Science.gov

Sample records for affect stability binding

  1. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  2. "DNA Binding Region" of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress.

  3. “DNA Binding Region” of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress. PMID:26884712

  4. pH-sensitive residues in the p19 RNA silencing suppressor protein from carnation Italian ringspot virus affect siRNA binding stability

    PubMed Central

    Law, Sean M; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Tombusviruses, such as Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), encode a protein homodimer called p19 that is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in their infected hosts by binding to and sequestering short-interfering RNA (siRNA) away from the RNA silencing pathway. P19 binding stability has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pH but the specific amino acid residues involved have remained unclear. Using constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified key pH-dependent residues that affect CIRV p19–siRNA binding stability at various pH ranges based on calculated changes in the free energy contribution from each titratable residue. At high pH, the deprotonation of Lys60, Lys67, Lys71, and Cys134 has the largest effect on the binding stability. Similarly, deprotonation of several acidic residues (Asp9, Glu12, Asp20, Glu35, and/or Glu41) at low pH results in a decrease in binding stability. At neutral pH, residues Glu17 and His132 provide a small increase in the binding stability and we find that the optimal pH range for siRNA binding is between 7.0 and 10.0. Overall, our findings further inform recent experiments and are in excellent agreement with data on the pH-dependent binding profile. PMID:23450521

  5. pH-sensitive residues in the p19 RNA silencing suppressor protein from carnation Italian ringspot virus affect siRNA binding stability.

    PubMed

    Law, Sean M; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-05-01

    Tombusviruses, such as Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), encode a protein homodimer called p19 that is capable of suppressing RNA silencing in their infected hosts by binding to and sequestering short-interfering RNA (siRNA) away from the RNA silencing pathway. P19 binding stability has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pH but the specific amino acid residues involved have remained unclear. Using constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified key pH-dependent residues that affect CIRV p19-siRNA binding stability at various pH ranges based on calculated changes in the free energy contribution from each titratable residue. At high pH, the deprotonation of Lys60, Lys67, Lys71, and Cys134 has the largest effect on the binding stability. Similarly, deprotonation of several acidic residues (Asp9, Glu12, Asp20, Glu35, and/or Glu41) at low pH results in a decrease in binding stability. At neutral pH, residues Glu17 and His132 provide a small increase in the binding stability and we find that the optimal pH range for siRNA binding is between 7.0 and 10.0. Overall, our findings further inform recent experiments and are in excellent agreement with data on the pH-dependent binding profile.

  6. Amino Acid Substitutions That Affect Receptor Binding and Stability of the Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Burke, David F.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-binding preference and stability of hemagglutinin have been implicated as crucial determinants of airborne transmission of influenza viruses. Here, amino acid substitutions previously identified to affect these traits were tested in the context of an A/H7N9 virus. Some combinations of substitutions, most notably G219S and K58I, resulted in relatively high affinity for α2,6-linked sialic acid receptor and acid and temperature stability. Thus, the hemagglutinin of the A/H7N9 virus may adopt traits associated with airborne transmission. PMID:26792744

  7. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  8. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  9. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  10. Factors Affecting Lateral Stability and Controllability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Toll, Thomas A

    1948-01-01

    The effects on dynamic lateral stability and controllability of some of the important aerodynamic and mass characteristics are discussed and methods are presented for estimating the various stability parameters to be used in the calculation of the dynamic lateral stability of airplanes with swept and low-aspect-ratio wings.

  11. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  12. On how hydrogen bonds affect foam stability.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Hamann, Martin; Preisig, Natalie; Chauhan, Vinay; Bordes, Romain

    2017-02-08

    Do intermolecular H-bonds between surfactant head groups play a role for foam stability? From the literature on the foam stability of various surfactants with C12 alkyl chains but different head groups a clear picture emerges: stable foams are only generated when hydrogen bonds can form between the head groups, i.e. when the polar head group has a hydrogen bond donor and a proton acceptor. Stable foams can therefore be generated with surfactants having a sugar unit, a glycine, an amine oxide (at pH~5), or a carboxylic acid (at pH~pKa) as polar head group. On the other hand, aqueous foams stabilized with surfactants having oligo(ethylene oxide), phosphine oxide, quaternary ammonium, sulfate, sarcosine, amine oxide (at pH≠5), or carboxylic acid (at pH≠pKa) are not very stable. These observations suggest that hydrogen bonds between neighbouring molecules at the surface enhance foam stability. Formation of hydrogen bonds between surfactant head groups gives rise to a short-range attractive interaction that may restrict the surfactant's mobility while providing a more elastic surfactant layer which can counteract deformations. To support our hypothesis we carried out a systematic foaming study of two types of surfactants, one of them being capable of forming H-bonds and the other one not. Generating foams of all surfactants mentioned above with the same foaming conditions we found that stable foams are obtained when the head group is capable of forming intersurfactant H-bonds. The outcome of this study constitutes a new step towards the implementation of H-bonds in the future design of surfactants.

  13. A single mutation within a Ca(2+) binding loop increases proteolytic activity, thermal stability, and surfactant stability.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuyoshi; Ozawa, Tadahiro; Tohata, Masatoshi; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya

    2013-03-01

    We improved the enzymatic properties of the oxidatively stable alkaline serine protease KP-43 through protein engineering to make it more suitable for use in laundry detergents. To enhance proteolytic activity, the gene encoding KP-43 was mutagenized by error-prone PCR. Screening identified a Tyr195Cys mutant enzyme that exhibited increased specific activity toward casein between pH 7 and 11. At pH 10, the mutant displayed 1.3-fold higher specific activity for casein compared to the wild-type enzyme, but the activity of the mutant was essentially unchanged toward several synthetic peptides. Furthermore, the Tyr195Cys mutation significantly increased thermal stability and surfactant stability of the enzyme under oxidizing conditions. Examination of the crystal structure of KP-43 revealed that Tyr195 is a solvent exposed residue that forms part of a flexible loop that binds a Ca(2+) ion. This residue lies 15-20Å away from the residues comprising the catalytic triad of the enzyme. These results suggest that the substitution at position 195 does not alter the structure of the active center, but instead may affect a substrate-enzyme interaction. We propose that the Tyr195Cys mutation enhances the interaction with Ca(2+) and affects the packing of the Ca(2+) binding loop, consequently increasing protein stability. The simultaneously increased proteolytic activity, thermal stability, and surfactant stability of the Tyr195Cys mutant enzyme make the protein an ideal candidate for laundry detergent application.

  14. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Nellas, Ricky B; Glover, Mary M; Shen, Tongye

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  15. Organic additives stabilize RNA aptamer binding of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Chi, Hong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Marks, Robert S; Steele, Terry W J

    2016-11-01

    Aptamer-ligand binding has been utilized for biological applications due to its specific binding and synthetic nature. However, the applications will be limited if the binding or the ligand is unstable. Malachite green aptamer (MGA) and its labile ligand malachite green (MG) were found to have increasing apparent dissociation constants (Kd) as determined through the first order rate loss of emission intensity of the MGA-MG fluorescent complex. The fluorescent intensity loss was hypothesized to be from the hydrolysis of MG into malachite green carbinol base (MGOH). Random screening organic additives were found to reduce or retain the fluorescence emission and the calculated apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding. The protective effect became more apparent as the percentage of organic additives increased up to 10% v/v. The mechanism behind the organic additive protective effects was primarily from a ~5X increase in first order rate kinetics of MGOH→MG (kMGOH→MG), which significantly changed the equilibrium constant (Keq), favoring the generation of MG, versus MGOH without organic additives. A simple way has been developed to stabilize the apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding over 24h, which may be beneficial in stabilizing other triphenylmethane or carbocation ligand-aptamer interactions that are susceptible to SN1 hydrolysis.

  16. Stability and Change in Affect among Centenarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter; da Rosa, Grace; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Garasky, Steven; Franke, Warren

    2012-01-01

    Much information is available about physical and functional health among very old adults, but little knowledge exists about the mental health and mental health changes in very late life. This study reports findings concerning positive and negative affect changes among centenarians. Nineteen centenarians from a Midwestern state participated in four…

  17. Proteolytically stabilizing fibronectin without compromising cell and gelatin binding activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy Wangechi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive proteolytic degradation of fibronectin (FN) has been implicated in impaired tissue repair in chronic wounds. We previously reported two strategies for stabilizing FN against proteolytic degradation; the first conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG) through cysteine residues and the second conjugated PEG chains of varying molecular weight on lysine residues. PEGylation of FN via lysine residues resulted in increased resistance to proteolysis with increasing PEG size, but an overall decrease in biological activity, as characterized by cell and gelatin binding. Our latest method to stabilize FN against proteolysis masks functional regions in the protein during lysine PEGylation. FN is PEGylated while it is bound to gelatin Sepharose beads with 2, 5, and 10 kDa PEG precursors. This results in partially PEGylated FN that is more stable than native FN and whose proteolytic stability increases with PEG molecular weight. Unlike completely PEGylated FN, partially PEGylated FN has cell adhesion, gelatin binding, and matrix assembly responses that are comparable to native FN. This is new evidence of how PEGylation variables can be used to stabilize FN while retaining its activity. The conjugates developed herein can be used to dissect molecular mechanisms mediated by FN stability and functionality, and address the problem of FN degradation in chronic wounds.

  18. Ligand binding and thermodynamic stability of a multidomain protein, calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Masino, L.; Martin, S. R.; Bayley, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation of calmodulin has been monitored spectroscopically to determine the stability for the intact protein and its two isolated domains as a function of binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The reversible urea unfolding of either isolated apo-domain follows a two-state mechanism with relatively low deltaG(o)20 values of approximately 2.7 (N-domain) and approximately 1.9 kcal/mol (C-domain). The apo-C-domain is significantly unfolded at normal temperatures (20-25 degrees C). The greater affinity of the C-domain for Ca2+ causes it to be more stable than the N-domain at [Ca2+] > or = 0.3 mM. By contrast, Mg2+ causes a greater stabilization of the N- rather than the C-domain, consistent with measured Mg2+ affinities. For the intact protein (+/-Ca2+), the bimodal denaturation profiles can be analyzed to give two deltaG(o)20 values, which differ significantly from those of the isolated domains, with one domain being less stable and one domain more stable. The observed stability of the domains is strongly dependent on solution conditions such as ionic strength, as well as specific effects due to metal ion binding. In the intact protein, different folding intermediates are observed, depending on the ionic composition. The results illustrate that a protein of low intrinsic stability is liable to major perturbation of its unfolding properties by environmental conditions and liganding processes and, by extension, mutation. Hence, the observed stability of an isolated domain may differ significantly from the stability of the same structure in a multidomain protein. These results address questions involved in manipulating the stability of a protein or its domains by site directed mutagenesis and protein engineering. PMID:10975573

  19. Ligand specificity and conformational stability of human fatty acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, A W; van Moerkerk, H T; Veerkamp, J H

    2001-09-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. At least eight different types of FABP occur, each with a specific tissue distribution and possibly with a distinct function. To define the functional characteristics of all eight human FABPs, viz. heart (H), brain (B), myelin (M), adipocyte (A), epidermal (E), intestinal (I), liver (L) and ileal lipid-binding protein (I-LBP), we studied their ligand specificity, their conformational stability and their immunological crossreactivity. Additionally, binding of bile acids to I-LBP was studied. The FABP types showed differences in fatty acid binding affinity. Generally, the affinity for palmitic acid was lower than for oleic and arachidonic acid. All FABP types, except E-FABP, I-FABP and I-LBP interacted with 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonic acid (ANS). Only L-FABP, I-FABP and M-FABP showed binding of 11-((5-dimethylaminonaphtalene-1-sulfonyl)amino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA). I-LBP showed increasing binding of bile acids in the order taurine-conjugated>glycine-conjugated>unconjugated bile acids. A hydroxylgroup of bile acids at position 7 decreased and at position 12 increased the binding affinity to I-LBP. The fatty acid-binding affinity and the conformation of FABP types were differentially affected in the presence of urea. Our results demonstrate significant differences in ligand binding, conformational stability and surface properties between different FABP types which may point to a specific function in certain cells and tissues. The preference of I-LBP (but not L-FABP) for conjugated bile acids is in accordance with a specific role in bile acid reabsorption in the ileum.

  20. Plant ecology. Anthropogenic environmental changes affect ecosystem stability via biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Yann; Tilman, David; Isbell, Forest; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Reich, Peter B

    2015-04-17

    Human-driven environmental changes may simultaneously affect the biodiversity, productivity, and stability of Earth's ecosystems, but there is no consensus on the causal relationships linking these variables. Data from 12 multiyear experiments that manipulate important anthropogenic drivers, including plant diversity, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, fire, herbivory, and water, show that each driver influences ecosystem productivity. However, the stability of ecosystem productivity is only changed by those drivers that alter biodiversity, with a given decrease in plant species numbers leading to a quantitatively similar decrease in ecosystem stability regardless of which driver caused the biodiversity loss. These results suggest that changes in biodiversity caused by drivers of environmental change may be a major factor determining how global environmental changes affect ecosystem stability.

  1. Binding stability of a cross-linked drug: Calculation of an anticancer drug cisplatin-DNA complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Zhang, Yong-Li; Prohofsky, E. W.

    1997-05-01

    One of the binding modes of anticancer and antibiotic drugs bound to DNA is the formation of a cross link, i.e., binding is made through the formation of covalent bonds between a binding drug and DNA. In this work we present a computational method to calculate the binding stability of a drug cross linked to DNA. Our method is based on the modified self-consistent harmonic approach in which the disruption probabil- ity of the cross-linked bonds as well as hydrogen bonds is calculated from a statistical analysis of micro- scopic thermal fluctuational motions. A Morse potential with appropriate parameters is used to model the cross-linked covalent bonds. Our method is applied to an anticancer drug cisplatin-DNA oligomer d(CTCTAGTGCTCAC).d(GTGAGCACTAGAG) complex. We calculated the equilibrium binding constant of a cisplatin bound to this DNA oligomer. Our method can also be used to analyze the effect of drug binding on DNA base-pair thermal stability. We find that, despite the disruption of certain interbase H bonds, the thermal fluctuational opening probability Pop of base pairs in the cisplatin binding region is enhanced by the formation of non-Watson-Crick H bonds as well as cross-linked covalent bonds. Although the entire DNA helix is bent by cisplatin binding, the stability of the base pairs outside the binding region is only slightly affected by this deformation.

  2. Nitrous oxide emissions affected by biochar and nitrogen stabilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both biochar and N fertilizer stabilizers (N transformation inhibitors) are potential strategies to reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from fertilization, but the mechanisms and/or N transformation processes affecting the N dynamics are not fully understood. This research investigated N2O emission...

  3. Binding of a fibrinogen mimetic stabilizes integrin αIIbβ3's open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Hantgan, Roy R.; Rocco, Mattia; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Weisel, John W.

    2001-01-01

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 is representative of a class of heterodimeric receptors that upon activation bind extracellular macromolecular ligands and form signaling clusters. This study examined how occupancy of αIIbβ3's fibrinogen binding site affected the receptor's solution structure and stability. Eptifibatide, an integrin antagonist developed to treat cardiovascular disease, served as a high-affinity, monovalent model ligand with fibrinogen-like selectivity for αIIbβ3. Eptifibatide binding promptly and reversibly perturbed the conformation of the αIIbβ3 complex. Ligand-specific decreases in its diffusion and sedimentation coefficient were observed at near-stoichiometric eptifibatide concentrations, in contrast to the receptor-perturbing effects of RGD ligands that we previously observed only at a 70-fold molar excess. Eptifibatide promoted αIIbβ3 dimerization 10-fold more effectively than less selective RGD ligands, as determined by sedimentation equilibrium. Eptifibatide-bound integrin receptors displayed an ectodomain separation and enhanced assembly of dimers and larger oligomers linked through their stalk regions, as seen by transmission electron microscopy. Ligation with eptifibatide protected αIIbβ3 from SDS-induced subunit dissociation, an effect on electrophoretic mobility not seen with RGD ligands. Despite its distinct cleft, the open conformer resisted guanidine unfolding as effectively as the ligand-free integrin. Thus, we provide the first demonstration that binding a monovalent ligand to αIIbβ3's extracellular fibrinogen-recognition site stabilizes the receptor's open conformation and enhances self-association through its distant transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains. By showing how eptifibatide and RGD peptides, ligands with distinct binding sites, each affects αIIbβ3's conformation, our findings provide new mechanistic insights into ligand-linked integrin activation, clustering and signaling. PMID:11468358

  4. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  5. Stability and reconstitution of pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum: dissection of the stabilizing effects of coenzyme binding and subunit interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Risse, B.; Stempfer, G.; Rudolph, R.; Möllering, H.; Jaenicke, R.

    1992-01-01

    Pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum is a homotetrameric flavoprotein with strong binding sites for FAD, TPP, and a divalent cation. Treatment with acid ammonium sulfate in the presence of 1.5 M KBr leads to the release of the cofactors, yielding the stable apoenzyme. In the present study, the effects of FAD, TPP, and Mn2+ on the structural properties of the apoenzyme and the reconstitution of the active holoenzyme from its constituents have been investigated. As shown by circular dichroism and fluorescence emission, as well as by Nile red binding, the secondary and tertiary structures of the apoenzyme and the holoenzyme do not exhibit marked differences. The quaternary structure is stabilized significantly in the presence of the cofactors. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation demonstrate that the holoenzyme retains its tetrameric state down to 20 micrograms/mL, whereas the apoenzyme shows stepwise tetramer-dimer-monomer dissociation, with the monomer as the major component, at a protein concentration of < 20 micrograms/mL. In the presence of divalent cations, the coenzymes FAD and TPP bind to the apoenzyme, forming the inactive binary FAD or TPP complexes. Both FAD and TPP affect the quaternary structure by shifting the equilibrium of association toward the dimer or tetramer. High FAD concentrations exert significant stabilization against urea and heat denaturation, whereas excess TPP has no effect. Reconstitution of the holoenzyme from its components yields full reactivation. The kinetic analysis reveals a compulsory sequential mechanism of cofactor binding and quaternary structure formation, with TPP binding as the first step. The binary TPP complex (in the presence of 1 mM Mn2+/TPP) is characterized by a dimer-tetramer equilibrium transition with an association constant of Ka = 2 x 10(7) M-1. The apoenzyme TPP complex dimer associates with the tetrameric holoenzyme in the presence of 10 microM FAD

  6. Intermembrane contact affects calcium binding to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ekerdt, R; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1982-01-01

    Binding of Ca2+ to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) was analyzed by potentiometric titrations. Ca2+ binding to large unilamellar PtdSer vesicles was saturable at a stoichiometry of 1:2 (Ca2+/PtdSer). At approximately 6 X 10(-4) M [Ca2+]free, the binding curve exhibited a discontinuity that can be attributed to the formation of a Ca2+/PtdSer complex with a higher affinity. When both Ca2+ and Mg2+ are present, depending on the relative concentrations, Mg2+ can either complete or can enhance Ca2+ binding. Concomitant to the enhanced binding, the vesicle suspension was found to aggregate, suggesting that close contact of membranes is a prerequisite for the abrupt change in affinity. This concept was tested by binding studies with liposomes of mixed composition. It was found that the incorporation of 50 mol% phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) into PtdSer liposomes produced a similar binding pattern to that of pure PtdSer with a saturable stoichiometry of 1:2 (Ca2+/PtdSer). However, incorporation of 50 mol% phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) completely abolished the discontinuous shift in affinity and apparent saturation was reached at a stoichiometry of 1:4 (Ca2+/PtdSer). In addition, Ca2+ binding to PtdSer liposomes with 10 mol% galactosylcerebroside was not altered when compared to pure PtdSer, whereas 10 mol% of the glycolipid GL-4 abolished the increased binding. The results are closely correlated with recent findings on the role of the membrane composition in Ca2+-induced fusion of liposomes and argue in favor of a specific Ca2+/PtdSer complex (with 1:2 stoichiometry) forming only at points of close contact between membranes and serving as the trigger for membrane fusion. PMID:6954538

  7. Free-surface stability criterion as affected by velocity distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng-Lung, Chen

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines how the velocity distribution of flow in open channels affects the kinematic and dynamic wave velocities, from which the various forms of the Vedernikov number V can be formulated. When V >1, disturbances created in open-channel flow will amplify in the form of roll waves; when V <1, some (though not all) disturbances will attenuate. A study of the Vedernikov stability criterion reveals that it can be readily deduced within the framework of the kinematic and dynamic wave theories by comparing the kinematic wave velocity to the corresponding dynamic wave velocity. -from Author

  8. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  9. Factors affecting storage stability of various commercial phytase sources.

    PubMed

    Sulabo, R C; Jones, C K; Tokach, M D; Goodband, R D; Dritz, S S; Campbell, D R; Ratliff, B W; DeRouchey, J M; Nelssen, J L

    2011-12-01

    phytase activity than when phytases were mixed with the vitamin or VTM premixes. Coated phytases stored in any form had greater (P < 0.01) activity retention than the uncoated phytases at all sampling periods. Results indicate that storage stability of commercially available phytases is affected by duration of storage, temperature, product form, coating, and phytase source. Pure products held at 23°C or less were the most stable. In premixes, longer storage times and higher temperatures reduced phytase activity, but coating mitigated some of these negative effects.

  10. CFTR: the nucleotide binding folds regulate the accessibility and stability of the activated state

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The functional roles of the two nucleotide binding folds, NBF1 and NBF2, in the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were investigated by measuring the rates of activation and deactivation of CFTR Cl- conductance in Xenopus oocytes. Activation of wild-type CFTR in response to application of forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) was described by a single exponential. Deactivation after washout of the cocktail consisted of two phases: an initial slow phase, described by a latency, and an exponential decline. Rate analysis of CFTR variants bearing analogous mutations in NBF1 and NBF2 permitted us to characterize amino acid substitutions according to their effects on the accessibility and stability of the active state. Access to the active state was very sensitive to substitutions for the invariant glycine (G551) in NBF1, where mutations to alanine (A), serine (S), or aspartic acid (D) reduced the apparent on rate by more than tenfold. The analogous substitutions in NBF2 (G1349) also reduced the on rate, by twofold to 10-fold, but substantially destabilized the active state as well, as judged by increased deactivation rates. In the putative ATP-binding pocket of either NBF, substitution of alanine, glutamine (Q), or arginine (R) for the invariant lysine (K464 or K1250) reduced the on rate similarly, by two- to fourfold. In contrast, these analogous substitutions produced opposite effects on the deactivation rate. NBF1 mutations destabilized the active state, whereas the analogous substitutions in NBF2 stabilized the active state such that activation was prolonged compared with that seen with wild-type CFTR. Substitution of asparagine (N) for a highly conserved aspartic acid (D572) in the ATP-binding pocket of NBF1 dramatically slowed the on rate and destabilized the active state. In contrast, the analogous substitution in NBF2 (D1370N) did not appreciably affect the on rate and markedly stabilized the active state

  11. Probing the binding of trypsin to glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongke; Liu, Xingbing; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Lu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of trypsin with glutathione-stabilized Au nanoparticles (NPs) using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. We find that trypsin binds strongly to the Au NPs with a static quenching mechanism, and that the interaction is characteristic of positive cooperative binding. Furthermore, we determine the binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters, which suggest that the main binding forces between the glutathione-stabilized Au NPs and trypsin are electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding. Analysis of UV-vis absorption spectra suggests that aggregation of the Au NPs occurs in the trypsin/Au NPs system, which significantly alters the conformation of the protein.

