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Sample records for affect sperm motility

  1. Is sperm motility maturation affected by static magnetic fields?

    PubMed Central

    Tablado, L; Pérez-Sánchez, F; Soler, C

    1996-01-01

    Kinematic parameters were evaluated in mouse epididymal extracts to monitor maturation of sperm movement in animals exposed to static magnetic fields using the Sperm-Class Analyzer computerized image analysis system. For this purpose, animals were exposed to a field of 0.7 T generated by a permanent magnet over 10 or 35 days for either 1 or 24 hr/day. The values of the motion endpoints were similar in animals used as controls and in those exposed to the nonionizing radiation, whatever the period of exposure or daily dosage. Changes in motility were observed in all groups: the percentage of total motile and progressive motile spermatozoa increased during passage through the epididymis, with major changes between the caput and corpus epididymides, and the pattern of swimming changed clearly towards more rapid and straighter trajectories. The processes of initiation of sperm motility and maturation of displacement patterns were not then affected by magnetic treatment. Moreover, it appears that sperm production is unaffected because no changes were observed in testicular or epididymal weights after exposure to static magnetic fields. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8959411

  2. Sodium affects the sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2016-08-01

    The role of seminal plasma sodium and activation media sodium on sperm motility was examined by selectively removing the element from these two media, in European eel sperm. Sperm size (sperm head area) was also measured using an ASMA (Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses) system, in the different conditions. Intracellular sodium [Na(+)]i was quantitatively analyzed by first time in the spermatozoa from a marine fish species. Measurement of [Na(+)]i was done before and after motility activation, by Flow Cytometry, using CoroNa Green AM as a dye. Sperm motility activation induced an increase in [Na(+)]i, from 96.72mM in quiescent stage to 152.21mM post-activation in seawater. A significant decrease in sperm head area was observed post-activation in seawater. There was a notable reduction in sperm motility when sodium was removed from the seminal plasma, but not when it was removed from the activation media. Sodium removal was also linked to a significant reduction in sperm head area in comparison to the controls. Our results indicate that the presence of the ion Na(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary for the preservation of sperm motility in European eel, probably because it plays a role in maintaining an appropriate sperm cell volume in the quiescent stage of the spermatozoa.

  3. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  4. The quality of sperm preparation medium affects the motility, viability, and DNA integrity of human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali; Ghazali, Shahin; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Johansson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The goal was to compare the effects of three different sperm preparation media on sperm motility, viability, and DNA integrity of semen samples from normozoospermic men. METHODS: A total of 15 normozoospermic males were included in the study. The semen analysis (SA) was performed in accordance with the WHO guidelines (2010). After SA, each sample was divided into three aliquots, and swim-up was performed with three different sperm preparation media (Sperm Preparation Media, Origio, Denmark; Ham's F10, Biochrome, Berlin, Germany; and VitaSperm™, Innovative Biotech, Iran). Sperm motility, viability, and DNA fragmentation were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 24 h after swim-up. RESULTS: There were no significant differences, at any time intervals, in the total sperm motility between the different sperm preparation media. However, the rate of progressive motility was significantly higher in spermatozoa prepared using the media from Origio in comparison with VitaSperm™ (P = 0.03), whereas no significant difference was found against Ham's F10 medium. No significant differences in sperm viability were seen between the media products. However, 1 h after swim-up, the extent of sperm DNA fragmentation was lower in the medium from Origio versus VitaSperm™ (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The data showed that the quality of medium for preparation of semen samples from normozoospermic men significantly affects the performance of spermatozoa in assisted conception programs. PMID:28216914

  5. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  6. Sperm dilution ratio affects post-thaw motility rate and velocity of Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes) sperm.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Ana T M; Leal, Marcelo C

    2016-10-01

    There is a lack of standardization in sperm cryopreservation of aquatic organisms and, thus, a necessity of more accurate investigations in all steps of this process. In this study, the effects of sperm dilution ratio on post-thaw sperm quality of Prochilodus lineatus were evaluated. Sperm was diluted in a standard freezing medium (glucose and methyl glycol) at four different ratios (sperm to final volume = 1:5, 1:10, 1:50 or 1:100), frozen in a nitrogen vapour vessel at -170°C and then stored in liquid nitrogen vessel at -196°C. Post-thaw motility rate and velocities (curvilinear = VCL; average path = VAP; straight line = VSL) were determined using a Computer-Assisted Sperm Analyzer (CASA) at 10 and 40 s post-activation. The highest motility rates were observed when sperm was frozen at a ratio of 1:5 (76%) and 1:10 (75%). The highest VCL (225 μm/s) and VAP (203 μm/s) were observed at a ratio of 1:10, while VSL was similar among samples frozen at 1:5, 1:10 and 1:50 (97-124 μm/s). When those parameters were evaluated again 30 s later, motility decreased significantly in samples frozen at a ratio of 1:5 (57%) and 1:10 (61%), while velocities decreased significantly in all samples regardless of dilution ratio (75-85 μm/s of VCL, 38-53 μm/s of VAP and 25-39 μm/s of VSL). P. lineatus sperm should be frozen at a ratio of 1:10, where both the number of loaded sperm per straw and the post-thaw quality are maximized.

  7. Hexavalent chromium affects sperm motility by influencing protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the midpiece of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Linqing; Wang, Lirui; Fu, Jieli; Li, Yuhua; Zhao, Na; Li, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium reportedly induces reproductive toxicity and further inhibits male fertility in mammals. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which hexavalent chromium affects motility signaling in boar spermatozoa in vitro. The results indicated that Cr(VI) decreased sperm motility, protein phosphorylation, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and metabolic enzyme activity starting at 4μmol/mL following incubation for 1.5h. Notably, all parameters were potently inhibited by 10μmol/mL Cr, while supplementation with the dibutyryl-cAMP (dbcAMP) and the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) prevented the inhibition of protein phosphorylation. Interestingly, high concentrations of Cr (>10μmol/mL) increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of some high-molecular-weight proteins in the principle piece but decreased that in the middle piece associated with an extreme reduction of sperm motility. These results suggest that chromium affects boar sperm motility by impairing tyrosine phosphorylation in the midpiece of sperm by blocking the cAMP/PKA pathway in boar sperm in vitro.

  8. Gadolinium, a mechano-sensitive channel blocker, inhibits osmosis-initiated motility of sea- and freshwater fish sperm, but does not affect human or ascidian sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, Zoltán; Morisawa, Masaaki; Krasznai, Zoárd Tibor; Morisawa, Sachiko; Inaba, Kazuo; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Rubovszky, Bálint; Bodnár, Béla; Borsos, Antal; Márián, Teréz

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to hypo-osmotic or hyperosmotic environment triggers the initiation of fish sperm motility. In this article, we report that calcium and potassium channel blockers do not influence motility of puffer fish sperm but calmodulin antagonists reversibly decrease it, suggesting that calmodulin-Ca(2+) interactions are prerequisite for the initiation of sperm motility in this species. Gadolinium (a stretch activated ion channel blocker) decreased the motility of puffer fish sperm from 92 +/- 3% to 6 +/- 3% and that of carp sperm from 91 +/- 7% to 3.5 +/- 4.3% in a dose-dependent manner (10-40 micro M). The effect of gadolinium was reversible, suggesting that stretch activated ion channels participate in the initiation of sperm motility of the two species. Gadolinium inhibits changes in the isoelectric point of certain proteins of puffer fish sperm, which occur when sperm motility is initiated in a hypertonic solution. Anisotropy measurements showed that hypo-osmotic treatment, which initiates carp sperm motility, increased membrane fluidity. When hypo-osmotic treatment was given in the presence of gadolinium, the sperm membrane remained as rigid as in quiescent cells, while motility was blocked. By contrast, gadolinium did not influence the motility parameters of Ciona or human sperm. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that conformational changes of mechanosensitive membrane proteins are involved in osmolality-dependent but not osmolality-independent sperm.

  9. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  10. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm.

  11. Daily exposure to summer temperatures affects the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells but not male fertility in an in vivo rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; Taberner, E; Sabés-Alsina, M; Ramon, J; Rafel, O; Tusell, L; Piles, M; López-Béjar, M

    2015-08-01

    High temperatures have negative effects on sperm quality leading to temporary or permanent sterility. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of long exposure to summer circadian heat stress cycles on sperm parameters and the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells from rabbit bucks. Twelve White New Zealand rabbit bucks were exposed to a daily constant temperature of the thermoneutral zone (from 18 °C to 22 °C; control group) or exposed to a summer circadian heat stress cycles (30 °C, 3 h/day; heat stress group). Spermatozoa were flushed from the epididymis and assessed for sperm quality parameters at recovery. Sperm total motility and progressivity were negatively affected by high temperatures (P < 0.05), as were also specific motility parameters (curvilinear velocity, linear velocity, mean velocity, straightness coefficient, linearity coefficient, wobble coefficient, and frequency of head displacement; P < 0.05, but not the mean amplitude of lateral head displacement). Heat stress significantly increased the percentage of less-motile sperm subpopulations, although the percentage of the high-motile subpopulation was maintained, which is consistent with the fact that no effect was detected on fertility rates. However, prolificacy was reduced in females submitted to heat stress when inseminated by control bucks. In conclusion, our results suggest that environmental high temperatures are linked to changes in the proportion of motile sperm subpopulations of the epididymis, although fertility is still preserved despite the detrimental effects of heat stress. On the other hand, prolificacy seems to be affected by the negative effects of high temperatures, especially by altering female reproduction.

  12. Sperm motility-initiating substance in newt egg-jelly induces differential initiation of sperm motility based on sperm intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akihiko; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Vines, Carol A; Cherr, Gary N

    2011-01-01

    Sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a novel motility inducer from newt egg-jelly, is activated by the release from associated jelly substances at the beginning of internal fertilization and affects female-stored sperm. We examined motility initiation kinetics of newt sperm in response to SMIS by monitoring the changes of sperm intracellular calcium ([Ca²(+)](i)). In quiescent non-motile sperm loaded with the Ca²(+) indicator Fluo-4, intracellular free Ca²(+) was observed around mitochondria using confocal scanning laser microscopy. A slight increase in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred simultaneously and transiently at motility initiation in sperm treated with either heated jelly extract (hJE) containing activated SMIS, or a low osmotic solution, which naturally initiates motility in externally-fertilizing amphibians and can initiate motility in urodele sperm. When the increase of [Ca²(+)](i) at motility-initiation was monitored using spectrofluorometry, large increases in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred immediately in the low osmotic solution and within 1.5 min in the hJE. In the intact jelly extract (no heating), small increases of [Ca²(+)](i) irregularly occurred from around 1 min and for about 4 min, during which motility was differentially initiated among sperm. These results indicate that the SMIS induces differential initiation of sperm motility depending on the activational states of the SMIS and its overall activity. The motility initiation in the jelly extract was delayed in sperm whose intracellular Ca²(+) had been chelated with BAPTA-AM. The relative levels of [Ca²(+)](i) were variable with a mean of 414 ± 256 nmol/L among resting sperm, suggesting that the level of [Ca²(+)](i) in the resting sperm modulates the responsiveness to the SMIS.

  13. Drosophila Sperm Motility in the Reproductive Tract1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Motile cilia and flagella exhibit many waveforms as outputs of dynein activation sequences on the highly conserved axoneme. Motility change of sperm in the reproductive tract is difficult to study and remains an important area of investigation. Sperm typically execute a sinusoidal waveform. Increased viscosity in the medium induces somewhat unusual arc-line and helical waveforms in some sperm. However, whether the latter two waveforms occur in vivo is not known. Using green fluorescence protein imaging, we show that Drosophila sperm in the uterus move in circular foci via arc-line waves, predominantly in a tail-leading orientation. From the uterus, a small fraction of the sperm enters the seminal receptacle (SR) in parallel formations. After sperm storage and coincident with fertilization of the egg, the sperm exit the SR via head-leading helical waves. Consistent with the observed bidirectional movements, the sperm show the ability to propagate both base-to-tip and tip-to-base flagellar waves. Numerous studies have shown that sperm motility is regulated by intraflagellar calcium concentrations; in particular, the Pkd2 calcium channel has been shown to affect sperm storage. Our analyses here suggest that Pkd2 is required for the sperm to adopt the correct waveform and movement orientation during SR entry. A working model for the sperm's SR entry movement is proposed. PMID:21293028

  14. Sperm motility under conditions of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, U; Krassnigg, F; Schill, W B

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in motility of frozen and thawed bull spermatozoa under conditions of weightlessness compared with ground conditions. The tests were performed within a series of scientific and technologic experiments under microgravity using sounding rockets in the Technologische Experimente unter Schwerelosigkeit (TEXUS) program launched in Kiruna, North Sweden. Using a computerized sperm motility analyzer, significant differences were found in sperm motility under microgravity compared with sperm under gravitational conditions on earth. Computer analysis showed alterations in straight line and curvilinear velocity, as well as in linearity values. The amount of progressively motile spermatozoa, including all spermatozoa with a velocity > 20 microns/second, increased significantly from 24% +/- 9.5% in the reference test to 49% +/- 7.6% in the microgravity test. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that gravity influences sperm motility.

  15. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  16. Laser radiation and motility patterns of human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, A.; Claroni, F.; Gandini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Barbieri, C.; Lino, A.; Dondero, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Human sperm were exposed in vitro to laser radiation. An increase in progressive sperm motility was associated with a faster rate of sperm ATP consumption. Computer-assisted analysis of sperm motility confirmed the positive effect of laser irradiation on velocity and linearity of sperm.

  17. Effects of environment factors on initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Shao, Mingyu; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2011-06-01

    Sperm of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) were quiescent in electrolyte NaCl solution and artificial seawater (ASW) and nonelectrolyte glucose and mannitol solutions when the osmolality was less than 200 mOsm kg-1. The sperm started to be motile as a result of increased osmolality, indicating an osmolality-dependent initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber. After a brief incubation in hypotonic NaCl and glucose solutions with osmolalities of 200 and 400 mOsm kg-1, sperm lost partial motile ability. Sperm became immobilized when pH was 6.0 in NaCl, glucose and mannitol solutions, suggesting that an H+ release is involved in sperm activation. The decreased pH had no effect on the percentage of motile sperm in ASW, whereas it delayed the time period to reach the maximum motility (motilitymax). Extracellular Ca2+ in electrolyte solutions was not essential for motility stimulation but shortened the time of reaching motilitymax. When Ca2+ was mixed in nonelectrolyte solutions the sperm motility was completely suppressed. The K+ channel blocker, quinine, suppressed the sperm motility in electrolyte solution, showing a possible involvement of K+ transport in the process. High K+ concentration did not affect the sperm motility in NaCl solution, but decreased it in ASW and almost entirely suppressed it in nonelectrolyte solutions. The different effects of pH and K+ in ASW and NaCl solution indicate that external ions may also regulate sperm motility.

  18. Cryopreservation of European catfish Silurus glanis sperm: sperm motility, viability, and hatching success of embryos.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Otomar; Rodina, Marek; Flajshans, Martin; Gela, David; Kocour, Martin

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to elaborate cryopreservation methods for ex situ conservation of European catfish. The success of sperm cryopreservation was evaluated by post-thaw sperm motility and velocity, percentage of live spermatozoa and fertility (hatching rates) using frozen/thawed sperm. The best hatching rates of 82-86% were obtained with sperm stored for 5 h before freezing in immobilizing solution and frozen with Me2SO in concentrations of 8, 10, and 12%, or with a mixture of 5% Me2SO and 5% propandiole. These results did not significantly differ from the fresh sperm control sample. The percentage of live spermatozoa in frozen/thawed sperm did not correlate with hatching rate or motility of spermatozoa, but was negatively correlated with velocity of spermatozoa (r=-0.47, P=0.05). The percentage motility in frozen/thawed sperm ranged from 8 to 62%, when sperm was stored in immobilizing solution 5h before freezing. The average value in the fresh sperm (control) was 96%. The frozen/thawed sperm motility rate significantly correlated with the hatching rate (r=0.76, P=0.0002), but not with the percentage of live spermatozoa (r=0.16, P=0.52) or the sperm velocity (r=0.07, P=0.79). The velocity of frozen/thawed spermatozoa ranged from 37 to 85 microm/s, whereby methanol concentrations of 7.5 and 10% resulted in highest velocities. Freezing sperm volumes of 1-4 ml did not affect the quality of frozen/thawed sperm.

  19. Sperm count and sperm motility decrease in old rats.

    PubMed

    Lucio, Rosa Angélica; Tlachi-López, José L; Eguibar, Jose R; Ågmo, Anders

    2013-02-17

    Sexual behavior declines with age in male rats. The rate and magnitude of this decline may depend on the amount of prior sexual experience and a number of other, unidentified factors. Age-dependent changes in the characteristics of ejaculate quality in rats have not been described earlier, and the relationship between such changes and modifications of sexual behavior is likewise unknown. We have recently developed a technique for the detailed analysis of parameters of ejaculate in rats, and this technique was used for the determination of semen and seminal plug characteristics in rats of different ages. Sexually experienced Wistar rats were tested for sex behavior at the ages of 3, 12 and 24 months. Semen was obtained from the female partner immediately after ejaculation at these tests. Between tests, the males were offered the opportunity to copulate once every 3-4 weeks. The behavioral data showed that the latency to ejaculation was increased only at 24 months. Concerning the characteristics of semen, there was a substantial increase in the proportion of immobile spermatozoa and motility of those moving was much reduced, both at 12 and 24 months of age. There was no relationship between parameters of sexual behavior and those of the ejaculate. Likewise, the size of the seminal plug did not affect the amount of intrauterine spermatozoa. The reduced sperm number together with the increased sperm immobility diminishes the ejaculate quality of old males, which could influence fertility.

  20. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies.

  1. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies. PMID:26680031

  2. Modulation of mammalian sperm motility by quercetin.

    PubMed

    Nass-Arden, L; Breitbart, H

    1990-04-01

    The flavonoid quercetin inhibits collective motility of ejaculated ram spermatozoa in the first 2 hr of incubation; during the next 3-4 hr motility is stimulated. To explain this interesting effect, we followed the influence of quercetin on sperm glycolysis, extracellular pH, ATP content, mitochondrial respiration, and lipid peroxidation. The collective motility of untreated cells is decreased to about 40% of the original motility during two hours of incubation. During this time, the rate of glycolysis is constant, respiration rate is increasing, there is no change in ATP content, the rate of lipid peroxidation is very slow, and the extracellular pH became very acidic (pH 5.5). It is concluded that motility is decreased due to this acidification. This acidification is prevented to some extent by quercetin, which indirectly inhibits glycolysis. Quercetin inhibits motility due to the inhibition of the plasma membrane calcium pump, as we showed previously (Breitbart et al., J Biol Chem 260:11548-11553, 1985). The motility of untreated cells is arrested after 3.5 hr of incubation, whereas quercetin-treated cells show high motility, which continues for additional 2-3 hr. After 3.5 hr, the control cells show no glycolytic activity, ATP content and respiration rates are decreased, and rate of lipid peroxidation is highly increased. At this time, quercetin-treated cells show no glycolytic activity, only a small decrease in ATP content and respiratory rate, and a very low rate of lipid peroxidation. Based on these data it is concluded that sperm motility after 3.5 hr of incubation is dependent mainly on mitochondrial respiration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Study of human sperm motility post cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Bhavni; Kumar, Sushil; Talwar, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is a widely used technique to preserve the fertility of males. It can also benefit the armed forces personnel who are to be sent for long recruitments, while leaving their families behind. This study, apart from studying the effects of freezing and thawing, reveals the effect of the post thaw interval on the motility of the human spermatozoa and thus widens the insemination window period. Methods A detailed semen analysis was carried out as per the WHO guidelines for 25 samples. The samples were then washed, analysed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. The semen samples were subsequently thawed and similarly analysed after 20 min and 40 min of thawing. This was then followed by statistical analysis of the comparative motilities. Results Motility of sperms is found to decrease after cryopreservation. However, the study revealed that after thawing a significant increase in the motility of the sperms was noted with the progression of time (p < 0.05). Conclusion By simulating conditions similar to the in vivo conditions for the post thaw semen samples, we can safely wait, confirm the parameters like motility and count, and then inseminate the samples instead of blindly inseminating them immediately after thawing. PMID:25382909

  4. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Rosales, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010). A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml) to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD) and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03), achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms. PMID:27441054

  5. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 10th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  6. Relationship between Porcine Sperm Motility and Sperm Enzymatic Activity using Paper-based Devices.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Koji; Huang, Han-Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2017-04-07

    Mammalian sperm motility has traditionally been analyzed to determine fertility using computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) systems. To develop low-cost and robust male fertility diagnostics, we created a paper-based MTT assay and used it to estimate motile sperm concentration. When porcine sperm motility was inhibited using sperm enzyme inhibitors for sperm enzymes related to mitochondrial activity and glycolysis, we simultaneously recorded sperm motility and enzymatic reactivity using a portable motility analysis system (iSperm) and a paper-based MTT assay, respectively. When using our paper-based MTT-assay, we calculated the area mean value signal intensity (AMV) to evaluate enzymatic reactivity. Both sperm motility and AMV decreased following treatment with iodoacetamide (IODO) and 3-bromopyruvic acid (3BP), both of which are inhibitors of glycolytic enzymes including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). We found a correlation between recorded motility using iSperm and AMV from our paper-based assay (P < 0.05), suggesting that a sperm-related enzymatic reaction is involved in sperm motility. Under this protocol, MTT reduction was coupled with catalysis of GAPDH and was promoted by electron transfer from NADH. Based on this inhibitor study, sperm motility can be estimated using our paper-based MTT-assay.

  7. Relationship between Porcine Sperm Motility and Sperm Enzymatic Activity using Paper-based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Koji; Huang, Han-Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian sperm motility has traditionally been analyzed to determine fertility using computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) systems. To develop low-cost and robust male fertility diagnostics, we created a paper-based MTT assay and used it to estimate motile sperm concentration. When porcine sperm motility was inhibited using sperm enzyme inhibitors for sperm enzymes related to mitochondrial activity and glycolysis, we simultaneously recorded sperm motility and enzymatic reactivity using a portable motility analysis system (iSperm) and a paper-based MTT assay, respectively. When using our paper-based MTT-assay, we calculated the area mean value signal intensity (AMV) to evaluate enzymatic reactivity. Both sperm motility and AMV decreased following treatment with iodoacetamide (IODO) and 3-bromopyruvic acid (3BP), both of which are inhibitors of glycolytic enzymes including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). We found a correlation between recorded motility using iSperm and AMV from our paper-based assay (P < 0.05), suggesting that a sperm-related enzymatic reaction is involved in sperm motility. Under this protocol, MTT reduction was coupled with catalysis of GAPDH and was promoted by electron transfer from NADH. Based on this inhibitor study, sperm motility can be estimated using our paper-based MTT-assay. PMID:28387379

  8. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than that of freshwater fish sperm (~150 seconds), with the longevities of both marine and freshwater fish being significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of anuran sperm (~4100 seconds). The average velocity of anuran sperm (25 μm/s) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of marine fish (140 μm/s) or freshwater fish (135 μm/s) sperm. The longevity of the sperm of giant salamanders (Cryptobranchoidea) of approximately 600 seconds was greater than that of freshwater fish sperm but much lower than anuran sperm. Our research and information from the literature showed that higher osmolarities promote greater longevity in anuran sperm, and some freshwater fish sperm, and that anuran and cryptobranchid sperm maintained membrane integrity long after the cessation of motility, demonstrating a preferential sharing of energy reserves toward the maintenance of membrane integrity. The maintenance of the membrane integrity of anuran sperm in fresh water for up to 6 hours showed an extremely high osmotic tolerance relative to fish sperm. The very high longevity and osmotic tolerance of anuran sperm and high longevity of cryptobranchid sperm, relative to those of freshwater fish, may reflect the complex fertilization history of amphibian sperm in

  9. Preventive effect of Desferal on sperm motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Nenkova, Galina; Stefanov, Rossen; Chervenkov, Mihail; Alexandrova, Albena

    2016-08-01

    Transition metal ions, mainly iron, are involved in the generation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which are the most powerful inducers of oxidative damage to all biomolecules. The lipids in sperm membranes are highly susceptible to oxidation. Sperm lipid peroxidation (LPO) leads to decrease of motility and reduction of likelihood for sperm-oocyte fusion. The excess radical production may affect also the spermatozoa morphology. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Desferal on the LPO, motility, and morphology of boar sperm subjected to oxidative stress. After collection, the ejaculates were equally separated and diluted in a commercial semen extender (experiment 1) or in physiological saline (experiment 2). The ejaculates of the 2 experiments were divided into aliquots, which were incubated with one of the following agents: FeSO4 (0.1mM), H2 O2 (0.5mM), or FeSO4  + H2 O2 (Fenton system), in the presence or absence of Desferal. The application of Desferal in the incubation medium had a protective effect against FeSO4  + H2 O2 -induced sperm damage, namely, decrease of LPO; decrease the quantity of immotile spermatozoa and decrease the number of morphological abnormalities, regardless of the used medium. In experiment 2, the presence of FeSO4 in the incubation medium induced LPO in the same range as the combination FeSO4  + H2 O2 , in which the effect was reduced by Desferal. Thus, the supplement of Desferal to media used for sperm storage and processing could be a useful tool for diminishing oxidative injury and improving the quality of the semen.

  10. Inhibition of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase by acetamide affects sperm motility and fertilization success of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, B; Glogowski, J; Cejko, B I; Kujawa, R; Szczepkowski, M; Kuźmiński, H; Dobosz, S; Kowalski, R K

    2014-03-15

    β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase (β-NAGase) is an enzyme found in the sperm acrosome of numerous animal species including fish. Fish spermatozoa differ in their morphology including acrosome or acrosomeless aquasperm in chondrostean (e.g., sturgeon) and teleostean (e.g., rainbow trout). It has been shown that β-NAGase exists with high activity in both eggs and sperm of these species. The present study shows the potency of β-NAGase in fertilization. In rainbow trout, increase in sperm motility parameters (VAP and MOT) were observed in the presence of acetamide, an inhibitor for β-NAGase. In contrast, sperm motility parameters (VCL, VSL, VAP, MOT, and PRG) were reduced on the Siberian sturgeon in the presence of acetamide. The inhibition of the activity of β-NAGase in rainbow trout spermatozoa was led to a reduction in the number of fertilized eggs from 79% to 40%, whereas in sturgeon no change was observed in fertilization. Moreover, inhibition of β-NAGase in both spermatozoa and eggs of trout and sturgeon resulted in significant decrease in fertilization rate from 79% to 1% in rainbow trout and from 84% to 12% in Siberian sturgeon. Our research proves that β-NAGase can play a significant role in the fertilization process in teleosteans.

  11. Relationship between stallion sperm motility and viability as detected by two fluorescence staining techniques using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Love, C C; Thompson, J A; Brinsko, S P; Rigby, S L; Blanchard, T L; Lowry, V K; Varner, D D

    2003-10-01

    Relationships between sperm motility parameters and viability were evaluated using two fluorescent staining techniques in fresh extended semen (fresh and after 24 h storage at 5 degrees C) that had various concentrations of dead sperm added to simulate different levels of viable and nonviable sperm. Both protocols incorporated SYBR-14 and propidium iodide (PI) while the second protocol added the mitochondrial probe JC-1. The relationship between total sperm motility and percent viable sperm was high between staining protocols (r = 0.98). Time (0 h versus 24 h, P<0.0001) and treatment (0, 10, 25, 50, and 75% nonviable sperm, P<0.0001) affected percent total sperm motility and percent viable sperm for both staining protocols. Actual percent viable sperm for each time and treatment did not differ from expected values.

  12. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  13. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  14. Queen reproductive tract secretions enhance sperm motility in ants

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Boris; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2016-01-01

    Queens of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants store sperm of multiple males after a single mating flight, and never remate even though they may live for decades and lay tens of thousands of eggs. Sperm of different males are initially transferred to the bursa copulatrix and compete for access to the long-term storage organ of queens, but the factors determining storage success or failure have never been studied. We used in vitro experiments to show that reproductive tract secretions of Acromyrmex echinatior queens increase sperm swimming performance by at least 50% without discriminating between sperm of brothers and unrelated males. Indiscriminate female-induced sperm chemokinesis makes the likelihood of storage directly dependent on initial sperm viability and thus provides a simple mechanism to secure maximal possible reproductive success of queens, provided that initial sperm motility is an accurate predictor of viability during later egg fertilization. PMID:27807252

  15. Egg jelly proteins stimulate directed motility in Xenopus laevis sperm.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Lindsey A; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Bieber, Allan L; Chandler, Douglas E

    2011-06-01

    Previously we have shown that extracts from Xenopus egg jelly (egg water) increase the passage of sperm through a porous membrane in a dose-dependent manner. Although this assay has shown that sperm accumulation occurs only in the presence of an egg water gradient, it has not revealed the dynamic features of how Xenopus sperm swim in such gradients. Here, we use video microscopic observations to trace sperm trajectories in a Zigmond chamber. Our results show that Xenopus sperm swim in linear and gently curving paths and only infrequently perform turns. In the presence of an egg water gradient, however, the percent of sperm swimming up the gradient axis and the net distance traveled by each sperm along this axis was increased significantly. There was no change in curvilinear velocity. Rather, the orientation of sperm travel was shifted to more closely match that of the gradient axis. In addition, using a porous filter assay, we demonstrate that the egg water protein allurin, in both purified and recombinant forms, stimulates directed motility of sperm. Finally, we use Oregon Green 488-conjugated allurin to show that this protein binds primarily to the sperm midpiece; binding of allurin to the entire head was observed in a minor subpopulation of sperm. Dose dependence of allurin binding occurred over the 0-1 µg/ml range and correlated well with previously published dose-dependent sperm attraction data. Binding was rapid with a half-time of about 10 sec. These data suggest that egg water proteins bind to sperm and modify sperm-orienting behavior.

  16. Rat sperm motility analysis: methodologic considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of these studies was to optimize conditions for computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of rat epididymal spermatozoa. Methodologic issues addressed include sample collection technique, sampling region within the epididymis, type of diluent medium used, and sample c...

  17. Effects of freezing/thawing on motile sperm subpopulations of boar and donkey ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Flores, E; Taberner, E; Rivera, M M; Peña, A; Rigau, T; Miró, J; Rodríguez-Gil, J E

    2008-10-01

    The main aim of this study is to assess the influence of freeze/thawing on motile sperm subpopulations in ejaculates from two phylogenetically different mammalian species, boar and donkey. Our results indicate that, whereas boar and donkey sperm respond very differently in their mean motion characteristics to freezing/thawing, this process did not change the existence of a 4-subpopulations structure in the ejaculates in either species when these subpopulations were defined by taking values of curvilinear velocity (VCL) as reference. Moreover, the freezing/thawing-linked changes in mean sperm-motion characteristics in both boar and donkey semen were especially due to changes in the proportion among each concrete subpopulation. In this way, the freezing/thawing-induced mean increase in motion characteristics observed in boar sperm was a result of the decrease in the percentage of sperm in Subpopulation 1 (from 53.9%+/-4.7% to 31.2%+/-3.9% after thawing) and a concomitant increase of sperm from Subpopulations 3 (from 13.3%+/-2.5% to 32.6%+/-3.9% after thawing) and 4 (from 3.4%+/-0.9% to 8.0%+/-1.1% after thawing). On the contrary, changes in mean motility of frozen/thawed donkey sperm were linked to an increase in the percentage of sperm in Subpopulation 1 (from 31.5%+/-4.3% to 58.8%+/-4.9% after thawing) and a concomitant decrease of sperm from Subpopulations 3 (from 32.4%+/-3.2% to 6.6%+/-1.8% after thawing) and 4 (from 12.2%+/-2.5% to 7.3%+/-1.9% after thawing). In conclusion, our results seem to indicate that motility changes induced by the freezing/thawing protocol are linked to concomitant changes in both the specific parameters and, more importantly, to the specific percentage of each of the motile sperm subpopulations. These changes did not affect the overall proportion of motile sperm present in both boar and donkey, which is conserved despite the detrimental effect caused by freezing/thawing in both species. Finally, the presence of some kind of motile sperm

  18. Cryopreservation of sperm in common carp Cyprinus carpio: sperm motility and hatching success of embryos.

    PubMed

    Linhart, O; Rodina, M; Cosson, J

    2000-11-01

    In this study, fish sperm cryopreservation methods were elaborated upon for ex situ conservation of nine strains of Bohemian common carp. Common carp sperm were diluted in Kurokura medium and chilled to 4 degrees C and dimethyl sulfoxide was added. Cryotubes of sperm with media were then cooled from +4 to -9 degrees C at a rate of 4 degrees C min(-1) and then from -9 to -80 degrees C at a rate of 11 degrees C min(-1), held for 6 min at -80 degrees C, and finally transferred into liquid N(2). The spermatozoa were thawed in a water bath at 35 degrees C for 110 s and checked for fertilization yield, hatching yield of embryos, and larval malformations. Fresh and frozen/thawed sperm were evaluated for the percentage and for the velocity of motile sperm from video frames using image analysis. The percentage and velocity of sperm motility at 15 s after activation of frozen/thawed sperm was significantly lower than that of fresh sperm (nine males). ANOVA showed a significant influence of fresh vs frozen/thawed sperm on fertilization rate (P < 0.0001), but differences in hatching rate and in larval malformation (0-6.8%) were not significant, and different males had a significant influence on fertilization and hatching rate (P < 0.003 and P < 0.007, respectively). Multiple range analysis (LSD) showed significant differences between fresh and frozen/thawed sperm regarding fertilization rate (68 +/- 11 and 56 +/- 10%, respectively) and insignificant differences between fresh and frozen/thawed sperm on the hatching rate (50 +/- 18 and 52 +/- 9%, respectively). The percentage and velocity of fresh sperm motility were correlated, respectively, with the fertilization yield of frozen/thawed sperm at the levels r = 0.51 and r = 0.54.

  19. A low conductivity culture medium suitable for the evaluation of sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Han, Chao; Sun, Zilong; Huang, Guoliang; Yu, Zhongyao; Zhou, Yuxiang; Wang, Jundong; Qiao, Jie; Cheng, Jing

    2008-12-01

    A novel culture medium of low conductivity suitable for dielectrophoretic selection of sperm was developed. Conventional IVF methods lack the capability of selecting the expected sperms and the embryonic development may be adversely affected to certain extent. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a technique commonly applied in cell manipulation [1], may provide an alternative. However, the conventional IVF medium has a high conductivity, which may result in the unexpected heating effect during DEP causing damage to the gametes. The newly developed medium consists of sucrose, HEPES, BSA and low concentrations of ions. The conductivity of this medium is significantly lower than the conventional IVF medium. Motility and membrane integrality of the mouse sperm were tested in the low-conductivity medium, demonstrating an acceptable percent rate of motile sperm compared to the control groups.

  20. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  1. Diet-induced obesity in rats leads to a decrease in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is rapidly becoming a worldwide epidemic that affects children and adults. Some studies have shown a relationship between obesity and infertility, but until now it remains controversial. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet-induced obesity on male reproductive parameters. Methods In a first experiment, male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or standard chow (SD) for 15, 30 or 45 weeks, after which they were evaluated by adiposity index, serum leptin levels, reproductive organ weights and sperm counts. In a second experiment, rats received HFD or SD only for 15 weeks, long enough to cause obesity. Sexual hormones and sexual behavior were evaluated in these animals, as well as fertility after natural mating. Another group of rats was submitted to motility analysis and fertility evaluation after in utero insemination. Results After 15, 30 or 45 weeks, HFD-fed animals presented significant increases in obesity index and serum leptin levels. Reproductive organ weights and sperm counts in the testis and epididymis were similar between the two groups at all timepoints studied. Sexual behavior was not altered by the diet regimen, and HFD fertility after natural mating was also similar to SD-fed animals. Intergroup testosterone levels were also comparable, but estradiol levels were increased in HFD rats. Furthermore, sperm quality was reduced in HFD animals as evidenced by their decreased percentage of sperm with progressive movement. This altered motility parameter was followed by a trend toward reduction in fertility potential after artificial in utero insemination. Conclusions The results reported herein showed that obesity can affect sperm quality, by reducing sperm motility, without affecting other sperm parameters. The low sperm quality caused a slight reduction in fertility potential, showing that obesity may lead to impairment in male fertility. PMID:21396114

  2. Chemotactic Motility of Sperm in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Chemical gradients are utilized by plants and animals in sexual reproduction to guide swimming sperm cells toward the egg. This process (``chemotaxis''), which can greatly increase the success of fertilization, is subject to interference by fluid flow, both in the bodily conduits of internal fertilizers (e.g. mammals) and in the aquatic environment of external fertilizers (e.g. benthic invertebrates). We studied the biomechanics of chemotaxing sea urchin spermatozoa using microfluidic devices, which allow for the precise and independent control of attractant gradients and fluid shear. We captured swimming trajectories and flagellar beat patterns using high-speed video-microscopy, to detect chemotactic responses and measure the effect of fluid forces on swimming. This work will ultimately help us to understand how swimming sperm cells actively navigate natural chemoattractant gradients for successful fertilization.

  3. Speract, a sea urchin egg peptide that regulates sperm motility, also stimulates sperm mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    García-Rincón, Juan; Darszon, Alberto; Beltrán, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Sea urchin sperm have only one mitochondrion, that in addition to being the main source of energy, may modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to regulate their motility and possibly the acrosome reaction. Speract is a decapeptide from the outer jelly layer of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus egg that upon binding to its receptor in the sperm, stimulates sperm motility, respiration and ion fluxes, among other physiological events. Altering the sea urchin sperm mitochondrial function with specific inhibitors of this organelle, increases [Ca(2+)]i in an external Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext)-dependent manner (Ardón, et al., 2009. BBActa 1787: 15), suggesting that the mitochondrion is involved in sperm [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis. To further understand the interrelationship between the mitochondrion and the speract responses, we measured mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) and NADH levels. We found that the stimulation of sperm with speract depolarizes the mitochondrion and increases the levels of NADH. Surprisingly, these responses are independent of external Ca(2+) and are due to the increase in intracellular pH (pHi) induced by speract. Our findings indicate that speract, by regulating pHi, in addition to [Ca(2+)]i, may finely modulate mitochondrial metabolism to control motility and ensure that sperm reach the egg and fertilize it.

  4. [Impacts of ultraviolet irradiation on the sperm motility and longevity of Acipenser baerii].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yan, Shi-wei; Zhang, Long-zhen; Zhuang, Ping; Tian, Mei-ping; Yan, Wen-gang; Jiang, Qi; Yao, Zhi-feng

    2011-08-01

    This paper studied the impacts of different dose ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm, UVC) on the sperm motility and longevity of Acipenser baerii. Ultraviolet irradiation had significant impacts on the sperm motility, its fast motion time, and longevity. With the increasing dose of ultraviolet irradiation, the sperm motility decreased rapidly first, increased rapidly then, and decreased rapidly again. The sperm fast motion time had the similar variation trend as the sperm motility, but the sperm longevity kept decreasing with increasing dose of ultraviolet irradiation. When the ultraviolet irradiation dose increased to 288 mJ x cm(-2), the sperm fast motion disappeared; when the ultraviolet irradiation dose increased up to 324 mJ x cm(-2), the sperm had no motility and died. According to the "Hertwig effect", the optimum ultraviolet irradiation dose for inactivating A. baerii sperm was 216 mJ x cm(-2).

  5. Rotation of Boar Semen Doses During Storage Affects Sperm Quality.

    PubMed

    Schulze, M; Rüdiger, K; Waberski, D

    2015-08-01

    It is common practice to rotate boar semen doses during storage for prevention of sperm sedimentation. In this study, the effect of rotation of boar semen doses during storage on sperm quality was investigated. Manual turning twice daily and automatic rotation five times per hour resulted in the following effects: alkalinization of the BTS-extender, loss of membrane integrity at day 3, and loss of motility and changes in sperm kinematics during a thermoresistance test at day 5. Using a pH-stabilized variant of BTS extender, sperm motility and velocity decreased in continuously rotated samples, whereas membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity remain unaffected. It is concluded that rotation of semen samples adversely affects sperm quality and, therefore, should no longer be recommended for AI practice.

  6. Melatonin intake since weaning ameliorates steroidogenic function and sperm motility of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    da Costa, C F P; Gobbo, M G; Taboga, S R; Pinto-Fochi, M E; Góes, R M

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin may be used as an antioxidant in therapy against systemic sequelae caused by oxidative stress in diabetes. However, as melatonin has a major role in regulating reproductive activity, its consequence on reproductive parameters under diabetes needs to be better clarified. We have studied whether prior and concomitant treatment of juvenile Wistar rats with low doses of melatonin interferes in reproductive damage induced by experimental diabetes after 1 and 8 weeks. The consequences of melatonin administration since weaning on reproductive parameters of healthy rats at adulthood were also evaluated. Melatonin was provided in drinking water (10 μg/kg b.w./day) after weaning (5-week-old). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (4.5 mg/100 g b.w.) at 13-week-old rats, and rats were euthanized 1 and 8 weeks after disease onset. Diabetes decreased circulating testosterone levels (~35% to 1 week; ~62% to 2 months; p < 0.01) but did not affect testes sperm counts. Two months of diabetes reduced the sperm reserve and led to atrophy of epididymal cauda. Both 1-week and 2-month diabetes impaired sperm motility, decreased the number of spermatozoa with progressive movement, and increased the number of immotile sperm. Melatonin intake reduced serum testosterone levels ~29% in healthy 14-week-old and ~23% in 21-week-old rats and reduced daily testicular sperm production ~26% in the latter disease stage, but did not interfere in sperm reserves and transit time for both experimental periods. Exogenous melatonin prevented the serum testosterone decrease and damage to sperm motility in diabetic rats and attenuated reduction in sperm counts and transit time induced by 1-week diabetes but did not avoid this decrease at 2-month diabetes. Low doses of melatonin administered prior to and during experimental diabetes attenuated damage to testicular steroidogenic activity and preserved sperm motility, but not sperm reserves in the rat. Our data indicated a

  7. Lactic acid is a sperm motility inactivation factor in the sperm storage tubules

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Mei; Mizushima, Shusei; Hiyama, Gen; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Shiba, Kogiku; Inaba, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kohsaka, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Yoshinobu; Atsumi, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Takashi; Sasanami, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Although successful fertilization depends on timely encounters between sperm and egg, the decoupling of mating and fertilization often confers reproductive advantages to internally fertilizing animals. In several vertebrate groups, postcopulatory sperm viability is prolonged by storage in specialized organs within the female reproductive tract. In birds, ejaculated sperm can be stored in a quiescent state within oviductal sperm storage tubules (SSTs), thereby retaining fertilizability for up to 15 weeks at body temperature (41 °C); however, the mechanism by which motile sperm become quiescent within SSTs is unknown. Here, we show that low oxygen and high lactic acid concentrations are established in quail SSTs. Flagellar quiescence was induced by lactic acid in the concentration range found in SSTs through flagellar dynein ATPase inactivation following cytoplasmic acidification (sperm morphology under hypoxic and high temperature conditions indicates that a combination of these factors enables sperm cells to survive during the ovulation cycles. Our findings suggested a novel physiological role for lactic acid in promoting sperm quiescence in SSTs and opened up a new opportunity for technological improvement in prolonging sperm longevity at ambient or body temperature. PMID:26619826

  8. In vitro effects of nicotine on sperm motility and bio-functional flow cytometry sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, R A; La Vignera, S; Giacone, F; Iacoviello, L; Vicari, E; Mongioi', L; Calogero, A E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effects of nicotine on sperm motility and on non-conventional sperm parameters in vitro. Capacitated spermatozoa isolated from 10 normozoospermic, healthy, non-smoker men were evaluated. Spermatozoa were exposed to increasing concentrations of nicotine (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml) for 3 and 24 hours. Progressive motility and the following non-conventional sperm parameters, evaluated by flow cytometry, were assessed: mitochondrial membrane potential, viability, phosphatidylserine externalization, late apoptosis, degree of chromatin compactness, and DNA fragmentation. Nicotine suppressed, in a concentration-dependent manner, sperm progressive motility starting from the lowest concentration used (1 ng/ml). Similarly, it reduced the percentage of viable spermatozoa and increased the number of spermatozoa in late apoptosis, with altered chromatin compactness, or DNA fragmentation already after 3 hours of incubation. These effects were observed at a concentration similar (100 ng/ml) to that found in the seminal plasma of smokers (70 ng/ml), with the exception of the effects on sperm DNA fragmentation whose significant effect was detected also at a lower concentration (10 ng/ml). Nicotine may be regarded as a noxious component of cigarette smoke on the male reproductive function.

  9. Metabolic activity of sperm cells: correlation with sperm cell concentration, viability and motility in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sabés-Alsina, Maria; Planell, Núria; Gil, Sílvia; Tallo-Parra, Oriol; Maya-Soriano, Maria José; Taberner, Ester; Piles, Miriam; Sabés, Manel; Lopez-Bejar, Manel

    2016-10-01

    The resazurin reduction test (RRT) is a useful technique to assess the metabolic rate of sperm cells. RRT depends on the ability of metabolically active cells to reduce the non-fluorescent dye resazurin to the fluorescent resorufin. The aim of this study was to develop a vital fluorometric method to evaluate metabolic activity of rabbit sperm cells. Twenty-five rabbit males were included in the study. Viability and morphology, motility and metabolic activity were evaluated using an eosin-nigrosin staining, a computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and the RRT, respectively. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between RRT and semen parameters. After evaluation, a concentration of 10 × 106 sperm cells/ml was selected for further experiments with RRT. No significant correlation was found between the RRT results and the motility parameters. However, after RRT a significant positive correlation between relative fluorescence units and the percentage of alive spermatozoa (r = 0.62; P = 0.001) and a negative one with the percentage of sperm cells with acrosomic abnormalities (r = -0.45; P < 0.05) were detected. The vital assessment of metabolic rate of sperm cells by RRT could provide more information about semen quality than other routine semen analysis, correlating with sperm viability and acrosome status information.

  10. Neurosensory perception of environmental cues modulates sperm motility critical for fertilization.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Katherine; Hoang, Hieu D; Prasain, Jeevan K; Brown, Naoko; Vibbert, Jack; Hollister, Kyle A; Moore, Ray; Ragains, Justin R; Reese, Jeff; Miller, Michael A

    2014-05-16

    Environmental exposures affect gamete function and fertility, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that pheromones sensed by ciliated neurons in the Caenorhabditis elegans nose alter the lipid microenvironment within the oviduct, thereby affecting sperm motility. In favorable environments, pheromone-responsive sensory neurons secrete a transforming growth factor-β ligand called DAF-7, which acts as a neuroendocrine factor that stimulates prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase [cyclooxygenase (Cox)]-independent prostaglandin synthesis in the ovary. Oocytes secrete F-class prostaglandins that guide sperm toward them. These prostaglandins are also synthesized in Cox knockout mice, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms exist in other animals. Our data indicate that environmental cues perceived by the female nervous system affect sperm function.

  11. Regulation of sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis caused by egg-derived substance(s) in sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masaya; Kitamura, Makoto; Nakajima, Ayako; Sri Susilo, Endang; Takemura, Akihiro; Okuno, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    The sea cucumber Holothuria atra is a broadcast spawner. Among broadcast spawners, fertilization occurs by means of an egg-derived substance(s) that induces sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis. Holothuria atra sperm were quiescent in seawater, but exhibited flagellar motility activation near eggs with chorion (intact eggs). In addition, they moved in a helical motion toward intact eggs as well as a capillary filled with the water layer of the egg extracts, suggesting that an egg-derived compound(s) causes motility activation and chemotaxis. Furthermore, demembranated sperm flagella were reactivated in high pH (> 7.8) solution without cAMP, and a phosphorylation assay using (gamma-32P)ATP showed that axonemal protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation also occurred in a pH-dependent manner. These results suggest that the activation of sperm motility in holothurians is controlled by pH-sensitive changes in axonemal protein phosphorylation. Ca2+ concentration affected the swimming trajectory of demembranated sperm, indicating that Ca2+-binding proteins present at the flagella may be associated with regulation of flagellar waveform. Moreover, the phosphorylation states of several axonemal proteins were Ca2+-sensitive, indicating that Ca2+ impacts both kinase and phosphatase activities. In addition, in vivo sperm protein phosphorylation occurred after treatment with a water-soluble egg extract. Our results suggest that one or more egg-derived compounds activate motility and subsequent chemotactic behavior via Ca2+-sensitive flagellar protein phosphorylation.

  12. Fertilization of sea urchin eggs and sperm motility are negatively impacted under low hypergravitational forces significant to space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Kim, S.; Schuber, M.; Seibt, D.; Kinsey, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    Sperm and other flagellates swim faster in microgravity (microG) than in 1 G, raising the question of whether fertilization is altered under conditions of space travel. Such alterations have implications for reproduction of plant and animal food and for long-term space habitation by man. We previously demonstrated that microG accelerates protein phosphorylation during initiation of sperm motility but delays the sperm response to the egg chemotactic factor, speract. Thus sperm are sensitive to changes in gravitational force. New experiments using the NiZeMi centrifugal microscope examined whether low hypergravity (hyperG) causes effects opposite to microG on sperm motility, signal transduction, and fertilization. Sperm % motility and straight-line velocity were significantly inhibited by as little as 1.3 G. The phosphorylation states of FP130, an axonemal phosphoprotein, and FP160, a cAMP-dependent salt-extractable flagellar protein, both coupled to motility activation, showed a more rapid decline in hyperG. Most critically, hyperG caused an approximately 50% reduction in both the rate of sperm-egg binding and fertilization. The similar extent of inhibition of both fertilization parameters in hyperG suggests that the primary effect is on sperm rather than eggs. These results not only support our earlier microG data demonstrating that sperm are sensitive to small changes in gravitational forces but more importantly now show that this sensitivity affects the ability of sperm to fertilize eggs. Thus, more detailed studies on the impact of space flight on development should include studies of sperm function and fertilization.

  13. Neurosensory Perception of Environmental Cues Modulates Sperm Motility Critical for Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Katherine; Hoang, Hieu D.; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Brown, Naoko; Vibbert, Jack; Hollister, Kyle A.; Moore, Ray; Ragains, Justin R.; Reese, Jeff; Miller, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposures impact gamete function and fertility, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that pheromones sensed by ciliated neurons in the C. elegans nose alter the lipid microenvironment within the oviduct, thereby affecting sperm motility. In favorable environments, pheromone-responsive sensory neurons secrete a TGF-β ligand called DAF-7, which acts as a neuroendocrine factor that stimulates prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (Cox)-independent prostaglandin synthesis in the ovary. Oocytes secrete F class prostaglandins that guide sperm toward them. These prostaglandins are also synthesized in Cox knockout mice, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms exist in other animals. Our data indicate environmental cues perceived by the female nervous system affect sperm function. PMID:24833393

  14. Role of calcium on the initiation of sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Luz; Vílchez, M Carmen; Gallego, Víctor; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Asturiano, Juan F

    2016-01-01

    Sperm from European eel males treated with hCGrec was washed in a calcium free extender, and sperm motility was activated both in the presence (seawater, SW) and in the absence of calcium (NaCl+EDTA), and treated with calcium inhibitors or modulators. The sperm motility parameters were evaluated by a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system, and changes in the [Ca(2+)]i fluorescence (and in [Na(+)]i in some cases) were evaluated by flow cytometry. After sperm motility was activated in a medium containing Ca(2+) (seawater, SW) the intracellular fluorescence emitted by Ca(2+) increased 4-6-fold compared to the levels in quiescent sperm. However, while sperm activation in a Ca-free media (NaCl+EDTA) resulted in a percentage of motility similar to seawater, the [Ca(2+)]i levels did not increase at all. This result strongly suggests that increasing [Ca(2+)]i is not a pre-requisite for the induction of sperm motility in European eel sperm. Several sperm velocities (VCL, VSL, VAP) decreased when sperm was activated in the Ca-free activator, thus supporting the theory that Ca(2+) has a modulatory effect on sperm motility. The results indicate that a calcium/sodium exchanger (NCX) which is inhibited by bepridil and a calcium calmodulin kinase (inhibited by W-7), are involved in the sperm motility of the European eel. Our results indicate that the increase in [Ca(2+)]i concentrations during sperm activation is due to an influx from the external medium, but, unlike in most other species, it does not appear to be necessary for the activation of motility in European eel sperm.

  15. Clinically relevant enhancement of human sperm motility using compounds with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor activity

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Steve; Madamidola, Oladipo A.; Brown, Sean G.; Frame, Lorna; Lefièvre, Linda; Wyatt, Paul G.; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Martins Da Silva, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we identify compound(s) with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI) activity that could be added to human spermatozoa in vitro to enhance their motility without compromising other sperm functions? SUMMARY ANSWER We have identified several compounds that produce robust and effective stimulation of sperm motility and, importantly, have a positive response on patient samples. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY For >20 years, the use of non-selective PDEIs, such as pentoxifylline, has been known to influence the motility of human spermatozoa; however, conflicting results have been obtained. It is now clear that human sperm express several different phosphodiesterases and these are compartmentalized at different regions of the cells. By using type-specific PDEIs, differential modulation of sperm motility may be achieved without adversely affecting other functions such as the acrosome reaction (AR). STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a basic medical research study examining sperm samples from normozoospermic donors and subfertile patients attending the Assisted Conception Unit (ACU), Ninewells Hospital Dundee for diagnostic semen analysis, IVF and ICSI. Phase 1 screened 43 commercially available compounds with reported PDEI activity to identify lead compounds that stimulate sperm motility. Samples were exposed (20 min) to three concentrations (1, 10 and 100 µM) of compound, and selected candidates (n = 6) progressed to Phase 2, which provided a more comprehensive assessment using a battery of in vitro sperm function tests. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All healthy donors and subfertile patients were recruited at the Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee and ACU, Ninewells Hospital Dundee (ethical approval 08/S1402/6). In Phase 1, poor motility cells recovered from the 40% interface of the discontinuous density gradient were used as surrogates for patient samples. Pooled samples from three to four different donors were utilized in

  16. Sperm motility initiation by egg jelly of the anuran, Discoglossus pictus may be mediated by sperm motility-initiating substance of the internally-fertilizing newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Campanella, Chiara; Kubo, Hideo; Watanabe, Akihiko

    2012-11-01

    The egg jelly of Discoglossus pictus contains sperm motility-activating activity, the molecular basis of which has not been studied. Discoglossus pictus sperm initiated motility immediately after immersion in egg-jelly extract, as well as after immersion in hyposmotic solution, which initiates sperm motility in the external fertilization of anuran amphibians. Sequential treatment of the D. pictus sperm with these two solutions revealed the predominant effect of hyposmolality in initiation of motility. The motility initiation induced by jelly extract was suppressed by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that is specific for the 34 kDa sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS) in the egg jelly of the newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster. Immunoblotting using the anti-SMIS mAb revealed several antigenic proteins that included major ones with sizes of 18- and 34-kDa in D. pictus jelly extract. Scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that granules of jelly matrix, in which SMIS localizes and which have a critical role in the internal fertilization of C. pyrrhogaster, were not observed near the surface of the D. pictus egg jelly. These results suggest that sperm motility-activating activity in egg jelly of D. pictus may be mediated by SMIS homologous proteins that act through a mechanism that is partially different from that of C. pyrrhogaster.

  17. Microfluidic assessment of swimming media for motility-based sperm selection

    PubMed Central

    Eamer, Lise; Nosrati, Reza; Vollmer, Marion; Zini, Armand; Sinton, David

    2015-01-01

    Selection medium is important in sperm isolation for assisted reproductive technologies. Contrary to the naturally occurring human cervical mucus which has a high viscosity, most current practices for motility based sperm selection use a low viscosity medium. In this study, we used a microfluidic device to assess the effects of high viscosity media made with hyaluronic acid (HA) and methyl cellulose (MC) on bovine and human sperm motility and viability (sperm transferred directly from cryoprotectant). The microfluidic penetration test, viability, and motility were compared for sperm swimming in both HA and MC media with about 20cp viscosity (measured at 20 °C). Our resulted indicate that MC medium resulted in a significantly higher number of viable bovine sperm penetrating the medium as compared to HA. Furthermore, MC resulted in the selection of a sperm subpopulation with a 274% increase in sperm viability in comparison to the raw semen, while HA increased viability by only 133%. In addition to viability, bovine sperm motility parameters were significantly higher in the MC medium as compared with HA. Experiments with human sperm swimming in MC indicate that sperm swim slower and straighter at higher viscosities. In conclusion, the results indicate that in a micro-confined environment representative of the in vivo environment, MC is a preferred high viscosity medium to ensure the highest concentration of motile and viable sperm. PMID:26339314

  18. Sperm DNA damage or progressive motility: which one is the better predictor of fertilization in vitro?

    PubMed

    Simon, Luke; Lewis, Sheena E M

    2011-06-01

    Sperm progressive motility has been reported to be one of the key factors influencing in vitro fertilization rates. However, recent studies have shown that sperm DNA fragmentation is a more robust predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes including reduced fertilization rates, embryo quality, and pregnancy rates. This study aimed to compare the usefulness of sperm progressive motility and DNA damage as predictive tools of in vitro fertilization rates. Here, 136 couples provided 1,767 eggs with an overall fertilization rate of 64.2%. The fertilization rate in vitro correlated with both sperm progressive motility (r² = 0.236; P = 0.002) and DNA fragmentation (r² = -0.318; P < 0.001). The relative risk of a poor fertilization rate was 9.5 times higher in sperm of men with high DNA fragmentation (>40%) compared with 2.6 times in sperm with poor motility (<40%). Further, sperm DNA fragmentation gave a higher specificity (93.3%) in predicting the fertilization rate than progressive motility (77.8%). Finally, the odds ratio to determine fertilization rate (>70%) was 4.81 (1.89-12.65) using progressive motility compared with 24.18 (5.21-154.51) using DNA fragmentation. This study shows that fertilization rates are directly dependent upon both sperm progressive motility and DNA fragmentation, but sperm DNA fragmentation is a much stronger test.

  19. Mobile phones affect multiple sperm quality traits: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao

    2013-01-01

    As mobile phone usage is growing rapidly, there is a need for a comprehensive analysis of the literature to inform scientific debates about the adverse effects of mobile phone radiation on sperm quality traits. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of the eligible published research studies on human males of reproductive age. Eleven studies were eligible for this analysis. Based on the meta-analysis, mobile phone use was significantly associated with deterioration in semen quality (Hedges’s g = -0.547; 95% CI: -0.713, -0.382; p < 0.001). The traits particularly affected adversely were sperm concentration, sperm morphology, sperm motility, proportion of non-progressive motile sperm (%), proportion of slow progressive motile sperm (%), and sperm viability. Direct exposure of spermatozoa to mobile phone radiation with in vitro study designs also significantly deteriorated the sperm quality (Hedges’s g = -2.233; 95% CI: -2.758, -1.708; p < 0.001), by reducing straight line velocity, fast progressive motility, Hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test score, major axis (µm), minor axis (µm), total sperm motility, perimeter (µm), area (µm 2), average path velocity, curvilinear velocity, motile spermatozoa, and  acrosome reacted spermatozoa (%). The strength of evidence for the different outcomes varied from very low to very high. The analysis shows that mobile phone use is possibly associated with a number of deleterious effects on the spermatozoa. PMID:24327874

  20. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  1. Elemental composition of human semen is associated with motility and genomic sperm defects among older men

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thomas E.; Grant, Patrick G.; Marchetti, Francesco; Weldon, Rosana H.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Older men tend to have poorer semen quality and are generally at higher risks for infertility and abnormal reproductive outcomes. METHODS We employed proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE, 3 MeV proton beam) to investigate the concentrations of zinc, copper, calcium, sulfur, chlorine, potassium, titanium, iron and nickel in washed sperm and seminal plasma from non-smoking groups of 10 older men (65–80 years old) and 10 younger men (22–28 years old) who were concurrently assayed for sperm function and genomicly defective sperm. RESULTS The older group showed elevated zinc, copper and calcium in sperm and elevated sulfur in seminal plasma compared with the younger men. The older group also showed reduced motility as well as increased sperm DNA fragmentation, achondroplasia mutations, DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations. Sperm calcium and copper were positively associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (P < 0.03). Seminal sulfur was positively associated with sperm DNA fragmentation and chromosomal aberrations (P < 0.04), and negatively associated with sperm motility (P < 0.05). Sperm calcium was negatively associated with sperm motility, independent of male age (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS We identified major differences in elemental concentrations between sperm and seminal plasma and that higher sperm copper, sulfur and calcium are quantitatively associated with poorer semen quality and increased frequencies of genomic sperm defects. PMID:23042799

  2. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner's Sperm Motility and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Poverini, Roberta; Lisi, Rosella; Carra, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI) vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners' sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners. PMID:27403162

  3. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner's Sperm Motility and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Montanino Oliva, Mario; Poverini, Roberta; Lisi, Rosella; Carra, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI) vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners' sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners.

  4. Development of a novel CASA system based on open source software for characterization of zebrafish sperm motility parameters.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Leedy, Jonas G; Ingermann, Rolf L

    2007-02-01

    Although computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) outperforms manual techniques, many investigators rely on non-automated analysis due to the high cost of commercial options. In this study, we have written and validated a free CASA software primarily for analysis of fish sperm. This software is a plugin for the free National Institutes of Health software ImageJ and is available with documentation at . That it is open source makes possible external validation, should improve quality control and enhance the comparative value of data obtained among laboratories. In addition, we have improved upon the traditional velocity straight line (VSL) algorithm, eliminating inaccurate characterization of highly curved fish sperm paths. Using this system, the motion of zebrafish (Danio rerio) sperm was characterized relative to time post-activation and the impact of acquisition conditions upon data analysis determined. There were decreases in velocity and path straightness (STR), but not linearity (LIN), relative to time. From 30 to 300 frames/s, frame rate significantly affected curvilinear velocity (VCL) and STR measurements. Sperm density in the field of view did not affect any measured parameter. There was significant inter-male variation for VCL, VSL, velocity average path (VAP), percent motility, path character (STR, LIN), and duration of motility. Furthermore, relative sperm output (a measure reflecting both semen volume and concentration) was positively correlated to percent motility. For all motion parameters measured (except duration), the average CV was < or =10%, comparable to values obtained using commercial systems.

