in China has deteriorated over the same period, with concentrations of sulphur dioxide and suspended particulates at high levels. The below-cloud acidification process has been simulated by a model which includes scavenging of both gas and aerosol species. The importance of rainout, gas washout or aerosol washout processes is found to vary with the location and with the different ion species considered. Gas washout always leads to overall acidification. Aerosol alkalization has been identified in some suburban areas. The effects on the rainwater acidification predicted from the reduction of sulphur dioxide gas emissions have also been simulated, and are expected to be negligible at Chongqing and Guiyang. The concentration of the hydrogen peroxide oxidant, not that of the pollutant sulphur dioxide, is the controlling factor for the pH of the rainfall in these regions.

  7. Conformational and adsorptive characteristics of albumin affect interfacial protein boundary lubrication: from experimental to molecular dynamics simulation approaches.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsu-Wei; Hsieh, Man-Ching; Huang, Huei-Ting; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Min-Hui

    2009-02-01

    The lifetime of artificial joints is mainly determined by their biotribological properties. Synovial fluid which consists of various biological molecules acts as the lubricant. Among the compositions of synovial fluid, albumin is the most abundant protein. Under high load and low sliding speed articulation of artificial joint, it is believed the lubricants form protective layers on the sliding surfaces under the boundary lubrication mechanism. The protective molecular layer keeps two surfaces from direct collision and thus decreases the possibility of wear damage. However, the lubricating ability of the molecular layer may vary due to the conformational change of albumin in the process. In this study, we investigated the influence of albumin conformation on the adsorption behaviors on the articulating surfaces and discuss the relationship between adsorbed albumin and its tribological behaviors. We performed the friction tests to study the effects of albumin unfolding on the frictional behaviors. The novelty of this research is to further carry out molecular dynamics simulation, and protein adsorption experiments to investigate the mechanisms of the albumin-mediated boundary lubrication of arthroplastic materials. It was observed that the thermal processes induce the loss of secondary structure of albumin. The compactness of the unfolded structure leads to a higher adsorption rate onto the articulating material surface and results in the increase of friction coefficient.

  8. Singular PCV2a or PCV2b Infection Results in Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Clinically Affected Gnotobiotic Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Systemic infection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is often clinically associated with respiratory signs, failure to thrive and diarrhea [1]. Currently, PCV2 can be further subdivided into two main genotypes, PCV2a and PCV2b which under experimental conditions result in very simi...

  9. How Race Affects Job Placement Decisions: Results of a Vignette Experiment with a National Sample of Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, Jomills Henry, II; And Others

    The effect of job candidates' race on employers' job placement decisions was examined through an experiment in which white personnel officers were presented with a vignette describing a particular candidate, told that their company had employed that person, and asked what sort of position that person is likely to be hired in. The results suggest…

  10. A Study on Learning Conditions of Students in the Construction Department and an Analysis of Factors Affecting Their Work Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Teruo; Ito, Hidetoshi

    The paper looked at students in the construction department for three years in 2000 to 2003, and examines the relation between the students‧ results and the following factors: “Subjects they are good/bad at at high school” , “Types of entrance exam” and “Small-scale classes at the university” , the classes that are divided into small groups in order to improve the effectiveness of the education for basic specialized subjects, using surveys and multiple regression analysis. The result of this study is as follows : (1) The students‧ strongest subject is mathematics, the weakest is English ; (2) Physics, which is an important subject, has substantial effect on the evaluation especially of the subjects that are based on dynamics. However, whether the students‧ have learnt physics or not at high school does not have substantial effect on their results after entering the university ; (3) Amongst the factors “Subjects they are good at” , “Subjects they are bad at” , “Types of entrance exam” , and “Small-scale classes” , the “Types of entrance exam” had the strongest link with the evaluation of results. For students learning civil-engineering, it was “Subjects they are good/bad at” , and for those learning architecture, it was “Small-scale classes” .