  12. Effects of the central potassium ions on the G-quadruplex and stabilizer binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Human telomeres undertake the structure of intra-molecular parallel G-quadruplex in the presence of K(+) in eukaryotic cell. Stabilization of the telomere G-quadruplex represents a potential strategy to prevent telomere lengthening by telomerase in cancer therapy. Current work demonstrates that the binding of central K(+) with the parallel G-quadruplex is a coordinated water directed step-wise process. The K(+) above the top G-tetrad is prone to leak into environment and the 5'-adenine quickly flips over the top G-tetrad, leading to the bottom gate of G-tetrads as the only viable pathway of K(+) binding. Present molecular dynamics studies on the two most potent stabilizers RHPS4 and BRACO-19 reveal that the central K(+) has little influence on the binding conformations of the bound stabilizers. But without the central K(+), either RHPS4 or BRACO-19 cannot stabilize the structure of G-quadruplex. The binding strength of stabilizers evaluated by the MM-PBSA method follows the order of BRACO-19> RHPS4, which agrees with the experimental results. The difference in binding affinities between RHPS4 and BRACO-19 is probably related to the ability to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds and favorable van del Waals interactions with G-quadruplex. In the models that have one central K(+) located at the upper/lower binding site, the corresponding top/bottom stacked stabilizers show more favorable binding affinities, indicating the apparent promoting effect of central K(+) on the stabilizer binding. Our findings provide further insights into the regulatory effect of K(+) on the G-quadruplex targeted binding, which is meaningful to the development of G-quadruplex stabilizers.

  13. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  14. Factors affecting hazardous waste solidification/stabilization: a review.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Rachana; Chaudhary, Rubina

    2006-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization is accepted as a well-established disposal technique for hazardous waste. As a result many different types of hazardous wastes are treated with different binders. The S/S products have different property from waste and binders individually. The effectiveness of S/S process is studied by physical, chemical and microstructural methods. This paper summarizes the effect of different waste stream such as heavy metals bearing sludge, filter cake, fly ash, and slag on the properties of cement and other binders. The factors affecting strength development is studied using mix designs, including metal bearing waste alters the hydration and setting time of binders. Pore structure depends on relative quantity of the constituents, cement hydration products and their reaction products with admixtures. Carbonation and additives can lead to strength improvement in waste-binder matrix.

  15. Nuclear ubiquitination by FBXL5 modulates Snail1 DNA binding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Viñas-Castells, Rosa; Frías, Álex; Robles-Lanuza, Estefanía; Zhang, Kun; Longmore, Gregory D.; García de Herreros, Antonio; Díaz, Víctor M.

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Snail1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition, repressing epithelial markers and activating mesenchymal genes. Snail1 is an extremely labile protein degraded by the cytoplasmic ubiquitin-ligases β-TrCP1/FBXW1 and Ppa/FBXL14. Using a short hairpin RNA screening, we have identified FBXL5 as a novel Snail1 ubiquitin ligase. FBXL5 is located in the nucleus where it interacts with Snail1 promoting its polyubiquitination and affecting Snail1 protein stability and function by impairing DNA binding. Snail1 downregulation by FBXL5 is prevented by Lats2, a protein kinase that phosphorylates Snail1 precluding its nuclear export but not its polyubiquitination. Actually, although polyubiquitination by FBXL5 takes place in the nucleus, Snail1 is degraded in the cytosol. Finally, FBXL5 is highly sensitive to stress conditions and is downregulated by iron depletion and γ-irradiation, explaining Snail1 stabilization in these conditions. These results characterize a novel nuclear ubiquitin ligase controlling Snail1 protein stability and provide the molecular basis for understanding how radiotherapy upregulates the epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducer Snail1. PMID:24157836

  16. Poly(rC) binding proteins mediate poliovirus mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, K E; Roberts, A W; Barton, D J

    2001-01-01

    The 5'-terminal 88 nt of poliovirus RNA fold into a cloverleaf RNA structure and form ribonucleoprotein complexes with poly(rC) binding proteins (PCBPs; AV Gamarnik, R Andino, RNA, 1997, 3:882-892; TB Parsley, JS Towner, LB Blyn, E Ehrenfeld, BL Semler, RNA, 1997, 3:1124-1134). To determine the functional role of these ribonucleoprotein complexes in poliovirus replication, HeLa S10 translation-replication reactions were used to quantitatively assay poliovirus mRNA stability, poliovirus mRNA translation, and poliovirus negative-strand RNA synthesis. Ribohomopoly(C) RNA competitor rendered wild-type poliovirus mRNA unstable in these reactions. A 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap prevented the degradation of wild-type poliovirus mRNA in the presence of ribohomopoly(C) competitor. Ribohomopoly(A), -(G), and -(U) did not adversely affect poliovirus mRNA stability. Ribohomopoly(C) competitor RNA inhibited the translation of poliovirus mRNA but did not inhibit poliovirus negative-strand RNA synthesis when poliovirus replication proteins were provided in trans using a chimeric helper mRNA possessing the hepatitis C virus IRES. A C24A mutation prevented UV crosslinking of PCBPs to 5' cloverleaf RNA and rendered poliovirus mRNA unstable. A 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap blocked the degradation of C24A mutant poliovirus mRNA. The C24A mutation did not inhibit the translation of poliovirus mRNA nor diminish viral negative-strand RNA synthesis relative to wild-type RNA. These data support the conclusion that poly(rC) binding protein(s) mediate the stability of poliovirus mRNA by binding to the 5'-terminal cloverleaf structure of poliovirus mRNA. Because of the general conservation of 5' cloverleaf RNA sequences among picornaviruses, including C24 in loop b of the cloverleaf, we suggest that viral mRNA stability of polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and rhinoviruses is mediated by interactions between PCBPs and 5' cloverleaf RNA. PMID:11497431

  17. Balancing protein stability and activity in cancer: a new approach for identifying driver mutations affecting CBL ubiquitin ligase activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C.; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L.; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus provide mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than did random non-cancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two-thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  18. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  19. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  20. Occlusion of the Ribosome Binding Site Connects the Translational Initiation Frequency, mRNA Stability and Premature Transcription Termination

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Mette; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Mitarai, Namiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein production is controlled by ribosome binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA), quantified in part by the binding affinity between the ribosome and the ribosome binding sequence on the mRNA. Using the E. coli lac operon as model, Ringquist et al. (1992) found a more than 1,000-fold difference in protein yield when varying the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and its distance to the translation start site. Their proposed model accounted for this large variation by only a variation in the binding affinity and the subsequent initiation rate. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in protein yield with weaker ribosome binding sites in addition is caused by a decreased mRNA stability, and by an increased rate of premature transcription termination. Using different ribosome binding site sequences of the E. coli lacZ gene, we found that an approximately 100-fold span in protein expression could be subdivided into three mechanisms that each affected expression 3- to 6-fold. Our experiments is consistent with a two-step ribosome initiation model, in which occlusion of the initial part of the mRNA by a ribosome simultaneously protects the mRNA from both premature transcription termination and degradation: The premature termination we suggest is coupled to the absence of occlusion that allows binding of transcription termination factor, possibly Rho. The mRNA stability is explained by occlusion that prevents binding of the degrading enzymes. In our proposed scenario, a mRNA with lower translation initiation rate would at the same time be “hit” by an increased premature termination and a shorter life-time. Our model further suggests that the transcription from most if not all natural promoters is substantially influenced by premature termination. PMID:28382022

  1. Mannose-binding lectin may affect pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Çalkavur, Şebnem; Erdemir, Gülin; Onay, Hüseyin; Altun Köroğlu, Özge; Yalaz, Mehmet; Zekioğlu, Osman; Aksu, Güzide; Özkınay, Ferda; Akercan, Fuat; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system and acts as a complement activator through the lectin pathway. Genetic variations of MBL and low MBL levels cause several infection problems, which may also be related to pregnancy problems. We aimed to investigate the role of MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels in pregnancy problems and premature delivery. In this prospective study, MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels were studied in 45 mothers who delivered earlier than 35 gestational weeks. The frequency of MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B was much higher (homozygous 4.4% and heterozygous 33.3%) in the study group mothers than the previously reported frequency in the healthy Turkish population (homozygous 2-6%, heterozygous 12-20%). MBL variant allele B frequency was closely related to low MBL levels (<0.1 μg/ml), vaginitis and increased IL-6 levels. The median MBL levels were lower than the critical level of 0.1 μg/ ml in study mothers who had recurrent miscarriage, infertility, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm premature rupture of membranes with duration of longer than 72 hours, tocolysis, histological chorioamnionitis, urinary tract infection and vaginitis. MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B is related to low serum MBL levels, increased IL-6 levels, genitourinary infections and may cause pregnancy-related problems such as infertility, recurrent miscarriage and preterm delivery.

  2. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide binding enhances virion stability and promotes environmental fitness of an enteric virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher M; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2014-01-15

    Enteric viruses, including poliovirus and reovirus, encounter a vast microbial community in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, which has been shown to promote virus replication and pathogenesis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we find that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, which enhances virion stability and cell attachment by increasing binding to the viral receptor. Additionally, we identified a poliovirus mutant, VP1-T99K, with reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding. Although T99K and WT poliovirus cell attachment, replication, and pathogenesis in mice are equivalent, VP1-T99K poliovirus was unstable in feces following peroral inoculation of mice. Consequently, the ratio of mutant virus in feces is reduced following additional cycles of infection in mice. Thus, the mutant virus incurs a fitness cost when environmental stability is a factor. These data suggest that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, enhancing cell attachment and environmental stability, potentially promoting transmission to a new host.

  3. Effects of ligand binding on the stability of aldo–keto reductases: Implications for stabilizer or destabilizer chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Aurangazeb; Honda, Ryo P.; Kamatari, Yuji O.; Endo, Satoshi; Fukuoka, Mayuko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ligands such as enzyme inhibitors stabilize the native conformation of a protein upon binding to the native state, but some compounds destabilize the native conformation upon binding to the non‐native state. The former ligands are termed “stabilizer chaperones” and the latter ones “destabilizer chaperones.” Because the stabilization effects are essential for the medical chaperone (MC) hypothesis, here we have formulated a thermodynamic system consisting of a ligand and a protein in its native‐ and non‐native state. Using the differential scanning fluorimetry and the circular dichroism varying the urea concentration and temperature, we found that when the coenzyme NADP+ was absent, inhibitors such as isolithocholic acid stabilized the aldo–keto reductase AKR1A1 upon binding, which showed actually the three‐state folding, but destabilized AKR1B10. In contrast, in the presence of NADP+, they destabilized AKR1A1 and stabilized AKR1B10. To explain these phenomena, we decomposed the free energy of stabilization (ΔΔG) into its enthalpy (ΔΔH) and entropy (ΔΔS) components. Then we found that in a relatively unstable protein showing the three‐state folding, native conformation was stabilized by the negative ΔΔH in association with the negative ΔΔS, suggesting that the stabilizer chaperon decreases the conformational fluctuation of the target protein or increase its hydration. However, in other cases, ΔΔG was essentially determined by the delicate balance between ΔΔH and ΔΔS. The proposed thermodynamic formalism is applicable to the system including multiple ligands with allosteric interactions. These findings would promote the development of screening strategies for MCs to regulate the target conformations. PMID:27595938

  4. A WD-Repeat Protein Stabilizes ORC Binding to Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhen; Sathyan, Kizhakke M.; Geng, Yijie; Zheng, Ruiping; Chakraborty, Arindam; Freeman, Brian; Wang, Fei; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.; Prasanth, Supriya G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Origin recognition complex (ORC) plays critical roles in the initiation of DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. In metazoans, ORC associates with origin DNA during G1 and with heterochromatin in postreplicated cells. However, what regulates the binding of ORC to chromatin is not understood. We have identified a highly conserved, leucine-rich repeats and WD40 repeat domain-containing protein 1 (LRWD1) or ORC-associated (ORCA) in human cells that interacts with ORC and modulates chromatin association of ORC. ORCA colocalizes with ORC and shows similar cell-cycle dynamics. We demonstrate that ORCA efficiently recruits ORC to chromatin. Depletion of ORCA in human primary cells and embryonic stem cells results in loss of ORC association to chromatin, concomitant reduction of MCM binding, and a subsequent accumulation in G1 phase. Our results suggest ORCA-mediated association of ORC to chromatin is critical to initiate preRC assembly in G1 and chromatin organization in post-G1 cells. PMID:20932478

  5. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  7. DNA Binding of Centromere Protein C (CENPC) Is Stabilized by Single-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yaqing; Topp, Christopher N.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres are the attachment points between the genome and the cytoskeleton: centromeres bind to kinetochores, which in turn bind to spindles and move chromosomes. Paradoxically, the DNA sequence of centromeres has little or no role in perpetuating kinetochores. As such they are striking examples of genetic information being transmitted in a manner that is independent of DNA sequence (epigenetically). It has been found that RNA transcribed from centromeres remains bound within the kinetochore region, and this local population of RNA is thought to be part of the epigenetic marking system. Here we carried out a genetic and biochemical study of maize CENPC, a key inner kinetochore protein. We show that DNA binding is conferred by a localized region 122 amino acids long, and that the DNA-binding reaction is exquisitely sensitive to single-stranded RNA. Long, single-stranded nucleic acids strongly promote the binding of CENPC to DNA, and the types of RNAs that stabilize DNA binding match in size and character the RNAs present on kinetochores in vivo. Removal or replacement of the binding module with HIV integrase binding domain causes a partial delocalization of CENPC in vivo. The data suggest that centromeric RNA helps to recruit CENPC to the inner kinetochore by altering its DNA binding characteristics. PMID:20140237

  8. Replacement of Val3 in Human Thymidylate Synthase Affects Its Kinetic Properties and Intracellular Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiao; Gibson, Lydia M.; Bell, Brittnaie J.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Pea, Maria Marjorette O.; Berger, Franklin G.; Berger, Sondra H.; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2010-11-03

    Human and other mammalian thymidylate synthase (TS) enzymes have an N-terminal extension of {approx}27 amino acids that is not present in bacterial TSs. The extension, which is disordered in all reported crystal structures of TSs, has been considered to play a primary role in protein turnover but not in catalytic activity. In mammalian cells, the variant V3A has a half-life similar to that of wild-type human TS (wt hTS) while V3T is much more stable; V3L, V3F, and V3Y have half-lives approximately half of that for wt hTS. Catalytic turnover rates for most Val3 mutants are only slightly diminished, as expected. However, two mutants, V3L and V3F, have strongly compromised dUMP binding, with K{sub m,app} values increased by factors of 47 and 58, respectively. For V3L, this observation can be explained by stabilization of the inactive conformation of the loop of residues 181-197, which prevents substrate binding. In the crystal structure of V3L, electron density corresponding to a leucine residue is present in a position that stabilizes the loop of residues 181-197 in the inactive conformation. Since this density is not observed in other mutants and all other leucine residues are ordered in this structure, it is likely that this density represents Leu3. In the crystal structure of a V3F {center_dot} FdUMP binary complex, the nucleotide is bound in an alternative mode to that proposed for the catalytic complex, indicating that the high K{sub m,app} value is caused not by stabilization of the inactive conformer but by substrate binding in a nonproductive, inhibitory site. These observations show that the N-terminal extension affects the conformational state of the hTS catalytic region. Each of the mechanisms leading to the high K{sub m,app} values can be exploited to facilitate design of compounds acting as allosteric inhibitors of hTS.

  9. Structural investigations into the binding mode of novel neolignans Cmp10 and Cmp19 microtubule stabilizers by in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Kumar, Akhil; Kumar, B Sathish; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule stabilizers provide an important mode of treatment via mitotic cell arrest of cancer cells. Recently, we reported two novel neolignans derivatives Cmp10 and Cmp19 showing anticancer activity and working as microtubule stabilizers at micromolar concentrations. In this study, we have explored the binding site, mode of binding, and stabilization by two novel microtubule stabilizers Cmp10 and Cmp19 using in silico molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and binding free energy calculations. Molecular docking studies were performed to explore the β-tubulin binding site of Cmp10 and Cmp19. Further, MD simulations were used to probe the β-tubulin stabilization mechanism by Cmp10 and Cmp19. Binding affinity was also compared for Cmp10 and Cmp19 using binding free energy calculations. Our docking results revealed that both the compounds bind at Ptxl binding site in β-tubulin. MD simulation studies showed that Cmp10 and Cmp19 binding stabilizes M-loop (Phe272-Val288) residues of β-tubulin and prevent its dynamics, leading to a better packing between α and β subunits from adjacent tubulin dimers. In addition, His229, Ser280 and Gln281, and Arg278, Thr276, and Ser232 were found to be the key amino acid residues forming H-bonds with Cmp10 and Cmp19, respectively. Consequently, binding free energy calculations indicated that Cmp10 (-113.655 kJ/mol) had better binding compared to Cmp19 (-95.216 kJ/mol). This study provides useful insight for better understanding of the binding mechanism of Cmp10 and Cmp19 and will be helpful in designing novel microtubule stabilizers.

  10. Dynamic stability as affected by the longitudinal moment of inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edwin B

    1924-01-01

    In a recent Technical Note (NACA-TN-115, October, 1922), Norton and Carrol have reported experiments showing that a relatively large (15 per cent) increase in longitudinal moment of inertia made no noticeable difference in the stability of a standard SE-5A airplane. They point out that G. P. Thomson, "Applied Aeronautics," page 208, stated that an increase in longitudinal moment of inertia would decrease the stability. Neither he nor they make any theoretical forecast of the amount of decrease. Although it is difficult, on account of the complications of the theory of stability of the airplane, to make any accurate forecast, it is the purpose of this report to attempt a discussion of the matter theoretically with reference to finding a rough quantitative estimate.

  11. FACTORS AFFECTING DISINFECTION AND STABILIZATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective disinfection and stabilization of sewage sludge prior to land application is essential to not only protect human health, but also to convince the public of its benefits and safety. A basic understanding of the key factors involved in producing a stable biosolid product ...

  12. Comparative effects of cryosolvents on tubulin association, thermal stability, and binding of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pajot-Augy, E

    1993-06-01

    Organic cryosolvents essential for cryopreservation of living cells have a colligative effect on water properties, but also affect cellular structures such as the membrane, actin, or tubulin cytoskeleton. The effects of cryosolvents on actin and its binding proteins are starting to be well investigated. In parallel, tubulin assembly characteristics were investigated comparatively, with 0-30% 1,2-propanediol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or glycerol, and with or without microtubule-associated proteins, at 37 or 4 degrees C. Tubulin association was monitored by spectrometry and sedimentation, providing the concentration in free protein, cold-depolymerizable microtubules, and cold-resistant associations. At 37 degrees C, 1,2-propanediol and dimethyl sulfoxide induce a similar association level and cold stability of the assemblies. Glycerol yields a lower level of tubulin association. Cold stability of the assemblies requires the presence of solvent, the amount of which is modulated by microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs): 15% 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide, decreasing down to 10% with MAPs, or 10% glycerol with MAPs only. At 4 degrees C, some cold-stable association is promoted by 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide above 10-15%, in the presence or absence of MAPs, but not with glycerol. In addition, protein content of the various fractions obtained with MAPs and 30% solvent was examined by densitometry of electrophoresis gels. Cold-labile associations obtained at 37 degrees C with 1,2-propanediol or dimethyl sulfoxide are lacking in tubulin and enriched in tau proteins relative to control or glycerol. Associations formed at 37 degrees C and stable to subsequent cold treatment, or at 4 degrees C, regardless of the solvent, present a large tubulin content, as well as few tau proteins and high-molecular-weight MAPs.

  13. Platelet (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding in affective disorders: trait versus state characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Barkai, A.; Gruen, R.; Peselow, E.; Fieve, R.R.; Quitkin, F.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet (3H)imipramine binding (Bmax) was determined in 67 patients with major affective illness (33 euthymic bipolar, 34 depressed unipolar) and 58 normal control subjects. Bipolar patients had significantly lower Bmax values than did control subjects. The mean Bmax in the unipolar patients was lower than in the control subjects, but the difference was not statistically significant. Dissociation constant (Kd) values did not distinguish patients in either category from control subjects. The significantly lower Bmax in euthymic bipolar patients and the apparent state independence of Bmax in some but not all unipolar patients suggest that platelet imipramine binding may be a trait marker in a subset of affective disorders.

  14. Binding, stability, and antioxidant activity of quercetin with soy protein isolate particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufang; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2015-12-01

    This work is to study the potential of particles fabricated from soy protein isolate (SPI) as a protective carrier for quercetin. When the concentration of SPI particles increases from 0 to 0.35 g/L, quercetin gives a gradually increased fluorescence intensity and fluorescence anisotropy. The addition of quercetin can highly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of SPI particles. These results are explained in terms of the binding of quercetin to the hydrophobic pockets of SPI particles mainly through the hydrophobic force together with the hydrogen bonding. The small difference in the binding constants at 25 and 40 °C suggests the structural stability of SPI particles. The relative changes in values of Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy indicate that the binding of quercetin with SPI particles is spontaneous and hydrophobic interaction is the major force. Furthermore, SPI particles are superior to native SPI for improving the stability and radical scavenging activity of quercetin.

  15. Distinct pose of discodermolide in taxol binding pocket drives a complementary mode of microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2009-12-15

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in beta-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that, like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in beta-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and toward the N-terminal H1-S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the alpha-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent beta-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo.

  16. Molecular Modeling Approaches to Study the Binding Mode on Tubulin of Microtubule Destabilizing and Stabilizing Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Maurizio; Forli, Stefano; Magnani, Matteo; Manetti, Fabrizio

    Tubulin targeting agents constitute an important class of anticancer drugs. By acting either as microtubule stabilizers or destabilizers, they disrupt microtubule dynamics, thus inducing mitotic arrest and, ultimately, cell death by apoptosis. Three different binding sites, whose exact location on tubulin has been experimentally detected, have been identified so far for antimitotic compound targeting microtubules, namely the taxoid, the colchicine and the vinka alkaloid binding site. A number of ligand- and structure-based molecular modeling studies in this field has been reported over the years, aimed at elucidating the binding modes of both stabilizing and destabilizing agent, as well as the molecular features responsible for their efficacious interaction with tubulin. Such studies are described in this review, focusing on information provided by different modeling approaches on the structural determinants of antitubulin agents and the interactions with the binding pockets on tubulin emerged as fundamental for antitumor activity.To describe molecular modeling approaches applied to date to molecules known to bind microtubules, this paper has been divided into two main parts: microtubule destabilizing (Part 1) and stabilizing (Part 2) agents. The first part includes structure-based and ligand-based approaches to study molecules targeting colchicine (1.1) and vinca alkaloid (1.2) binding sites, respectively. In the second part, the studies performed on microtubule-stabilizing antimitotic agents (MSAA) are described. Starting from the first representative compound of this class, paclitaxel, molecular modeling studies (quantitative structure-activity relationships - QSAR - and structure-based approaches), performed on natural compounds acting with the same mechanism of action and temptative common pharmacophoric hypotheses for all of these compounds, are reported.