  5. Motility and acrosomal integrity comparisons between electro-ejaculated and epididymal ram sperm after exposure to a range of anisosmotic solutions, cryoprotective agents and low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Varisli, Omer; Uguz, Cevdet; Agca, Cansu; Agca, Yuksel

    2009-02-01

    Effective ram sperm cryopreservation protocols, which would yield acceptable lambing rates following artificial insemination (AI), are currently lacking. The objectives of the current studies were to compare the effects of various anisosmotic conditions, cryoprotective agents (CPAs) and chilling on the motility and acrosomal integrity of electro-ejaculated and epididymal ram sperm. Three experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, ejaculated and epididymal ram sperm were exposed to 75, 150, 225, 600, 900 and 1200 milliosmolal (mOsm)/kg sucrose solutions, held for 5 min and then returned to isosmotic condition. Motility characteristics of sperm during exposure to each anisosmotic solutions and after returning to isosmotic conditions were determined. In experiment 2, ejaculated and epididymal ram sperm were exposed to 1M glycerol (Gly), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG) for 5 min and then returned to isosmotic conditions. Motility characteristics of sperm samples during exposure to each CPA solution and after returning to isosmotic conditions were determined. In experiment 3, effects of various temperatures on motility characteristics of ejaculated and epididymal ram sperm were determined after exposing them to three different sub-physiologic temperatures (4, 10 and 22 degrees C) for 30 min and subsequently returning them to 37 degrees C. The motility of ejaculated ram sperm was significantly more affected from anisosmotic stress than was epididymal ram sperm (P<0.05). While anisosmotic stress had no effects on acrosomal integrity of epididymal ram sperm, there was a significant reduction in acrosomal integrity for ejaculated ram sperm after the addition and removal of a 75 mOsm sucrose solution. The abrupt addition and removal of 1M Gly, DMSO, EG or PG had no effect on the motility and acrosomal integrity of epididymal ram sperm (P>0.05). However, there was a slight decrease in acrosomal integrity for ejaculated ram sperm

  6. Removal of extracellular coat from giant sperm in female receptacle induces sperm motility in Mytilocypris mytiloides (Cyprididae, Ostracoda, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Matzke-Karasz, Renate; Smith, Robin J; Heß, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies of cypridoidean ostracods have noted that (1) their giant spermatozoa are immotile inside the male, (2) these spermatozoa are motile in the female seminal receptacle and (3) these receptacles are often filled with empty sperm coats. Such findings have led previous authors to hypothesize that sperm must shed their coats in the female receptacle to become motile. We present light and electron microscopy results and video recordings of mating experiments with virgin specimens of Mytilocypris mytiloides. We show that the empty sperm coats frequently found in the female receptacles are not the result of sperm molting but are the resistant inner coats of exhausted sperm not used for egg fertilization. In contrast, we show that an outer granular coating material is successively removed from the sperm while resident inside the female receptacles before first oviposition occurs. During this period, previously immotile sperm gain motility, showing strong movement shortly before first oviposition takes place. By correlation of these phenomena, we suggest that dissolution of the outer coat material is required for motility to develop.

  7. Effects of osmolality on sperm morphology, motility and flagellar wave parameters in Northern pike (Esox lucius L.).

    PubMed

    Alavi, S M Hadi; Rodina, Marek; Viveiros, Ana T M; Cosson, Jacky; Gela, David; Boryshpolets, Sergei; Linhart, Otomar

    2009-07-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) spermatozoa are uniflagellated cells differentiated into a head without acrosome, a midpiece and a flagellar tail region flanked by a fin structure. Total, flagellar, head and midpiece lengths of spermatozoa were measured and show mean values of 34.5, 32.0, 1.32, 1.17 microm, respectively, with anterior and posterior widths of the midpiece measuring 0.8 and 0.6 microm, respectively. The osmolality of seminal plasma ranged from 228 to 350 mOsmol kg(-1) (average: 283.88+/-33.05). After triggering of sperm motility in very low osmolality medium (distilled water), blebs appeared along the flagellum. At later periods in the motility phase, the tip of the flagellum became curled into a loop shape which resulted in a shortening of the flagellum and a restriction of wave development to the proximal part (close to head). Spermatozoa velocity and percentage of motile spermatozoa decreased rapidly as a function of time postactivation and depended on the osmolality of activation media (P<0.05). In general, the greatest percentage of motile spermatozoa and highest spermatozoa velocity were observed between 125 and 235 mOsmol kg(-1). Osmolality above 375 mOsmol kg(-1) inhibited the motility of spermatozoa. After triggering of sperm motility in activation media, beating waves propagated along the full length of flagella, while waves appeared dampened during later periods in the motility phase, and were absent at the end of the motility phase. By increasing osmolality, the velocity of spermatozoa reached the highest value while wave length, amplitude, number of waves and curvatures also were at their highest values. This study showed that sperm morphology can be used for fish classification. Sperm morphology, in particular, the flagellar part showed several changes during activation in distilled water. Sperm motility of pike is inhibited due to high osmolality in the seminal plasma. Osmolality of activation medium affects the percentage of motile

  8. A Role of TMEM16E Carrying a Scrambling Domain in Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Gyobu, Sayuri; Miyata, Haruhiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Yamazaki, Daiju; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 16E (TMEM16E) belongs to the TMEM16 family of proteins that have 10 transmembrane regions and appears to localize intracellularly. Although TMEM16E mutations cause bone fragility and muscular dystrophy in humans, its biochemical function is unknown. In the TMEM16 family, TMEM16A and -16B serve as Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, while TMEM16C, -16D, -16F, -16G, and -16J support Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scrambling. Here, we show that TMEM16E carries a segment composed of 35 amino acids homologous to the scrambling domain in TMEM16F. When the corresponding segment of TMEM16A was replaced by this 35-amino-acid segment of TMEM16E, the chimeric molecule localized to the plasma membrane and supported Ca2+-dependent scrambling. We next established TMEM16E-deficient mice, which appeared to have normal skeletal muscle. However, fertility was decreased in the males. We found that TMEM16E was expressed in germ cells in early spermatogenesis and thereafter and localized to sperm tail. TMEM16E−/− sperm showed no apparent defect in morphology, beating, mitochondrial function, capacitation, or binding to zona pellucida. However, they showed reduced motility and inefficient fertilization of cumulus-free but zona-intact eggs in vitro. Our results suggest that TMEM16E may function as a phospholipid scramblase at inner membranes and that its defect affects sperm motility. PMID:26667038

  9. Peptides in Seminal Fluid and Their Role in Infertility: A Potential Role for Opiorphin Inhibition of Neutral Endopeptidase Activity as a Clinically Relevant Modulator of Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelvin P.; Neal-Perry, Genevieve S.

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a devastating medical condition that adversely affects emotional health and well-being of couples who desire pregnancy and parenthood. The overall demographic data suggest that the indication for more than one-third of assisted reproductive technology cycles performed in the United States includes male factor infertility. There is increasing recognition of the role that peptides present in seminal plasma have in determining sperm motility. Several recent studies suggest that peptidases, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase N (APN), impose significant adverse effects on sperm motility. Interestingly, several recent studies demonstrate that there is an endogenous NEP/APN inhibitor peptide called opiorphin in human seminal plasma. Our pilot studies suggest opiorphin promotes sperm motility and may positively influence sperm motility parameters in some cases of males infertility characterized by asthenozoospermia. PMID:24855109

  10. Identification of phosphoproteins coupled to initiation of motility in live epididymal mouse sperm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Bracho, G. E.

    1998-01-01

    A method for collecting live immotile cauda epididymal mouse sperm that initiate motility by dilution into an activation buffer is described. Sperm in collection buffer showed low percent motility (MOT) and population progression (PRG) that increased 10-fold and 9-fold, respectively, during the first 2 min after dilution into activation buffer. Western phosphoserine (pS), phosphothreonine (pT), and phosphotyrosine (pY) analysis revealed a 120 kDa protein that markedly increased in pT content during initiation of motility and may be related to FP130, the motility-coupled axonemal protein of sea urchin sperm. A prominent 82 kDa protein that was pS and pT-phosphorylated in immotile and motile sperm is likely the fibrous sheath component AKAP82 that is phosphorylated during spermatogenesis. Analysis of live human sperm also identified a prominent 120 kDa pT protein. Thus it appears that phosphorylation of FP130 and related 120 kDa proteins in mouse, and perhaps human sperm, represent common targets during motility initiation in sperm. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Motility, ATP levels and metabolic enzyme activity of sperm from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Burness, Gary; Moyes, Christopher D; Montgomerie, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Male bluegill displays one of two life history tactics. Some males (termed "parentals") delay reproduction until ca. 7 years of age, at which time they build nests and actively courts females. Others mature precociously (sneakers) and obtain fertilizations by cuckolding parental males. In the current study, we studied the relations among sperm motility, ATP levels, and metabolic enzyme activity in parental and sneaker bluegill. In both reproductive tactics, sperm swimming speed and ATP levels declined in parallel over the first 60 s of motility. Although sneaker sperm initially had higher ATP levels than parental sperm, by approximately 30 s postactivation, no differences existed between tactics. No differences were noted between tactics in swimming speed, percent motility, or the activities of key metabolic enzymes, although sperm from parentals had a higher ratio of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) to citrate synthase (CS). In both tactics, with increasing CPK and CS activity, sperm ATP levels increased at 20 s postactivation, suggesting that capacities for phosphocreatine hydrolysis and aerobic metabolism may influence interindividual variation in rates of ATP depletion. Nonetheless, there was no relation between sperm ATP levels and either swimming speed or percent of sperm that were motile. This suggests that interindividual variation in ATP levels may not be the primary determinant of variation in sperm swimming performance in bluegill.

  12. Typha capensis (Rohrb.)N.E.Br. (bulrush) extract scavenges free radicals, inhibits collagenase activity and affects human sperm motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Henkel, R; Fransman, W; Hipler, U-C; Wiegand, C; Schreiber, G; Menkveld, R; Weitz, F; Fisher, D

    2012-05-01

    The biodiversity in South Africa provides more than 30,000 higher plants, of which more than 3000 are used by traditional healers to treat diseases. Typha capensis (bulrush) is one of the medicinal plants used in South Africa to treat male fertility problems. Considering that South African traditional healers have been recognised by Law and the health benefits of T. capensis have not been scientifically investigated yet, this study aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of aqueous extracts from this plant on male reproductive functions. Both leaves and rhizomes of T. capensis were dried, infused with distilled water and freeze-dried. Motile sperm from 50 men were isolated by swim-up and incubated with 1 μg ml(-1) aqueous extract of Typha rhizome for 1 h at 37 °C. Vitality, motility, sperm production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential were analysed in the test sample, a control and in the pellet from the swim-up. Results showed that the rhizome extract had significant (P < 0.0001) negative effects on all parameters. The extracts from the leaves and rhizomes revealed dose-dependent inhibitory activity for collagenase and free radical formation. No inhibitory activity for elastase was found. The inhibitory activity for collagenase might indicate possible anti-cancer effects.

  13. Energy Utilization for Survival and Fertilization-Parsimonious Quiescent Sperm Turn Extravagant on Motility Activation in Rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokesh; Yadav, Santosh K; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Pandey, Aastha; Sharma, Vikas; Verma, Vikas; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Rajender, Singh; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-04-01

    Quiescent sperm survive in cauda epididymis for long periods of time under extreme crowding conditions and with a very limited energy substrate, while after ejaculation, motile sperm live for a much shorter period with an unlimited energy resource and without crowding. Thus, the energy metabolism in relation to the energy requirement of the two may be quite different. A simple physiological technique was evolved to collect viable quiescent sperm from rat cauda epididymis to compare its energy metabolism with motile sperm. Quiescent sperm exhibited 40%-60% higher activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I-IV and ATP synthase in comparison to motile sperm and accumulated Ca(2+) in the midpiece mitochondria to enhance oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). In contrast, motile sperm displayed up to 75% higher activities of key glycolytic enzymes and secreted more than two times the lactate than quiescent sperm. Quiescent sperm phosphorylated AMPK and MAPK-p38, while motile sperm phosphorylated AKT and MAPK/ERK. Glycolytic inhibitor iodoacetamide prevented motility activation of quiescent rat sperm and inhibited conception in rabbits more effectively than OxPhos uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Apparently, quiescent sperm employ the most energy efficient OxPhos to survive for extended periods of time under extreme conditions of nutrition and crowding. However, on motility initiation, sperm switch predominantly to glycolysis to cater to their high- and quick-energy requirement of much shorter periods. This study also presents a proof of concept for targeting sperm energy metabolism for contraception.

  14. Lycopene and resveratrol improve post-thaw bull sperm parameters: sperm motility, mitochondrial activity and DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Bucak, M N; Ataman, M B; Başpınar, N; Uysal, O; Taşpınar, M; Bilgili, A; Öztürk, C; Güngör, Ş; İnanç, M E; Akal, E

    2015-06-01

    We focussed on evaluating the protective effect of lycopene and resveratrol on post-thaw bull sperm and oxidative stress parameters. Nine ejaculates for each bull were used in the study. Each ejaculate, splitted into three equal aliquots and diluted at 37 °C with base extenders containing lycopene (1 × 10(-3)  g ml(-1) ) and resveratrol (1 mm), and no antioxidant (control), was cooled to 5 °C and then frozen. Frozen straws were thawed in a water bath for evaluation. The supplementation of the semen extender with lycopene and resveratrol increased the percentages of post-thawed computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) motility (55.8 ± 3.8 and 61.9 ± 4.0%) and progressive motility (38 ± 2.4 and 37 ± 8.8), compared with the controls (50.7 ± 2.65 and 33.3 ± 3.74%, respectively, P < 0.05). Resveratrol provided a higher ALH (4.3 ± 0.1), in comparison with the control (3.9 ± 0.3, P < 0.05). The supplementation of the semen extender with lycopene and resveratrol produced a higher mitochondrial activity (24.6 ± 2.9 and 30.1 ± 6.5% respectively), compared with that of the control (11.8 ± 9.5%, P < 0.05). It was determined that both antioxidants resulted in a lower percentage of sperm with damaged DNA than that of the control (P < 0.05). Sperm motion characteristics except for ALH, acrosome integrity, sperm viability and oxidative stress parameters were not affected by the adding of lycopene and resveratrol.

  15. Microfluidic mixing for sperm activation and motility analysis of pearl Danio zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel S.; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Bordelon, Hali; Tiersch, Terrence R.; Monroe, W. Todd

    2013-01-01

    Sperm viability in aquatic species is increasingly being evaluated by motility analysis via computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) following activation of sperm with manual dilution and mixing by hand. User variation can limit the speed and control over the activation process, preventing consistent motility analysis. This is further complicated by the short interval (i.e., less than 15 s) of burst motility in these species. The objectives of this study were to develop a staggered herringbone microfluidic mixer to: 1) activate small volumes of Danio pearl zebrafish (Danio albolineatus) sperm by rapid mixing with diluent, and 2) position sperm in a viewing chamber for motility evaluation using a standard CASA system. A herringbone micromixer was fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to yield high quality smooth surfaces. Based on fluorescence microscopy, mixing efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved within 5 s for a range of flow rates (from 50 to 250 μL/h), with a correlation of mixing distances and mixing efficiency. For example, at the nominal flow rate of 100 μL/h, there was a significant difference in mixing efficiency between 3.5 mm (75 ± 4%; mean ± SD) and 7 mm (92 ± 2%; P = 0.002). The PDMS micromixer, integrated with standard volumetric slides, demonstrated activation of fresh zebrafish sperm with reduced user variation, greater control, and without morphologic damage to sperm. Analysis of zebrafish sperm viability by CASA revealed a statistically higher motility rate for activation by micromixing (56 ± 4%) than manual activation (45 ± 7%; n = 5, P = 0.011). This micromixer represented a first step in streamlining methods for consistent, rapid assessment of sperm quality for zebrafish and other aquatic species. The capability to rapidly activate sperm and consistently measure motility with CASA using the PDMS micromixer described herein will improve studies of germplasm physiology and cryopreservation. PMID:22494680

  16. Photobiomodulation with light-emitting diodes improves sperm motility in men with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Ban Frangez, Helena; Frangez, Igor; Verdenik, Ivan; Jansa, Vid; Virant Klun, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Sperm motility is an important parameter of male fertility and depends on energy consumption. Photobiomodulation with light-emitting diode (LED) is known to stimulate respiratory chain in mitochondria of different mammalian cells. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of photobiomodulation with LED on sperm motility in infertile men with impaired sperm motility-asthenozoospermia. Thirty consecutive men with asthenozoospermia and normal sperm count who visited the infertility clinic of University Medial Centre Ljubljana between September 2011 and February 2012 were included in the study. Semen sample of each man was divided into five parts: one served as a non-treated (native) control and four parts were irradiated with LED of different wavelengths: (1) 850 nm, (2) 625, 660 and 850 nm, (3) 470 nm and (4) 625, 660 and 470 nm. The percentage of motile sperm and kinematic parameters were measured using a Sperm Class Analyser system following the WHO recommendations. In the non-treated semen samples, the average ratio of rapidly progressive sperms was 12% and of immotile sperm 73%. Treating with LED significantly increased the proportion of rapidly progressive sperm (mean differences were as follows: 2.83 (1.39-4.28), 3.33 (1.61-5.05), 4.50 (3.00-5.99) and 3.83 (2.31-5.36) for groups 1-4, respectively) and significantly decreased the ratio of immotile sperm (the mean differences and 95% CI were as follows: 3.50 (1.30-5.70), 4.33 (2.15-6.51), 5.83 (3.81-7.86) and 5.50 (2.98-8.02) for groups 1-4, respectively). All differences were highly statistically significant. This finding confirmed that photobiomodulation using LED improved the sperm motility in asthenozoospermia regardless of the wavelength.

  17. Post-thaw motility of frozen boar sperm does not predict success with in vitro fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using cryopreserved boar sperm rather than liquid semen for in vitro fertilization (IVF) allows improved IVF consistency. However, cryopreservation of boar sperm results in reduced post-thaw motility, fertilization and embryo development. Boars are often screened on an individual basis prior to use ...

  18. Two egg-derived molecules in sperm motility initiation and fertilization in the Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi).

    PubMed

    Cherr, Gary N; Morisawa, Masaaki; Vines, Carol A; Yoshida, Kaoru; Smith, Edmund H; Matsubara, Takahiro; Pillai, Murali C; Griffin, Frederick J; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo

    2008-01-01

    Sperm of the Pacific herring are immotile at spawning. Two egg-derived molecules are capable of initiating sperm motility. One is herring sperm activating protein(s) (HSAPs) and the other is sperm motility initiation factor (SMIF). These two motility initiators differ in their location and association with the chorion, and in their isoelectric points and molecular weights. In this study we have investigated the roles of these two inducers with respect to motility and fertilization. Using computer analysis of sperm motility, we found that HSAPs, as well as the C-terminal HSAPs peptide, elicit a linear motility pattern, while SMIF induced a highly circular and asymmetric pattern. HSAPs induced a two-fold increase in intracellular calcium, whereas SMIF induced a four-fold increase of motility initiation. SMIF-exposed sperm, preloaded with BAPTA-AM, showed a more linear motility and this motility trajectory decreased with their fertilizing capability. The difference in intracellular calcium levels between HSAPs and SMIF is consistent with the observed linear and circular motility. In the absence of SMIF, HSAPs do not support fertilization. Fertilization is rescued in these experiments if SMIF is reintroduced. We propose that diffusible HSAPs are not essential for fertilization, but enhance sperm-egg collisions via linear motility. SMIF, which is bound to the micropylar region of the chorion, is required for fertilization and induces circular motility that is a prerequisite for sperm to enter the micropylar canal and fertilize the egg.

  19. Repression of common bull sperm flora and in vitro impairment of sperm motility with Pseudomonas aeruginosa introduced by contaminated lubricant.

    PubMed

    Smole, I; Thomann, A; Frey, J; Perreten, V

    2010-08-01

    Semen collected from clinically healthy bulls at an artificial insemination centre was examined for bacterial diversity. While bacteria that are normally present in the common flora of bovine semen were absent, such as Mycoplasma sp., Proteus sp. and Corynebacterium sp., all semen samples contained an unusually high number of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Analysis via pulsed field gel electrophoresis demonstrated that one particular P. aeruginosa strain, present in a sealed bottle of lubricant, was widespread in bull semen. This strain was shown to secrete substances that inhibited both the growth of bacteria constituting the normal bull sperm flora and the motility of spermatozoa in vitro. This study demonstrated that commercially available lubricants might contain bacteria that can spread amongst breeding bulls and affect the quality of semen. Bacteriological controls and species' identification are necessary at several production levels, including lubricants and extenders, to ensure high semen quality and avoid the spread of pathogens.

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N.; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility. PMID:25970615

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation.

    PubMed

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica H; Marín-Briggiler, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility.

  2. Laser light-scattering study of the toxic effects of methylmercury on sperm motility

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M.K.; Lee, W.I.; Mottet, N.K.; Burbacher, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    An in vitro study was designed using the laser light-scattering technique to obtain further information on the dose-effect relationship of methylmercury on sperm motility. The technique provided a quantitative evaluation of sperm swimming speed. Semen samples were collected from normal male Macaca fascicularis monkeys by anal electroejaculation. Methylmercury was added to aliquots of sperm suspensions in BWW medium in doses of 10, 5, 2, and 1 ppm. After 3 hours, the relative speed was 35%, 59%, 69%, and 92% of the corresponding controls at doses of 10, 5, 2, and 1 ppm, respectively. The percentage of motile spermatozoa decreased significantly at 10 ppm. By microscopic observation abnormal motility was detected at 5 and 10 ppm, especially after 20 to 40 minutes. Head movement increased from side to side, and many spermatozoa developed coiled tails. The technique proved useful for defining the dose-effect relationship of methylmercury and sperm swimming speed.

  3. Association of seminal plasma motility inhibitors/semenogelins with sperm in asthenozoospermia-infertile men.

    PubMed

    Terai, K; Yoshida, K; Yoshiike, M; Fujime, M; Iwamoto, T

    2010-01-01

    Seminal plasma motility inhibitors (SPMIs) are proteinase-resistant fragments of semenogelin I and II (Sgs), which are the major proteins of semen coagulum. SPMIs inhibit the motility of spermatozoa, and Sgs are thought to be natural regulators of human sperm function. The mechanism underlying sperm motility regulation and its association with defective motility in infertile men remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between SPMIs and spermatozoa in infertile men with asthenozoospermia. Fifty-four semen samples from 37 asthenozoospermic patients and 17 samples from 9 normal healthy subjects were analyzed. Spermatozoa, washed by Percoll density gradients, were immunostained with anti-SPMI antibody and subjected to flow cytometric analysis. The proportion of spermatozoa labeled with the antibody and the average intensity of fluorescence labeling per spermatozoa were analyzed in relation to the parameters used for semen analysis. A significant negative correlation was found between sperm motility and the proportion (R = -0.68) and intensity (R = -0.38) of labeling. These results suggest that SPMIs remain on the sperm surface after liquefaction. This might account for some disorders of sperm motility observed in infertile men with asthenozoospermia.

  4. Sperm development and motility are regulated by PP1 phosphatases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-ching; Go, Aiza C; Samson, Mark; Cintra, Thais; Mirsoian, Susan; Wu, Tammy F; Jow, Margaret M; Routman, Eric J; Chu, Diana S

    2012-01-01

    Sperm from different species have evolved distinctive motility structures, including tubulin-based flagella in mammals and major sperm protein (MSP)-based pseudopods in nematodes. Despite such divergence, we show that sperm-specific PP1 phosphatases, which are required for male fertility in mouse, function in multiple processes in the development and motility of Caenorhabditis elegans amoeboid sperm. We used live-imaging analysis to show the PP1 phosphatases GSP-3 and GSP-4 (GSP-3/4) are required to partition chromosomes during sperm meiosis. Postmeiosis, tracking fluorescently labeled sperm revealed that both male and hermaphrodite sperm lacking GSP-3/4 are immotile. Genetic and in vitro activation assays show lack of GSP-3/4 causes defects in pseudopod development and the rate of pseudopodial treadmilling. Further, GSP-3/4 are required for the localization dynamics of MSP. GSP-3/4 shift localization in concert with MSP from fibrous bodies that sequester MSP at the base of the pseudopod, where directed MSP disassembly facilitates pseudopod contraction. Consistent with a role for GSP-3/4 as a spatial regulator of MSP disassembly, MSP is mislocalized in sperm lacking GSP-3/4. Although a requirement for PP1 phosphatases in nematode and mammalian sperm suggests evolutionary conservation, we show PP1s have independently evolved sperm-specific paralogs in separate lineages. Thus PP1 phosphatases are highly adaptable and employed across a broad range of sexually reproducing species to regulate male fertility.

  5. [On the significance of Solcoseryl on fertility. 1. The effect of Solcoseryl on sperm motility in vitro].

    PubMed

    Mattheus, A; Heise, H; Hofmann, R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of different Solcoseryl (Solco, Basel, Switzerland) concentrations on the motility of human sperm were tested on 37 ejaculates taken from two subject groups. Altogether 111 motility studies were performed using the eosine vitality test. In view of the considerable variations associated with motility tests, Solcoseryl appeared to have no effect on sperm motility in the majority of cases in group 1. The observed improvement in motility (20%) was countered by still greater motility losses (27%). The results, obtained by studies on selected asthenospermia (group 2) are different, however: the 26% increase in motility was opposed to a motility loss of only 17%. A Solcoseryl concentration of 50% was found to have the best effects on motility. A general rise in sperm motility by means of Solcoseryl cannot be considered, although tests would appear advisable in isolated instances. Solcoseryl may be a valuable protective resuspension agent for insemination purposes.

  6. The mu (μ) and delta (δ) opioid receptors modulate boar sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Heriberto

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous and exogenous opioids modulate reproductive functions in target cells via opioid receptors (μ, δ, and κ). Sperm motility is a metric of gamete functionality, and serves as a suitable parameter for in vitro drug-induced toxicity assays. This study identifies the presence and location of opioid receptors in pig spermatozoa as well as their functional response after in vitro challenge with known agonists (morphine [μ]; [D-Pen 2,5]-enkephanile [δ]; and U 50488 [κ]) and antagonists (naloxone [μ]; naltrindole [δ]; and nor-binaltrorphimine [κ]). Only the μ- and δ-opioid receptors were present in the boar sperm plasma membrane, overlying the acrosome, neck, and principal piece. Challenge experiments with agonists and antagonists identified both μ- and δ-opioid receptors as regulators of sperm kinematics, wherein μ maintains or increases sperm movement whereas δ decreases sperm motility over time. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 724-734, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hydrophobic silicone elastomer chamber for recording trajectories of motile porcine sperms without adsorption.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Koji; Kuroda, Yuka; Yamashita, Keisuke; Funahashi, Hiroaki

    2011-02-01

    Motile porcine sperms adhere to hydrophilic materials such as glass and plastics. The adsorption of sperms to a hydrophobic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane is less compared with that to glass. We investigated the linear velocity (LV) and amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALHD) of motile porcine sperm on glass and PDMS preparations using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). Significant decreases were observed in the 15-min LV (P<0.05) and ALHD (P<0.05) in motile porcine sperm on glass preparations compared with those on PDMS preparations. These differences were due to adsorption of the head and/or neck to hydrophilic substrates. Because of the elasticity of PDMS, we propose that a PDMS membrane should be used for CASA. To investigate the dynamics of motile porcine sperms with microfluidics, we do not recommend plasma treatment to bond PDMS and glass in the microchannel preparation; instead, we suggest that a PDMS molding process without plasma treatment be used for preparation of microfluidic channels.

  8. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis.

  9. Assay of sperm motility to study the effects of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Timourian, H.; Watchmaker, G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for quantitating sperm motility is applied here to study the effects of metal ions on animal cells. The quantitative technique is based on orienting sperm by subjecting them to flow and then measuring their capacity for returning to randomness when the orienting force is discontinued. The optical anisotropy of sperm permits determination of orientation with a spectrophotometer equipped with a flow cell. A wide range of concentrations of zinc, copper, and nickel ions were tested to determine their effects on the motility of sea-urchin sperm. Sea urchins are a ready and convenient source of sperm. Since energy production in sperm depends on their limited supply of endogenous substrate, this test system gives us a simple screening procedure for comparing the effects of various agents on the cell's capacity for utilizing energy. Nickel at concentrations higher than 10..pi../sup 5/M had an initial depressing effect on motility; however, this effect was eventually overcome, and in some cases overcompensation resulted in an increase motility. Zinc had either an enhancing or a depressing effect, depending not only on its concentration but on the time of exposure. At 10/sup -5/M it enhanced motility if present at the time the sperm were first shed in seawater, the time of high respiration. At 10..pi../sup 4/M it depressed motility only if present during the period of decreasing respiration, 1 to 2 hr after being shed into seawater. Copper depressed activity at 10..pi../sup 4/M to 10..pi../sup 6/M at all times tested.

  10. Chloride channels are involved in sperm motility and are downregulated in spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-Wen; Li, Yuan; Zou, Li-Li; Guan, Yu-Tao; Peng, Shuang; Zheng, Li-Xin; Deng, Shun-Mei; Zhu, Lin-Yan; Wang, Li-Wei; Chen, Li-Xin

    2016-06-03

    Human spermatozoa encounter an osmotic decrease from 330 to 290 mOsm l-1 when passing through the female reproductive tract. We aimed to evaluate the role of chloride channels in volume regulation and sperm motility from patients with asthenozoospermia. Spermatozoa were purified using Percoll density gradients. Sperm volume was measured as the forward scatter signal using flow cytometry. Sperm motility was analyzed using computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA). When transferred from an isotonic solution (330 mOsm l-1 ) to a hypotonic solution (290 mOsm l-1 ), cell volume was not changed in spermatozoa from normozoospermic men; but increased in those from asthenozoospermic samples. The addition of the chloride channel blockers, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'- isulfonic acid (DIDS) or 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) to the hypotonic solution caused the normal spermatozoa to swell but did not increase the volume of those from the asthenozoospermic semen. DIDS and NPPB decreased sperm motility in both sets of semen samples. The inhibitory effect of NPPB on normal sperm motility was much stronger than on spermatozoa from the asthenozoospermic samples. Both sperm types expressed ClC-3 chloride channels, but the expression levels in the asthenozoospermic samples were much lower, especially in the neck and mid-piece areas. Spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia demonstrated lower volume regulating capacity, mobility, and ClC-3 expression levels (especially in the neck) than did normal spermatozoa. Thus, chloride channels play important roles in the regulation of sperm volume and motility and are downregulated in cases of asthenozoospermia.

  11. Cluster analysis reveals a binary effect of storage on boar sperm motility function.

    PubMed

    Henning, Heiko; Petrunkina, Anna M; Harrison, Robin A P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-06-01

    Storage of liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa is associated with a loss of fertilising ability of the preserved spermatozoa, which standard semen parameters barely reflect. Monitoring responses to molecular effectors of sperm function (e.g. bicarbonate) has proven to be a more sensitive approach to investigating storage effects. Bicarbonate not only initiates capacitation in spermatozoa, but also induces motility activation. This occurs at ejaculation, but also happens throughout passage through the oviduct. In the present study we tested whether the specific response of boar sperm subpopulations to bicarbonate, as assessed by motility activation, is altered with the duration of storage in vitro. Three ejaculates from each of seven boars were diluted in Beltsville thawing solution and stored at 17°C. Only minor changes in the parameters of diluted semen were revealed over a period of 72h storage. For assessment of bicarbonate responses, subsamples of diluted spermatozoa were centrifuged through a discontinuous Percoll gradient after 12, 24 and 72h storage. Subsequently, spermatozoa were incubated in two Ca2+-free variants of Tyrode's medium either without (TyrControl) or with (TyrBic) 15mM bicarbonate, and computer-aided sperm analysis motility measurements were made. Cluster analysis of imaging data from motile spermatozoa revealed the presence of five major sperm subpopulations with distinct motility characteristics, differing between TyrBic and TyrControl at any given time (P<0.001). Although there was an increasing loss of motility function in both media, bicarbonate induced an increase in a 'fast linear' cohort of spermatozoa in TyrBic regardless of storage (66.4% at 12h and 63.9% at 72h). These results imply a binary pattern in response of sperm motility function descriptors to storage: although the quantitative descriptor (percentage of motile spermatozoa) declines in washed semen samples, the qualitative descriptor (percentage of spermatozoa stimulated into

  12. Colloidal centrifugation with Androcoll-E prolongs stallion sperm motility, viability and chromatin integrity.

    PubMed

    Johannisson, A; Morrell, J M; Thorén, J; Jönsson, M; Dalin, A-M; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2009-11-01

    The objective was to investigate the changes in stallion sperm quality (sperm motility, viability, membrane integrity and chromatin integrity) occurring during cool storage, and to study the effect of sperm selection by single layer colloidal centrifugation on these parameters of sperm quality. Spermatozoa from 3 stallions (10 ejaculates, 3-4 per stallion) were selected by centrifugation through a single layer of colloid (SLC). The resulting sperm preparations and the control samples (extended but unselected semen samples) were stored at 5 degrees C for 48h. Assessments of sperm quality, such as sperm motility, viability (SYBR-14/PI staining), membrane stability (Annexin-V/PI staining) and chromatin integrity, were performed on aliquots of the selected sperm preparations and unselected samples on the day of collection (3h) and after 24 and 48h of storage. In the SLC-selected sperm samples, sperm motility, sperm viability, proportions of spermatozoa with normal morphology and with intact chromatin were significantly better than in unselected samples (motility: 77+/-4% vs. 64+/-8% at 3h; P<0.001; viability: 79.5+/-9% vs. 64.7+/-9%, P<0.001; normal morphology 89+/-6% vs. 69+/-9%; chromatin integrity DFI 11.3+/-5% vs. 22.1+/-10%). Membrane stability, however, was not different in the SLC-selected and unselected samples (74.6+/-8% vs. 69.3+/-8%). The deterioration seen in sperm quality in the unselected samples was prevented by SLC, so that sperm viability, membrane stability and chromatin integrity were unchanged in the selected samples by 48h compared to 3h (P<0.001), whereas the unselected samples were significantly worse by 48h (P<0.001). Furthermore, it should be possible to send an aliquot of a normal insemination dose (i.e. unselected spermatozoa) overnight to a reference laboratory for analysis of both plasma membrane and chromatin integrity. In conclusion, centrifugation of stallion spermatozoa through a single layer of colloid is a useful technique for

  13. The effect of aminoguanidine on sperm motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in varicocelized rats

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Rafieh; Navid, Shadan; Abbasi, Niloofar; Yari, Abazar; Mazaheri, Zohreh; Daneshi, Erfan; Agarwal, Ashok; Abbasi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the testicular veins of people suffering from varicocele have already been reported. However, the role of NO-synthase (NOS) isozymes and their inhibitors have not been extensively studied. We aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of aminoguanidine (AG), on sperm motility, vitality, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in varicocelized rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty fore male Wister rats were divided into control, sham, varicocele, and treatment groups. Varicocele and treatment groups underwent partial ligation of left renal vein. Rats in the sham group underwent the same procedures as the varicocele group with the exception of vein ligation. 10 weeks after varicocele induction, sperm parameters were evaluated in all groups. The treatment group received 50 mg/kg AG injection daily for 10 weeks after which they were sacrificed prior to assessment of the parameters. Sperm viability and MMP were assessed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and rhodamine 123 (Rh123), respectively. Results: The results of this study show a decrease in sperm viability, motility and MMP in the varicocele group compared with the other groups. After AG injection, we observed that all the parameters were significantly enhanced in the treatment group compared with the other groups. Rh123 staining revealed a positive relation between MMP and sperm motility, whereas PI staining showed a positive relation between sperm motility and viability. Conclusion: The findings of our study show that AG improves sperm motility and MMP, and thus, might be useful in the management of varicocele-related infertility. PMID:28096959

  14. Simple optical method of qualitative assessment of sperm motility: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozanska, Agnieszka; Kolwas, Krystyna; Galas, Jacek; Blocki, Narcyz; Czyzewski, Adam

    2005-09-01

    The examination of quality of the sperm ejaculate is one of the most important steps in artificial fertilization procedure. The main aim of semen storage centres is to characterise the best semen quality for fertilization. Reliable information about sperm motility is also one the most important parameters for in vitro laboratory procedures. There exist very expensive automated methods for semen analysis but they are unachievable for most of laboratories and semen storage centres. Motivation for this study is to elaborate a simple, cheap, objective and repeatable method for semen motility assessment. The method enables to detect even small changes in motility introduced by medical, physical or chemical factors. To test the reliability of the method we used cryopreserved bull semen from Lowicz Semen Storage Centre. The examined sperm specimen was warmed in water bath and then centrifuged. The best semen was collected by the swim-up technique and diluted to a proper concentration. Several semen concentrations and dilutions were tested in order to find the best probe parameters giving repeatable results. For semen visualization we used the phase-contrast microscope with a CCD camera. A PC computer was used to acquire and to analyse the data. The microscope table equipped with a microscope glass pool 0.7mm deep instead of some conventional plane microscope slides was stabilised at the temperature of 37°C. The main idea of our method is based on a numerical processing of the optical contrast of the sperm images which illustrates the dynamics of the sperm cells movement and on appropriate analysis of a grey scale level of the superimposed images. An elaborated numerical algorithm allows us to find the relative amount of motile sperm cells. The proposed method of sperm motility assessment seems to be objective and repeatable.

  15. Effect of overdose zinc on mouse testis and its relation with sperm count and motility.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Günfer; Abban, Gülcin; Turgut, Sabahat; Take, Gülnur

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of excessive zinc intake on the testes and on sperm count and motility in mice. Thirty Balb c mice were divided randomly into 3 groups of 10 animals in each. Group I acted as controls; group II was supplied with drinking water containing 1.5 g/100 mL Zn, and group III was supplied with drinking water containing 2.5 g/100 mL Zn. The animals were sacrificed after 3 wk supplementation and the epididymis and testis were quickly excised. A negative correlation between Zn dose and sperm count and motility was found. The sperm count in group III was significantly lower than in groups II and I (p<0.05). The sperm motility in group III was significantly lower than in the controls (p<0.05). Degenerative changes, including spermatic arrest, degeneration of seminiferous tubules, and fibrosis in interstitial tissue, were observed in group III animals. These results show that high doses of zinc significantly alter sperm motility.

  16. Tales of the Tail and Sperm Head Aches Changing concepts on the prognostic significance of sperm pathologies affecting the head, neck and tail

    PubMed Central

    Chemes, Héctor E; Alvarez Sedo, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an update on the variable prognostic significance of different sperm pathologies in patients with severe male factor infertility due to morphology and motility disorders. Severe asthenozoospermia is one of the leading causes of male infertility as spermatozoa cannot reach the oocyte and/or penetrate normally. Identifying structural causes of sperm immotility was of great concern before the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), because immotility was the limiting factor in the treatment of these patients. In these cases, in vitro methods are used to identify live spermatozoa or stimulate sperm motility to avoid selection of non-viable cells. With these advances, fertilization and pregnancy results have improved dramatically. The identification of genetic phenotypes in asthenozoospermia is important to adequately inform patients of treatment outcomes and risks. The one sperm characteristic that seriously affects fertility prognosis is teratozoospermia, primarily sperm head and neck anomalies. Defects of chromatin condensation and acrosomal hypoplasia are the two most common abnormalities in severe teratozoospermia. The introduction of microscopic methods to select spermatozoa and the development of new ones to evaluate sperm quality before ICSI will assure that ultrastructural identification of sperm pathologies will not only be of academic interest, but will also be an essential tool to inform treatment choice. Herein, we review the differential roles played by sperm components in normal fertilization and early embryo development and explore how assisted reproductive technologies have modified our concepts on the prognostic significance of sperm pathologies affecting the head, neck, mid-piece and tail. PMID:22198630

  17. Effect of non-Newtonian fluid properties on bovine sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Hyakutake, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Satoru

    2015-09-18

    The swimming process by which mammal spermatozoa progress towards an egg within the reproductive organs is important in achieving successful internal fertilization. The viscosity of oviductal mucus is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of water, and oviductal mucus also has non-Newtonian properties. In this study, we experimentally observed sperm motion in fluids with various fluid rheological properties and investigated the influence of varying the viscosity and whether the fluid was Newtonian or non-Newtonian on the sperm motility. We selected polyvinylpyrrolidone and methylcellulose as solutes to create solutions with different rheological properties. We used the semen of Japanese cattle and investigated the following parameters: the sperm velocity, the straight-line velocity and the amplitude from the trajectory, and the beat frequency from the fragellar movement. In a Newtonian fluid environment, as the viscosity increased, the motility of the sperm decreased. However, in a non-Newtonian fluid, the straight-line velocity and beat frequency were significantly higher than in a Newtonian fluid with comparable viscosity. As a result, the linearity of the sperm movement increased. Additionally, increasing the viscosity brought about large changes in the sperm flagellar shape. At low viscosities, the entire flagellum moved in a curved flapping motion, whereas in the high-viscosity, only the tip of the flagellum flapped. These results suggest that the bovine sperm has evolved to swim toward the egg as quickly as possible in the actual oviduct fluid, which is a high-viscosity non-Newtonian fluid.

  18. Automatic Tracking and Motility Analysis of Human Sperm in Time-Lapse Images.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Leonardo F; Masson, Puneet; VerMilyea, Matthew; Kam, Moshe

    2017-03-01

    We present a fully automated multi-sperm tracking algorithm. It has the demonstrated capability to detect and track simultaneously hundreds of sperm cells in recorded videos while accurately measuring motility parameters over time and with minimal operator intervention. Algorithms of this kind may help in associating dynamic swimming parameters of human sperm cells with fertility and fertilization rates. Specifically, we offer an image processing method, based on radar tracking algorithms, that detects and tracks automatically the swimming paths of human sperm cells in timelapse microscopy image sequences of the kind that is analyzed by fertility clinics. Adapting the well-known joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF), we automatically tracked hundreds of human sperm simultaneously and measured their dynamic swimming parameters over time. Unlike existing CASA instruments, our algorithm has the capability to track sperm swimming in close proximity to each other and during apparent cell-to-cell collisions. Collecting continuously parameters for each sperm tracked without sample dilution (currently impossible using standard CASA systems) provides an opportunity to compare such data with standard fertility rates. The use of our algorithm thus has the potential to free the clinician from having to rely on elaborate motility measurements obtained manually by technicians, speed up semen processing, and provide medical practitioners and researchers with more useful data than are currently available.

  19. Relationship between conventional semen characteristics, sperm motility patterns and fertility of Andalusian donkeys (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Acha, D; Ortiz, I; Gálvez, M J; Carrasco, J J; Díaz, B; Gómez-Arrones, V; Calero-Carretero, R; Hidalgo, M

    2013-12-01

    Sperm quality has an important role in determining fertility. The aims of this study were to compare the conventional sperm parameters, plus the characteristics of the motility patterns of the different sperm subpopulations, of donkey donors with different fertility level, and to determine their relationships to fertility. Thirty ejaculates from 6 Andalusian donkeys were assessed for gel-free volume, pH, sperm concentration, motility and morphology. The fertility of donkeys was classified on the basis of pregnancy rates per cycle, where donkeys with a per cycle pregnancy rate ≥60% were considered to be "fertile" (n=3) and those with a per cycle pregnancy rate <40% were categorized to be "sub-fertile" (n=3). Significant differences (P<0.001) between the "fertile" and the "sub-fertile" group were found for total and progressive motility, and for straight line velocity. Sperm variables associated (P<0.05) with an increase in percent pregnant per cycle included total motility (r=0.37), progressive motility (r=0.53), curvilinear velocity (r=0.44), straightness (r=0.39), beat cross frequency (r=0.44), and gel-free volume (r=0.53). Four sperm subpopulations (sP) were identified in fresh semen: sP1 (slow and non-progressive spermatozoa, 20%), sP2 (moderately slow but progressive spermatozoa, 71.2%), sP3 (highly active but non-progressive spermatozoa, 2.9%), and sP4 (highly active and progressive spermatozoa, 5.9%). The lowest percentage (3.1%; P<0.001) of sP4 spermatozoa was observed in the "sub-fertile" group. Three of the sperm subpopulations were related (P<0.05) to fertility (sP2, r=0.54; sP3, r=0.45; sP4, r=0.56). In conclusion, we were able to relate the fertility of donkeys with in vitro measures of sperm motility using computer-assisted sperm analysis techniques.

  20. Motility and fertility of the subtropical freshwater fish streaked prochilod (Prochilodus lineatus) sperm cryopreserved in powdered coconut water.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, A T M; Nascimento, A F; Orfão, L H; Isaú, Z A

    2010-09-01

    Streaked prochilod (Prochilodus lineatus) is a freshwater fish inhabiting many South American rivers. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of coconut water (ACP), combined with methylglycol, as a freezing medium for streaked prochilod sperm. A secondary objective was to compare a computer-assisted sperm analyzer (CASA) system versus subjective microscropic examination as a means of assessing sperm motility. As a control, glucose and methylglycol was used, according to our previous study. Sperm diluted in each medium was loaded into 0.5 mL straws, frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor (in a dry shipper), and stored in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C). Half of the samples were evaluated for sperm motility, both subjectively and with CASA; the remainder were evaluated for fertility. There was no difference (P > 0.05) between subjective or CASA assessment of post-thaw sperm motility. Although sperm motility was higher in sperm cryopreserved in ACP (85%) than in glucose (75%), cryopreservation in either extender yielded similar fertilization rates (46-48%) and sperm velocities. There were positive correlations (r = 0.56-0.8) between all sperm velocities and fertilization rate. In conclusion, streaked prochilod sperm cryopreserved in glucose or ACP and methylglycol was fertile, and thus could be used for research or commercial settings. Furthermore, although the CASA system provided objective data regarding sperm motility, in the present study, subjective evaluation of sperm motility was practical and a good indication of sperm quality; it could readily be done by well-trained personnel under field or laboratory conditions.

  1. SPERM MOTILITY IN HSF1 KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER HEAT SHOCK IS ASSOCIATED WITH FERTILITY DEFICITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPERM MOTILITY IN HSF1 KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER HEAT SHOCK IS ASSOCIATED WITH FERTILITY DEFICITS. L.F. Strader*, S.D. Perreault, J.C. Luft*, and D.J. Dix*. US EPA/ORD, Reproductive Toxicology Div., Research Triangle Park, NC
    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from environm...

  2. Aquaporin inhibition changes protein phosphorylation pattern following sperm motility activation in fish.

    PubMed

    Zilli, Loredana; Beirão, José; Schiavone, Roberta; Herraez, Maria Paz; Cabrita, Elsa; Storelli, Carlo; Vilella, Sebastiano

    2011-09-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that osmolality is the key signal in sperm motility activation in Sparus aurata spermatozoa. In particular, we have proposed that the hyper-osmotic shock triggers water efflux from spermatozoa via aquaporins. This water efflux determines the cell volume reduction and, in turn, the rise in the intracellular concentration of ions. This increase could lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase and of the cAMP-signaling pathway, causing the phosphorylation of sperm proteins and then the initiation of sperm motility. This study confirms the important role of sea bream AQPs (Aqp1a and Aqp10b) in the beginning of sperm motility. In fact, when these proteins are inhibited by HgCl(2), the phosphorylation of some proteins (174 kDa protein of head; 147, 97 and 33 kDa proteins of flagella), following the hyper-osmotic shock, was inhibited (totally or partially). However, our results also suggest that more than one transduction pathways could be activated when sea bream spermatozoa were ejaculated in seawater, since numerous proteins showed an HgCl(2)(AQPs)-independent phosphorylation state after motility activation. The role played by each different signal transduction pathways need to be clarified.

  3. Signaling Pathways Used by Ergot Alkaloids to Inhibit Bovine Sperm Motility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids exert their toxic or pharmaceutical effects through membrane receptor-mediated activities. This study investigated the signaling pathways involved in the in vitro inhibitory effects of both ergotamine (ET) and dihydroergotamine (DEHT) on bovine sperm motility using specific inhibitor...

  4. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF HYPERACTIVATED MOTILITY IN RAT SPERMATOZA USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective evaluation of hyperactivated motility in rat spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis.

    Cancel AM, Lobdell D, Mendola P, Perreault SD.

    Toxicology Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    The aim of this study was t...

  5. Microfluidic separation of motile sperm with millilitre-scale sample capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reza; Vollmer, Marion; Eamer, Lise; Zeidan, Krista; San Gabriel, Maria C.; Zini, Armand; Sinton, David

    2012-11-01

    Isolating motile from non-motile spermatozoa has been a challenge since the establishment of in vitro fertilization. Microfluidic approaches have been employed for this purpose, but current devices are limited by low sample volume. Here, we present a high-throughput microfluidic device that separates spermatozoa from one millilitre of raw semen sample based on the hydrodynamic characteristics of swimming sperm in a confined geometry. The device consists of two layers: an outer injection ring on top aligned with a network of radial microchannels at the bottom guiding motile sperm into an inner collection chamber. This approach (1) maximizes exposure of the sperm to the fluid channels, (2) maximizes surface area density (3) prevents fluid flow bias, and (4) employs a non-Newtonian viscoelastic medium consistent with the in vivo environment. Tests with human and bull spermatozoa indicate an increase in motile sperm concentration from 62.2% in raw semen to 99.2% in separated sample combined with a higher incidence of normal morphology. DNA integrity testing is currently underway. In conclusion, we present an effective one-step procedure to perform semen purification and separation on a millilitre-scale with clinically relevant numbers.

  6. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K.; Kline, Douglas W.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  7. Microgravity alters protein phosphorylation changes during initiation of sea urchin sperm motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Bracho, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) studies demonstrated that bull sperm swim with higher velocity in microgravity (microG) than at 1 G. Coupling between protein phosphorylation and sperm motility during activation in microG and at 1 G was examined in the ESA Biorack on two space shuttle missions. Immotile sperm were activated to swim (86-90% motility) at launch +20 h by dilution into artificial seawater (ASW). Parallel ground controls were performed 2 h after the flight experiment. Activation after 0, 30, and 60 s was terminated with electrophoresis sample buffer and samples analyzed for phosphoamino acids by Western blotting. Phosphorylation of a 130-kDa phosphothreonine-containing protein (FP130) occurred three to four times faster in microG than at 1 G. A 32-kDa phosphoserine-containing protein was significantly stimulated at 30 s but returned to 1 G control levels at 60 s. The rate of FP130 phosphorylation in microG was attenuated by D2O, suggesting that changes in water properties participate in altering signal transduction. Changes in FP130 phosphorylation triggered by the egg peptide speract were delayed in microG. These results demonstrate that previously observed effects of microG on sperm motility are coupled to changes in phosphorylation of specific flagellar proteins and that early events of sperm activation and fertilization are altered in microG.

  8. Motility and fertility of rabbit sperm cryopreserved using soybean lecithin as an alternative to egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Kazutoshi; Kitajima, Shuji; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Teruo; Fan, Jianglin; Matsuda, Yukihisa

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to investigate whether soy lecithin can be used as an alternative cryoprotectant to establish a procedure that does not require the use of egg yolk to cryopreserve rabbit strains. Semen from Japanese White rabbits was frozen with HEPES extender containing 20% egg yolk (EYH), 0.5% (Lec-0.5), 1.5% (Lec-1.5), 2.5% (Lec-2.5), or 3.5% (Lec-3.5; wt/vol) lecithin (type IV-S, ≥30%), and the motility of thawed sperm was analyzed. The sperm motility in the Lec-1.5 group was significantly higher than that in the Lec-2.5 and 3.5 groups and equivalent to the EYH group. From 17 rounds of artificial insemination with frozen-thawed sperm in the EYH and Lec-1.5 groups, 12 rabbits in both groups were pregnant (70.6%) and delivered offspring. The litter size was 3.3 in the EYH group and 5.1 in the Lec-1.5 group. These results indicate that soy lecithin can be used as a substitute for egg yolk as a cryoprotectant on the basis of motility and fertility of the frozen-thawed rabbit sperm and that 1.5% lecithin (type IV-S, ≥30%) in the semen extender was the optimum concentration for rabbit sperm cryopreservation.

  9. Control of sturgeon sperm motility: Antagonism between K+ ions concentration and osmolality.

    PubMed

    Prokopchuk, Galina; Dzyuba, Borys; Rodina, Marek; Cosson, Jacky

    2016-01-01

    Spermatozoa are stored in a quiescent state in the male reproductive tract and motility is induced in response to various environmental stimuli, such as change of osmolality (general case) and a decrease of extracellular K+ in fish from Acipenseridae family. This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between osmolality and extracellular K+ concentration in controlling sperm motility in sturgeon. Pre-incubation of sturgeon sperm for 5s in hypertonic solutions of glycerol, NaCl, or sucrose (each of 335 mOsm/kg osmolality) prepares sturgeon spermatozoa to become fully motile in presence of high concentration of K+ ions (15 mM), which has previously been demonstrated to fully repress motility. Furthermore, presence of 0.5mM KCl during the high osmolality pre-incubation exposure completely prevented subsequent spermatozoa activation in a K+-rich media. Manipulating the transport of K+ ions by the presence of K+ ionophore (valinomycin), it was concluded that once an efflux of K+ ions, the precursor of sturgeon sperm motility activation, is taking place, spermatozoa then become insensitive to a large extracellular K+ concentration.

  10. Dietary carotenoids do not improve motility or antioxidant capacity in cichlid fish sperm.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Melissa; Brown, Alexandria C; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2014-10-01

    Carotenoids may act as antioxidants under many circumstances. We examined the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants in the gonads of male convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata), a species in which males lack the carotenoid-based breeding coloration that characterizes females. Male fish were fed one of four diets that included different combinations of xanthophyll and carotene carotenoids, and then we measured carotenoid concentration of the gonads, gonadosomatic index (GSI), sperm motility, and the antioxidant capacity of the gonads. Significant differences were found in gonadal carotenoid content among treatment groups, suggesting that dietary carotenoids were indeed sequestered in the gonads. There were no differences among diet groups, however, in GSI, sperm motility, or gonadal antioxidant capacity. These findings suggest that carotenoids are required only in small amounts in the testes of male convict cichlids or that they play a limited role in protecting sperm from oxidative damage.

  11. Cellular biophysics during freezing of rat and mouse sperm predicts post-thaw motility.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Mie; Choi, Jeung Hwan; Devireddy, Ramachandra V; Roberts, Kenneth P; Wolkers, Willem F; Makhlouf, Antoine; Bischof, John C

    2009-10-01

    Though cryopreservation of mouse sperm yields good survival and motility after thawing, cryopreservation of rat sperm remains a challenge. This study was designed to evaluate the biophysics (membrane permeability) of rat in comparison to mouse to better understand the cooling rate response that contributes to cryopreservation success or failure in these two sperm types. In order to extract subzero membrane hydraulic permeability in the presence of ice, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method was used. By analyzing rat and mouse sperm frozen at 5 degrees C/min and 20 degrees C/min, heat release signatures characteristic of each sperm type were obtained and correlated to cellular dehydration. The dehydration response was then fit to a model of cellular water transport (dehydration) by adjusting cell-specific biophysical (membrane hydraulic permeability) parameters L(pg) and E(Lp). A "combined fit" (to 5 degrees C/min and 20 degrees C/min data) for rat sperm in Biggers-Whitten-Whittingham media yielded L(pg) = 0.007 microm min(-1) atm(-1) and E(Lp) = 17.8 kcal/mol, and in egg yolk cryopreservation media yielded L(pg) = 0.005 microm min(-1) atm(-1) and E(Lp) = 14.3 kcal/mol. These parameters, especially the activation energy, were found to be lower than previously published parameters for mouse sperm. In addition, the biophysical responses in mouse and rat sperm were shown to depend on the constituents of the cryopreservation media, in particular egg yolk and glycerol. Using these parameters, optimal cooling rates for cryopreservation were predicted for each sperm based on a criteria of 5%-15% normalized cell water at -30 degrees C during freezing in cryopreservation media. These predicted rates range from 53 degrees C/min to 70 degrees C/min and from 28 degrees C/min to 36 degrees C/min in rat and mouse, respectively. These predictions were validated by comparison to experimentally determined cryopreservation outcomes, in this case based on motility. Maximum

  12. Intracellular signal transduction pathways in the regulation of fowl sperm motility: evidence for the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) cascade.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Koji; Omura, Yusuke; Katayama, Seiichi; Tatemoto, Hideki; Narumi, Kazunori; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro

    2009-07-01

    The possible role of PI3-K in the reversible temperature-dependent immobilization of fowl sperm motility was investigated by using PI3-K inhibitor (LY294002) and its inactive analogue (LY303511). The existence of the PI3-K in fowl spermatozoa was also confirmed by Western blotting analysis. Fowl sperm motility in TES/NaCl buffer remained negligible at the avian body temperature of 40 degrees C but was maintained vigorously when the temperature was decreased to 30 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, no stimulation or inhibition of motility was observed after the addition of 2 mM CaCl2 and 10 microM LY294002 or LY303511: around 70-80% of spermatozoa remained motile. In contrast, at 40 degrees C, the motility of spermatozoa was activated immediately after the addition of Ca(2+), but the subsequent addition of LY294002 inhibited the motility again. The addition of LY303511 did not appreciably affect the Ca(2+)-supplemented sperm motility, which was maintained for at least 15 min. The ATP concentrations of spermatozoa after the addition of LY294002 + Ca(2+) or LY303511 + Ca(2+) were almost the same values compared with those of Ca(2+) alone at 40 degrees C, suggesting that the addition of LY294002 was not simply affecting membrane damage or inhibiting energy production in the spermatozoa, but may be acting on some part of the motility-regulating cascade. Immunoblotting of sperm extract using an antibody to PI3-K revealed a major cross-reacting protein of 85 kDa, which corresponds to the molecular weight of the subunit of PI3-K. These results suggest that PI3-K may be positively involved in the calcium-regulated maintenance of flagellar movement of fowl spermatozoa at 40 degrees C.

  13. Osmotic tolerance limits and effects of cryoprotectants on the motility, plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity of rat sperm.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Benson, James D; Men, Hongsheng; Critser, John K

    2006-12-01

    Osmotic stress is an important factor that can result in cell damage during cryopreservation. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) isosmotic sperm cell volume; (2) osmotically inactive volume; (3) osmotic tolerance limits of rat sperm; and (4) the effects of addition and removal of glycerol (Gly), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG) or dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) on rat sperm function. Sperm from Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. An electronic particle counter was used to measure the cell volume of rat sperm. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis and flow-cytometric analysis were used to assess sperm motility, plasma membrane and acrosomal integrity. The isosmotic sperm cell volumes of the two strains were 37.0+/-0.1 and 36.2+/-0.2 microm(3), respectively. Rat sperm behaved as linear osmometers from 260 to 450 mOsm, and the osmotically inactive sperm volumes of the two strains were 79.8+/-1.5% and 81.4+/-2.2%, respectively. Rat sperm have very limited osmotic tolerances. The sperm motility and the sperm plasma membranes of both strains were sensitive to anisosmotic treatments, but the acrosomes of both strains were more sensitive to hyposmotic than hyperosmotic conditions. The one-step addition and removal of Me(2)SO showed the most deleterious effect on rat sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosomal integrity among the four cryoprotectants. These data characterizing rat sperm osmotic behavior, osmotic and cryoprotectant tolerance will be used to design cryopreservation protocols for rat sperm.

  14. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  15. Sperm cryopreservation update: Cryodamage, markers, and factors affecting the sperm freezability in pigs.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation is the most efficient method for long-term preservation of mammalian sperm. However, freeze-thawing procedures may strongly impair the sperm function and survival and thus decrease the reproductive performance. In addition, the sperm resilience to withstand cryopreservation, also known as freezability, presents a high individual variability. The present work summarizes the principles of cryoinjury and the relevance of permeating and nonpermeating cryoprotective agents. Descriptions about sperm cryodamage are mainly focused on boar sperm, but reference to other mammalian species is also made when relevant. Main cryoinjuries not only regard to sperm motility and membrane integrity, but also to the degradation effect exerted by freeze-thawing on other important components for sperm fertilizing ability, such as mRNAs. After delving into the main differences between good and poor freezability boar ejaculates, those protein markers predicting the sperm ability to sustain cryopreservation are also mentioned. Moreover, factors that may influence sperm freezability, such as season, diet, breed, or ejaculate fractions are discussed, together with the effects of different additives, like seminal plasma and antioxidants. After briefly referring to the effects of long-term sperm preservation in frozen state and the reproductive performance of frozen-thawed boar sperm, this work speculates with new research horizons on the preservation of boar sperm, such as vitrification and freeze-drying.

  16. Role of potassium and pH on the initiation of sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2017-01-01

    The role of potassium from the seminal plasma and/or the activation media was examined by selectively removing K(+) from this media, and by testing the use of K(+) channel inhibitors and a K-ionophore. Sperm motility was measured using a CASA system, intracellular K(+) and pH were measured by flow cytometry, and sperm head area was measured by ASMA: Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses. Sperm motility was notably inhibited by the removal of K(+) from the seminal plasma and by treatment with the K(+) ionophore valinomycin. This therefore indicates that a reduction of K(+) levels in the quiescent stage inhibits further motility. The normal decrease in sperm head area induced by seawater activation was altered by the removal of K(+) from the seminal plasma, and an increase in the pHi in the quiescent stage was also induced. Intracellular pH (pHi) was quantitatively measured for the first time in European eel spermatozoa, being 7.2 in the quiescent stage and 7.1 post-activation. Intracellular and external pH levels influenced sperm motility both in the quiescent stage and at activation. The alkalinization of the pHi (by NH4Cl) inhibited sperm motility activation, while acidification (by Na-acetate) did not have any effect. Our results indicate that a pH gradient between the sperm cell and the seminal plasma is necessary for sperm motility activation. The presence of the ion K(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary in order to maintain sperm volume, intracellular pH and sperm motility.

  17. Changes in the structures of motile sperm subpopulations in dog spermatozoa after both cryopreservation and centrifugation on PureSperm(®) gradient.