  11. A decision support tool for simulating the effects of alternative policies affecting water resources: an application at the European scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassio, A.; Giupponi, C.; Hiederer, R.; Simota, C.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents the methodology applied and results obtained from testing the Decision Support System 'mDSS' developed by the MULINO Project (Multi-sectoral, integrated and operational decision support system for the sustainable use of water resources at the catchment scale), for assessing alternative measures for the reduction of nitrogen pressure from agriculture on water resources at European level. The European policy background is set by the EU Nitrates Directive (91/676/EEC) and the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC). The nature of the research is exploratory. It is aimed in particular at testing the usefulness of available official statistics for ex ante evaluations of alternative policy measures at the European scale, and the feasibility of such operations within the newly released mDSS software. Alternative measures for reducing N-pressure and spatial targets were designed and simulated in a GIS environment based on raster maps of 1 km resolution. The geographic extent of the present work is defined as the agricultural land of EU15. Data deriving from official statistics were used to calculate a simplified nitrogen balance, in which the sources of nitrogen are separated into organic (livestock manure) and mineral fertilisers, to distinguish the potential contribution of livestock and crop productions to water pollution at the river basin scale. Spatial indicators and evaluation indices were defined within a conceptual framework. For the study the DPSIR approach (Driving force, Pressure, State, Impact, Response), proposed by the European Environmental Agency, was adopted. The approach was subsequently elaborated by means of the multi-criteria functionality provided by mDSS. The results of this application test at the regional scale highlight the potential of the tool for evaluating the effects of policy measures targeted at different spatial implementation strategies through the application of simple screening models and using available data

  12. A simulation model of the epidemiology of urban dengue fever: literature analysis, model development, preliminary validation, and samples of simulation results.

    PubMed

    Focks, D A; Daniels, E; Haile, D G; Keesling, J E

    1995-11-01

    process for a specific location, we compare simulation results with reports on the nature of epidemics and seroprevalence of antibody in Honduras in low-lying coastal urbanizations and Tegucigalpa following the initial introduction of dengue-1 in 1978 into Central America. We conclude with some additional examples of simulation results to give an indication of the types of questions that can be investigated with the models.

  13. The Noncentral Chi-square Distribution in Misspecified Structural Equation Models: Finite Sample Results from a Monte Carlo Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Patrick J.; Bollen, Kenneth A.; Paxton, Pamela; Kirby, James; Chen, Feinian

    2002-01-01

    Examined several hypotheses about the suitability of the noncentral chi square in applied research using Monte Carlo simulation experiments with seven sample sizes and three distinct model types, each with five specifications. Results show that, in general, for models with small to moderate misspecification, the noncentral chi-square is well…

  14. Simulating Results of Experiments on Gene Regulation of the Lactose Operon in Escherichia coli; a Problem-Solving Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchen, Trevor; Metcalfe, Judith

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simulation of the results of real experiments which use different strains of Escherichia coli. Provides an inexpensive practical problem-solving exercise to aid the teaching and understanding of the Jacob and Monod model of gene regulation. (Author/CW)

  15. The Graphical Display of Simulation Results, with Applications to the Comparison of Robust IRT Estimators of Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thissen, David; Wainer, Howard

    Simulation studies of the performance of (potentially) robust statistical estimation produce large quantities of numbers in the form of performance indices of the various estimators under various conditions. This report presents a multivariate graphical display used to aid in the digestion of the plentiful results in a current study of Item…

  16. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments and its constituents (base metal, weld metal and simulated heat affected zones)

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Microstructure across a weldment base metal through transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) to cast weld metal. HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldment consists of coarse-grain bainite, fine-grain bainite and intercritical region. These HAZ microstructures were simulated by isothermal heat-treatments. Creep tests were carried out on base metal, weld metal, weldment and the simulated HAZ structures. Creep deformation and fracture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldments has been assessed based on the properties of its constituents. Coarse-grain bainite with low ductility and intercritical structure with low strength are the critical components of HAZ determining performance of the weldments.