  17. Two Polo-like kinase 4 binding domains in Asterless perform distinct roles in regulating kinase stability

    PubMed Central

    Klebba, Joseph E.; Galletta, Brian J.; Nye, Jonathan; Plevock, Karen M.; Buster, Daniel W.; Hollingsworth, Natalie A.; Slep, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) and its binding partner Asterless (Asl) are essential, conserved centriole assembly factors that induce centriole amplification when overexpressed. Previous studies found that Asl acts as a scaffolding protein; its N terminus binds Plk4’s tandem Polo box cassette (PB1-PB2) and targets Plk4 to centrioles to initiate centriole duplication. However, how Asl overexpression drives centriole amplification is unknown. In this paper, we investigated the Asl–Plk4 interaction in Drosophila melanogaster cells. Surprisingly, the N-terminal region of Asl is not required for centriole duplication, but a previously unidentified Plk4-binding domain in the C terminus is required. Mechanistic analyses of the different Asl regions revealed that they act uniquely during the cell cycle: the Asl N terminus promotes Plk4 homodimerization and autophosphorylation during interphase, whereas the Asl C terminus stabilizes Plk4 during mitosis. Therefore, Asl affects Plk4 in multiple ways to regulate centriole duplication. Asl not only targets Plk4 to centrioles but also modulates Plk4 stability and activity, explaining the ability of overexpressed Asl to drive centriole amplification. PMID:25688134

  18. Feature binding and affect: emotional modulation of visuo-motor integration.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-28

    The primate cortex represents the external world in a distributed fashion, which calls for a mechanism that integrates and binds the features of a perceived or processed event. Animal and patients studies provide evidence that feature binding in the visual cortex is driven by the muscarinic-cholinergic system, whereas visuo-motor integration may be under dopaminergic control. Consistent with this scenario, we present indication that the binding of visual and action features is modulated by emotions through the probable stimulation of the dopaminergic system. Interestingly, the impact of emotions on binding was restricted to tasks in which shape was task-relevant, suggesting that extracting affective information is not automatic but requires attention to shape.

  19. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs.

  20. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  1. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract.

  2. Exploring the stability of ligand binding modes to proteins by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Watanabe, Etsurou; Kokubo, Hironori

    2017-02-01

    The binding mode prediction is of great importance to structure-based drug design. The discrimination of various binding poses of ligand generated by docking is a great challenge not only to docking score functions but also to the relatively expensive free energy calculation methods. Here we systematically analyzed the stability of various ligand poses under molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. First, a data set of 120 complexes was built based on the typical physicochemical properties of drug-like ligands. Three potential binding poses (one correct pose and two decoys) were selected for each ligand from self-docking in addition to the experimental pose. Then, five independent MD simulations for each pose were performed with different initial velocities for the statistical analysis. Finally, the stabilities of ligand poses under MD were evaluated and compared with the native one from crystal structure. We found that about 94% of the native poses were maintained stable during the simulations, which suggests that MD simulations are accurate enough to judge most experimental binding poses as stable properly. Interestingly, incorrect decoy poses were maintained much less and 38-44% of decoys could be excluded just by performing equilibrium MD simulations, though 56-62% of decoys were stable. The computationally-heavy binding free energy calculation can be performed only for these survived poses.

  3. Exploring the stability of ligand binding modes to proteins by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Watanabe, Etsurou; Kokubo, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    The binding mode prediction is of great importance to structure-based drug design. The discrimination of various binding poses of ligand generated by docking is a great challenge not only to docking score functions but also to the relatively expensive free energy calculation methods. Here we systematically analyzed the stability of various ligand poses under molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. First, a data set of 120 complexes was built based on the typical physicochemical properties of drug-like ligands. Three potential binding poses (one correct pose and two decoys) were selected for each ligand from self-docking in addition to the experimental pose. Then, five independent MD simulations for each pose were performed with different initial velocities for the statistical analysis. Finally, the stabilities of ligand poses under MD were evaluated and compared with the native one from crystal structure. We found that about 94% of the native poses were maintained stable during the simulations, which suggests that MD simulations are accurate enough to judge most experimental binding poses as stable properly. Interestingly, incorrect decoy poses were maintained much less and 38-44% of decoys could be excluded just by performing equilibrium MD simulations, though 56-62% of decoys were stable. The computationally-heavy binding free energy calculation can be performed only for these survived poses.

  4. Cow biological type affects ground beef colour stability.

    PubMed

    Raines, Christopher R; Hunt, Melvin C; Unruh, John A

    2009-12-01

    To determine the effects of cow biological type on colour stability of ground beef, M. semimembranosus from beef-type (BSM) and dairy-type (DSM) cows was obtained 5d postmortem. Three blends (100% BSM, 50% BSM+50% DSM, 100% DSM) were adjusted to 90% and 80% lean points using either young beef trim (YBT) or beef cow trim (BCT), then packaged in high oxygen (High-O(2); 80% O(2)) modified atmosphere (MAP). The BSM+YBT patties had the brightest colour initially, but discoloured rapidly. Although DSM+BCT patties had the darkest colour initially, they discoloured least during display. Metmyoglobin reducing ability of ground DSM was up to fivefold greater than ground BSM, and TBARS values of BSM was twofold greater than DSM by the end of display (4d). Though initially darker than beef cow lean, dairy cow lean has a longer display colour life and may be advantageous to retailers using High-O(2) MAP.

  5. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  6. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  7. Folding and stability of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Jackson, Sophie E.

    2002-01-01

    A complex pathway involving many molecular chaperones has been proposed for the folding, assembly, and maintenance of a high-affinity ligand-binding form of steroid receptors in vivo, including the glucocorticoid receptor. To better understand this intricate folding and assembly process, we studied the folding of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in vitro. We found that this domain can be refolded into a compact, highly structured state in vitro in the absence of chaperones. However, the presence of zwitterionic detergent is required to maintain the domain in a soluble form. In this state, the protein is dimeric and has considerable helical structure as shown by far-UV circular dichroism. Further investigation of the properties of this in vitro refolded state show that it is stable and resistant to denaturation by heat or low concentrations of chemical denaturants. A detailed analysis of the unfolding equilibria using three different structural probes demonstrated that this state unfolds via a highly populated dimeric intermediate state. Together, these data clearly show that the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor does not require chaperones for folding per se. However, this in vitro refolded state binds the ligand dexamethasone only weakly (Kd = 45 μM) compared to the in vivo assembled receptor (Kd = 3.4 nM). We suggest that the role of Hsp90 and associated chaperones is to bind to, and stabilize, a specific conformational state of the receptor which binds ligand with high affinity. PMID:12142447

  8. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  9. Affect influences feature binding in memory: Trading between richness and strength of memory representations.

    PubMed

    Spachtholz, Philipp; Kuhbandner, Christof; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Research has shown that long-term memory representations of objects are formed as a natural product of perception even without any intentional memorization. It is not known, however, how rich these representations are in terms of the number of bound object features. In particular, because feature binding rests on resource-limited processes, there may be a context-dependent trade-off between the quantity of stored features and their memory strength. The authors examined whether affective state may bring about such a trade-off. Participants incidentally encoded pictures of real-world objects while experiencing positive or negative affect, and the authors later measured memory for 2 features. Results showed that participants traded between richness and strength of memory representations as a function of affect, with positive affect tuning memory formation toward richness and negative affect tuning memory formation toward strength. These findings demonstrate that memory binding is a flexible process that is modulated by affective state. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I. ); Lions, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the sequel of a previous work where the authors showed a general necessary and sufficient condition for the stability of an arbitrary molecular system (possibly ionized) in the framework of Hartree or Thomas-Fermi type theories. This condition, roughly speaking, meant that certain particular subsystems have to be bound. They show here in particular that this condition reduces for general molecular system with nonnegative excess charge to the binding of all subsystems with the same property. For neutral molecular systems, this reduces to the binding of all neutral subsystems. In both cases, all other subsystems can be bound. They also show that, for the Hartree-Fock and Hartree models, this condition involves only physical subsystems. They use these reduced conditions to conclude about the stability or the binding in some particular cases. This work is also the second of a series devoted to these equations and the authors come back on the binding of neutral systems in Part 3. 18 refs.

  11. The Structure, Stability and Pheromone Binding of the Male Mouse Protein Sex Pheromone Darcin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Marie M.; McLean, Lynn; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Hurst, Jane L.; Beynon, Robert J.; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mouse urine contains highly polymorphic major urinary proteins that have multiple functions in scent communication through their abilities to bind, transport and release hydrophobic volatile pheromones. The mouse genome encodes for about 20 of these proteins and are classified, based on amino acid sequence similarity and tissue expression patterns, as either central or peripheral major urinary proteins. Darcin is a male specific peripheral major urinary protein and is distinctive in its role in inherent female attraction. A comparison of the structure and biophysical properties of darcin with MUP11, which belongs to the central class, highlights similarity in the overall structure between the two proteins. The thermodynamic stability, however, differs between the two proteins, with darcin being much more stable. Furthermore, the affinity of a small pheromone mimetic is higher for darcin, although darcin is more discriminatory, being unable to bind bulkier ligands. These attributes are due to the hydrophobic ligand binding cavity of darcin being smaller, caused by the presence of larger amino acid side chains. Thus, the physical and chemical characteristics of the binding cavity, together with its extreme stability, are consistent with darcin being able to exert its function after release into the environment. PMID:25279835

  12. Amino acid polymorphisms in the fibronectin-binding repeats of fibronectin-binding protein A affect bond strength and fibronectin conformation.

    PubMed

    Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Cruz, Carlos H B; Lins, Roberto D; DiBartola, Alex C; Howard, Jessica; Liang, Xiaowen; Höök, Magnus; Viana, Isabelle F T; Sierra-Hernández, M Roxana; Lower, Steven K

    2017-04-11

    The Staphylococcus aureus cell surface contains cell wall-anchored proteins such as fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) that bind to host ligands (e.g. fibronectin; Fn) present in the extracellular matrix of tissue or coatings on cardiac implants. Recent clinical studies have found a correlation between cardiovascular infections caused by S. aureus and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FnBPA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and molecular simulations were used to investigate interactions between Fn and each of eight, 20-mer peptide variants containing amino acids A, H, I, K, N, and Q at positions equivalent to 782 and/or 786 in Fn-binding repeat-9 (FnBR-9) of FnBPA. Experimentally measured bond lifetimes (1/koff ) and dissociation constants (Kd = koff / kon ), determined by mechanically dissociating the Fn-peptide complex at loading rates relevant to the cardiovascular system varied from the lowest-affinity H782A+K786A peptide (0.011 sec, 747 µM) to the highest-affinity H782Q+K786N peptide (0.192 sec, 15.7 µM). These AFM results tracked remarkably well to metadynamics simulations in which peptide detachment was defined solely by the free-energy landscape. Simulations and SPR experiments suggested that an Fn conformational change may enhance the stability of the binding complex for peptides with K786I or H782Q+K786I (Kd(app) = 0.2 to 0.5 µM. as determined by SPR) compared with the lowest-affinity double alanine peptide (Kd(app) = 3.8 µM). Together, these findings demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in FnBR-9 can significantly affect bond strength and influence the conformation of Fn upon binding. They provide a mechanistic explanation for the observation of nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA) among clinical isolates of S. aureus that cause endovascular infections.

  13. Rfx2 Stabilizes Foxj1 Binding at Chromatin Loops to Enable Multiciliated Cell Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative transcription factor binding at cis-regulatory sites in the genome drives robust eukaryotic gene expression, and many such sites must be coordinated to produce coherent transcriptional programs. The transcriptional program leading to motile cilia formation requires members of the DNA-binding forkhead (Fox) and Rfx transcription factor families and these factors co-localize to cilia gene promoters, but it is not clear how many cilia genes are regulated by these two factors, whether these factors act directly or indirectly, or how these factors act with specificity in the context of a 3-dimensional genome. Here, we use genome-wide approaches to show that cilia genes reside at the boundaries of topological domains and that these areas have low enhancer density. We show that the transcription factors Foxj1 and Rfx2 binding occurs in the promoters of more cilia genes than other known cilia transcription factors and that while Rfx2 binds directly to promoters and enhancers equally, Foxj1 prefers direct binding to enhancers and is stabilized at promoters by Rfx2. Finally, we show that Rfx2 and Foxj1 lie at the anchor endpoints of chromatin loops, suggesting that target genes are activated when Foxj1 bound at distal sites is recruited via a loop created by Rfx2 binding at both sites. We speculate that the primary function of Rfx2 is to stabilize distal enhancers with proximal promoters by operating as a scaffolding factor, bringing key regulatory domains bound by Foxj1 into close physical proximity and enabling coordinated cilia gene expression. PMID:28103240

  14. Stability Affects of Artificial Viscosity in Detonation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Souers, P C

    2002-06-03

    Accurate multi-dimensional modeling of detonation waves in solid HE materials is a difficult task. To treat applied problems which contain detonation waves one must consider reacting flow with a wide range of length-scales, non-linear equations of state (EOS), and material interfaces at which the detonation wave interacts with other materials. To be useful numerical models of detonation waves must be accurate, stable, and insensitive to details of the modeling such as the mesh spacing, and mesh aspect ratio for multi-dimensional simulations. Studies we have performed show that numerical simulations of detonation waves can be very sensitive to the form of the artificial viscosity term used. The artificial viscosity term is included in our ALE hydrocode to treat shock discontinuities. We show that a monotonic, second order artificial viscosity model derived from an approximate Riemann solver scheme can strongly damp unphysical oscillations in the detonation wave reaction zone, improving the detonation wave boundary wall interaction. These issues are demonstrated in 2D model simulations presented of the 'Bigplate' test. Results using LX-I 7 explosives are compared with numerical simulation results to demonstrate the affects of the artificial viscosity model.

  15. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Luis E; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2014-07-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor.

  16. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor. PMID:24686081

  17. Murine startle mutant Nmf11 affects the structural stability of the glycine receptor and increases deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Megan E.; Caley, Alex; Gielen, Marc C.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Hyperekplexia or startle disease is a serious neurological condition affecting newborn children and usually involves dysfunctional glycinergic neurotransmission.Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are major mediators of inhibition in the spinal cord and brainstem.A missense mutation, replacing asparagine (N) with lysine (K), at position 46 in the GlyR α1 subunit induced hyperekplexia following a reduction in the potency of the transmitter glycine; this resulted from a rapid deactivation of the agonist current at mutant GlyRs.These effects of N46K were rescued by mutating a juxtaposed residue, N61 on binding Loop D, suggesting these two asparagines may interact.Asparagine 46 is considered to be important for the structural stability of the subunit interface and glycine binding site, and its mutation represents a new mechanism by which GlyR dysfunction induces startle disease. Abstract Dysfunctional glycinergic inhibitory transmission underlies the debilitating neurological condition, hyperekplexia, which is characterised by exaggerated startle reflexes, muscle hypertonia and apnoea. Here we investigated the N46K missense mutation in the GlyR α1 subunit gene found in the ethylnitrosourea (ENU) murine mutant, Nmf11, which causes reduced body size, evoked tremor, seizures, muscle stiffness, and morbidity by postnatal day 21. Introducing the N46K mutation into recombinant GlyR α1 homomeric receptors, expressed in HEK cells, reduced the potencies of glycine, β‐alanine and taurine by 9‐, 6‐ and 3‐fold respectively, and that of the competitive antagonist strychnine by 15‐fold. Replacing N46 with hydrophobic, charged or polar residues revealed that the amide moiety of asparagine was crucial for GlyR activation. Co‐mutating N61, located on a neighbouring β loop to N46, rescued the wild‐type phenotype depending on the amino acid charge. Single‐channel recording identified that burst length for the N46K mutant was reduced and fast agonist application

  18. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  19. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I.; Lions, P.L. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the third of a series devoted to the study of the binding of atoms, molecules and ions and of the stability of general molecular systems including molecular ions, in the context of Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories. For Thomas-Fermi-von Weizsaecker or Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-von Weizsaecker models, it is proven here that neutral systems can be bound and in view of the results shown in the preceding parts this yields the stability of arbitrary molecules (general neutral molecular systems). For the Hartree and Hartree-Fock models, it is proven that neutral planar systems can be bound and this yields the stability of arbitrary tetraatomic molecules for instance. Various variants and extensions are also considered. 24 refs.

  20. Stabilization of Cu(I) for binding and calorimetric measurements in aqueous solution†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Destinee K.; Stevenson, Michael J.; Almadidy, Zayed A.; Jenkins, Sharon E.; Wilcox, Dean. E.; Grossoehme, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Conditions have been developed for the comproportionation reaction of Cu2+ and copper metal to prepare aqueous solutions of Cu+ that are stabilized from disproportionation by MeCN and other Cu+-stabilizing ligands. These solutions were then used in ITC measurements to quantify the thermodynamics of formation of a set of Cu+ complexes (CuI(MeCN)3+, CuIMe6Trien+, CuI(BCA)23−, CuI(BCS)23−), which have stabilities ranging over 15 orders of magnitude, for their use in binding and calorimetric measurements of Cu+ interaction with proteins and other biological macromolecules. These complexes were then used to determine the stability and thermodynamics of formation of a 1 : 1 complex of Cu+ with the biologically important tri-peptide glutathione, GSH. These results identify Me6Trien as an attractive Cu+-stabilizing ligand for calorimetric experiments, and suggest that caution should be used with MeCN to stabilize Cu+ due to its potential for participating in unquantifiable ternary interactions. PMID:26327397

  1. Gemini surfactants affect the structure, stability, and activity of ribonuclease Sa.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Laurents, Douglas V

    2014-09-11

    Gemini surfactants have important advantages, e.g., low micromolar CMCs and slow millisecond monomer ↔ micelle kinetics, for membrane mimetics and for delivering nucleic acids for gene therapy or RNA silencing. However, as a prerequisite, it is important to characterize interactions occurring between Gemini surfactants and proteins. Here NMR and CD spectroscopies are employed to investigate the interactions of cationic Gemini surfactants with RNase Sa, a negatively charged ribonuclease. We find that RNase Sa binds Gemini surfactant monomers and micelles at pH values above 4 to form aggregates. Below pH 4, where the protein is positively charged, these aggregates dissolve and interactions are undetectable. Thermal denaturation experiments show that surfactant lowers RNase Sa's conformational stability, suggesting that surfactant binds the protein's denatured state preferentially. Finally, Gemini surfactants were found to bind RNA, leading to the formation of large complexes. Interestingly, Gemini surfactant binding did not prevent RNase Sa from cleaving RNA.

  2. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  3. Binding of bivalent ions to actinomycete mannanase is accompanied by conformational change and is a key factor in its thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yuya; Kawakami, Kayoko; Uraji, Misugi; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to define the key factors involved in the modulation of actinomycete mannanases. We focused on the roles of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and bivalent ions. To investigate the effects of these factors, two actinomycete mannanase genes were cloned from Streptomyces thermoluteus (StManII) and Streptomyces lividans (SlMan). CBMs fused to mannanase catalytic domains do not affect the thermal stability of the proteins. CBM2 of StManII increased the catalytic efficiency toward soluble-mannan and insoluble-mannan by 25%-36%, and CBM10 of SlMan increased the catalytic efficiency toward soluble-mannan by 40%-50%. Thermal stability of wild-type and mutant enzymes was enhanced by calcium and manganese. Thermal stability of SlMandC was also slightly enhanced by magnesium. These results indicated that bivalent ion-binding site responsible for thermal stability was in the catalytic domains. Thermal stability of mannanase differed in the kinds of bivalent ions. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the catalytic domain of StManII bound bivalent ions with a K(a) of 5.39±0.45×10(3)-7.56±1.47×10(3)M(-1), and the catalytic domain of SlMan bound bivalent ions with a K(a) of 1.06±0.34×10(3)-3.86±0.94×10(3)M(-1). The stoichiometry of these bindings was consistent with one bivalent ion-binding site per molecule of enzyme. Circular dichroism spectrum revealed that the presence of bivalent ions induced changes in the secondary structures of the enzymes. The binding of certain bivalent ion responsible for thermal stability was accompanied by a different conformational change by each bivalent ion. Actinomycete mannanases belong to GHF5 which contained various hemicellulases; therefore, the information obtained from mannanases applies to the other enzymes.

  4. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept.

  5. Pin1 promotes histone H1 dephosphorylation and stabilizes its binding to chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Nikhil; Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Williams, Kylie; Fang, He; Mizzen, Craig; Hayes, Jeffrey J.; Th’ng, John

    2013-01-01

    Histone H1 plays a crucial role in stabilizing higher order chromatin structure. Transcriptional activation, DNA replication, and chromosome condensation all require changes in chromatin structure and are correlated with the phosphorylation of histone H1. In this study, we describe a novel interaction between Pin1, a phosphorylation-specific prolyl isomerase, and phosphorylated histone H1. A sub-stoichiometric amount of Pin1 stimulated the dephosphorylation of H1 in vitro and modulated the structure of the C-terminal domain of H1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Depletion of Pin1 destabilized H1 binding to chromatin only when Pin1 binding sites on H1 were present. Pin1 recruitment and localized histone H1 phosphorylation were associated with transcriptional activation independent of RNA polymerase II. We thus identify a novel form of histone H1 regulation through phosphorylation-dependent proline isomerization, which has consequences on overall H1 phosphorylation levels and the stability of H1 binding to chromatin. PMID:24100296

  6. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  7. Mitoxantrone and Analogues Bind and Stabilize i-Motif Forming DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Elisé P.; Day, Henry A.; Ibrahim, Ali M.; Kumar, Jeethendra; Boswell, Leo J. E.; Huguin, Camille; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Pors, Klaus; Waller, Zoë A. E.

    2016-01-01

    There are hundreds of ligands which can interact with G-quadruplex DNA, yet very few which target i-motif. To appreciate an understanding between the dynamics between these structures and how they can be affected by intervention with small molecule ligands, more i-motif binding compounds are required. Herein we describe how the drug mitoxantrone can bind, induce folding of and stabilise i-motif forming DNA sequences, even at physiological pH. Additionally, mitoxantrone was found to bind i-motif forming sequences preferentially over double helical DNA. We also describe the stabilisation properties of analogues of mitoxantrone. This offers a new family of ligands with potential for use in experiments into the structure and function of i-motif forming DNA sequences. PMID:28004744

  8. Mitoxantrone and Analogues Bind and Stabilize i-Motif Forming DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Elisé P.; Day, Henry A.; Ibrahim, Ali M.; Kumar, Jeethendra; Boswell, Leo J. E.; Huguin, Camille; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Pors, Klaus; Waller, Zoë A. E.

    2016-12-01

    There are hundreds of ligands which can interact with G-quadruplex DNA, yet very few which target i-motif. To appreciate an understanding between the dynamics between these structures and how they can be affected by intervention with small molecule ligands, more i-motif binding compounds are required. Herein we describe how the drug mitoxantrone can bind, induce folding of and stabilise i-motif forming DNA sequences, even at physiological pH. Additionally, mitoxantrone was found to bind i-motif forming sequences preferentially over double helical DNA. We also describe the stabilisation properties of analogues of mitoxantrone. This offers a new family of ligands with potential for use in experiments into the structure and function of i-motif forming DNA sequences.

  9. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  10. SNP2TFBS - a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-04

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/.