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Alcaráz, L; Duarte, N; Portero, J M; Acha, D; Hidalgo, M

    2011-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) determine if discrete motile sperm subpopulations exist and their incidence in fresh dog ejaculates, (2) evaluate the effects of cryopreservation on the distribution of spermatozoa within the different subpopulations, and (3) determine the effect of the discontinuous PureSperm(®) gradient on the sperm subpopulation structure of frozen-thawed dog spermatozoa. Semen from 5 dogs were collected and cryopreserved following a standard protocol. After thawing, semen samples were selected by centrifugation on PureSperm(®). Sperm motility (assessed by computerized-assisted semen analysis, CASA) was assessed before freezing, just after thawing and after preparation on the PureSperm(®) gradients. Cryopreservation had a significant (P<0.001) effect on CASA-derived parameters. PureSperm(®) centrifugation yielded sperm suspensions with improved motility (P<0.01). A multivariate clustering procedure separated 19414 motile spermatozoa into four subpopulations: Subpopulation 1 consisting of poorly active and non-progressive spermatozoa (20.97%), Subpopulation 2 consisting of slow and low-linear spermatozoa (18.24%), Subpopulation 3 consisting of highly active but non-progressive spermatozoa (20.75%), and Subpopulation 4 consisting of high speed and progressive spermatozoa (40.03%). Although, cryopreservation had a significant (P<0.001) effect on both the frequency distribution of spermatozoa within subpopulations and the motion characteristics of each subpopulation, the sperm subpopulation structure was perfectly maintained after freezing and thawing. The selected sperm samples was enrich in Subpopulation 4, reaching a proportion of 31.9% of the present spermatozoa, in contrast with the unselected sperm samples, where this sperm subpopulation accounted for 24.9% of the total. From these results, we concluded that four well-defined motile sperm subpopulations were present either in fresh semen, in unselected sperm samples or in selected

  18. Differences in ATP Generation Via Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation and Relationships with Sperm Motility in Mouse Species*

    PubMed Central

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse sperm produce enough ATP to sustain motility by anaerobic glycolysis and respiration. However, previous studies indicated that an active glycolytic pathway is required to achieve normal sperm function and identified glycolysis as the main source of ATP to fuel the motility of mouse sperm. All the available evidence has been gathered from the studies performed using the laboratory mouse. However, comparative studies of closely related mouse species have revealed a wide range of variation in sperm motility and ATP production and that the laboratory mouse has comparatively low values in these traits. In this study, we compared the relative reliance on the usage of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation as ATP sources for sperm motility between mouse species that exhibit significantly different sperm performance parameters. We found that the sperm of species with higher oxygen consumption/lactate excretion rate ratios were able to produce higher amounts of ATP, achieving higher swimming velocities. Additionally, we show that the species with higher respiration/glycolysis ratios have a higher degree of dependence upon active oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, we characterize for the first time two mouse species in which sperm depend on functional oxidative phosphorylation to achieve normal performance. Finally, we discuss that sexual selection could promote adaptations in sperm energetic metabolism tending to increase the usage of a more efficient pathway for the generation of ATP (and faster sperm). PMID:26048989

  19. Differences in ATP Generation Via Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation and Relationships with Sperm Motility in Mouse Species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-08-14

    Mouse sperm produce enough ATP to sustain motility by anaerobic glycolysis and respiration. However, previous studies indicated that an active glycolytic pathway is required to achieve normal sperm function and identified glycolysis as the main source of ATP to fuel the motility of mouse sperm. All the available evidence has been gathered from the studies performed using the laboratory mouse. However, comparative studies of closely related mouse species have revealed a wide range of variation in sperm motility and ATP production and that the laboratory mouse has comparatively low values in these traits. In this study, we compared the relative reliance on the usage of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation as ATP sources for sperm motility between mouse species that exhibit significantly different sperm performance parameters. We found that the sperm of species with higher oxygen consumption/lactate excretion rate ratios were able to produce higher amounts of ATP, achieving higher swimming velocities. Additionally, we show that the species with higher respiration/glycolysis ratios have a higher degree of dependence upon active oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, we characterize for the first time two mouse species in which sperm depend on functional oxidative phosphorylation to achieve normal performance. Finally, we discuss that sexual selection could promote adaptations in sperm energetic metabolism tending to increase the usage of a more efficient pathway for the generation of ATP (and faster sperm).

  20. A Role for the Chemokine Receptor CCR6 in Mammalian Sperm Motility and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Campo, Pedro; Buffone, Mariano G.; Benencia, Fabian; Conejo-García, José R.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Gerton, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Although recent evidence indicates that several chemokines and defensins, well-known as inflammatory mediators, are expressed in the male and female reproductive tracts, the location and functional significance of chemokine networks in sperm physiology and sperm reproductive tract interactions are poorly understood. To address this deficiency in our knowledge, we examined the expression and function in sperm of CCR6, a receptor common to several chemoattractant peptides, and screened several reproductive tract fluids for the presence of specific ligands. CCR6 protein is present in mouse and human sperm and mainly localized in the sperm tail with other minor patterns in sperm from mice (neck and acrosomal region) and men (neck and midpiece regions). As expected from the protein immunoblotting and immunofluorescence results, mouse Ccr6 mRNA is expressed in the testis. Furthermore, the Defb29 mRNA encoding the CCR6 ligand, β-defensin DEFB29, is expressed at high levels in the epididymis. As determined by protein chip analysis, several chemokines (including some that act through CCR6, such as CCL20/MIP-3α (formerly Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3α) and protein hormones were present in human follicular fluid, endometrial secretions, and seminal plasma. In functional chemotaxis assays, capacitated human sperm exhibited a directional movement towards CCL20, and displayed modifications in motility parameters. Our data indicate that chemokine ligand/receptor interactions in the male and female genital tracts promote sperm motility and chemotaxis under non-inflammatory conditions. Therefore, some of the physiological reactions mediated by CCR6 ligands in male reproduction extend beyond a pro-inflammatory response and might find application in clinical reproduction and/or contraception. PMID:23765988

  1. Sperm motility patterns in Andalusian donkey (Equus asinus) semen: effects of body weight, age, and semen quality.

    PubMed

    Dorado, J; Acha, D; Gálvez, M J; Ortiz, I; Carrasco, J J; Díaz, B; Gómez-Arrones, V; Calero-Carretero, R; Hidalgo, M

    2013-04-15

    The aims of this study were to (1) identify sperm subpopulations with specific motion characteristics in fresh Andalusian donkey ejaculates; (2) evaluate the effects of individual donkey and ejaculates within the same donkey on the distribution of the subpopulations found; and (3) explore the relationship between the age and the body weight of donkey donors, the sperm quality parameters, and the sperm subpopulations structure. Sixty ejaculates from 12 Andalusian donkeys (five ejaculates per donkey), ranging in age from 4 to 15 years, were collected. Immediately after collection, sperm characteristics (volume, sperm concentration, objective sperm motility, and sperm morphology) were assessed. Donkeys were evaluated for body weight. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were established between the body weight of the donkeys and the pH (r = -0.52), sperm motility (percentage of motile spermatozoa: r = -0.31; percentage of progressive motile spermatozoa: r = -0.34), and total sperm abnormalities (r = 0.38). The correlations of the age with the measures of semen quality were low and not significant (P > 0.05). A multivariate clustering procedure separated 65,342 motile spermatozoa into four subpopulations: subpopulation 1, consisting of slow and nonprogressive spermatozoa (15.4%), subpopulation 2, consisting of moderately slow but progressive spermatozoa (35.9%), subpopulation 3, consisting of highly active but nonprogressive spermatozoa (18.5%), and subpopulation 4, consisting of highly active and progressive spermatozoa (30.2%). The distribution of these subpopulations varied significantly (P < 0.05) according to several parameters such as the individual donkey, the ejaculate of the same donkey, the total motility, and the overall sperm concentration. Our results show the existence of four well-defined motile sperm subpopulations in Andalusian donkey ejaculates, and suggest a high heterogeneity in the ejaculate structure in donkey. The relationship between the

  2. hemingway is required for sperm flagella assembly and ciliary motility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Soulavie, Fabien; Piepenbrock, David; Thomas, Joëlle; Vieillard, Jennifer; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Cortier, Elisabeth; Laurençon, Anne; Göpfert, Martin C.; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Cilia play major functions in physiology and development, and ciliary dysfunctions are responsible for several diseases in humans called ciliopathies. Cilia motility is required for cell and fluid propulsion in organisms. In humans, cilia motility deficiencies lead to primary ciliary dyskinesia, with upper-airways recurrent infections, left–right asymmetry perturbations, and fertility defects. In Drosophila, we identified hemingway (hmw) as a novel component required for motile cilia function. hmw encodes a 604–amino acid protein characterized by a highly conserved coiled-coil domain also found in the human orthologue, KIAA1430. We show that HMW is conserved in species with motile cilia and that, in Drosophila, hmw is expressed in ciliated sensory neurons and spermatozoa. We created hmw-knockout flies and found that they are hearing impaired and male sterile. hmw is implicated in the motility of ciliated auditory sensory neurons and, in the testis, is required for elongation and maintenance of sperm flagella. Because HMW is absent from mature flagella, we propose that HMW is not a structural component of the motile axoneme but is required for proper acquisition of motile properties. This identifies HMW as a novel, evolutionarily conserved component necessary for motile cilium function and flagella assembly. PMID:24554765

  3. Vitrification of Sperm from Marine Fishes: Effect on Motility and Membrane Integrity.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Uribe, Rafael; Chesney, Edward J; Daly, Jonathan; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2015-06-01

    Our goal was to develop a standardized approach for sperm vitrification of marine fishes that can be applied generally in aquatic species. The objectives were to: 1) estimate acute toxicity of cryoprotectants over a range of concentrations; 2) evaluate the properties of vitrification solutions (VS); 3) evaluate different thawing solutions, and 4) evaluate sperm quality after thawing by examination of motility and membrane integrity. Sperm were collected from red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). A total of 29 combinations of cryoprotectants were evaluated for toxicity and glass formation. Samples were loaded onto 10-µL polystyrene loops and plunged into liquid nitrogen. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in post-thaw motility among VS and among species when using the same VS. The sperm in VS of 15% DMSO + 15% ethylene glycol + 10% glycerol + 1% X-1000™ + 1% Z-1000™ had an average post-thaw motility of 58% and membrane integrity of 19% for spotted seatrout, 38% and 9% for red snapper, and 30% and 19% for red drum. Adaptations by marine fish to high osmotic pressures could explain the survival in the high cryoprotectant concentrations. Vitrification offers an alternative to conventional cryopreservation.

  4. Luteinizing hormone modulates intracellular calcium, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and motility during human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Aideé S; González-González, María E; Mata-Martínez, Esperanza; Larrea, Fernando; Treviño, Claudia L; Chirinos, Mayel

    2017-02-05

    In order to fertilize, spermatozoa must undergo physiological and biochemical changes during their transit along the female reproductive tract before reaching and fusing with the oocyte, process known as capacitation. Sperm modifications associated with capacitation are modulated by their interaction with molecules present in the female reproductive tract. During the woman fertile window, some reproductive hormones reach their maximum concentrations in serum, such as the luteinizing hormone (LH). Since spermatozoa preparing to fertilize may be exposed to LH, the purpose of this work was to study the effects of this hormone on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), protein tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm motility and acrosome reaction under capacitating conditions. The results showed that LH increases the duration and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. Furthermore, motility analysis indicated that LH decreases rapid progressive motility and that sperm hyperactivation as well as several kinetic parameters augment in the presence of 0.5 and 1 μg/ml of the hormone. In addition, these two hormone concentrations also consistently promoted protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, no effects on acrosome reaction were observed. In conclusion, the evidence indicates that LH modulates several sperm function variables involved in capacitation, suggesting that may have an important and unexplored role during human fertilization.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epididymitis disrupts epididymal beta-defensin expression and inhibits sperm motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Li, Yidong; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yuchuan; Diao, Hua; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yonglian; Lu, Jian

    2010-12-01

    Although more than 40 beta-defensins have been identified in rat epididymis, little is known about their regulation or their relation to male infertility caused by inflammation. Using a rat model of epididymitis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we examined expression of SPAG11E (also known as Bin1b), a caput epididymis-specific beta-defensin in rat. Unlike the expression of other beta-defensins in various epithelial cells with upregulated expression after LPS stimulation, expression of SPAG11E was significantly decreased by LPS at the mRNA and protein levels. LPS treatment also significantly decreased both sperm binding to SPAG11E and sperm motility, and supplementation of the spermatozoa with recombinant SPAG11E in vitro remarkably increased both SPAG11E binding and motility of sperm. To clarify whether decreased expression is a common pattern of epididymal beta-defensins after LPS stimulation, we examined the expression of another 12 epididymal beta-defensins expressed in the caput epididymis. For nine of these beta-defensins, expression was decreased, but for the other three, expression remained unaffected. These findings demonstrate that LPS-induced epididymitis can decrease the expression of epididymal beta-defensins and that disruption of SPAG11E expression is involved in the impairment of sperm motility.

  6. Peptides in seminal fluid and their role in infertility: a potential role for opiorphin inhibition of neutral endopeptidase activity as a clinically relevant modulator of sperm motility: a review.

    PubMed

    Bosler, Jayme S; Davies, Kelvin P; Neal-Perry, Genevieve S

    2014-11-01

    Infertility is a devastating medical condition that adversely affects emotional health and well-being of couples who desire pregnancy and parenthood. The overall demographic data suggest that the indication for more than one-third of assisted reproductive technology cycles performed in the United States includes male factor infertility. There is increasing recognition of the role that peptides present in seminal plasma have in determining sperm motility. Several recent studies suggest that peptidases, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase N (APN), impose significant adverse effects on sperm motility. Interestingly, several recent studies demonstrate that there is an endogenous NEP/APN inhibitor peptide called opiorphin in human seminal plasma. Our pilot studies suggest opiorphin promotes sperm motility and may positively influence sperm motility parameters in some cases of males infertility characterized by asthenozoospermia.

  7. Effect of dilution in sperm maturation media and time of storage on sperm motility and fertilizing capacity of cryopreserved semen of sex-reversed female rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Judycka, Sylwia; Ciereszko, Andrzej; Dobosz, Stefan; Zalewski, Tomasz; Dietrich, Grzegorz J

    2017-05-01

    Masculinized females, also called neomales or sex-reversed females have a male phenotype but retain the female genotype (XX). Therefore, all spermatozoa produced in their functional testes carry an X chromosome, which is desired for the production of all-female rainbow trout populations. Semen of sex-reversed female rainbow trout is of low quality and in vitro maturation is required, which includes dilution of sperm suspensions with specially formulated maturation solutions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dilution in different maturation media on sperm quality (sperm motility characteristics and fertilizing capacity) of frozen/thawed sperm of sex-reversed female rainbow trout. The effect of time of post-thaw storage (0, 15, 60 and 120min) on semen quality was also tested. Sperm motility parameters and fertilization rate at the eyed and hatching stages were assessed for post-thaw semen diluted in different media. The cryopreservation procedure resulted in high post-thaw sperm motility of about 57% and did not differ from fresh semen. Unexpectedly, maturation media decreased sperm activation capacity immediately after dilution; however, sperm motility increased over time. Fertilization rates of frozen/thawed semen were high (71-87%) and did not differ significantly between experimental variants at any of tested periods of storage. Our results demonstrated that the effect of the maturation media on frozen/thawed sperm is different from that of fresh sperm. The progressive increase in post-thaw sperm motility in maturation media can potentially be applied to routine hatchery practice.

  8. Heavy ion radiation can promote greater motility and enolase protein expression in ram sperm in in vitro liquid storage.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxuan; Li, Hongyan; He, Jianhua; Zhao, Xingxu

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of heavy ion radiation (HIR) on ram sperm quality during 24h of in vitro liquid storage at 15°C, and identify the most appropriate dose which did not injure, but actually improved sperm quality and confirmed the relationship between highly expressed enolase and ram sperm quality during storage in vitro. Six Dorset ram (Ovis aries) semen pools from five mature and healthy rams were each divided into seven experimental groups with different doses of HIR (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5Gy) under the same experimental conditions. Sperm motility, viability, ATP content, and the gene and protein expression of enolase were measured at 24h of storage. Irradiated semen which had been stored for 24h, retained not only greater sperm motility, viability, and ATP content, but had greater enolase protein expression. This was evidenced by increased amounts of mRNA for this enzyme and amount of enolase protein as compared with semen from control rams, especially for the 0.1Gy group (P<0.001). These results indicate that HIR can promote enhanced motility and viability during in vitro liquid storage, and the 0.1Gy may be a suitable dose for improving sperm quality. Greater amounts of enolase and ATP content may results from enhanced sperm glycolysis by HIR. HIR enhances sperm glycolysis to generate sufficient ATP for maintaining sperm motility during storage.

  9. AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Calle-Guisado, Violeta; de Llera, Ana Hurtado; Martin-Hidalgo, David; Mijares, Jose; Gil, Maria C; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Bragado, Maria J; Garcia-Marin, Luis J

    2016-09-27

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work's aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%-80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS) in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC). AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied.

  10. Quantification of bovine sperm separation by a swim-up method. Relationship to sperm motility, integrity of acrosomes, sperm migration in polyacrylamide gel and fertility.

    PubMed

    Parrish, J J; Foote, R H

    1987-01-01

    The number of bovine spermatozoa separated in a swim-up procedure was quantified using an electronic cell counter. In an initial test of the swim-up procedure, non-frozen sperm samples with different ratios of live to dead cells were prepared and tested for the number of spermatozoa counted by the swim-up procedure. In ejaculates from six bulls, the number of spermatozoa swimming up was related to the number of live cells present (R2 = 0.97). Next, sperm quality of frozen-thawed semen immediately after thawing was measured at 37 C by swim-up sperm count, sperm motility, spermatozoa with an intact acrosome and migration in polyacrylamide gel and then compared with the fertility of the semen used for artificial insemination. Twenty-nine ejaculates of frozen-thawed semen from 11 bulls were evaluated. Correlations with fertility were highest on an ejaculate basis for motility (r = 0.41, P = 0.05) and for swim-up sperm count (r = 0.35, P = 0.06). On a bull basis, swim-up sperm count had the highest correlation with fertility (r = 0.59, P = 0.06). In a multiple regression model to predict male fertility that included all described measures of semen quality, a R2 value of 0.69 was obtained. This is the first report showing that the ability of spermatozoa to swim out of a more dense medium (whole milk-glycerol extender) into culture media is quantitatively related to in vivo fertility.

  11. Implications of caveolae in testicular and epididymal myoid cells to sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Regiana L; Parent, Adam; Cyr, Daniel G; Gregory, Mary; Mandato, Craig A; Smith, Charles E; Hermo, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Seminiferous tubules of the testis and epididymal tubules in adult rodents are enveloped by contractile myoid cells, which move sperm and fluids along the male reproductive tract. Myoid cells in the testis influence Sertoli cells by paracrine signaling, but their role in the epididymis is unknown. Electron microscopy revealed that elongated myoid cells formed several concentric layers arranged in a loose configuration. The edges of some myoid cells in a given layer closely approximated one another, and extended small foot-like processes to cells of overlying layers. Gap junction proteins, connexins 32 and 43, were detected within the myoid cell layers by immunohistochemistry. These myoid cells also had caveolae that contained caveolin-1 and cavin-1 (also known as PTRF). The number of caveolae per unit area of plasma membrane was significantly reduced in caveolin-1-deficient mice (Cav1(-/-) ). Morphometric analyses of Cav1-null testes revealed an enlargement in whole-tubule and epithelial profile areas, whereas these parameters were slightly reduced in the epididymis. Although sperm are non-motile as they pass through the proximal epididymis, statistical analyses of cauda epididymidis sperm concentrations revealed no significant differences between wild-type and Cav1(-/-) mice. Motility analyses, however, indicated that sperm velocity parameters were reduced while beat cross frequency was higher in gametes of Cav1(-/-) mice. Thus while caveolae and their associated proteins are not necessary for myoid cell contractility, they appear to be crucial for signaling with the epididymal epithelium to regulate the proper acquisition of sperm motility. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 526-540, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Involvement of zinc in the regulation of pHi, motility, and acrosome reactions in sea urchin sperm

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    When sperm of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus or Lytechinus pictus are diluted into seawater, motility is initiated; and when exposed to egg jelly, an acrosome reaction is induced. In the presence of a variety of structurally different metal chelators (0.1-1 mM EDTA, EGTA, phenanthroline, dipyridyl, cysteine, or dithiothreitol), motility initiation is delayed and the acrosome reaction is inhibited. Of the metals detected in the sperm of these two species, very low levels of Zn+2 (0.1 microM free Zn+2) uniquely prevent this chelator inhibition. L. pictus sperm concentrate 65Zn+2 from seawater, and EDTA removes 50% of the accumulated 65Zn+2 by 5 min. Since both sperm motility and acrosome reactions are in part regulated by intracellular pH (pHi), the effect of chelators on the sperm pHi was examined by using the fluorescent pH sensitive probe, 9-aminoacridine, EDTA depresses sperm pHi in both species, and 0.1 microM free Zn+2 reverses this pHi depression. When sperm are diluted into media that contain chelators, both NH4Cl and monensin (a Na+/H+ ionophore) increase the sperm pHi and reverse the chelator inhibition of sperm motility and acrosome reactions. The results of this study are consistent with the involvement of a trace metal (probably zinc) in the pHi regulation of sea urchin sperm and indicate a likely mechanism for the previously observed effects of chelators on sperm motility and acrosome reactions. PMID:3922992

  13. Sperm motility parameters to evaluate the seminal quality of Boa constrictor occidentalis, a threatened snake species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Cardozo, G A; Guidobaldi, H A; Giojalas, L C; Bertona, M; Chiaraviglio, M

    2007-02-01

    Semen quality analysis constitutes a powerful tool to evaluate the fertility potential of males in threatened species. The Argentine boa constrictor or lampalagua (Boa constrictor occidentalis) is a threatened snake species and has been included in Appendix I of CITES. The objective of this work is to characterize the sperm of B. c. occidentalis on the bases of dynamic parameters to improve this species conservation. Dynamic parameters were measured in sperm samples using videomicroscopy and image analysis software. The sperm population showed a high degree of heterogeneity in velocity parameter values and 95% of the cells showed a linear pattern of movement. Studies in other species indicate that the number of motile spermatozoa and their movement speed is directly correlated with fertilization success. This work will help to establish basic parameter values for the evaluation of the reproductive potential of populations of B. c. occidentalis and to resolve questions referred to its reproductive strategies.

  14. TDRP deficiency contributes to low sperm motility and is a potential risk factor for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shanhua; Wu, Fei; Cao, Xinyi; He, Min; Liu, Naijia; Wu, Huihui; Yang, Zhihong; Ding, Qiang; Wang, Xuanchun

    2016-01-01

    TDRP (Testis Development-Related Protein), a nuclear factor, might play an important role in spermatogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of TDRP underlying these fundamental processes remain elusive. In this study, a Tdrp-deficient mouse model was generated. Fertility tests and semen analysis were performed. Tdrp-deficient mice were not significantly different from wild-type littermates in development of testes, genitourinary tract, or sperm count. Morphologically, spermatozoa of the Tdrp-deficient mice was not significantly different from the wild type. Several sperm motility indexes, i.e. the average path velocity (VAP), the straight line velocity (VSL) and the curvilinear velocity (VCL) were significantly decreased in Tdrp-deficient mice (p<0.05). The proportion of slow velocity sperm also increased significantly in the mutant mice (p<0.05). However, fertility tests showed that no significant difference inaverage offspring amount (AOA), frequency of copulatory plug (FCP), and frequency of conception (FC). Furthermore, TDRP1 could interact with PRM2, which might be the molecular mechanism of its nuclear function in spermatozoa. In conclusion, these data collectively demonstrated that Tdrp deficiency impaired the sperm motility, but Tdrp deficiency alone was not sufficient to cause male infertility in mice. Additionally, TDRP1 might participate in spermatogenes is through interaction with PRM2. PMID:27069551

  15. Kinesin force generation measured using a centrifuge microscope sperm-gliding motility assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, K; Cole, D; Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1996-01-01

    To measure force generation and characterize the relationship between force and velocity in kinesin-driven motility we have developed a centrifuge microscope sperm-gliding motility assay. The average (extrapolated) value of maximum isometric force at low kinesin density was 0.90 +/- 0.14 pN. Furthermore, in the experiments at low kinesin density, sperm pulled off before stall at forces between 0.40 and 0.75 pN. To further characterize our kinesin-demembranated sperm assay we estimated maximum isometric force using a laser trap-based assay. At low kinesin density, 4.34 +/- 1.5 pN was the maximum force. Using values of axoneme stiffness available from other studies, we concluded that, in our centrifuge microscope-based assay, a sperm axoneme functions as a lever arm, magnifying the centrifugal force and leading to pull-off before stall. In addition, drag of the distal portion of the axoneme is increased by the centrifugal force (because the axoneme is rotated into closer proximity to the glass surface) and represents an additional force that the kinesin motor must overcome. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:8968616

  16. Factors affecting sperm recovery rates and survival after centrifugation of equine semen.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, M S; Lyle, S K; Eilts, B E; Eljarrah, A H; Paccamonti, D L

    2012-11-01

    Conventional centrifugation protocols result in important sperm losses during removal of the supernatant. In this study, the effect of centrifugation force (400 or 900 × g), duration (5 or 10 min), and column height (20 or 40 mL; Experiment 1); sperm concentration (25, 50, and 100 × 10(6)/mL; Experiment 2), and centrifugation medium (EZ-Mixin CST [Animal Reproduction Systems, Chino, CA, USA], INRA96 [IMV Technologies, Maple Grove, MN, USA], or VMDZ [Partnar Animal Health, Port Huron, MI, USA]; Experiment 3) on sperm recovery and survival after centrifugation and cooling and storage were evaluated. Overall, sperm survival was not affected by the combination of centrifugation protocol and cooling. Total sperm yield was highest after centrifugation for 10 min at 400 × g in 20-mL columns (95.6 ± 5%, mean ± SD) or 900 × g in 20-mL (99.2 ± 0.8%) or 40-mL (91.4 ± 4.5%) columns, and at 900 × g for 5 min in 20-mL columns (93.8 ± 8.9%; P < 0.0001). Total (TMY) and progressively motile sperm yield followed a similar pattern (P < 0.0001). Sperm yields were not significantly different among samples centrifuged at various sperm concentrations. However, centrifugation at 100 × 10(6)/mL resulted in significantly lower total sperm yield (83.8 ± 10.7%) and TMY (81.7 ± 6.8%) compared with noncentrifuged semen. Centrifugation in VMDZ resulted in significantly lower TMY (69.3 ± 22.6%), progressively motile sperm yield (63.5 ± 18.2%), viable yield (60.9 ± 36.5%), and survival of progressively motile sperm after cooling (21 ± 10.8%) compared with noncentrifuged semen. In conclusion, centrifuging volumes of ≤ 20 mL minimized sperm losses with conventional protocols. With 40-mL columns, it may be recommended to increase the centrifugal force to 900 × g for 10 min and dilute the semen to a sperm concentration of 25 to 50 × 10(6)/mL in a milk- or fractionated milk-based medium. The semen extender VMDZ did not seem well suited for centrifugation of equine semen.

  17. The role of mitochondria in energy production for human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Piomboni, P; Focarelli, R; Stendardi, A; Ferramosca, A; Zara, V

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondria of spermatozoa are different from the corresponding organelles of somatic cells, in both their morphology and biochemistry. The biochemical differences are essentially related to the existence of specific enzyme isoforms, which are characterized by peculiar kinetic and regulatory properties. As mitochondrial energy metabolism is a key factor supporting several sperm functions, these organelles host critical metabolic pathways during germ cell development and fertilization. Furthermore, spermatozoa can use different substrates, and therefore activate different metabolic pathways, depending on the available substrates and the physico-chemical conditions in which they operate. This versatility is critical to ensure fertilization success. However, the most valuable aspect of mitochondria function in all types of cells is the production of chemical energy in the form of ATP which can be used, in the case of spermatozoa, for sustaining sperm motility. The latter, on the other hand, represents one of the major determinants of male fertility. Accordingly, the presence of structural and functional alterations in mitochondria from asthenozoospermic subjects confirms the important role played by these organelles in energy maintenance of sperm motility. The present study gives an overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside human sperm mitochondria and critically analyse the differences with respect to somatic mitochondria. Such a comparison has also been carried out between the functional characteristics of human sperm mitochondria and those of other mammalian species. A deeper understanding of mitochondrial energy metabolism could open up new avenues of investigation in bioenergetics of human sperm mitochondria, both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. In Vitro Effect of Cell Phone Radiation on Motility, DNA Fragmentation and Clusterin Gene Expression in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Zalata, Adel; El-Samanoudy, Ayman Z; Shaalan, Dalia; El-Baiomy, Youssef; Mostafa, Taymour

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of cellular phones emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) has been increased exponentially and become a part of everyday life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro RF-EMF exposure emitted from cellular phones on sperm motility index, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal clusterin (CLU) gene expression. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, a total of 124 semen samples were grouped into the following main categories: i. normozoospermia (N, n=26), ii. asthenozoospermia (A, n=32), iii. asthenoteratozoospermia (AT, n=31) and iv. oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, n=35). The same semen samples were then divided into two portions non-exposed and exposed samples to cell phone radiation for 1 hour. Before and immediately after exposure, both aliquots were subjected to different assessments for sperm motility, acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and CLU gene expression. Statistical differences were analyzed using paired t student test for comparisons between two sub-groups where p<0.05 was set as significant. Results There was a significant decrease in sperm motility, sperm linear velocity, sperm linearity index, and sperm acrosin activity, whereas there was a significant increase in sperm DNA fragmentation percent, CLU gene expression and CLU protein levels in the exposed semen samples to RF-EMF compared with non-exposed samples in OAT>AT>A>N groups, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion Cell phone emissions have a negative impact on exposed sperm motility index, sperm acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal CLU gene expression, especially in OAT cases. PMID:25918601

  19. Changes in motility, ATP content, morphology and fertilisation capacity during the movement phase of tetraploid Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) sperm.

    PubMed

    Suquet, M; Labbe, C; Brizard, R; Donval, A; Le Coz, J R; Quere, C; Haffray, P

    2010-07-01

    Changes in sperm features during the movement phase are especially interesting to study in external fertilization species whose sperm duration movement is long because this implies a significant adaptation of moving cells to the external medium. This study describes the changes in tetraploid Pacific oyster sperm characteristics in relation to time post activation. Sperm individually collected on three tetraploid males were activated in seawater. Their features were analysed over a 24h period and compared to a sperm pool collected on three diploid males as a reference. The percentage of motile spermatozoa, the intracellular ATP content, and the fine structure of spermatozoa were studied in relation to time post activation. Furthermore, the fertilisation capacity of sperm individually collected on five diploid males was assessed after 1 and 24h post activation. A forward progressive movement was maintained for at least a 20h duration. Compared to diploid males, the percentage of motile spermatozoa was lower in tetraploid males. The intracellular ATP concentration was higher in spermatozoa from tetraploid males than in spermatozoa from diploid males. A decrease in ATP content was observed in the first 6h post activation and severe alterations were observed in sperm morphology after 24h. Then, a lower fertilisation capacity of sperm from diploid males was observed at the end of the movement phase. The cessation of Pacific oyster sperm motility was unlikely caused by ATP consumption as ATP concentration was still high at the end of sperm movement but rather caused by drastic changes in sperm morphology. Compared to sperm collected on diploid males, the lower quality of sperm from tetraploid males was emphasized by a shorter movement duration and deeper morphological alterations at the end of the movement phase.

  20. The role of Zn-alpha2 glycoprotein in sperm motility is mediated by changes in cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fei; Ying, Xiaoqian; Guo, Wei; Guo, Qiangsu; Chen, Guowu; Liu, Yue; Ding, Zhide

    2007-10-01

    Sperm motility is essential for male reproduction or natural fertilization. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)/cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway is generally recognized as one of the significant signaling pathways in the regulation of mammalian spermatozoan motility. Since Zn-alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) activity in mammalian adipose tissue is mediated via the beta(3)-adrenoreceptor, with upregulation of the cAMP pathway, we hypothesize that ZAG may play the same role in sperm motility regulation, a new factor of regulation of sperm motility. Therefore, the gene encoding human ZAG was cloned and polyclonal antibodies were generated, and then laser scanning confocal microscopy and flow cytometry were employed to identify this protein in human spermatozoa. The results showed that ZAG protein was mostly localized on the pre-equatorial region covering the acrosome, neck, and middle piece of the flagellum of spermatozoa. Furthermore, using computer-assisted sperm analysis, we found that anti-human ZAG antibodies could significantly reduce the motility of human swim-up spermatozoa after 90- or 120-min incubation (P<0.05 and P<0.01 respectively), together with the decreasing of intracellular cAMP and PKA levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that ZAG is present in human spermatozoa and may be involved in the regulation of sperm motility via the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway.

  1. Separation of motile sperm for in vitro fertilization from frozen-thawed bull semen using progesterone induction on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchun; Ning, Bolin; Cao, Xinyan; Luo, Yinghua; Guo, Li; Wei, Guosheng; Liu, Shengjun; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Aizhong; Wu, Rui; Li, Yanbing

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a novel method for the separation of motile sperm from non-progressive motile and immotile sperm and in vitro Fertilization (IVF). This separation of bull sperm was accomplished by inducing chemotaxis along a progesterone release agent in a 7.5-mm microchannel microchip composed of a biocompatible polydimethysiloxane layer and a glass gradient. The selected sperm was applied directly for IVF. In the first experiment, we tested the effect of different lengths of microchannnel (5mm, 7.5mm and 10mm) on quality parameter of separated sperm. The results showed that separated sperm using 7.5-mm microchannel chip were improved in sperm motility, swimming velocity, and beat frequency compared with other groups. In the second experiment, a medium containing sperm from swim-up method and outlet reservoir of our 7.5-mm microchannel chip was collected and mitochondrial activity of the sperm was determined by fluorescence microscopy. The sperm from the microchip had higher mitochondria activity (47.6%±6.0%) than the sperm from the swim-up method (23.6%±4.7%) (P<0.05). There were significant differences in rate of acrosome intactness between the swim-up method and the microchip (36.0%±4.1% vs. 66.8±2.1%, respectively, P<0.05). In the third experiment, we compared sperm penetration in the microchip-IVF system with a standard IVF method (droplet-IVF). The microchip-IVF group had the highest percentages of oocytes penetrated (82.2%±1.6% vs. 63.5%±2.4%) and monospermic oocytes (67.8%±3.4% vs. 42.4%±1.5%). In addition, early developmental competence of oocytes to the blastocyst stage was higher when the oocytes were inseminated in the microchip-IVF system compared with those inseminated in a standard droplet-IVF system. These results demonstrate that our microchip based on a sperm chemotaxis system is useful for motile sperm separation from frozen-thawed bull semen for IVF. Therefore, the optimized microchip system provides a good opportunity to sort

  2. Sperm treatment affects capacitation parameters and penetration ability of ejaculated and epididymal boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Matás, C; Sansegundo, M; Ruiz, S; García-Vázquez, F A; Gadea, J; Romar, R; Coy, P

    2010-11-01

    This work was designed to study how this ability is affected by different sperm treatments routinely used for in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay. In this study, boar sperm samples from epididymal or ejaculated origin were processed by three different methods: left unwashed (NW group), washed in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline supplemented with 0.1% BSA (BSA group), and washed on a Percoll(®) gradient (PERCOLL group). After preparation of semen samples, changes in motility patterns were studied by CASA, calcium uptake by spectrofluorimetry, and ROS generation, spontaneous acrosome reaction, and lipid disorder by means of flow cytometry. Finally IVF assays were also performed with the different semen samples and penetrability results evaluated at 2 and 4 h post insemination (hpi). Independently of the sperm treatment, epididymal spermatozoa showed higher values of progressive motility, percentage of live cells with low lipid disorder, and penetration ability at 4 hpi than the corresponding ejaculated spermatozoa. Ejaculated spermatozoa showed higher levels of calcium uptake, ROS generation and percentage of spontaneous acrosome reaction than epididymal sperm. Regarding sperm treatments, PERCOLL group showed the highest values for some motility parameters (linearity of the curvilinear trajectory, straightness, and average path velocity/curvilinear velocity), ROS generation and penetration ability at 2 and 4 hpi; however this same group showed the lowest values for sperm curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement. From all experimental groups, ejaculated-PERCOLL-treated spermatozoa showed the highest fertilization ability after 2 hpi. Results suggest that capacitation pathways can be regulated by suitable treatments making the ejaculated sperm able to reach capacitation and fertilize oocytes in similar levels than epididymal spermatozoa, although most of the studied capacitation-associated changes do not correlate with this ability.

  3. The secretory activity of the seminal vesicles and its relationship to sperm motility: effects of infection in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Garcia-Hjarles, M A; Gutierrez, R; Guerra-Garcia, R

    1989-08-01

    In 146 males aged between 20 years and 40 years attending an infertility service, the secretory activity of the seminal vesicles was assessed by measurement of corrected seminal fructose concentration. This value was related to the presence of a positive semen culture, other evidence of inflammatory processes in the reproductive tract and sperm motility. Only 48% of subjects with a positive semen culture showed evidence of inflammation in the reproductive tract, as assessed by the presence of more than 20 white blood cells per high power field, and greater than 10% spermagglutination in the ejaculate. There was a relationship between the inflammatory process, hypofunction of the seminal vesicles and poor sperm motility. When the semen culture was positive but there was no evidence of inflammation neither seminal vesicle function nor sperm motility was affected. When the semen culture was negative, i.e. no evidence of inflammation and the subjects were asthenozoospermic, the corrected fructose levels were normal. It is proposed that in these conditions the cause of asthenozoospermia may be factors other than accessory sex organ dysfunction. In conclusion, there was no close relationship between the bacteriological results and evidence of inflammation of the accessory glands. A positive semen culture was related to lower levels of corrected fructose (hypofunction of the seminal vesicles) when the positive sperm culture was associated with inflammation of the reproductive tract and asthenozoospermia.

  4. Comparison of methods for detecting mitomycin C- and ethyl nitrosourea-induced germ cell damage in mice: sperm enzyme activities, sperm motility, and testis weight

    SciTech Connect

    Ficsor, G.; Oldford, G.M.; Loughlin, K.R.; Panda, B.B.; Dubien, J.L.; Ginsberg, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    Testes weights, sperm motility and enzyme activities in single sperm were compared with respect to their ability to detect either developmental or mutational damage to germ cells. Male mice were injected i.p. with 2.5 mg/kg mitomycin C (MC) or 50 or 100 mg/kg ethylnitrosourea (ENU) or saline and were then killed at times such that sperm derived from treated vas sperm (SZ), spermatids (ST), preleptotene-late-spermatogonial cells (PLSG), spermatogonial cells (SG), or spermatogonial stem cells (SGS) could be evaluated. The authors conclude that testis weight, which is easily obtained, is a sensitive indicator of germ cell damage by these agents. Sperm from each animal were evaluated for sperm motility, acrosin activity, succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity with or without the competitive inhibitor malonate or after exposure to 60/sup 8/C for 10 min. The latter two assays were to detect sperm enzymes resistant to the inhibitor or heat. The presence of the acrosin protein was also detected immunologically. Of the sperm assays, acrosin activity proved to be the most sensitive indicator of germ cell damage and was the simplest to measure.

  5. CRISP1 as a novel CatSper regulator that modulates sperm motility and orientation during fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Ernesto, Juan I.; Weigel Muñoz, Mariana; Battistone, María A.; Vasen, Gustavo; Martínez-López, Pablo; Orta, Gerardo; Figueiras-Fierro, Dulce; De la Vega-Beltran, José L.; Moreno, Ignacio A.; Guidobaldi, Héctor A.; Giojalas, Laura; Darszon, Alberto; Cohen, Débora J.

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent mechanisms are critical for successful completion of fertilization. Here, we demonstrate that CRISP1, a sperm protein involved in mammalian fertilization, is also present in the female gamete and capable of modulating key sperm Ca2+ channels. Specifically, we show that CRISP1 is expressed by the cumulus cells that surround the egg and that fertilization of cumulus–oocyte complexes from CRISP1 knockout females is impaired because of a failure of sperm to penetrate the cumulus. We provide evidence that CRISP1 stimulates sperm orientation by modulating sperm hyperactivation, a vigorous motility required for penetration of the egg vestments. Moreover, patch clamping of sperm revealed that CRISP1 has the ability to regulate CatSper, the principal sperm Ca2+ channel involved in hyperactivation and essential for fertility. Given the critical role of Ca2+ for sperm motility, we propose a novel CRISP1-mediated fine-tuning mechanism to regulate sperm hyperactivation and orientation for successful penetration of the cumulus during fertilization. PMID:26416967

  6. The epididymal sperm viability, motility and DNA integrity in dead mice maintained at 4-6oC

    PubMed Central

    Golshan Iranpour, Farhad; Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    Background: When male animals die, spermatozoa within the body of animal will be degenerated. Because of unique chromatin structure of sperm, maybe this degeneration is different from other cells. However there is not any research which considered directly the integrity of sperm DNA by keeping the cadaver in refrigerator. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess viability, total motility and DNA integrity of sperm cells after death. Materials and Methods:In this experimental study, 24 male Swiss white mice were killed by cervical dislocation and then kept in refrigerator (4-6oC) for up to 12 days. On the 0 (immediately after death as control group), 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th and the 12th days after death cauda epididymides were removed and squeezed in Ham’s F10 medium. The proportion of viable, motile and double stranded DNA spermatozoa was examined. Viability and DNA integrity of sperm cells were examined consecutively by eosin nigrosin and acridine orange stainings. Results:The data obtained from this study showed that viability and total motility of sperm cells were significantly decreased during 12 days after death (p<0.001). In contrast with viability and motility, DNA integrity was without significant changes (even 12 days after death). Conclusion:This study suggests that integrity of sperm DNA would not change even after 12 days after death if the cadaver kept in refrigerator. PMID:24639746

  7. Protective effect of silymarin on viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm treated with sodium arsenite

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Farzaneh; Momeni, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sodium arsenite can impair male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress. Silymarin is known as a potent antioxidant. Objective: This study was performed to investigate if silymarin can prevent the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on ram sperm viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential. Materials and Methods: Epidydimal spermatozoa obtained from ram were divided into five groups: 1) Spermatozoa at 0 hr, 2) spermatozoa at 180 min (control), 3) spermatozoa treated with sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min, 4) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) + sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min and 5) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) for 180 min. MTT assay and Rhodamine 123 staining were used to assess sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential respectively. Sperm motility was performed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Results: Viability (p<0.01), nonprogressive motility (p<0.001) and intact mitochondrial membrane potential (p<0.001) of the spermatozoa were significantly decreased in sodium arsenite treated group compared to control group. In silymarin + sodium arsenite group, silymarin could significantly reverse the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on these sperm parameters compared to sodium arsenite group (p<0.001). In addition, the application of silymarin alone for 180 minutes could significantly increase progressively motile sperm (p<0.001) and decrease non motile sperm (p<0.01) compared to the control. Conclusion: Silymarin could compensate the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on viability, nonprogressive motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm. PMID:27525323

  8. A Novel Cysteine Knot Protein for Enhancing Sperm Motility That Might Facilitate the Evolution of Internal Fertilization in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Misato; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Saito, Yoko; Kutsuzawa, Megumi; Fujita, Kosuke; Ochi, Haruki; Nakauchi, Yuni; Watanabe, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Internal fertilization ensures successful reproduction of tetrapod vertebrates on land, although how this mode of reproduction evolved is unknown. Here, we identified a novel gene encoding sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a key protein for the internal fertilization of the urodele Cynops pyrrhogaster by Edman degradation of an isolated protein and subsequent reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The SMIS gene encoded a 150 amino-acid sequence including the cysteine knot (CK) motif. No gene with substantial similarity to the SMIS was in the data bank of any model organisms. An active site of the SMIS was in the C-terminal region of the 2nd loop of CK motif. A synthetic peptide including the active site sequence bound to the midpiece and initiated/enhanced the circular motion of C. pyrrhogaster sperm, which allows penetration of the egg jelly specialized for the internal fertilization of this species. The synthetic peptide bound to whole sperm of Rhacophorus arboreus and enhanced the rotary motion, which is adapted to propel the sperm through egg coat matrix specialized for arboreal reproduction, while it bound to the tip of head and tail of Bufo japonicus sperm, and enhanced the vibratory motion, which is suited to sperm penetration through the egg jelly specialized for the reproduction of that species in freshwater. The polyclonal antibody against the active site of the SMIS specifically bound to egg coat matrix of R. arboreus. These findings suggest that diversification of amphibian reproductive modes accompanies the specialization of egg coat and the adaptation of sperm motility to penetrate the specialized egg coat, and SMIS acts as the sperm motility enhancer of anurans and urodeles that might facilitate to adaptively optimize sperm motility for allowing the establishment of internal fertilization.

  9. A Novel Cysteine Knot Protein for Enhancing Sperm Motility That Might Facilitate the Evolution of Internal Fertilization in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Misato; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Saito, Yoko; Kutsuzawa, Megumi; Fujita, Kosuke; Ochi, Haruki; Nakauchi, Yuni; Watanabe, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Internal fertilization ensures successful reproduction of tetrapod vertebrates on land, although how this mode of reproduction evolved is unknown. Here, we identified a novel gene encoding sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a key protein for the internal fertilization of the urodele Cynops pyrrhogaster by Edman degradation of an isolated protein and subsequent reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The SMIS gene encoded a 150 amino-acid sequence including the cysteine knot (CK) motif. No gene with substantial similarity to the SMIS was in the data bank of any model organisms. An active site of the SMIS was in the C-terminal region of the 2nd loop of CK motif. A synthetic peptide including the active site sequence bound to the midpiece and initiated/enhanced the circular motion of C. pyrrhogaster sperm, which allows penetration of the egg jelly specialized for the internal fertilization of this species. The synthetic peptide bound to whole sperm of Rhacophorus arboreus and enhanced the rotary motion, which is adapted to propel the sperm through egg coat matrix specialized for arboreal reproduction, while it bound to the tip of head and tail of Bufo japonicus sperm, and enhanced the vibratory motion, which is suited to sperm penetration through the egg jelly specialized for the reproduction of that species in freshwater. The polyclonal antibody against the active site of the SMIS specifically bound to egg coat matrix of R. arboreus. These findings suggest that diversification of amphibian reproductive modes accompanies the specialization of egg coat and the adaptation of sperm motility to penetrate the specialized egg coat, and SMIS acts as the sperm motility enhancer of anurans and urodeles that might facilitate to adaptively optimize sperm motility for allowing the establishment of internal fertilization. PMID:27579691

  10. Does folic acid and zinc sulphate intervention affect endocrine parameters and sperm characteristics in men?

    PubMed

    Ebisch, I M W; Pierik, F H; DE Jong, F H; Thomas, C M G; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M

    2006-04-01

    We evaluated pre- and post-intervention endocrine and semen parameters in a double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention study to investigate the underlying mechanism of increased sperm concentration after folic acid and zinc sulphate intervention. A total of 47 fertile and 40 subfertile males participated in a 26-week intervention study consisting of a daily treatment with folic acid (5 mg/day) and zinc sulphate (66 mg/day), or placebo. Pre- and post-intervention semen parameters, serum folate, zinc, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone and inhibin B concentrations were measured. The results indicated that intervention treatment significantly increased sperm concentration in subfertile males. Other semen and endocrine parameters were not affected by intervention treatment. At baseline, positive correlations were found between serum zinc and sperm concentration, motility and inhibin B. Serum zinc and FSH were inversely correlated. As (already) well known from previous research, inhibin B positively correlated with sperm concentration, motility and morphology, and was inversely correlated with FSH. The latter was positively correlated with testosterone. In addition, testosterone and inhibin B were inversely correlated. After intervention, the correlations with zinc disappeared. We conclude that the increase in sperm concentration after folic acid and zinc sulphate intervention is not the result of alterations in FSH, testosterone or inhibin B concentrations. Although zinc and folate have several effects on spermatogenesis, the underlying mechanisms involved are not clear.

  11. Effect of chamber characteristics, loading and analysis time on motility and kinetic variables analysed with the CASA-mot system in goat sperm.

    PubMed

    Del Gallego, R; Sadeghi, S; Blasco, E; Soler, C; Yániz, J L; Silvestre, M A

    2017-02-01

    Several factors unrelated to the semen samples could be influencing in the sperm motility analysis. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of four chambers with different characteristics, namely; slide-coverslip, Spermtrack, ISAS D4C10, and ISAS D4C20 on the sperm motility. The filling procedure (drop or capillarity) and analysis time (0, 120 and 240s), depth of chamber (10 or 20μm) and field on motility variables were analysed by use of the CASA-mot system in goat sperm. Use of the drop-filling chambers resulted in greater values than capillarity-filling chambers for all sperm motility and kinetic variables, except for LIN (64.5% compared with 56.3% of motility for drop- and capillarity-filling chambers respectively, P<0.05). There were no significant differences in total sperm motility between different chamber depths, however, use of the 20μm-chambers resulted in greater sperm progressive motility rate, VSL and LIN, and less VCL and VAP than chambers with a lesser depth. There was less sperm motility and lesser values for kinetic variables as time that elapsed increased between sample loading and sperm evaluation. For sperm motility, use of droplet-loaded chambers resulted in similar values of MOT in all microscopic fields, but sperm motility assessed in capillarity-loaded chambers was less in the central fields than in the outermost microscopic fields. For goats, it is recommended that sperm motility be analysed using the CASA-mot system with a drop-loaded chamber within 2min after filling the chamber.

  12. Changes in sperm motility in response to osmolality/Ca2+ in three Indonesian fresh water teleosts: goby (Oxyeleotris marmorata), Java carp (Puntius javanicus), and catfish (Clarias batrachus).

    PubMed

    Morita, Masaya; Okuno, Makoto; Susilo, Endang Sri; Setyo, Bambang Pramono; Martarini, Diptarina; Harnadi, Lilik; Takemura, Akihiro

    2006-03-01

    Sperm of most fresh water teleosts become motile when released into the hypotonic fresh water environment, but the role of osmolality and Ca2+ on sperm motility is not clear. Osmotic pressure and Ca2+ concentrations increase from fresh water to brackish water. Java carp Puntius javanicus and catfish Clarias batrachus live and reproduce only in fresh water. On the other hand, goby Oxyeleotris marmorata can acclimate and reproduce from fresh water to brackish water. In the present study, sperm motility and trajectory were compared among these three Indonesian endemic species. Sperm of Java carp, goby, and catfish begun to move in the hypotonic condition (< 200 mOsm/kg). However, the response to Ca2+ was different among these teleosts. In the presence of Ca2+, Java carp sperm swam in circular paths and immediately become quiescent, suggesting that Java carp sperm motility is activated in hypotonic aquatic environment without Ca2+. Goby sperm swam straightforward in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Percentages of motile sperm increased in 100-200 mOsm/kg but suppressed by removal of Ca2+. Regarding sperm motility and trajectory, no response was found in catfish sperm. These results suggest that a response to Ca2+ is different among sperm of the three species and suited to their habitat.

  13. An Extract of Pomegranate Fruit and Galangal Rhizome Increases the Numbers of Motile Sperm: A Prospective, Randomised, Controlled, Double-Blinded Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fedder, Maja D. K.; Jakobsen, Henrik B.; Giversen, Ina; Christensen, Lars P.; Parner, Erik T.; Fedder, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum) and galangal (Alpinia galanga) have separately been shown to stimulate spermatogenesis and to increase sperm counts and motility in rodents. Within traditional medicine, pomegranate fruit has long been used to increase fertility, however studies on the effect on spermatogenesis in humans have never been published. With this study we investigated whether oral intake of tablets containing standardised amounts of extract of pomegranate fruit and powder of greater galangal rhizome (Punalpin) would increase the total number of motile spermatozoa. The study was designed as a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial. Enrolment was based on the mean total number of motile spermatozoa of two ejaculates. The participants delivered an ejaculate after 4–8 days of tablet intake and two ejaculates just before they stopped taking the tablets. Seventy adult men with a semen quality not meeting the standards for commercial application at Nordic Cryobank, but without azoospermia, were included in the study. Participants were randomized to take tablets containing extract of pomegranate fruit (standardised with respect to punicalagin A+B, punicalin and ellagic acid) and freeze-dried rhizome of greater galangal (standardised with respect to 1′S-1′-acetoxychavicol acetate) or placebo on a daily basis for three months. Sixty-six participants completed the intervention (active treatment: n = 34; placebo: n = 32). After the intervention the total number of motile spermatozoa was increased in participants treated with plant extracts compared with the placebo group (p = 0.026). After three months of active treatment, the average total number of motile sperm increased by 62% (from 23.4 to 37.8 millions), while for the placebo group, the number of motile sperm increased by 20%. Sperm morphology was not affected by the treatment. Our findings may help subfertile men to gain an improved amount of motile ejaculated sperm by

  14. Sperm metabolism of the telost fishes Chalcalburnus chalcoides and Oncorhynchus mykiss and its relation to motility and viability.

    PubMed

    Lahnsteiner, F; Berger, B; Weismann, T

    1999-09-01

    In the teleost fish Chalcalburnus chalcoides (Cyprinidae) the influence of metabolic inhibitors, substrates, coenzymes, and oxygen concentrations on spermatozoal parameters during motility and during immotile incubation was studied, the respiration rate was characterized, representative metabolite levels were measured, and the results were compared with Oncorhynchus mykiss (Salmonidae). In Chalcalburnus chalcoides the sperm motility rate, the average path swimming velocity, the motility duration, and the viability of immotile semen were significantly reduced in the presence of inhibitors of respiration (potassium cyanide, 2.4-dinitrophenol, atractyloside). Anaerobic conditions (<1 mg O(2)/liter) and inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid cycle by malonate and >7.5 mmol/liter succinate had similar effects on the sperm motility parameters and on the viability of immotile spermatozoa. Pyruvate and coenzyme A (an acyl-group carrier during oxidative carboxylation of pyruvate) prolonged the duration of sperm motility and the viability of immotile incubated spermatozoa, and also increased the spermatozoal respiration rate. Glucose levels significantly decreased during motility and during immotile storage and, under anaerobic conditions, the levels of lactate increased indicating that pyruvate derived from glycolysis. The respiration rate and the glycolytic rate significantly increased during motility. Therefore oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and aerobic glycolysis are central energy-supplying pathways for spermatozoa of Chalcalburnus chalcoides. The stimulatory effect of pyruvate and coenzyme A indicated that glycolysis is a rate-controlling pathway. Similar results were obtained for Oncorhynchus mykiss with the only exception that the stimulatory effect of coenzyme A was more significant than the stimulatory effect of pyruvate. When the sperm motility-activating saline solutions were optimized in aspects of energy supply, ionic composition, and

  15. SLC6 family transporter SNF-10 is required for protease-mediated activation of sperm motility in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fenker, Kristin E.; Hansen, Angela A.; Chong, Conrad A.; Jud, Molly C.; Duffy, Brittany A.; Norton, J. Paul; Hansen, Jody M.; Stanfield, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Motility of sperm is crucial for their directed migration to the egg. The acquisition and modulation of motility are regulated to ensure that sperm move when and where needed, thereby promoting reproductive success. One specific example of this phenomenon occurs during differentiation of the amoeboid sperm of C. elegans as they activate from a round spermatid to a mature, crawling spermatozoon. Sperm activation is regulated by redundant pathways to occur at a specific time and place for each sex. Here, we report the identification of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) transporter protein SNF-10 as a key regulator of C. elegans sperm activation in response to male protease activation signals. We find that SNF-10 is present in sperm and is required for activation by the male but not by the hermaphrodite. Loss of both snf-10 and a hermaphrodite activation factor render sperm completely insensitive to activation. Using in vitro assays, we find that snf-10 mutant sperm show a specific deficit in response to protease treatment but not to other activators. Prior to activation, SNF-10 is present in the plasma membrane, where it represents a strong candidate to receive signals that lead to subcellular morphogenesis. After activation, it shows polarized localization to the cell body region that is dependent on membrane fusions mediated by the dysferlin FER-1. Our discovery of snf-10 offers insight into the mechanisms differentially employed by the two sexes to accomplish the common goal of producing functional sperm, as well as how the physiology of nematode sperm may be regulated to control motility as it is in mammals. PMID:24929237

  16. Environmental chemicals impact dog semen quality in vitro and may be associated with a temporal decline in sperm motility and increased cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Richard G.; Byers, Andrew S.; Sumner, Rebecca N.; Rhind, Stewart M.; Zhang, Zulin; Freeman, Sarah L.; Moxon, Rachel; Richardson, Holly M.; Green, Martin; Craigon, Jim; England, Gary C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse temporal trends in human semen quality and cryptorchidism in infants have been associated with exposure to environmental chemicals (ECs) during development. Here we report that a population of breeding dogs exhibit a 26 year (1988–2014) decline in sperm quality and a concurrent increased incidence of cryptorchidism in male offspring (1995–2014). A decline in the number of males born relative to the number of females was also observed. ECs, including diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and polychlorinated bisphenol 153 (PCB153), were detected in adult dog testes and commercial dog foods at concentrations reported to perturb reproductive function in other species. Testicular concentrations of DEHP and PCB153 perturbed sperm viability, motility and DNA integrity in vitro but did not affect LH stimulated testosterone secretion from adult testis explants. The direct effects of chemicals on sperm may therefore contribute to the decline in canine semen quality that parallels that reported in the human. PMID:27503122

  17. Correlation of Adiponectin mRNA Abundance and Its Receptors with Quantitative Parameters of Sperm Motility in Rams

    PubMed Central

    Kadivar, Ali; Heidari Khoei, Heidar; Hassanpour, Hossein; Golestanfar, Arefe; Ghanaei, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2), known as adiponectin system, have some proven roles in the fat and glucose metabolisms. Several studies have shown that adiponectin can be considered as a candidate in linking metabolism to testicular function. In this regard, we evaluated the correlation between sperm mRNA abundance of adiponectin and its receptors, with sperm motility indices in the present study. Materials and Methods In this completely randomized design study, semen samples from 6 adult rams were fractionated on a two layer discontinuous percoll gradient into high and low motile sperm cells, then quantitative parameters of sperm motility were determined by computer-assisted sperm analyzer (CASA). The mRNA abundance levels of Adiponectin, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were measured quantitatively using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the high and low motile groups. Results Firstly, we showed that adiponectin and its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) were transcriptionally expressed in the ram sperm cells. Using Pfaff based method qRT- PCR, these levels of transcription were significantly higher in the high motile rather than low motile samples. This increase was 3.5, 3.6 and 2.5 fold change rate for Adiponectin, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, respectively. Some of sperm motility indices [curvilinear velocity (VCL), straight-line velocity (VSL), average path velocity (VAP), linearity (LIN), wobble (WOB) and straightness (STR)] were also significantly correlated with Adiponectin and AdipoR1 relative expression. The correlation of AdipoR2 was also significant with the mentioned parameters, although this correlation was not comparable with adiponectin and AdipoR1. Conclusion This study revealed the novel association of adiponectin system with sperm motility. The results of our study suggested that adiponectin is one of the possible factors which can be evaluated and studied in male infertility disorders. PMID:27123210

  18. Rat dorsal prostate is necessary for vaginal adhesion of the seminal plug and sperm motility in the uterine horns.

    PubMed

    Tlachi-López, José L; López, Aurora; Hoffman, Kurt; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; García-Lorenzana, Mario; Lucio, Rosa Angélica

    2011-01-01

    The rat prostate comprises dorsal, ventral and lateral lobes that are morphologically and biochemically distinct. Lesions to these structures are expected to affect the quality of the ejaculate and male fertility. In experiment 1, we analyzed ejaculate parameters of males that had chemical lesions of the dorsal or ventral lobes. At pre-lesion and at 5 and 20 days post-lesion males were mated, and after ejaculation, seminal fluid and seminal plug were obtained from the mated females. In experiment 2, the ventral lobes were ablated, and the ejaculate was analyzed. In experiment 3, the fertility of males with chemically-lesioned dorsal lobes or ablation of the ventral lobes was evaluated. Chemical lesion of the dorsal lobe prevented the adhesion of the seminal plug to vaginal walls. When these males were tested at 5-days postlesion, no sperm were found in uterus, and at 20-days post-lesion, the few sperm encountered showed slow progressive motility. None of the females that mated with dorsal lobe-lesioned males became pregnant. However, chemical lesion or ablation of the ventral lobes did not affect ejaculate or fertility. Our results indicate that the dorsal prostatic lobes are indispensable for reproductive success in males, and define parameters of ejaculate with which fertility can be estimated.

  19. Seminal plasma affects sperm sex sorting in boars.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Diego V; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Tarantini, Tatiana; Del Olmo, David; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted in boar semen samples to evaluate how both holding time (24h) and the presence of seminal plasma (SP) before sorting affect sperm sortability and the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to tolerate liquid storage. Whole ejaculate samples were divided into three aliquots immediately after collection: one was diluted (1:1, v/v) in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS; 50% SP); the SP of the other two aliquots was removed and the sperm pellets were diluted with BTS + 10% of their own SP (10% SP) or BTS alone (0% SP). The three aliquots of each ejaculate were divided into two portions, one that was processed immediately for sorting and a second that was sorted after 24h storage at 15-17°C. In the first experiment, the ability to exhibit well-defined X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm peaks (split) in the cytometry histogram and the subsequent sorting efficiency were assessed (20 ejaculates). In contrast with holding time, the SP proportion influenced the parameters examined, as evidenced by the higher number of ejaculates exhibiting split and better sorting efficiency (P<0.05) in semen samples with 0-10% SP compared with those with 50% SP. In a second experiment, the quality (viability, total and progressive motility) and functionality (plasma membrane fluidity and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species) of sex-sorted spermatozoa were evaluated after 0, 72 and 120h storage at 15-17°C (10 ejaculates). Holding time and SP proportion did not influence the quality or functionality of stored sex-sorted spermatozoa. In conclusion, a holding time as long as 24h before sorting did not negatively affect sex sorting efficiency or the ability of sorted boar spermatozoa to tolerate long-term liquid storage. A high proportion of SP (50%) in the semen samples before sorting reduced the number of ejaculates to be sorted and negatively influenced the sorting efficiency, but did not affect the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to tolerate liquid

  20. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal HydrolaseL3 Correlates with Human Sperm Count, Motility and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijiao; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina; Cheng, Zhi; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCHL3) belongs to the group of deubiquitinating enzymes and plays a part in apoptosis of germ cells and the differentiation of spermatocytes into spermatids. However, the exact role of UCHL3 in human spermatogenesis and sperm function remains unknown. Here we examined the level and activity of UCHL3 in spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia (A), oligoasthenozoospermia (OA) or normozoospermia (N). Immunofluorescence indicated that UCHL3 was mainly localized in the acrosome and throughout the flagella, and western blotting revealed a lower level in A or OA compared with N (p < 0.05). The catalytic activity of UCHL3 was decreased in spermatozoa from A or OA (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). The level and activity of UCHL3 were positively correlated with sperm count, concentration and motility. The UCHL3 level was positively correlated with the normal fertilization rate (FR) and percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The UCHL3 activity was also positively correlated with FR, the percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation and high-quality embryos rate of IVF. Aforementioned correlations were not manifested in intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These findings suggest that UCHL3 may play a role in male infertility. PMID:27780264

  1. Slow cooling prevents cold-induced damage to sperm motility and acrosomal integrity in the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes).

    PubMed

    Santymire, R M; Marinari, P E; Kreeger, J S; Wildt, D E; Howard, J G

    2007-01-01

    The endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) has benefited from artificial insemination; however, improved sperm cryopreservation protocols are still needed. The present study focused on identifying factors influencing gamete survival during processing before cryopreservation, including: (1) the presence or absence of seminal plasma; (2) temperature (25 degrees C v. 37 degrees C); (3) type of medium (Ham's F10 medium v. TEST yolk buffer [TYB]); (4) cooling rate (slow, rapid and ultra-rapid); and (5) the presence or absence of glycerol. Seminal plasma did not compromise (P > 0.05) sperm motility or acrosomal integrity. Sperm motility traits were maintained longer (P < 0.05) at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C in Ham's or TYB, but temperature did not affect (P > 0.05) acrosomal integrity. Overall, TYB maintained optimal (P < 0.05) sperm motility compared with Ham's medium, but Ham's medium maintained more (P < 0.05) intact acrosomes than TYB. Slow cooling (0.2 degrees C min(-1)) was optimal (P < 0.05) compared to rapid cooling (1 degrees C min(-1)), and ultra-rapid cooling (9 degrees C min(-1)) was found to be highly detrimental (P < 0.05). Results obtained in TYB with 0% or 4% glycerol were comparable (P > 0.05), indicating that 4% glycerol was non-toxic to ferret sperm; however, glycerol failed to ameliorate the detrimental effects of either rapid or ultra-rapid cooling. The results of the present study demonstrate that the damage observed to black-footed ferret spermatozoa is derived largely from the rate of cooling.

  2. Nerve growth factor promotes human sperm motility in vitro by increasing the movement distance and the number of A grade spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Ding, Xue-Feng; Shi, Cui-Ge; Zeng, Dan; QuZong, SuoLang; Liu, Shu-Hong; Wu, Yan; LuoBu, GeSang; Fan, Ming; Zhao, Y-Q

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was first found in the central nervous system and is now well known for its multiple pivotal roles in the nervous system and immune system. However, more and more evidences showed that NGF and its receptors TrkA and p75 were also found in the head and tail of spermatozoa, which indicate the possible effect of NGF on the sperm motility. Nevertheless, the exact role of NGF in the human sperm motility remains unclear until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of NGF on human sperm motility, and the results showed that NGF could promote human sperm motility in vitro by increasing the movement distance and the number of A grade spermatozoa. Further analysis demonstrated that NGF promoted the sperm motility in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. These results may facilitate the further studies on human fertility and assisted reproduction techniques.

  3. Sperm-Associated Antigen–17 Gene Is Essential for Motile Cilia Function and Neonatal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Zhang, Zhibing; Costanzo, Richard M.; Henderson, Scott C.; Corwin, Frank D.; Zweit, Jamal; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Subler, Mark; Salloum, Fadi N.; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), resulting from defects in cilia assembly or motility, is caused by mutations in a number of genes encoding axonemal proteins. PCD phenotypes are variable, and include recurrent respiratory tract infections, bronchiectasis, hydrocephaly, situs inversus, and male infertility. We generated knockout mice for the sperm-associated antigen–17 (Spag17) gene, which encodes a central pair (CP) protein present in the axonemes of cells with “9 + 2” motile cilia or flagella. The targeting of Spag17 resulted in a severe phenotype characterized by immotile nasal and tracheal cilia, reduced clearance of nasal mucus, profound respiratory distress associated with lung fluid accumulation and disruption of the alveolar epithelium, cerebral ventricular expansion consistent with emerging hydrocephalus, failure to suckle, and neonatal demise within 12 hours of birth. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the loss of one CP microtubule in approximately one quarter of tracheal cilia axonemes, an absence of a C1 microtubule projection, and other less frequent CP structural abnormalities. SPAG6 and SPAG16 (CP proteins that interact with SPAG17) were increased in tracheal tissue from SPAG17-deficient mice. We conclude that Spag17 plays a critical role in the function and structure of motile cilia, and that neonatal lethality is likely explained by impaired airway mucociliary clearance. PMID:23418344

  4. Discrete Dynamics Model for the Speract-Activated Ca2+ Signaling Network Relevant to Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, Jesús; Aldana, Maximino; Guerrero, Adán; Wood, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how spermatozoa approach the egg is a central biological issue. Recently a considerable amount of experimental evidence has accumulated on the relation between oscillations in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca]) in the sea urchin sperm flagellum, triggered by peptides secreted from the egg, and sperm motility. Determination of the structure and dynamics of the signaling pathway leading to these oscillations is a fundamental problem. However, a biochemically based formulation for the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms operating in the axoneme as a response to external stimulus is still lacking. Based on experiments on the S. purpuratus sea urchin spermatozoa, we propose a signaling network model where nodes are discrete variables corresponding to the pathway elements and the signal transmission takes place at discrete time intervals according to logical rules. The validity of this model is corroborated by reproducing previous empirically determined signaling features. Prompted by the model predictions we performed experiments which identified novel characteristics of the signaling pathway. We uncovered the role of a high voltage-activated channel as a regulator of the delay in the onset of fluctuations after activation of the signaling cascade. This delay time has recently been shown to be an important regulatory factor for sea urchin sperm reorientation. Another finding is the participation of a voltage-dependent calcium-activated channel in the determination of the period of the fluctuations. Furthermore, by analyzing the spread of network perturbations we find that it operates in a dynamically critical regime. Our work demonstrates that a coarse-grained approach to the dynamics of the signaling pathway is capable of revealing regulatory sperm navigation elements and provides insight, in terms of criticality, on the concurrence of the high robustness and adaptability that the reproduction processes are predicted to have developed

  5. Calcium regulates motility and protein phosphorylation by changing cAMP and ATP concentrations in boar sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhong; Wang, Lirui; Li, Yuhua; Zhao, Na; Zhen, Linqing; Fu, Jieli; Yang, Qiangzhen

    2016-09-01

    Considering the importance of calcium (Ca(2+)) in regulating sperm capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction, little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of this ion in this process. In the present study, assessment of the molecular mechanism from the perspective of energy metabolism occurred. Sperm motility variables were determined using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) and the phosphorylation of PKA substrates, tyrosine residues and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were analyzed by Western blot. Moreover, intracellular sperm-specific glyceraldehyde 3-phosphatedehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were assessed in boar sperm treated with Ca(2+). Results of the present study indicated that, under greater extracellular Ca(2+)concentrations (≥3.0mM), sperm motility and protein phosphorylation were inhibited. Interestingly, these changes were correlated with that of GAPDH activity, AMPK phosphorylation, cAMP and ATP concentrations. The negative effects of Ca(2+) on these intracellular processes were attenuated by addition of the calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor W7 and the inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), KN-93. In the presence of greater extracellular Ca(2+), however, the phosphorylation pathway was suppressed by H-89. Taken together, these results suggested that Ca(2+) had a dual role in regulating boar sperm motility and protein phosphorylation due to the changes of cAMP and ATP concentrations, in response to cAMP-mediated signal transduction and the Ca(2+) signaling cascade. The present study provided some novel insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of Ca(2+) on boar sperm as well as the involvement of energy metabolism in this mechanism.

  6. Sperm Shape (Morphology): Does It Affect Fertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... decide whether a couple should use in vitro fertilization (IVF) to attempt a pregnancy. It is best ... genetic material. Once the sperm enters the egg, fertilization has a good chance of taking place. However, ...

  7. In vitro effect of myo-inositol on sperm motility in normal and oligoasthenospermia patients undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Artini, P G; Casarosa, E; Carletti, E; Monteleone, P; Di Noia, A; Di Berardino, O M

    2017-02-01

    It is a known fact that abnormal seminal liquid specimens contain abnormal amounts of oxygen free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that the use of antioxidant molecules both in vivo and in vitro leads to improvement of semen quality in terms of motility, reduction in DNA damage, with obvious consequences on the fertilization potential. Myo-inositol has been observed to have anti-oxidant properties and be present in much greater concentrations specifically in seminal liquid than in the blood. Moreover, there seems to be a direct relationship between myo-inositol and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and sperm motility. Studies performed in vivo have demonstrated that a dietary supplementation with myo-inositol in men undergoing assisted reproduction techniques may improve sperm quality and motility in oligoasthenospermia (OAT) patients. In the following study we utilized myo-inositol in vitro to verify its effect on semen quality in both normal and OAT patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with respect to standard sperm medium. In vitro incubation of seminal liquid carried out using myo-inositol (Andrositol-Lab, Lo.Li. Pharma-Roma, Italy) at a concentration of 15 μl/ml improved progressive motility in both normospermia and OAT subjects. In our opinion, myo-inositol may prove to be a useful strategy to improve sperm preparation for clinical use in IVF.

  8. Ionic regulation of the plasma membrane potential of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) spermatozoa: Role in the initiation of sperm motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, J.L.; Billard, R.; Christen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The ionic dependence of the trout sperm plasma membrane potential was analysed by measuring the accumulation of the lipophilic ions {sup 3}H-tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP) and {sup 14}C-thiocyanate (SCN) following dilution in artificial media isotonic to the seminal fluid. Our data showed that the trout sperm plasma membrane has a mixed conductance: the plasma membrane potential is sensitive upon the transmembrane gradients of K+, Na+, and H+. This potential is negative (less than -40 mV) in a 125 mM choline chloride media (ChM) at pH 8.5. Replacement of choline by sodium has a small depolarizing effect. The membrane potential is about -15 mV in a 125 mM potassium chloride and falls near zero mV only if valinomycin is added. In ChM changing the external pH (pHe) greatly affects the membrane potential: its value rises from less than -40 mV at pHe 9.0 to -17 mV at pHe 5.0. This pH effect is observed also in presence of sodium or potassium. A decrease in the transmembrane proton gradient produced by increasing internal pH without changing pHe induces also a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In the different media in which trout sperm remain immotile after dilution (media with (K+) greater than 20-40 mM or a pH less than 7.5) the plasma membrane is more depolarized than in media allowing motility, suggesting a relationship between the state of membrane polarization and the intracellular effectors of the axonemal movement.

  9. Enzymatic treatment of spermatozoa with a trypsin solution, SpermSolute: improved motility and enhanced ATP concentration.

    PubMed

    Figenschau, Y; Bertheussen, K

    1999-10-01

    We have developed a solution, fully described in this report, that can be used in a pretreatment procedure to promote liquefaction and to enhance motility during preparation of spermatozoa. It was applied to native ejaculates prior to swim-up and, in parallel investigations, motility and adenosine triphosphate concentration were compared in treated and untreated samples, which revealed that the solution significantly improved both parameters. The solution, named SpermSolute, is based on a proteinase (trypsin), which previously has been shown to stimulate the activity of a glycolytic key-enzyme. We speculate that our findings reflect intracellular enzyme activation and we suggest that our formula can be used in sperm preparation to prevent cell aggregates and to promote liquefaction, in addition to promotion of motility.

  10. Decreased Sperm Motility Retarded ICSI Fertilization Rate in Severe Oligozoospermia but Good-Quality Embryo Transfer Had Achieved the Prospective Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jufeng; Lu, Yongning; Qu, Xianqin; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Luiwen; Gao, Minzhi; Shi, Huijuan; Jin, Xingliang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spermatozoa motility is the critical parameter to affect the treatment outcomes during assisted reproductive technologies (ART), but its reproductive capability remains a little informed in condition of severe male factor infertility. This retrospective cohort study aimed to evaluate the effects of reduced sperm motility on the embryological and clinical outcomes in intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment of severe oligozoospermia. Patients and Methods 966 cycles (812 couples) of severe oligozoospermia diagnosed by spermatozoa count ≤ 5 × 106/mL and motile spermatozoa ≤ 2 × 106/mL were divided into four groups in according to the number of motile spermatozoa in one ejaculate on the day of oocyte retrieval (Group B—E). The control (Group A) was 188 cycles of moderate oligozoospermia with spermatozoa count > 5 × 106/mL and motile spermatozoa > 2 × 106/mL. All female partners were younger than 35 years of age. Logistic regression analyzed embryological outcomes (the rates of fertilization, cleavage and good-quality embryo) and clinical outcomes (the rates of pregnancy, implantation, early miscarriage and live birth). Quality of embryo transfer (ET) was divided into three classes as continuous factor to test the effects of embryo quality on clinical outcomes. Results The reduction in the number of motile sperm in four groups of severe oligozoospermia gave rise to comparable inability of the fertilization (p < 0.001) and a decreased rate of good-quality embryo at Day 3 (p < 0.001) by compared to the control. The cleavage rate of the derived zygotes was similar to the control. ET classes significantly affected the clinical outcomes (p < 0.001). Class I ET gave rise to similar rates of clinical outcomes between five groups, but Class II and Class III ET retarded the rates of pregnancy, implantation and live birth and this particularly occurred in Group C, D and E. The rate of early miscarriage was not comparably different between groups

  11. Nitric oxide stimulates human sperm motility via activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Erica; De Angelis, Federico; Gazzano, Elena; Hassanpour, Hossain; Bertagna, Angela; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Revelli, Alberto; Ghigo, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a modulator of several physiological processes, is involved in different human sperm functions. We have investigated whether NO may stimulate the motility of human spermatozoa via activation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway. Sperm samples obtained by masturbation from 70 normozoospermic patients were processed by the swim-up technique. The kinetic parameters of the motile sperm-rich fractions were assessed by computer-assisted sperm analysis. After a 30-90  min incubation, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) exerted a significant enhancing effect on progressive motility (77, 78, and 78% vs 66, 65, and 62% of the control at the corresponding time), straight linear velocity (44, 49, and 48 μm/s vs 34, 35, and 35.5 μm/s), curvilinear velocity (81, 83, and 84 μm/s vs 68 μm/s), and average path velocity (52, 57, and 54 μm/s vs 40, 42, and 42 μm/s) at 5 μM but not at lower concentrations, and in parallel increased the synthesis of cGMP. A similar effect was obtained with the NO donor spermine NONOate after 30 and 60  min. The GSNO-induced effects on sperm motility were abolished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a specific sGC inhibitor) and mimicked by 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; a cell-permeating cGMP analog); the treatment with Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinases) prevented both the GSNO- and the 8-Br-cGMP-induced responses. On the contrary, we did not observe any effect of the cGMP/PRKG1 (PKG) pathway modulators on the onset of hyperactivated sperm motility. Our results suggest that NO stimulates human sperm motility via the activation of sGC, the subsequent synthesis of cGMP, and the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

  12. Effect of semen collection method on sperm motility of gray wolves (Canis lupus) and domestic dogs (C. l. familiaris).

    PubMed

    Christensen, Bruce W; Asa, Cheryl S; Wang, Chong; Vansandt, Lindsey; Bauman, Karen; Callahan, Margaret; Jens, Jackie K; Ellinwood, N Matthew

    2011-09-15

    Genetic management of Mexican gray wolves includes semen banking, but due to the small number of animals in the population and handling restrictions, improvements in semen collection and cryopreservation rely on results from studies of domestic dogs. Semen collection from wolves requires anesthesia and electroejaculation, which introduce potentially important variables into species comparisons, as dog semen is typically collected manually from conscious animals. To investigate possible effects of collection method on semen quality, we compared semen collection by the traditional manual method and by electroejaculation (EE) in a group of dogs (n = 5) to collection by EE only in wolves (n = 7). Samples were divided into two aliquots: neat or diluted in Tris/egg yolk extender, with motility evaluated at intervals up to 24 h. There were no differences (P > 0.10) in sperm motility in either neat or extended samples at 24 h from EE dogs and wolves, although motility of the wolf neat samples declined more rapidly (P < 0.05). However, there were differences (P < 0.01) between EE and manually collected dog semen in motility at 24 h, in both the neat and extended samples. Therefore, general motility patterns of dog and wolf semen collected by EE were similar, especially when diluted with a Tris/egg yolk extender, but sperm collected from dogs by EE did not maintain motility as long as manually collected samples, perhaps related to the longer exposure of EE samples to more prostate fluid.

  13. Thermosensitive ion channel TRPV1 is endogenously expressed in the sperm of a fresh water teleost fish (Labeo rohita) and regulates sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Yadav, Manoj; Swain, Nirlipta; Kumari, Shikha; Saha, Ashish; Pradhan, Avinash; Goswami, Luna; Saha, Somdatta; Samanta, Luna; Maity, Apratim; Nayak, Tapas Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Rajakuberan, Chitra; Kumar, Abhishek; Goswami, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    Sperm cells exhibit extremely high sensitivity in response to slight changes in temperature, osmotic pressure and/or presence of various chemical stimuli. In most cases throughout the evolution, these physico-chemical stimuli trigger Ca (2+)-signaling and subsequently alter structure, cellular function, motility and survival of the sperm cells. Few reports have recently demonstrated the presence of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels in the sperm cells from higher eukaryotes, mainly from higher mammals. In this work, we have explored if the sperm cells from lower vertebrates can also have thermo-sensitive TRP channels. In this paper, we demonstrate the endogenous presence of one specific thermo-sensitive ion channel, namely Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid family member sub type 1 (TRPV1) in the sperm cells collected from fresh water teleost fish, Labeo rohita. By using western blot analysis, fluorescence assisted cell sorting (FACS) and confocal microscopy; we confirm the presence of this non-selective cation channel. Activation of TRPV1 by an endogenous activator NADA significantly increases the quality as well as the duration of fish sperm movement. The sperm cell specific expression of TRPV1 matches well with our in silico sequence analysis. The results demonstrate that TRPV1 gene is conserved in various fishes, ranging from 1-3 in copy number, and it originated by fish-specific duplication events within the last 320 million years (MY). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of any thermo-sensitive TRP channels in the sperm cells of early vertebrates as well as of aquatic animals, which undergo external fertilization in fresh water. This observation may have implications in the aquaculture, breeding of several fresh water and marine fish species and cryopreservation of fish sperms.

  14. Sperm motility parameters and spermatozoa morphometric characterization in marine species: a study of swimmer and sessile species.

    PubMed

    Gallego, V; Pérez, L; Asturiano, J F; Yoshida, M

    2014-09-15

    The biodiversity of marine ecosystems is diverse and a high number of species coexist side by side. However, despite the fact that most of these species share a common fertilization strategy, a high variability in terms of the size, shape, and motion of spermatozoa can be found. In this study, we have analyzed both the sperm motion parameters and the spermatozoa morphometric features of two swimmer (pufferfish and European eel) and two sessile (sea urchin and ascidian) marine species. The most important differences in the sperm motion parameters were registered in the swimming period. Sessile species sperm displayed notably higher values than swimmer species sperm. In addition, the sperm motilities and velocities of the swimmer species decreased sharply once the sperm was activated, whereas the sessile species were able to maintain their initial values for a long time. These results are linked directly to the species-specific lifestyles. Although sessile organisms, which show limited or no movement, need sperm with a capacity to swim for long distances to find the oocytes, swimmer organisms can move toward the female and release gametes near it, and therefore the spermatozoa does not need to swim for such a long time. At the same time, sperm morphology is related to sperm motion parameters, and in this study an in-depth morphometric analysis of ascidian, sea urchin, and pufferfish spermatozoa, using computer-assisted sperm analysis software, has been carried out for the first time. A huge variability in shapes, sizes, and structures of the studied species was found using electron microscopy.

  15. Characterization of secretory proteins from cultured cauda epididymal cells that significantly sustain bovine sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Moreno, Carlos; Boilard, Mathieu; Sullivan, Robert; Sirard, Marc-André

    2002-12-01

    Epididymis provides a safe environment in which stored-spermatozoa could survive for days before ejaculation. In vitro studies suggested that epididymal proteins seem to be implicated in sperm survival during coincubation with cultured epididymal cells. This study was basically designed to confirm if secretory proteins from bovine epididymal cell cultures provide sperm protection against rapid loss of sperm motility in vitro. Bovine spermatozoa were incubated in conditioned media (CM), which were prepared from cultured cauda epididymal cell (CEC). Motion parameters were recorded using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. Sperm-free protein extracts from CM were fractionated by ultrafiltration through a 10-kDa cut off membrane. A significantly positive effect on sperm motility was observed when spermatozoa were incubated in CM (54 +/- 4%) and CM > 10 kDa (57 +/- 4%) compared to CM < 10-kDa fraction (30 +/- 3%) or fresh media (34 +/- 3%), after a 6-hr incubation period. This beneficial effect on sperm motility was abolished when the CM > 10-kDa fraction was heat-treated at 100 degrees C for 10 min. The CM > 10 kDa fraction provides factors that remained active even though spermatozoa were washed twice after a 2-hr preincubation period. To identify potential beneficial factors, bovine spermatozoa were incubated with radiolabeled proteins obtained using (35)S-methionine in culture medium. SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins extracted from CM-preincubated spermatozoa revealed the presence of a 42-kDa protein strongly associated to the sperm surface. This 42-kDa spot was trypsin-digested and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) as a protein homologue to a 35-kDa bovine estrogen-sulfotransferase. This protein can play a role in epididymal biology and sperm function. Taken together, these results suggest that specific epididymal proteins can be implicated in the sperm protection in vitro, and can be characterized in our cell culture

  16. Dephosphorylation of Major Sperm Protein (MSP) Fiber Protein 3 by Protein Phosphatase 2A during Cell Body Retraction in the MSP-based Amoeboid Motility of Ascaris Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Kexi; Wang, Xu; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.; Stewart, Murray

    2009-01-01

    The crawling movement of nematode sperm requires coordination of leading edge protrusion with cell body retraction, both of which are powered by modulation of a cytoskeleton based on major sperm protein (MSP) filaments. We used a cell-free in vitro motility system in which both protrusion and retraction can be reconstituted, to identify two proteins involved in cell body retraction. Pharmacological and depletion-add back assays showed that retraction was triggered by a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, a Ser/Thr phosphatase activated by tyrosine dephosphorylation). Immunofluorescence showed that PP2A was present in the cell body and was concentrated at the base of the lamellipod where the force for retraction is generated. PP2A targeted MSP fiber protein 3 (MFP3), a protein unique to nematode sperm that binds to the MSP filaments in the motility apparatus. Dephosphorylation of MFP3 caused its release from the cytoskeleton and generated filament disassembly. Our results suggest that interaction between PP2A and MFP3 leads to local disassembly of the MSP cytoskeleton at the base of the lamellipod in sperm that in turn pulls the trailing cell body forward. PMID:19458186

  17. Effect of supplementation of butylated hydroxytoluene on post-thaw sperm viability, motility and membrane integrity of Hariana bulls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Akhil; Saxena, Atul; Swain, Dilip Kumar; Yadav, Dushyant; Yadav, Sanjay Singh; Kumar, Abhishek; Kumar, Anuj

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to see the beneficial effect of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as a semen additive of Hariana bull semen. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in Hariana bulls. Twenty-four ejaculates from two bulls were used for this study. Each ejaculate was extended with standard glycerolated egg yolk tris extender and supplemented with BHT at two concentrations as 0.5 mM (T1) and 1.0 mM (T2). After dilution, equilibration and 24 h of cryopreservation, the samples were analyzed for progressive motility, sperm viability and membrane integrity. Results: Progressive motility, sperm viability and sperm membrane integrity were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the samples fortified with BHT as compared to the control during the process of cryopreservation and thawing. The BHT concentration of 1 mM revealed better results as compared to 0.5 mM. Conclusion: Addition of 1.0 mM BHT was found better in cryopreservation of Hariana bull semen compared to 0.5 mM BHT and control samples. The addition of BHT has improved the sperm quality by acting as an antioxidant thereby reducing the lipid peroxidation of the sperms. PMID:27065652

  18. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell’Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant’Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p < 0.05) when boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  19. Effects of ascorbic acid on sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction and DNA integrity in teratozoospermic samples

    PubMed Central

    Fanaei, Hamed; Khayat, Samira; Halvaei, Iman; Ramezani, Vahid; Azizi, Yaser; Kasaeian, Amir; Mardaneh, Jalal; Parvizi, Mohammad Reza; Akrami, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress in teratozoospermic semen samples caused poor assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcomes. Among antioxidants, ascorbic acid is a naturally occurring free radical scavenger and as such its presence assists various other mechanisms in decreasing numerous disruptive free radical processes. Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate potential protective effects of ascorbic acid supplementation during in vitro culture of teratozoospermic specimens. Materials and Methods: Teratozoospermic semen samples that collected from 15 volunteers were processed, centrifuged and incubated at 37oC until sperm swimmed-up. Supernatant was divided into four groups and incubated at 37oC for one hour under different experimental conditions: Control, 10 µm A23187, 600µm ascorbic acid and 10 µm A23187+600 µm ascorbic acid. After incubation sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction, DNA damage and malondialdehyde levels were evaluated. Results: Our results indicated that after one hour incubation, ascorbic acid significantly reduced malondialdehyde level in ascorbic acid group (1.4±0.11 nmol/ml) compared to control group (1.58±0.13 nmol/ml) (p<0.001). At the end of incubation, progressive motility and viability in ascorbic acid group (64.5±8.8% and 80.3±6.4%, respectively) were significantly (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) higher than the control group (54.5±6.8% and 70.9±7.3%, respectively). A23187 significantly (p<0.0001) increased acrosome reaction in A23187 group (37.3±5.6%) compared to control group (8.5±3.2%) and this effect of A23187 attenuated by ascorbic acid in ascorbic acid+A23187 group (17.2±4.4%). DNA fragmentation in ascorbic acid group (20±4.1%) was significantly (p<0.001) lower than controls (28.9±4.6%). Conclusion: In vitro ascorbic acid supplementation during teratozoospermic semen processing for ART could protect teratozoospermic specimens against oxidative stress, and it could improve ART outcome. PMID

  20. The Effect of Low-Level Laser Irradiation on Sperm Motility, and Integrity of the Plasma Membrane and Acrosome in Cryopreserved Bovine Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Guilherme Henrique C.; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Crespilho, André Maciel; Peron, Jean Pierre Schatzman; Rossato, Cristiano; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Albertini, Regiane

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Freezing changes sperm integrity remarkably. Cryopreservation involves cooling, freezing, and thawing and all these contribute to structural damage in sperm, resulting in reduced fertility potential. Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) could increase energy supply to the cell and cause reactive oxygen species reduction (ROS), contributing to the restoration of oxygen consumption and adenosine triphosphate synthesis (ATP) in the mitochondria. Our goal was to analyze the effects of low-level laser irradiation on sperm motility and integrity of the plasma membrane and acrosome in cryopreserved bovine sperm. Study Design/Materials and Methods We analyzed 09 samples of bull semen (Bos taurus indicus), divided into three groups: a control group without laser irradiation, a 4J group subjected to a laser irradiation dose of 4 joules, and a 6J group subjected to dose of 6 joules. Samples were divided for the analysis of cell viability and acrosomal membrane integrity using flow cytometry; another portion was used for motion analysis. Irradiation was performed in petri dishes of 30 mm containing 3 ml of semen by an aluminum gallium indium phosphide laser diode with a wavelength of 660 nm, 30 mW power, and energy of 4 and 6 joules for 80 and 120 seconds respectively. Subsequently, the irradiated and control semen samples were subjected to cryopreservation and analyzed by flow cytometry (7AAD and FITC-PSA) using the ISAS - Integrated Semen Analysis System. Results Flow cytometry showed an increase in the percentage of live sperm cells and acrosome integrity in relation to control cells when subjected to irradiation of low-power laser in two different doses of 4 and 6 joules (p < 0.05). In the analysis of straightness, percentage of cell movement, and motility, a dose of 4 joules was more effective (p < 0.05). Conclusion We conclude that LLLI may exert beneficial effects in the preservation of live sperm. A dose of 4 joules prior to cryopreservation was

  1. Notch signaling in the epididymal epithelium regulates sperm motility and is transferred at a distance within epididymosomes.

    PubMed

    Murta, D; Batista, M; Silva, E; Trindade, A; Henrique, D; Duarte, A; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2016-03-01

    Spermatozoa undergo sequential maturation changes during their transit along the epididymis. These changes are modulated by the epididymal epithelium and require a finely tuned gene expression. The Notch cell signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell fate decisions in several tissues, including the testis. Here, we evaluated the transcription and expression patterns of Notch components (Notch1-3, Dll1, Dll4, and Jagged1) and effectors (Hes1-2 and Hes5) in the adult mouse epididymis, and evaluated the role of Notch signaling in the epididymis through its in vivo blockade following administration of an inhibitor (DAPT). Notch components and effectors were dynamically transcribed and expressed in the epididymis and vas deferens, each segment exhibiting a specific combination of epithelial receptor/ligand/effector expression patterns. Nuclear detection of Notch effectors indicates that Notch signaling was active. Notch components (but not effectors) were identified in the cytoplasmic droplet of spermatozoa, in a dynamic and specific pattern along the epididymis. In addition, Notch components were identified within large and small vesicles in the epididymal lumen. A purified population of these membranous vesicles from different epididymal segments was obtained, and through dot blot analysis, it was confirmed that Notch components were carried within these vesicles in a dynamic pattern along the epididymal lumen. We hypothesize that these vesicles (epididymosomes) allow Notch signaling at distance from epididymal epithelial cells to spermatozoa. DAPT-induced in vivo Notch signaling blockade, although showing a low efficiency, disrupted the expression patterns of Notch components and effectors in the epididymal epithelium and in spermatozoa, and significantly decreased sperm motility, although not affecting male fertility. These results prompt for a regulatory role of Notch signaling in epididymal epithelial function and sperm maturation.

  2. A critical role of solute carrier 22a14 in sperm motility and male fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Shin-ya; Ito, Momoe; Ikami, Yuusuke; Okitsu, Yu; Ito, Chizuru; Toshimori, Kiyotaka; Fujii, Wataru; Yogo, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified solute carrier 22a14 (Slc22a14) as a spermatogenesis-associated transmembrane protein in mice. Although Slc22a14 is a member of the organic anion/cation transporter family, its expression profile and physiological role have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Slc22a14 is crucial for sperm motility and male fertility in mice. Slc22a14 is expressed specifically in male germ cells, and mice lacking the Slc22a14 gene show severe male infertility. Although the overall differentiation of sperm was normal, Slc22a14−/− cauda epididymal spermatozoa showed reduced motility with abnormal flagellar bending. Further, the ability to migrate into the female reproductive tract and fertilise the oocyte were also impaired in Slc22a14−/− spermatozoa. The abnormal flagellar bending was thought to be partly caused by osmotic cell swelling since osmotic challenge or membrane permeabilisation treatment alleviated the tail abnormality. In addition, we found structural abnormalities in Slc22a14−/− sperm cells: the annulus, a ring-like structure at the mid-piece–principal piece junction, was disorganised, and expression and localisation of septin 4, an annulus component protein that is essential for the annulus formation, was also impaired. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Slc22a14 plays a pivotal role in normal flagellar structure, motility and fertility in mouse spermatozoa. PMID:27811987

  3. Contribution of the secretory material of caecilian (amphibia: Gymnophiona) male Mullerian gland to motility of sperm: a study in Uraeotyphlus narayani.

    PubMed

    George, Jancy M; Smita, Mathew; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Girija, Ramankutty; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2005-02-01

    Caecilians are a unique group of limbless burrowing amphibians with discontinuous distribution. Several caecilian species are viviparous, and all practice internal fertilization. In amniotic vertebrates the sperm undergo post-testicular physiological maturation when they are initiated into motility under the influence of an epididymal secretion. Further, during ejaculation mammalian sperm are suspended in a fluid secreted by the male accessory sex glands, viz., prostate gland and seminal vesicles. Caecilians lack comparable glands, but still practice internal fertilization. Uniquely, male caecilians retain the Mullerian ducts in the adults as a pair of functional glands. It has long been hypothesized, based on indirect evidence, that the Mullerian gland would be a male accessory sex gland, secreting a fluid in which sperm are suspended during ejaculation and which would also provide nutritional support to the ejaculated sperm. In the present study, the secretory material of the Mullerian gland of Uraeotyphlus narayani was mixed with sperm obtained from the testis, and the changes in motility were recorded. Uraeotyphlus narayani sperm possess a perforatorium of the acrosome proceeding deep into the endonuclear canal of the nucleus. The midpiece is characterized by closely applied centrioles, the anterior ends of the axoneme and axial fiber, and a mitochondrial sheath. The long tail has an undulating membrane on one side, supported by the axoneme and an axial fiber. The live sperm possess a mitochondrial vesicle, also known as the cytoplasmic droplet, anywhere along the head and the midpiece, as in anuran sperm, which is shed from sperm that have ceased motility. Uraeotyphlus narayani sperm are motile the moment they are released directly from the testis, indicating that the sperm do not require post-testicular physiological maturation. On being mixed with the secretory material of the Mullerian gland, the spermatozoa are enhanced in speed as well as duration of

  4. Motility of Fasciola hepatica miracidia assessed with a computer-assisted sperm analyser.

    PubMed

    Villa-Mancera, A; Reynoso-Palomar, A; Olivares-Pérez, J; Ortega-Vargas, S; Cruz-Mendoza, I; Quiroz-Romero, H

    2015-07-01

    The motility parameters of Fasciola hepatica miracidia were assessed at different temperatures and times post-hatching using computer-assisted sperm analysis. Eggs were incubated at 22 °C or 25 °C for 14 days. Five motion parameters were evaluated at different incubation temperatures up to 10 h post-hatching. No differences were observed in the percentage that hatched after incubation at the two different temperatures. However, the straight-line velocity of miracidia following incubation at 22 °C was significantly different from that observed at 25 °C (P< 0.01). All miracidium motion parameters at different post-hatching temperatures showed an overall decrease at the end of the experiment. Those miracidia hatching from eggs incubated at 25 °C had a higher velocity of 1673.3 μm/s compared with 1553.3 μm/s at 22 °C. Velocity parameters increased as the post-hatching temperature increased from 22 °C to 37 °C.

  5. Identification of Motile Sperm Domain–Containing Protein 2 as Regulator of Human Monocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Yacov, Niva; Salem, Yaniv; Propheta-Meiran, Oshrat; Ishai, Eti; Breitbart, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    Binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors on monocytes instigates a cascade of events that directs these cells to migrate to sites of inflammation and cancerous tissues. Although targeting of selected chemokine receptors on monocytes exhibited preclinical efficacy, attempts to translate these studies to the clinic have failed thus far, possibly due to redundancy of the target receptor. We reveal that motile sperm domain–containing protein 2 (MOSPD2), a protein with a previously unknown function, regulates monocyte migration in vitro. This protein was found to be expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane of human monocytes. Silencing or neutralizing MOSPD2 in monocytes restricted their migration when induced by different chemokines. Mechanistically, silencing MOSPD2 inhibited signaling events following chemokine receptor ligation. When tested for expression in other immune cell subsets, MOSPD2 was apparent also, though less abundantly, in neutrophils, but not in lymphocytes. Thus, in the presence of neutralizing Abs, neutrophil migration was inhibited to some extent whereas lymphocyte migration remained intact. In view of these results, we suggest MOSPD2 as a potential target protein for treating diseases in which monocyte and neutrophil accumulation is correlated with pathogenesis. PMID:28137892

  6. Identification of Motile Sperm Domain-Containing Protein 2 as Regulator of Human Monocyte Migration.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Itzhak; Yacov, Niva; Salem, Yaniv; Propheta-Meiran, Oshrat; Ishai, Eti; Breitbart, Eyal

    2017-03-01

    Binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors on monocytes instigates a cascade of events that directs these cells to migrate to sites of inflammation and cancerous tissues. Although targeting of selected chemokine receptors on monocytes exhibited preclinical efficacy, attempts to translate these studies to the clinic have failed thus far, possibly due to redundancy of the target receptor. We reveal that motile sperm domain-containing protein 2 (MOSPD2), a protein with a previously unknown function, regulates monocyte migration in vitro. This protein was found to be expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane of human monocytes. Silencing or neutralizing MOSPD2 in monocytes restricted their migration when induced by different chemokines. Mechanistically, silencing MOSPD2 inhibited signaling events following chemokine receptor ligation. When tested for expression in other immune cell subsets, MOSPD2 was apparent also, though less abundantly, in neutrophils, but not in lymphocytes. Thus, in the presence of neutralizing Abs, neutrophil migration was inhibited to some extent whereas lymphocyte migration remained intact. In view of these results, we suggest MOSPD2 as a potential target protein for treating diseases in which monocyte and neutrophil accumulation is correlated with pathogenesis.

  7. An adenylyl cyclase with a phosphodiesterase domain in basal plants with a motile sperm system

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Urano, Yuki; Yamamoto, Chiaki; Ohmori, Mikiya; Takada, Yuki; Okuda, Shujiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC), which produces the signalling molecule cAMP, has numerous important cellular functions in diverse organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Here we report the identification and characterization of an AC gene from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The encoded protein has both a C-terminal AC catalytic domain similar to those of class III ACs and an N-terminal cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain that degrades cyclic nucleotides, thus we designated the gene MpCAPE (COMBINED AC with PDE). Biochemical analyses of recombinant proteins showed that MpCAPE has both AC and PDE activities. In MpCAPE-promoter-GUS lines, GUS activity was specifically detected in the male sexual organ, the antheridium, suggesting MpCAPE and thus cAMP signalling may be involved in the male reproductive process. CAPE orthologues are distributed only in basal land plants and charophytes that use motile sperm as the male gamete. CAPE is a subclass of class III AC and may be important in male organ and cell development in basal plants. PMID:27982074

  8. Seminal plasma concentrations of Anti-Müllerian hormone and inhibin B predict motile sperm recovery from cryopreserved semen in asthenozoospermic men: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nery, S F; Vieira, M A F; Dela Cruz, C; Lobach, V N M; Del Puerto, H L; Torres, P B; Rocha, A L L; Reis, A B; Reis, F M

    2014-11-01

    The rate of motile sperm recovery after cryopreservation is very variable and difficult to predict. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin B are produced by Sertoli cells and released into the seminal plasma, where they could be functional markers of spermatogenesis and sperm resistance to thermal stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether seminal plasma levels of AMH and inhibin B predict sperm recovery after cryopreservation. The study included 153 men enrolled prospectively during a semen analysis. The cohort was stratified by the fresh semen characteristics into: normal (n = 52), high sperm count (n = 55), asthenozoospermia (n = 23), and oligozoospermia (n = 23). The main outcome measure was motile sperm recovery rate, defined as post-thaw total motile sperm count × 100/pre-freezing total motile sperm count. In men with asthenozoospermia there was a significant correlation between motile sperm recovery rate and the pre-freezing concentrations of AMH (r = 0.522, p < 0.05) and inhibin B (0.471, p < 0.05). In this group, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of AMH and inhibin B for prediction of ≥50% motile sperm recovery after cryopreservation were, respectively, 0.808 and 0.638. AMH was particularly useful, with sensitivity of 0.85, specificity of 0.80, positive predictive value of 0.84 and negative predictive value of 0.80. The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of inhibin B for the same outcome were, respectively, 0.62, 0.60, 0.67, and 0.55. The median motile sperm recovery rate was 83% when seminal plasma AMH concentration was ≥0.84 ng/mL, vs. 27% when AMH concentration was <0.84 ng/mL (p < 0.05). In other patient groups, there was no correlation between the two hormone levels in seminal plasma and the motile sperm recovery rate. In conclusion, seminal plasma AMH and inhibin B concentrations correlate with and can be used to predict motile sperm recovery after semen

  9. Ability of abnormally-shaped human spermatozoa to adhere to and penetrate zona-free hamster eggs: correlation with sperm morphology and postincubation motility.

    PubMed

    Bronson, Richard A; Bronson, Susan K; Oula, Lucila D

    2007-01-01

    A body of evidence indicates that morphologically abnormal human spermatozoa may exhibit impaired ability to fertilize. Yet teratospermia has widely varying etiologies, including associations with varicoceles, following fever, cigarette smoking, and exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Abnormalities of sperm shape in mice have also been shown to be associated with autosomal gene mutations. These varying causes of teratospermia could have different molecular consequences reflected in altered sperm function. We studied the ability of morphologically abnormal human sperm to penetrate zona-free hamster eggs as a measure of their ability to undergo an acrosome reaction and gamete membrane fusion. Motile sperm from ejaculates containing 15% normal sperm or less, as judged by World Health Organization (1999) criteria, were recovered by ISolate density centrifugation and capacitated by overnight incubation. Zona-free hamster eggs were inseminated with 1 x 10(6) motile capacitated cells and scored for sperm penetration after 3 hours of coincubation. A significant trend was found between the percent of abnormal spermatozoa within the ejaculate and impaired egg-penetrating ability, reflected in the percent of eggs penetrated, the number of penetrating sperm per egg, and the number of sperm adherent to the oolemma. Because only acrosome-reacted human spermatozoa adhere to the oolemma, these results support the notion that abnormally shaped sperm may exhibit an impaired ability to undergo an acrosome reaction. A correlation was also noted between the loss of motility of sperm following overnight incubation and impairment of their ability to undergo gamete membrane fusion. These results confirm prior findings at the level of the zona pellucida that abnormally shaped sperm exhibit functional abnormalities. However, a wide variation was observed between men in the behavior of such sperm, including occasionally high rates of egg penetration. These observations suggest that

  10. Addition of D-penicillamine, hypotaurine, and epinephrine (PHE) mixture to IVF medium maintains motility and longevity of bovine sperm and enhances stable production of blastocysts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Sik; Koyama, Keisuke; Huang, Weiping; Yang, Yinghua; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish an efficient system for bovine embryo production by in vitro fertilization (IVF) that can achieve stable normal fertilization and blastocyst developmental rates in any bull without optimization of the sperm concentration in IVF medium. We examined the effects of a PHE mixture (20 μM D-penicillamine, 10 μM hypotaurine and 1 μM epinephrine), theophylline (2.5 mM), and sperm concentration (1, 2 or 5 × 10(6) cells/ml) on fertilization and blastocyst developmental rates. High cleavage rates (78.3 to 92.4%) and blastocyst developmental rates (31.9 to 62.0%) at day 7 were obtained in the presence of PHE and theophylline in IVF medium with a sperm concentration of 2 × 10(6) cells/ml using sperm from 9 bulls. In addition, the synergistic effect of PHE and theophylline on normal fertilization (2 pronuclei) was clarified at 12 h after IVF with a sperm concentration of 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. Moreover, high linearity, high flagellar beat cross frequency, and low amplitude of lateral head of motile sperm were found by computer-assisted sperm analysis. In conclusion, the combination of the PHE mixture and theophylline synergistically accelerates sperm motility and sperm penetration of bovine oocytes. Theophylline activates sperm motility with increasing intracellular cAMP. However, PHE prevents an excessive increase of cAMP and maintains sperm motility without hyperactivation. When the combination of PHE and theophylline is added to IVF medium at a sperm concentration of 2 × 10(6) cells/ml, we can achieve stable normal fertilization and blastocyst development in any bull.

  11. Addition of D-penicillamine, hypotaurine, and epinephrine (PHE) mixture to IVF medium maintains motility and longevity of bovine sperm and enhances stable production of blastocysts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    KANG, Sung-Sik; KOYAMA, Keisuke; HUANG, Weiping; YANG, Yinghua; YANAGAWA, Yojiro; TAKAHASHI, Yoshiyuki; NAGANO, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish an efficient system for bovine embryo production by in vitro fertilization (IVF) that can achieve stable normal fertilization and blastocyst developmental rates in any bull without optimization of the sperm concentration in IVF medium. We examined the effects of a PHE mixture (20 μM D-penicillamine, 10 μM hypotaurine and 1 μM epinephrine), theophylline (2.5 mM), and sperm concentration (1, 2 or 5 × 106 cells/ml) on fertilization and blastocyst developmental rates. High cleavage rates (78.3 to 92.4%) and blastocyst developmental rates (31.9 to 62.0%) at day 7 were obtained in the presence of PHE and theophylline in IVF medium with a sperm concentration of 2 × 106 cells/ml using sperm from 9 bulls. In addition, the synergistic effect of PHE and theophylline on normal fertilization (2 pronuclei) was clarified at 12 h after IVF with a sperm concentration of 1 × 106 cells/ml. Moreover, high linearity, high flagellar beat cross frequency, and low amplitude of lateral head of motile sperm were found by computer-assisted sperm analysis. In conclusion, the combination of the PHE mixture and theophylline synergistically accelerates sperm motility and sperm penetration of bovine oocytes. Theophylline activates sperm motility with increasing intracellular cAMP. However, PHE prevents an excessive increase of cAMP and maintains sperm motility without hyperactivation. When the combination of PHE and theophylline is added to IVF medium at a sperm concentration of 2 × 106 cells/ml, we can achieve stable normal fertilization and blastocyst development in any bull. PMID:25501343

  12. Lactate and Pyruvate Are Major Sources of Energy for Stallion Sperm with Dose Effects on Mitochondrial Function, Motility, and ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Darr, Christa R; Varner, Dickson D; Teague, Sheila; Cortopassi, Gino A; Datta, Sandipan; Meyers, Stuart A

    2016-08-01

    Stallion sperm rely primarily on oxidative phosphorylation for production of ATP used in sperm motility and metabolism. The objective of the study was to identify which substrates included in Biggers, Whitten, and Whittingham (BWW) media are key to optimal mitochondrial function through measurements of sperm motility parameters, mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. It was expected that mitochondrial substrates, pyruvate and lactate, would support sperm motility and mitochondrial function better than the glycolytic substrate, glucose, due to direct utilization within the mitochondria. Measurements were performed after incubation in modified BWW media with varying concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, and glucose. The effects of media and duration of incubation on sperm motility, ROS production, and oxygen consumption were determined using a linear mixed-effects model. Duplicate ejaculates from four stallions were used in three separate experiments to determine the effects of substrate availability and concentration on sperm motility and mitochondrial function and the relationship of oxygen consumption with cellular ROS production. The present results indicate that lactate and pyruvate are the most important sources of energy for stallion sperm motility and velocity, and elicit a dose-dependent response. Additionally, lactate and pyruvate are ideal for maximal mitochondrial function, as sperm in these media operate at a very high level of their bioenergetic capability due to the high rate of energy metabolism. Moreover, we found that addition of glucose to the media is not necessary for short-term storage of equine sperm, and may even result in reduction of mitochondrial function. Finally, we have confirmed that ROS production can be the result of mitochondrial dysfunction as well as intense mitochondrial activity.

  13. Percentage of motile spermatozoa at 22 hours after swim-up procedure: An indicator for intracytoplasmic sperm injection?

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Yukiko; Sugimoto, Hironobu; Uemura, Mikiko; Ono, Yuri; Kishi, Junji; Emi, Nobuyuki; Ono, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective The decision to use in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or split insemination (IVF-ICSI) in the first cycle is based on the number of motile sperm. Hence, total fertilization failure (TFF) often occurs during IVF cycles, despite normozoospermia. To investigate whether the cumulative motile swim-up spermatozoa percentage at 22 hours post-insemination (MSPPI) is an indicator for ICSI, we analyzed TFF, fertilization, blastocyst development, chemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, and live birth rates. Methods This prospective study was performed using data obtained from 260 IVF cycles. At 22 hours after insemination, the remaining swim-up spermatozoa were observed and divided into six groups according to MSPPI (<10%, 10% to <30%, 30% to <50%, 50% to <70%, 70% to <90%, and 90% to 100%). Results Regardless of the ejaculated motile sperm concentration (0.6–280×106/mL motile spermatozoa), the incidence of TFF significantly increased when MSPPI was <10%, and the fertilization rate significantly decreased when MSPPI was <30%. We found that cumulative MSPPI correlated with the cumulative fertilization rate (Spearman correlation, 0.508, p<0.001). Regarding embryo development, we observed no significant differences in the rates of blastocyst development, chemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, or live birth among all groups. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MSPPI is a viable indicator for split IVF-ICSI and ICSI. Taken together, by employing the MSPPI test in advance before IVF, ICSI, or split IVF-ICSI cycles, unnecessary split IVF-ICSI and ICSI may be avoided. PMID:27689038

  14. Distinct Ca2+ channels maintain a high motility state of the sperm that may be needed for penetration of egg jelly of the newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomoe; Kutsuzawa, Megumi; Shiba, Kogiku; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Inaba, Kazuo; Watanabe, Akihiko

    2013-09-01

    Activation state of sperm motility named "hyperactivation" enables mammalian sperm to progress through the oviductal matrix, although a similar state of sperm motility is unknown in non-mammalian vertebrates at fertilization. Here, we found a high motility state of the sperm in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. It was predominantly caused in egg jelly extract (JE) and characterized by a high wave velocity of the undulating membrane (UM) that was significantly higher at the posterior midpiece. An insemination assay suggested that the high motility state might be needed for sperm to penetrate the egg jelly, which is the accumulated oviductal matrix. Specific characteristics of the high motility state were completely abrogated by a high concentration of verapamil, which blocks the L-type and T-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). Mibefradil, a dominant blocker of T-type VDCCs, suppressed the wave of the UM at the posterior midpiece with separate wave propagation from both the anterior midpiece and the posterior principal piece. In addition, nitrendipine, a dominant L-type VDCC blocker, weakened the wave of the UM, especially in the anterior midpiece. Live Ca(2+) imaging showed that, compared with the intact sperm in the JE, the relative intracellular Ca(2+) level changed especially in the anterior and posterior ends of the midpiece of the blocker-treated sperm. These suggest that different types of Ca(2+) channels mediate the intracellular Ca(2+) level predominantly in the anterior and posterior ends of the midpiece to maintain the high motility state of the newt sperm.

  15. A simulation study of sperm motility hydrodynamics near fish eggs and spheres.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Cosson, Jacky; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2016-01-21

    For teleost fish fertilisation, sperm must proceed through a small opening on the egg surface, referred to as the micropyle. In this paper, we have used boundary element simulations to explore whether the hydrodynamic attraction between sperm and a fish egg can be a sperm guidance cue. Hydrodynamical egg-sperm interactions alone do not increase the chances of an egg encounter, nor do they induce surface swimming for virtual turbot fish sperm across smooth spheres with a diameter of 1mm, which is representative of a turbot fish egg. When a repulsive surface force between the virtual turbot sperm and the egg is introduced, as motivated by surface charge and van-der-Waals interactions for instance, we find that extended surface swimming of the virtual sperm across a model turbot egg occurs, but ultimately the sperm escapes from the egg. This is due to the small exit angle of the scattering associated with the initial sperm-egg interaction at the egg surface, leading to a weak drift away from the egg, in combination with a weak hydrodynamical attraction between both gametes, though the latter is not sufficient to prevent eventual escape. The resulting transience is not observed experimentally but is a detailed quantitative difference between theory and observation in that stable surface swimming is predicted for eggs with radii larger than about 1.8mm. Regardless, the extended sperm swimming trajectory across the egg constitutes a two-dimensional search for the micropyle and thus the egg is consistently predicted to provide a guidance cue for sperm once they are sufficiently close. In addition, the observation that the virtual turbot sperm swims stably next to a flat plane given repulsive surface interactions, but does not swim stably adjacent to a turbot-sized egg, which is extremely large by sperm-lengthscales, also highlights that the stability of sperm swimming near a boundary is very sensitive to geometry.

  16. Epididymal contraction and sperm parameters are affected by clonidine.

    PubMed

    da Silva Júnior, E D; de Souza, B P; Vilela, V V; Rodrigues, J Q D; Nichi, M; de Agostini Losano, J D; Dalmazzo, A; Barnabe, V H; Jurkiewicz, A; Jurkiewicz, N H

    2014-11-01

    The use of clonidine, a selective agonist of α2-adrenoceptors, is related to the fertility impairment. Thus, it has been described that changes in the epididymal function are related to the loss of fertility. Therefore, this study was sought to further evaluate the effects of clonidine in the rat distal cauda epididymis contractions and its consequence in the sperm parameters. The in vitro effects of clonidine in the isolated distal cauda epididymis were evaluated by pharmacological experiments. The consecutive contractile responses for clonidine in distal cauda epididymis showed desensitization. The noradrenaline-induced contractions were desensitized after in vitro clonidine pre-treatment (10(-5) M for 10 min). Clonidine was unable to alter the noradrenaline contractions if the in vitro pre-treatment was made in the presence of idazoxan (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), whereas prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) was ineffective. Moreover, the in vitro clonidine pre-treatment increased frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contraction of distal cauda epididymis. In addition, to induce in vivo desensitization of α2-adrenoceptors, male Wistar rats were treated with crescent doses of clonidine and distal cauda of epididymis contraction and sperm parameters were analyzed. The in vivo treatment with clonidine diminished the potency of the contractions induced by adrenergic agonists and augmented the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contraction of distal cauda epididymis. This treatment also altered the sperm transit time in epididymis, epididymal sperm reserves, sperm lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant enzymes activity. The results suggest that clonidine was able to affect the sperm quantity and quality by decreasing the transit time related to the increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contractions in epididymis, although the contractions induced by adrenergic agonists were desensitized.

  17. The effects of different sugars on motility, morphology and DNA damage during the liquid storage of rat epididymal sperm at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Sariözkan, Serpil; Bucak, Mustafa Numan; Canturk, Fazile; Özdamar, Saim; Yay, Arzu; Tuncer, Pürhan Barbaros; Özcan, Servet; Sorgucu, Neslihan; Caner, Yusuf

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the protective effects of supplementation with three different sugars on the motility, morphology and DNA integrity of rat epididymal sperm chilled and stored at 4°C Epididymides were obtained from each donor. Rat epididymal sperm was diluted in Ham's F10 plus raffinose, Ham's F10 plus trehalose, Ham's F10 plus fructose, and Ham's F10 medium for control purposes. Thereafter, the extended sperm were chilled and stored in liquid form at 4°C. Sperm motility, morphological abnormalities and DNA damage were determined at 0 and 12h after chilling. No significant difference was observed in any of the parameters evaluated at 0h, before storage (P>0.05). After 12h of storage, all sugar additives led to statistically higher motility, normal sperm morphology and DNA integrity in comparison to the control group. Raffinose gave the best motility percentages (32.86±1.84%) after 12h of storage at 4°C, compared to the other groups (P<0.001). In conclusion, Raffinose, trehalose and fructose provided a better protection of sperm functional parameters against chilling injury, in comparison to the control group.

  18. Assessment of sperm hyperactivated motility and acrosome reaction can discriminate the use of spermatozoa for conventional in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wiser, A; Sachar, S; Ghetler, Y; Shulman, A; Breitbart, H

    2014-04-01

    Basic semen analysis is insufficient for determining the fertility potential. The aim of this study was to determine if hyperactivated motility (HAM) and acrosome reaction (AR) can be useful tests for evaluating semen quality during male infertility evaluations and to help the clinician decide whether regular insemination or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is preferable during in vitro fertilisation. A prospective study was conducted. Patients with normal sperm according to World Health Organization guidelines who underwent IVF treatment and planned regular insemination were asked to participate. A portion of sperm sample was evaluated for HAM and AR on day of ovum pick up. In HAM assessment, 93.3% of patients with increased HAM had a high fertilisation rate compared with 64% in the group without increased HAM (P = 0.059). For the AR evaluation, 91.7% of samples with a low rate of spontaneous AR had a high fertilisation rate compared with 39.3% in the group with a high rate of spontaneous AR (P = 0.004).

  19. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  20. Effect of pre-freezing conditions on the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhou, Y; Xia, W; Wu, H; Yao, K; Liu, H; Xiong, C

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of sperm concentration, progressive motility, sperm morphology, duration of abstinence and collection season on the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa to identify characteristics that predict the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa and improve the protocol for sperm collecting in sperm banks. A total of 14 190 semen samples donated at Zhejiang human sperm bank of China between September 2006 and June 2011 were collected from 1624 donors. Semen was evaluated according to WHO standard procedures for sperm concentration. Progressive motility, sperm morphology, ejaculate collection season and abstinence time were recorded. After freezing and thawing, the progressive motility was assessed. Results showed that sperm concentration, progressive motility and normal morphology were significantly associated with the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa. In addition, the abstinence time and collection season also significantly affected progressive motility recovery rate. Our results indicated that sperm concentration, progressive motility and normal morphology could be valuable in predicting the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa. As such, progressive motility recovery may be improved by donating semen when abstinent for 3-5 days and during seasons other than summer.

  1. Effect of caffeine on motility and vitality of sperm and in vitro fertilization of outbreed mouse in T6 and M16 media

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Narges; Todehdehghan, Fatemeh; Shiravi, Abdollhossein

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine increases the CAMP production that stimulates spermatozoa movement. Caffeine is also used for induction of in vitro acrosome reaction in mammalian spermatozoa, an important step in achieving fertilization. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of caffeine on sperm's motility, vitality and laboratory fertilization rates in mouse in two T6 and M16 media. Materials and Methods: Epididymal mouse sperms were collected and treated by caffine in T6 and M16 media and their motility and vitality rates were evaluated. The pretreated sperms were added to oocytes in T6 and M16 media with and without caffeine and fertilization rates were recorded after 24 hours incubation. Results: Sperm's motility (81.7±1.67%) and vitality (88.7±1.33%) rates and percentage of fertilized oocytes (67.52±8.16%) in T6 medium plus caffeine compare to control group have increased and shown significant differences at p≤0.01. While the percentages of these parameters in M16 medium supplemented with caffeine were 68.3±6.01%, 78±6.11%, and 42.6±12.96 respectively and in comparison to control group (M16 without caffeine) have not shown significant differences. Conclusion: Addition of caffeine to T6 medium promotes the sperm's motility and vitality and enhances fertilization and early in vitro development of mouse embryos. This article extracted from M.Sc. thesis. (Narges Navabi) PMID:24639814

  2. Glycolytic enzyme activity is essential for domestic cat (Felis catus) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) sperm motility and viability in a sugar-free medium.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Kimberly A; Wildt, David E; Anthony, Nicola M; Bavister, Barry D; Leibo, S P; Penfold, Linda M; Marker, Laurie L; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported a lack of glucose uptake in domestic cat and cheetah spermatozoa, despite observing that these cells produce lactate at rates that correlate positively with sperm function. To elucidate the role of glycolysis in felid sperm energy production, we conducted a comparative study in the domestic cat and cheetah, with the hypothesis that sperm motility and viability are maintained in both species in the absence of glycolytic metabolism and are fueled by endogenous substrates. Washed ejaculates were incubated in chemically defined medium in the presence/absence of glucose and pyruvate. A second set of ejaculates was exposed to a chemical inhibitor of either lactate dehydrogenase (sodium oxamate) or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-chlorohydrin). Sperm function (motility and acrosomal integrity) and lactate production were assessed, and a subset of spermatozoa was assayed for intracellular glycogen. In both the cat and cheetah, sperm function was maintained without exogenous substrates and following lactate dehydrogenase inhibition. Lactate production occurred in the absence of exogenous hexoses, but only if pyruvate was present. Intracellular glycogen was not detected in spermatozoa from either species. Unexpectedly, glycolytic inhibition by alpha-chlorohydrin resulted in an immediate decline in sperm motility, particularly in the domestic cat. Collectively, our findings reveal an essential role of the glycolytic pathway in felid spermatozoa that is unrelated to hexose metabolism or lactate formation. Instead, glycolytic enzyme activity could be required for the metabolism of endogenous lipid-derived glycerol, with fatty acid oxidation providing the primary energy source in felid spermatozoa.

  3. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Hadassa; Arvatz, Gil; Tkacz, Itai Dov; Binder, Lior; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Okalang, Uthman; Chikne, Vaibhav; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL) exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB) utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT), through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo). This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites. PMID:28257521

  4. Decreased sperm number and motile activity on the F1 offspring maternally exposed to butyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid (butyl paraben).

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Sun; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Ryu, Doug-Young; Kim, Tae-Won; Li, Guang-Xun; Lee, Yong-Soon

    2002-03-01

    Butyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid (butyl paraben, BP) is widely used as a preservative in food and cosmetic products. Routledge et al showed that BP is weakly estrogenic in both in vitro and in vivo (rat uterotrophic) analyses. We investigated whether maternal exposures to BP during gestation and lactation periods affected the development of the reproductive organs of the F1 offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with 100 or 200 mg/kg of BP from gestation day (GD) 6 to postnatal day (PND) 20. In the group exposed to 200 mg/kg of BP, the proportion of pups born alive and the proportion of pups surviving to weaning were decreased. The body weights of female offspring were significantly decreased at PND 49. The weights of testes, seminal vesicles and prostate glands were significantly decreased in rats exposed to 100 mg/kg of BP on PND 49. In contrast, the weights of female reproductive organs were not affected by BP. The sperm count and the sperm motile activity in the epididymis were significantly decreased at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg of BP. In accordance with the sperm count in the epididymis, the number of round spermatids and elongated spermatids in the seminiferous tubule (stage VII) were significantly decreased by BP. Testicular expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta mRNA was significantly increased in 200 mg/kg of BP treated group at PND 90. Taken together, these results indicated that maternal exposure of BP might have adverse effects on the F1 male offspring.