  11. Development of an efficient G-quadruplex stabilized thrombin binding aptamer containing 3-carbon spacer molecule.

    PubMed

    Naduvile Veedu, Rakesh; Aaldering, Lukas; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Langkjaer, Niels; Murugan, Arul; Jørgensen, Per Trolle; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-02-02

    Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) that shows anticoagulant properties is one of the most studied G-quadruplex forming aptamers. In this study, we investigated the impact of different chemical modifications such as Spacer-C3, unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) and 3'-amine-modified UNA (amino-UNA) on the structural dynamics and stability of TBA. All three modifications were incorporated at three different loop positions (T3, T7 and T12) of the TBA G-quadruplex structure rendering a series of TBA variants and studied their stability by thermal denaturation studies, folding by circular dichroism spectroscopy and thrombin clotting time. The results showed that Spacer-C3 introduction at T7 loop position (TBA-SP7) significantly improved the stability and thrombin clotting time while maintaining a similar binding affinity as TBA to thrombin. Detailed molecular modelling experiments provided novel insights to the experimental observation that further supported the efficacy of TBA-SP7. The results of this study could provide valuable information for future designs of TBA analogues with superior thrombin inhibition properties.

  12. Calcium Binding and Disulfide Bonds Regulate the Stability of Secretagogin towards Thermal and Urea Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Weiffert, Tanja; Ní Mhurchú, Niamh; O’Connell, David; Linse, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin is a calcium-sensor protein with six EF-hands. It is widely expressed in neurons and neuro-endocrine cells of a broad range of vertebrates including mammals, fishes and amphibia. The protein plays a role in secretion and interacts with several vesicle-associated proteins. In this work, we have studied the contribution of calcium binding and disulfide-bond formation to the stability of the secretagogin structure towards thermal and urea denaturation. SDS-PAGE analysis of secretagogin in reducing and non-reducing conditions identified a tendency of the protein to form dimers in a redox-dependent manner. The denaturation of apo and Calcium-loaded secretagogin was studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy under conditions favoring monomer or dimer or a 1:1 monomer: dimer ratio. This analysis reveals significantly higher stability towards urea denaturation of Calcium-loaded secretagogin compared to the apo protein. The secondary and tertiary structure of the Calcium-loaded form is not completely denatured in the presence of 10 M urea. Reduced and Calcium-loaded secretagogin is found to refold reversibly after heating to 95°C, while both oxidized and reduced apo secretagogin is irreversibly denatured at this temperature. Thus, calcium binding greatly stabilizes the structure of secretagogin towards chemical and heat denaturation. PMID:27812162

  13. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis.

  14. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  15. Actin-Binding Protein Requirement for Cortical Stability and Efficient Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, C. Casey; Gorlin, Jed B.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Hartwig, John H.; Janmey, Paul A.; Randolph Byers, H.; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    Three unrelated tumor cell lines derived from human malignant melanomas lack actin-binding protein (ABP), which cross-links actin filaments in vitro and connects these filaments to plasma membrane glycoproteins. The ABP-deficient cells have impaired locomotion and display circumferential blebbing of the plasma membrane. Expression of ABP in one of the lines after transfection restored translocational motility and reduced membrane blebbing. These findings establish that ABP functions to stabilize cortical actin in vivo and is required for efficient cell locomotion.

  16. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-05-28

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of EiIi, d, and γ, where EiIi and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates.

  17. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories. Part 4: Binding of neutral systems for the Hartree model

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I.; Lions, P.L. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the fourth of a series devoted to the study of the stability of general molecular systems in Thomas-Fermi or Hartree type models. In the preceding part, the authors proved the binding of arbitrary neutral systems for Thomas-Fermi type theories and of planar neutral systems for the Hartree model. In this part, they manage to get rid of this restriction and thus prove the binding and the stability of arbitrary neutral systems for the Hartree model. 23 refs.

  18. Binding specificity and stability of duplexes formed by modified oligonucleotides with a 4096-hexanucleotide microarray

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Edward; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    The binding of oligodeoxynucleotides modified with adenine 2′-O-methyl riboside, 2,6-diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl riboside, cytosine 2′-O-methyl riboside, 2,6-diaminopurine deoxyriboside or 5-bromodeoxyuridine was studied with a microarray containing all possible (4096) polyacrylamide-bound hexadeoxynucleotides (a generic microchip). The generic microchip was manufactured by using reductive immobilization of aminooligonucleotides in the activated copolymer of acrylamide, bis-acrylamide and N-(2,2-dimethoxyethyl) acrylamide. The binding of the fluorescently labeled modified octanucleotides to the array was analyzed with the use of both melting profiles and the fluorescence distribution at selected temperatures. Up to three substitutions of adenosines in the octamer sequence by adenine 2′-O-methyl ribosides (Am), 2,6-diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl ribosides (Dm) or 2,6-diaminopurine deoxyribosides (D) resulted in increased mismatch discrimination measured at the melting temperature of the corresponding perfect duplex. The stability of complexes formed by 2′-O-methyl-adenosine-modified oligodeoxynucleotides was slightly decreased with every additional substitution, yielding ∼4°C of total loss in melting temperature for three modifications, as followed from microchip thermal denaturation experiments. 2,6-Diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl riboside modifications led to considerable duplex stabilization. The cytosine 2′-O-methyl riboside and 5-bromodeoxyuridine modifications generally did not change either duplex stability or mismatch resolution. Denaturation experiments conducted with selected perfect duplexes on microchips and in solution showed similar results on thermal stabilities. Some hybridization artifacts were observed that might indicate the formation of parallel DNA. PMID:11410672

  19. The use of "stabilization exercises" to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-06-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term "core stability" is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. "stabilization exercise", "motor control exercise"). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms "core stability" and "stabilization exercise", 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process.

  20. Using DNA duplex stability information for transcription factor binding site discovery.

    PubMed

    Gordân, Raluca; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site discovery is an important step in understanding transcriptional regulation. Many computational tools have already been developed, but their success in detecting TF motifs is still limited. We believe one of the main reasons for the low accuracy of current methods is that they do not take into account the structural aspects of TF-DNA interaction. We have previously shown that knowledge about the structural class of the TF and information about nucleosome occupancy can be used to improve motif discovery. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of using information about the DNA double-helical stability for motif discovery. We notice that, in general, the energy needed to destabilize the DNA double helix is higher at TF binding sites than at random DNA sites. We use this information to derive informative positional priors that we incorporate into a motif finding algorithm. When applied to yeast ChIP-chip data, the new informative priors improve the performance of the motif finder significantly when compared to priors that do not use the energetic stability information.

  1. Controlled Aggregation and Increased Stability of β-Glucuronidase by Cellulose Binding Domain Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonjung; Kwon, Kil Koang; Fu, Yaoyao; Kim, Haseong; Lee, Hyewon; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jung, Heungchae; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) are protein domains with cellulose-binding activity, and some act as leaders in the localization of cellulosomal scaffoldin proteins to the hydrophobic surface of crystalline cellulose. In this study, we found that a CBD fusion enhanced and improved soluble β-glucuronidase (GusA) enzyme properties through the formation of an artificially oligomeric state. First, a soluble CBD fused to the C-terminus of GusA (GusA-CBD) was obtained and characterized. Interestingly, the soluble GusA-CBD showed maximum activity at higher temperatures (65°C) and more acidic pH values (pH 6.0) than free GusA did (60°C and pH 7.5). Moreover, the GusA-CBD enzyme showed higher thermal and pH stabilities than the free GusA enzyme did. Additionally, GusA-CBD showed higher enzymatic activity in the presence of methanol than free GusA did. Evaluation of the protease accessibility of both enzymes revealed that GusA-CBD retained 100% of its activity after 1 h incubation in 0.5 mg/ml protease K, while free GusA completely lost its activity. Simple fusion of CBD as a single domain may be useful for tunable enzyme states to improve enzyme stability in industrial applications. PMID:28099480

  2. Cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of the urokinase mRNA binding protein regulates message stability.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sreerama

    2002-08-01

    Treatment of small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells or lung epithelial (Beas2B) cells with TNF-alpha or PMA induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression. Treatment of these cells with TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide but not TGF-beta increased steady-state expression of uPAmRNA. TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide caused 8-10 fold extensions of the uPAmRNA half-life in SAEC or Beas2B cells treated with DRB, a transcriptional inhibitor. These findings suggest that uPA gene expression involves a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we identified a 30 kDa uPA mRNA binding protein (uPA mRNABp) that selectively binds to a 66 nt protein binding fragment of uPA mRNA containing regulatory information for message stabilization. Binding of cytoplasmic uPA mRNABp to uPA mRNA was abolished after treatment with TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta. In addition, we found the accumulation of 30 kDa uPAmRNABp in the nuclear extracts of TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta treated cells. The uPA mRNABp starts moving to the nucleus from the cytoplasmic compartment as early as three hours after TNF-alpha treatment. Complete translocation is achieved between 12-24 h, which coincides with the maximal expression of uPA protein effected by cytokine stimulation. Treatment of Beas2B cells with NaF inhibited TNF-alpha-mediated translocation of uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and concomitant inhibition of uPA expression. TNF-alpha stabilizes uPA mRNA by translocating the uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism governing uPA mRNA stability through shuttling of uPA mRNABp between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This newly identified pathway may have evolved to regulate uPA-mediated functions of the lung epithelium in inflamation or neoplasia.

  3. RNA-Binding Protein Dnd1 Promotes Breast Cancer Apoptosis by Stabilizing the Bim mRNA in a miR-221 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Feng; Pan, Ying; Lu, Yi-Min; Zhu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and miRNAs are capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. Both of them could determine RNA transcripts fate from synthesis to decay. One such RBP, Dead end (Dnd1), is essential for regulating germ-cell viability and suppresses the germ-cell tumors development, yet how it exerts its functions in breast cancer has remained unresolved. The level of Dnd1 was detected in 21 cancerous tissues paired with neighboring normal tissues by qRT-PCR. We further annotated TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) mRNA expression profiles and found that the expression of Dnd1 and Bim is positively correlated (p = 0.04). Patients with higher Dnd1 expression level had longer overall survival (p = 0.0014) by KM Plotter tool. Dnd1 knockdown in MCF-7 cells decreased Bim expression levels and inhibited apoptosis. While knockdown of Dnd1 promoted the decay of Bim mRNA 3′UTR, the stability of Bim-5′UTR was not affected. In addition, mutation of miR-221-binding site in Bim-3′UTR canceled the effect of Dnd1 on Bim mRNA. Knockdown of Dnd1 in MCF-7 cells confirmed that Dnd1 antagonized miR-221-inhibitory effects on Bim expression. Overall, our findings indicate that Dnd1 facilitates apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bim via its competitive combining with miR-221 in Bim-3′UTR. The new function of Dnd1 may contribute to a vital role in breast cancer development. PMID:28191469

  4. RNA-Binding Protein Dnd1 Promotes Breast Cancer Apoptosis by Stabilizing the Bim mRNA in a miR-221 Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Pan, Ying; Lu, Yi-Min; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Shuzheng

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and miRNAs are capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. Both of them could determine RNA transcripts fate from synthesis to decay. One such RBP, Dead end (Dnd1), is essential for regulating germ-cell viability and suppresses the germ-cell tumors development, yet how it exerts its functions in breast cancer has remained unresolved. The level of Dnd1 was detected in 21 cancerous tissues paired with neighboring normal tissues by qRT-PCR. We further annotated TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) mRNA expression profiles and found that the expression of Dnd1 and Bim is positively correlated (p = 0.04). Patients with higher Dnd1 expression level had longer overall survival (p = 0.0014) by KM Plotter tool. Dnd1 knockdown in MCF-7 cells decreased Bim expression levels and inhibited apoptosis. While knockdown of Dnd1 promoted the decay of Bim mRNA 3'UTR, the stability of Bim-5'UTR was not affected. In addition, mutation of miR-221-binding site in Bim-3'UTR canceled the effect of Dnd1 on Bim mRNA. Knockdown of Dnd1 in MCF-7 cells confirmed that Dnd1 antagonized miR-221-inhibitory effects on Bim expression. Overall, our findings indicate that Dnd1 facilitates apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bim via its competitive combining with miR-221 in Bim-3'UTR. The new function of Dnd1 may contribute to a vital role in breast cancer development.

  5. Conformational stability and DNA binding specificity of the cardiac T-box transcription factor Tbx20.

    PubMed

    Macindoe, Ingrid; Glockner, Laura; Vukasin, Paul; Stennard, Fiona A; Costa, Mauro W; Harvey, Richard P; Mackay, Joel P; Sunde, Margaret

    2009-06-12

    The transcription factor Tbx20 acts within a hierarchy of T-box factors in lineage specification and morphogenesis in the mammalian heart and is mutated in congenital heart disease. T-box family members share a approximately 20-kDa DNA-binding domain termed the T-box. The question of how highly homologous T-box proteins achieve differential transcriptional control in heart development, while apparently binding to the same DNA sequence, remains unresolved. Here we show that the optimal DNA recognition sequence for the T-box of Tbx20 corresponds to a T-half-site. Furthermore, we demonstrate using purified recombinant domains that distinct T-boxes show significant differences in the affinity and kinetics of binding and in conformational stability, with the T-box of Tbx20 displaying molten globule character. Our data highlight unique features of Tbx20 and suggest mechanistic ways in which cardiac T-box factors might interact synergistically and/or competitively within the cardiac regulatory network.

  6. Effect of Mutation and Substrate Binding on the Stability of Cytochrome P450BM3 Variants.

    PubMed

    Geronimo, Inacrist; Denning, Catherine A; Rogers, W Eric; Othman, Thaer; Huxford, Tom; Heidary, David K; Glazer, Edith C; Payne, Christina M

    2016-06-28

    Cytochrome P450BM3 is a heme-containing enzyme from Bacillus megaterium that exhibits high monooxygenase activity and has a self-sufficient electron transfer system in the full-length enzyme. Its potential synthetic applications drive protein engineering efforts to produce variants capable of oxidizing nonnative substrates such as pharmaceuticals and aromatic pollutants. However, promiscuous P450BM3 mutants often exhibit lower stability, thereby hindering their industrial application. This study demonstrated that the heme domain R47L/F87V/L188Q/E267V/F81I pentuple mutant (PM) is destabilized because of the disruption of hydrophobic contacts and salt bridge interactions. This was directly observed from crystal structures of PM in the presence and absence of ligands (palmitic acid and metyrapone). The instability of the tertiary structure and heme environment of substrate-free PM was confirmed by pulse proteolysis and circular dichroism, respectively. Binding of the inhibitor, metyrapone, significantly stabilized PM, but the presence of the native substrate, palmitic acid, had no effect. On the basis of high-temperature molecular dynamics simulations, the lid domain, β-sheet 1, and Cys ligand loop (a β-bulge segment connected to the heme) are the most labile regions and, thus, potential sites for stabilizing mutations. Possible approaches to stabilization include improvement of hydrophobic packing interactions in the lid domain and introduction of new salt bridges into β-sheet 1 and the heme region. An understanding of the molecular factors behind the loss of stability of P450BM3 variants therefore expedites site-directed mutagenesis studies aimed at developing thermostability.

  7. The RNA-binding protein HuR regulates DNA methylation through stabilization of DNMT3b mRNA.

    PubMed

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Gorospe, Myriam; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Srikantan, Subramanya; Alaminos, Miguel; Berdasco, María; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Fraga, Mario F; Jacinto, Filipe V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-05-01

    The molecular basis underlying the aberrant DNA-methylation patterns in human cancer is largely unknown. Altered DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity is believed to contribute, as DNMT expression levels increase during tumorigenesis. Here, we present evidence that the expression of DNMT3b is post-transcriptionally regulated by HuR, an RNA-binding protein that stabilizes and/or modulates the translation of target mRNAs. The presence of a putative HuR-recognition motif in the DNMT3b 3'UTR prompted studies to investigate if this transcript associated with HuR. The interaction between HuR and DNMT3b mRNA was studied by immunoprecipitation of endogenous HuR ribonucleoprotein complexes followed by RT-qPCR detection of DNMT3b mRNA, and by in vitro pulldown of biotinylated DNMT3b RNAs followed by western blotting detection of HuR. These studies revealed that binding of HuR stabilized the DNMT3b mRNA and increased DNMT3b expression. Unexpectedly, cisplatin treatment triggered the dissociation of the [HuR-DNMT3b mRNA] complex, in turn promoting DNMT3b mRNA decay, decreasing DNMT3b abundance, and lowering the methylation of repeated sequences and global DNA methylation. In summary, our data identify DNMT3b mRNA as a novel HuR target, present evidence that HuR affects DNMT3b expression levels post-transcriptionally, and reveal the functional consequences of the HuR-regulated DNMT3b upon DNA methylation patterns.

  8. Stabilization of Nucleotide Binding Domain Dimers Rescues ABCC6 Mutants Associated with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yanchao; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2017-02-03

    ABC transporters are polytopic membrane proteins that utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis to facilitate transport across biological membranes. Forty-eight human ABC transporters have been identified in the genome, and the majority of these are linked to heritable disease. Mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP binding cassette transporter C6) ABC transporter are associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a disease of altered elastic properties in multiple tissues. Although ∼200 mutations have been identified in pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients, the underlying structural defects associated with the majority of these are poorly understood. To evaluate the structural consequences of these missense mutations, a combination of biophysical and cell biological approaches were applied to evaluate the local and global folding and assembly of the ABCC6 protein. Structural and bioinformatic analyses suggested that a cluster of mutations, representing roughly 20% of the patient population with identified missense mutations, are located in the interface between the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain. Biochemical and cell biological analyses demonstrate these mutations influence multiple steps in the biosynthetic pathway, minimally altering local domain structure but adversely impacting ABCC6 assembly and trafficking. The differential impacts on local and global protein structure are consistent with hierarchical folding and assembly of ABCC6. Stabilization of specific domain-domain interactions via targeted amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain restored proper protein trafficking and cell surface localization of multiple biosynthetic mutants. This rescue provides a specific mechanism by which chemical chaperones could be developed for the correction of ABCC6 biosynthetic defects.

  9. Thermodynamics of DNA hairpins: contribution of loop size to hairpin stability and ethidium binding.

    PubMed Central

    Rentzeperis, D; Alessi, K; Marky, L A

    1993-01-01

    A combination of calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques was used to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of a set of DNA hairpins with the sequence d(GCGCTnGCGC), where n = 3, 5 and 7, and the interaction of each hairpin with ethidium. All three hairpins melt in two-state monomolecular transitions, with tm's ranging from 79.1 degrees C (T3) to 57.5 degrees C (T7), and transition enthalpies of approximately 38.5 kcal mol-1. Standard thermodynamic profiles at 20 degrees C reveal that the lower stability of the T5 and T7 hairpins corresponds to a delta G degree term of +0.5 kcal mol-1 per thymine residue, due to the entropic ordering of the thymine loops and uptake of counterions. Deconvolution of the ethidium-hairpin calorimetric titration curves indicate two sets of binding sites that correspond to one ligand in the stem with binding affinity, Kb, of approximately 1.8 x 10(6) M-1, and two ligands in the loops with Kb of approximately 4.3 x 10(4) M-1. However, the binding enthalpy, delta Hb, ranges from -8.6 (T3) to -11.6 kcal mol-1 (T7) for the stem site, and -6.6 (T3) to -12.7 kcal mol-1 (T7) for the loop site. Relative to the T3 hairpin, we obtained an overall thermodynamic contribution (per dT residue) of delta delta Hb = delta(T delta Sb) = -0.7(5) kcal mol-1 for the stem sites and delta delta Hb = delta(T delta Sb) = -1.5 kcal mol-1 for the loop sites. Therefore, the induced structural perturbations of ethidium binding results in a differential compensation of favorable stacking interactions with the unfavorable ordering of the ligands. PMID:8332464

  10. Conformational stability and domain coupling in D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The monomeric D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) from Escherichia coli (Mr 33000) is a periplasmic protein that serves as a high-affinity receptor for the active transport and chemotaxis towards both sugars. The effect of D-glucose binding on the thermal unfolding of the GGBP protein at pH 7.0 has been measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), far-UV CD and intrinsic tryptophanyl residue fluorescence (Trp fluorescence). All three techniques reveal reversible, thermal transitions and a midpoint temperature (Tm) increase from 50 to 63 °C produced by 10 mM D-glucose. Both in the absence and presence of D-glucose a single asymmetric endotherm for GGBP is observed in DSC, although each endotherm consists of two transitions about 4 °C apart in Tm values. In the absence of D-glucose, the protein unfolding is best described by two non-ideal transitions, suggesting the presence of unfolding intermediates. In the presence of D-glucose protein, unfolding is more co-operative than in the absence of the ligand, and the experimental data are best fitted to a model that assumes two ideal (two-state) sequential transitions. Thus D-glucose binding changes the character of the GGBP protein folding/unfolding by linking the two domains such that protein unfolding becomes a cooperative, two two-state process. A KA′ value of 5.6×106 M−1 at 63 °C for D-glucose binding is estimated from DSC results. The domain with the lower stability in DSC measurements has been identified as the C-terminal domain of GGBP from thermally induced Trp fluorescence changes. PMID:15032747

  11. Influence of the H-site residue 108 on human glutathione transferase P1-1 ligand binding: structure-thermodynamic relationships and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Parker, Lorien J; Primavera, Alessandra; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; Barón, Carmen; Morton, Craig J; Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Lo Bello, Mario; Parker, Michael W; García-Fuentes, Luis

    2009-12-01

    The effect of the Y108V mutation of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (hGST P1-1) on the binding of the diuretic drug ethacrynic acid (EA) and its glutathione conjugate (EASG) was investigated by calorimetric, spectrofluorimetric, and crystallographic studies. The mutation Tyr 108 --> Val resulted in a 3D-structure very similar to the wild type (wt) enzyme, where both the hydrophobic ligand binding site (H-site) and glutathione binding site (G-site) are unchanged except for the mutation itself. However, due to a slight increase in the hydrophobicity of the H-site, as a consequence of the mutation, an increase in the entropy was observed. The Y108V mutation does not affect the affinity of EASG for the enzyme, which has a higher affinity (K(d) approximately 0.5 microM) when compared with those of the parent compounds, K(d) (EA) approximately 13 microM, K(d) (GSH) approximately 25 microM. The EA moiety of the conjugate binds in the H-site of Y108V mutant in a fashion completely different to those observed in the crystal structures of the EA or EASG wt complex structures. We further demonstrate that the Delta C(p) values of binding can also be correlated with the potential stacking interactions between ligand and residues located in the binding sites as predicted from crystal structures. Moreover, the mutation does not significantly affect the global stability of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that calorimetric measurements maybe useful in determining the preference of binding (the binding mode) for a drug to a specific site of the enzyme, even in the absence of structural information.