  5. Fertilisation is not a new beginning: sperm environment affects offspring developmental success.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Hannah; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-08-15

    For organisms with complex life histories, the direction and magnitude of phenotypic links among life-history stages can have important ecological and evolutionary effects. While the phenotypic links between mothers and offspring, as well as between larvae and adults, are well recognised, the links between sperm phenotype and offspring phenotype have been less well explored. Here, we used a split-clutch/split-ejaculate design to examine whether the environment that sperm experience affects the subsequent performance of larvae in the broadcast spawning marine invertebrate Galeolaria gemineoa. The environment that sperm experienced affected the developmental success of larvae sired by these sperm; larvae sired by sperm that experienced low salinities had poorer developmental success than larvae sired by sperm that experienced a normal salinity. When we explored the interactive effects of the sperm environment and the larval environment with an orthogonal design, we found an interaction; when sperm and larvae experienced the same environment, performance was generally higher than when the sperm and larval environments differed. These effects could be due to selection on specific sperm phenotypes, phenotypic modification of the sperm or both. Together, our results challenge the traditional notion that sperm are merely transporters of genetic material; instead, significant covariance between sperm and offspring phenotypes exists. Our study adds to a growing list that demonstrates that fertilisation does have a homogenising effect on the phenotype of the zygote, and that events before fertilisation during the gamete phase can carry through to affect performance in later life-history stages.

  6. Effects of dilution and centrifugation on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey semen.

    PubMed

    Miró, J; Taberner, E; Rivera, M; Peña, A; Medrano, A; Rigau, T; Peñalba, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of dilution and centrifugation (i.e., two methods of reducing the influence of the seminal plasma) on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey (Equus asinus) semen. Fifty ejaculates from nine Catalonian jackasses were collected. Gel-free semen was diluted 1:1, 1:5 or 1:10 with Kenney extender. Another sample of semen was diluted 1:5, centrifuged, and then resuspended with Kenney extender until a final dilution of 25x10(6) sperm/ml was achieved (C). After 24 h, 48 h or 72 h of refrigerated storage at 5 degrees C, aliquots of these semen samples were incubated at 37 degrees C for 5 min. The percentage of viable sperm was determined by staining with eosin-nigrosin. The motility characteristics of the spermatozoa were examined using the CASA system (Microptic, Barcelona, Spain). At 24h, more surviving spermatozoa were seen in the more diluted and in the centrifuged semen samples (1:1 48.71%; 1:5 56.58%, 1:10 62.65%; C 72.40%). These differences were maintained at 48 h (1:1 34.31%, 1:5 40.56%, 1:10 48.52%, C 66.30%). After 72 h, only the C samples showed a survival rate of above 25%. The four known donkey motile sperm subpopulations were maintained by refrigeration. However, the percentage of motile sperms in each subpopulation changed with dilution. Only the centrifuged samples, and only at 24h, showed exactly the same motile sperm subpopulation proportions as recorded for fresh sperm. However, the 1:10 dilutions at 24 and 48 h, and the centrifuged semen at 48 h, showed few variations compared to fresh sperm. These results show that the elimination of seminal plasma increases the survival of spermatozoa and the maintenance of motility patterns. The initial sperm concentration had a significant (P<0.05) influence on centrifugation efficacy, but did not influence the number of spermatozoa damaged by centrifugation. In contrast, the percentage of live

  7. Effect of number of motile frozen-thawed boar sperm and number of fixed-time inseminations on fertility in estrous-synchronized gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are advantages for use of frozen-thawed boar sperm (FTS) as a tool for preservation and transfer of valuable genetic material, despite its practical limitations. We hypothesized that increasing the number of motile FTS and number of timed artificial inseminations (AI) would improve pregnancy r...

  8. Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation (RF-EMR) from GSM (0.9/1.8GHZ) Mobile Phones Induces Oxidative Stress and Reduces Sperm Motility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mailankot, Maneesh; Kunnath, Anil P; Jayalekshmi, H; Koduru, Bhargav; Valsalan, Rohith

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mobile phones have become indispensable in the daily lives of men and women around the globe. As cell phone use has become more widespread, concerns have mounted regarding the potentially harmful effects of RF-EMR from these devices. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of RF-EMR from mobile phones on free radical metabolism and sperm quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male albino Wistar rats (10–12 weeks old) were exposed to RF-EMR from an active GSM (0.9/1.8 GHz) mobile phone for 1 hour continuously per day for 28 days. Controls were exposed to a mobile phone without a battery for the same period. The phone was kept in a cage with a wooden bottom in order to address concerns that the effects of exposure to the phone could be due to heat emitted by the phone rather than to RF-EMR alone. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours after the last exposure and tissues of interest were harvested. RESULTS: One hour of exposure to the phone did not significantly change facial temperature in either group of rats. No significant difference was observed in total sperm count between controls and RF-EMR exposed groups. However, rats exposed to RF-EMR exhibited a significantly reduced percentage of motile sperm. Moreover, RF-EMR exposure resulted in a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and low GSH content in the testis and epididymis. CONCLUSION: Given the results of the present study, we speculate that RF-EMR from mobile phones negatively affects semen quality and may impair male fertility. PMID:19578660

  9. Reconstitution in vitro of the motile apparatus from the amoeboid sperm of Ascaris shows that filament assembly and bundling move membranes.

    PubMed

    Italiano, J E; Roberts, T M; Stewart, M; Fontana, C A

    1996-01-12

    We have developed an in vitro motility system from Ascaris sperm, unique amoeboid cells that use filament arrays composed of major sperm protein (MSP) instead of an actin-based apparatus for locomotion. Addition of ATP to sperm extracts induces formation of fibers approximately 2 microns in diameter. These fibers display the key features of the MSP cytoskeleton in vivo. Each fiber consists of a meshwork of MSP filaments and has at one end a vesicle derived from the plasma membrane at the leading edge of the cell. Fiber growth is due to filament assembly at the vesicle; thus, fiber elongation results in vesicle translocation. This in vitro system demonstrates directly that localized polymerization and bundling of filaments can move membranes and provides a powerful assay for evaluating the molecular mechanism of amoeboid cell motility.

  10. Resource level affects relative performance of the two motility systems of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Hillesland, Kristina L; Velicer, Gregory J

    2005-05-01

    The adventurous (A) and social (S) motility systems of the microbial predator Myxococcus xanthus show differential swarming performance on distinct surface types. Under standard laboratory conditions, A-motility performs well on hard agar but poorly on soft agar, whereas the inverse pattern is shown by S-motility. These properties may allow M. xanthus to swarm effectively across a greater diversity of natural surfaces than would be possible with one motility system alone. Nonetheless, the range of ecological conditions under which dual motility enhances effective swarming across distinct surfaces and how ecological parameters affect the complementarity of A-motility and S-motility remain unclear. Here we have examined the role of nutrient concentration in determining swarming patterns driven by dual motility on distinct agar surfaces, as well as the relative contributions of A-motility and S-motility to these patterns. Swarm expansion rates of dually motile (A+S+), solely A-motile (A+S-), and solely S-motile (A-S+) strains were compared on hard and soft agar across a wide range of casitone concentrations. At low casitone concentrations (0-0.1%), swarming on soft agar driven by S-motility is very poor, and is significantly slower than swarming on hard agar driven by A-motility. This reverses at high casitone concentration (1-3.2%) such that swarming on soft agar is much faster than swarming on hard agar. This pattern greatly constrained the ability of M. xanthus to encounter patches of prey bacteria on a soft agar surface when nutrient levels between the patches were low. The swarming patterns of a strain that is unable to produce extracellular fibrils indicate that these appendages are responsible for the elevated swarming of S-motility at high resource levels. Together, these data suggest that large contributions by S-motility to predatory swarming in natural soils may be limited to soft, wet, high-nutrient conditions that may be uncommon. Several likely benefits

  11. Effect of semen extender and storage temperature on ram sperm motility over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of ram semen for long period of time depends on a number of factors, including type of extender and storage temperature. A study compared the effect of semen extender and storage temperature on motility of ram semen stored for 72 h. Semen collected via electroejaculator from 5 mature Katahd...

  12. The degree of resistance to freezing-thawing is related to specific changes in the structures of motile sperm subpopulations and mitochondrial activity in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Flores, E; Fernández-Novell, J M; Peña, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J E

    2009-10-01

    The main aim of this work was to analyze the possible relationship between the structures of motile-sperm subpopulations and boar (Sus scrofa domesticus) sperm resistance to freezability. For this purpose, 45 boar ejaculates were subjected to a standard freezing-thawing protocol, and afterwards they were classified into three groups, in accordance with their resistance to freezing-thawing. Our analysis yielded four separate motile-sperm subpopulations in all of the studied ejaculates, both in fresh samples and after freezing-thawing. Furthermore, whereas curvilinear velocity (VCL), mean velocity (VAP), and dance (DNC) of sperm from Subpopulation 1 underwent significant increases after freezing-thawing in samples with a good response to freezing-thawing, the same parameters of Subpopulation 1 either did not undergo significant variations (VCL and DNC) or even showed a decrease (VAP) (from 20.4+/-0.4 microm/sec in fresh samples to 15.2+/-2.2 microm/sec after freezing-thawing) in samples with the poorest response. Similarly, the behavior of other motility parameters in each subpopulation was also very different in the worst samples when comparing them with those with a good or average response to cryopreservation. Additionally, the DNC of all four subpopulations was in all cases lower in samples with the poorest characteristics of freezability. This was not the only difference, and significant changes in parameters such as the VCL of Subpopulations 2 and 4, linearity coefficient (LIN) of Subpopulations 1, 2, and 3, and wobble coefficient (WOB) of Subpopulations 2 and 3 were also observed in samples with different response to freezing-thawing. Meanwhile, the determination of mitochondrial activity and mitochondrial-linked reactive oxygen species formation indicated that the samples with the poorest freezability characteristics were also those with the lowest mitochondrial activity. We conclude that boar ejaculate resistance to cryopreservation seems to be related to

  13. Dynamics of sperm subpopulations based on motility and plasma membrane status in thawed ram spermatozoa incubated under conditions that support in vitro capacitation and fertilisation.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Ramón, Manuel; del Olmo, Enrique; Jiménez-Rabadán, Pilar; Fernández-Santos, M Rocio; Anel-López, Luis; Garde, J Julián; Soler, Ana J

    2014-06-01

    The present study evaluated modifications occurring in thawed ram spermatozoa during incubation in different media that supported in vitro capacitation and fertilisation, and examines how these changes relate to IVF. Thawed sperm samples were incubated under capacitating (Cap) and non-capacitating (non-Cap) conditions for 0, 1 and 2h and used in an IVF test. During incubation, changes related to membrane status and the motility pattern of spermatozoa were assessed, the latter being used to characterise sperm subpopulations. A significantly greater increase (P≤0.05) in the percentage of spermatozoa with higher membrane fluidity was observed in samples incubated with Cap medium from the beginning of incubation. In addition, changes over time in the distribution of the motile subpopulation were particularly evident when spermatozoa were incubated with Cap medium, with a noted increase in spermatozoa classified as 'hyperactivated like', with major changes occurring after 1h incubation. Both characteristics (i.e. membrane fluidity and the percentage of the hyperactivated-like subpopulation) were significantly related with in vitro fertility, and only sperm samples incubated with the Cap medium were capable of fertilising oocytes. These results support the idea that changes in sperm membrane fluidity and motility pattern (i.e. an increase in hyperactivated spermatozoa) are needed for fertilisation to take place.

  14. Protective effects of in vitro treatment with zinc, d-aspartate and coenzyme q10 on human sperm motility, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spermatozoa are extremely vulnerable to oxidative stress caused by the unbalance between concentrations of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant scavenging systems present inside the male reproductive tract. In spite of a large number of clinical studies that claimed the beneficial effects of antioxidant oral administration on sperm physiology and fertility, only a few studies were addressed to evaluate their effects on spermatozoa in vitro. Main aims of the present study were to assess the influence of zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10, included in the dietary supplement Genadis (Merck Serono), on human sperm motility, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Methods Semen samples, obtained from forty-four patients (23–30 years of age) were enrolled in this study, twenty-four were normospermic and twenty patients were oligospermic. Semen samples were analysed for sperm progressive motility and kinetics through computer assisted analysis, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Results Main results showed that in both normo and oligospermic samples, total and progressive sperm motility is maintained by in vitro treatment with zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10, whereas a significant decrease of these parameters occurs in parallel samples incubated in medium alone. Zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10 also prevented the decrease of sperm kinetics but such an effect was highly significant only in oligospermic samples. Moreover, they also protected spermatozoa by the increase of DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Conclusions Zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10 exert a direct protective effect on human spermatozoa preventing the decrease of motility and the increase of DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation during in vitro culture. PMID:23958080

  15. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; Sayad, Sara El; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W.; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β−/− Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β−/− cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β−/− cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β–actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β–microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β–EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  16. Sperm competition affects male behaviour and sperm output in the rainbow darter

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Rainbow darters, Etheostoma caeruleum, are promiscuous fish with moderate rates of group spawning (between one and five males may simultaneously mate with one female). In this study, I examined male sperm output and male willingness to spawn under different levels of sperm competition intensity. One male and one female were allowed to spawn in an aquarium where they had visual and olfactory access to one of four treatments: four males, one male, zero males, or one female. Theory predicts that males should reduce sperm output when there are more than the average number of males at a group spawning (four-male treatment) and should increase sperm output when there are fewer than average males at a group spawning (one-male treatment). Mean sperm output did not differ among treatments. However, males released more sperm when spawning in the presence of competing males (four-male and one-male treatments pooled) than when spawning in the absence of competing males (zero-male and one-female treatments pooled). Males were also most likely to forego spawning opportunities when sperm competition intensity was high. Furthermore, male willingness to spawn was size dependent. Large males were more likely to forego spawning opportunities under high sperm competition intensity. Large males may be better off waiting for future spawning opportunities when there is a lower potential for sperm competition intensity.

  17. Oligomycin A-induced inhibition of mitochondrial ATP-synthase activity suppresses boar sperm motility and in vitro capacitation achievement without modifying overall sperm energy levels.

    PubMed

    Ramió-Lluch, Laura; Yeste, Marc; Fernández-Novell, Josep M; Estrada, Efrén; Rocha, Luiz; Cebrián-Pérez, José A; Muiño-Blanco, Teresa; Concha, Ilona I; Ramírez, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    Incubation of boar spermatozoa in a capacitation medium with oligomycin A, a specific inhibitor of the F0 component of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, induced an immediate and almost complete immobilisation of cells. Oligomycin A also inhibited the ability of spermatozoa to achieve feasible in vitro capacitation (IVC), as measured through IVC-compatible changes in motility patterns, tyrosine phosphorylation levels of the acrosomal p32 protein, membrane fluidity and the ability of spermatozoa to achieve subsequent, progesterone-induced in vitro acrosome exocytosis (IVAE). Both inhibitory effects were caused without changes in the rhythm of O2 consumption, intracellular ATP levels or mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). IVAE was accompanied by a fast and intense peak in O2 consumption and ATP levels in control spermatozoa. Oligomycin A also inhibited progesterone-induced IVAE as well as the concomitant peaks of O2 consumption and ATP levels. The effect of oligomycin on IVAE was also accompanied by concomitant alterations in the IVAE-induced changes on intracellular Ca(2+) levels and MMP. Our results suggest that the oligomycin A-sensitive mitochondrial ATP-synthase activity is instrumental in the achievement of an adequate boar sperm motion pattern, IVC and IVAE. However, this effect seems not to be linked to changes in the overall maintenance of adequate energy levels in stages other than IVAE.

  18. Effect of Metals on the Development of Hyperactivated Motility by Rabbit Sperm Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Dairy Sci. Vol. 67, pp 1147-1156 (1984). 13. Carreras, A., and Mendoza, C., "Zinc Levels in Seminal Plasma of Fertile and Infertile Men ," Andrologia...cadmium chlorides, used in the study, spanned the concentration range of the metals found in seminal plasma of men exposed to the metals. 9󈧎 The highest...269-275 (1990). 28. Ernst, E., and Bonde, J.P., "Sex Hormone and Epididymal Sperm Parameters in rats Following Sub-Chronic Treatment with Hexavalent

  19. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases have important roles in spermatozoa; however, little is known about the presence and regulation in these cells of their counterparts in signaling, namely, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs). The objectives of the present study were to identify PTPs and DSPs in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa; to characterize their subcellular distribution; and to investigate the roles of tyrosine phosphatases in maintenance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation level and in sperm motility. Using Western blotting with specific antibodies in boar and stallion sperm lysates, we unequivocally identified two PTPs (PTPRB and PTPN11) and two DSPs (DUSP3 and DUSP4). In dog sperm lysates, only PTPN11, DUSP3, and DUSP4 were detected. In all these species, we did not detect the specific signal with anti-PTPRC (CD45), CDKN3, DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP6, DUSP9, PTPN1, PTPN3, PTPN6, PTPN7, PTPN13, PTPRA, PTPRG, PTPRJ, PTPRK, or PTPRZ antibodies. Positive matches were further investigated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that PTPRB was associated with the plasma membrane in the head and tail of boar and stallion spermatozoa. In agreement with Western blotting results, PTPRB antibodies did not show immunoreactivity in dog sperm analyzed by immunofluorescence. In the three species, DUSP4 was mainly found in the tail of spermatozoa, with little or no immunoreactivity in the head. PTPN11 was mainly located in the postacrosomal region in the head, whereas DUSP3 immunoreactivity was extended within the acrosome. PTPN11 and DUSP3 showed immunoreactivity in the tail that was restricted to the midpiece. Finally, we incubated boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa with pervanadate and sodium orthovanadate, two PTP inhibitors, and analyzed overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation and assessed sperm motility. Sodium orthovanadate and pervanadate showed concentration-dependent inhibition of sperm motility that was

  20. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  1. Treatment of GnRHa-implanted Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) with 11-ketoandrostenedione stimulates spermatogenesis and increases sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Agulleiro, Maria J; Scott, Alexander P; Duncan, Neil; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Cerdà, Joan

    2007-08-01

    The effect of 11-ketoandrostenedione (OA) on plasma concentrations of sexual steroids and spermatogenesis of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) implanted with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) was investigated. Males were treated with saline (control) or with GnRHa implants (50 mug kg(-1)) in the presence or absence of OA (2 or 7 mg kg(-1)) during twenty eight days. Treatment with GnRHa alone slightly stimulated spermatogenesis and milt production with respect to controls, and this was associated with a transient elevation of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) at day seven and an increase of 5beta-reduced metabolite(s) of 17,20beta-dihydroxy-pregn-4-en-3-one (17,20betaP) at day twenty eight. However, treatment with GnRHa+OA increased plasma concentrations of 11-KT and free+sulphated 5beta-reduced metabolites of 17,20betaP at days seven, fourteen and twenty one. After twenty eight days, the testis of GnRHa+OA-treated fish showed a lower number of spermatogonia B and spermatocytes I, and a higher number of spermatids, than fish treated with GnRHa alone. In addition, the motility of spermatozoa produced by GnRHa+OA males was enhanced by 2-fold with respect to controls or GnRHa males. These results suggest that treatment of Senegalese sole with GnRHa+OA stimulates spermatogenesis resulting in more motile sperm. Such effects could be mediated by an increased synthesis of 11-KT and/or 17,20betaP in the testis but further studies will be required to elucidate the specific mechanism involved.

  2. The phylogeny of swimming kinematics: The environment controls flagellar waveforms in sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Burton, Lisa; Zimmer, Richard; Hosoi, Anette; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, phylogenetic and molecular analyses have dominated the study of ecology and evolution. However, physical interactions between organisms and their environment, a fundamental determinant of organism ecology and evolution, are mediated by organism form and function, highlighting the need to understand the mechanics of basic survival strategies, including locomotion. Focusing on spermatozoa, we combined high-speed video microscopy and singular value decomposition analysis to quantitatively compare the flagellar waveforms of eight species, ranging from marine invertebrates to humans. We found striking similarities in sperm swimming kinematics between genetically dissimilar organisms, which could not be uncovered by phylogenetic analysis. The emergence of dominant waveform patterns across species are suggestive of biological optimization for flagellar locomotion and point toward environmental cues as drivers of this convergence. These results reinforce the power of quantitative kinematic analysis to understand the physical drivers of evolution and as an approach to uncover new solutions for engineering applications, such as micro-robotics.

  3. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  4. Motile Sperm Output by Male Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) Managed Ex Situ Is Influenced by Public Exposure and Number of Care-Givers.

    PubMed

    Koester, Diana C; Freeman, Elizabeth W; Brown, Janine L; Wildt, David E; Terrell, Kimberly A; Franklin, Ashley D; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2015-01-01

    The collective cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population in zoological institutions has never been self-sustaining because of challenges in natural reproduction. A retrospective analysis of North American zoo-breeding records has revealed that >90% of litters produced since 2003 occurred in facilities 'off-display' from the public. We examined seminal, endocrine, and behavioral traits of 29 adult male cheetahs that were: 1) managed in public exhibit or off-display facilities; 2) maintained by different numbers of cheetah-specific care-givers; and 3) living adjacent to varying numbers of adult conspecifics. Cheetahs housed off-display produced more total motile sperm/ejaculate (P = 0.04) than on-exhibit males. This finding was mirrored in our laboratory's historical records where two-fold more total motile sperm (P < 0.01) were measured in ejaculates from individuals with no public exposure (n = 43) compared to on-exhibit (n = 116) counterparts. Males at institutions with ≤3 care-givers also produced more total motile sperm/ejaculate (P < 0.03) and spent more time behaviorally active (P < 0.01) than at facilities using >3 care-givers. Exposure to high numbers of conspecifics within the same institution did not impact (P > 0.05) seminal traits, and presence of the public, care-giver number, or animals/facility had no influence (P > 0.05) on androgen or glucocorticoid excretion or other behavioral metrics. Findings indicate that male cheetahs are sensitive to general public exposure and too many care-givers, resulting in compromised motile sperm output/ejaculate with mechanism of action unrelated to altered androgen or glucocorticoid excretion.

  5. Motile Sperm Output by Male Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) Managed Ex Situ Is Influenced by Public Exposure and Number of Care-Givers

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Diana C.; Freeman, Elizabeth W.; Brown, Janine L.; Wildt, David E.; Terrell, Kimberly A.; Franklin, Ashley D.; Crosier, Adrienne E.

    2015-01-01

    The collective cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population in zoological institutions has never been self-sustaining because of challenges in natural reproduction. A retrospective analysis of North American zoo-breeding records has revealed that >90% of litters produced since 2003 occurred in facilities ‘off-display’ from the public. We examined seminal, endocrine, and behavioral traits of 29 adult male cheetahs that were: 1) managed in public exhibit or off-display facilities; 2) maintained by different numbers of cheetah-specific care-givers; and 3) living adjacent to varying numbers of adult conspecifics. Cheetahs housed off-display produced more total motile sperm/ejaculate (P = 0.04) than on-exhibit males. This finding was mirrored in our laboratory’s historical records where two-fold more total motile sperm (P < 0.01) were measured in ejaculates from individuals with no public exposure (n = 43) compared to on-exhibit (n = 116) counterparts. Males at institutions with ≤3 care-givers also produced more total motile sperm/ejaculate (P < 0.03) and spent more time behaviorally active (P < 0.01) than at facilities using >3 care-givers. Exposure to high numbers of conspecifics within the same institution did not impact (P > 0.05) seminal traits, and presence of the public, care-giver number, or animals/facility had no influence (P > 0.05) on androgen or glucocorticoid excretion or other behavioral metrics. Findings indicate that male cheetahs are sensitive to general public exposure and too many care-givers, resulting in compromised motile sperm output/ejaculate with mechanism of action unrelated to altered androgen or glucocorticoid excretion. PMID:26332582

  6. CASK interacts with PMCA4b and JAM-A on the mouse sperm flagellum to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis and motility.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, Rolands G; Fomin, Victor P; Naik, Ulhas P; Modelski, Mark J; Naik, Meghna U; Galileo, Deni S; Duncan, Randall L; Martin-Deleon, Patricia A

    2012-08-01

    Deletion of the highly conserved gene for the major Ca(2+) efflux pump, Plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPase 4b (Pmca4b), in the mouse leads to loss of progressive and hyperactivated sperm motility and infertility. Here we first demonstrate that compared to wild-type (WT), Junctional adhesion molecule-A (Jam-A) null sperm, previously shown to have motility defects and an abnormal mitochondrial phenotype reminiscent of that seen in Pmca4b nulls, exhibit reduced (P < 0.001) ATP levels, significantly (P < 0.001) greater cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ](c)) and ∼10-fold higher mitochondrial sequestration, indicating Ca(2+) overload. Investigating the mechanism involved, we used co-immunoprecipitation studies to show that CASK (Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent serine kinase), identified for the first time on the sperm flagellum where it co-localizes with both PMCA4b and JAM-A on the proximal principal piece, acts as a common interacting partner of both. Importantly, CASK binds alternatively and non-synergistically with each of these molecules via its single PDZ (PDS-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain to either inhibit or promote efflux. In the absence of CASK-JAM-A interaction in Jam-A null sperm, CASK-PMCA4b interaction is increased, resulting in inhibition of PMCA4b's enzymatic activity, consequent Ca(2+) accumulation, and a ∼6-fold over-expression of constitutively ATP-utilizing CASK, compared to WT. Thus, CASK negatively regulates PMCA4b by directly binding to it and JAM-A positively regulates it indirectly through CASK. The decreased motility is likely due to the collateral net deficit in ATP observed in nulls. Our data indicate that Ca(2+) homeostasis in sperm is maintained by the relative ratios of CASK-PMCA4b and CASK-JAM-A interactions.

  7. Expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in male germ cells: GM-CSF enhances sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Lourdes T; Rauch, M Cecilia; Mansilla, Alejandra; Zambrano, Angara; Brito, Mónica; Werner, Enrique; Alfaro, Víctor; Cox, José F; Concha, Ilona I

    2003-10-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine capable of stimulating proliferation, maturation and function of hematopoietic cells. Receptors for this cytokine are composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and are expressed on myeloid progenitors and mature mononuclear phagocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and neutrophils, as well as in other nonhematopietic cells. We have recently demonstrated that bull spermatozoa express functional GM-CSF receptors that signal for increased glucose and Vitamin C uptake. In this study, we analyzed the expression of GM-CSF in bovine and human germ cells and its influence in bovine sperm motility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that adult bovine and human testes expressed GM-CSF. In addition, immunolocalization studies confirmed the presence of GM-CSF in the germ cell line in bovine and human testes. Computer-assisted evaluation of patterns of sperm motility demonstrated that the addition of GM-CSF enhances several parameters of sperm motility in the presence of glucose or fructose substrates.

  8. Superoxide dismutase activity in the oviductal and uterine fluid of the bitch and the effects of the enzyme on viability, motility and hyperactivation of canine sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Wada, Miho; Hori, Tatsuya; Kawakami, Eiichi

    2014-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in flushings from oviducts and uterine horns of 8 anestrous, 5 estrous and 7 diestrous bitches was measured. SOD activity in oviductal fluid in estrous bitches was significantly higher than that in anestrous and diestrous bitches (P<0.01). SOD activity in uterine fluid of diestrous bitches was, however, significantly higher than that in anestrous and estrous bitches (P<0.01). Additionally, sperm collected from normal dogs were incubated in MEM and in MEM containing SOD (SOD-MEM) for 24 hr. The percentages of sperm with viability, motility and hyperactivation in SOD-MEM were higher than those in MEM. SOD produced in oviduct and uterus may be able to maintain or improve sperm quality and fertility in the dog.

  9. DNA fragmentation and oxidative stress compromise sperm motility and survival in late pregnancy exposure to omega-9 fatty acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oluwakemi, Oyelowo; Olufeyisipe, Adegoke

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidative status and DNA integrity in testes of wistar rat offspring exposed to omega-9 monounsaturated (MUFA) at different times of late organogenesis. Materials and Methods: Sixty female rats were divided into six groups of 10 animals. The first group served as control and received the drug vehicle, olive oil (1 ml/kg/day). The second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth group received 1000 mg/kg of oleic acid on gestation day 15 (D15), 16 (D16), 17 (D17), 18 (D18) and 19 (D19), respectively. Male pups were allowed to attain puberty and thereafter, blood was taken for hormonal analyses. Sperm count and motility were assessed. Testes homogenate was used for the determination of biochemical variables. Testes DNA was also determined. Results: The results showed that sperm count and motility were significantly decreased in the treated groups as compared to the control. There was a marked increase in the malondialdehyde level in rat testes from all of the treated groups as compared to the control (P<0.05). DNA from the testes of rats of D19 had the highest level of fragmentation as compared to the control. Conclusion: Omega-9 MUFA exposure in utero imposes negative effects on sperm variables and increases the level of sperm DNA fragmentation and oxidative stress. PMID:27403258

  10. Vanadate-sensitized cleavage of dynein heavy chains by 365-nm irradiation of demembranated sperm flagella and its effect on the flagellar motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, B.H.; Gibbons, I.R.

    1987-06-15

    Irradiation of demembranated flagella of sea urchin sperm at 365 nm in the presence of 0.05-1 mM MgATP and 5-10 microM vanadate (Vi) cleaves the alpha and beta heavy chains of the outer arm dynein at the same site and at about the same rate as reported previously for the solubilized dynein. The decrease in intact alpha and beta heavy chain material is biphasic, with about 80% being lost with a half-time of 8-10 min, and the remainder more slowly. Five other axonemal polypeptides of Mr greater than 350,000 are lost similarly, concomitant with the appearance of at least 9 new peptides of Mr 150,000-250,000. The motility of irradiated sperm flagella upon subsequent dilution into reactivation medium containing 1 mM ATP and 2.5 mM catechol shows a progressive decrease in flagellar beat frequency for irradiation times that produce up to about 50% cleavage of the dynein heavy chains; more prolonged irradiation causes irreversible loss of motility. Competition between photocleaved and intact outer arm dynein for rebinding to dynein-depleted sperm flagella shows that cleavage has little effect upon the ability for rebinding, although the cleaved dynein partially inhibits subsequent motility. Substitution of MnATP for the MgATP in the irradiation medium prevents the loss of all of the axonemal polypeptides during irradiation for up to 60 min and also protects the potential for subsequent flagellar motility.

  11. Cryopreservation of human spermatozoa. III. The effect of cryoprotectants on motility.

    PubMed

    Critser, J K; Huse-Benda, A R; Aaker, D V; Arneson, B W; Ball, G D

    1988-08-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to examine potential toxic effects of cryoprotectants on motility of human spermatozoa. The data indicated that exposure of spermatozoa to cryoprotectant medium for as little as 15 minutes at room temperature caused a reduction in motility. This reduction in motility was caused by glycerol. Lowering glycerol concentrations from 7.5% to 5.0% improved sperm motility at 24 hours post-thaw. Sperm motility was not affected by either slow or abrupt cooling rates above -5 degrees C. Motility was greater in cryopreserved sperm at 24 hours post-thaw when glycerol was added at -5 degrees C rather than at room temperature. These data suggest that avoiding glycerol toxicity either by reducing the concentration used or by adding glycerol at a lower temperature, or both, may improve human sperm cryosurvival rates.

  12. Sperm cryopreservation of a live-bearing fish, Xiphophorus couchianus: male-to-male variation in post-thaw motility and production of F(1) hybrid offspring.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiping; Hazlewood, Leona; Walter, Ronald B; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2009-03-01

    Fishes of the genus Xiphophorus are well-studied biomedical research models, and some species, such as X. couchianus, are currently listed as endangered in the wild. Sperm cryopreservation in these live-bearing fishes has begun recently. Thus far, live young have been produced with cryopreserved sperm only in one species (Xiphophorus helleri). In this study, the goal was to develop a practical protocol for sperm cryopreservation of Xiphophorus couchianus, and to produce live young with cryopreserved sperm. Sperm were collected by crushing of testis in Hanks' balanced salt solution at an osmolality of 500 mOsmol/kg (HBSS500), and were cryopreserved with 14% glycerol (v/v) as cryoprotectant at a cooling rate of 20 degrees C/min from 5 to -80 degrees C in 250-microL French straws. For artificial insemination, samples were thawed at 40 degrees C for 5 s in a water bath, washed once using fresh HBSS500 by centrifuging at 1000 g for 5 min at 4 degrees C, concentrated into approximately 5 microL, and injected into virgin females of Xiphophorus maculatus. The inseminated females were monitored for 90 days for subsequent discharge of live young. Results from 2006 and 2007 showed considerable male-to-male variation in post-thaw motility (from 1 to 70%). Offspring were produced by cryopreserved sperm in two tanks (of three) at 36 and 66 days after insemination in 2007. Paternity was confirmed via phenotypes (body color) and genotypes (microsatellite genetic marker) of the hybrid offspring. Overall, a practical protocol for sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination is provided to preserve X. couchianus, which is an important biomedical research model, and also currently listed as an endangered species in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list.

  13. In vitro effects of l-carnitine and glutamine on motility, acrosomal abnormality, and plasma membrane integrity of rabbit sperm during liquid-storage.

    PubMed

    Sarıözkan, Serpil; Ozdamar, Saim; Türk, Gaffari; Cantürk, Fazile; Yay, Arzu

    2014-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of l-carnitine and glutamine (Gln) on the sperm quality parameters of liquid-stored rabbit semen maintained up to 24 h at 5°C. Pooled and extended ejaculates were divided into two equal portions. l-Carnitine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2mM were added to the first portion, and glutamine was added at the same doses to the second portion. All samples were cooled to 5°C and examined at 0, 6, 12 and 24 h of liquid storage. Supplementation of the semen extender with three different doses of l-carnitine provided significant increases in the percentage of motile sperm at 12 h (P<0.01), and 24h (P<0.001) and enabled significant protection of the sperm plasma membrane (P<0.01) at 12 and 24h of cool-storage, in comparison to the control samples. Only the 2mM dose of l-carnitine significantly (P<0.01) decreased the rate of acrosomal damage when compared to the control group. Furthermore, all doses of Gln caused a significant (P<0.01) decrease in acrosomal damage at 6h, and provided significant improvement (P<0.01) in sperm motility, acrosomal and plasma membrane integrities at 12 and 24h of liquid storage, when compared to the controls. In conclusion, the supplementation of liquid-stored rabbit semen with l-carnitine and Gln provided a protection for sperm against cool storage-induced functional and structural damages.

  14. Post-thaw survival of ram spermatozoa and fertility after insemination as affected by prefreezing sperm concentration and extender composition.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A G; Martemucci, A G; Colonna, M A; Bellitti, A

    2001-03-15

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of prefreezing sperm concentration using two extenders on post-thaw survival and acrosomal status of ram spermatozoa (Experiment 1) and fertility after intrauterine insemination with differing doses of semen (Experiment 2). In autumn (Northern hemisphere), semen was collected by artificial vagina from 8 adult Leccese rams and ejaculates of good quality semen were pooled. Two extender systems for cryopreservation were considered, one based on milk-lactose egg yolk (Milk-LY) and the other based on tris-fructose egg yolk (Tris-FY). Experiment 1 (2 x 6 factorial scheme) examined the in vitro characteristics of spermatozoa in relation to the Milk-LY and Tris-FY extenders and six prefreezing sperm concentrations (50, 100, 200, 400, 500 and 800 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL). Experiment 2 (2 x 4 factorial) evaluated the influence of the Milk-LY vs Tris-FY extenders and four doses (20, 40, 80 and 160 x 10(6) spermatozoa/0.25 mL) corresponding to prefreezing spermatozoa concentrations of 100, 200, 400 and 800 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL, on fertility of ewes inseminated in uterus by laparoscope. Prefreezing sperm concentration influenced (P < 0.01) freezability of spermatozoa and affected negatively all the in vitro parameters at 800 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL. Overall, Milk-LY tended to ensure higher viability and acrosomal integrity of spermatozoa after thawing at the intermediate sperm densities (range 100 to 500 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL). At 500 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL concentration corresponded the best condition for survival of spermatozoa (71.2%), acrosome integrity (71.5%) and acrosomal loss (6.0%). At the lowest sperm concentration (50 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL), Tris-FY resulted in a higher survival rate than Milk-LY (61.3%, P < 0.05) and lower acrosomal loss (9.7%, P < 0.05). Milk-LY supported spermatozoa motility better than Tris-FY after incubation at sperm concentration between 50 and 400 x 10(6) spermatozoa/mL (0.05 > P < 0

  15. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  16. Effects of mechanical stresses on sperm function and fertilization rate in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Wang, Ting; Qiu, Zhuo Lin; Li, Ke; Li, Liu; Chan, Carol Pui Shan; Chan, Si Mei; Li, Tian-Chiu; Quan, Song

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether any of the observed changes in mouse sperm function tests secondary to mechanical stresses (centrifugation and pipetting) correlate with sperm fertilization ability. Chinese Kunming mice were used as sperm and oocyte donors. Sperm samples were allocated evenly into centrifugation, pipette, and control groups. Sperm plasma membrane integrity (PMI), mitochondrial membrane permeability (MMP), baseline and stimulated intracellular ROS, and sperm fertilization ability were measured by hypo-osmotic swelling, flow cytometry, and fertilization tests. Parallel studies were conducted and all tests were repeated six times. Our results showed that after centrifugation, the progressive motility, average path velocity, and overall sperm motility and PMI decreased significantly (p < 0.05). In addition, the MMP level decreased significantly in viable sperm when the centrifugation condition reached 1,400 g × 15 minutes (p < 0.05). When pipetting was performed two or more times, progressive motility, average path velocity, and overall sperm motility decreased significantly (p < 0.05); when it was performed four or more times, sperm membrane integrity and intracellular basal ROS level of viable sperm was also significantly decreased (p < 0.05). In conclusion, various mechanical stresses seem to affect sperm function, however this does not appear to alter fertilization rate. Laboratory handling steps should be minimized to avoid unnecessary mechanical stresses being applied to sperm samples.

  17. Effect of proctodeal gland foam on sperm kinetics in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Farooq, U; Cho, S; Rybnik-Trzaskowska, P K; Singh, R P; Malecki, I A

    2015-01-15

    The proctodeal gland of the male Japanese quail produces thick foam that accompanies semen when it is transferred to the female. It is thought that this foam enhances fertilization by improving the motility of the sperm, but reports are conflicting because the effect of foam on sperm motility has only been assessed subjectively The velocity of individual sperm was not able to be measured accurately, variations were large, and small changes in motility could not be accurately evaluated. So, we tested the hypothesis that foam affects the motility of spermatozoa of Japanese quail by analyzing motility objectively using computer-assisted semen analysis and determining changes in sperm kinetics in the presence of different concentrations of proctodeal gland foam. The addition of 5% or 10% foam to the sperm suspension increased (P < 0.05) all sperm kinetic parameters (the curvilinear velocity, straight line velocity, the velocity of the average path, linearity, straightness, and beat cross frequency). As a result, the percentage of motile and progressive motile sperm also increased. All these parameters declined (P < 0.05) with a further increase in the concentration of foam to 15% and 20%. Furthermore, this effect was similar in males that were 8, 16, or 26 weeks of age. We conclude that sperm motility is enhanced by proctodeal gland foam, and this enhancement depends on its concentration.

  18. Insulin affects sperm capacity in pig through nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Saveria; Giordano, Francesca; Guido, Carmela; Rago, Vittoria; Carpino, Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Insulin (Ins) has recently been demonstrated to have the ability to induce the capacitation process in pig spermatozoa. In various mammalian species, capacitation has been linked to the nitric oxide (NO) signalling; therefore, this study investigated NO production in Ins-treated pig spermatozoa by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. For the same samples, sperm capacitation was evaluated by chlortetracycline staining, protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and acrosomal status. A significant increase of the intrasperm NO level and the activation of three capacitation indices were detected in response to Ins treatment. Conversely, sperm preincubation with an NO synthase inhibitor (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) or with the anti-Ins receptor β (IRβ) antibody reversed all of the Ins-related effects. These results suggest that Ins has the capacity to enhance intracellular NO concentrations in pig spermatozoa and indicate a possible NO implication upon Ins promotion of capacitation.

  19. Cryopreservation of bull semen shipped overnight and its effect on post-thaw sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential and normal acrosomes.

    PubMed

    Anzar, M; Kroetsch, T; Boswall, L

    2011-06-01

    In the Canadian Animal Genetic Resource Program, bull semen is donated in frozen or fresh (diluted) states. This study was designed to assess the cryopreservation of diluted bull semen shipped at 4°C overnight, and to determine the post-thaw quality of shipped semen using different straw volumes and freezing rates. Semen was collected from four breeding bulls (three ejaculates per bull). Semen was diluted in Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol (TEYG) extender, cooled to 4°C and frozen as per routine (control semen). After cooling to 4°C, a part of semen was removed and shipped overnight to the research laboratory via express courier (shipped semen). Semen was packaged in 0.25 or 0.5 ml straws and frozen in a programmable freezer using three freezing rates, i.e., -10, -25 or -40°C/min. Control semen was also shipped to the research laboratory. Post-thaw sperm motility characteristics were assessed using CASA, and post-thaw sperm plasma membrane, mitochondrial membrane potential and normal acrosomes were assessed using flow cytometry. Post-thaw sperm quality was greater in shipped semen as compared to control (P<0.001). The shipped semen packaged in 0.25 ml straws had better post-thaw sperm quality than in 0.5 ml straws (P<0.001). Freezing rate had no effect on post-thaw sperm quality. In conclusion, bull semen can be shipped overnight for subsequent cryopreservation and gene banking. Overnight shipping of semen was found advantageous for bull semen cryopreservation. Semen packaging in 0.25 ml straws yielded better post-thaw quality than 0.5 ml straws.

  20. Sperm motility in Mytilus edulis in relation to mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms: implications for the evolution of doubly uniparental inheritance in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Jha, M; Côté, J; Hoeh, W R; Blier, P U; Stewart, D T

    2008-01-01

    Bivalves of the families Mytilidae, Unionidae, and Veneridae have an unusual mode of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transmission called doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). A characteristic feature of DUI is the presence of two gender-associated mtDNA genomes that are transmitted through males (M-type mtDNA) and females (F-type mtDNA), respectively. Female mussels are predominantly homoplasmic with only the F-type expressed in both somatic and gonadal tissue; males are heteroplasmic with the M-type expressed in the gonad and F-type in somatic tissue for the most part. An unusual evolutionary feature of this system is that an mt genome with F-coding sequences occasionally invades the male route of inheritance (i.e., a "role reversal" event), and is thereafter transmitted as a new M-type. Phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that the new or "recently masculinized" M-types may eventually replace the older or "standard" M-types over time. To investigate whether this replacement process could be due to an advantage in sperm swimming behavior, we measured differences in motility parameters and found that sperm with the recently masculinized M-type had significantly faster curvilinear velocity and average path velocity when compared to sperm with standard M-type. This increase in sperm swimming speed could explain the multiple evolutionary replacements of standard M-types by masculinized M-types that have been hypothesized for the mytilid lineage. However, our observations do not support the hypothesis that DUI originated because it permits the evolution of mitochondrial adaptations specific to sperm performance, otherwise, the evolutionarily older, standard M genome should perform better.

  1. Sperm Chromatin Immaturity Observed in Short Abstinence Ejaculates Affects DNA Integrity and Longevity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Salian, Sujith Raj; Kumar, Dayanidhi; Singh, Vikram Jeet; D’Souza, Fiona; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Kamath, Asha; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of ejaculatory abstinence (EA) on semen parameters and subsequent reproductive outcome is still debatable; hence understanding the impact of EA on sperm structural and functional integrity may provide a valuable information on predicting successful clinical outcome. Objective To understand the influence of EA on sperm chromatin maturity, integrity, longevity and global methylation status. Methods This experimental prospective study included 76 ejaculates from 19 healthy volunteers who provided ejaculates after observing 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of abstinence. Sperm chromatin maturity, DNA integrity and global methylation status were assessed in the neat ejaculate. Sperm motility, DNA integrity and longevity were assessed in the processed fraction of the fresh and frozen-thawed ejaculates to determine their association with the length of EA. Results Spermatozoa from 1 day ejaculatory abstinence (EA-1) displayed significantly higher level of sperm chromatin immaturity in comparison to EA-3 (P < 0.05) and EA-5 (P < 0.01) whereas; the number of 5-methyl cytosine immunostained spermatozoa did not vary significantly across groups. On the other hand, in vitro incubation of processed ejaculate from EA-1 resulted in approximately 20 and 40 fold increase in the DNA fragmented spermatozoa at the end of 6 and 24h respectively (P < 0.01–0.001). Conclusion Use of short-term EA for therapeutic fertilization would be a clinically valuable strategy to improve the DNA quality. However, use of such spermatozoa after prolonged incubation in vitro should be avoided as it can carry a substantial risk of transmitting DNA fragmentation to the oocytes. PMID:27043437

  2. Does sperm DNA fragmentation affect the developmental potential and the incidence of apoptosis following blastomere biopsy?

    PubMed

    Haghpanah, Tahereh; Salehi, Mohammad; Ghaffari Novin, Marefat; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Fadaei-Fathabadi, Fatemeh; Dehghani-Mohammadabadi, Maryam; Azimi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Common methods employed in assisted reproduction technology (ART) include intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with an unspecified level of sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of SDF on human preimplantation embryo development and the incidence of apoptosis following a single blastomere biopsy. Using sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) to assess SDF, a total of 20 processed semen samples were categorized into two groups; group I: SDF ≤30% and group II: SDF >30%. After ICSI, fertilization, cleavage, and embryo quality score were assessed. A single blastomere was biopsied from day 3 embryos and development was monitored on day 4. The frequency of apoptosis in biopsied embryos was assayed by TUNEL and the level of BCL-2, BAX, hsa-mir-15a, and hsa-mir-16-1 were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). SCD was found to be negatively correlated with sperm motility and normal form spermatozoa (p < 0.05). The rate of fertilization, cleavage, and embryo quality score were not significantly different between the two groups (all p > 0.05). SDF >30% had no negative effect on potential development and did not increase the proportion of apoptotic cells and the level of apoptosis-related genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in group II vs. group I (p > 0.05). It appears that at the levels assessed paternal genome damage had little if any negative effect on preimplantaton embryo development and apoptosis following single blastomere biopsy. This may reflect the selection of morphologically normal sperm for ICSI and the repair capacity of the oocyte.

  3. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  4. Targeted ablation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) 1 and 4 indicates a major housekeeping function for PMCA1 and a critical role in hyperactivated sperm motility and male fertility for PMCA4.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Gbolahan W; Miller, Marian L; Pyne, Gail J; Sutliff, Roy L; O'Connor, Kyle T; Neumann, Jonathan C; Andringa, Anastasia; Miller, Daniel A; Prasad, Vikram; Doetschman, Thomas; Paul, Richard J; Shull, Gary E

    2004-08-06

    The relative importance of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) 1 and PMCA4 was assessed in mice carrying null mutations in their genes (Atp2b1 and Atp2b4). Loss of both copies of the gene encoding PMCA1 caused embryolethality, whereas heterozygous mutants had no overt disease phenotype. Despite widespread and abundant expression of PMCA4, PMCA4 null (Pmca4-/-) mutants exhibited no embryolethality and appeared outwardly normal. Loss of PMCA4 impaired phasic contractions and caused apoptosis in portal vein smooth muscle in vitro; however, this phenotype was dependent on the mouse strain being employed. Pmca4-/- mice on a Black Swiss background did not exhibit the phenotype unless they also carried a null mutation in one copy of the Pmca1 gene. Pmca4-/- male mice were infertile but had normal spermatogenesis and mating behavior. Pmca4-/- sperm that had not undergone capacitation exhibited normal motility but could not achieve hyperactivated motility needed to traverse the female genital tract. Ultrastructure of the motility apparatus in Pmca4-/- sperm tails was normal, but an increased incidence of mitochondrial condensation indicated Ca2+ overload. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry showed that PMCA4 is the most abundant isoform in testis and sperm and that it is localized to the principle piece of the sperm tail, which is also the location of the major Ca2+ channel (CatSper) required for sperm motility. These results are consistent with an essential housekeeping or developmental function for PMCA1, but not PMCA4, and show that PMCA4 expression in the principle piece of the sperm tail is essential for hyperactivated motility and male fertility.

  5. The post-thaw irradiation of avian spermatozoa with He-Ne laser differently affects chicken, pheasant and turkey sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, N; Paventi, G; Pizzuto, R; Passarella, S; Cerolini, S; Zaniboni, L; Marzoni, M; Castillo, A; Rosato, M P

    2013-11-30

    The effects of post-thaw Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation on mobility and functional integrity of frozen/thawed chicken, pheasant and turkey spermatozoa were investigated. Cytochrome C oxidase (COX) activity was also determined as a measure of the effect of irradiation on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Semen samples from each species were collected, processed and frozen according to the pellet procedure. After thawing, each semen sample was divided into two subsamples: the first one was the control; the second one was irradiated with a single mode continuous He-Ne laser wave (wavelength 632.8 nm; 6 mW; 3.96 J/cm(2)). Then the samples were assessed for sperm mobility (Accudenz(®) swim-down test), viability (SYBR-14/PI staining), osmotic-resistance (HOS test) and COX activity. The irradiation was effective P<0.05 increasing sperm motility in the turkey semen (0.228 ± 0.01 compared with 0.294 ± 0.02). The irradiation also caused an increase (P<0.05) of the COX activity in pheasant (+135 ± 4%) and turkey (+116 ± 4%) sperm, without affecting viability and osmotic-resistance. The COX was positively correlated (P<0.05) with the viability of chicken sperm, however no significant interactions were found between mobility and COX activity in the three avian species. Due to the difference in energetic metabolism among avian species used in this study, the He-Ne laser irradiation has a differential action on bio-stimulation of turkey, chicken and pheasant spermatozoa. The present results are the first to elucidate the possibility for restoration of motility of cryopreserved avian spermatozoa by bio-stimulation provided via He-Ne laser irradiation.

  6. Reducing endogenous estrogen during prepuberal life does not affect boar libido or sperm fertilizing potential.

    PubMed

    Berger, Trish; Conley, Alan J

    2014-09-01

    Increasing sperm production per breeding male has economic significance with increasing use of artificial insemination. Manipulations to increase sperm production in livestock will only be useful if libido and sperm fertilizing capacity are not adversely affected. Reducing endogenous estrogens in the postnatal interval increases the number of Sertoli cells and hence testicular sperm production capacity. These experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of reducing endogenous estrogens on libido and sperm fertilizing capacity. Boars were treated with an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, to reduce testicular estrogen production between 1 and 6 weeks of age or between 11 and 16 weeks of age, and the littermates to these boars were treated with the canola oil vehicle. Letrozole treatment did not affect time to first mount at 22 weeks of age, regardless of whether the treatment occurred from 1 to 6 weeks of age (118 seconds vs. 233 seconds, SEM = 161 for letrozole-treated and vehicle-treated boars, respectively) or from 11 to 16 weeks of age (107 seconds vs. 67 seconds, SEM = 63 for letrozole-treated and vehicle-treated boars, respectively). Similarly, sperm fertilizing ability and in vivo fertility were equivalent in letrozole-treated boars and their vehicle-treated littermates. Surprisingly, the increase in Sertoli cell numbers observed in the letrozole-treated boars at 20 weeks of age (5.8 vs. 4.3 billion, SEM = 0.5; P < 0.05) was not maintained to 40 weeks of age in their letrozole-treated littermates. Reducing endogenous estrogen production neonatally or prepuberally had no detectable adverse effect on libido or sperm fertilizing capacity.

  7. Exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol decreases motility and ATP in sperm of male fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tracy M; Brown, Alexandria C; Gendelman, Hannah K; Ota, Mizuho; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2014-03-01

    The synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical released into aquatic environments from sewage treatment facilities. We tested the effects of two environmentally relevant concentrations of waterborne EE2, 10 and 100 ng L(-1) , on reproductive endpoints in the teleost fish Betta splendens. In the first experiment, testes were removed from males and sperm were exposed to EE2 directly through the activation water. Direct exposure to EE2 had no effect on any measure of sperm swimming performance. In the second experiment, we exposed sexually mature male B. splendens to EE2 using a semi-static exposure protocol for 4 weeks. There were no significant treatment effects in the 10 ng L(-1) treatment group, but at the 100 ng L(-1) dose we found that fish had smaller gonads and reduced sperm swimming velocity. When allowed to interact freely with female conspecifics, males exposed to 100 ng L(-1) EE2 built smaller nests and showed a nonsignificant decrease in fertilization success. To investigate further the potential mechanism underlying the decrease in sperm quality, we repeated the chronic exposure experiment and analyzed the ATP content of sperm from fish in each treatment group. We found that males exposed to 100 ng L(-1) of EE2 had fewer moles of ATP per sperm than did fish in the other two treatment groups, suggesting that a decrease in intracellular ATP caused a reduction in sperm swimming velocity. The current study adds to the growing body of literature that indicates the risks to aquatic organisms of exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of EE2.

  8. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics.

  9. Expression of CatSper family transcripts in the mouse testis during post-natal development and human ejaculated spermatozoa: relationship to sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Gang; Ding, Xiao-Fang; Liao, Ai-Hua; Kong, Xiang-Bing; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2007-05-01

    CatSper is a unique sperm cation channel-like protein family exclusively expressed in the testis and plays important roles in sperm functions. The temporal expression profiles of CatSper1-4 mRNAs in the mouse testis during post-natal development through adulthood were investigated using real-time RT-PCR. The CatSper2 transcript was present in the testis of the 8-day-old mice, and was repressed in the adult testis after two sharp up-regulations at day 18 and 35. CatSper1 and CatSper3, 4 mRNAs were detectable in the testis of 18-day and 15-day-old mice, respectively. After sharp up-regulation at day 25 and 35, respectively, they were maximal at the adult testis stage. The differences between the temporal expression profiles of the CatSper transcripts in post-natal mouse testis development suggest different regulation to their transcription, and potentially contribute to the possibility of forming heteromeric channels among these four CatSper family members. CatSper1-3 transcripts were identified to be present in the human ejaculated spermatozoa by RT-PCR. Significantly higher levels of CatSper2 and CatSper3 mRNAs revealed by real-time RT-PCR were observed in the high-motile spermatozoa than in the low-motile fraction and suggests that CatSper2 and CatSper3 transcripts in the human ejaculated spermatozoa could be the potential targets for further study and male infertility screening.

  10. The dynamics of sperm detachment from epithelium in a coupled fluid-biochemical model of hyperactivated motility.

    PubMed

    Simons, Julie; Olson, Sarah; Cortez, Ricardo; Fauci, Lisa

    2014-08-07

    Hyperactivation in mammalian sperm is characterized by a high-amplitude, asymmetric flagellar waveform. A mechanical advantage of this hyperactivated waveform has been hypothesized to be the promotion of flagellar detachment from oviductal epithelium. In order to investigate the dynamics of a free-swimming sperm׳s binding and escaping from a surface, we present an integrative model that couples flagellar force generation and a viscous, incompressible fluid. The elastic flagellum is actuated by a preferred curvature model that depends upon an evolving calcium profile along its length. In addition, forces that arise due to elastic bonds that form and break between the flagellar head and the surface are accounted for. As in recent laboratory experiments, we find that a hyperactive waveform does result in frequent detaching and binding dynamics that is not observed for symmetric flagellar beats. Moreover, we demonstrate that flagellar behavior depends strongly on the assumptions of the bond model, suggesting the need for more experimental investigation of the biochemistry of epithelial bonding and the shedding of binding proteins on the sperm head.

  11. Computer assisted sperm analysis of motility patterns of postthawed epididymal spermatozoa of springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis), impala (Aepyceros melampus), and blesbok (Damaliscus dorcus phillipsi) incubated under conditions supporting domestic cattle in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Chatiza, F P; Bartels, P; Nedambale, T L; Wagenaar, G M

    2012-07-15

    The need for information on the reproductive physiology of different wildlife species is important for ex situ conservation using such methods as in vitro fertilization (IVF). Information on species reproductive physiology and evaluation of sperm quality using accurate, objective, repeatable methods, such as computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) for ex situ conservation has become a priority. The aim of this study was to evaluate motility patterns of antelope epididymal spermatozoa incubated for 4 h under conditions that support bovine IVF using CASA. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa were collected postmortem from testicles of springbok (N=38), impala (N=26), and blesbok (N=42), and cryopreserved in biladyl containing 7% glycerol. Spermatozoa were thawed and incubated in Capacitation media and modified Tyrode lactate (m-TL) IVF media using a protocol developed for domestic cattle IVF. The study evaluates 14 motility characteristics of the antelope epididymal sperm at six time points using CASA. Species differences in CASA parameters evaluated under similar conditions were observed. Several differences in individual motility parameters at the time points were reported for each species. Epididymal sperm of the different antelope species responded differently to capacitation agents exhibiting variations in hyperactivity. Motility parameters that describe the vigor of sperm decreased over time. Spermatozoa from the different antelope species have different physiological and optimal capacitation and in vitro culture requirements. The interspecies comparison of kinematic parameters of spermatozoa between the antelopes over several end points contributes to comparative sperm physiology which forms an important step in the development of species specific assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) for ex situ conservation of these species.

  12. Sperm Competition, Sperm Numbers and Sperm Quality in Muroid Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Montoto, Laura; Magaña, Concepción; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Martín-Coello, Juan; Crespo, Cristina; Luque-Larena, Juan José

    2011-01-01

    Sperm competition favors increases in relative testes mass and production efficiency, and changes in sperm phenotype that result in faster swimming speeds. However, little is known about its effects on traits that contribute to determine the quality of a whole ejaculate (i.e., proportion of motile, viable, morphologically normal and acrosome intact sperm) and that are key determinants of fertilization success. Two competing hypotheses lead to alternative predictions: (a) sperm quantity and quality traits co-evolve under sperm competition because they play complementary roles in determining ejaculate's competitive ability, or (b) energetic constraints force trade-offs between traits depending on their relevance in providing a competitive advantage. We examined relationships between sperm competition levels, sperm quantity, and traits that determine ejaculate quality, in a comparative study of 18 rodent species using phylogenetically controlled analyses. Total sperm numbers were positively correlated to proportions of normal sperm, acrosome integrity and motile sperm; the latter three were also significantly related among themselves, suggesting no trade-offs between traits. In addition, testes mass corrected for body mass (i.e., relative testes mass), showed a strong association with sperm numbers, and positive significant associations with all sperm traits that determine ejaculate quality with the exception of live sperm. An “overall sperm quality” parameter obtained by principal component analysis (which explained 85% of the variance) was more strongly associated with relative testes mass than any individual quality trait. Overall sperm quality was as strongly associated with relative testes mass as sperm numbers. Thus, sperm quality traits improve under sperm competition in an integrated manner suggesting that a combination of all traits is what makes ejaculates more competitive. In evolutionary terms this implies that a complex network of genetic and

  13. Room temperature storage of mouse epididymal spermatozoa: exploration of factors affecting sperm survival.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Aki

    2004-05-01

    To explore optimal conditions for in vitro sperm survival, we examined the effects of several media used for murine egg culture and in vitro fertilization (IVF; including M16, M2, PB1, TYH, and CZB) on motility of murine spermatozoa stored at 22 degrees C under paraffin oil. Of media tested, M2 medium, that had been adjusted to pH 7.2 by adding N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), was found to be the best. Addition of various concentrations of HEPES to TYH did not improve sperm survival, suggesting that HEPES (and probably neutral pH) do not enhance survival of murine sperm. Since M16 has higher amounts of bicarbonate than M2 (25 mM versus 4.15 mM), four variations of M16 media containing 4.15, 8.30, 16.60, or 33.20 mM bicarbonate were prepared and tested. The modified M16 media with 4.15-16.60 mM bicarbonate yielded good sperm survival (comparable to M2 medium), while relatively high concentrations of bicarbonate (ranging from 16.60 to 33.20 mM) were deleterious to isolated sperm, suggesting the need for a minimum level of residual bicarbonate. However, the mechanism by which the lifespan of spermatozoa is extended remains unknown. The in vitro fertilizing abilities of spermatozoa left in M2 medium for 1, 3, and 5 days at 22 degrees C were 52.5, 21.8, and 7.0%, respectively, when the cleavage rate to the two-cell stage was examined. Transfer of two-cell embryos produced in vitro with spermatozoa stored for 1, 3, and 5 days at 22 degrees C resulted in production of fetuses with efficiencies of 42.5, 23.4, and 12.5%, respectively, which were lower than that of embryos derived from in vitro fertilization with fresh spermatozoa (68.1%). In conclusion, spermatozoa kept in M2 medium for up to 5 days at 22 degrees C can fertilize oocytes.

  14. The measurement of sperm motility by the fibre optic Doppler anemometer as a prediction of bovine fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, J. G.; Ross, D. A.

    The fibre optic Doppler anemometer (FODA) has been used to develop an accurate quantitative method of routinely assessing bull fertility. This method is of importance to the artificial insemination industry because the present qualitative estimation, performed by viewing semen using a microscope, can only set broad limits of quality. Laser light from the FODA was directed into diluted semen samples and the back scattered light was measured. A digital correlator was used to calculate the signal correlation of the back scattered light. The resultant data curves were interpreted in terms of the collective motility and swimming speed of the spermatozoa using a microcomputer. These two parameters are accepted as being indicative of fertility. The accuracy of this method is demonstrated by examination of results obtained in an experiment where enzymes, thought to alter fertility, were added to semen. The effect of the enzymes on the swimming speed and motility was clearly demonstrated.

  15. Inter- and intra-breed comparative study of sperm motility and viability in Iberian and Duroc boar semen during long-term storage in MR-A and XCell extenders.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hidalgo, D; Barón, F J; Robina, A; Bragado, M J; Llera, A Hurtado de; García-Marín, L J; Gil, M C

    2013-06-01

    During boar semen liquid preservation, extender is one of the factors that influence storage tolerance of spermatozoa. However, there are few studies about intra-breed variation in the preservation of semen quality during storage in different extenders. Similarly, boar breed is generally not considered a possible factor influencing variation in the semen storage tolerance in a particular extender. The aim of this study was to compare boar semen storage potential, in terms of the ability to maintain sperm viability and motility, of two currently used long-term extenders, MR-A and XCell. Extended semen from two breeds, Iberian and Duroc that had been stored at 17°C for up to 7 days was used. Intra- and inter-breed effect was studied. On Days 1, 4 and 7 (Day 0=day of semen collection), motility parameters and the percentage of total motile sperm and progressively motile sperm using a CASA system was evaluated. Viability (SYBR-14/PI) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Within each breed and for each storage day, there were differences between extenders, although semen tolerance to preservation was more influenced by the extender in the Iberian than in the Duroc breed. Neither breed nor extender influenced the percentage of viable spermatozoa during the storage time. Moreover, differences in motility parameters were observed between breeds, although the differences were greater when the XCell extender was used. In conclusion, both extender and breed influence motility characteristics of liquid-stored boar semen, so both aspects have to be considered in the design of comparative studies about stored boar semen quality from different breeds or with different extenders. Further studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  16. Antioxidant Effects of Brown Algae Sargassum on Sperm Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, Alireza; Eftekhaari, Tasnim Eghbal; Shahrzad, Mohammad Esmaeil; Natami, Mohammad; Fallahi, Soghra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of oxidative stress during the sperm freeze-thaw cycles affects the sperm parameters and eventually leads to a decrease in its reproductive potential. Sperm protection against oxidative reactions during freezing is done by antioxidants. Since the selection of a suitable sperm cryopreservation bank is effective in maintaining acceptable reproductive potential and motility of sperm during cryopreservation. This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant effects of different doses of the extract of brown algae Sargassum on oxidative stress and frozen human sperm parameters. We conducted a randomized controlled trial on the semen samples from 11 healthy men in the age group of 25 to 36 years. The samples were collected by masturbation after 3 to 5 days of abstinence from ejaculation. The specimens were divided into 3 equal parts, including 1 control group and 2 experimental groups. The 2 experimental groups were frozen using the rapid solidification technique with Sargassum extract at doses of 250 and 500 μg/mL. Motility and morphology of sperms were measured using a computer system and CASA software and the amount of reactive oxygen species was determined using Oxisperm kit. Sargassum extract significantly decreased the amount of reactive oxygen species (P < 0.005) and at doses of 250 and 500 μg/mL, significantly increased the overall motility (P < 0.006) and progressive motility (P < 0.007) after solidification, but did not affect the normal morphology of sperms. The addition of ethanol extract of Sargassum prevents reactive oxygen species production during the solidification process and improves sperm motility at doses of 250 and 500 μg/mL. PMID:26717354

  17. Re-feeding food-deprived male meadow voles affects the sperm allocation of their rival males.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Ashlee A; Delbarco-Trillo, Javier; Ferkin, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    An individual's nutritional status affects the manner in which same- and opposite-sex conspecifics respond to that individual, which may affect their fitness. Male meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, increase their sperm allocation if they encounter the scent mark of an unfamiliar male that is not nutritionally challenged. If, however, the scent mark comes from a male that has been food deprived for 24 hours, stud male voles do not increase their sperm allocation. Food deprived males may be viewed as being lower quality and a reduced risk of sperm competition by rival males. We hypothesized that stud males in promiscuous mating systems tailor their sperm allocations depending on whether rival males have been food deprived and then re-fed. We predicted that newly re-fed males will be considered a strong risk of sperm competition because of the potentially high fitness and survival costs associated with food deprivation in males, and that they will cause stud males to increase their sperm allocation. Our results, however, showed that the recovery period from 24 hours of food deprivation was a relatively slow process. It took between 96 hours and 336 hours of re-feeding male scent donors that were food deprived for 24 hours to induce stud males to increase their sperm allocation to levels comparable to when scent donors were not food deprived. Stud male voles may be conserving the amount of sperm allocated until the male scent donors have recovered from food deprivation and subsequent re-feeding.

  18. Long-lived sperm in the geothermal bryophyte Pohlia nutans

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstiel, Todd N.; Eppley, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-vascular plants rely on sperm to cross the distance between male and female reproductive organs for fertilization and sexual reproduction to occur. The majority of non-vascular plants have separate sexes, and thus, this distance may be a few millimetres to many metres. Because sperm need water for transport, it has been assumed that sperm lifespans are short and that this type of sexual reproduction limits the expansion of non-vascular plants in terrestrial environments. However, little data is available on the lifespan of sperm in non-vascular plants, and none is available for bryophytes, the group thought to have first colonized terrestrial habitats. Here, we documented the lifespan of sperm of Pohlia nutans, collected from a geothermal spring's area, and tested the effects of variation under environmental conditions on this lifespan. Surprisingly, 20 per cent of the sperm were still motile after 100 h, and sperm lifespan was not significantly affected by temperature variation between 22 and 60°C. Lifespan was significantly affected by sperm dilution and temperatures above 75°C. These results suggest the need to reconsider the importance of sperm motility in bryophyte fertilization. PMID:19640871

  19. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  20. 3,3 diindolylmethane leads to apoptosis, decreases sperm quality, affects blood estradiol 17 β and testosterone, oestrogen (α and β) and androgen receptor levels in the reproductive system in male rats.

    PubMed

    Aksu, E H; Akman, O; Ömür, A D; Karakuş, E; Can, I; Kandemir, F M; Dorman, E; Uçar, Ö

    2016-12-01

    3,3 Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a major digestive product of indole-3 carbinol, obtained from Brassica family vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts. This study aimed to investigate the effects of DIM on sperm parameters, histological structures of testicular tissues, blood testosterone (T) and estradiol 17-β (E2) in male rats. Thirty-eight male Sprague Dawley rats were used. Rats were divided into four groups: Group I: referred as Control group, received corn oil only; Group II: as DIM-10, rats received 10 mg kg(-1) DIM; Group III: as DIM-50, rats received 50 mg kg(-1) DIM; Group IV: as DIM-100, received 100 mg kg(-1) DIM during 53 days. Spermatological parameters, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of testes and serum T and E2 levels were assayed. Histopathological examinations of tests were done. DIM caused an increase in MDA levels. It decreased motility and live sperm rates and increased degeneration of testicular tissues. While DIM-10 did not affect abnormal sperm rate, higher concentrations increased the abnormalities. Sperm density was higher in DIM-10 groups when compared to both other groups. Only DIM-50 had an anti-androgenic effect among all groups. Only, DIM-10 showed anti-estrogenic activity as compared to higher DIM groups. In conclusion, DIM (i) had side effect on some sperm characteristics, (ii) increased the MDA levels and (iii) led to histological degeneration of testicular tissues and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. Does blood transfusion affect pituitary gonadal axis and sperm parameters in young males with sickle cell disease?

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; Yasin, Mohamed; El-Awwa, Ahmed; Abdelrahman, Mohamed O.; De Sanctis, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effect of packed red cell transfusion (PCTx) on serum concentrations of gonadotropins luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (LH and FSH) and testosterone (T) levels and measured sperm parameters in young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) on top-up transfusion (TTx) and those on exchange transfusion (ETx) regimen. Materials and Methods: Basal serum concentrations of FSH, LH, and T and semen parameters were evaluated before and 7 days after PCTx in 18 young adults with transfusion-dependent SCD, aged 20.7 ± 2.88 years. They had full pubertal development (Tanner's stage 5), and capacity to ejaculate. They were regularly transfused since early childhood. Chelation therapy was started early during the first 2 years of life using desferrioxamine and was replaced by deferasirox for the last 4-5 years. Ten patients were on TTx and eight were on ETx regimen. Results: PCTx significantly increased hemoglobin (Hb) from 8.5 ± 1.17 g/dl to 10.5 ± 0.4 g/dl, T from 12.3 ± 1.24 nmol/L to 14.23 ± 1.22 nmol/L and gonadotropins’ concentrations. Sperm parameters improved significantly after PCTx including: total sperm count from 87.4 ± 24.6 million/ml to 146.2 ± 51.25 million/ml, total progressive sperm motility (TPM) from 40.8 ± 11.1 million/ml to 93.4 ± 38.3 million/ml, rapid progressive sperm motility (RPM) progressive motility from 29.26 ± 8.75 million/ml to 67.4 ± 29 million/ml. After PCTx the total sperm count, TPM and RPM were significantly better in the ETx group versus the TTx group. Before and after PCTx, T concentrations were correlated significantly with sperm total count, volume, TPM and RPM (r = 0.53, 0.55, 0.42, and 0.38, respectively, P < 0.01). Hb concentrations were correlated significantly with sperm count, TPM, RPM, and % of sperms with normal morphology (r = 0.60, 0.69, 0.66, and 0.86, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggests that in males with SCD blood transfusion is associated with

  2. Resveratrol prevents oxidative damage and loss of sperm motility induced by long-term treatment with valproic acid in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ourique, Giovana M; Pês, Tanise S; Saccol, Etiane M H; Finamor, Isabela A; Glanzner, Werner G; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Pavanato, Maria A; Gonçalves, Paulo B D; Barreto, Kátia P

    2016-09-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug widely use for the treatment of epilepsy in both children and adults. Evidence suggests that long-term use of VPA may lead to an impairment in the male reproductive function. Oxidative stress is considered to play a major role in VPA associated toxicity. In the present work, we demonstrated that the natural antioxidant compound resveratrol (RSV) can be use to prevent VPA oxidative damage. Wistar rats treated with VPA (400mgkg(-1)) by gavage for 28days showed decrease in sperm motility accompanied by increase in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. Additionally, VPA administration leaded to depletion of reduced glutathione and decrease in total antioxidant potential in testes and epididymides of Wistar rats. The co-administration of RSV (10mgkg(-1)) efficiently prevented VPA pro-oxidant effects. In summary, RSV was shown to protect the reproductive system from the damage induced by VPA. Altogether, our data strongly suggests that RSV administration might be a valuable strategy to minimize reproductive impairment in patients requiring long-term VPA treatment.

  3. Time within reproductive season, but not age or inbreeding coefficient, affects seminal and sperm quality in the whooping crane (Grus americana).

    PubMed

    Brown, M E; Converse, S J; Chandler, J N; Crosier, A L; Lynch, W; Wildt, D E; Keefer, C L; Songsasen, N

    2015-08-11

    All living whooping cranes (Grus americana) are descended from 16 or fewer birds that remained alive in the early 1940s, a bottleneck that puts the species at potential risk for inbreeding depression. Although AI is commonly used in the management of the captive population of this species, little is known about seminal traits or factors affecting sperm quality in the whooping crane. In the present study, semen samples were collected from 29 adult males (age 3-27 years) during the early (March), mid (April) and late (May) breeding season over 2 consecutive years. The effects of donor age, time within reproductive season and level of inbreeding on seminal characteristics were analysed using regression and information-theoretic model selection. Only time within reproductive season significantly affected seminal traits, with total numbers of spermatozoa and proportions of pleiomorphisms increasing across the season. We conclude that, even with a highly restricted number of founders, there is no discernible influence of inbreeding (at the levels described) on sperm output or quality. Furthermore, although there is variance in seminal quality, the whooping crane produces significant numbers of motile spermatozoa throughout the breeding season, similar to values reported for the greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida).

  4. Heat stress but not inbreeding affects offensive sperm competitiveness in Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Lieshout, Emile; Tomkins, Joseph L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-01-01

    Environmental and genetic stress have well-known detrimental effects on ejaculate quality, but their concomitant effect on male fitness remains poorly understood. We used competitive fertilization assays to expose the effects of stress on offensive sperm competitive ability in the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, a species where ejaculates make up more than 5% of male body mass. To examine the effects of environmental and genetic stress, males derived from outcrosses or sib matings were heat shocked at 50°C for 50 min during the pupal stage, while their siblings were maintained at a standard rearing temperature of 28°C. Heat-shocked males achieved only half the offensive paternity success of their siblings. While this population exhibited inbreeding depression in body size, sperm competitiveness was unaffected by inbreeding, nor did the effect of heat shock stress on sperm competitiveness depend on inbreeding status. In contrast, pupal emergence success was increased by 34% among heat-stressed individuals, regardless of their inbreeding status. Heat-shocked males' ejaculate size was 19% reduced, but they exhibited 25% increased mating duration in single mating trials. Our results highlight both the importance of stress in postcopulatory sexual selection, and the variability among stressors in affecting male fitness. PMID:24101978

  5. Heat stress but not inbreeding affects offensive sperm competitiveness in Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Lieshout, Emile; Tomkins, Joseph L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-09-01

    Environmental and genetic stress have well-known detrimental effects on ejaculate quality, but their concomitant effect on male fitness remains poorly understood. We used competitive fertilization assays to expose the effects of stress on offensive sperm competitive ability in the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, a species where ejaculates make up more than 5% of male body mass. To examine the effects of environmental and genetic stress, males derived from outcrosses or sib matings were heat shocked at 50°C for 50 min during the pupal stage, while their siblings were maintained at a standard rearing temperature of 28°C. Heat-shocked males achieved only half the offensive paternity success of their siblings. While this population exhibited inbreeding depression in body size, sperm competitiveness was unaffected by inbreeding, nor did the effect of heat shock stress on sperm competitiveness depend on inbreeding status. In contrast, pupal emergence success was increased by 34% among heat-stressed individuals, regardless of their inbreeding status. Heat-shocked males' ejaculate size was 19% reduced, but they exhibited 25% increased mating duration in single mating trials. Our results highlight both the importance of stress in postcopulatory sexual selection, and the variability among stressors in affecting male fitness.

  6. Changes of sperm quality and hormone receptors in the rat testis after exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa; Sueudom, Wanvipa; Tangsrisakda, Nareelak; Thanoi, Samur

    2016-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is known to damage neurons and induce psychosis. It can also induce apoptosis in seminiferous tubules and affect sperm quality. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of a rat model of METH addiction on sperm quality and expression of progesterone receptors (PR) and estrogen receptors (ER) in the testis. Sperm quality parameters including sperm motility, sperm morphology and sperm concentration were examined. Protein and gene expressions PR, ERα and ERβ were studied using immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The percentages of normal sperm motility and normal sperm morphology were significantly decreased in animals receiving METH, especially in escalating dose (ED METH) and escalating dose-binge (ED-binge METH) groups when compared with control. In addition, sperm concentrations in ED METH and ED-binge METH groups were numerically decreased. PR, ERα and ERβ immunoreactive cells were significantly decreased in spermatogonia, spermatogenic cells and especially in Sertoli cells in all METH-treated groups. Furthermore, messenger RNA expression of PR, ERα and ERβ were also significantly decreased in all METH-treated animals. These results indicate that METH can induce abnormal sperm quality. These changes of sperm quality may relate to the reduction of PR, ERα and ERβ expressions in male germ cells and Sertoli cells which are essential for spermatogenesis and development of sperm.

  7. How is plasminogen/plasmin system contributing to regulate sperm entry into the oocyte?

    PubMed

    Grullón, Luis A; Gadea, Joaquín; Mondéjar, Irene; Matás, Carmen; Romar, Raquel; Coy, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Plasminogen is present in the oviduct, on the zona pellucida (ZP) and on oolemma, and reduces the number of sperm penetrating the oocyte during in vitro fertilization in pig and cow. It is unknown how this reduction occurs. We tested whether plasminogen (1) changed the ZP resistance to enzymatic digestion thus making the passage of the spermatozoa across it difficult; (2) reduced the sperm functionality, assessed by sperm viability, motility, spontaneous acrosome reaction and membrane lipid disorder; or (3) affected the sperm-ZP binding before or after sperm-ZP interaction. The mechanism by which plasminogen/plasmin system contributes to regulate sperm entry into the oocyte is not inducing a ZP hardening or a decrease in sperm functionality but detaching more than 50% of sperm bound to the ZP. It is suggested that the fertilizing spermatozoon activates plasminogen into plasmin at the oocyte surface and that plasmin removes additional spermatozoa attached to the ZP.

  8. Kinematics and subpopulations' structure definition of blue fox (Alopex lagopus) sperm motility using the ISAS® V1 CASA system.

    PubMed

    Soler, C; García, A; Contell, J; Segervall, J; Sancho, M

    2014-08-01

    Over recent years, technological advances have brought innovation in assisted reproduction to the agriculture. Fox species are of great economical interest in some countries, but their semen characteristics have not been studied enough. To advance the knowledge of function of fox spermatozoa, five samples were obtained by masturbation, in the breeding season. Kinetic analysis was performed using ISAS® v1 system. Usual kinematic parameters (VCL, VSL, VAP, LIN, STR, WOB, ALH and BCF) were considered. To establish the standardization for the analysis of samples, the minimum number of cells to analyse and the minimum number of fields to capture were defined. In the second step, the presence of subpopulations in blue fox semen was analysed. The minimum number of cells to test was 30, because kinematic parameters remained constant along the groups of analysis. Also, the effectiveness of ISAS® D4C20 counting chamber was studied, showing that the first five squares presented equivalent results, while in the squares six and seven, the kinematic parameters showed a reduction in all of them, but not in the concentration or motility percentage. Kinematic variables were grouped into two principal components (PC). A linear movement characterized PC1, while PC2 showed an oscillatory movement. Three subpopulations were found, varying in structure among different animals.

  9. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    PubMed Central

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh, Pooneh; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin) on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA) production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Results Aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4) diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Conclusion Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production. PMID:27441055

  10. Pharmacological investigation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in human ejaculatory sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Liu, Jihong; Li, Jiagui; Ye, Zhangqun

    2006-01-01

    The types of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculatory sperm and the effects of calcium channel blocker (CCB) on human sperm motility parameters in vitro were investigated. The human sperm motility parameters in vitro in response to the pharmacological agents nifedipine (NIF, inhibitor of L-type VDCC) and co-conotoxin (GVIA, inhibitor of N-type VDCC) were compared and analyzed statistically. The results showed that NIF (1, 5, 10 micromol/L) could not only significantly affect human sperm's shape but also spermatozoa motility after incubated at least 10 min in vitro (P<0.001). GVIA (0.1, 0.5 and 1 micromol/L) could just only significantly affect human sperm's progressive motility (a %+b %) after incubated for 20 min in vitro (P<0.01), but they both could not significantly affect spermic abnormality rate. It is suggested that L-type VDCC, non L-type VDCCs and isoform of L-type VDCC exist in the cell membrane of human sperm solely or together, and they participate in the spermic physiological processes especially the spermic motility.

  11. Effect of dietary selenium and vitamin E on the ultrastructure and ATP concentration of boar spermatozoa, and the efficacy of added sodium selenite in extended semen on sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Marin-Guzman, J; Mahan, D C; Whitmoyer, R

    2000-06-01

    Three experiments evaluated the effects of dietary Se and vitamin E on the ultrastructure of spermatozoa, ATP concentration of spermatozoa, and the effects of adding sodium selenite to semen extenders on subsequent sperm motility. The experiment was a 2 x 2 arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design. A total of 10 mature boars were fed from weaning to 18 mo of age diets fortified with two levels of supplemental Se (0 or .5 ppm) or vitamin E (0 or 220 IU/kg diet). The nonfortified diets contained .06 ppm Se and 4.4 IU vitamin E/kg. In Exp. 1, the spermatozoa from all boars were examined by electron microscopy. Vitamin E had no effect on structural abnormalities in the spermatozoa. When the low-Se diet was fed the acrosome or nuclei of the spermatozoa was unaffected, but the mitochondria in the tail midpiece were more oval with wider gaps between organelles. The plasma membrane connection to the tail midpiece was not tightly bound as when boars were fed Se. Immature spermatozoa with cytoplasmic droplets were more numerous when boars were fed the low-Se diet, but the occurrence of midpiece abnormalities occurred in boars fed diets with or without Se or vitamin E. Our results suggest that Se may enhance spermatozoa maturation in the epididymis and may reduce the number of sperm with cytoplasmic droplets. In Exp. 2, the concentration of ATP in the spermatozoa was evaluated in the semen of all treatment boars. When the low-Se diet was fed, ATP concentration was lower (P < .01), whereas vitamin E had no effect on ATP concentration. Experiment 3 investigated the effect of diluting boar semen with a semen extender with sodium selenite added at 0, .3, .6, or .9 ppm Se. Three ejaculates from each boar were used to evaluate these effects on sperm motility to 48 h after dilution. Sperm motility declined (P < .01) when Se was added to the extender, and this decline was exacerbated as the concentration of added Se increased (P < .01). The added Se was

  12. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  13. Boar sperm thawing practices: the number of straws does matter.

    PubMed

    Casas, I; Torner, E; Yeste, M; Bonet, S

    2012-04-15

    The number of straws thawed has been largely neglected in reports of boar sperm cryopreservation. Whereas previous studies confirm the effect of sperm concentration on function and survival of thawed boar spermatozoa, it is still unknown whether, for a same concentration, total number of sperm in the thawing solution affects its mechanics. The present trial sought to define good boar sperm thawing practices by checking if a minimal number of straws as well as the percentage of air volume in the thawing tube should be stated or not to decrease variability from one trial to another. In a first assay, three tubes with different numbers of thawed straws were compared in terms of motility and membrane integrity: control (C, four straws), T1.1 (two straws), and T1.2 (one straw). In a second parallel assay, the sperm motility was evaluated when one straw was thawed in a tube containing 86.67% of air volume (T2.1), and when the tube contained < 1% air volume (T2.2). In all treatments the final concentration of sperm in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS) was 1:3 (v:v) and quality parameters were assessed 4 h after thawing. Results showed the number of straws does affect motility parameters but not the membrane integrity, whereas less air volume in the tube nonsignificantly minimizes data deviation among replicates. In conclusion, it is recommended the use of four straws at 1:3 (v:v) to maintain motility records in boar sperm thawing practices as well as to be provided with vials that fit the sperm volume.

  14. Developmental temperature affects the expression of ejaculatory traits and the outcome of sperm competition in Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, R; Deeming, D C; Eady, P E

    2014-09-01

    The outcome of post-copulatory sexual selection is determined by a complex set of interactions between the primary reproductive traits of two or more males and their interactions with the reproductive traits of the female. Recently, a number of studies have shown the primary reproductive traits of both males and females express phenotypic plasticity in response to the thermal environment experienced during ontogeny. However, how plasticity in these traits affects the dynamics of sperm competition remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate plasticity in testes size, sperm size and sperm number in response to developmental temperature in the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. Males reared at the highest temperature eclosed at the smallest body size and had the smallest absolute and relative testes size. Males reared at both the high- and low-temperature extremes produced both fewer and smaller sperm than males reared at intermediate temperatures. In the absence of sperm competition, developmental temperature had no effect on male fertility. However, under conditions of sperm competition, males reared at either temperature extreme were less competitive in terms of sperm offence (P(2)), whereas those reared at the lowest temperature were less competitive in terms of sperm defence (P(1)). This suggests the developmental pathways that regulate the phenotypic expression of these ejaculatory traits are subject to both natural and sexual selection: natural selection in the pre-ejaculatory environment and sexual selection in the post-ejaculatory environment. In nature, thermal heterogeneity during development is commonplace. Therefore, we suggest the interplay between ecology and development represents an important, yet hitherto underestimated component of male fitness via post-copulatory sexual selection.

  15. [Effects of low doses of desmopressin (DDAPV) on gonadal and adrenal development, and on the testicular function and sperm motility].

    PubMed

    García-Pascual, I J; Sánchez-Yagüe, J; Rodríguez Hernández, M C; Paniagua Gómez-Alvárez, R

    1994-04-01

    The present study proved that desmopressin (DDAVP) (1 microgram DDAVP/12 h/5 días) does not affect ovary, testis and adrenal development in immature Wistar rats (17 days old), because the DDAVP does not modify the weight of the aforementioned organs as compared with the control group. Nevertheless, the male adults Wistar rats (80 days old) showed lower serum testosterone concentrations than the control group, after injection of 4 micrograms/day (2 micrograms/12 h) or 8 micrograms/day (4 micrograms/12 h) of DDAVP during a 5 days period time. Moreover, paradoxical significant lower concentrations of serum testosterone were found in 4 micrograms DDAVP/day-treated rats than in 8 micrograms DDAVP/day-treated ones. The former also showed a decreased number of spermatozoa as compared with the latter and with the control group. The percentage of mobile spermatozoa was lower in rats treated with both concentrations of DDAVP as compared with the control group. Therefore, desmopressin does not delay gonadal and adrenal growth in immature rats, but, at low doses, it affects the testicular function and the mobility of the spermatozoa in male adult rats.

  16. Effect of donkey seminal plasma on sperm movement and sperm-polymorphonuclear neutrophils attachment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miró, Jordi; Vilés, Karina; García, Wilber; Jordana, Jordi; Yeste, Marc

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of seminal plasma in endometrial inflammation in donkeys, samples from fresh pure, fresh diluted and frozen-thawed semen of three different jackasses were co-incubated in water bath at 37°C with uterine Jennie's secretions collected 6h after artificial insemination with frozen-thawed donkey semen. Individual sperm movement parameters using the computerised sperm analysis system (CASA) and sperm-polymorphonuclear neutrophils (sperm-PMN) attachment observed in Diff-Quick stained smears were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4h of co-incubation. Controls consisted of incubating diluted or frozen-thawed sperm in the absence of uterine secretions. For data analyses, a repeated measures ANOVA was performed with incubation time as intra-subject factor and with treatment and donkey as inter-subject factor, followed by a post-hoc Bonferroni's test. Greater values (P<0.05) of sperm-PMN percentages and a loss of progressive motility were observed in frozen-thawed semen compared with pure and diluted fresh semen samples throughout the incubation time. In addition, the presence of seminal plasma in fresh and diluted semen samples reduced the inflammatory response of polymorphonuclear neutrophils produced after insemination by suppressing the sperm-PMN attachment in vitro. Motility sperm parameters analysed by CASA were also less affected than those in frozen-thawed semen samples. In conclusion, seminal plasma in jennies appears to have a modulation on the endometrial response after artificial insemination with frozen-thawed donkey semen. As a result, spermatozoa with the greater motility characteristics are selected.

  17. Choline Dehydrogenase Polymorphism rs12676 Is a Functional Variation and Is Associated with Changes in Human Sperm Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy R.; Lao, Sai; Wang, Tongwen; Galanko, Joseph A.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 15% of couples are affected by infertility and up to half of these cases arise from male factor infertility. Unidentified genetic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, translocations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be the underlying cause of many cases of idiopathic male infertility. Deletion of the choline dehydrogenase (Chdh) gene in mice results in decreased male fertility due to diminished sperm motility; sperm from Chdh−/− males have decreased ATP concentrations likely stemming from abnormal sperm mitochondrial morphology and function in these cells. Several SNPs have been identified in the human CHDH gene that may result in altered CHDH enzymatic activity. rs12676 (G233T), a non-synonymous SNP located in the CHDH coding region, is associated with increased susceptibility to dietary choline deficiency and risk of breast cancer. We now report evidence that this SNP is also associated with altered sperm motility patterns and dysmorphic mitochondrial structure in sperm. Sperm produced by men who are GT or TT for rs12676 have 40% and 73% lower ATP concentrations, respectively, in their sperm. rs12676 is associated with decreased CHDH protein in sperm and hepatocytes. A second SNP located in the coding region of IL17BR, rs1025689, is linked to altered sperm motility characteristics and changes in choline metabolite concentrations in sperm. PMID:22558321

  18. Sperm characteristics and androgens in Acipenser ruthenus after induction of spermiation by carp pituitary extract or GnRHa implants.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi; Hatef, Azadeh; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Gela, David; Papadaki, Maria; Rodina, Marek; Kašpar, Vojtech; Pšenička, Martin; Podhorec, Peter; Linhart, Otomar

    2012-12-01

    Spermiation and changes in androgen (testosterone, T and 11-ketotestosterone, 11-KT) levels were studied in sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) treated with GnRH agonist implants (DAla(6)-Pro(9)-LHRHa) at 25 and 75 μg kg(-1) b.w. and compared with those males treated with 4 mg kg(-1) b.w. of carp pituitary extract (CPE) and 3 pellets of Ovopel kg(-1) b.w., which contains DAla(6)-Pro(9)NEt-mGnRH and metoclopramide. Sperm quality (sperm mass, spermatozoa concentration and sperm motility and velocity) was evaluated 24, 48 and 72 h after hormonal treatments. Males did not release sperm in the control group injected with physiological solution, while sperm could not be collected 7 days after treatments in all hormonally treated groups. Spermiation rates were 100 % in the CPE and Ovopel groups and 25-50 % in the GnRHa-treated groups. Sperm production was significantly lower in the GnRHa-treated groups than in the CPE and Ovopel groups and decreased 72 h after hormonal treatment. Sperm motility and velocity were higher in the Ovopel and GnRHa (75 μg) groups compared to the CPE and GnRHa (25 μg) groups and decreased 72 h after hormonal treatment. Androgens were only affected in spermiating males and changed in the Ovopel and GnRHa (75 μg) after hormonal treatment. Significant correlations were observed between sperm production, sperm motility and sperm velocity, but not androgens. The present study suggests involvement of dopamine in sturgeon spawning. Additionally, better sperm quality observed in the Ovopel group and particularly sperm motility in the GnRHa (75 μg) suggests enhancement of sperm quality in sturgeon treated with GnRHa. Therefore, further study is needed to induce fully spermiation using GnRHa implants in combination with a dopamine inhibitor.

  19. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, D.; Dolivo, G.; Marti, E.; Sieme, H.; Wedekind, C.

    2015-01-01

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies. PMID:25904670

  20. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus).

    PubMed

    Burger, D; Dolivo, G; Marti, E; Sieme, H; Wedekind, C

    2015-05-22

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies.

  1. JAM-A is present in mammalian spermatozoa where it is essential for normal motility.

    PubMed

    Shao, Minghai; Ghosh, Ananya; Cooke, Vesselina G; Naik, Ulhas P; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2008-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that are expressed in endothelial and epithelial cells and function in tight junction assembly, also perform important roles in testis where the closely-related JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C are found. Disruption of murine Jam-B and Jam-C has varying effects on sperm development and function; however, deletion of Jam-A has not yet been studied. Here we show for the first time that in addition to expression in the Sertoli-Sertoli tight junctions in the seminiferous tubules, the approximately 32 kDa murine JAM-A is present in elongated spermatids and in the plasma membrane of the head and flagellum of sperm. Deletion of Jam-A, using the gene trap technology, results in flagellar defects at the ultrastructural level. In Jam-A-deficient mice, which have reduced litter size, both progressive and hyperactive motility are significantly affected (P<0.0001) before and, more severely, after capacitation. The findings show that JAM-A is involved in sperm tail formation and is essential for normal motility, which may occur via its signal transduction and protein phosphorylation properties. Detection of JAM-A in human sperm proteins indicates that its role may be conserved in sperm motility and that JAM-A may be a candidate gene for the analysis of idiopathic sperm motility defects resulting in male subfertility in the human population.

  2. Advancing age increases sperm chromatin damage and impairs fertility in peroxiredoxin 6 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozkosem, Burak; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Fisher, Aron B.; O’Flaherty, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Due to socioeconomic factors, more couples are choosing to delay conception than ever. Increasing average maternal and paternal age in developed countries over the past 40 years has raised the question of how aging affects reproductive success of males and females. Since oxidative stress in the male reproductive tract increases with age, we investigated the impact of advanced paternal age on the integrity of sperm nucleus and reproductive success of males by using a Prdx6−/− mouse model. We compared sperm motility, cytoplasmic droplet retention sperm chromatin quality and reproductive outcomes of young (2-month-old), adult (8-month-old), and old (20-month-old) Prdx6−/− males with their age-matched wild type (WT) controls. Absence of PRDX6 caused age-dependent impairment of sperm motility and sperm maturation and increased sperm DNA fragmentation and oxidation as well as decreased sperm DNA compaction and protamination. Litter size, total number of litters and total number of pups per male were significantly lower in Prdx6−/− males compared to WT controls. These abnormal reproductive outcomes were severely affected by age in Prdx6−/− males. In conclusion, the advanced paternal age affects sperm chromatin integrity and fertility more severely in the absence of PRDX6, suggesting a protective role of PRDX6 in age-associated decline in the sperm quality and fertility in mice. PMID:25796034

  3. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  4. Bacterial Shape and ActA Distribution Affect Initiation of Listeria monocytogenes Actin-Based Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rafelski, Susanne M.; Theriot, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the process by which the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes initiates actin-based motility and determined the contribution of the variable surface distribution of the ActA protein to initiation and steady-state movement. To directly correlate ActA distributions to actin dynamics and motility of live bacteria, ActA was fused to a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1). Actin comet tail formation and steady-state bacterial movement rates both depended on ActA distribution, which in turn was tightly coupled to the bacterial cell cycle. Motility initiation was found to be a highly complex, multistep process for bacteria, in contrast to the simple symmetry breaking previously observed for ActA-coated spherical beads. F-actin initially accumulated along the sides of the bacterium and then slowly migrated to the bacterial pole expressing the highest density of ActA as a tail formed. Early movement was highly unstable with extreme changes in speed and frequent stops. Over time, saltatory motility and sensitivity to the immediate environment decreased as bacterial movement became robust at a constant steady-state speed. PMID:15980176

  5. Sperm mitochondrial DNA deletion in Iranian infertiles with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Bahrehmand Namaghi, I; Vaziri, H

    2017-04-01

    Asthenozoospermia is an important cause of male infertility. The mutations in sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) result in either functionless or malfunctioning some proteins, subsequently affecting sperm motility leading to asthenozoospermia. The purpose of this study was to investigate sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion in infertile men with low sperm motility/immotile spermatozoa compared to healthy subjects with high sperm motility. Semen samples of 256 asthenozoospermic infertiles and 200 controls from northern Iran were collected. After extraction of spermatozoa total DNA, Gap-polymerase chain reaction (Gap-PCR) was performed. The deletion was observed in 85.93% of patients with asthenozoospermia compared with 14% in controls [OR = 37.5397, 95% confidence interval = 12.937-108.9276, p < .0001]. It is concluded that there is a strong association between sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion and asthenozoospermia-induced infertility in the population examined. Large-scale mtDNA deletions in spermatozoa may induce bioenergetic disorders. Nevertheless, to validate our results broader research may be needed.

  6. Sperm Flagellum Volume Determines Freezability in Red Deer Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Santaella, José Luis; Domínguez-Rebolledo, Álvaro Efrén; Garde, José Julián

    2014-01-01

    The factors affecting the inter-individual differences in sperm freezability is a major line of research in spermatology. Poor sperm freezability is mainly characterised by a low sperm velocity, which in turn is associated with low fertility rates in most animal species. Studies concerning the implications of sperm morphometry on freezability are quite limited, and most of them are based on sperm head size regardless of the structural parts of the flagellum, which provides sperm motility. Here, for the first time, we determined the volumes of the flagellum structures in fresh epididymal red deer spermatozoa using a stereological method under phase contrast microscopy. Sperm samples from thirty-three stags were frozen and classified as good freezers (GF) or bad freezers (BF) at two hours post-thawing using three sperm kinetic parameters which are strongly correlated with fertility in this species. Fourteen stags were clearly identified as GF, whereas nineteen were BF. No significant difference in sperm head size between the two groups was found. On the contrary, the GF exhibited a lower principal piece volume than the BF (6.13 µm3 vs 6.61 µm3, respectively, p = 0.006). The volume of the flagellum structures showed a strong negative relationship with post-thawing sperm velocity. For instance, the volume of the sperm principal piece was negatively correlated with sperm velocity at two hours post-thawing (r = −0.60; p<0.001). Our results clearly show that a higher volume of the sperm principal piece results in poor freezability, and highlights the key role of flagellum size in sperm cryopreservation success. PMID:25380133

  7. Sperm flagellum volume determines freezability in red deer spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ros-Santaella, José Luis; Domínguez-Rebolledo, Alvaro Efrén; Garde, José Julián

    2014-01-01

    The factors affecting the inter-individual differences in sperm freezability is a major line of research in spermatology. Poor sperm freezability is mainly characterised by a low sperm velocity, which in turn is associated with low fertility rates in most animal species. Studies concerning the implications of sperm morphometry on freezability are quite limited, and most of them are based on sperm head size regardless of the structural parts of the flagellum, which provides sperm motility. Here, for the first time, we determined the volumes of the flagellum structures in fresh epididymal red deer spermatozoa using a stereological method under phase contrast microscopy. Sperm samples from thirty-three stags were frozen and classified as good freezers (GF) or bad freezers (BF) at two hours post-thawing using three sperm kinetic parameters which are strongly correlated with fertility in this species. Fourteen stags were clearly identified as GF, whereas nineteen were BF. No significant difference in sperm head size between the two groups was found. On the contrary, the GF exhibited a lower principal piece volume than the BF (6.13 µm3 vs 6.61 µm3, respectively, p = 0.006). The volume of the flagellum structures showed a strong negative relationship with post-thawing sperm velocity. For instance, the volume of the sperm principal piece was negatively correlated with sperm velocity at two hours post-thawing (r = -0.60; p<0.001). Our results clearly show that a higher volume of the sperm principal piece results in poor freezability, and highlights the key role of flagellum size in sperm cryopreservation success.

  8. How nematode sperm crawl.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Dean; Mogilner, Alexander; Roberts, Tom; Stewart, Murray; Oster, George

    2002-01-15

    Sperm of the nematode, Ascaris suum, crawl using lamellipodial protrusion, adhesion and retraction, a process analogous to the amoeboid motility of other eukaryotic cells. However, rather than employing an actin cytoskeleton to generate locomotion, nematode sperm use the major sperm protein (MSP). Moreover, nematode sperm lack detectable molecular motors or the battery of actin-binding proteins that characterize actin-based motility. The Ascaris system provides a simple 'stripped down' version of a crawling cell in which to examine the basic mechanism of cell locomotion independently of other cellular functions that involve the cytoskeleton. Here we present a mechanochemical analysis of crawling in Ascaris sperm. We construct a finite element model wherein (a) localized filament polymerization and bundling generate the force for lamellipodial extension and (b) energy stored in the gel formed from the filament bundles at the leading edge is subsequently used to produce the contraction that pulls the rear of the cell forward. The model reproduces the major features of crawling sperm and provides a framework in which amoeboid cell motility can be analyzed. Although the model refers primarily to the locomotion of nematode sperm, it has important implications for the mechanics of actin-based cell motility.

  9. Air Pollution and Quality of Sperm: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Namvar, Farideh; Ghavami Ghanbarabadi, Vahid; Hadizadeh Talasaz, Zahra; Esmaeli, Mahin

    2015-01-01

    Context: Air pollution is common in all countries and affects reproductive functions in men and women. It particularly impacts sperm parameters in men. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the impact of air pollution on the quality of sperm. Evidence Acquisition: The scientific databases of Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, Cochrane Library, and Elsevier were searched to identify relevant articles published between 1978 to 2013. In the first step, 76 articles were selected. These studies were ecological correlation, cohort, retrospective, cross-sectional, and case control ones that were found through electronic and hand search of references about air pollution and male infertility. The outcome measurement was the change in sperm parameters. A total of 11 articles were ultimately included in a meta-analysis to examine the impact of air pollution on sperm parameters. The authors applied meta-analysis sheets from Cochrane library, then data extraction, including mean and standard deviation of sperm parameters were calculated and finally their confidence interval (CI) were compared to CI of standard parameters. Results: The CI for pooled means were as follows: 2.68 ± 0.32 for ejaculation volume (mL), 62.1 ± 15.88 for sperm concentration (million per milliliter), 39.4 ± 5.52 for sperm motility (%), 23.91 ± 13.43 for sperm morphology (%) and 49.53 ± 11.08 for sperm count. Conclusions: The results of this meta-analysis showed that air pollution reduces sperm motility, but has no impact on the other sperm parameters of spermogram. PMID:26023349

  10. Fluoride decreased the sperm ATP of mice through inhabiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zilong; Zhang, Wen; Xue, Xingchen; Zhang, Yuliang; Niu, Ruiyan; Li, Xuying; Li, Baojun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-01

    Fluoride-induced low sperm motility was observed in accumulated investigations. However, the effect of fluoride exposure on ATP generation which is essential to sperm motility remains to be elucidated. In this study, 120 healthy male mice were orally administrated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg L(-1) NaF for 90 d. Results showed that compared with controls, fluoride ingestion significantly reduced sperm count, survival, as well as mobility and total ATP level in sperm untreated with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or pyruvate, which was used to establish glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration model, respectively. Data further revealed that sperm mobility and ATP level under mitochondrial respiration condition were significantly suppressed, while no statistical difference occurred in the model of glycolysis, indicating ATP derived from mitochondria was affected. Moreover, mRNA expressions of mitochondrial cytochrome b (mt-Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (mt-COX2), two important molecules in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), were down-regulated in all fluoride treatment groups. Mitochondria in sperm of mice exposed to 100 mg L(-1) NaF appeared to be irregular and vacuolated. These findings suggested that decreased sperm motility induced by fluoride may result from low ATP generation due to the disturbed ETC in sperm mitochondrial.

  11. Sperm quality evaluation in Solea senegalensis during the reproductive season at cellular level.

    PubMed

    Beirão, J; Soares, F; Herráez, M P; Dinis, M T; Cabrita, E

    2009-12-01

    Sperm quality seems to be one of the reasons for the reproduction constraints faced by Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) aquaculturists. Previous studies in this species indicated that the sperm quality of individuals kept in culture varies throughout the year and that different sperm subpopulations can be identified in ejaculates according to the motility pattern of spermatozoa. Aiming to better understand factors affecting sole sperm quality in captivity, sperm of 11 males was assessed during the reproductive season using different parameters: motility characteristics using CASA analysis; cell plasma membrane resistance to seawater hyperosmolarity; DNA fragmentation with single-cell gel electrophoresis; and early apoptosis, labeled with Annexin-V FITC. Computer-assisted sperm analyses motility data were treated using multivariate analysis to identify the presence of different spermatozoa subpopulations according to their motility pattern. Four distinct sperm subpopulations were obtained: Subpop1, which includes fast linear spermatozoa; Subpop2, made up of fast nonlinear spermatozoa; Subpop3, which includes slow linear spermatozoa; and Subpop4, which contains slow nonlinear spermatozoa. The sperm subpopulation structure varied with time after activation and with male. Low cell resistance to the seawater hyperosmotic conditions was noticed. The Annexin-V assay allowed the identification of an apoptotic population ranging from 6% to 20%. A high percentage of cells (64.1%) showed a DNA fragmentation level below 30%, but these values varied significantly between males. DNA fragmentation appears to be related to cell membrane resistance to hyperosmotic conditions faced by the cells when in contact with seawater. This condition seems to modulate the composition of the motile sperm population and performance after activation. This phenomenon could be related to the spermatozoa maturation process.

  12. Effect of various commercial buffers on sperm viability and capacitation.

    PubMed

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Cosmi, Erich; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of sperm preparation protocols are currently available for assisted conception. They include density gradient separation and washing methods. Both aim at isolating and capacitating as much motile sperm as possible for subsequent oocyte fertilization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four commercial sperm washing buffers on sperm viability and capacitation. Semen samples from 48 healthy donors (normal values of sperm count, motility, morphology, and volume) were analyzed. After separation (density gradient 40/80%), sperm were incubated in various buffers then analysed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, viability, tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) labeling, and the acrosome reaction (AR). The buffers affected ROS generation in various ways resulting either in rapid cell degeneration (when the amount of ROS was too high for cell survival) or the inability of the cells to maintain correct functioning (when ROS were too few). Only when the correct ROS generation curve was maintained, suitable membrane reorganization, evidenced by CTB labeling was achieved, leading to the highest percentages of both Tyr-P- and acrosome-reacted-cells. Distinguishing each particular pathological state of the sperm sample would be helpful to select the preferred buffer treatment since both ROS production and membrane reorganization can be significantly altered by commercial buffers.

  13. The application of in vitro sperm competition test to evaluate the impact of ZP-derived peptides on fertilization capacity of cat sperm.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuyu; Greube, Alexa; Ji, Weizhi; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2006-09-01

    The present study aimed to establish a sensitive in vitro assay to assess the binding capacity of cat spermatozoa. Cat oocytes and epididymal sperm cells were isolated from gonads and cultured for in vitro fertilization. Before fertilization, the sperm cells were incubated either in 10 microM green dye Fluo-3-AM or 10 microM orange dye CellTracker Orange CMTMR (Molecular Probes), respectively. After removing the dyes by washing, sperm cells stained with each dye were added to medium drops containing oocytes in various proportions and cultured for 16 h at 37 degrees C, 5% CO(2). The oocytes were examined using fluorescence microscopy. Sperm bound to oocytes, and stained with different colors, were counted. When fresh epididymal sperm were mixed in at a specific proportion, the number of sperm bound to the zona pellucida (ZP) of oocytes reflected the proportion of differently colored sperm in the medium. This indicated that neither dye influenced the binding capacity of cat sperm. Mixing fresh and cryopreserved sperm, however, resulted in a higher number of fresh sperm bound to the oocyte surface in comparison to frozen-thawed sperm. Also, the pre-incubation of cat sperm cells with ZP derived peptide reduced the sperm binding capacity by 40%. In conclusion, the presented sperm competition assay allows assessment of fertilizing capacity of cat spermatozoa in vitro when a mixture of two different populations is used. The applied supravital fluorescence dyes do not affect motility and binding capacity of sperm cells and were clearly distinguishable under fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that the assay can be used to study the impact of sperm treatment, such as cryopreservation or pre-incubation in bioactive peptides, on fertilizing capacity.

  14. No evidence of sperm conjugate formation in an Australian mouse bearing sperm with three hooks

    PubMed Central

    Firman, Renée C; Bentley, Blair; Bowman, Faye; Marchant, Fernando García-Solís; Parthenay, Jahmila; Sawyer, Jessica; Stewart, Tom; O'Shea, James E

    2013-01-01

    Sperm conjugation occurs when two or more sperm physically unite for motility or transport through the female reproductive tract. In many muroid rodent species, sperm conjugates have been shown to form by a single, conspicuous apical hook located on the sperm head. These sperm “trains” have been reported to be highly variable in size and, despite all the heads pointing in roughly the same direction, exhibit a relatively disordered arrangement. In some species, sperm “trains” have been shown to enhance sperm swimming speed, and thus have been suggested to be advantageous in sperm competition. Here, we assessed the behavior of sperm in the sandy inland mouse (Pseudomys hermannsburgensis), a muroid rodent that bears sperm with three apical hooks. First, we accrued genetic evidence of multiple paternity within “wild” litters to unequivocally show that sperm competition does occur in this species. Following this we utilized both in vitro and in vivo methodologies to determine whether sandy inland mouse sperm conjugate to form motile trains. Our observations of in vitro preparations of active sperm revealed that sandy inland mouse sperm exhibit rapid, progressive motility as individual cells only. Similarly, histological sections of the reproductive tracts of mated females revealed no in vivo evidence of sperm conjugate formation. We conclude that the unique, three-hooked morphology of the sandy inland mouse sperm does not facilitate the formation of motile conjugates, and discuss our findings in relation to the different hypotheses for the evolution of the muroid rodent hook/s. PMID:23919134

  15. G alpha12 is targeted to the mitochondria and affects mitochondrial morphology and motility.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2008-08-01

    G alpha12 constitutes, along with G alpha13, one of the four families of alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. We found that the N terminus of G alpha12, but not those of other G alpha subunits, contains a predicted mitochondrial targeting sequence. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation, we demonstrated that up to 40% of endogenous G alpha12 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells colocalize with mitochondrial markers. N-terminal sequence of G alpha12 fused to GFP efficiently targeted the fusion protein to mitochondria. G alpha12 with mutated mitochondrial targeting sequence was still located in mitochondria, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms for mitochondrial localization. Lysophosphatidic acid, one of the known stimuli transduced by G alpha12/13, inhibited mitochondrial motility, while depletion of endogenous G alpha12 increased mitochondrial motility. G alpha12Q229L variants uncoupled from RhoGEFs (but not fully functional activated G alpha12Q229L) induced transformation of the mitochondrial network into punctate mitochondria and resulted in a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. All examined G alpha12Q229L variants reduced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at Ser-70, while only mutants unable to bind RhoGEFs also decreased cellular levels of Bcl-2. These G alpha12 mutants were also more efficient Hsp90 interactors. These findings are the first demonstration of a heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit specifically targeted to mitochondria and involved in the control of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  16. A new locus affects cell motility, cellulose binding, and degradation by Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Xu, Yuanxi; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Ning; Lu, Xuemei

    2012-10-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a Gram-negative gliding bacterium, which can rapidly degrade crystalline cellulose via a novel strategy without any recognizable processive cellulases. Its mechanism of cellulose binding and degradation is still a mystery. In this study, the mutagenesis of C. hutchinsonii with the mariner-based transposon HimarEm3 and gene complementation with the oriC-based plasmid carrying the antibiotic resistance gene cfxA or tetQ were reported for the first time to provide valuable tools for mutagenesis and genetic manipulation of the bacterium. Mutant A-4 with a transposon mutation in gene CHU_0134, which encodes a putative thiol-disulfide isomerase exhibits defects in cell motility and cellulose degradation. The cellulose binding ability of A-4 was only half of that of the wild-type strain, while the endo-cellulase activity of the cell-free supernatants and on the intact cell surface of A-4 decreased by 40%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins binding to cellulose in the outer membrane showed that most of them were significantly decreased or disappeared in A-4 including some Gld proteins and hypothetical proteins, indicating that these proteins might play an important role in cell motility and cellulose binding and degradation by the bacterium.

  17. Sperm-Egg Interaction: Evidence for Boar Sperm Plasma Membrane Receptors for Porcine Zona Pellucida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Rudolph N.; Russell, Lonnie; Bundman, Donna; Freund, Matthew

    1980-01-01

    Freshly ejaculated, noncapacitated boar sperm bind rapidly and in large numbers to pig egg zona pellucida in vitro. In the present study, the number of sperm bound decreased sharply when sperm motility was lowered by energy poisons or by reducing the temperature. Highly motile sperm from humans, guinea pigs, and rats, added at concentrations ten times higher than control sperm, did not bind to the porcine zona. At the same high concentration, a small number of hamster and bull sperm bound to the zona. Binding of boar sperm to the zona pellucida was blocked almost completely by diluted whole antiserum to sperm plasma membranes and by univalent (Fab) antibody to these membranes. When antibody to sperm plasma membrane was first absorbed with plasma membrane vesicles, sperm binding was not inhibited. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of sperm plasma membrane receptors for the zona pellucida of the pig.

  18. Sperm competition differentially affects swimming velocity and size of spermatozoa from closely related muroid rodents: head first.

    PubMed

    Gómez Montoto, Laura; Varea Sánchez, María; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Martín-Coello, Juan; Luque-Larena, Juan José; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2011-12-01

    Sperm competition favours an increase in sperm swimming velocity that maximises the chances that sperm will reach the ova before rival sperm and fertilise. Comparative studies have shown that the increase in sperm swimming speed is associated with an increase in total sperm size. However, it is not known which are the first evolutionary steps that lead to increases in sperm swimming velocity. Using a group of closely related muroid rodents that differ in levels of sperm competition, we here test the hypothesis that subtle changes in sperm design may represent early evolutionary changes that could make sperm swim faster. Our findings show that as sperm competition increases so does sperm swimming speed. Sperm swimming velocity is associated with the size of all sperm components. However, levels of sperm competition are only related to an increase in sperm head area. Such increase is a consequence of an increase in the length of the sperm head, and also of the presence of an apical hook in some of the species studied. These findings suggest that the presence of a hook may modify the sperm head in such a way that would help sperm swim faster and may also be advantageous if sperm with larger heads are better able to attach to the epithelial cells lining the lower isthmus of the oviduct where sperm remain quiescent before the final race to reach the site of fertilisation.

  19. Low physiological levels of prostaglandins E2 and F2α improve human sperm functions.

    PubMed

    Rios, Mariana; Carreño, Daniela V; Oses, Carolina; Barrera, Nelson; Kerr, Bredford; Villalón, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) have been reported to be present in the seminal fluid and cervical mucus, affecting different stages of sperm maturation from spermatogenesis to the acrosome reaction. This study assessed the effects of low physiological PGE2 and PGF2α concentrations on human sperm motility and on the ability of the spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). Human spermatozoa were isolated from seminal samples with normal concentration and motility parameters and incubated with 1μM PGE2, 1μM PGF2α or control solution to determine sperm motility and the ability to bind to human ZP. The effects of both PGs on intracellular calcium levels were determined. Incubation for 2 or 18h with PGE2 or PGF2α resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in the percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility. In contrast with PGF2α, PGE2 alone induced an increase in sperm intracellular calcium levels; however, the percentage of sperm bound to the human ZP was doubled for both PGs. These results indicate that incubation of human spermatozoa with low physiological levels of PGE2 or PGF2α increases sperm functions and could improve conditions for assisted reproduction protocols.

  20. Cryopreservation of Sperm from the Endangered Colorado Pikeminnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiersch, T.R.; Figiel, C.R.; Wayman, W.R.; Williamson, J.H.; Gorman, O.T.; Carmichael, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    We developed methods for the cryopreservation of sperm of the endangered Colorado pikeminnow Ptychocheilus lucius. Sperm were collected from a captive broodstock population of Colorado pikeminnow reared and maintained at the Dexter National Fish Hatchery and Technology Center. Our objectives were to (1) evaluate the effects on sperm motility of 24-h storage in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS); (2) characterize sperm motility and duration; (3) examine the relationship between sperm motility and osmotic pressure; (4) examine the effect of four cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO], dimethyl acetamide [DMA], glycerol, and methanol [MeOH] at two concentrations [5% and 10%]) on postthaw motility; and (5) compare the effect of two cooling rates (40??C/ min and 4??C/min) on postthaw motility. The sperm samples diluted with HBSS retained higher motility (mean ??SD, 77 ?? 22%; n = 9) than did undiluted samples (12 ?? 30%; n = 9) after 24 h of storage. When exposed to HBSS at 274 mosmols/kg or more, few sperm became motile (???1%). Exposure to HBSS at 265 mosmols/kg elicited threshold activation (defined as 10% motility), and maximum motility (>95%) was observed at 93 mosmols/ kg. The maximum motility of sperm was observed within 10 s after activation with deionized water, and sperm remained motile for 57 s. The sperm that were cooled at a rate of 40??C/min and cryopreserved with 5% MeOH retained higher postthaw motility (56 ?? 13%) than did sperm cryopreserved with DMSO, DMA, or glycerol (at 5% and 10%). When the sperm samples were cooled at a rate of 4??C/min, sperm cryopreserved with MeOH (5% or 10%) or DMSO (5% or 10%) retained the highest postthaw motilities (???14%). The use of cryopreserved sperm can assist hatchery managers in the production of fish, provide for the long-term conservation of genetic resources, and assist in the recovery of endangered species such as the Colorado pikeminnow.

  1. RNA interference of the period gene affects the rhythm of sperm release in moths.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Joanna; Bebas, Piotr; Gvakharia, Barbara O; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2009-02-01

    The period (per) gene is 1 of the core elements of the circadian clock mechanism in animals from insects to mammals. In clock cells of Drosophila melanogaster, per mRNA and PER protein oscillate in daily cycles. Consistent with the molecular clock model, PER moves to cell nuclei and acts as a repressor of positive clock elements. Homologs of per are known in many insects; however, specific roles of per in generating output rhythms are not known for most species. The aim of this article was to determine whether per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm of sperm release in the moth, Spodoptera littoralis. In this species, as in other moths, rhythmic release of sperm bundles from the testis into the upper vas deferens occurs only in the evening, and this rhythm continues in the isolated reproductive system. S. littoralis was used to investigate the expression of per mRNA and protein in the 2 types of cells involved in sperm release: the cyst cells surrounding sperm bundles in the testes, and the barrier cells separating testicular follicles from the vas deferens. In cyst cells, PER showed a nuclear rhythm in light/dark (LD) cycles but was constitutively cytoplasmic in constant darkness (DD). In barrier cells, nuclear cycling of PER was observed in both LD and DD. To determine the role of PER in rhythmic sperm release in moths, testes-sperm duct complexes were treated in vitro with double-stranded fragments of per mRNA (dsRNA). This treatment significantly lowered per mRNA and protein in cyst cells and barrier cells and caused a delay of sperm release. These data demonstrate that a molecular oscillator involving the period gene plays an essential role in the regulation of rhythmic sperm release in this species.

  2. UV-B affects photosynthesis, ROS production and motility of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter.

    PubMed

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Shin, Woongghi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2012-10-15

    The effects of ultraviolet B (UV-B; 295-320 nm) radiation on certain vital physiological (photosynthesis), biochemical (production of reactive oxygen species - ROS) and behavioral (motility and orientation) characteristics were investigated in the unicellular photoautotroph, Euglena agilis Carter. The photosynthetic performance of E. agilis was recorded after exposure of between 15 and 60 min followed by a period of recovery lasting 6-24h under dim light (5-10 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). The maximum quantum yield of PS II (F(v)/F(m)) was reduced to 65% and 14% of initial values immediately following 15 and 30 min UV-B exposure, but recovered to 100 and 86% of the initials, respectively. Values of rETR(max) in E. agilis exposed to 15 min UV-B were similar to those of the initials, but a 30 min UV exposure resulted in 75% reduction of rETR(max) with only a 43% recovery as compared with the initial after 24h recovery. After a 60 min UV-B exposure, there were no Chl a fluorescence signals, and hence no F(v)/F(m) or rETR(max). A UV dose-dependent increase in DCFH-DA fluorescence was found in E. agilis cells, reflecting an increase in ROS production. After exposures to UV-B for between 15 and 60 min, the percentages of motile cells in the population decreased to 76, 39 and 15%, respectively. Following 24h in dim light, the percentage of motile cells increased to between 66% and 95% of the initial value. The velocity of non-irradiated cells was 60 μm s(-1), which decreased to 16-35 μm s(-1) immediately following exposure for 15-60 min. After periods of time in dim light (6, 12 and 24h) velocities had recovered to between 44 and 81% of the initial value. In untreated controls, the r-value was 0.23, indicating random movement of E. agilis, but it increased to 0.35 and 0.72 after exposure to UV-B for 30 and 60 min, respectively. There was a tendency towards vertical downward movement of cells proportional to the duration of exposure. The compactness of E. agilis decreased

  3. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on sperm capacitation and protein phosphorylation of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Lilian; Bussalleu, Eva; Yeste, Marc; Bonet, Sergi

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have reported the detrimental effects that bacteriospermia causes on boar sperm quality, but little is known about its effects on IVC. Considering that, the present study sought to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on different indicators of capacitation status (sperm viability, membrane lipid disorder, sperm motility kinematics, and protein phosphorylation of boar spermatozoa) after IVC. Flow cytometry and computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) revealed that the presence of P aeruginosa in boar sperm samples, mostly at concentrations greater than 10(6) CFU/mL, is associated with a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the percentages of both sperm membrane integrity and sperm with low membrane lipid disorder, and also with a reduction in sperm motility kinetic parameters when compared with results obtained from the control sample, which presented the typical motility pattern of capacitated-like boar spermatozoa. Moreover, Western blot results also showed significant (P < 0.05) changes in the levels of tyrosine, serine, and threonine protein phosphorylation because of bacterial contamination, the decrease in phosphotyrosine levels of p32, a well-known marker of IVC achievement in boar sperm, being the most relevant. Indeed, after 3 hours of IVC, phosphotyrosine levels of p32 in the control sample were 3.13 ± 0.81, whereas in the tubes with 10(6) and 10(8) CFU/mL were 1.05 ± 0.20 and 0.36 ± 0.07, respectively. Therefore, the present study provides novel data regarding the effects of bacterial contamination on boar sperm, suggesting that the presence of P aeruginosa affects the fertilizing ability of boar sperm by altering its ability to accomplish IVC.

  4. Influence of anaesthetic drugs on the epididymal sperm quality in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Pérez-Marín, C C; Millán, Y; Agüera, E

    2011-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of different anaesthetic agents commonly used in cats on the fresh and frozen-thawed epididymal sperm. Seventeen male domestic cats were castrated using pentobarbital, ketamine HCl or isoflurane. Sperm samples were recovered from epididymides and evaluated before and after freezing, determining the vigor, motility, morphology, acrosome status, sperm viability and functional membrane integrity. Fresh epididymal sperm was influenced by the drugs used, noting that motility features, i.e. vigor (p≤0.05) and progressive motility (p≤0.05), were higher for the inhalation anaesthetic while the others did not showed statistical differences. In frozen-thawed sperm samples, cats treated with barbiturics showed lower values for acrosome status (p≤0.05) and integrity and functionality of membrane (p≤0.05 and p≤0.01, respectively) than in the others groups. Results suggested that drugs used for castration in cats could affect the sperm quality and this should be considered when implementing sperm cryopreservation in the feline.

  5. Superoxide dismutase affects the viability of thawed European mouflon (Ovis g. musimon) semen and the heterologous fertilization using both IVF and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Berlinguer, Fiammetta; Ledda, Sergio; Rosati, Irma; Bogliolo, Luisa; Leoni, Giovanni; Naitana, Salvatore

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on viability and acrosome integrity of European mouflon spermatozoa after cryopreservation and on the fertilization rates of sheep oocytes after i.v.f. or intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (i.c.s.i.). Frozen semen was thawed and washed with synthetic oviduct fluid supplemented with 0.6% bovine serum albumin. After centrifugation, the spermatozoa pellet was split into two culture systems: (i) without SOD; and (ii) in the presence of 1500 IU mL(-1) SOD. Sperm viability and acrosome integrity were evaluated simultaneously, immediately after thawing and after 3, 6 and 9 h of culture (5% CO2, 39 degrees C, 90% humidity), by incubating sperm with propidium iodide and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled Pisum sativum agglutinin. At the same time, sperm were assessed for motility using a standard scoring system (independent operators' observation of sperm) that graded degree of motility (i.e. 1 = immotile to 10 = maximum motility, as observed at the moment of thawing). For i.v.f., frozen-thawed semen derived from the two culture systems was placed in culture together with in vitro-matured sheep oocytes. For i.c.s.i., semen derived from the same culture systems as that for i.v.f. was used, and incubated for 1 h under standard conditions. The results showed a marked difference (P < 0.01) between the percentages of live spermatozoa in medium with SOD and those obtained in medium alone, after 3, 6 and 9 h of culture. The percentages of intact acrosome spermatozoa were higher in medium with SOD after 6 h (P = 0.05) of culture. Spermatozoa motility decreased significantly in SOD containing medium at 3 and 6 h of culture compared with motility in control medium. Fertilization rates were significantly lower in medium with SOD than in medium alone, whereas in the i.c.s.i. system fertilization rates were significantly higher in the presence of SOD. The results indicate that the addition of SOD to the culture media

  6. Deiodinase knockdown during early zebrafish development affects growth, development, energy metabolism, motility and phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Enise; Heijlen, Marjolein; Vergauwen, Lucia; Hagenaars, An; Houbrechts, Anne M; Esguerra, Camila V; Blust, Ronny; Darras, Veerle M; Knapen, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3) decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray), biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO) knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO) and knockdown of D3 (D3MO) both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle) development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct TH balance

  7. Progesterone through progesterone receptors affects survival and metabolism of pig sperm.

    PubMed

    De Amicis, F; Santoro, M; Guido, C; Sisci, D; Bruno, R; Carpino, A; Aquila, S

    2012-11-01

    Progesterone receptors (PR) through interaction with the specific ligand progesterone (PRG), play a central coordinate role in different reproductive events. In this study conventional PR were identified in boar spermatozoa by Western blotting. Immunofluorescence techniques indicate that PR are located at sperm acrosomal region, suggesting a possible role in the oocyte fertilization events. Treatment with 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) enhanced viability and induced cholesterol efflux, serine and tyrosine phosphorylation, p-Bcl2, p-Akt that are known hallmarks of capacitation in sperm. The analysis of the triglyceride contents, lipase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities, as well as the G6PDH activity, was conducted so as to address whether there was an increase in energy expenditure via 17-OHP through the PR. Taken together these results, particularly the 17-OHP action on boar sperm lipid and glucose metabolism, give emphasis to the role of PR in sperm physiology within the oviductal environment. Moreover the present study highlights, the effect of PRG via PR on boar sperm survival, renewing the role of this hormone in male reproduction as candidate for boar fertility. Thus the present research contributes to further elucidating the role of progesterone on the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for a successful fertilization.