  12. Maltose-binding protein effectively stabilizes the partially closed conformation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter MalFGK2.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jingwei; Gu, Shuo; Gao, Xin; Huang, Xuhui; Wang, Wenning

    2017-04-05

    Maltose transporter MalFGK2 is a type-I importer in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Upon the binding of its periplasmic binding protein, MalE, the ATPase activity of MalFGK2 can be greatly enhanced. Crystal structures of the MalFGK2-MalE-maltose complex in a so-called "pretranslocation" ("pre-T") state with a partially closed conformation suggest that the formation of this MalE-stabilized intermediate state is a key step leading to the outward-facing catalytic state. On the contrary, crosslinking and fluorescence studies suggest that ATP binding alone is sufficient to promote the outward-facing catalytic state, thereby doubting the role of MalE binding. To clarify the role of MalE binding and to gain deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MalFGK2, we calculated the free energy surfaces (FESs) related to the lateral motion in the presence and absence of MalE using atomistic metadynamics simulations. The results showed that, in the absence of MalE, laterally closing motion was energetically forbidden but, upon MalE binding, more closed conformations similar to the pre-T state become more stable. The significant effect of MalE binding on the free energy landscapes was in agreement with crystallographic studies and confirmed the important role of MalE in stabilizing the pre-T state. Our simulations also revealed that the allosteric effect of MalE stimulation originates from the MalE-binding-promoted vertical motion between MalF and MalG cores, which was further supported by MD simulation of the MalE-independent mutant MalF500.

  13. The stability and the metal ions binding properties of mutant A85M of CopC.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhen; Dong, Jinlong; Yuan, Wen; Zhang, Caifeng; Ren, Yuehong; Yang, Binsheng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the mutant A85M of CopC was obtained. The stability of mutant A85M of CopC and the binding properties of metal ions were clarified through various spectroscopic techniques. The binding capacity of A85M to metal ions was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV differential absorbance. The results suggested that Cu(2+) can bind with A85M in 1:1 form, and the constant of A85M was nearly the same as that of CopC. Ag(+) can occupy the Cu(+) binding site located at C-terminal, and the binding constant was (2.64±0.48)×10(6)L/mol. Hg(2+) not only can occupy the Cu(+) binding site located at C-terminal, but also can occupy the Cu(2+) binding site located at N-terminal. The stability of A85M was measured by chemical unfolding experiment. The intermediate was observed in the unfolding pathway of A85M-Cu(2+) induced by urea. In addition, the interaction of SDS with A85M also can result in the formation of the intermediate. The effect of metal ions on the stability of intermediate suggested that the C terminal region of intermediate was unfolded and the N terminal region suffered few effects. Compared with CopC, the stability of A85M was decreased. The main reason was the lower stability of N terminal region. The results of molecular dynamic simulation suggested that when the alanine at 85 site was mutated to methionine, the hydrophobic almost unchanged, but the distance between the phenylalanine at 25 site and tryptophan at 83 site increased because of the spatial effect. And it made the stacking interaction of aromatic rings decreased, which was the main reason for the decreasing stability of N terminal region for A85M.

  14. Intermonomer Interactions in Hemagglutinin Subunits HA1 and HA2 Affecting Hemagglutinin Stability and Influenza Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    DeFeo, Christopher J.; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus entry by binding to cell surface receptors and fusing the viral and endosomal membranes following uptake by endocytosis. The acidic environment of endosomes triggers a large-scale conformational change in the transmembrane subunit of HA (HA2) involving a loop (B loop)-to-helix transition, which releases the fusion peptide at the HA2 N terminus from an interior pocket within the HA trimer. Subsequent insertion of the fusion peptide into the endosomal membrane initiates fusion. The acid stability of HA is influenced by residues in the fusion peptide, fusion peptide pocket, coiled-coil regions of HA2, and interactions between the surface (HA1) and HA2 subunits, but details are not fully understood and vary among strains. Current evidence suggests that the HA from the circulating pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] is less stable than the HAs from other seasonal influenza virus strains. Here we show that residue 205 in HA1 and residue 399 in the B loop of HA2 (residue 72, HA2 numbering) in different monomers of the trimeric A(H1N1)pdm09 HA are involved in functionally important intermolecular interactions and that a conserved histidine in this pair helps regulate HA stability. An arginine-lysine pair at this location destabilizes HA at acidic pH and mediates fusion at a higher pH, while a glutamate-lysine pair enhances HA stability and requires a lower pH to induce fusion. Our findings identify key residues in HA1 and HA2 that interact to help regulate H1N1 HA stability and virus infectivity. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the principal antigen in inactivated influenza vaccines and the target of protective antibodies. However, the influenza A virus HA is highly variable, necessitating frequent vaccine changes to match circulating strains. Sequence changes in HA affect not only antigenicity but also HA stability, which has important implications for vaccine production, as well

  15. Binding-induced Stabilization and Assembly of the Phage P22 Tail Accessory Factor gp4

    SciTech Connect

    Olia,A.; Al-Bassam, J.; Winn-Stapley, D.; Joss, L.; Casjens, S.; Cingolani, G.

    2006-01-01

    To infect and replicate, bacteriophage P22 injects its 43 kbp genome across the cell wall of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The attachment of phage P22 to the host cell as well as the injection of the viral DNA into the host is mediated by the virion's tail complex. This 2.8 MDa molecular machine is formed by five proteins, which include the portal protein gp1, the adhesion tailspike protein gp9, and three tail accessory factors: gp4, gp10, gp26. We have isolated the tail accessory factor gp4 and characterized its structure and binding interactions with portal protein. Interestingly, gp4 exists in solution as a monomer, which displays an exceedingly low structural stability (T{sub m} 34 {sup o}C). Unfolded gp4 is prone to aggregation within a narrow range of temperatures both in vitro and in Salmonella extracts. In the virion the thermal unfolding of gp4 is prevented by the interaction with the dodecameric portal protein, which stabilizes the structure of gp4 and suppresses unfolded gp4 from irreversibly aggregating in the Salmonella milieu. The structural stabilization of gp4 is accompanied by the concomitant oligomerization of the protein to form a ring of 12 subunits bound to the lower end of the portal ring. The interaction of gp4 with portal protein is complex and likely involves the distinct binding of two non-equivalent sets of six gp4 proteins. Binding of the first set of six gp4 equivalents to dodecameric portal protein yields a gp(1){sub 12}:gp(4){sub 6} assembly intermediate, which is stably populated at 30 {sup o}C and can be resolved by native gel electrophoresis. The final product of the assembly reaction is a bi-dodecameric gp(1){sub 12}:gp(4){sub 12} complex, which appears hollow by electron microscopy, suggesting that gp4 does not physically plug the DNA entry/exit channel, but acts as a structural adaptor for the other tail accessory factors: gp10 and gp26.

  16. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  17. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  18. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-08-05

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  19. Systematic reconstruction of binding and stability landscapes of the fluorogenic aptamer spinach

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Weber, Wilfried; Meier, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fluorogenic RNAs that are based on the complex formed by 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI) derivatives and the RNA aptamer named Spinach were used to engineer a new generation of in vitro and in vivo sensors for bioanalytics. With the resolved crystal structure of the RNA/small molecule complex, the engineering map becomes available, but comprehensive information regarding the thermodynamic profile of the molecule is missing. Here, we reconstructed the full thermodynamic binding and stability landscapes between DFHBI and a truncated sequence of first-generation Spinach. For this purpose, we established a systematic screening procedure for single- and double-point mutations on a microfluidic large-scale integrated chip platform for 87-nt long RNAs. The thermodynamic profile with single base resolution was used to engineer an improved fluorogenic spinach generation via a directed rather than evolutional approach. PMID:26400180

  20. STAR RNA-binding protein Quaking suppresses cancer via stabilization of specific miRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Jou; Paik, Ji-Hye; Zhang, Hailei; Shukla, Sachet A; Mortensen, Richard; Hu, Jian; Ying, Haoqiang; Hu, Baoli; Hurt, Jessica; Farny, Natalie; Dong, Caroline; Xiao, Yonghong; Wang, Y Alan; Silver, Pamela A; Chin, Lynda; Vasudevan, Shobha; Depinho, Ronald A

    2012-07-01

    Multidimensional cancer genome analysis and validation has defined Quaking (QKI), a member of the signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family of RNA-binding proteins, as a novel glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor suppressor. Here, we establish that p53 directly regulates QKI gene expression, and QKI protein associates with and leads to the stabilization of miR-20a; miR-20a, in turn, regulates TGFβR2 and the TGFβ signaling network. This pathway circuitry is substantiated by in silico epistasis analysis of its components in the human GBM TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas Project) collection and by their gain- and loss-of-function interactions in in vitro and in vivo complementation studies. This p53-QKI-miR-20a-TGFβ pathway expands our understanding of the p53 tumor suppression network in cancer and reveals a novel tumor suppression mechanism involving regulation of specific cancer-relevant microRNAs.

  1. The CREB-binding protein affects the circadian regulation of behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Christian; Winter, Tobias; Chen, Siwei; Hung, Hsiu-Cheng; Weber, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Rhythmic changes in light and temperature conditions form the primary environmental cues that synchronize the molecular circadian clock of most species with the external cycles of day and night. Previous studies established a role for the CREB-binding protein (CBP) in molecular clock function by coactivation of circadian transcription. Here, we report that moderately increased levels of CBP strongly dampen circadian behavioural rhythms without affecting molecular oscillations of circadian transcription. Interestingly, light-dark cycles as well as high temperature facilitated a circadian control of behavioural activity. Based on these observations we propose that in addition to its coactivator function for circadian transcription, CBP is involved in the regulation of circadian behaviour down-stream of the circadian clock.

  2. CTCF-mediated reduction of vigilin binding affects the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Yan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Wei, Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ran; Yang, Wen-Li; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Wen-Quan; Huang, Yuan; Qin, Yang

    2014-05-02

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in numerous aspects of chromosome biology, and vigilin, a multi-KH-domain protein, participates in heterochromatin formation and chromosome segregation. We previously showed that CTCF interacts with vigilin. Here, we show that human vigilin, but not CTCF, colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. CTCF up-regulates the transcription of satellite 2, while vigilin down-regulates it. Vigilin depletion or CTCF overexpression reduces the binding of HP1α on the satellite 2 locus. Furthermore, overexpression of CTCF resists the loading of vigilin onto the satellite 2 locus. Thus CTCF may regulate vigilin behavior and thus indirectly influence the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

  3. Structural Stability and Binding Strength of a Designed Peptide-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Roxbury, Daniel; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Mittal, Jeetain; DeGrado, William F.; Jagota, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Biological polymers hybridized with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have elicited much interest recently for applications in SWCNT-based sorting as well as biomedical imaging, sensing, and drug delivery. Recently, de novo designed peptides forming a coiled-coil structure have been engineered to selectively disperse SWCNT of a certain diameter. Here we report on a study of the binding strength and structural stability of the hybrid between such a “HexCoil-Ala” peptide and the (6,5)-SWCNT. Using the competitive binding of a surfactant, we find that affinity strength of the peptide ranks in comparison to that of two single-stranded DNA sequences as (GT)30-DNA > HexCoil-Ala > (TAT)4T-DNA. Further, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), we show that the hexamer peptide complex has both similarities with and differences from the original design. While one of two distinct helix-helix interfaces of the original model was largely retained, a second interface showed much greater variability. These conformational differences allowed an aromatic tyrosine residue designed to lie along the solvent-exposed surface of the protein instead to penetrate between the two helices and directly contact the SWCNT. These insights will inform future designs of SWCNT-interacting peptides. PMID:24466357

  4. Cyclophilin A stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid through a novel non-canonical binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Perilla, Juan R.; Ning, Jiying; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Ramalho, Ruben; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Byeon, In-Ja; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Prevelige, Peter E.; Rousso, Itay; Aiken, Christopher; Polenova, Tatyana; Schulten, Klaus; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The host cell factor cyclophilin A (CypA) interacts directly with the HIV-1 capsid and regulates viral infectivity. Although the crystal structure of CypA in complex with the N-terminal domain of the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) has been known for nearly two decades, how CypA interacts with the viral capsid and modulates HIV-1 infectivity remains unclear. We determined the cryoEM structure of CypA in complex with the assembled HIV-1 capsid at 8-Å resolution. The structure exhibits a distinct CypA-binding pattern in which CypA selectively bridges the two CA hexamers along the direction of highest curvature. EM-guided all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and solid-state NMR further reveal that the CypA-binding pattern is achieved by single-CypA molecules simultaneously interacting with two CA subunits, in different hexamers, through a previously uncharacterized non-canonical interface. These results provide new insights into how CypA stabilizes the HIV-1 capsid and is recruited to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

  5. Density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal affect the stability of predator-prey metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Hauzy, Céline; Gauduchon, Mathias; Hulot, Florence D; Loreau, Michel

    2010-10-07

    Although density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal (the difference in dispersal rates between species) have been documented in natural systems, their effects on the stability of metacommunities are poorly understood. Here we investigate the effects of intra- and interspecific density-dependent dispersal on the regional stability in a predator-prey metacommunity model. We show that, when the dynamics of the populations reach equilibrium, the stability of the metacommunity is not affected by density-dependent dispersal. However, the regional stability, measured as the regional variability or the persistence, can be modified by density-dependent dispersal when local populations fluctuate over time. Moreover these effects depend on the relative dispersal of the predator and the prey. Regional stability is modified through changes in spatial synchrony. Interspecific density-dependent dispersal always desynchronizses local dynamics, whereas intraspecific density-dependent dispersal may either synchronize or desynchronize it depending on dispersal rates. Moreover, intra- and interspecific density-dependent dispersal strengthen the top-down control of the prey by the predator at intermediate dispersal rates. As a consequence the regional stability of the metacommunity is increased at intermediate dispersal rates. Our results show that density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal of species are keys to understanding the response of ecosystems to fragmentation.

  6. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties.

  7. The 3' untranslated region of human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulatory subunit 1 contains regulatory elements affecting transcript stability

    PubMed Central

    Moncini, Silvia; Bevilacqua, Annamaria; Venturin, Marco; Fallini, Claudia; Ratti, Antonia; Nicolin, Angelo; Riva, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background CDK5R1 plays a central role in neuronal migration and differentiation during central nervous system development. CDK5R1 has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders and proposed as a candidate gene for mental retardation. The remarkable size of CDK5R1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) suggests a role in post-transcriptional regulation of CDK5R1 expression. Results The bioinformatic study shows a high conservation degree in mammals and predicts several AU-Rich Elements (AREs). The insertion of CDK5R1 3'-UTR into luciferase 3'-UTR causes a decreased luciferase activity in four transfected cell lines. We identified 3'-UTR subregions which tend to reduce the reporter gene expression, sometimes in a cell line-dependent manner. In most cases the quantitative analysis of luciferase mRNA suggests that CDK5R1 3'-UTR affects mRNA stability. A region, leading to a very strong mRNA destabilization, showed a significantly low half-life, indicating an accelerated mRNA degradation. The 3' end of the transcript, containing a class I ARE, specifically displays a stabilizing effect in neuroblastoma cell lines. We also observed the interaction of the stabilizing neuronal RNA-binding proteins ELAV with the CDK5R1 transcript in SH-SY5Y cells and identified three 3'-UTR sub-regions showing affinity for ELAV proteins. Conclusion Our findings evince the presence of both destabilizing and stabilizing regulatory elements in CDK5R1 3'-UTR and support the hypothesis that CDK5R1 gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled in neurons by ELAV-mediated mechanisms. This is the first evidence of the involvement of 3'-UTR in the modulation of CDK5R1 expression. The fine tuning of CDK5R1 expression by 3'-UTR may have a role in central nervous system development and functioning, with potential implications in neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders. PMID:18053171

  8. Penem derivatives: beta-lactamase stability and affinity for penicillin-binding proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohya, S; Utsui, Y; Sugawara, S; Yamazaki, M

    1982-03-01

    Penem derivatives, a new group of beta-lactam antibiotics with potent activities against a wide range of bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were tested for their stability against hydrolysis by beta-lactamases purified from clinical isolates of Morganella morganii. Proteus vulgaris, and Escherichia coli and by a penicillinase from Bacillus cereus. Penems having 6 alpha substituents, such as hydroxyethyl, hydroxymethyl, and ethyl groups, were very stable against hydrolysis by each of the enzymes. Penems having no 6 alpha substituents were easily hydrolyzed by P. vulgaris and E. coli enzymes, whereas they were rather stable against hydrolysis by M. morganii and B. cereus enzymes, a typical cephalosporinase and penicillinase, respectively. Affinity of the penems for E. coli penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was also tested. beta-Lactamase-stable penems having a 6 alpha-hydroxyethyl group showed high affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 as well as for PBP-1A, -1Bs, and -2. However, the penems having no 6 alpha substituents showed a far lower affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 than that shown by the corresponding 6 alpha-hydroxyethyl penems. Among the penems tested, affinity for PBP-4, -5, and -6 was closely related to their beta-lactamase stability, as was the case among cephamycins and cephalosporins. Effects of the penems on the morphology of a strain of E. coli are also described.

  9. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junhua E-mail: timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon E-mail: timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de

    2014-05-28

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of E{sub i}I{sub i}, d, and γ, where E{sub i}I{sub i} and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates.

  10. SARM1 and TRAF6 bind to and stabilize PINK1 on depolarized mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kataoka, Ken; Huh, Nam-ho

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) or parkin cause autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson's disease. Recent work suggests that loss of mitochondrial membrane potential stabilizes PINK1 and that accumulated PINK1 recruits parkin from the cytoplasm to mitochondria for elimination of depolarized mitochondria, which is known as mitophagy. In this study, we find that PINK1 forms a complex with sterile α and TIR motif containing 1 (SARM1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6), which is important for import of PINK1 in the outer membrane and stabilization of PINK1 on depolarized mitochondria. SARM1, which is known to be an adaptor protein for Toll-like receptor, binds to PINK1 and promotes TRAF6-mediated lysine 63 chain ubiquitination of PINK1 at lysine 433. Down-regulation of SARM1 and TRAF6 abrogates accumulation of PINK1, followed by recruitment of parkin to damaged mitochondria. Some pathogenic mutations of PINK1 reduce the complex formation and ubiquitination. These results indicate that association of PINK1 with SARM1 and TRAF6 is an important step for mitophagy. PMID:23885119

  11. Centrally truncated and stabilized porcine neuropeptide Y analogs: design, synthesis, and mouse brain receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Krstenansky, J L; Owen, T J; Buck, S H; Hagaman, K A; McLean, L R

    1989-01-01

    Porcine neuropeptide Y (pNPY) has been proposed to form an intramolecularly stabilized structure characterized by N- and C-terminal helical regions arranged antiparallel due to a central turn region. Analogs based on this structural model that have the central turn region and various amounts of the helical regions removed, yet retain the N and C termini in a similar spatial orientation were designed. The gap formed by removal of the central residues (residues 8-17 or 7-20) was spanned with a single 8-aminooctanoic acid residue (Aoc) and the structure was further stabilized by the introduction of a disulfide bridge. [D-Cys7,Aoc8-17,Cys20]pNPY and [Cys5,Aoc7-20,D-Cys24]pNPY were synthesized and found to have receptor binding affinities of 2.3 nM and 150 nM, respectively, in mouse brain membranes (pNPY affinity is 3.6 nM in this assay). It is proposed that the central region (residues 7-17) of pNPY serves a structural role in the peptide and is not involved in direct receptor interaction. PMID:2543973

  12. Introducing folding stability into the score function for computational design of RNA-binding peptides boosts the probability of success.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingqing; Agris, Paul F; Hall, Carol K

    2016-05-01

    A computational strategy that integrates our peptide search algorithm with atomistic molecular dynamics simulation was used to design rational peptide drugs that recognize and bind to the anticodon stem and loop domain (ASL(Lys3)) of human tRNAUUULys3 for the purpose of interrupting HIV replication. The score function of the search algorithm was improved by adding a peptide stability term weighted by an adjustable factor λ to the peptide binding free energy. The five best peptide sequences associated with five different values of λ were determined using the search algorithm and then input in atomistic simulations to examine the stability of the peptides' folded conformations and their ability to bind to ASL(Lys3). Simulation results demonstrated that setting an intermediate value of λ achieves a good balance between optimizing the peptide's binding ability and stabilizing its folded conformation during the sequence evolution process, and hence leads to optimal binding to the target ASL(Lys3). Thus, addition of a peptide stability term significantly improves the success rate for our peptide design search.

  13. Ligand binding assay critical reagents and their stability: recommendations and best practices from the Global Bioanalysis Consortium Harmonization Team.

    PubMed

    King, Lindsay E; Farley, Esme; Imazato, Mami; Keefe, Jeannine; Khan, Masood; Ma, Mark; Pihl, K Susanne; Sriraman, Priya

    2014-05-01

    The L4 Global Harmonization Team on reagents and their stability focused on the management of critical reagents for pharmacokinetic, immunogenicity, and biomarker ligand binding assays. Regulatory guidance recognizes that reagents are important for ligand binding assays but do not address numerous aspects of critical reagent life cycle management. Reagents can be obtained from external vendors or developed internally, but regardless of their source, there are numerous considerations for their reliable long-term use. The authors have identified current best practices and provided recommendations for critical reagent lot changes, stability management, and documentation.

  14. Current industrial practices and regulatory requirements to assess analyte and reagent stability using ligand-binding assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Nowatzke, William; Ma, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Specific guidelines on bioanalytical method validation for drug development support are recommended by regulatory agencies. Regarding stability assessment, US FDA states that 'Stability procedures should evaluate the stability of the analytes during sample collection and handling, after long-term (frozen at the intended storage temperature) and short-term (bench-top, room temperature) storage, and after going through freeze and thaw cycles and the analytical process'. Additional regulatory considerations are discussed including topics such as analyte and reagent stability. This article reviews the regulatory requirements as issued by the USA (FDA), Europe (EMA) and Japan (MHLW), for stability studies where bioanalytical methods are used to support drug development programs and summarizes the current industry standard for conducting stability studies when utilizing ligand-binding assays.

  15. The oxidation of methionine-54 of epoetinum alfa does not affect molecular structure or stability, but does decrease biological activity.

    PubMed

    Labrenz, Steven R; Calmann, Melissa A; Heavner, George A; Tolman, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin therapy is used to treat severe anemia in renal failure and chemotherapy patients. One of these therapies based on recombinant human erythropoietin is marketed under the trade name of EPREX and utilizes epoetinum alfa as the active pharmaceutical ingredient. The effect of oxidation of methionine-54 on the structure and stability of the erythropoietin molecule has not been directly tested. We have observed partial and full chemical oxidation of methionine-54 to methionine-54 sulfoxide, accomplished using tert-Butylhydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A blue shift in the fluorescence center of spectral mass wavelength was observed as a linear response to the level of methionine sulfoxide in the epoetinum alfa molecule, presumably arising from a local change in the environment near tryptophan-51, as supported by potassium iodide quenching studies. Circular dichroism studies demonstrated no change in the folded structure of the molecule with methionine oxidation. The thermal unfolding profiles of partial and completely oxidized epoetinum alfa overlap, with a T(m) of 49.5 degrees C across all levels of methionine sulfoxide content. When the protein was tested for activity, a decrease in biological activity was observed, correlating with methionine sulfoxide levels. An allosteric effect between Met54, Trp51, and residues involved in receptor binding is proposed. These results indicate that methionine oxidation has no effect on the folded structure and global thermodynamic stability of the recombinant human erythropoietin molecule. Oxidation can affect potency, but only at levels significantly in excess of those seen in EPREX.