  8. Computer-assisted sperm analysis of fresh epididymal cat spermatozoa and the impact of cool storage (4 degrees C) on sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Filliers, M; Rijsselaere, T; Bossaert, P; De Causmaecker, V; Dewulf, J; Pope, C E; Van Soom, A

    2008-12-01

    Epididymal cat sperm is commonly used for in vitro fertilization. Because of the high variability in preparation protocols and methods of evaluation, sperm quality may vary considerably between experiments and laboratories. The aims of the present study were (1) to describe an epididymal sperm preparation protocol to produce clean, highly motile samples using density gradient centrifugation, (2) to provide reference values of computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) parameters of fresh epididymal cat sperm after density gradient centrifugation and (3) to investigate the effect of cool storage on various spermatozoa characteristics. After slicing the epididymides, viable and motile sperm cells were isolated using Percoll centrifugation. Sperm motility parameters were subsequently assessed using CASA in experiment 1. In experiment 2, fresh (day 0) sperm samples were evaluated for motility parameters (HTR) and stained for assessment of acrosomal status (FITC-PSA), morphology (eosin/nigrosin (E/N)), membrane integrity (E/N and SYBR((R))14-PI) and DNA fragmentation (TUNEL). After addition of a Tris-glucose-citrate diluent containing 20% egg yolk, samples were cooled to 4 degrees C and reassessed on d1, d3, d5, d7 and d10. Cool storage impaired most motility and velocity parameters: MOT, PMOT, VAP, VSL, VCL, BCF, RAPID and the percentage of normal spermatozoa showed a decrease over time (P<0.05) as compared to fresh samples. In contrast, STR, ALH, membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation and the percentage of acrosome intact spermatozoa were not affected by cool storage. However, the influence of cool storage of cat spermatozoa on subsequent in vitro embryo development and quality after IVF requires further investigation.

  9. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  10. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells (Morone saxatilis) on viability, intracellular Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial membrane potential (''m), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation as determined by flow cytometry; motion activati...

  11. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells on viability, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (D'm), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cy...

  12. Implications of the pH and temperature of diluted, cooled boar semen on fresh and frozen-thawed sperm motility characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boar semen is typically collected, diluted and cooled for AI use over numerous days, or frozen immediately after shipping to capable laboratories. The storage temperature and pH of the diluted, cooled boar semen could potentially influence the fertility of boar sperm. Therefore, the purpose of thi...

  13. Protein acetylation affects acetate metabolism, motility and acid stress response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal, Vicente; Post, Harm; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cappadona, Salvatore; Sánchez-Díaz, Nerea C; Sauer, Uwe; Heck, Albert JR; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Cánovas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Although protein acetylation is widely observed, it has been associated with few specific regulatory functions making it poorly understood. To interrogate its functionality, we analyzed the acetylome in Escherichia coli knockout mutants of cobB, the only known sirtuin-like deacetylase, and patZ, the best-known protein acetyltransferase. For four growth conditions, more than 2,000 unique acetylated peptides, belonging to 809 proteins, were identified and differentially quantified. Nearly 65% of these proteins are related to metabolism. The global activity of CobB contributes to the deacetylation of a large number of substrates and has a major impact on physiology. Apart from the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase, we found that CobB-controlled acetylation of isocitrate lyase contributes to the fine-tuning of the glyoxylate shunt. Acetylation of the transcription factor RcsB prevents DNA binding, activating flagella biosynthesis and motility, and increases acid stress susceptibility. Surprisingly, deletion of patZ increased acetylation in acetate cultures, which suggests that it regulates the levels of acetylating agents. The results presented offer new insights into functional roles of protein acetylation in metabolic fitness and global cell regulation. PMID:25518064

  14. Caffeine, dibutyryl cyclic-AMP and heparin affect the chemotactic and phagocytotic activities of neutrophils for boar sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, J-C; Yamaguchi, S; Kondo, Y; Funahashi, H

    2011-04-15

    The objective was to examine the effects of caffeine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, and heparin on the chemotaxis and/or phagocytosis of PMNs for porcine sperm. The chemotactic activity of PMNs, determined in a blind well chamber, increased (P < 0.05) when fresh serum was added to the medium (control containing BSA, 1109.5 cells/mm(2) vs serum, 1226.3 cells/mm(2)), regardless of the presence of sperm (control, 1121.1 cells/mm(2) vs serum, 1245.8 cells/mm(2)), whereas heat-inactivated serum did not affect activity (without sperm, 1099.4 cells/mm(2) and with sperm, 1132.6 cells/mm(2)). Regardless of live and dead sperm and of the origin of PMNs (boars vs sows), the phagocytotic activity of PMNs, as determined by co-culture of PMNs with sperm for 60 min, increased (P < 0.05) in the presence of fresh serum containing active complement (46.7 and 43.0%, respectively), but stimulation was decreased (P < 0.05) when 1 mM or higher concentrations of caffeine was added to the medium (from 40.7 to 20.8-31.6%). The origin of PMNs (sows vs boars) did not significantly affect phagocytotic activity. The percentage of PMNs that phagocytized polystyrene latex beads decreased when 2 mM caffeine was added to the medium containing porcine serum (from 43.7 to 21.5%). Serum-stimulated chemotactic activity of PMNs (1089.9 cells/mm(2)) was also reduced (P < 0.05) with 2 mM caffeine (942.5 cells/mm(2)). Furthermore, dibutyryl cAMP at ≥ 0.1 mM or heparin at ≥ 100 μg/mL decreased phagocytotic activity, in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Supplementation of PMNs with heparin at 100 or 500 μg/mL decreased (P < 0.05) chemotactic activity in the presence of serum (from 1137.1 cells/mm(2) to 1008.8-1026.3 cells/mm(2)). We inferred that opsonization in the presence of active complement stimulated phagocytotic and chemotactic activities of PMNs, whereas supplementation with caffeine and dibutyryl cAMP (which could be associated with the intracellular cAMP level of PMNs) or adding heparin

  15. Does being overweight affect seminal variables in fertile men?

    PubMed

    Taha, Emad A; Sayed, Sohair K; Gaber, Hisham D; Abdel Hafez, Hatem K; Ghandour, Nagwa; Zahran, Asmaa; Mostafa, Taymour

    2016-12-01

    The effect of being overweight on seminal variables was assesed in 165 fertile men. Participants were divided into three groups: fertile men with normal body mass index (BMI) (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), fertile overweight men (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) and fertile obese men (BMI >30 kg/m(2)). Medical history was taken, a clinical examination conducted. Semen analysis was undertaken and BMI measured. Seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) was estimated by chemiluminescent assay, sperm vitality by the hypo-osmotic swelling test and sperm DNA fragmentation by propidium iodide staining with flowcytometry. Fertile obese men had significantly lower sperm concentration, progressive sperm motility and sperm normal morphology, with significantly higher seminal ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation compared with fertile normal-weight men and overweight men (all P < 0.05). BMI was negatively correlated with sperm concentration (r = -0.091; P = 0.014), progressive sperm motility (r = -0.697; P = 0.001), normal sperm morphology (r = -0.510; P = 0.001), sperm vitality (r = -0.586; P = 0.001), but positively correlated with sperm DNA fragmentation percentage (r = 0.799; P = 0.001) and seminal ROS (r = 0.673; P = 0.001). Increased BMI was found to affect semen parameters negatively even in fertile men.

  16. The effects on boar sperm quality of dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids differ among porcine breeds.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Barrera, Xavier; Coll, David; Bonet, Sergi

    2011-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to shed light on the relationship between boar sperm quality and dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which has been reported inconsistently in the literature. With this aim, such effects were evaluated and compared among three different porcine breeds: Duroc, Large-White, and Pietrain. Animals were randomly separated into two groups and fed either with a control diet or with a diet supplemented with omega-3. Sperm quality of these boar (ejaculate volume, sperm concentration, sperm viability, acrosome and mitochondrial sheath integrity, sperm motility, sperm morphology, and osmotic resistance of spermatozoa) was assessed every week for a 26-week period. Supplementing boar's diet with omega-3 did not affect ejaculate volume, sperm concentration, sperm motility, sperm viability, and acrosome and mitochondrial sheath integrity. In contrast, supplemented diet positively affected both sperm morphology in Large-White and Pietrain breeds and the osmotic resistance of Pietrain spermatozoa. No effects were seen for the same sperm parameters in Duroc breed. These breed-differences in boar fed with the supplemented diet could explain the contradictions in literature and might be related with differences in the composition of plasma membrane among breeds reported by other authors. Because no harmful effects were observed in the three evaluated breeds, but positive effects in Large-White and Pietrain boar, we can conclude that omega-3 fatty acids may be added to boar's diet at the levels used in this study to improve their sperm quality. More research is, however, needed to determine how these fatty acids differently affect the morphology and the osmotic resistance of the spermatozoa in these breeds.

  17. Potential changes in rat spermatogenesis and sperm parameters after inhalation of Boswellia papyrifera and Boswellia carterii incense.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtar; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Alokail, Majed S; Hussain, Tajamul

    2013-02-28

    In this study the effect of Boswellia papyrifera (B. papyrifera) and Boswellia carterii (B. carterii) smoke exposure on spermatogenesis and sperm parameters in male albino rats was investigated. Rats (n = 11) were exposed daily in smoking chambers to smoke emanated by burning 4 g each of either B. papyrifera or B. carterii for 48 days. At the end of exposure duration rats were killed, and the testes were excised and analysed for histopathological and ultrastructural changes. Sperm analysis including total sperm count, motility, velocity and relative percentage of abnormal sperms were recorded. Rats exposed to B. papyrifera and B. carterii showed significant disturbances in spermatogenetic patterns and changes in sperm kinetics compared to unexposed rats. Atrophied seminiferous tubules with dynamic changes were also noticed. The boundaries of intercellular and intracellular vacuoles were seen in the Sertoli cells. Furthermore, in spermatids acrosomal vesicles were not fully formed. Degenerating spermatids were devoid of their nuclear membrane with electron dense matrix and vacuolization. Structural changes in Leydig cells were observed. Sperm analysis in exposed rats exhibited significant decrease in the sperm count, motility, speed and an increase in sperm anomalies when compare to controls. These findings demonstrate that the B. papyrifera and B. carterii smoke affects the process of spermatogenesis and sperm parameters and indicate the detrimental effects of these incense materials on human reproductive system.

  18. Effect of alcohol intake and cigarette smoking on sperm parameters and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A M E; Menkveld, R; Lens, J W; Nienhuis, S E; Rhemrev, J P T

    2014-03-01

    Much has been published about smoking and alcohol intake influencing male fertility, sperm parameters and reproductive outcome. However, there is no conclusive agreement about the effects of cigarette smoking and alcohol use on these outcomes and thus no generally accepted guidelines. The combined effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol intake, though, has not been rigorously investigated. Because alcohol consumption and smoking are often seen together, this study focuses on the effect of smoking and drinking habits separately and combined on semen parameters, such as volume, sperm count, motility and morphology, and on pregnancy outcome. These suggested toxic effects are studied in a group of subfertile, asthenozoospermic men (<10% motile spermatozoa), compared with a group of 'proven fertile', healthy men. The extreme asthenozoospermic group has especially been chosen because of the suspected effect, that is, oxidative stress, on sperm motility. In our study, we found that cigarette smoking and alcohol intake did not differ between the subfertile and fertile group. In conclusion, cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption do not appear to significantly affect sperm parameters, such as volume, sperm count, motility and morphology or pregnancy outcome in our study population.

  19. Exposure to Endosulfan can result in male infertility due to testicular atrophy and reduced sperm count

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, R; Raghavan, SC

    2015-01-01

    Endosulfan (ES) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and is speculated to be detrimental to human health. However, very little is known about mechanism of its genotoxicity. Using mouse model system, we show that exposure to ES affected physiology and cellular architecture of organs and tissues. Among all organs, damage to testes was extensive and it resulted in death of different testicular-cell populations. We find that the damage in testes resulted in qualitative and quantitative defects during spermatogenesis in a time-dependent manner, increasing epididymal reactive oxygen species levels, affecting sperm chromatin integrity. This further culminated in reduced number of epididymal sperms and actively motile sperms. Finally, we show that ES exposure affected fertility in male but not in female mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that ES exerts pathophysiological changes in mice, induces testicular atrophy, affects spermatogenesis, reduces quantity and vigour of epididymal sperm and leads to infertility in males. PMID:27551453

  20. HPV-DNA sperm infection and infertility: from a systematic literature review to a possible clinical management proposal.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Noventa, M; De Toni, L; Gizzo, S; Garolla, A

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the implications of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection on male fertility, impairment of sperm parameters, and possible alteration of sperm nuclear status and to identify a possible effective management of infertile men with HPV sperm infection. We employed a systematic review and clinical management proposal at the Centers for Reproductive and Health care for treating infertile male patients with HPV infection. Literature search was carried out in electronic databases in the last two decades. We focused our attention on: (i) HPV sperm prevalence (ii) HPV-related alteration of sperm parameters; (iii) molecular mechanisms of HPV semen infection and infertility. The main outcome measures were HPV prevalence in infertile male patients and semen parameters. The prevalence of HPV sperm infection ranges between 2 and 31% in men from general population and between 10 and 35.7% in men affected by unexplained infertility. The presence of HPV in semen is associated with an impairment of sperm motility and the presence of anti-sperm antibodies. The molecular mechanisms underlying impairment of sperm motility apparatus need further evaluations. A greater attention should be applied to assess HPV sperm infection, particularly in men undergoing assisted reproduction techniques cycle for male infertility or sperm banking. It would be useful to perform HPV test and fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis for HPV in semen from these patients both at first admission, to define the possible presence and localization of semen infection, and after 6 months, to assess the possible virus clearance retrieval on normal sperm parameters.

  1. Effects of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on bovine sperm function.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Adriano F P; Maria, Fernanda S; Mendes, Camilla M; Hamilton, Thais R S; Dalmazzo, Andressa; Dreyer, Thiago R; da Silva, Herculano M; Nichi, Marcilio; Milazzotto, Marcella P; Visintin, José A; Assumpção, Mayra E O A

    2016-08-01

    Fertilization rates and subsequent embryo development rely on sperm factors related to semen quality and viability. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) is based on emission of electromagnetic waves of a laser optical system that interact with cells and tissues resulting in biological effects. This interaction is mediated by photoacceptors that absorb the electromagnetic energy. Effects are dependent of irradiation parameters, target cell type, and species. In sperm, PBMT improves several features like motility and viability, affecting sperm aerobic metabolism and energy production. The aim of this study was to investigate, under same conditions, how different output powers (5, 7.5, and 10 mW) and time of irradiation (5 and 10 min) of laser (He-Ne laser, 633 nm) may affect frozen/thawed bovine sperm functions. Results showed significant effects depending on power while using 10 min of irradiation on motility parameters and mitochondrial potential. However, no effect was observed using 5 min of irradiation, regardless of power applied. In conclusion, PBMT is effective to modulate bovine sperm function. The effectiveness is dependent on the interaction between power applied and duration of irradiation, showing that these two parameters simultaneously influence sperm function. In this context, when using the same fluency and energy with different combinations of power and time of exposure, we observed distinct effects, revealing that biological effects should be also based on simple parameters rather than only composite parameters such as fluency, irradiance and energy. Laser irradiation of frozen/thawed bovine semen led to an increase on mitochondrial function and motility parameters that could potentially improve fertility rates.

  2. What affects fertility of sexed bull semen more, low sperm dosage or the sorting process?

    PubMed

    Frijters, A C J; Mullaart, E; Roelofs, R M G; van Hoorne, R P; Moreno, J F; Moreno, O; Merton, J S

    2009-01-01

    Until now it has been unclear to what extent the reduced fertility with sexed semen in the dairy industry is caused by too few sperm per AI dose, or by the effect of flow cytometric sorting, which is the established procedure for sexing semen. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of low sperm numbers per dose with and without sorting on non-return rates after 56 days (NRR 56); in addition, we evaluated the effects of bulls, in order to further optimize use of sexed semen. Based on results of using sexed semen from seven Holstein bulls, an overall numerical decline of 13.6% in NRR 56 was observed (P<0.05). About two-thirds of this decline (8.6%) was due to the low dose (P<0.05), and a third (5.0%) due to the process of sorting (P<0.05). The effect of low dosage and sorting differed among bulls. We observed a sex ratio of 91.6% females for sexed semen from the first 131 calves born. Currently the best way to increase fertility of sexed semen is by closely monitoring fertility so that the highest fertility bulls are used, and by improving farm animal management. However, to make substantial progress, more in depth studies are needed on the sexing technology, especially on aspects such as sorting procedures and sperm dosage.

  3. Sperm quality and oxidative status as affected by homogenization of liquid-stored boar semen diluted in short- and long-term extenders.

    PubMed

    Menegat, Mariana B; Mellagi, Ana Paula G; Bortolin, Rafael C; Menezes, Tila A; Vargas, Amanda R; Bernardi, Mari Lourdes; Wentz, Ivo; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Bortolozzo, Fernando P

    2017-04-01

    Homogenization of diluted boar semen during storage has for a long time been regarded as beneficial. Recent studies indicated an adverse effect of homogenization on sperm quality for yet unknown reasons. This study aimed to verify the effect of homogenization on sperm parameters and to elucidate the impact of oxidative stress. Twenty-one normospermic ejaculates (21 boars) were diluted with Androstar(®) Plus (AND) and Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS). Semen doses were submitted to no-homogenization (NoHom) or twice-a-day manual homogenization (2xHom) during storage at 17°C for 168h. NoHom and 2xHom were similar (P>0.05) for both short- and long-term extenders with respect to motility and kinematics parameters (CASA system), membrane viability (SYBR-14/PI), acrosome integrity, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species, sulfhydryl content, and total radical-trapping antioxidant potential. 2xHom reduced sperm motility and motion kinematics (VCL, VSL, VAP, BCF, and ALH) following the thermoresistance test and presented with a slight increase in pH along the storage (P=0.05) as compared to NoHom. Furthermore, 2xHom semen doses presented with a constant SOD and GSH-Px activity during storage whereas enzymatic activity increased for NoHom at the end of the storage. These findings confirm that homogenization of semen doses is detrimental to sperm quality. Moreover, it is shown that the effect of homogenization is unlikely to be primarily related to oxidative stress. Homogenization is not recommended for storage of liquid boar semen for up to 168h in both short- and long-term extenders.

  4. Potential effect of smoking on semen quality through DNA damage and the downregulation of Chk1 in sperm

    PubMed Central

    CUI, XIANGRONG; JING, XUAN; WU, XUEQING; WANG, ZHENQIANG; LI, QIANG

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that smoking is associated with decreased male fertility via altering the quality of semen. However, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects semen quality remains to be fully elucidated. Heavy smoking-induced DNA damage has been reported to correlate with abnormal spermatozoa and male infertility. It has been reported that, in response to DNA damage, activation of the checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) facilitates S and G2 checkpoint arrest. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of Chk1 in sperm cells of smoking and non-smoking men, and to further examine the correlation between DNA fragmentation rates and the expression levels of Chk1 with smoking. The present study was performed on a cohort of 841 smoking men and 287 non-smoking men. In the investigation, sperm concentration, motility, viability, seminal plasma zinc concentration, acrosin activity and sperm DNA fragmentation were examined. The gene and protein expression levels of Chk1 were detected using reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. It was observed that the progressive motility of the sperm was significantly decreased in the moderate and heavy smoking groups, whereas no significant changes were observed in the mild smoking group. The sperm in the medium-term smoking group had significantly decreased progressive motility, and the semen concentration, sperm count and progressive motility vitality were markedly decreased in the long-term smoking group. Compared with the non-smoking group, the abnormal head rates in the heavy smoking group and long-term smoking group were significantly increased. The sperm viability and seminal plasma zinc concentration were markedly increased in the smoking group. Increased DNA fragmentation rates were found in the smoking group. The expression of Chk1 was significantly decreased in the smoking group, compared with the non-smoking group. Progressive

  5. Viability and fertilizing capacity of cryopreserved sperm from three North American acipenseriform species: A retrospective study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horvath, A.; Wayman, W.R.; Dean, J.C.; Urbanyi, B.; Tiersch, T.R.; Mims, S.D.; Johnson, D.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Populations of sturgeon across the globe are threatened due to unregulated harvest and habitat loss, and the status varies among species across North America. Ready access to viable and functional sperm would contribute to recovery programmes for these species. In this study, we examined the motility, viability (cell membrane integrity) of cryopreserved sperm from three North American acipenseriform species and fertilizing capacity. Milt samples were collected from captive shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum), wild paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and cryopreserved using combinations of Modified Tsvetkova's (MT) extender, Original Tsvetkova's extender, and modified Hanks' balanced salt solution, along with the cryoprotectants methanol (MeOH) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). A dual-staining technique using the fluorescent stains SYBR-14 and propidium iodide was employed with flow cytometry to determine the percentages of spermatozoa that were viable by virtue of having intact membranes. The percentage of viable spermatozoa ranged from 5% to 12% in shortnose sturgeon, 30-59% in paddlefish, and 44-58% in pallid sturgeon. In the first experiment with shortnose sturgeon sperm, methanol allowed for higher values for dependent variables than did DMSO, and sperm viability generally correlated with post-thaw motility. However, fertilization rate, neurulation, or hatching rates were independent from these factors. In the second experiment with shortnose sturgeon, 5% MeOH combined with MT yielded higher values for all parameters tested than the other combinations: viability was correlated with motility, fertilization rate, and hatching rate. Overall, viability and post-thaw motility was not affected by the use of hyperosmotic extenders (OT) or cryoprotectants (DMSO), but their use decreased fertilization percentages. For paddlefish sperm (experiment 3), MT combined with 10% MeOH was clearly a good choice for cryopreservation

  6. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  7. Copper: a biphasic regulator of caprine sperm forward progression.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debarun; Dey, Souvik; Majumder, Gopal Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Debdas

    2014-02-01

    Copper is essential for spermatogenesis and its presence has been demonstrated in male and female reproductive fluids in several mammalian species. However, little is known about the physiological significance of this trace element in the regulation of forward progression of mammalian sperm cells which is essential for sperm fertility potential in vivo. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the physiological role of the bivalent copper ion (Cu(2+)) on mammalian sperm forward motility using a chemically-defined medium and caprine cauda epididymal sperm model. Sperm forward motility was significantly enhanced by Cu(2+) in a dose-dependent manner; maximal activation (approx 20%) was noted at the 5 µM level of the metal. Above 10 µM Cu(2+) sperm motility decreased, showing that Cu(2+) exerts a biphasic regulation on sperm motility. These findings have been confirmed using a spectrophotometric motility assay, an objective method of motility analysis. At lower concentrations (up to 5 µM), copper enhanced sperm membrane lipid peroxidation as well as the level of intra-sperm cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (c-AMP), but at a higher level it caused marked inhibition of both of the biochemical parameters. The observed correlation of Cu(2+)-dependent biphasic modulation of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation and intrasperm c-AMP with sperm forward motility is consistent with the view that Cu(2+) regulation of sperm motility is mediated by membrane lipid peroxidation, which in turn modulates the level of intra-sperm c-AMP, a well-known activator of sperm motility.

  8. EFFECT OF CRYOPRESERVATION AND THEOPHYLLINE ON MOTILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF LAKE STURGEON (ACIPENSER FULVESCENS) SPERMATOZOA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-assisted motility analysis (CASA) was used to evaluate the effect of cryopreservation and theophylline treatment on sperm motility of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens).Motility was recorded at 0 and 5 min postactivation.The effect of cryopreservation on sperm acrosin-...

  9. Seminal plasma applied post-thawing affects boar sperm physiology: a flow cytometry study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gago, Rocío; Domínguez, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe

    2013-09-01

    Cryopreservation induces extensive biophysical and biochemical changes in the sperm. In the present study, we used flow cytometry to assess the capacitation-like status of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa and its relationship with intracellular calcium, assessment of membrane fluidity, modification of thiol groups in plasma membrane proteins, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, viability, acrosomal status, and mitochondrial activity. This experiment was performed to verify the effect of adding seminal plasma on post-thaw sperm functions. To determine these effects after cryopreservation, frozen-thawed semen from seven boars was examined after supplementation with different concentrations of pooled seminal plasma (0%, 10%, and 50%) at various times of incubation from 0 to 4 hours. Incubation caused a decrease in membrane integrity and an increase in acrosomal damage, with small changes in other parameters (P > 0.05). Although 10% seminal plasma showed few differences with 0% (ROS increase at 4 hours, P < 0.05), 50% seminal plasma caused important changes. Membrane fluidity increased considerably from the beginning of the experiment, and ROS and free thiols in the cell surface increased by 2 hours of incubation. By the end of the experiment, viability decreased and acrosomal damage increased in the 50% seminal plasma samples. The addition of 50% of seminal plasma seems to modify the physiology of thawed boar spermatozoa, possibly through membrane changes and ROS increase. Although some effects were detrimental, the stimulatory effect of 50% seminal plasma could favor the performance of post-thawed boar semen, as showed in the field (García JC, Domínguez JC, Peña FJ, Alegre B, Gonzalez R, Castro MJ, Habing GG, Kirkwood RN. Thawing boar semen in the presence of seminal plasma: effects on sperm quality and fertility. Anim Reprod Sci 2010;119:160-5).

  10. The copulatory plug delays ejaculation by rival males and affects sperm competition outcome in house mice.

    PubMed

    Sutter, A; Lindholm, A K

    2016-08-01

    Females of many species mate with multiple males (polyandry), resulting in male-male competition extending to post-copulation (sperm competition). Males adapt to such post-copulatory sexual selection by altering features of their ejaculate that increase its competitiveness and/or by decreasing the risk of sperm competition through female manipulation or interference with rival male behaviour. At ejaculation, males of many species deposit copulatory plugs, which are commonly interpreted as a male adaptation to post-copulatory competition and are thought to reduce or delay female remating. Here, we used a vertebrate model species, the house mouse, to study the consequences of copulatory plugs for post-copulatory competition. We experimentally manipulated plugs after a female's first mating and investigated the consequences for rival male behaviour and paternity outcome. We found that even intact copulatory plugs were ineffective at preventing female remating, but that plugs influenced the rival male copulatory behaviour. Rivals facing intact copulatory plugs performed more but shorter copulations and ejaculated later than when the plug had been fully or partially removed. This suggests that the copulatory plug represents a considerable physical barrier to rival males. The paternity share of first males increased with a longer delay between the first and second males' ejaculations, indicative of fitness consequences of copulatory plugs. However, when males provided little copulatory stimulation, the incidence of pregnancy failure increased, representing a potential benefit of intense and repeated copulation besides plug removal. We discuss the potential mechanisms of how plugs influence sperm competition outcome and consequences for male copulatory behaviour.

  11. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Acephate on Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Dhanushka, M. A. Thamali

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) could alter semen quality and sperm DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis. Acephate is a highly toxic extensively used OP and, therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effects of acephate on human semen quality and sperm DNA integrity. Sperm collected from healthy males were exposed to 0, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL of acephate and incubated for 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h. Subsequently, sperm motility, vitality, functional integrity of plasma membrane, sperm capacitation, and DNA damage were examined. Result showed a significant decline of the motility at 100 μg/mL after 3 h and with 200 μg/mL after 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h. Viability was significantly reduced at 200 μg/mL after 2 h and 3 h. Functional integrity was significantly affected at 100 μg/mL after 3h and in 200 μg/mL dose after 2 h and 3h. Similarly, sperm capacitation was significantly affected at 200 μg/mL after 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h and at 100 μg/mL at 3 h. DNA damage was significantly increased only in 200 μg/mL dose after 3 h. The study suggests that exposure to acephate may result in alterations of sperm structure and function thus contributing towards deteriorating in human semen quality triggering infertility. PMID:28392800

  12. Performance of Rodent Spermatozoa Over Time Is Enhanced by Increased ATP Concentrations: The Role of Sperm Competition.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Varea-Sánchez, María; Luque-Larena, Juan J; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-09-01

    Sperm viability, acrosome integrity, motility, and swimming velocity are determinants of male fertility and exhibit an extreme degree of variation among closely related species. Many of these sperm parameters are associated with sperm ATP content, which has led to predictions of trade-offs between ATP content and sperm motility and velocity. Selective pressures imposed by sperm competition have been proposed as evolutionary causes of this pattern of diversity in sperm traits. Here, we examine variation in sperm viability, acrosome integrity, motility, swimming velocity, and ATP content over time, among 18 species of closely related muroid rodents, to address the following questions: (a) Do sperm from closely related species vary in ATP content after a period of incubation? (b) Are these differences in ATP levels related to differences in other sperm traits? (c) Are differences in ATP content and sperm performance over time explained by the levels of sperm competition in these species? Our results revealed a high degree of interspecific variability in changes in sperm ATP content, acrosome integrity, sperm motility and swimming velocity over time. Additionally, species with high sperm competition levels were able to maintain higher levels of sperm motility and faster sperm swimming velocity when they were incubated under conditions that support sperm survival. Furthermore, we show that the maintenance of such levels of sperm performance is correlated with the ability of sperm to sustain high concentrations of intracellular ATP over time. Thus, sperm competition may have an important role maximizing sperm metabolism and performance and, ultimately, the fertilizing capacity of spermatozoa.

  13. Sperm whales ability to avoid approaching vessels is affected by sound reception in stratified waters.

    PubMed

    Gannier, A; Marty, G

    2015-06-15

    Collision with vessels is a major cause of whale mortality in the Mediterranean Sea. The effect of non-spherical sound propagation effects on received levels (RL) was investigated for the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). Relevant dive patterns were considered in each case and the RL were compared for two periods using a ray tracing software, the winter conditions and the summer stratified situation. RL were plotted as a function of time in a simulated collision case for two vessel speeds representative of a conventional merchant ship (15knots) and a fast-ferry (37knots). In almost all simulated cases, RL featured a brutal 23-31dB re 1μPa rise from below 100dB while the vessel approached the whale at close range. Summer situations were worse because this transition occurred at closer ranges, resulting in acoustic warning times of less than 30s in the fast ferry case. These results suggested that sperm whales could not be able to achieve an escape manoeuvre in a critical situation such as a fast vessel approaching under stratified waters conditions.

  14. Site of intrauterine artificial insemination in the bitch does not affect sperm distribution within the uterus.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, F B; Malm, C; Henry, M; Gheller, V A; Serakides, R; Neves, M M; Macedo, S P; Figueiredo, M S; Andrade, M E J; Chaves, M S; Silva, M X; Rezende, C M F; Melo, E G

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of frozen-thawed spermatozoa within the uterine lumen and oviducts following intrauterine laparoscopic deposition at two sites. Twelve bitches of unknown reproductive history were randomly distributed into two groups. Semen (3 ml containing 300 × 10(6) frozen-thawed spermatozoa) was infused at the uterine body (UB group) or at the cranial tip of the left uterine horn. A 22-G catheter was used to access the uterine lumen. Sperm cell distribution was evaluated after ovariohysterectomy performed 3 h after artificial insemination (AI). There was no difference between groups in mean time to perform AI. Spermatozoa were detected in all uterine segments, including the tip of both horns, but none was detected in the oviduct. The 22-G catheter facilitated deposition of semen in the uterine lumen, particularly at the UB site. Sperm cell distribution occurred evenly along both horns, independent of the site of semen deposition.

  15. Dynamics of sperm DNA fragmentation in the swine: ejaculate and temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llano, B; López-Fernández, C; García-Casado, P; Arroyo, F; Gosalbez, A; Sala, R; Gosálvez, J

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of sperm DNA fragmentation was examined in 16 boar ejaculates using the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test and a two-tail comet assay. The net sperm rich fraction was preserved at two different temperatures (Trial 1: 15 degrees C, n=10; Trial 2: 37 degrees C, n=6) and sub-samples were taken every day until a sperm motility of zero. Significant differences in the dynamics of DNA fragmentation were observed among the different ejaculates and also according to the storage temperature. After analyzing the dynamic response of the sperm DNA damage, when the sperm samples are incubated at 15 or 37 degrees C, each ejaculate could be classified and a considerable variation among individuals for an increase in DNA damage was observed. Thus, while in some ejaculates no rise in DNA fragmentation was observed, in others, the sperm DNA fragmentation process was triggered during the initial days of the experiment. In general, sperm incubation at 37 degrees C diminished sperm DNA quality. The two-tail comet assay indicated that at time zero existing DNA damage mainly consisted of double stranded DNA breakage. During storage, DNA damage affected one of the DNA strands until a second wave of DNA damage, in which there was both single and double stranded DNA damage.

  16. Aspermy, Sperm Quality and Radiation in Chernobyl Birds

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Rudolfsen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Background Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, large amounts of radionuclides were emitted and spread in the environment. Animals living in such contaminated areas are predicted to suffer fitness costs including reductions in the quality and quantity of gametes. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied whether aspermy and sperm quality were affected by radioactive contamination by examining ejaculates from wild caught birds breeding in areas varying in background radiation level by more than three orders of magnitude around Chernobyl, Ukraine. The frequency of males with aspermy increased logarithmically with radiation level. While 18.4% of males from contaminated areas had no sperm that was only the case for 3.0% of males from uncontaminated control areas. Furthermore, there were negative relationships between sperm quality as reflected by reduced sperm velocity and motility, respectively, and radiation. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that radioactive contamination around Chernobyl affects sperm production and quality. We are the first to report an interspecific difference in sperm quality in relation to radioactive contamination. PMID:24963711

  17. Effects of Synthetic Serum Supplementation in Sperm Preparation Media on Sperm Capacitation and Function Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ying-Fu; Tzeng, Shu-Ling; Huang, Chun-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Albumin supplementation of culture media induces sperm capacitation in assisted reproduction technique cycles. Synthetic serum supplementation is clinically used to replace albumin for preventing transmission of infectious agents. However, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation have rarely been investigated. Spermatozoa from 30 men with normal basic semen analysis results were collected, divided into five aliquots, and cultured in capacitating conditions in four combinations of two synthetic serum supplements, serum substitute supplement (SSS) and serum protein substitute (SPS), and two fertilization media, Quinns Advantage™ Fertilization (QF) and human tubular fluid (HTF) media. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in spermatozoa were measured through chemiluminescence. Furthermore, acrosome reaction and western blotting for tyrosine phosphorylation were used to evaluate sperm capacitation. HTF+SSS had significantly higher ROS levels than QF+SPS did (11,725 ± 1,172 versus 6,278 ± 864 relative light units). In addition, the spermatozoa cultured in QF+SPS had lower motility, acrosome reaction rates, and tyrosine phosphorylation levels compared with those cultured in HTF+SSS. In conclusion, the effects of synthetic serum supplementation on sperm capacitation varied according to the combination of media. These differences may lead to variations in spermatozoon ROS levels, thus affecting sperm function test results. PMID:27413417

  18. Oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio) sperm.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; McCarthy, Megan; Carter, Virginia L; Meyers, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Laboratories around the world have produced tens of thousands of mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines. As with mice, maintaining all of these valuable zebrafish genotypes is expensive, risky, and beyond the capacity of even the largest stock centers. Because reducing oxidative stress has become an important aspect of reducing the variability in mouse sperm cryopreservation, we examined whether antioxidants might improve cryopreservation of zebrafish sperm. Four experiments were conducted in this study. First, we used the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) system to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). The X-XO system was capable of producing a stress reaction in zebrafish sperm reducing its sperm motility in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). Second, we examined X-XO and the impact of antioxidants on sperm viability, ROS and motility. Catalase (CAT) mitigated stress and maintained viability and sperm motility (P>0.05), whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) and vitamin E did not (P<0.05). Third, we evaluated ROS in zebrafish spermatozoa during cryopreservation and its effect on viability and motility. Methanol (8%) reduced viability and sperm motility (P<0.05), but the addition of CAT mitigated these effects (P>0.05), producing a mean 2.0 to 2.9-fold increase in post-thaw motility. Fourth, we examined the effect of additional cryoprotectants and CAT on fresh sperm motility. Cryoprotectants, 8% methanol and 10% dimethylacetamide (DMA), reduced the motility over the control value (P<0.5), whereas 10% dimethylformamide (DMF) with or without CAT did not (P>0.05). Zebrafish sperm protocols should be modified to improve the reliability of the cryopreservation process, perhaps using a different cryoprotectant. Regardless, the simple addition of CAT to present-day procedures will significantly improve this process, assuring increased and less variable fertilization success and allowing resource managers to dependably plan how many straws are needed to safely

  19. Anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide), a brain cannabinoid receptor agonist, reduces sperm fertilizing capacity in sea urchins by inhibiting the acrosome reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Schuel, H; Goldstein, E; Mechoulam, R; Zimmerman, A M; Zimmerman, S

    1994-01-01

    Anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide) is an endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonist in mammalian brain. Sea urchin sperm contain a high-affinity cannabinoid receptor similar to the cannabinoid receptor in mammalian brain. (-)-delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive cannabinoid in marihuana, reduces the fertilizing capacity of sea urchin sperm by blocking the acrosome reaction that normally is stimulated by a specific ligand in the egg's jelly coat. We now report that anandamide produces effects similar to those previously obtained with THC in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus in reducing sperm fertilizing capacity and inhibiting the egg jelly-stimulated acrosome reaction. Arachidonic acid does not inhibit the acrosome reaction under similar conditions. The adverse effects of anandamide on sperm fertilizing capacity and the acrosome reaction are reversible. The receptivity of unfertilized eggs to sperm and sperm motility are not impaired by anandamide. Under conditions where anandamide completely blocks the egg jelly-stimulated acrosome reaction, it does not inhibit the acrosome reaction artificially initiated by ionomycin, which promotes Ca2+ influx, and nigericin, which activates K+ channels in sperm. These findings provide additional evidence that the cannabinoid receptor in sperm plays a role in blocking the acrosome reaction, indicate that anandamide or a related molecule may be the natural ligand for the cannabinoid receptor in sea urchin sperm, and suggest that binding of anandamide to the cannabinoid receptor modulates stimulus-secretion-coupling in sperm by affecting an event prior to ion channel opening. PMID:8052642

  20. Regulation of flagellar motility by the conserved flagellar protein CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Cochran, Deborah A.; Gargano, Mary D.; King, Iryna; Samhat, Nayef K.; Burger, Benjain P.; Sabourin, Katherine R.; Hou, Yuqing; Awata, Junya; Parry, David A.D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Witman, George B.; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are vital sensory and motile organelles. The calcium channel PKD2 mediates sensory perception on cilia and flagella, and defects in this can contribute to ciliopathic diseases. Signaling from Pkd2-dependent Ca2+ rise in the cilium to downstream effectors may require intermediary proteins that are largely unknown. To identify these proteins, we carried out genetic screens for mutations affecting Drosophila melanogaster sperm storage, a process mediated by Drosophila Pkd2. Here we show that a new mutation lost boys (lobo) encodes a conserved flagellar protein CG34110, which corresponds to vertebrate Ccdc135 (E = 6e-78) highly expressed in ciliated respiratory epithelia and sperm, and to FAP50 (E = 1e-28) in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar proteome. CG34110 localizes along the fly sperm flagellum. FAP50 is tightly associated with the outer doublet microtubules of the axoneme and appears not to be a component of the central pair, radial spokes, dynein arms, or structures defined by the mbo waveform mutants. Phenotypic analyses indicate that both Pkd2 and lobo specifically affect sperm movement into the female storage receptacle. We hypothesize that the CG34110/Ccdc135/FAP50 family of conserved flagellar proteins functions within the axoneme to mediate Pkd2-dependent processes in the sperm flagellum and other motile cilia. PMID:21289096

  1. Characterization of epididymal sperm motion and its correlation with stages of target cells in rats given alpha-chlorohydrin, cyclophosphamide or nitrazepam.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, M; Kanamori, S; Hara, K; Kishi, K

    1999-08-01

    Epididymal sperm motion in rats was characterized by computer-aided sperm motion analysis (CASA) with its correlation to testicular lesions in the 2-week treatment study, using three compounds which are known to affect different stages of germ cells. Mature male rats were treated daily for 2 weeks with alpha-chlorohydrin (alpha-CH, 5 mg/kg), cyclophosphamide (CP, 20 mg/kg) or nitrazepam (NZ, 20, 40, 60 mg/kg). Changes in sperm motion were detected only in the alpha-CH and 60-mg/kg NZ-treated groups. Of the sperm motion parameters, velocity and amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) were concomitantly reduced in these two groups with good correlation. With respect to the distribution of the values in parameters, however, alpha-CH shifted the values down within a small range with high percentages of motile sperm, while NZ distributed them over a wide range with low percentages of motile sperm. CP treatment showed no histopathological changes in advanced germ cells, though it showed a decrease in the number of early germ cells. NZ treatment affected round and elongating spermatids (approximately step 14) at doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, and affected also more advanced spermatids (approximately step 19) at the dose of 60 mg/kg. alpha-CH treatment did not affect testicular histopathology. These findings indicate that 60-mg/kg NZ treatment reduced sperm motion as a result of lesions affected in elongated spermatids and alpha-CH reduced it by direct effects on epididymal spermatozoa. The present study indicates that in addition to percentage of motile sperm, the velocity and ALH can be useful to detect the changes in sperm motion caused by different actions of NZ and alpha-CH, though each compound showed a distinct distribution pattern of these parameters.

  2. Role of C-type natriuretic peptide in the function of normal human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Chen, Yao; Wu, Ke-Jia; Zhao, Hu; Xiong, Cheng-Liang; Huang, Dong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a newly discovered type of local regulatory factor that mediates its biological effects through the specific, membrane-bound natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B). Recent studies have established that CNP is closely related to male reproductive function. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of CNP/NPR-B in human ejaculated spermatozoa through different methods (such as immunolocalization, real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot), and then to evaluate the influence of CNP on sperm function in vitro, such as motility and acrosome reaction. Human semen samples were collected from consenting donors who met the criteria of the World Health Organization for normozoospermia. Our results show that the specific receptor NPR-B of CNP is localized in the acrosomal region of the head and the membrane of the front-end tail of the sperm, and there is no signal of CNP in human sperm. Compared with the control, CNP can induce a significant dose-dependent increase in spermatozoa motility and acrosome reaction. In summary, CNP/NPR-B can affect sperm motility and acrosome reaction, thus regulating the reproductive function of males. CNP may be a new key factor in regulating sperm function. PMID:25926602

  3. Healthy Sperm: Improving Your Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Getting pregnant Healthy sperm aren't always a given. Understand how lifestyle factors can affect your ... as a laptop, might enhance sperm quality. Adopting healthy lifestyle practices to promote your fertility — and avoiding things ...

  4. Absence of beneficial effects on rabbit sperm cell cryopreservation by several antioxidant agents.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; Taberner, E; Sabés-Alsina, M; Piles, M; Lopez-Bejar, M

    2015-02-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species associated with cryopreservation could be responsible for mammalian sperm damage and the limitable value of stored semen in artificial insemination. The aim of this study was to assess several antioxidant agents supplemented in a commercial freezing extender (Gent B®) in order to improve post-thaw rabbit sperm quality. Ejaculates of 26 New Zealand White rabbit bucks were collected, evaluated and frozen using a conventional protocol. Antioxidant agents were tested at different concentrations: bovine serum albumin (BSA; 5, 30 or 60 mg/ml), retinol (RO; 50, 100 or 200 μM) and retinyl (RI; 0.282 or 2.82 μg/ml). Per cent viability, morphological abnormalities and intact acrosomes were determined using eosin-nigrosin staining. Motility and progressivity were analyzed by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). In general, all sperm quality parameters were negatively affected by the cryopreservation process, the largest effect seen was for total motility. The addition of antioxidant agents did not improve thaw sperm quality. Furthermore, for RI groups a significant decrease in sperm quality parameters was recorded. In conclusion, rabbit sperm quality is negatively affected by the cryopreservation process. To our knowledge this report is the first using these antioxidants to supplement rabbit freezing extender. BSA and RO at concentrations used in the study did not improve sperm quality parameters after thawing, whereas RI supplementation appeared to be toxic. More studies are required to find the appropriate antioxidants necessary and their most effective concentrations to improve rabbit post-thaw sperm quality.

  5. Impact of kudzu and puerarin on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sandra L; Lackey, Brett R; Boone, William R

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of kudzu (Pueraria mirifica) and the isoflavone puerarin in functional toxicological tests on spermatozoa and to assess the affinity of extracts and pure isoflavones for estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and -beta (ERα, ERβ) in receptor binding assays. Capacitation, acrosome reaction and chromatin decondensation in spermatozoa were analyzed using microscopic analysis. Kudzu, but not puerarin, reduced motility of sperm. Puerarin reduced the percent spontaneous acrosome reaction in spermatozoa. The pathways used by kudzu that affect sperm function are not fully mirrored by puerarin. Puerarin, kudzu and its other phytoestrogenic components displayed preferential affinity for ERβ, however the diverse effects of kudzu and puerarin on sperm function implicate the involvement of multiple signaling systems.

  6. Transrectal microwave thermotherapy causing a short-time influence on sperm quality in Chinese chronic nonbacterial prostatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jia-Xin; Wang, Han-Zhang; Zhai, Zheng-Xing; Ma, Bao-Liang; Li, Qin-Fang; Xiao, Nan; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2016-08-19

    Chronic prostatitis can affect the sperm's quality. Previous studies have shown that transrectal microwave thermotherapy (TRMT) results in symptomatic relief in patients with chronic prostatitis, but the effects on sperm have not been carefully investigated. This study evaluates the impact of TRMT on the relief or decrease of symptoms and quality of sperm when used to treat patients with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. Sixty patients were enrolled in the study. TRMT treatment was administered over 5 days, 1 h per day. Semen examination was carried out pretreatment and immediately at the conclusion of the 5-day treatment. Also, it was repeated 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months later. The treatment's symptom relief efficacy was evaluated using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). After the treatment, the overall NIH-CPSI scores were lower compared to those of pretreatment. In addition, the white blood cells and lecithin in expressed prostatic secretion were normal after the treatment. The sperm count was decreased by 23.8% 3 months after the treatment, sperm motility was reduced by 10.3% immediately after treatment, and sperm deformity was increased by 17.2%. The sperm volume and PH were not affected. However, the sperm quality recovered after treatment and the malformation rate was also lower at 6 months after treatment. TRMT is a favorable and safe treatment option for patients with nonbacterial chronic prostatitis. It could relieve the patient's symptoms and impact on sperm quality in the short-term.

  7. Biochemical and microscopic analysis of sperm in copper deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.; Jackson, P.; Allison, S.

    1986-03-01

    The Mottle Brindle Mouse Syndrome is a disease in mice which mimics Menkes Syndrome in humans. Treatment of affected male mice has led to varying survival rates in mice and few attempts have led to the development of virile male offsprings in mice and none in humans. In this study the authors examined sperm produced by Brindle mice in an attempt to ascertain reasons for the observed failure of the Brindle mice to reproduce. Microscopic analysis revealed that sperm counts in these mice are higher than sperm counts of the C57/BL or the C57/6J (normal) mice. Microscopically, sperm from Brindle mice showed changes in the acrosomal and flagellum regions. Motility of these sperm were 10% to 50% that of sperm from normal mice. Biochemically, cytochrome oxidase activity was 10% to 50% of the activity seen in normal mice. Hexokinase activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was equal to that observed in normal mice. These observations suggest that infertility in Brindle male mice is due to an impairment of testicular copper transport which leads to a decline in copper dependent processes.

  8. Cholesterol-Loaded Cyclodextrin Increases the Cholesterol Content of Goat Sperm to Improve Cold and Osmotic Resistance and Maintain Sperm Function after Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Vianney M; Leclerc, Pierre; Bailey, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    The success of semen cryopreservation depends on sperm membrane integrity and function after thawing. Cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC) is used for in vitro incorporation of cholesterol to protect cells against cold temperatures. We hypothesized that CLC treatment also enhances sperm cholesterol content to increase tolerance to osmotic shock and cryoresistance, thereby improving fertility. We confirmed the fact that treatment of goat semen with 3 mg/ml CLC increases sperm cholesterol content using both the Liebermann-Burchard approach and filipin III labeling of membrane cholesterol. Sperm were then treated with or without CLC and cryopreserved. After thawing, sperm cholesterol dramatically fell, even in the presence of CLC, which explains the mechanism of cryocapacitation. CLC treatment, however, maintained a normal prefreeze cholesterol level in sperm after cryopreservation. Furthermore, fresh sperm treated with CLC and subjected to either cold shock or incubated in hypo-, iso-, and hyperosmotic media, designed to mimic stresses associated with freezing/thawing, displayed increased temperature and osmotic tolerance. CLC treatment also improved sperm viability, motility, and acrosome integrity after thawing. Furthermore, CLC treatment did not affect the sperm's ability to undergo in vitro capacitation according to chlortetracycline fluorescence and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. A pilot field trial demonstrated that artificial insemination with sperm that underwent increased cholesterol levels following CLC treatment yielded higher fertility ( ITALIC! P< 0.1) and proliferation ( ITALIC! P< 0.05) rates in vivo than untreated semen from the same ejaculate samples. These observations suggest that CLC treatment could be used to improve cryoprotection during the freezing and thawing of goat sperm.

  9. Removing seminal plasma improves bovine sperm sex-sorting.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, C B; Graham, J K; Lenz, R W; Seidel, G E

    2016-11-01

    Bull ejaculates with sperm concentrations of less than 1 billion sperm sort poorly for sex chromosomes, but whether this is because of the sperm concentration or the concomitant seminal plasma content has not been elucidated. Experiments were conducted to determine why ejaculates with lower sperm concentrations sort poorly and develop a protocol to increase sorting efficiency. In Experiment I, spermatozoa at 160 or 240 × 10(6) sperm/mL were stained at 49, 65 or 81 μm Hoechst 33342 with 0 or 10% seminal plasma and then sex-sorted. In Experiment II, seminal plasma was adjusted to create samples with sperm concentrations of 0.7, 1.4 and 2.1 × 10(9) sperm/mL, prior to sex-sorting. In Experiment III, spermatozoa were diluted to 0.7, 1.4 and 2.1 × 10(9) sperm/mL using TALP containing 0 or 10% seminal plasma prior to sex-sorting and cryopreservation. In Experiment I, the optimal staining combination was 160 × 10(6) sperm/mL stained with 65 μm Hoechst 33342 and no seminal plasma. In Experiment II, the percentages of membrane-impaired sperm were lower for sample concentrations of 2.1 × 10(9) sperm/mL (15%) than for samples at 1.4 × 10(9) (17%) or 0.7 × 10(9) sperm/mL (18%; p < 0.01). The X sort rate was slower for samples stored at 0.7 × 10(9) sperm/mL (3.45 × 10(3) sperm/sec) than for samples stored at 1.4 × 10(9) and 2.1 × 10(9) sperm/mL (3.85 and 3.94 × 10(3) sperm/sec, respectively; p < 0.05). In Experiment III, samples containing 0% seminal plasma had higher percentages of live-oriented cells (54 vs. 50%; p < 0.05), fewer dead sperm (19 vs. 22%; p < 0.01) and higher post-thaw motility (41 vs. 35%; p < 0.05) than samples containing 10% seminal plasma. Ejaculates with high sperm concentrations result in superior sorting because these samples have less seminal plasma during staining than ejaculates with lower initial sperm concentrations as all samples are diluted to 160 × 10(6) sperm/mL for staining. Therefore, sorting

  10. Depolymerization-driven flow and the crawling of nematode sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles

    2008-03-01

    Cell crawling motility is integral in many biological and biomedical processes, such as wound healing, cancer metastasis, and morphogenesis. A complete understanding of the mechanisms by which cells crawl is still lacking, but it is known to entail at least three separate physical processes: (i) cytoskeletal extension at the front of the cell; (ii) adhesion to the substrate at the cell front and release at the rear; and (iii) advance of the cell body. In most cells, the cytoskeletal network is composed of actin. The mechanism by which force is generated to drive translocation of the cell body is still debated. Originally, this force was attributed to an actomyosin system similar to muscle. However, nematode sperm utilize a cytoskeleton composed of a network of Major Sperm Protein (MSP) that forms non-polar filaments for which molecular motors have not been identified. The motility of these cells still exhibits all three fundamental processes required for standard crawling motility. Experiments suggest that depolymerization of the cytoskeletal network is the force-producing mechanism for pulling up the rear. In this talk I will present a mechanical model that describes how depolymerization of the cytoskeleton can drive motility. This model accounts for both cytoskeletal displacements and cytsolic (the fluid component of the cell) flow. The model accurately fits in vitro data using nematode sperm extracts where depolymerization induces contraction of MSP polymer bundles. Application of this model to cell crawling produces testable predictions about how the size and shape of a cell affect crawling speed. Experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans sperm show good agreement with the model predictions. Interestingly, the model requires that cells are anisotropically elastic, being more stiff in the direction of motion than perpendicular to it. A simple physical picture can account for this anisotropy. The model also predicts that cell speed increases with anisotropy and

  11. Sperm characterization and identification of sperm sub-populations in ejaculates from pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus).

    PubMed

    Beracochea, F; Gil, J; Sestelo, A; Garde, J J; Santiago-Moreno, J; Fumagalli, F; Ungerfeld, R

    2014-10-01

    Pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) is a native endangered species. Knowledge of the basic spermiogram characteristics and the morphometric descriptors is necessary to effectively develop sperm cryopreservation. In other species, sperm sub-population is related to sperm cryo-resistance. The objective was to provide a general description of the sperm, including sperm head morphometric descriptors, its repeatability, and the existence of sperm sub-populations. Sperm were obtained from adult males by electroejaculation during the breeding season. The motility score was 3.4 ± 0.2 (mean ± SEM) and progressive motility was 59.4 ± 3.7%. Ejaculated volume was 413.9 ± 51.0 μl, the total number of sperm ejaculated was 321.2 ± 55.4 × 10(6). Also, 63.3 ± 3.1% of the sperm were morphologically abnormal and 23.7 ± 2.3% had acrosome damage. The sperm head length was 7.6 ± 0.01 μm, width 4.4 ± 0.01 μm, area 28.1 ± 0.07 μm(2) and the perimeter was 21.9 ± 0.04 μm. There was a positive relationship among morphometric descriptors and the motility score, overall motility and progressive motility. Also length (P=0.011), width (P=0.003), area (P=0.006) and perimeter (P=0.009) of sperm head obtained in two different collections were positively related. Overall, the low concentration, volume, overall quality and abnormal morphology, and wide variation of these variables may be a limitation for the development of sperm cryopreserved banks. There were three sperm sub-populations with different morphometric characteristics. The morphometric descriptors are maintained similarly among different collections.

  12. Proteome analysis for profiling infertility markers in male mouse sperm after carbon ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Yan; Zhang, Hong

    2013-04-05

    Ion radiation or radiotherapy is used to treat male patients with oligozoospermia, azoospermia, temporarily infertility, or even permanent infertility. The present study aims to investigate the potential infertility mechanism of sperm in mice after carbon ion radiation (CIR). The caudal epididymal sperm of male mice whole-body irradiated with carbon ion beam (0.5Gy and 4Gy) were used 7 days after irradiation. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approach was employed to investigate the changes in protein expression in the caudal edididymal sperm. Spot detection and matching were performed using the PDQuest 8.0 software. The criteria used to select spots for the analysis were more than a threefold difference in protein quantities (normalized spot volume), which allowed the detection of six differentially expressed proteins. Protein identification was performed using MALDI-TOF-TOF. Six specific proteins were identified by searching the NCBI protein sequence database. Among these proteins, HSP 70-2, PLC, GPX4, β-tubulin, and GAPDHS were associated with sperm motility, which can affect fertility. β-tubulin is important in axoneme migration flagellar movement and regulation, and GAPDHS is related to sperm energy supply. We analyzed their expressions using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. The changes in sperm protein expression after CIR are mainly associated with motility. These proteins are potential markers for the mechanisms of infertility in space or radiotherapy.

  13. The Effects of Total Motile Sperm Count on Spontaneous Pregnancy Rate and Pregnancy After IUI Treatment in Couples with Male Factor and Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hajder, Mithad; Hajder, Elmira; Husic, Amela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Male infertility factor is defined if the total number of motile spermatozoa (TMSC) < 20 × 106/ejaculated, and unexplained infertility if spermiogram is normal with normal female factor. The aim: of this study was to determine the predictive value of TMSC for spontaneous pregnancy (ST) and pregnancy after treatment with intrauterine insemination (IUI) in couples with male factor and unexplained infertility. What is known already: According to the WHO qualification system abnormal spermiogram can be diagnosed as oligozoospermia (O), asthenozoospermia (A), teratozoospermia (T) or combination (O+A+T) and azoospermia (A). Although this classification indicates the accuracy of findings its relevance for prognosis in infertile couple and the choice of treatment is questionable. Materials and Methods: The study included 98 couples with male infertility factor (bad spermiogram) and couples with normospermia and normal female factor (unexplained infertility). Testing group is randomized at: group (A) with TMSC> 3,106 / ejaculate and a spontaneous pregnancy, group (B) with TMSCl <3 x 106 / ejaculate and pregnancy after IUI, plus couples who have not achieved SP with TMSC> 3 x 106 / ejaculate and couples who have not achieved pregnancy. Main results: From a total of 98 pairs of men’s and unexplained infertility, 42 of them (42.8%) achieved spontaneous pregnancy, while 56 (57.2%) pairs did not achieve spontaneous pregnancy. TMSC was significantly higher (42.4 ± 28.4 vs. 26.2 ± 24, p <0.05) in the group A compared to group B. Couples with TMSC 1-5 × 106 ejaculate had significantly lower (9.8% vs. 22.2%, p <0.0001) rate of spontaneous pregnancy in comparison to couples after IUI treatment. Couples with unexplained infertility had significantly higher (56.8% vs. 29.9%, p <0.01) spontaneous pregnancy rate compared to couples after IUI treatment. Infertile couples had significant pregnancy rate with TMSC 5-10 x 106 / ejaculate (OR = 1.45, 95% CI:1.26-1.78, <0

  14. Sperm viral infection and male infertility: focus on HBV, HCV, HIV, HPV, HSV, HCMV, and AAV.

    PubMed

    Garolla, Andrea; Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Menegazzo, Massimo; Barzon, Luisa; Foresta, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Chronic viral infections can infect sperm and are considered a risk factor in male infertility. Recent studies have shown that the presence of HIV, HBV or HCV in semen impairs sperm parameters, DNA integrity, and in particular reduces forward motility. In contrast, very little is known about semen infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpesviruses (HSV), cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV). At present, EU directives for the viral screening of couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques require only the evaluation of HIV, HBV, and HCV. However, growing evidence suggests that HPV, HSV, and HCMV might play a major role in male infertility and it has been demonstrated that HPV semen infection has a negative influence on sperm parameters, fertilization, and the abortion rate. Besides the risk of horizontal or vertical transmission, the negative impact of any viral sperm infection on male reproductive function seems to be dramatic. In addition, treatment with antiviral and antiretroviral therapies may further affect sperm parameters. In this review we attempted to focus on the interactions between defined sperm viral infections and their association with male fertility disorders. All viruses considered in this article have a potentially negative effect on male reproductive function and dangerous infections can be transmitted to partners and newborns. In light of this evidence, we suggest performing targeted sperm washing procedures for each sperm infection and to strongly consider screening male patients seeking fertility for HPV, HSV, and HCMV, both to avoid viral transmission and to improve assisted or even spontaneous fertility outcome.

  15. Vacuoles in sperm head are not associated with head morphology, DNA damage and reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Adriana; Boni, Raffaele; Leo, Rita; Nacchia, Giuseppina; Liguori, Francesca; Casale, Sofia; Bonassisa, Paolo; Tosti, Elisabetta

    2016-02-01

    In this retrospective study of 873 men enrolled for assisted reproduction techniques, relationships between sperm quality parameters, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME), DNA damage and live birth rate were evaluated. The presence of vacuoles in the sperm heads was detected by MSOME. Either chromatin decondensation or DNA fragmentation was used to study DNA damage. Results show that age significantly affected some of the examined parameters. In particular, sperm concentration was positively correlated (R = 0.088; P = 0.01) and chromatin decondensation was negatively correlated (R = -0.102; P = 0.003) with age. Furthermore, live birth rate was significantly lower in men aged 40 years or older (P < 0.02) compared with the younger age groups. The presence of sperm head vacuoles was not associated with head morphology, main sperm quality parameters, DNA fragmentation and live birth rate. Considering sperm heads in relation to the shape (normal/abnormal) and vacuoles (presence/absence), no significant variations in the occurrence of vacuoles in either normal or abnormal heads were found. These data suggest that vacuoles are physiological features that do not alter sperm functionality, and it seems that MSOME is not necessary for increasing the success of assisted reproduction techniques.

  16. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P < 0.05) sperm motility and membrane integrity, in both nonselected and DCG-selected sperm samples, >60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection.

  17. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  18. Scrotal heat stress effects on sperm viability, sperm DNA integrity, and the offspring sex ratio in mice.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Crespo, M; Pintado, B; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2008-01-01

    Evidence exists to suggest detrimental effects of heat stress on male fertility. This study was designed to assess the effects of scrotal heat stress on mature and developing sperm in a mouse model. After receiving shock heat treatment (42 degrees C for 30 min), mature spermatozoa were recovered from the epididymis hours (6) or Days (7, 14, 21, 28, 60) later, to determine the variables: number of spermatozoa, sperm viability, motility and progressive motility, sperm DNA integrity as established by the TUNEL method, embryo implantation rate, and sex ratio of the fetuses conceived using the heat-exposed spermatozoa. Our results indicate that transient mild heat treatment does not affect in the same way the different types of male germ cells. Spermatocytes present within the testis at the time of heat stress resulted into a lower concentration of spermatozoa with reduced viability and low motility. Even though, DNA integrity of spermatozoa resulting from spermatocytes was also compromised by heat stress, the higher degree of DNA damage was found among spermatozoa resulting from spermatids present within the testis at the time of heat stress. At last, heat shock effect on spermatozoa present in the epididymis at the time of thermal stress resulted into a sex ratio distortion. These findings point to a higher sensitivity of spermatocytes to heat exposure and also suggest a different response of X and Y chromosome-bearing spermatozoa to heat stress that warrants further investigation.

  19. Effect of mobile telephones on sperm quality: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jessica A; Galloway, Tamara S; Mondal, Debapriya; Esteves, Sandro C; Mathews, Fiona

    2014-09-01

    Mobile phones are owned by most of the adult population worldwide. Radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) from these devices could potentially affect sperm development and function. Around 14% of couples in high- and middle-income countries have difficulty conceiving, and there are unexplained declines in semen quality reported in several countries. Given the ubiquity of mobile phone use, the potential role of this environmental exposure needs to be clarified. A systematic review was therefore conducted, followed by meta-analysis using random effects models, to determine whether exposure to RF-EMR emitted from mobile phones affects human sperm quality. Participants were from fertility clinic and research centres. The sperm quality outcome measures were motility, viability and concentration, which are the parameters most frequently used in clinical settings to assess fertility. We used ten studies in the meta-analysis, including 1492 samples. Exposure to mobile phones was associated with reduced sperm motility (mean difference -8.1% (95% CI -13.1, -3.2)) and viability (mean difference -9.1% (95% CI -18.4, 0.2)), but the effects on concentration were more equivocal. The results were consistent across experimental in vitro and observational in vivo studies. We conclude that pooled results from in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that mobile phone exposure negatively affects sperm quality. Further study is required to determine the full clinical implications for both sub-fertile men and the general population.

  20. Effects of different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on boar sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Lilian; Bussalleu, Eva; Yeste, Marc; Bonet, Sergi

    2014-11-30

    Bacteriospermia in boar ejaculates is a frequent finding that compromises the sperm quality and, consequently, causes economic losses in swine industry. The present study sought to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on boar sperm quality over a storing period of 11 days at 15-17 ° C. Ten commercial seminal doses coming from post-pubertal and healthy boars were artificially inoculated with different infective concentrations of P. aeruginosa, ranging from 2 × 10(8) to 2 × 10(4)cfu/mL. Negative controls were non-inoculated doses. Sperm quality, assessed as sperm motility (CASA), sperm viability, acrosome integrity and pH, as well as the bacterial growth, were checked after 0, 1, 2, 4, 7, 9 and 11 days of storage at 15-17 ° C. Results obtained showed significant decreases in the percentages of total and progressive sperm motility, sperm viability and acrosome integrity in the greatest infective concentrations (2 × 10(7) and 2 × 10(8)cfu/mL), when compared to the negative control. In contrast, there was no effect on seminal pH throughout the experiment. Results indicate the presence of P. aeruginosa in boar semen, apart from being a potential source for the spread of infectious diseases and harmful impact on sows, negatively affects the longevity and fertilizing ability of boar sperm when present in high concentrations. Thus, P. aeruginosa causes deleterious effects on boar sperm quality during liquid storage at 15-17 ° C, thus strict hygienic measures must be implemented in boar studs to minimize bacterial concentration of semen doses.

  1. Decay of sperm obtained from epididymes of wild ruminants depending on postmortem time.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pastor, F; Guerra, C; Kaabi, M; Diaz, A R; Anel, E; Herraez, P; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a study on the effect of postmortem time (PT) in some characteristics of epididymal sperm salvaged from hunted Iberian red deer and roe deer. Testis were collected, identified, refrigerated down to 5 degrees C, and sent to our laboratory by the wardens of the hunting reserves. This way, samples were delivered at different times postmortem. Sperm were extracted from the cauda epididymis by means of cuts. Analyzed parameters were: osmolality, pH, motility-both subjectively and with CASA, HOS test reactivity, acrosomal status and viability (assessed with propidium iodide). Osmolality and pH rose with prolonged postmortem time, possibly due to tissue decomposition. Most sperm quality parameters negatively correlated with PT. Besides, when comparing PT classes (groups of 24 h for red deer and 30 h for roe deer), we could appreciate that motility was more affected by PT than other quality variables. Progressive motility was especially impaired. We also classified the samples in high, medium and low quality for each PT group (considering progressive motility, intact acrosomes and reactivity to the HOS test), and it was clear that after 2 days the number of high quality samples was testimonial, and after several days, we almost found only low quality samples. In conclusion, epididymal sperm from Iberian red deer and roe deer undergo a decrease of quality with PT, but it could stay acceptable within many hours postmortem. There are implications for wildlife conservation programs, as epididymal sperm is a good source of germplasm. If valuable animals die and it is not possible to process their sperm immediately, it may still be possible to obtain viable spermatozoa many hours later.

  2. Comparative evidence for the evolution of sperm swimming speed by sperm competition and female sperm storage duration in passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Oddmund; Fossøy, Frode; Laskemoen, Terje; Robertson, Raleigh J; Rudolfsen, Geir; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2009-09-01

    Sperm swimming speed is an important determinant of male fertility and sperm competitiveness. Despite its fundamental biological importance, the underlying evolutionary processes affecting this male reproductive trait are poorly understood. Using a comparative approach in a phylogenetic framework, we tested the predictions that sperm swim faster with (1) increased risk of sperm competition, (2) shorter duration of female sperm storage, and (3) increased sperm length. We recorded sperm swimming speed in 42 North American and European free-living passerine bird species, representing 35 genera and 16 families. We found that sperm swimming speed was positively related to the frequency of extrapair paternity (a proxy for the risk of sperm competition) and negatively associated with clutch size (a proxy for the duration of female sperm storage). Sperm swimming speed was unrelated to sperm length, although sperm length also increased with the frequency of extrapair paternity. These results suggest that sperm swimming speed and sperm length are not closely associated traits and evolve independently in response to sperm competition in passerine birds. Our findings emphasize the significance of both sperm competition and female sperm storage duration as evolutionary forces driving sperm swimming speed.

  3. Factors impacting the success of post-mortem sperm rescue in the rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Stoops, M A; Robeck, T R; O'Brien, J K

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors that influenced the ability to successfully rescue sperm post-mortem from rhinoceroses maintained in North American zoos. Factors considered included procedural technicalities, individual rhinoceros characteristics and timing. Gross testicular pathology was noted in 17.4% of males (4/23) but did not impact sperm recovery except in one case of azoospermia (4.3%). Of the males in which sperm recovery was attempted (n=21), 62% yielded quality samples considered adequate for cryopreservation (≥ 30% motility with ≥ 2.0 forward progressive status). A high percentage of males (70.6%; 12/17) from which reproductive tissue was removed an d cooled ≤ 4 h after death yielded quality sperm samples, whereas only 25% (1/4) of males from which tissue was removed>4h after death yielded quality samples. Quality samples were recovered 1-51 h post-mortem from rhinoceroses 8 to 36 years old. Neither type of illness (prolonged or acute), or method of death (euthanasia or natural) affected the ability to harvest quality samples (P > 0.05). The Indian rhinoceros yielded significantly more sperm on average (40 × 10(9)) than the African black rhinoceros (3.6 × 10(9); P < 0.01) and the African white rhinoceros (3.2 × 10(9); P < 0.05). Across all species and samples assessed (n = 11), mean post-thaw sperm motility (41%), was only 15% less than pre-freeze motility (56%) and only decreased to 22% during the 6h post-thaw assessment period. Rhinoceros sperm rescue post-mortem is relatively successful across a wide range of variables, especially when tissues are removed and cooled promptly after death, and should be considered standard practice among zoos.

  4. An environmentally relevant organochlorine mixture impairs sperm function and embryo development in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campagna, Céline; Guillemette, Christine; Paradis, René; Sirard, Marc-André; Ayotte, Pierre; Bailey, Janice L

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of an environmentally relevant mixture of more than 15 organochlorines on the development of pig oocytes and sperm during in vitro fertilization (IVF). Oocytes were cocultured with sperm in IVF medium containing increasing concentrations of an organochlorine mixture, similar to that found in women of highly exposed populations. Exposure to the organochlorine mixture diminished oocyte penetration rates and polyspermy in a linear manner. The mixture did not affect rates of cleavage nor development to multicell embryos. However, rates of development to the blastocyst stage were lower at the highest concentration at which oocyte penetration was observed. The same experiment was performed using oocytes that were preexposed during in vitro maturation. This greater exposure to the mixture also reduced penetration in a dose-response manner and affected polyspermy. Frozen-thawed pig sperm were also cultured in IVF medium containing the same organochlorine concentrations. Sperm motility parameters were immediately reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the organochlorines, followed by diminished viability 2 h later. From these results, it appears that reduced sperm quality would account for decreases in fertilization, polyspermy, and blastocyst formation. These results suggest that exposing porcine oocytes and sperm to an environmentally pertinent organochlorine mixture in vitro disrupts the oocyte block to polyspermy, sperm fertility, and further embryonic development, and supports recent concerns that such pollutants harm reproductive health in humans and other species.

  5. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  6. Does chronic supplementation of the diet with dietary fibre extracted from pea or carrot affect colonic motility in man?

    PubMed

    Guédon, C; Ducrotté, P; Antoine, J M; Denis, P; Colin, R; Lerebours, E

    1996-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess, in healthy volunteers and under physiological conditions, the acceptability, clinical tolerance and effects on colonic motility of chronic supplementation of the usual diet with new dietary fibre sources. Three studies were carried out, one after a period of habitual diet, and two after randomized 3-week periods of supplementation with fibre extracted either from pea hulls or carrots, added to the meals as a fine powder. The 24 h motility was recorded on an unprepared colon at five levels to determine the initiation site and the number of high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC) and to quantify motor activity every 30 min, particularly in the two periods following lunch and breakfast. With the habitual diet the motility pattern was an irregular alternation of quiescence and sporadic non-propagated contractions. HAPC always started from the ascending colon and occurred mainly after breakfast. With either type of fibre the 24 h motor profiles, the 24 h variations and the number of HAPC were not significantly modified but a more distal initiation of HAPC was found. The colonic postprandial motor response was more diffuse after dietary enrichment with carrot fibre than after enrichment with pea-hull fibre. In healthy volunteers the long-term addition of fibre extracted from pea hulls and carrots to the usual diet was easy and well-tolerated without clinical side-effects, but with limited colonic motor effects. However, the more distal initiation of HAPC observed could be deleterious.

  7. Motile properties of the bi-directional kinesin-5 Cin8 are affected by phosphorylation in its motor domain

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Ofer; Gheber, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 performs essential mitotic functions in spindle assembly and anaphase B spindle elongation. Recent work has shown that Cin8 is a bi-directional motor which moves towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs) under high ionic strength (IS) conditions and changes directionality in low IS conditions and when bound between anti-parallel microtubules. Previous work from our laboratory has also indicated that Cin8 is differentially phosphorylated during late anaphase at cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-specific sites located in its motor domain. In vivo, such phosphorylation causes Cin8 detachment from spindles and reduces the spindle elongation rate, while maintaining proper spindle morphology. To study the effect of phosphorylation on Cin8 motor function, we examined in vitro motile properties of wild type Cin8, as well as its phosphorylation using phospho-deficient and phospho-mimic variants, in a single molecule fluorescence motility assay. Analysis was performed on whole cell extracts and on purified Cin8 samples. We found that addition of negative charges in the phospho-mimic mutant weakened the MT-motor interaction, increased motor velocity and promoted minus-end-directed motility. These results indicate that phosphorylation in the catalytic domain of Cin8 regulates its motor function. PMID:27216310

  8. Cryopreservation of Iberian pig spermatozoa. Comparison of different freezing extenders based on post-thaw sperm quality.

    PubMed

    De Mercado, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Ana; Gómez, Emilio; Sanz, Elena

    2010-03-01

    characteristics. It can be suggested that in the Iberian pig, the beneficial effects of Orvus ES Paste during the freezing process of spermatozoa is time dependent. The analysis of different sperm characteristics such as motility, plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial function, determined that the extenders studied in the present experiment affected the quality of frozen-thawed semen in Iberian boar.

  9. Standardisation of a novel sperm banking kit - NextGen(®) - to preserve sperm parameters during shipment.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sharma, R; Singh, A; Gupta, S; Sharma, R

    2016-08-01

    Many male patients diagnosed with cancer are within their reproductive years. These men are advised to freeze their spermatozoa prior to the start of cancer treatment. Very often, sperm banking facilities may not be readily available and patients may be required to travel to distant sperm bank centres. Our objective was to design and standardise a remote home shipping sperm kit that allows patients to collect a semen sample at home and ship it overnight to a sperm bank. A total of 21 semen samples and two transport media (refrigeration media and human tubal fluid) and five different combinations of ice packs were tested for maintaining desired shipping temperature. Ten semen samples were assessed for pre- and post-shipment changes in sperm motility, membrane integrity, total motile spermatozoa and recovery of motile spermatozoa. Even though motility, membrane integrity and total motile spermatozoa declined both in samples examined under simulated shipped conditions and in overnight-shipped samples, the observed motility and total motile spermatozoa were adequate for use with assisted reproductive techniques. Using refrigeration media, cooling sleeve and ice packs, adequate sperm motility can be maintained utilising NextGen(®) kit and these spermatozoa can be used for procreation utilising ART techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  10. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  11. Effect of semen extender supplementation with cysteine on postthaw sperm quality, DNA damage, and fertilizing ability in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Öğretmen, Fatih; İnanan, Burak Evren; Kutluyer, Filiz; Kayim, Murathan

    2015-06-01

    Amino acids have an important biological role for prevention of cell damage during cryopreservation. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of cysteine on postthaw sperm motility, duration of sperm motility, DNA damage, and fertility in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Sperm collected from 10 individuals was cryopreserved in extenders containing different cysteine concentrations (2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mM). Semen samples diluted at the ratio of 1:9 by the extenders were subjected to cryopreservation. After dilution, the semen was aspirated into 0.25-mL straws; the straws were placed on the tray, frozen in nitrogen vapor, and plunged into liquid nitrogen. DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay after cryopreservation. Our results indicated that an increase in the concentration of cysteine caused a significant increase in the motility rate and duration of sperm in the common carp (C carpio; P < 0.05). Comparing all concentrations of cysteine, the best concentration of cysteine was 20 mM. Higher postthaw motility (76.00 ± 1.00%) and fertilization (97.00 ± 1.73%) rates were obtained with the extender at the concentration of 20 mM. Supplementation of the extender with cysteine was increased the fertilization and hatching rate and decreased DNA damage. Consequently, cysteine affected the motility, fertilization, and DNA damage positively, and extenders could be supplemented with cysteine.

  12. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Using DNA-Fragmented Sperm in Mice Negatively Affects Embryo-Derived Embryonic Stem Cells, Reduces the Fertility of Male Offspring and Induces Heritable Changes in Epialleles

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-González, Raúl; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Calero, Antonia; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in mice using DNA-fragmented sperm (DFS) has been linked to an increased risk of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities both in embryos and offspring. This study examines: whether embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from DFS-ICSI embryos reflect the abnormalities observed in the DFS-ICSI progeny; the effect of DFS-ICSI on male fertility; and whether DFS-ICSI induces epigenetic changes that lead to a modified heritable phenotype. DFS-ICSI-produced embryos showed a low potential to generate ESC lines. However, these lines had normal karyotype accompanied by early gene expression alterations, though a normal expression pattern was observed after several passages. The fertility of males in the DFS-ICSI and control groups was compared by mating test. Sperm quantity, vaginal plug and pregnancy rates were significantly lower for the DFS-ICSI-produced males compared to in vivo-produced mice, while the number of females showing resorptions was higher. The epigenetic effects of DFS-ICSI were assessed by analyzing the phenotype rendered by the Axin1Fu allele, a locus that is highly sensitive to epigenetic perturbations. Oocytes were injected with spermatozoa from Axin1Fu/+ mice and the DFS-ICSI-generated embryos were transferred to females. A significantly higher proportion of pups expressed the active kinky-tail epiallele in the DFS-ICSI group than the controls. In conclusion: 1) ESCs cannot be used as a model of DFS-ICSI; 2) DFS-ICSI reduces sperm production and fertility in the male progeny; and 3) DFS-ICSI affects the postnatal expression of a defined epigenetically sensitive allele and this modification may be inherited across generations. PMID:24743851

  13. Protective effect of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin pretreatment against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage in ram sperm.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Zahid; Ahmad, Ejaz; Aksoy, Melih; Küçük, Niyazi; Serin, İlker; Ceylan, Ahmet; Boyacıoğlu, Murat; Kum, Cavit

    2015-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the protective effect of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cryo-induced damage in ram sperm. In Experiment 1, the fresh ejaculates were either treated with CLC or remained untreated. Both CLC treated and untreated samples were then incubated with 0, 250 or 500 μM H2O2 at 35°C for 12 h. After incubation period of 12 h, the motility, viability and membrane integrity remained higher in CLC treated sperm even in the presence of 250 or 500 μM H2O2. The H2O2 treatment affected all the sperm parameters adversely (P<0.05). However, compared to CLC untreated counterpart, the motility, viability and membrane integrity remained higher (P<0.05) in treated sperm, even in the presence of 250 or 500 μM H2O2 during 12 h of incubation. In Experiment 2, semen was cryopreserved in the presence or absence of CLC. The post-thaw results revealed that CLC treated sperm has higher (P<0.05) motility, viability and membrane integrity compared to the control. In Experiment 3, lipid peroxidation levels were assessed by determining malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations during the H2O2-induced oxidative stress in CLC treated and untreated sperm. However, no difference (P>0.05) in MDA level was observed among the groups at any stage of incubation. In conclusion, the CLC incorporation in ram sperm membrane may protects it against H2O2 or cryo-induced oxidative damage. The cryoprotective influence of CLC on ram sperm might be resulted from, at least partly, its antioxidative property.

  14. Functional nonequivalence of sperm in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed Central

    Snook, R R; Markow, T A; Karr, T L

    1994-01-01

    We report on a form of sperm polymorphism, termed polymegaly, that occurs in species of the Drosophila obscura group. Individual males of species in this group characteristically produce more than one discrete length of nucleated, motile sperm. Hypotheses suggested to explain the evolutionary significance of sperm polymorphism have been either nonadaptive or adaptive, with the latter focusing on sperm competition or nutrient provisioning. These hypotheses assume all sperm types fertilize eggs; however, no data have been gathered to test this assumption. We found that two size classes of sperm are produced and transferred to females in approximately equal numbers by the male; only long sperm persist in significant numbers in female sperm storage organs. Furthermore, we used a DNA-specific dye (bisbenzimide) and sperm-specific antibodies to ask if both sperm types fertilize eggs in Drosophila pseudoobscura. Confocal microscopy and immunofluorescent analyses of fertilized eggs using anti-sperm polyclonal antisera demonstrated that only long sperm participate in fertilization. These data falsify those hypotheses in which all sperm types are assumed to be functionally equivalent (fertilize eggs). Any remaining or new hypotheses for the evolutionary significance of polymegaly must incorporate these findings. Several new areas of research are suggested. Images PMID:7972038

  15. Similarities and differences between the sperm quality index and sperm mobility index of broiler breeder semen.

    PubMed

    Dumpala, P R; Parker, H M; McDaniel, C D

    2006-12-01

    The sperm quality index (SQI) and sperm mobility index (SMI) both predict sperm motility. Previous research was conducted comparing the SMI with the SQI; however, semen was diluted improperly for the SQI (40-fold). For an accurate comparison, semen must be diluted 10-fold for the SQI. Therefore, the overall objective of this study, utilizing 4 experiments, was to examine the relationship of the SQI with the SMI when: 1) active, heat-inactivated, and boiled sperm were incubated and analyzed over 60 min, 2) motile and immotile sperm were combined, 3) dead sperm (boiled or frozen) and live sperm were combined, and 4) sperm were rendered immotile by adding Zn. In experiment 1, the SQI was stable throughout incubation for active sperm and zero for heat-inactivated and boiled sperm. The SMI from active sperm steadily increased over incubation. However, the SMI from heat-inactivated sperm increased drastically resulting in values higher than active sperm after 35 min of incubation. The SMI from active sperm was higher than boiled sperm throughout incubation. For experiment 2, a cubic increase in the SQI occurred as active sperm increased from 0 to 100%. However, there was no difference in SMI readings until samples contained 80% active sperm. In experiment 3, for both boiled and frozen sperm, as the percentage of viable sperm increased, there was a logarithmic increase in the SQI. The SMI values were similar for 0 and 100% viable sperm when using boiled sperm, and all SMI readings were similar to 0% viable for frozen sperm. For experiment 4, both the SQI and SMI values from semen incubated with Zn were lower than that of saline. The SQI from sperm incubated in saline was higher than that of Zn throughout incubation, yet there were no differences in SMI values after 90 min of incubation. In conclusion, both the SQI and SMI of sperm decrease in response to Zn. However, it appears that immotile and dead sperm are capable of increasing SMI values but not SQI values.

  16. Organophosphorous pesticide exposures and sperm quality

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Melissa J.; Venners, Scott A.; Chen, Xing; Liu, Xue; Tang, Genfu; Xing, Houxun; Barr, Dana Boyd; Xu, Xiping

    2010-01-01

    Many Americans are exposed to low levels of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. In is unclear whether these exposures impact sperm production. We investigated whether there was an association between urinary OP insecticide metabolites and sperm concentration and motility in newly married men from a rural area of eastern People’s Republic of China. Ninety-four cases and 95 controls were included based on their median residual value of sperm concentration and motility after adjusting for relevant covariates. Their urine was analyzed for six dialkylphosphate (DAP) compounds. After adjustment for demographic and exposure variables, the odds of being a case were greater (Odds Ratio=1.30, 95% Confidence Interval 1.02-1.65) in men with higher urinary concentrations of dimethylphosphate (DMP) compared to men with lower levels. No significant differences between cases and controls were found among the other DAP concentrations. DMP exposure and sperm concentration and motility should be explored further in environmental exposure studies. PMID:20850521

  17. Male seminal fluid substances affect sperm competition success and female reproductive behavior in a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takashi; Goenaga, Julieta; Rönn, Johanna Liljestrand; Arnqvist, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Male seminal fluid proteins are known to affect female reproductive behavior and physiology by reducing mating receptivity and by increasing egg production rates. Such substances are also though to increase the competitive fertilization success of males, but the empirical foundation for this tenet is restricted. Here, we examined the effects of injections of size-fractioned protein extracts from male reproductive organs on both male competitive fertilization success (i.e., P2 in double mating experiments) and female reproduction in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We found that extracts of male seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 1 day after the females' initial mating, while extracts from accessory glands and testes increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 2 days after the females' initial mating. Moreover, different size fractions of seminal fluid proteins had distinct and partly antagonistic effects on male competitive fertilization success. Collectively, our experiments show that several different seminal fluid proteins, deriving from different parts in the male reproductive tract and of different molecular weight, affect male competitive fertilization success in C. maculatus. Our results highlight the diverse effects of seminal fluid proteins and show that the function of such proteins can be contingent upon female mating status. We also document effects of different size fractions on female mating receptivity and egg laying rates, which can serve as a basis for future efforts to identify the molecular identity of seminal fluid proteins and their function in this model species.

  18. Male Seminal Fluid Substances Affect Sperm Competition Success and Female Reproductive Behavior in a Seed Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Takashi; Goenaga, Julieta; Rönn, Johanna Liljestrand; Arnqvist, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Male seminal fluid proteins are known to affect female reproductive behavior and physiology by reducing mating receptivity and by increasing egg production rates. Such substances are also though to increase the competitive fertilization success of males, but the empirical foundation for this tenet is restricted. Here, we examined the effects of injections of size-fractioned protein extracts from male reproductive organs on both male competitive fertilization success (i.e., P2 in double mating experiments) and female reproduction in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We found that extracts of male seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 1 day after the females’ initial mating, while extracts from accessory glands and testes increased competitive fertilization success when males mated with females 2 days after the females’ initial mating. Moreover, different size fractions of seminal fluid proteins had distinct and partly antagonistic effects on male competitive fertilization success. Collectively, our experiments show that several different seminal fluid proteins, deriving from different parts in the male reproductive tract and of different molecular weight, affect male competitive fertilization success in C. maculatus. Our results highlight the diverse effects of seminal fluid proteins and show that the function of such proteins can be contingent upon female mating status. We also document effects of different size fractions on female mating receptivity and egg laying rates, which can serve as a basis for future efforts to identify the molecular identity of seminal fluid proteins and their function in this model species. PMID:25893888

  19. Down-regulation of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase affects glycosaminoglycans synthesis and motility in HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tsung-Pao; Pan, Yun-Ru; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You

    2010-10-15

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes oxidation of UDP-glucose to yield UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor of hyaluronic acid (HA) and other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in extracellular matrix. Although association of extracellular matrix with cell proliferation and migration has been well documented, the importance of UGDH in these behaviors is not clear. Using UGDH-specific small interference RNA to treat HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells, a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of UGDH, as well as the cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and GAG production was observed. Treatment of HCT-8 cells with either UGDH-specific siRNA or HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone effectively delayed cell aggregation into multicellular spheroids and impaired cell motility in both three-dimensional collagen gel and transwell migration assays. The reduction in cell aggregation and migration rates could be restored by addition of exogenous HA. These results indicate that UGDH can regulate cell motility through the production of GAG. The enzyme may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of colorectal cancers.

  20. Sperm cryopreservation of lane snapper Lutjanus synagris (Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Sanches, E G; Oliveira, I R; Serralheiro, P C S; Cerqueira, V R

    2015-08-01

    This study aims developing and evaluate a protocol of semen cryopreservation of the lane snapper Lutjanus synagris. Firstly, sperm motility rate, motility time, density and spermatocrit were appraised to characterize the sperm quality of the lane snapper. The effect of three extenders with distinct ionic compositions and pH values combined with seven concentrations of cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide (0; 2.5; 5.0; 7.5; 10.0; 12.5 e 15.0%), five cooling rates (110, 90, 60, 45 e 30°C -min), nine equilibration time (1; 2,5; 5; 10; 15; 20; 25; 30 e 60 minutes) e five dilutions ratio (1:1; 1:3; 1:6; 1:10 e 1:20) on the sperm motility rate and motility time were analyzed. Fertilization test was accomplished to evaluate the viability of the cryopreserved sperm. The higher sperm motility rate and motility time (P<0.05) was achieved by combining extender with pH 8.2 with 10% concentration of dimethylsulfoxide and cooling rate 60°C -min, 1 minute of equilibration time and 1:3 (v/v) dilution ratio. The use of cryopreserved sperm presented fertilization rates >60% validating the present protocol for lane snapper. The cryoconserved sperm of lane snapper is a viable alternative, being possible to maintain appropriate sperm viability.

  1. The 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Is Involved in the Augmentation of Antioxidant Defenses in Cryopreserved Chicken Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Seigneurin, François; Froment, Pascal; Combarnous, Yves; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Semen cryopreservation is a unique tool for the management of animal genetic diversity. However, the freeze-thaw process causes biochemical and physical alterations which make difficult the restoration of sperm energy-dependent functions needed for fertilization. 5’-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor and regulator of intracellular energy metabolism. Mitochondria functions are known to be severely affected during sperm cryopreservation with deleterious oxidative and peroxidative effects leading to cell integrity and functions damages. The aim of this study was thus to examine the role of AMPK on the peroxidation/antioxidant enzymes defense system in frozen-thawed sperm and its consequences on sperm functions. Chicken semen was diluted in media supplemented with or without AMPK activators (AICAR or Metformin [MET]) or inhibitor (Compound C [CC]) and then cryopreserved. AMPKα phosphorylation, antioxidant enzymes activities, mitochondrial potential, ATP, citrate, viability, acrosome reaction ability (AR) and various motility parameters were negatively affected by the freeze-thaw process while reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and lactate concentration were dramatically increased. AICAR partially restored superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and Glutathione Reductase (GR), increased ATP, citrate, and lactate concentration and subsequently decreased the ROS and LPO (malondialdehyde) in frozen-thawed semen. Motility parameters were increased (i.e., + 23% for motility, + 34% for rapid sperm) as well as AR (+ 100%). MET had similar effects as AICAR except that catalase activity was restored and that ATP and mitochondrial potential were further decreased. CC showed effects opposite to AICAR on SOD, ROS, LPO and AR and motility parameters. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that, upon freeze-thaw process, AMPK stimulated intracellular anti-oxidative defense enzymes through ATP regulation, thus

  2. Cryorecovery of Mouse Sperm by Different IVF Methods Using MBCD and GSH

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Wen; Glass, Olivia C; Zarrabi, Jasmin; Baker, Lisa N.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent

    2016-01-01

    Different protocols incorporating methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) have been reported to improve IVF recovery of cryopreserved mouse sperm on a C57BL/6 (J and N) genetic background. However, it is not clear which IVF protocol is most appropriate when using the various methods to cryorecover sperm with different sperm quality and sample volumes. Therefore, in the present study we correlated sperm motility with fertilization rate and compared the efficiency of different IVF methods using various sperm samples so as to establish general guidelines for mouse sperm cryorecovery by IVF. High linear correlation between sperm fertilization rate and progressive motility was found, R2 was 0.9623 and 0.9993 for pre-freezing and post-thaw progressive motility, respectively. High amounts of cryoprotective agent (CPA) were observed to impair both sperm capacitation and fertilization. Moreover, the presence of a large number of immotile sperm in the sperm-oocyte co-incubation drop was found to reduce IVF success which could be partially reversed by supplementation using monothioglycerol (MTG) during centrifugation. It was concluded that the efficiency of IVF using cryorecovered mouse sperm in media containing MBCD and GSH can be predicted from sperm progressive motility. High concentrations of CPA and immotile sperm should be mitigated prior to IVF. The optimum IVF method should be selected based on sperm sample volume and sperm parameters. PMID:27413624

  3. Cryorecovery of Mouse Sperm by Different IVF Methods Using MBCD and GSH.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Wen; Glass, Olivia C; Zarrabi, Jasmin; Baker, Lisa N; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2016-05-01

    Different protocols incorporating methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) have been reported to improve IVF recovery of cryopreserved mouse sperm on a C57BL/6 (J and N) genetic background. However, it is not clear which IVF protocol is most appropriate when using the various methods to cryorecover sperm with different sperm quality and sample volumes. Therefore, in the present study we correlated sperm motility with fertilization rate and compared the efficiency of different IVF methods using various sperm samples so as to establish general guidelines for mouse sperm cryorecovery by IVF. High linear correlation between sperm fertilization rate and progressive motility was found, R(2) was 0.9623 and 0.9993 for pre-freezing and post-thaw progressive motility, respectively. High amounts of cryoprotective agent (CPA) were observed to impair both sperm capacitation and fertilization. Moreover, the presence of a large number of immotile sperm in the sperm-oocyte co-incubation drop was found to reduce IVF success which could be partially reversed by supplementation using monothioglycerol (MTG) during centrifugation. It was concluded that the efficiency of IVF using cryorecovered mouse sperm in media containing MBCD and GSH can be predicted from sperm progressive motility. High concentrations of CPA and immotile sperm should be mitigated prior to IVF. The optimum IVF method should be selected based on sperm sample volume and sperm parameters.

  4. The effect of glycosaminoglycan enzymes and proteases on the viscosity of alpaca seminal plasma and sperm function.

    PubMed

    Kershaw-Young, C M; Stuart, C; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2013-05-01

    In order to advance the development of cryopreservation and other assisted reproductive technologies in camelids it is necessary to eliminate the viscous component of the seminal plasma without impairing sperm function. It has been postulated that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or proteoglycans are responsible for this viscosity. This study investigated the effect of the GAG enzymes hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and keratanase and the proteases papain and proteinase K on seminal plasma viscosity and sperm function in order to aid identification of the cause of seminal plasma viscosity and propose methods for the reduction of viscosity. Sperm motility, DNA integrity, acrosome integrity and viability were assessed during 2h incubation. All enzymes reduced seminal plasma viscosity compared to control (P<0.001) although papain was most effective, completely eliminating viscosity within 30 min of treatment. Sperm motility and DNA integrity was not affected by enzyme treatment. The proportion of viable, acrosome intact sperm was reduced in all enzyme treated samples except those treated with papain (P<0.001). These findings suggest that proteins, not GAGs are the main cause of alpaca seminal plasma viscosity. Papain treatment of alpaca semen may be a suitable technique for reduction of seminal plasma viscosity prior to sperm cryopreservation.

  5. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction.

  6. Flow cytometry application in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity of men with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Piasecka, M; Gaczarzewicz, D; Laszczyńska, M; Starczewski, A; Brodowska, A

    2007-01-01

    Sperm genomic integrity and ultrastructural features of ejaculated spermatozoa contributing to the assessment of gamete fertility potential in patients with asthenozoospermia are discussed. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in the semen of patients with low sperm motility (n=40; p<0.01) as compared to men with normal sperm motility (n=54). Sperm DNA fragmentation negatively correlated (n=94) with sperm motility, sperm concentration, and integrity of the sperm cellular membrane (HOS-test). Two categories of patients were distinguished: (1) patients (23 out of 94 subjects) with < or = 4% of TUNEL-positive cells and (2) patients (71 subjects) with 4% of TUNEL-positive cells. A significant difference was noted in the sperm motility and HOS-test results between patients from both groups. Large numbers of immature spermatozoa with extensive cytoplasmic retention, ultrastructural chromatin and midpiece abnormalities, and conglomerates containing sperm fragments were present more frequently in the semen of asthenozoospermic subjects with >4% of TUNEL-positive sperm cells. Low sperm motility seems to be accompanied by serious defects of gamete chromatin expressed as diminished sperm genomic integrity and abnormal DNA condensation and by defects of sperm midpiece. These abnormalities may reflect developmental failure during the spermatogenic remodeling process. The DNA fragmentation test may be considered as an additional assay for the evaluation of spermatozoa beside standard analysis and taken together with electron microscopy may help to determine the actual number of "healthy" spermatozoa thereby playing an important role during diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  7. Beneficial effect of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate treatment on the Indochinese leopard (Panthera pardus delacouri) sperm quality after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Thuwanut, P; Tipkantha, W; Siriaroonrat, B; Comizzoli, P; Chatdarong, K

    2016-11-22

    The Indochinese leopard (Panthera pardus delacouri) population, included in CITES Appendix I, has been declining for decades. Proper gamete preservation condition is critical for breeding programme management using artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization (IVF). The present study aimed at investigating the impact of post-thawing treatment of leopard semen with extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATPe) on sperm quality (including morphological traits and ability to fertilize an oocyte). Semen from six adult male leopards was collected by electroejaculation (one ejaculation per cat). After the evaluation of the fresh sample quality, the semen was cryopreserved (10 × 10(6) cells per straw; two straws per cat). After thawing, the sperm sample from the first straw of each cat was divided into three aliquots: control (no ATPe), supplemented with 1.0 or 2.5 mM ATPe that were evaluated for sperm quality at 10, 30 min and 3 hr post-thawing. The sperm sample from the second straw, supplemented with 0, 1.0 or 2.5 mM ATPe for 30 min, was assessed for IVF with domestic cat oocytes. Sperm quality (all metrics) was negatively affected by the cryopreservation process (p ≤ .05). However, the percentage of sperm motility, level of progressive motility and percentage of plasma membrane integrity did not differ (p > .05) among post-thawing groups. The sperm mitochondrial membrane potential was enhanced (p ≤ .05) by ATPe treatment (1.0 and 2.5 mM; 10 min to 3 hr of incubation). Furthermore, incubation of ATPe (1.0 and 2.5 mM) for 30 min could promote sperm velocity patterns (curvilinear velocity; VCL and straight line velocity; VSL) (p ≤ .05). The percentage of pronuclear formation and cleaved embryos was increased (p ≤ .05) after 1.0 ATPe treatment (49.8 ± 2.8; 45.9 ± 1.5) compared to 0 mM (41.4 ± 3.3; 38.9 ± 0.5) whereas the number of sperm binding/oocyte did not significantly differ among groups. In summary, we suggest that ATPe

  8. Effects of Nigella sativa (Habbatus sauda) Oil and Nicotine Chronic Treatments on Sperm Parameters and Testis Histological Features of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Noor Hashida; Hasan Adli, Durriyyah Sharifah

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley male rats (7–9 weeks old, 200–250 g) were divided into Nicotine (N) (0.5 mg/100 g body weight (BW), Nicotine Control (NC) (saline, 0.1 mL/100 g BW), Habbatus sauda oil (HS) (6.0 μL/100 g BW), and Habbatus sauda Control (HSC) (corn oil, 0.1 mL/100 g BW) groups and treated for 100 days. Sperm parameters and seminiferous tubules measurements were evaluated. The N showed a significantly lower sperm motility (1.03 ± 0.05 × 106 sperm/mL) and percentage of normal (82.61 ± 0.03%) and live (93.88 ± 0.01%) sperm, higher value for the seminiferous tubule (253.36 ± 1.83 μm) and lumen (100.15 ± 2.38 μm) diameters and spermatogonia (19.85 ± 0.39 μm) and spermatocytes (33.37 ± 0.59 μm) layers, and thinner spermatid-sperm layer (22.14 ± 0.71 μm) than the NC (P < 0.05). The HS had significantly higher sperm motility (1.49 ± 0.04 × 106 sperm/mL) and percentage of normal (90.61 ± 0.01%) and live (96.98 ± 0.01%) sperm, smaller lumen diameter (67.53 ± 2.34 μm) and thinner spermatogonia (17.67 ± 0.32 μm) and wider spermatid-sperm (36.95 ± 0.79 μm) layers than the HSC (P < 0.05). This research confirmed that nicotine reduced sperm motility and morphology of normal and live sperms and also affected the testis histology, while Habbatus sauda oil increased sperm quality and gave better testis histological features. PMID:24982686

  9. Acute and chronic effects of gold nanoparticles on sperm parameters and chromatin structure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Mahsa; Talebi, Ali Reza; Hosseini Sharifabad, Mohammad; Abbasi, Abolghasem; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Danafar, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: The particles in the range of 1-100 nm are called nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticle is one of the most important metal nanoparticles with wide usage. Objective: This study investigated the effects of gold nanoparticles on sperm parameters and chromatin structure in mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 72 male bulb-c mice were divided into 9 groups including: 4 Sham groups (Sc 1-4), 4 experimental groups (Au 1-4), and 1 control group (C). Experimental groups received 40 and 200 µg/kg/day soluble gold (Au) nano-particles for 7 and 35 days, by intra peritoneal injection, respectively. Sham groups were treated with 1.2 mM sodium citrate solution with 40 and 200 µg/kg/day doses for same days and control group did not receive any materials. Motility and Morphology of spermatozoa were analyzed. Chromatin quality was also evaluated using AB (Aniline blue), TB (Toluidine blue) and CMA3 (Chromomycin A3) staining methods. Results: The sperm analysis results showed that motility and morphology of sperm in experimental groups (especially in groups that have been treated for 35 days with nano-particles) had significant decrease in comparison with control group. TB, AB and CMA3 results showed a significant increase in abnormal spermatozoa from all Au-treated groups. Conclusion: Gold nano-particles firstly can reduce the sperm parameters such as motility and normal morphology and secondly affect sperm chromatin remodeling and cause the increase instability of chromatin and also increase the rate of sperm DNA damage. These deleterious effects were more obvious in maximum dose and chronic phase. PMID:27921087

  10. Sperm-egg penetration assay assessment of the contraceptive effects of glycerol and egg yolk in rooster sperm diluents.

    PubMed

    Abouelezz, F M K; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Esteso, M C; López-Sebastián, A; Campo, J L; Santiago-Moreno, J

    2015-06-01

    Glycerol (GLY) and egg yolk (EY) are good cryoprotectants of avian and mammalian sperm, but in birds, they strongly inhibit the eventual fertilization of ova. Using the sperm penetration (SP-holes) assay and fertility trials, the present study investigates (1) the possible mechanism by which this contraceptive effect occurs in chickens and (2) the maximum concentrations of GLY and EY tolerated by fresh rooster sperm. Seventy Black-Barred Andaluza hens (five per treatment) were inseminated four times (twice per week) with 0.1 mL of fresh semen from roosters of the same breed diluted 1:1 (v:v) with Lake and Ravie medium containing different concentrations of GLY or EY. No adverse effects on acrosome integrity, sperm motility, or viability were seen with any concentration of GLY or EY. The number of SP-holes on perivitelline layer samples taken from above the germinal disc became progressively lower at GLY concentrations of 1.5% or greater (P > 0.05). No holes caused by sperms were seen in unfertilized eggs. The corresponding fertility results showed similar reductions when the GLY concentration was 1.5% or greater. No changes in the number of SP-holes were seen with increasing EY concentrations (0%-7.5%), nor were any differences in fertility observed, except for a reduction when 15% EY was used. The results therefore reveal that GLY affects the transit of sperms through the oviduct in their attempt to reach the infundibulum area, limiting their access to the ovum perivitelline layer. Egg yolk had no such effect, nor did it influence acrosome reaction capacity; its mechanism of contraceptive action therefore remains unknown. The maximum GLY and EY concentrations tolerated by the rooster sperm were 0.75% and 7.5%, respectively.

  11. Effects of Enterobacter cloacae on boar sperm quality during liquid storage at 17°C.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Martínez, Noelia; Bussalleu, Eva; Garcia-Bonavila, Estela; Bonet, Sergi; Yeste, Marc

    2014-07-01

    Contamination of fresh and extended boar sperm often occurs in farms and artificial insemination (AI) centres during semen collection, processing and storage. The presence of bacteria produces detrimental effects on boar sperm quality, which may cause economic losses in reproductive centres. The present study has evaluated for the first time how the presence of Enterobacter cloacae affects the preservation of boar spermatozoa in liquid storage at 15-17 °C for an 11-day period. With this purpose, extended semen samples from seven healthy post-pubertal boars were artificially contaminated with different sperm:bacterium ratios (2:1; 1:1; 1:5 and 1:10) of E. cloacae. The 1:0 ratio (non-inoculated) served as a negative control. The most infective ratios (i.e. 1:5 and 1:10) significantly damaged sperm motility and membrane integrity, increased sperm agglutination, and decreased the osmotic resistance of spermatozoa. In contrast, the negative impact that the lowest bacterial concentration (2:1) had on boar sperm quality was clearly lower. In addition, other parameters such as pH were also more affected at the highest infective ratios (i.e. 1:5 and 1:10), despite no damage being observed on sperm morphology. In conclusion, the present work shows that damage inflicted by the presence of E. cloacae in boar sperm during liquid storage at 15-17 °C compromises the longevity and fertilising ability of seminal doses when bacterial concentration is higher than a 1:1 ratio. Further research is warranted to address by which mechanism E. cloacae impairs boar sperm quality.

  12. Cooling and freezing of sperm from captive, free-living and endangered squirrel monkey species.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karol G; Santos, Regiane R; Leão, Danuza L; Brito, Adriel B; Lima, Julianne S; Sampaio, Wlaísa V; Domingues, Sheyla F S

    2016-06-01

    Germoplasm banking is an important tool for the preservation of genetic material from Neotropical primates in captivity, and from free living species, especially the endangered ones like Saimiri vanzolinii (Black-headed squirrel monkey), a primate with a low incidence area (870 km(2) of floodplains) in the southern part of the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve, Brazil. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to develop a sperm cryopreservation protocol comparing sperm cooling in presence (T1) and absence (T2) of egg yolk, and to test freezing protocols to preserve semen from captive (Saimiri collinsi), and free-living (Saimiri vanzolinii, Saimiri cassiquiarensis and Saimiri macrodon) New World primates. Cooling preserved sperm of S. collinsi in all evaluated microscopic parameters, except for sperm motility. No differences were observed among the treatments, indicating that semen of this species can be cooled without egg yolk. Freezing did not affect sperm quality of S. collinsi, except plasma membrane integrity that was negatively affected. Generally, a good maintenance rate was observed between cooling and thawing of semen for the four species, showing the positive translational application of protocols from S. collinsi to the free-living species. Developed freezing protocol proved to be useful for sperm cryopreservation of S. collinsi and in field conditions.

  13. One-sided ejaculation of echidna sperm bundles.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Smith, B; Pyne, M; Stenzel, D; Holt, W V

    2007-12-01

    We report for the first time an unusual ejaculatory mechanism in the short-beaked echidna in which each side of the bilaterally symmetrical, rosettelike glans penis is used alternately, with the other being shut down. This is unparalleled in mammals but is reminiscent of the use of hemipenes in squamate reptiles, providing further reproductive evidence of a sauropsidian lineage in the Monotremata. Further, we describe the occurrence of motile sperm bundles in ejaculated echidna semen and provide scanning electron micrographs of their morphology. Sperm bundling appears to confer increased sperm motility, which may provide the potential for sperm competition between males.

  14. Cigarette smoking and its possible effects on sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikauskas, V.; Blaustein, D.; Ablin, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    The possible effects of cigarette smoking on sperm were evaluated by comparison of the quality of sperm from 103 smokers and 135 nonsmokers in a blind study. Smokers were found to possess significantly decreased density (number) and motility of their sperm than nonsmokers. Morphologic abnormalities, particularly bicephalia, although prevalent among individual smokers, did not differ significantly when a comparison of smokers versus nonsmokers was made as a whole. Based on these observations and those of others demonstrating the presence of the mutagenic properties of smoke condensates, the authors suggest that decreases in sperm density and motility in cigarette smokers may be reflective of smoke condensate-induced mutagenic spermatogenital alterations.

  15. Sperm processing for advanced reproductive technologies: Where are we today?

    PubMed

    Rappa, Kari L; Rodriguez, Harold F; Hakkarainen, Gloria C; Anchan, Raymond M; Mutter, George L; Asghar, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) utilize sperm sorting methods to select viable sperm from the semen samples. Conventional sperm sorting techniques in current use are density gradient centrifugation, direct swim-up, and conventional swim-up. These methods use multiple centrifugation steps, which have been shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that decrease DNA integrity and damage sperm. Newer technologies, such as microfluidics, electrophoresis, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME), and birefringence eliminate the centrifugation steps and can improve the selection of sperm with higher DNA integrity, normal morphology, and motility as well as improved artificial insemination outcomes. In this review, we discuss some recent research in centrifugation and non-centrifugation based techniques and their effect on sperm quality and ART outcomes.

  16. Novel and traditional traits of frozen-thawed porcine sperm related to in vitro fertilization success.

    PubMed

    Daigneault, Bradford W; McNamara, Kelli A; Purdy, Phillip H; Krisher, Rebecca L; Knox, Robert V; Miller, David J

    2014-07-15

    Cryopreserved semen allows the use of single ejaculates for repeated analyses, potentially improving IVF consistency by eliminating interejaculate variability observed with fresh semen. However, the freezing and thawing processes result in compromised sperm function and IVF success. Semen samples are often screened for motility before use for IVF. Samples that are below a designated motility threshold may be discarded. Our objectives were to determine if post-thaw sperm motility, other traits that may be indicative of sperm function, or a novel assay of oviduct binding were related to IVF success. Semen from 16 boars was cooled to 15 °C for overnight shipment before cryopreservation. Semen was thawed and motility was recorded microscopically and confirmed using computer-automated sperm assessment. Each sample was tested by IVF in two to three independent replicates. Regression and correlation analyses were employed to determine the interrelationships between sperm traits and the relationships between post-thaw motility, sperm-oviduct binding and IVF outcomes. Among the sperm traits examined, sperm acrosome integrity was negatively correlated with post-thaw motility (r(2) = 0.64) but not with IVF results. The number of sperm bound to oviduct aggregates was correlated with IVF polyspermy rates (r(2) = 0.62, P < 0.05) but less with overall IVF rates (r(2) = 0.31, P > 0.10). There was some relationship of post-thaw motility with IVF monospermic fertilization (P = 0.06, r(2) = 0.08) but not to other IVF outcomes. Our results indicate that post-thaw motility of frozen-thawed boar sperm is strongly related to acrosome integrity but has limited use for predicting IVF success. The number of sperm bound to oviduct cells was related to IVF polyspermy rates and may be more indicative of in vitro sperm function than traditional sperm motility and acrosome status evaluation.

  17. Trajectory variance and autocorrelations within single-sperm tracks as population-level descriptors of sperm track complexity, predictability, and energy-generating ability.

    PubMed

    Abaigar, Teresa; Barbero, Javier; Holt, William V

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to develop an alternative theoretical approach to the analysis of sperm motility and to develop motility parameters that would complement those more commonly used in current computer-assisted semen analysis procedures. We have defined a set of parameters and have tested them using boar spermatozoa undergoing bicarbonate-induced motility activation. The new parameters were calculated for a series of (x,y) coordinates of sperm head positions recorded at each move along the trajectory. The parameters were: mean velocity (MV), immobility ratio, fractal dimension (FD), the variance of the steplengths (VAR), and 2 autocorrelation function coefficients of the step-length time series for lags 1 and 2 (C(1) and C(2)). MV measures the average speed along the trajectory, and VAR is a measure of displacement variability that can be related to the specific mean (per step) kinetic energy of the spermatozoon. All of the parameters except MV and FD were affected by the sampling frequency (25 vs 50 Hz); inappropriately high sampling frequency in relation to magnification resulted in step-lengths between successive frames that were below the resolution threshold of the imaging system. The autocorrelation functions were especially informative; discrimination between sperm subpopulations was obvious within simple histogram formats, and complex statistical analyses were not needed for their identification.

  18. Learn About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  19. About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  20. Sperm of patients with severe asthenozoospermia show biochemical, molecular and genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Oriana; Romeo, Giulietta; Asero, Paola; Pezzino, Franca Maria; Castiglione, Roberto; Burrello, Nunziatina; Sidoti, Giuseppe; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Vicari, Enzo; D'Agata, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    The multifactorial pathological condition, that is, severe low sperm motility is a frequent cause of infertility. However, mechanisms underlying the development of this condition are not completely understood. Single abnormalities have been reported in sperm of patients with asthenozoospermia. In this study, we characterized, in 22 normozoospermic men and in 37 patients with asthenozoospermia, biochemical, molecular and genomic abnormalities that frequently occur in sperm of patients with asthenozoospermia. We evaluated a panel of sperm biomarkers that may affect the motility and fertilizing ability of sperm of patients with severe asthenozoospermia. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is involved in the pathogenesis of such sperm abnormalities, we determined the association between ROS production and sperm abnormalities. High percentage of patients with severe asthenozoospermia showed increased basal and stimulated ROS production. Moreover, these patients showed increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number but decreased mtDNA integrity and they were associated with elevated ROS levels. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential was also significantly decreased and again associated with high ROS production in these patients. However, the rate of nuclear DNA fragmentation was increased only in less than one-fifth of these patients. An important cohort of these patients showed multiple identical biochemical, molecular and genomic abnormalities, which are typical manifestations of oxidative stress. The most frequent association was found in patients with high ROS levels, increased mtDNA copy number and decreased integrity, and low MMP. A smaller cohort of the aforementioned patients also showed nDNA fragmentation. Therefore, patients with asthezoospermia likely present reduced fertilizing potential because of such composed abnormalities.

  1. Combining reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid has supplementary beneficial effects on boar sperm cryotolerance.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Elisa; Estrada, Efrén; Bucci, Diego; Spinaci, Marcella; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Yeste, Marc

    2015-02-01

    The main aim of this work was to evaluate how supplementing freezing and thawing media with reduced glutathione (GSH) and l-ascorbic acid (AA) affected the quality parameters of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa. With this purpose, semen samples of 12 ejaculates coming from 12 boars were used. Each ejaculate was split into seven aliquots to which 5 mM of GSH and 100 μM of AA were added separately or together at two different steps of freeze-thawing. Various sperm parameters (levels of free cysteine residues in sperm nucleoproteins, sperm viability, acrosome membrane integrity, intracellular peroxide and superoxide levels [ROS], and total and progressive motility) were evaluated before freezing and at 30 and 240 minutes after thawing. Both GSH and AA significantly improved boar sperm cryotolerance when they were separately added to freezing and thawing media. However, the highest improvement was recorded when both freezing and thawing media were supplemented with 5 mM of GSH plus 100 μM of AA. This improvement was observed in sperm viability and acrosome integrity, sperm motility, and nucleoprotein structure. Although ROS levels were not much increased by freeze-thawing procedures, the addition of GSH and AA to both freezing and thawing extenders significantly decreased intracellular peroxide levels and had no impact on superoxide levels. According to our results, we can conclude that supplementation of freezing and thawing media with both GSH and AA has a combined, beneficial effect on frozen-thawed boar sperm, which is greater than that obtained with the separate addition of either GSH or AA.

  2. Sperm competition and the evolution of precopulatory weapons: Testis size and amplexus position, but not arm strength, affect fertilization success in a chorusing frog.

    PubMed

    Buzatto, Bruno A; Thyer, Evan M; Roberts, J Dale; Simmons, Leigh W

    2017-02-01

    Trade-offs between pre- and postcopulatory traits influence their evolution, and male expenditure on such traits is predicted to depend on the number of competitors, the benefits from investing in weapons, and the risk and intensity of sperm competition. Males of the chorusing frog Crinia georgiana use their arms as weapons in contest competition. Previously, we showed that increased numbers of rivals elevated the risk and intensity of sperm competition due to multimale amplexus, and caused a reversal in the direction of precopulatory selection on arm girth. Here, we focused on the factors affecting postcopulatory fertilization success during group spawning, using paternity data from natural choruses. Competitive fertilization success depended on the time spent amplexed and amplexus position. Relative testes size but not arm girth, contributed to fertilization success, but the effect of testes size depended on amplexus position. Our findings offer within species empirical support for recent sperm competition models that incorporate precopulatory male-male competition, and show why an understanding of the evolution of animal weapons requires a consideration of both pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection.

  3. Alternative relay domains of Drosophila melanogaster myosin differentially affect ATPase activity, in vitro motility, myofibril structure and muscle function.

    PubMed

    Kronert, William A; Dambacher, Corey M; Knowles, Aileen F; Swank, Douglas M; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2008-06-06

    The relay domain of myosin is hypothesized to function as a communication pathway between the nucleotide-binding site, actin-binding site and the converter domain. In Drosophila melanogaster, a single myosin heavy chain gene encodes three alternative relay domains. Exon 9a encodes the indirect flight muscle isoform (IFI) relay domain, whereas exon 9b encodes one of the embryonic body wall isoform (EMB) relay domains. To gain a better understanding of the function of the relay domain and the differences imparted by the IFI and the EMB versions, we constructed two transgenic Drosophila lines expressing chimeric myosin heavy chains in indirect flight muscles lacking endogenous myosin. One expresses the IFI relay domain in the EMB backbone (EMB-9a), while the second expresses the EMB relay domain in the IFI backbone (IFI-9b). Our studies reveal that the EMB relay domain is functionally equivalent to the IFI relay domain when it is substituted into IFI. Essentially no differences in ATPase activity, actin-sliding velocity, flight ability at room temperature or muscle structure are observed in IFI-9b compared to native IFI. However, when the EMB relay domain is replaced with the IFI relay domain, we find a 50% reduction in actin-activated ATPase activity, a significant increase in actin affinity, abolition of actin sliding, defects in myofibril assembly and rapid degeneration of muscle structure compared to EMB. We hypothesize that altered relay domain conformational changes in EMB-9a impair intramolecular communication with the EMB-specific converter domain. This decreases transition rates involving strongly bound actomyosin states, leading to a reduced ATPase rate and loss of actin motility.

  4. Effect of drugs affecting microtubular assembly on microtubules, phospholipid synthesis and physiological indices (signalling, growth, motility and phagocytosis) in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Csaba, G

    2006-01-01

    Structural changes of microtubules, incorporation of radioactively labelled components into phospholipids, cell motility, growth and phagocytosis were studied under the effect of four drugs affecting microtubular assembly: colchicine, nocodazole, vinblastine and taxol. Although the first three agents influence microtubules in the direction of depolymerization and the fourth stabilizes them, their effects on the structure of microtubules cannot be explained by this. Using confocal microscopy after an acetylated anti-tubulin label, in nocodazole- and colchicine-treated cells, the basal body cages disappear and longitudinal microtubules (LM) became thinner without changing transversal microtubules (TM). After taxol treatment LM also became thinner, however TM disappeared. Under the effect of vinblastine TM became thinner, without influencing LM. These drugs influence the incorporation of components ([(3)H]-serine, [(3)H]-palmitic acid and (32)P) into phospholipids, however their effect is equivocal and cannot be consequently coupled with the effect on the microtubules. Nocodazole, vinblastine and taxol significantly reduced the cell's motility, however colchicine did so to a lesser degree. Vinblastine and nocodazole totally inhibited, and taxol significantly decreased cell growth, while colchicine in a lower concentration increased the multiplication of cells. Phagocytosis was not significantly influenced after 1 min, but after 5 min all the agents studied (except colchicine) significantly inhibited phagocytosis. After 15 and 30 min each molecule caused highly significant inhibition. The experiments demonstrate that drugs affecting microtubular assembly dynamics influence differently the diverse (longitudinal, transversal etc.) microtubular systems of Tetrahymena and also differently influence microtubule-dependent physiological processes. The latter are more dependent on microtubular dynamics than are changes in phospholipid signalling.

  5. In vitro effect of produced water on cod, Gadus morhua, sperm cells and fertilization.

    PubMed

    Hamoutene, Dounia; Samuelson, S; Lush, L; Burt, K; Drover, D; King, T; Lee, K

    2010-05-01

    The in vitro effect of produced water released by oil and gas platforms was assessed by exposing cod sperm cells to realistic concentrations of this mixture (100, 200, 500 ppm). We investigated produced water impact on enzymes of the aerobic (citrate synthase) and glycolytic metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase), lipid catabolism (lipase), as well as an anti-oxidant enzyme (catalase). Fertilization rates, viability, respiration, ATP, and total motility duration were also evaluated. To explore correlations between these parameters, we have also tested the effect of conserving sperm for 24 h at 4 degrees C. After conservation, fertilization success was decreased but other parameters were not affected. Produced water did not result in a significant change in fertilization; a significant increase in sperm protein amounts and citrate synthase activity can be observed. No correlations are found between parameters showing that sperm viability and unchanged energy levels do not translate into equivalent fertilization capacity. To conclude, exposure of sperm to produced water resulted only in subtle effects on cells. These findings bring information on the effect of produced water on sperm itself rather than on spermatogenesis or testis development of an exposed fish.

  6. Easy sperm processing technique allowing exclusive accumulation and later usage of DNA-strandbreak-free spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ebner, T; Shebl, O; Moser, M; Mayer, R B; Arzt, W; Tews, G

    2011-01-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation is increased in poor-quality semen samples and correlates with failed fertilization, impaired preimplantation development and reduced pregnancy outcome. Common sperm preparation techniques may reduce the percentage of strandbreak-positive spermatozoa, but, to date, there is no reliable approach to exclusively accumulate strandbreak-free spermatozoa. To analyse the efficiency of special sperm selection chambers (Zech-selectors made of glass or polyethylene) in terms of strandbreak reduction, 39 subfertile men were recruited and three probes (native, density gradient and Zech-selector) were used to check for strand breaks using the sperm chromatin dispersion test. The mean percentage of affected spermatozoa in the ejaculate was 15.8 ± 7.8% (range 5.0–42.1%). Density gradient did not significantly improve the quality of spermatozoa selected(14.2 ± 7.0%). However, glass chambers completely removed 90% spermatozoa showing strand breaks and polyethylene chambers removed 76%. Both types of Zech-selectors were equivalent in their efficiency, significantly reduced DNA damage (P < 0.001) and,with respect to this, performed better than density gradient centrifugation (P < 0.001). As far as is known, this is the first report ona sperm preparation technique concentrating spermatozoa unaffected in terms of DNA damage. The special chambers most probably select for sperm motility and/or maturity.

  7. The impact of bacteriospermia on boar sperm storage and reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Kuster, C E; Althouse, G C

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriospermia is a documented risk to reproductive performance when using extended boar semen for artificial insemination. A substantial list of bacteria have been recovered from boar semen attributed to fecal, preputial, skin, and hair microorganisms, with these and other environmental bacteria from processing areas identified in doses prepared for artificial insemination. Gram-negative bacteria are most commonly recovered from extended doses, including both Enterobacteriaceae and environmental contaminants, such as those that inhabit water purification systems. The method of processing, distributing, and storing fresh liquid boar semen before insemination plays a role in bacterial growth dynamics and the degree to which the bacteria may damage the sperm or affect the sow. Not all bacterial isolates or contamination levels have the same impact on sperm, with multiple factors governing if and when storage longevity will be reduced through sperm-to-sperm agglutination, impaired motility, acrosome disruption, or loss of membrane viability. Suboptimal reproductive performance can occur because of reduced fertilizing capacity of the sperm or induction of a uterine environment hostile to sperm and/or embryonic survival. Effective bacterial control strategies are necessary to minimize the risk of bacteria contaminating extended semen doses, including monitoring programs designed for quick detection and intervention, should the need arise.

  8. Effects of centrifugation through three different discontinuous Percoll gradients on boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Matás, C; Vieira, L; García-Vázquez, F A; Avilés-López, K; López-Úbeda, R; Carvajal, J A; Gadea, J

    2011-08-01

    In this study, different combinations of 2-step, discontinuous gradient centrifugation were used, consisting of three different combinations of isotonic Percoll (45/60, 60/75 and 45/90%) that allowed us to select different sperm subpopulations from fertile and normozoospermic boars. Our objective in this study is to evaluate the effects of centrifugation through three different discontinuous Percoll gradients on sperm function parameters (motility, viability, morphology, acrosome status, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, ROS generation, tyrosine phosphorylation and intracellular calcium concentration) and the sperm penetrating capacity in an IVF system. All the Percoll treatments evaluated increased the percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology, the proportion of un-damaged DNA, normal chromatin condensation, motion parameters measured by CASA and the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa with tyrosine phosphorylated proteins compared to control group. Finally, the in vitro oocyte penetrating capacity of boar spermatozoa was significantly