  16. Selective binding to transthyretin and tetramer stabilization in serum from patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy by an iodinated diflunisal derivative

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, TTR (transthyretin) variants are deposited as amyloid fibrils. It is thought that this process involves TTR tetramer dissociation, which leads to partially unfolded monomers that aggregate and polymerize into amyloid fibrils. This process can be counteracted by stabilization of the tetramer. Several small compounds, such as diclofenac, diflunisal and flufenamic acid, have been reported to bind to TTR in vitro, in the T4 (thyroxine) binding channel that runs through the TTR tetramer, and consequently are considered to stabilize TTR. However, if these agents bind plasma proteins other than TTR, decreased drug availability will occur, compromising their use as therapeutic agents for TTR amyloidosis. In the present work, we compared the action of these compounds and of new derivatives designed to increase both selectivity of binding to TTR and inhibitory potency in relation to TTR amyloid fibril formation. We found two diflunisal derivatives that, in contrast with diclofenac, flufenamic acid and diflunisal, displaced T4 from TTR in plasma preferentially over binding to albumin and thyroxine binding globulin. The same diflunisal derivatives also had a stabilizing effect on TTR tetramers in plasma, as studied by isoelectric focusing of whole plasma under semi-denaturing conditions. In addition, by transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated that, in contrast with other proposed TTR stabilizers (namely diclofenac, flufenamic acid and diflunisal), one of the diflunisal derivatives tested efficiently inhibited TTR aggregation. Taken together, our ex vivo and in vitro studies present evidence for the selectivity and efficiency of novel diflunisal derivates as TTR stabilizers and as inhibitors of fibril formation. PMID:15080795

  17. SR-like RNA-binding protein Slr1 affects Candida albicans filamentation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ariyachet, Chaiyaboot; Solis, Norma V; Liu, Yaoping; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Filler, Scott G; McBride, Anne E

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans causes both mucosal and disseminated infections, and its capacity to grow as both yeast and hyphae is a key virulence factor. Hyphal formation is a type of polarized growth, and members of the SR (serine-arginine) family of RNA-binding proteins influence polarized growth of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Therefore, we investigated whether SR-like proteins affect filamentous growth and virulence of C. albicans. BLAST searches with S. cerevisiae SR-like protein Npl3 (ScNpl3) identified two C. albicans proteins: CaNpl3, an apparent ScNpl3 ortholog, and Slr1, another SR-like RNA-binding protein with no close S. cerevisiae ortholog. Whereas ScNpl3 was critical for growth, deletion of NPL3 in C. albicans resulted in few phenotypic changes. In contrast, the slr1Δ/Δ mutant had a reduced growth rate in vitro, decreased filamentation, and impaired capacity to damage epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro. Mice infected intravenously with the slr1Δ/Δ mutant strain had significantly prolonged survival compared to that of mice infected with the wild-type or slr1Δ/Δ mutant complemented with SLR1 (slr1Δ/Δ+SLR1) strain, without a concomitant decrease in kidney fungal burden. Histopathology, however, revealed differential localization of slr1Δ/Δ hyphal and yeast morphologies within the kidney. Mice infected with slr1Δ/Δ cells also had an increased brain fungal burden, which correlated with increased invasion of brain, but not umbilical vein, endothelial cells in vitro. The enhanced brain endothelial cell invasion was likely due to the increased surface exposure of the Als3 adhesin on slr1Δ/Δ cells. Our results indicate that Slr1 is an SR-like protein that influences C. albicans growth, filamentation, host cell interactions, and virulence.

  18. An alternative domain near the nucleotide-binding site of Drosophila muscle myosin affects ATPase kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Becky M; Zhang, Shuxing; Suggs, Jennifer A; Swank, Douglas M; Littlefield, Kimberly P; Knowles, Aileen F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2005-10-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster expression of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms occurs by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The exon 7 domain is one of four variable regions in the catalytic head and is located near the nucleotide-binding site. To ascribe a functional role to this domain, we created two chimeric myosin isoforms (indirect flight isoform-exon 7a and embryonic-exon 7d) that differ from the native indirect flight muscle and embryonic body-wall muscle isoforms only in the exon 7 region. Germline transformation and subsequent expression of the chimeric myosins in the indirect flight muscle of myosin-null Drosophila allowed us to purify the myosin for in vitro studies and to assess in vivo structure and function of transgenic muscles. Intriguingly, in vitro experiments show the exon 7 domain modulates myosin ATPase activity but has no effect on actin filament velocity, a novel result compared to similar studies with other Drosophila variable exons. Transgenic flies expressing the indirect flight isoform-exon 7a have normal indirect flight muscle structure, and flight and jump ability. However, expression of the embryonic-exon 7d chimeric isoform yields flightless flies that show improvements in both the structural stability of the indirect flight muscle and in locomotor abilities as compared to flies expressing the embryonic isoform. Overall, our results suggest the exon 7 domain participates in the regulation of the attachment of myosin to actin in order to fine-tune the physiological properties of Drosophila myosin isoforms.

  19. Nanog RNA-binding proteins YBX1 and ILF3 affect pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuanliang; Xue, Yan; Yang, Guanheng; Yin, Shang; Shi, Wansheng; Cheng, Yan; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Fan, Shuyue; Zhang, Huijun; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Nanog is a well-known transcription factor that plays a fundamental role in stem cell self-renewal and the maintenance of their pluripotent cell identity. There remains a large data gap with respect to the spectrum of the key pluripotency transcription factors' interaction partners. Limited information is available concerning Nanog-associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the intrinsic protein-RNA interactions characteristic of the regulatory activities of Nanog. Herein, we used an improved affinity protocol to purify Nanog-interacting RBPs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and 49 RBPs of Nanog were identified. Among them, the interaction of YBX1 and ILF3 with Nanog mRNA was further confirmed by in vitro assays, such as Western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), and ex vivo methods, such as immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), MS2 in vivo biotin-tagged RNA affinity purification (MS2-BioTRAP). Interestingly, RNAi studies revealed that YBX1 and ILF3 positively affected the expression of Nanog and other pluripotency-related genes. Particularly, downregulation of YBX1 or ILF3 resulted in high expression of mesoderm markers. Thus, a reduction in the expression of YBX1 and ILF3 controls the expression of pluripotency-related genes in ESCs, suggesting their roles in further regulation of the pluripotent state of ESCs.

  20. Cellular glycosylation affects Herceptin binding and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Diluka; Spector, Alexander F.; Lomax-Browne, Hannah; Azimi, Tayebeh; Ramesh, Bala; Loizidou, Marilena; Welch, Hazel; Dwek, Miriam V.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in protein glycosylation are a key feature of oncogenesis and have been shown to affect cancer cell behaviour perturbing cell adhesion, favouring cell migration and metastasis. This study investigated the effect of N-linked glycosylation on the binding of Herceptin to HER2 protein in breast cancer and on the sensitivity of cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DXR) and growth factors (EGF and IGF-1). The interaction between Herceptin and recombinant HER2 protein and cancer cell surfaces (on-rate/off-rate) was assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance biosensor revealing an increase in the accessibility of HER2 to Herceptin following deglycosylation of cell membrane proteins (deglycosylated cells Bmax: 6.83 Hz; glycosylated cells Bmax: 7.35 Hz). The sensitivity of cells to DXR and to growth factors was evaluated using an MTT assay. Maintenance of SKBR-3 cells in tunicamycin (an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation) resulted in an increase in sensitivity to DXR (0.1 μM DXR P < 0.001) and a decrease in sensitivity to IGF-1 alone and to IGF-1 supplemented with EGF (P < 0.001). This report illustrates the importance of N-linked glycosylation in modulating the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic and biological treatments and highlights the potential of glycosylation inhibitors as future combination treatments for breast cancer. PMID:28223691

  1. Seat surface inclination may affect postural stability during Boccia ball throwing in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Shen; Yu, Yi-Chen; Huang, Po-Chang; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how seat surface inclination affects Boccia ball throwing movement and postural stability among children with cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with bilateral spastic CP (3 with gross motor function classification system Level I, 5 with Level II, and 4 with Level III) participated in this study. All participants underwent pediatric reach tests and ball throwing performance analyses while seated on 15° anterior- or posterior-inclined, and horizontal surfaces. An electromagnetic motion analysis system was synchronized with a force plate to assess throwing motion and postural stability. The results of the pediatric reach test (p = 0.026), the amplitude of elbow movement (p = 0.036), peak vertical ground reaction force (PVGRF) (p < 0.001), and movement range of the center of pressure (COP) (p < 0.020) were significantly affected by seat inclination during throwing. Post hoc comparisons showed that anterior inclination allowed greater amplitude of elbow movement and PVGRF, and less COP movement range compared with the other inclines. Posterior inclination yielded less reaching distance and PVGRF, and greater COP movement range compared with the other inclines. The anterior-inclined seat yielded superior postural stability for throwing Boccia balls among children with bilateral spastic CP, whereas the posterior-inclined seat caused difficulty.

  2. FANCI-FANCD2 stabilizes the RAD51-DNA complex by binding RAD51 and protects the 5'-DNA end.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Shimomuki, Mayo; Katsuki, Yoko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ishiai, Masamichi; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-12-15

    The FANCI-FANCD2 (I-D) complex is considered to work with RAD51 to protect the damaged DNA in the stalled replication fork. However, the means by which this DNA protection is accomplished have remained elusive. In the present study, we found that the I-D complex directly binds to RAD51, and stabilizes the RAD51-DNA filament. Unexpectedly, the DNA binding activity of FANCI, but not FANCD2, is explicitly required for the I-D complex-mediated RAD51-DNA filament stabilization. The RAD51 filament stabilized by the I-D complex actually protects the DNA end from nucleolytic degradation by an FA-associated nuclease, FAN1. This DNA end protection is not observed with the RAD51 mutant from FANCR patient cells. These results clearly answer the currently enigmatic question of how RAD51 functions with the I-D complex to prevent genomic instability at the stalled replication fork.

  3. Increases thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase by fusion of cellulose binding domain derived from Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Thongekkaew, Jantaporn; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CSLP and fusion enzyme were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C for 120-min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme was responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion enzyme has an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization. -- Abstract: To improve the thermal stability and cellulose-binding capacity of Cryptococcus sp. S-2 lipase (CSLP), the cellulose-binding domain originates from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I was engineered into C-terminal region of the CSLP (CSLP-CBD). The CSLP and CSLP-CBD were successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris using the strong methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter and the secretion signal sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ({alpha} factor). The recombinant CSLP and CSLP-CBD were secreted into culture medium and estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 22 and 27 kDa, respectively. The fusion enzyme was stable at 80 Degree-Sign C and retained more than 80% of its activity after 120-min incubation at this temperature. Our results also found that the fusion of fungal exoglucanase cellulose-binding domain to CSLP is responsible for cellulose-binding capacity. This attribute should make it an attractive applicant for enzyme immobilization.

  4. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability.

    PubMed

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G; Andersen, J S; Baccarini, M; von Gabain, A

    1998-11-24

    The stability of the ompA mRNA depends on the bacterial growth rate. The 5' untranslated region is the stability determinant of this transcript and the target of the endoribonuclease, RNase E, the key player of mRNA degradation. An RNA-binding protein with affinity for the 5' untranslated region ompA was purified and identified as Hfq, a host factor initially recognized for its function in phage Qbeta replication. The ompA RNA-binding activity parallels the amount of Hfq, which is elevated in bacteria cultured at slow growth rate, a condition leading to facilitated degradation of the ompA mRNA. In hfq mutant cells with a deficient Hfq gene product, the RNA-binding activity is missing, and analysis of the ompA mRNA showed that the growth-rate dependence of degradation is lost. Furthermore, the half-life of the ompA mRNA is prolonged in the mutant cells, irrespective of growth rate. Hfq has no affinity for the lpp transcript whose degradation, like that of bulk mRNA, is not affected by bacterial growth rate. Compatible with our results, we found that the intracellular concentration of RNase E and its associated degradosome components is independent of bacterial growth rate. Thus our results suggest a regulatory role for Hfq that specifically facilitates the ompA mRNA degradation in a growth rate-dependent manner.

  5. Surface binding of alamethicin stabilizes its helical structure: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    1999-01-01

    Alamethicin is an amphipathic alpha-helical peptide that forms ion channels. An early event in channel formation is believed to be the binding of alamethicin to the surface of a lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to compare the structural and dynamic properties of alamethicin in water and alamethicin bound to the surface of a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. The bilayer surface simulation corresponded to a loosely bound alamethicin molecule that interacted with lipid headgroups but did not penetrate the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Both simulations started with the peptide molecule in an alpha-helical conformation and lasted 2 ns. In water, the helix started to unfold after approximately 300 ps and by the end of the simulation only the N-terminal region of the peptide remained alpha-helical and the molecule had collapsed into a more compact form. At the surface of the bilayer, loss of helicity was restricted to the C-terminal third of the molecule and the rod-shaped structure of the peptide was retained. In the surface simulation about 10% of the peptide/water H-bonds were replaced by peptide/lipid H-bonds. These simulations suggest that some degree of stabilization of an amphipathic alpha-helix occurs at a bilayer surface even without interactions between hydrophobic side chains and the acyl chain core of the bilayer. PMID:10354443

  6. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  7. Involvement of the heterodimeric interface region of the nucleotide binding domain-2 (NBD2) in the CFTR quaternary structure and membrane stability.

    PubMed

    Micoud, Julien; Chauvet, Sylvain; Scheckenbach, Klaus Ernst Ludwig; Alfaidy, Nadia; Chanson, Marc; Benharouga, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the only member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily that functions as a chloride channel. The predicted structure of CFTR protein contains two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), each followed by a nucleotide binding domain (NBD1 and NBD2). The opening of the Cl- channel is directly linked to ATP-driven tight dimerization of CFTR's NBD1 and NBD2 domains. The presence of a heterodimeric interfaces (HI) region in NBD1 and NBD2 generated a head to tail orientation necessary for channel activity. This process was also suggested to promote important conformational changes in the associated transmembrane domains of CFTR, which may impact the CFTR plasma membrane stability. To better understand the role of the individual HI region in this process, we generated recombinant CFTR protein with suppressed HI-NBD1 and HI-NBD2. Our results indicate that HI-NBD2 deletion leads to the loss of the dimerization profile of CFTR that affect its plasma membrane stability. We conclude that, in addition to its role in Cl- transport, HI-NBD2 domain confers membrane stability of CFTR by consolidating its quaternary structure through interactions with HI-NBD1 region.

  8. Allochthonous subsidy of periodical cicadas affects the dynamics and stability of pond communities.

    PubMed

    Nowlin, Weston H; González, María J; Vanni, Michael J; Stevens, M Henry H; Fields, Matthew W; Valente, Jonathon J

    2007-09-01

    Periodical cicadas emerge from below ground every 13 or 17 years in North American forests, with individual broods representing the synchronous movement of trillions of individuals across geographic regions. Due to predator satiation, most individuals escape predation, die, and become deposited as detritus. Some of this emergent biomass falls into woodland aquatic habitats (small streams and woodland ponds) and serves as a high-quality allochthonous detritus pulse in early summer. We present results of a two-part study in which we (1) quantified deposition of Brood X periodical cicada detritus into woodland ponds and low-order streams in southwestern Ohio, and (2) conducted an outdoor mesocosm experiment in which we examined the effects of deposition of different amounts of cicada detritus on food webs characteristic of forest ponds. In the mesocosm experiment, we manipulated the amount of cicada detritus input to examine if food web dynamics and stability varied with the magnitude of this allochthonous resource subsidy, as predicted by numerous theoretical models. Deposition data indicate that, during years of periodical cicada emergence, cicada carcasses can represent a sizable pulse of allochthonous detritus to forest aquatic ecosystems. In the mesocosm experiment, cicada carcass deposition rapidly affected food webs, leading to substantial increases in nutrients and organism biomass, with the magnitude of increase dependent upon the amount of cicada detritus. Deposition of cicada detritus impacted the stability of organism functional groups and populations by affecting the temporal variability and biomass minima. However, contrary to theory, stability measures were not consistently related to the size of the allochthonous pulse (i.e., the amount of cicada detritus). Our study underscores the need for theory to further explore consequences of pulsed allochthonous subsidies for food web stability.

  9. Binding of manganese(II) to a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme as studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    KISSELEVA, NATALIA; KHVOROVA, ANASTASIA; WESTHOF, ERIC; SCHIEMANN, OLAV

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to study the binding of MnII ions to a tertiary stabilized hammer-head ribozyme (tsHHRz) and to compare it with the binding to the minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz). Continuous wave EPR measurements show that the tsHHRz possesses a single high-affinity MnII binding site with a KD of ≤10 nM at an NaCl concentration of 0.1 M. This dissociation constant is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than the KD determined previously for the single high-affinity MnII site in the mHHRz. In addition, whereas the high-affinity MnII is displaced from the mHHRz upon binding of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B, it is not from the tsHHRz. Despite these pronounced differences in binding, a comparison between the electron spin echo envelope modulation and hyperfine sublevel correlation spectra of the minimal and tertiary stabilized HHRz demonstrates that the structure of both binding sites is very similar. This suggests that the MnII is located in both ribozymes between the bases A9 and G10.1 of the sheared G · A tandem base pair, as shown previously and in detail for the mHHRz. Thus, the much stronger MnII binding in the tsHHRz is attributed to the interaction between the two external loops, which locks in the RNA fold, trapping the MnII in the tightly bound conformation, whereas the absence of long-range loop–loop interactions in the mHHRz leads to more dynamical and open conformations, decreasing MnII binding. PMID:15611296

  10. Full engagement of liganded maltose-binding protein stabilizes a semi-open ATP-binding cassette dimer in the maltose transporter

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Frances Joan D.; Orelle, Cédric; Huang, Yan; Bajaj, Ruchika; Everly, R. Michael; Klug, Candice S.; Davidson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary MalFGK2 is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that mediates the uptake of maltose/maltodextrins into Escherichia coli. A periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) delivers maltose to the transmembrane subunits (MalFG) and stimulates the ATPase activity of the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding subunits (MalK dimer). This MBP-stimulated ATPase activity is independent of maltose for purified transporter in detergent micelles. However, when the transporter is reconstituted in membrane bilayers, only the liganded form of MBP efficiently stimulates its activity. To investigate the mechanism of maltose stimulation, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to study the interactions between the transporter and MBP in nanodiscs and in detergent. We found that full engagement of both lobes of maltose-bound MBP unto MalFGK2 is facilitated by nucleotides and stabilizes a semi-open MalK dimer. Maltose-bound MBP promotes the transition to the semi-open state of MalK when the transporter is in the membrane, whereas such regulation does not require maltose in detergent. We suggest that stabilization of the semi-open MalK2 conformation by maltose-bound MBP is key to the coupling of maltose transport to ATP hydrolysis in vivo, because it facilitates the progression of the MalK dimer from the open to the semi-open conformation, from which it can proceed to hydrolyze ATP. PMID:26268698

  11. Full engagement of liganded maltose-binding protein stabilizes a semi-open ATP-binding cassette dimer in the maltose transporter.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Frances Joan D; Orelle, Cédric; Huang, Yan; Bajaj, Ruchika; Everly, R Michael; Klug, Candice S; Davidson, Amy L

    2015-12-01

    MalFGK2 is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that mediates the uptake of maltose/maltodextrins into Escherichia coli. A periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) delivers maltose to the transmembrane subunits (MalFG) and stimulates the ATPase activity of the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding subunits (MalK dimer). This MBP-stimulated ATPase activity is independent of maltose for purified transporter in detergent micelles. However, when the transporter is reconstituted in membrane bilayers, only the liganded form of MBP efficiently stimulates its activity. To investigate the mechanism of maltose stimulation, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the interactions between the transporter and MBP in nanodiscs and in detergent. We found that full engagement of both lobes of maltose-bound MBP unto MalFGK2 is facilitated by nucleotides and stabilizes a semi-open MalK dimer. Maltose-bound MBP promotes the transition to the semi-open state of MalK when the transporter is in the membrane, whereas such regulation does not require maltose in detergent. We suggest that stabilization of the semi-open MalK2 conformation by maltose-bound MBP is key to the coupling of maltose transport to ATP hydrolysis in vivo, because it facilitates the progression of the MalK dimer from the open to the semi-open conformation, from which it can proceed to hydrolyze ATP.

  12. Stability Limits of Capillary Bridges: How Contact Angle Hysteresis Affects Morphology Transitions of Liquid Microstructures.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Riëlle; Semprebon, Ciro; van Gorcum, Mathijs; Duits, Michèl H G; Brinkmann, Martin; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-06-12

    The equilibrium shape of a drop in contact with solid surfaces can undergo continuous or discontinuous transitions upon changes in either drop volume or surface energies. In many instances, such transitions involve the motion of the three-phase contact line and are thus sensitive to contact angle hysteresis. Using a combination of electrowetting-based experiments and numerical calculations, we demonstrate for a generic sphere-plate confinement geometry how contact angle hysteresis affects the mechanical stability of competing axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric drop conformations and qualitatively changes the character of transitions between them.

  13. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  14. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages.

  15. βI-tubulin mutations in the laulimalide/peloruside binding site mediate drug sensitivity by altering drug-tubulin interactions and microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Rowe, Matthew R; Field, Jessica J; Northcote, Peter T; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; Miller, John H

    2015-09-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and laulimalide (LAU) are potent microtubule-stabilizing natural products that are effective against a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The interactions of PLA and LAU with tubulin have attracted a great deal of attention, mainly because they bind to β-tubulin at a site that is different from the classical taxoid site. Multiple βI-tubulin amino acid residues have been predicted by computer modelling studies and more recently by protein crystallography to participate in the binding of PLA and LAU to tubulin. The relevance of these residues in determining cellular sensitivity to the compounds, however, remains largely uncertain. To determine the role of four binding site residues, Q291, D295, V333, and N337 on PLA and LAU activity, we introduced single mutations to these sites by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected each mutant tubulin separately into HEK and/or HeLa cells. We found that a Q291M βI-tubulin mutation increased sensitivity of the cells to PLA, but not to LAU, paclitaxel (PTX), or vinblastine (VBL). In contrast, V333W and N337L mutations led to less stable microtubules, with the V333W causing resistance to PLA and PTX, but not LAU, and the N337L causing resistance to PLA, LAU, and PTX. Moreover, cells expressing either W333 or L337 were hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent, VBL. The D295I mutation conferred resistance to both PLA and LAU without affecting microtubule stability or sensitivity to PTX or ixabepilone (IXB). This study identifies the first mammalian βI-tubulin mutation that specifically increases sensitivity to PLA, and reports mutations at PLA and LAU binding site residues that can either reduce microtubule stability or impair drug-tubulin binding, conferring resistance to these microtubule-stabilizing agents. This information provides insights on β-tubulin residues important for maintaining microtubule structural integrity and for sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents, and suggests novel

  16. Mapping the Binding Site of the Inhibitor Tariquidar That Stabilizes the First Transmembrane Domain of P-glycoprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are clinically important because drug pumps like P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) confer multidrug resistance and mutant ABC proteins are responsible for many protein-folding diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Identification of the tariquidar-binding site has been the subject of intensive molecular modeling studies because it is the most potent inhibitor and corrector of P-gp. Tariquidar is a unique P-gp inhibitor because it locks the pump in a conformation that blocks drug efflux but activates ATPase activity. In silico docking studies have identified several potential tariquidar-binding sites. Here, we show through cross-linking studies that tariquidar most likely binds to sites within the transmembrane (TM) segments located in one wing or at the interface between the two wings (12 TM segments form 2 divergent wings). We then introduced arginine residues at all positions in the 12 TM segments (223 mutants) of P-gp. The rationale was that a charged residue in the drug-binding pocket would disrupt hydrophobic interaction with tariquidar and inhibit its ability to rescue processing mutants or stimulate ATPase activity. Arginines introduced at 30 positions significantly inhibited tariquidar rescue of a processing mutant and activation of ATPase activity. The results suggest that tariquidar binds to a site within the drug-binding pocket at the interface between the TM segments of both structural wings. Tariquidar differed from other drug substrates, however, as it stabilized the first TM domain. Stabilization of the first TM domain appears to be a key mechanism for high efficiency rescue of ABC processing mutants that cause disease. PMID:26507655

  17. SIRT1 stimulation by polyphenols is affected by their stability and metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Vincent C J; de Goffau, Marcus C; Arts, Ilja C W; Hollman, Peter C H; Keijer, Jaap

    2006-07-01

    Silent information regulator two ortholog 1 (SIRT1) is the human ortholog of the yeast sir2 protein; one of the most important regulators of lifespan extension by caloric restriction in several organisms. Dietary polyphenols, abundant in vegetables, fruits, cereals, wine and tea, were reported to stimulate the deacetylase activity of recombinant SIRT1 protein and could therefore be potential regulators of aging associated processes. However, inconsistent data between effects of polyphenols on the recombinant SIRT1 and on in vivo SIRT1, led us to investigate the influence of (1) stability of polyphenols under experimental conditions and (2) metabolism of polyphenols in human HT29 cells, on stimulation of SIRT1. With an improved SIRT1 deacetylation assay we found three new polyphenolic stimulators. Epigallocatechin galate (EGCg, 1.76-fold), epicatechin galate (ECg, 1.85-fold) and myricetin (3.19-fold) stimulated SIRT1 under stabilizing conditions, whereas without stabilization, these polyphenols strongly inhibited SIRT1, probably due to H2O2 formation. Using metabolically active HT29 cells we were able to show that quercetin (a stimulator of recombinant SIRT1) could not stimulate intracellular SIRT1. The major quercetin metabolite in humans, quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, slightly inhibited the recombinant SIRT1 activity which explains the lack of stimulatory action of quercetin in HT29 cells. This study shows that the stimulation of SIRT1 is strongly affected by polyphenol stability and metabolism, therefore extrapolation of in vitro SIRT1 stimulation results to physiological effects should be done with caution.

  18. Cavity filling mutations at the thyroxine-binding site dramatically increase transthyretin stability and prevent its aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Varejāo, Nathalia; Gallego, Pablo; Esperante, Sebastian; Ferreira, Priscila; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Palhano, Fernando L; de Carvalho, Mamede; Foguel, Debora; Reverter, David; Saraiva, Maria João; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-03-24

    More than a hundred different Transthyretin (TTR) mutations are associated with fatal systemic amyloidoses. They destabilize the protein tetrameric structure and promote the extracellular deposition of TTR as pathological amyloid fibrils. So far, only mutations R104H and T119M have been shown to stabilize significantly TTR, acting as disease suppressors. We describe a novel A108V non-pathogenic mutation found in a Portuguese subject. This variant is more stable than wild type TTR both in vitro and in human plasma, a feature that prevents its aggregation. The crystal structure of A108V reveals that this stabilization comes from novel intra and inter subunit contacts involving the thyroxine (T4) binding site. Exploiting this observation, we engineered a A108I mutation that fills the T4 binding cavity, as evidenced in the crystal structure. This synthetic protein becomes one of the most stable TTR variants described so far, with potential application in gene and protein replacement therapies.

  19. Identification of VPS13C as a Galectin-12-Binding Protein That Regulates Galectin-12 Protein Stability and Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ri-Yao; Xue, Huiting; Yu, Lan; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Monaco, Anthony P.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-12, a member of the galectin family of β-galactoside-binding animal lectins, is preferentially expressed in adipocytes and required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. This protein was recently found to regulate lipolysis, whole body adiposity, and glucose homeostasis in vivo. Here we identify VPS13C, a member of the VPS13 family of vacuolar protein sorting-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, as a major galectin-12-binding protein. VPS13C is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation, and is required for galectin-12 protein stability. Knockdown of Vps13c markedly reduces the steady-state levels of galectin-12 by promoting its degradation through primarily the lysosomal pathway, and impairs adipocyte differentiation. Our studies also suggest that VPS13C may have a broader role in protein quality control. The regulation of galectin-12 stability by VPS13C could potentially be exploited for therapeutic intervention of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:27073999

  20. The Drosophila RNA-binding protein HOW controls the stability of dgrasp mRNA in the follicular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Giuliano; Giuliani, Fabrizio; Volk, Talila; Rabouille, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of RNA stability and localization underlies a wide array of developmental processes, such as axon guidance and epithelial morphogenesis. In Drosophila, ectopic expression of the classically Golgi peripheral protein dGRASP at the plasma membrane is achieved through its mRNA targeting at key developmental time-points, in a process critical to follicular epithelium integrity. However, the trans-acting factors that tightly regulate the spatio-temporal dynamics of dgrasp are unknown. Using an in silico approach, we identified two putative HOW Response Elements (HRE1 and HRE2) within the dgrasp open reading frame for binding to Held Out Wings (HOW), a member of the Signal Transduction and Activation of RNA family of RNA-binding proteins. Using RNA immunoprecipitations, we confirmed this by showing that the short cytoplasmic isoform of HOW binds directly to dgrasp HRE1. Furthermore, HOW loss of function in vivo leads to a significant decrease in dgrasp mRNA levels. We demonstrate that HRE1 protects dgrasp mRNA from cytoplasmic degradation, but does not mediate its targeting. We propose that this binding event promotes the formation of ribonucleoprotein particles that ensure dgrasp stability during transport to the basal plasma membrane, thus enabling the local translation of dgrasp for its roles at non-Golgi locations. PMID:24217913

  1. Molecular cloning, expression profile, odorant affinity, and stability of two odorant-binding proteins in Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2017-02-01

    The polyembryonic endoparasitoid wasp Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is deployed successfully as a biocontrol agent for corn pest insects from the Lepidopteran genus Ostrinia in Europe and throughout Asia, including Japan, Korea, and China. The odorants are recognized, bound, and solubilized by odorant-binding protein (OBP) in the initial biochemical recognition steps in olfaction that transport them across the sensillum lymph to initiate behavioral response. In the present study, we examine the odorant-binding effects on thermal stability of McinOBP2, McinOBP3, and their mutant form that lacks the third disulfide bonds. Real-time PCR experiments indicate that these two are expressed mainly in adult antennae, with expression levels differing by sex. Odorant-binding affinities of aldehydes, terpenoids, and aliphatic alcohols were measured with circular dichroism spectroscopy based on changes in the thermal stability of the proteins upon their affinities to odorants. The obtained results reveal higher affinity of trans-caryophelle, farnesene, and cis-3-Hexen-1-ol exhibits to both wild and mutant McinOBP2 and McinOBP3. Although conformational flexibility of the mutants and shape of binding cavity make differences in odorant affinity between the wild-type and mutant, it suggested that lacking the third disulfide bond in mutant proteins may have chance to incorrect folded structures that reduced the affinity to these odorants. In addition, CD spectra clearly indicate proteins enriched with α-helical content.

  2. Phosphine passivated gold clusters: how charge transfer affects electronic structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Mollenhauer, Doreen; Gaston, Nicola

    2016-11-02

    A systematic evaluation of small phosphine ligand-protected gold clusters with six to nine gold atoms using density functional theory with dispersion correction has been performed in order to understand the major factors determining stability, including its size, shape, and charge dependence. We show that the charge per atom of the cluster is much more important for the interaction between the ligand shell and gold cluster than the system size. Thus, strong charge transfer effects determine the binding strength between the ligand shell and cluster. The clusters in this series are all non-spherical and exhibit large HOMO-LUMO gaps (above 2.7 eV). Analysis of the delocalized nature of the electronic states at the centre of the clusters demonstrates the presence of nascent superatomic states. However the number of delocalized electrons in these systems is significantly influenced by the charge transfer from the phosphine ligands, contrary to the usual accounting rule for superatom complex systems. Thus, not only electron withdrawing but also charge transfer effects should be considered to influence the superatomic structure of charged ligand surrounded clusters. In consequence in the phosphine gold cluster series under consideration the systems Au7(PPh3)7(+) and Au8(PPh3)8(2+) exhibit nearly fully filled S and P states and the HOMO-LUMO gap increases by 0.2 eV and 0.9 eV, respectively. The interpretation for the stability of the gold phosphine systems is in agreement with experimental results and demonstrates the importance of the superatomic concept.

  3. Stabilization of Human Serum Albumin by the Binding of Phycocyanobilin, a Bioactive Chromophore of Blue-Green Alga Spirulina: Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Radibratovic, Milica; Minic, Simeon; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Nikolic, Milan; Milcic, Milos; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Phycocyanobilin (PCB) binds with high affinity (2.2 x 106 M-1 at 25°C) to human serum albumin (HSA) at sites located in IB and IIA subdomains. The aim of this study was to examine effects of PCB binding on protein conformation and stability. Using 300 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, CD, FT-IR, spectrofluorimetry, thermal denaturation and susceptibility to trypsin digestion, we studied the effects of PCB binding on the stability and rigidity of HSA, as well as the conformational changes in PCB itself upon binding to the protein. MD simulation results demonstrated that HSA with PCB bound at any of the two sites showed greater rigidity and lower overall and individual domain flexibility compared to free HSA. Experimental data demonstrated an increase in the α-helical content of the protein and thermal and proteolytic stability upon ligand binding. PCB bound to HSA undergoes a conformational change to a more elongated conformation in the binding pockets of HSA. PCB binding to HSA stabilizes the structure of this flexible transport protein, making it more thermostable and resistant to proteolysis. The results from this work explain at molecular level, conformational changes and stabilization of HSA structure upon ligand binding. The resultant increased thermal and proteolytic stability of HSA may provide greater longevity to HSA in plasma.

  4. Stabilization of Human Serum Albumin by the Binding of Phycocyanobilin, a Bioactive Chromophore of Blue-Green Alga Spirulina: Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Nikolic, Milan; Milcic, Milos; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Phycocyanobilin (PCB) binds with high affinity (2.2 x 106 M-1 at 25°C) to human serum albumin (HSA) at sites located in IB and IIA subdomains. The aim of this study was to examine effects of PCB binding on protein conformation and stability. Using 300 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, CD, FT-IR, spectrofluorimetry, thermal denaturation and susceptibility to trypsin digestion, we studied the effects of PCB binding on the stability and rigidity of HSA, as well as the conformational changes in PCB itself upon binding to the protein. MD simulation results demonstrated that HSA with PCB bound at any of the two sites showed greater rigidity and lower overall and individual domain flexibility compared to free HSA. Experimental data demonstrated an increase in the α-helical content of the protein and thermal and proteolytic stability upon ligand binding. PCB bound to HSA undergoes a conformational change to a more elongated conformation in the binding pockets of HSA. PCB binding to HSA stabilizes the structure of this flexible transport protein, making it more thermostable and resistant to proteolysis. The results from this work explain at molecular level, conformational changes and stabilization of HSA structure upon ligand binding. The resultant increased thermal and proteolytic stability of HSA may provide greater longevity to HSA in plasma. PMID:27959940

  5. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  6. Habitat stability affects dispersal and the ability to track climate change.

    PubMed

    Hof, Christian; Brändle, Martin; Dehling, D Matthias; Munguía, Mariana; Brandl, Roland; Araújo, Miguel B; Rahbek, Carsten

    2012-08-23

    Habitat persistence should influence dispersal ability, selecting for stronger dispersal in habitats of lower temporal stability. As standing (lentic) freshwater habitats are on average less persistent over time than running (lotic) habitats, lentic species should show higher dispersal abilities than lotic species. Assuming that climate is an important determinant of species distributions, we hypothesize that lentic species should have distributions that are closer to equilibrium with current climate, and should more rapidly track climatic changes. We tested these hypotheses using datasets from 1988 and 2006 containing all European dragon- and damselfly species. Bioclimatic envelope models showed that lentic species were closer to climatic equilibrium than lotic species. Furthermore, the models over-predicted lotic species ranges more strongly than lentic species ranges, indicating that lentic species track climatic changes more rapidly than lotic species. These results are consistent with the proposed hypothesis that habitat persistence affects the evolution of dispersal.

  7. Harvest date affects aronia juice polyphenols, sugars, and antioxidant activity, but not anthocyanin stability.

    PubMed

    Bolling, Bradley W; Taheri, Rod; Pei, Ruisong; Kranz, Sarah; Yu, Mo; Durocher, Shelley N; Brand, Mark H

    2015-11-15

    The goal of this work was to characterize how the date of harvest of 'Viking' aronia berry impacts juice pigmentation, sugars, and antioxidant activity. Aronia juice anthocyanins doubled at the fifth week of the harvest, and then decreased. Juice hydroxycinnamic acids decreased 33% from the first week, while proanthocyanidins increased 64%. Juice fructose and glucose plateaued at the fourth week, but sorbitol increased 40% to the seventh harvest week. Aronia juice pigment density increased due to anthocyanin concentration, and polyphenol copigmentation did not significantly affect juice pigmentation. Anthocyanin stability at pH 4.5 was similar between weeks. However, addition of quercetin, sorbitol, and chlorogenic acid to aronia anthocyanins inhibited pH-induced loss of color. Sorbitol and citric acid may be partially responsible for weekly variation in antioxidant activity, as addition of these agents inhibited DPPH scavenging 13-30%. Thus, aronia polyphenol and non-polyphenol components contribute to its colorant and antioxidant functionality.

  8. Phosphorylation states of translational initiation factors affect mRNA cap binding in wheat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2004-07-20

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translational initiation factors (eIFs) has been shown to be an important means of regulating protein synthesis. Plant initiation factors undergo phosphorylation/dephosphorylation under a variety of stress and growth conditions. We have shown that recombinant wheat cap-binding protein, eIF(iso)4E, produced from E. coli can be phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of eIF(iso)4E has effects on m(7)G cap-binding affinity similar to those of phosphorylation of mammalian eIF4E even though eIF(iso)4E lacks an amino acid that can be phosphorylated at the residue corresponding to Ser-209, the phosphorylation site in mammalian eIF4E. The cap-binding affinity was reduced 1.2-2.6-fold when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated. The in vitro phosphorylation site for wheat eIF(iso)4E was identified as Ser-207. Addition of eIF(iso)4G and eIF4B that had also been phosphorylated in vitro further reduced cap-binding affinity. Temperature-dependent studies showed that DeltaH(degrees) was favorable for cap binding regardless of the phosphorylation state of the initiation factors. The entropy, however, was unfavorable (negative) except when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated and interacting with eIF(iso)4G. Phosphorylation may modulate not only cap-binding activity, but other functions of eukaryotic initiation factors as well.

  9. Identification of Residues in Domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin That Affect Binding and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Kyong; You, Taek H.; Gould, Fred L.; Dean, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    Alanine substitution mutations in the Cry1Ac domain III region, from amino acid residues 503 to 525, were constructed to study the functional role of domain III in the toxicity and receptor binding of the protein to Lymantria dispar, Manduca sexta, and Heliothis virescens. Five sets of alanine block mutants were generated at the residues 503SS504, 506NNI508, 509QNR511, 522ST523, and 524ST525. Single alanine substitutions were made at the residues 509Q, 510N, 511R, and 513Y. All mutant proteins produced stable toxic fragments as judged by trypsin digestion, midgut enzyme digestion, and circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The mutations, 503SS504-AA, 506NNI508-AAA, 522ST523-AA, 524ST525-AA, and 510N-A affected neither the protein’s toxicity nor its binding to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from these insects. Toward L. dispar and M. sexta, the 509QNR511-AAA, 509Q-A, 511R-A, and 513Y-A mutant toxins showed 4- to 10-fold reductions in binding affinities to BBMV, with 2- to 3-fold reductions in toxicity. Toward H. virescens, the 509QNR511-AAA, 509Q-A, 511R-A, and 513Y-mutant toxins showed 8- to 22-fold reductions in binding affinities, but only 509QNR511-AAA and 511R-A mutant toxins reduced toxicity by approximately three to four times. In the present study, greater loss in binding affinity relative to toxicity has been observed. These data suggest that the residues 509Q, 511R, and 513Y in domain III might be only involved in initial binding to the receptor and that the initial binding step becomes rate limiting only when it is reduced more than fivefold. PMID:10508083

  10. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Let, Mette B; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit M; Meyer, Anne S

    2007-03-07

    In this study fish oil was incorporated into commercial homogenized milk using different homogenization temperatures and pressures. The main aim was to understand the significance of homogenization temperature and pressure on the oxidative stability of the resulting milks. Increasing homogenization temperature from 50 to 72 degrees C decreased droplet size only slightly, whereas a pressure increase from 5 to 22.5 MPa decreased droplet size significantly. Surprisingly, emulsions having small droplets, and therefore large interfacial area, were less oxidized than emulsions having bigger droplets. Emulsions with similar droplet size distributions, but resulting from different homogenization conditions, had significantly different oxidative stabilities, indicating that properties of significance to oxidation other than droplet size itself were affected by the different treatments. In general, homogenization at 72 degrees C appeared to induce protective effects against oxidation as compared to homogenization at 50 degrees C. The results thus indicated that the actual composition of the oil-water interface is more important than total surface area itself.

  11. Mutagenesis of Paramyxovirus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Membrane-Proximal Stalk Region Influences Stability, Receptor Binding, and Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Kim, Lori S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviridae consist of a large family of enveloped, negative-sense, nonsegmented single-stranded RNA viruses that account for a significant number of human and animal diseases. The fusion process for nearly all paramyxoviruses involves the mixing of the host cell plasma membrane and the virus envelope in a pH-independent fashion. Fusion is orchestrated via the concerted action of two surface glycoproteins: an attachment protein called hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN [also called H or G depending on virus type and substrate]), which acts as a receptor binding protein, and a fusion (F) protein, which undergoes a major irreversible refolding process to merge the two membranes. Recent biochemical evidence suggests that receptor binding by HN is dispensable for cell-cell fusion. However, factors that influence the stability and/or conformation of the HN 4-helix bundle (4HB) stalk have not been studied. Here, we used oxidative cross-linking as well as functional assays to investigate the role of the structurally unresolved membrane-proximal stalk region (MPSR) (residues 37 to 58) of HN in the context of headless and full-length HN membrane fusion promotion. Our data suggest that the receptor binding head serves to stabilize the stalk to regulate fusion. Moreover, we found that the MPSR of HN modulates receptor binding and neuraminidase activity without a corresponding regulation of F triggering. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses require two viral membrane glycoproteins, the attachment protein variously called HN, H, or G and the fusion protein (F), to couple host receptor recognition to virus-cell fusion. The HN protein has a globular head that is attached to a membrane-anchored flexible stalk of ∼80 residues and has three activities: receptor binding, neuraminidase, and fusion activation. In this report, we have identified the functional significance of the membrane-proximal stalk region (MPSR) (HN, residues 37 to 56) of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus

  12. Independent multimerization of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein-1 stabilized by cross-linking and enhanced by heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Troilo, Helen; Steer, Ruth; Collins, Richard F.; Kielty, Cay M.; Baldock, Clair

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ plays key roles in fibrosis and cancer progression, and latency is conferred by covalent linkage to latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs). LTBP1 is essential for TGFβ folding, secretion, matrix localization and activation but little is known about its structure due to its inherent size and flexibility. Here we show that LTBP1 adopts an extended conformation with stable matrix-binding N-terminus, extended central array of 11 calcium-binding EGF domains and flexible TGFβ-binding C-terminus. Moreover we demonstrate that LTBP1 forms short filament-like structures independent of other matrix components. The termini bind to each other to facilitate linear extension of the filament, while the N-terminal region can serve as a branch-point. Multimerization is enhanced in the presence of heparin and stabilized by the matrix cross-linking enzyme transglutaminase-2. These assemblies will extend the span of LTBP1 to potentially allow simultaneous N-terminal matrix and C-terminal fibrillin interactions providing tethering for TGFβ activation by mechanical force. PMID:27677855

  13. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies showed that CBP KIX mutation affects the stability of CBP:c-Myb complex.

    PubMed

    Odoux, Anne; Jindal, Darren; Tamas, Tamara C; Lim, Benjamin W H; Pollard, Drake; Xu, Wu

    2016-06-01

    The coactivators CBP (CREBBP) and its paralog p300 (EP300), two conserved multi-domain proteins in eukaryotic organisms, regulate gene expression in part by binding DNA-binding transcription factors. It was previously reported that the CBP/p300 KIX domain mutant (Y650A, A654Q, and Y658A) altered both c-Myb-dependent gene activation and repression, and that mice with these three point mutations had reduced numbers of platelets, B cells, T cells, and red blood cells. Here, our transient transfection assays demonstrated that mouse embryonic fibroblast cells containing the same mutations in the KIX domain and without a wild-type allele of either CBP or p300, showed decreased c-Myb-mediated transcription. Dr. Wright's group solved a 3-D structure of the mouse CBP:c-Myb complex using NMR. To take advantage of the experimental structure and function data and improved theoretical calculation methods, we performed MD simulations of CBP KIX, CBP KIX with the mutations, and c-Myb, as well as binding energy analysis for both the wild-type and mutant complexes. The binding between CBP and c-Myb is mainly mediated by a shallow hydrophobic groove in the center where the side-chain of Leu302 of c-Myb plays an essential role and two salt bridges at the two ends. We found that the KIX mutations slightly decreased stability of the CBP:c-Myb complex as demonstrated by higher binding energy calculated using either MM/PBSA or MM/GBSA methods. More specifically, the KIX mutations affected the two salt bridges between CBP and c-Myb (CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306; CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294). Our studies also revealed differing dynamics of the hydrogen bonds between CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306 and between CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294 caused by the CBP KIX mutations. In the wild-type CBP:c-Myb complex, both of the hydrogen bonds stayed relatively stable. In contrast, in the mutant CBP:c-Myb complex, hydrogen bonds between R646 and E306 showed an increasing trend followed by a decreasing trend, and hydrogen

  14. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array

    PubMed Central

    Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2013-01-01

    Our perception of an object’s size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour – a binding ring – and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation) by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size. PMID:24555042

  15. A new locus affects cell motility, cellulose binding, and degradation by Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Xu, Yuanxi; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Ning; Lu, Xuemei

    2012-10-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a Gram-negative gliding bacterium, which can rapidly degrade crystalline cellulose via a novel strategy without any recognizable processive cellulases. Its mechanism of cellulose binding and degradation is still a mystery. In this study, the mutagenesis of C. hutchinsonii with the mariner-based transposon HimarEm3 and gene complementation with the oriC-based plasmid carrying the antibiotic resistance gene cfxA or tetQ were reported for the first time to provide valuable tools for mutagenesis and genetic manipulation of the bacterium. Mutant A-4 with a transposon mutation in gene CHU_0134, which encodes a putative thiol-disulfide isomerase exhibits defects in cell motility and cellulose degradation. The cellulose binding ability of A-4 was only half of that of the wild-type strain, while the endo-cellulase activity of the cell-free supernatants and on the intact cell surface of A-4 decreased by 40%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins binding to cellulose in the outer membrane showed that most of them were significantly decreased or disappeared in A-4 including some Gld proteins and hypothetical proteins, indicating that these proteins might play an important role in cell motility and cellulose binding and degradation by the bacterium.

  16. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  17. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J Daniel; Kupitz, Colin; Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2013-01-01

    Our perception of an object's size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour - a binding ring - and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation) by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size.

  18. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca{sup 2+}-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  19. Odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes affect host specificity in a fig-pollinator mutualistic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Wang, N X; Niu, L M; Bian, S N; Xiao, J H; Huang, D W

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between figs and their pollinating wasps is regarded as a model system for studying specialized co-evolved mutualism. Chemoreception of fig wasps plays an important role in this interaction, and odorant-binding proteins (OBP) function in the first step of odorant detection. The OBP repertoire of the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi is reported to be one of the smallest among insects; however, it is unknown how these OBPs are related to the complicated mating process occurring within the fig cavity and the extreme host specificity of the species. In the present study, we combined a structural analysis of the conserved cysteine pattern and motif order, a phylogenetic analysis, and previous studies on ligand-binding assays to deduce the function of OBPs. We also quantified the expression of OBP genes in different life stages of female and male fig wasps by using real-time quantitative PCR, which can help to predict the function of these genes. The results indicated that CsolOBP1 and CsolOBP2 (or CsolOBP5) in males may bind to pheromones and play important roles in mate choice, whereas CsolOBP4 and CsolOBP5 may primarily function in host localization by females through binding of volatile compounds emitted by receptive figs.

  20. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  1. Spectrofluorimetric methods of stability-indicating assay of certain drugs affecting the cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, B. A.; Mohamed, M. F.; Youssef, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    Two stability-indicating spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed for the determination of ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil, drugs affecting the cardiovascular system, and validated in the presence of their degradation products. The first method, for ezetimibe, is based on an oxidative coupling reaction of ezetimibe with 3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-one hydrazone hydrochloride in the presence of cerium (IV) ammonium sulfate in an acidic medium. The quenching effect of ezetimibe on the fluorescence of excess cerous ions is measured at the emission wavelength, λem, of 345 nm with the excitation wavelength, λex, of 296 nm. Factors affecting the reaction were carefully studied and optimized. The second method, for olmesartan medoxomil, is based on measuring the native fluorescence intensity of olmesartan medoxomil in methanol at λem = 360 nm with λex = 286 nm. Regression plots revealed good linear relationships in the assay limits of 10-120 and 8-112 g/ml for ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil, respectively. The validity of the methods was assessed according to the United States Pharmacopeya guidelines. Statistical analysis of the results exposed good Student's t-test and F-ratio values. The introduced methods were successfully applied to the analysis of ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil in drug substances and drug products as well as in the presence of their degradation products.

  2. Hydrophobic Peptides Affect Binding of Calmodulin and Ca2+ as Explored by H/D Amide Exchange and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, Justin B.; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Zhu, Mei M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular sensor protein, binds Ca2+ and interacts with various targets as part of signal transduction. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) and a high resolution PLIMSTEX (Protein-Ligand Interactions by Mass Spectrometry, Titration, and H/D Exchange) protocol, we examined five different states of calmodulin: calcium-free, calcium-loaded, and three states of calcium-loaded in the presence of either melittin, mastoparan, or skeletal myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). When CaM binds Ca2+, the extent of HDX decreased, consistent with the protein becoming stabilized upon binding. Furthermore, Ca2+-saturated calmodulin exhibits increased protection when bound to the peptides, forming high affinity complexes. The protocol reveals significant changes in EF hands 1, 3, and 4 with saturating levels of Ca2+. Titration of the protein using PLIMSTEX provides the binding affinity of Ca2+ to calmodulin within previously reported values. The affinities of calmodulin to Ca2+ increase by factors of 300 and 1000 in the presence of melittin and mastoparan, respectively. A modified PLIMSTEX protocol whereby the protein is digested to component peptides gives a region-specific titration. The titration data taken in this way show a decrease in the root mean square fit of the residuals, indicating a better fit of the data. The global H/D exchange results and those obtained in a region-specific way provide new insight into the Ca2+-binding properties of this well-studied protein. PMID:21765646

  3. Calcium-binding and structural stability of echidna and canine milk lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, M; Kawano, K; Nitta, K

    1998-10-01

    For echidna and canine milk lysozymes, which were presumed to be the calcium-binding lysozymes by their amino acid sequences, we have quantitated their calcium-binding strength and examined their guanidine unfolding profiles. The calcium-binding constants of echidna and canine lysozymes were determined to be 8.6 x 10(6) M(-1) and 8.9 x 10(6) M(-1) in 0.1 M KCl at pH 7.1 and 20 C, respectively. The unfolding of decalcified canine lysozyme proceeds in the same manner as that of alpha-lactalbumin, through a stable molten globule intermediate. However, neither calcium-bound nor decalcified echidna lysozyme shows a stable molten globule intermediate. This unfolding profile of echidna lysozyme is identical to that of conventional lysozymes and pigeon egg-white lysozyme, avian calcium-binding lysozyme. This result supports the suggestion of Prager and Jolles (Prager EM, Jolles P. 1996. Animal lysozymes c and g: An overview. In: Jolles P, ed. Lysozymes: Model enzymes in biochemistry and biology. Basel-Boston-Berlin: Birkhauzer Verlag. pp 9-31) that the lineage of avian and echidna calcium-binding lysozymes and that of eutherian calcium-binding lysozymes diverged separately from that of conventional lysozymes.

  4. The contribution of methionine to the stability of the Escherichia coli MetNIQ ABC transporter - substrate binding protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phong T.; Li, Qi Wen; Kadaba, Neena S.; Lai, Jeffrey Y.; Yang, Janet G.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous role of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) importers in nutrient uptake, only the E. coli maltose and vitamin B12 ABC transporters have been structurally characterized in multiple conformations relevant to the alternating access transport mechanism. To complement our previous structure determination of the E. coli MetNI methionine importer in the inward facing conformation (Kadaba et al. (2008) Science 321, 250–253), we have explored conditions stabilizing the outward facing conformation. Using two variants, the Walker B E166Q mutation with ATP+EDTA to stabilize MetNI in the ATP-bound conformation and the N229A variant of the binding protein MetQ, shown in this work to disrupt methionine binding, a high affinity MetNIQ complex was formed with a dissociation constant measured to be 27 nM. Using wild type MetQ containing a co-purified methionine (for which the crystal structure is reported at 1.6 Å resolution), the dissociation constant for complex formation with MetNI is measured to be ~40-fold weaker, indicating that complex formation lowers the affinity of MetQ for methionine by this amount. Preparation of a stable MetNIQ complex is an essential step towards the crystallographic analysis of the outward facing conformation, a key intermediate in the uptake of methionine by this transport system. PMID:25803078

  5. Cell surface sialylation affects binding of enterovirus 71 to rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), and infection of EV71 to central nerve system (CNS) may result in a high mortality in children less than 2 years old. Although there are two highly glycosylated membrane proteins, SCARB2 and PSGL-1, which have been identified as the cellular and functional receptors of EV71, the role of glycosylation in EV71 infection is still unclear. Results We demonstrated that the attachment of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells was diminished after the removal of cell surface sialic acids by neuraminidase. Sialic acid specific lectins, Maackia amurensis (MAA) and Sambucus Nigra (SNA), could compete with EV71 and restrained the binding of EV71 significantly. Preincubation of RD cells with fetuin also reduced the binding of EV71. In addition, we found that SCARB2 was a sialylated glycoprotein and interaction between SCARB2 and EV71 was retarded after desialylation. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that cell surface sialic acids assist in the attachment of EV71 to host cells. Cell surface sialylation should be a key regulator that facilitates the binding and infection of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells. PMID:22853823

  6. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  7. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  8. A novel ER–microtubule-binding protein, ERLIN2, stabilizes Cyclin B1 and regulates cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebao; Cai, Juan; Zheng, Ze; Polin, Lisa; Lin, Zhenghong; Dandekar, Aditya; Li, Li; Sun, Fei; Finley, Russell L; Fang, Deyu; Yang, Zeng-Quan; Zhang, Kezhong

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lipid raft-associated protein 2 (ERLIN2) is amplified in human breast cancers. ERLIN2 gene mutations were also found to be associated with human childhood progressive motor neuron diseases. Yet, an understanding of the physiological function and mechanism for ERLIN2 remains elusive. In this study, we reveal that ERLIN2 is a spatially and temporally regulated ER–microtubule-binding protein that has an important role in cell cycle progression by interacting with and stabilizing the mitosis-promoting factors. Whereas ERLIN2 is highly expressed in aggressive human breast cancers, during normal development ERLIN2 is expressed at the postnatal stage and becomes undetectable in adulthood. ERLIN2 interacts with the microtubule component α-tubulin, and this interaction is maximal during the cell cycle G2/M phase where ERLIN2 simultaneously interacts with the mitosis-promoting complex Cyclin B1/Cdk1. ERLIN2 facilitates K63-linked ubiquitination and stabilization of Cyclin B1 protein in G2/M phase. Downregulation of ERLIN2 results in cell cycle arrest, represses breast cancer proliferation and malignancy and increases sensitivity of breast cancer cells to anticancer drugs. In summary, our study revealed a novel ER–microtubule-binding protein, ERLIN2, which interacts with and stabilizes mitosis-promoting factors to regulate cell cycle progression associated with human breast cancer malignancy. PMID:27462423

  9. PsbI affects the stability, function, and phosphorylation patterns of photosystem II assemblies in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Schwenkert, Serena; Umate, Pavan; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Volz, Stefanie; Mlçochová, Lada; Zoryan, Mikael; Eichacker, Lutz A; Ohad, Itzhak; Herrmann, Reinhold G; Meurer, Jörg

    2006-11-10

    Photosystem II (PSII) core complexes consist of CP47, CP43, D1, D2 proteins and of several low molecular weight integral membrane polypeptides, such as the chloroplast-encoded PsbE, PsbF, and PsbI proteins. To elucidate the function of PsbI in the photosynthetic process as well as in the biogenesis of PSII in higher plants, we generated homoplastomic knock-out plants by replacing most of the tobacco psbI gene with a spectinomycin resistance cartridge. Mutant plants are photoautotrophically viable under green house conditions but sensitive to high light irradiation. Antenna proteins of PSII accumulate to normal amounts, but levels of the PSII core complex are reduced by 50%. Bioenergetic and fluorescence studies uncovered that PsbI is required for the stability but not for the assembly of dimeric PSII and supercomplexes consisting of PSII and the outer antenna (PSII-LHCII). Thermoluminescence emission bands indicate that the presence of PsbI is required for assembly of a fully functional Q(A) binding site. We show that phosphorylation of the reaction center proteins D1 and D2 is light and redox-regulated in the wild type, but phosphorylation is abolished in the mutant, presumably due to structural alterations of PSII when PsbI is deficient. Unlike wild type, phosphorylation of LHCII is strongly increased in the dark due to accumulation of reduced plastoquinone, whereas even upon state II light phosphorylation is decreased in delta psbI. These data attest that phosphorylation of D1/D2, CP43, and LHCII is regulated differently.

  10. The importance of sulphide binding for leaching of heavy metals from contaminated Norwegian marine sediments treated by stabilization/solidification.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Eek, Espen; Grini, Randi Skirstad

    2009-07-01

    Over time, Norwegian fjords and harbour areas have received contaminants from industrial activities and urban run-off, and measures to remediate contaminated marine sediments are therefore needed. Stabilization/solidification (S/S) technology, in which the contaminated marine sediments are mixed with cement and other binding agents, has been shown to be a promising remediation technology. This paper summarizes a study of the environmental effect of stabilization, highlighting the importance of sulphide binding governing the leaching of heavy metals from the S/S of contaminated marine sediments. The study is a part of a research project focusing on developing effective methods for S/S of contaminated seabed sediments for use in new construction areas. Four cementitious binders were tested on sediments from six different locations: Bergen, Gilhus, Grenland, Hammerfest, Sandvika and Trondheim. The sediments differed with respect to properties such as concentration of contaminants, water content, organic content and grain size distribution. Portland cement, Portland cement with fly ash, industry cement, and sulphate resistant cement, were tested as binders. The leaching from the S/S sediments after 28 days of curing was measured by using a standard leaching batch test (EN 12457-2: 2003), with seawater as leaching agent. The eluate was analysed for pH and redox, as well as content of heavy metals and organic contaminants. Available volatile sulphide (AVS) and simultaneously extractable metals (SEM) were also measured in the sediments. This paper focuses on the leaching of lead (Pb) and copper (Cu). A reduced leaching of Pb after stabilization was observed for the mixtures, whereas the leaching of Cu from Hammerfest sediments increased substantially after stabilization for all cementitious additions. Experiments show that Hammerfest samples had lower values of AVS than the other sediments. This was confirmed by the SEM/AVS analysis, highlighting the importance of

  11. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Background Antigen presenting cells (APCs) sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC) and three mouse H2-IA alleles. Results The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation between peptide data set obtained from different sources demonstrated that direct incorporation of peptide length potentially results in over-fitting of the binding prediction method. Focusing on amino terminal peptide flanking residues (PFR), we demonstrate a consistent gain in predictive performance by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic amino acids at most anchor positions, whereas the SMM-align method identifies a preference for hydrophobic or neutral amino acids at the anchors. Conclusion The SMM-align method was

  12. Relative resistance of the F-42-stabilized classical pathway C3 convertase to inactivation by C4-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Daha, M R; van Es, L A

    1980-11-01

    The sera of some patients with SLE contain an IgG antibody (F-42) directed against the classical pathway C3 convertase (C-42), which is capable of stabilizing C42 in a dose-dependent manner. The half-life (T 1/2) of C42 is prolonged by F-42. In order to determine whether C4-binding protein was capable of reversing stabilization of C42, stabilized and unstabilized cell-bound C42 were exposed to purified C4-bp and the convertase activity was assessed. C4-bp was capable of accelerating the decay of C42 in a dose-dependent manner; 2 microgram/ml C4-bp reduced the T 1/2 of C42 from 5 to 2.5 min at 30 degrees C. On the other hand, 16 microgram C4-bp could reverse stabilization of C42 by F-42 from T 1/2 = 78 min to a T 1/2 - 40 min; 128 microgram C4-bp reduced the T 1/2 of stabilized C42 to 4 min. Functional inactivation of C42 occurs via enhanced decay-dissociation of C2 from the convertase by C4-bp, as shown by the release of 125I-C2i from the cell-bound convertase. Stabilization of C42 by F-42 is caused by prevention of decay-dissociation of 125I-C2. F-42 was also capable of stabilizing C4oxy2 even further, as shown by prolongation of the T 1/2 of cell-bound C4 oxy2 to a T 1/2 of at least 300 min at 30 degrees C.

  13. Poly(A) binding protein C1 is essential for efficient L1 retrotransposition and affects L1 RNP formation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lixin; Taylor, Martin S; O'Donnell, Kathryn A; Boeke, Jef D

    2012-11-01

    Poly(A) binding proteins (PABPs) specifically bind the polyadenosine tail of mRNA and have been shown to be important for RNA polyadenylation, translation initiation, and mRNA stability. Using a modified L1 retrotransposition vector, we examined the effects of two PABPs (encoded by PABPN1 and PABPC1) on the retrotransposition activity of the L1 non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposon in both HeLa and HEK293T cells. We demonstrated that knockdown of these two genes by RNA interference (RNAi) effectively reduced L1 retrotransposition by 70 to 80% without significantly changing L1 transcription or translation or the status of the poly(A) tail. We identified that both poly(A) binding proteins were associated with the L1 ribonucleoprotein complex, presumably through L1 mRNA. Depletion of PABPC1 caused a defect in L1 RNP formation. Knockdown of the PABPC1 inhibitor PAIP2 increased L1 retrotransposition up to 2-fold. Low levels of exogenous overexpression of PABPN1 and PABPC1 increased L1 retrotransposition, whereas unregulated overexpression of these two proteins caused pleiotropic effects, such as hypersensitivity to puromycin and decreased L1 activity. Our data suggest that PABPC1 is essential for the formation of L1 RNA-protein complexes and may play a role in L1 RNP translocation in the host cell.

  14. Barbiturates Bind in the GLIC Ion Channel Pore and Cause Inhibition by Stabilizing a Closed State*♦

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Zaineb; Ruza, Reinis Reinholds; Laverty, Duncan; Drège, Emmanuelle; Delarue-Cochin, Sandrine; Joseph, Delphine; Koehl, Patrice; Smart, Trevor; Delarue, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Barbiturates induce anesthesia by modulating the activity of anionic and cationic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). Despite more than a century of use in clinical practice, the prototypic binding site for this class of drugs within pLGICs is yet to be described. In this study, we present the first X-ray structures of barbiturates bound to GLIC, a cationic prokaryotic pLGIC with excellent structural homology to other relevant channels sensitive to general anesthetics and, as shown here, to barbiturates, at clinically relevant concentrations. Several derivatives of barbiturates containing anomalous scatterers were synthesized, and these derivatives helped us unambiguously identify a unique barbiturate binding site within the central ion channel pore in a closed conformation. In addition, docking calculations around the observed binding site for all three states of the receptor, including a model of the desensitized state, showed that barbiturates preferentially stabilize the closed state. The identification of this pore binding site sheds light on the mechanism of barbiturate inhibition of cationic pLGICs and allows the rationalization of several structural and functional features previously observed for barbiturates. PMID:27986812

  15. Post-Biostimulation Biogenic U(IV) Stability and Microbial Community Structure that Affects its Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Long, P. E.; Moon, H.; N'Guessan, L.; Peacock, A.; Sinha, M.; Tan, H.; Traub, D.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Flow-through sediment column experiments were conducted to determine the stability of biogenic U(IV) after biostimulation has been discontinued, and to isolate the key biogeochemical processes that affect the post-biostimulation U(IV) stability. Columns, packed with sediments from an UMTRA site (Rifle Colorado) were biostimulated for two months by injecting groundwater containing 3 mM acetate and 20 uM U(VI) at flow rates typically encountered at the Rifle site. After the biostimulation period, acetate injection was discontinued, and groundwater containing dissolved oxygen was allowed to enter the columns. Columns were then sacrificed at two week intervals to examine the sediment geochemistry and associated microbial community. Results showed that iron sulfide precipitates, that formed during the bioreduction phase, acted as a buffer to partially prevent biogenic U(IV) oxidation during the month post stimulation period. Groundwater and sediment microbial community compositions were analyzed over a period of one month post-biostimulation. The results indicate that two distinct biological processes, characterized by oxygen utilization, played important roles during this period. Within two weeks post stimulation, organisms such as Hydrogenophaga sp. and Thiobacillus sp. were observed in the columns. These bacteria, are able to use Fe(II), sulfide, or thiosulfate as their electron donor in the presence of O2. Furthermore, organisms closely related to Lysobacter sp. and Sterolibacterium sp. were also detected in the groundwater and sediment. It was suggested that these organisms may be feeding on decaying biomass and consuming O2 in the process. The presence of these oxidizing and spoilage bacteria is thought to have resulted in the consumption of oxygen, therefore protecting the biogenic U(IV) from being reoxidized in the sediment columns. To simulate the in situ U(IV) stability under post biostimulation conditions, columns bioreduced in the laboratory, as described

  16. Rice LGD1 containing RNA binding activity affects growth and development through alternative promoters.

    PubMed

    Thangasamy, Saminathan; Chen, Pei-Wei; Lai, Ming-Hsing; Chen, Jychian; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2012-07-01

    Tiller initiation and panicle development are important agronomical traits for grain production in Oryza sativa L. (rice), but their regulatory mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this study, T-DNA mutant and RNAi transgenic approaches were used to functionally characterize a unique rice gene, LAGGING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 (LGD1). The lgd1 mutant showed slow growth, reduced tiller number and plant height, altered panicle architecture and reduced grain yield. The fewer unelongated internodes and cells in lgd1 led to respective reductions in tiller number and to semi-dwarfism. Several independent LGD1-RNAi lines exhibited defective phenotypes similar to those observed in lgd1. Interestingly, LGD1 encodes multiple transcripts with different transcription start sites (TSSs), which were validated by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Additionally, GUS assays and a luciferase promoter assay confirmed the promoter activities of LGD1.1 and LGD1.5. LGD1 encoding a von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain containing protein is a single gene in rice that is seemingly specific to grasses. GFP-tagged LGD1 isoforms were predominantly detected in the nucleus, and weakly in the cytoplasm. In vitro northwestern analysis showed the RNA-binding activity of the recombinant C-terminal LGD1 protein. Our results demonstrated that LGD1 pleiotropically regulated rice vegetative growth and development through both the distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns of its multiple transcripts and RNA binding activity. Hence, the study of LGD1 will strengthen our understanding of the molecular basis of the multiple transcripts, and their corresponding polypeptides with RNA binding activity, that regulate pleiotropic effects in rice.

  17. The Study of Stability of Compression-loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report under the NCC-1-233 research program (dated September 15, 1998; see Appendix 5) carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, NCCW-73, NCC-1-233 and NCCW 1-233 accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively. The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  18. Stability and Control Harmony in Approach and Landing. [analysis of factors affecting flight characteristics at low airspeeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. B.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the factors which affect stability and control harmony in approach and landing is made to obtain a clearer understanding of the proper relationship, the trade-offs involved, and to show how limits in stability and control harmony are established for advanced aircraft. Factors which influence stability and control harmony include the longitudinal short period response of the aircraft and the level of several pitch control characteristics including control power, control sensitivity, and control feel. At low stability levels for advanced aircraft, less conventional control techniques such as DLC are needed to improve harmony and some form of stability augmentation must be provided to improve precession of flight path control and reduce pilot work load.

  19. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  20. Dihydrotanshinone-I interferes with the RNA-binding activity of HuR affecting its post-transcriptional function

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Vito Giuseppe; Lal, Preet; Mantelli, Barbara; Tiedje, Christopher; Zucal, Chiara; Thongon, Natthakan; Gaestel, Matthias; Latorre, Elisa; Marinelli, Luciana; Seneci, Pierfausto; Amadio, Marialaura; Provenzani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is an essential determinant of gene expression programs in physiological and pathological conditions. HuR is a RNA-binding protein that orchestrates the stabilization and translation of mRNAs, critical in inflammation and tumor progression, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). We identified the low molecular weight compound 15,16-dihydrotanshinone-I (DHTS), well known in traditional Chinese medicine practice, through a validated high throughput screening on a set of anti-inflammatory agents for its ability to prevent HuR:RNA complex formation. We found that DHTS interferes with the association step between HuR and the RNA with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range in vitro (Ki = 3.74 ± 1.63 nM). In breast cancer cell lines, short term exposure to DHTS influences mRNA stability and translational efficiency of TNF in a HuR-dependent manner and also other functional readouts of its post-transcriptional control, such as the stability of selected pre-mRNAs. Importantly, we show that migration and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to DHTS are modulated by HuR expression, indicating that HuR is among the preferential intracellular targets of DHTS. Here, we disclose a previously unrecognized molecular mechanism exerted by DHTS, opening new perspectives to therapeutically target the HuR mediated, post-transcriptional control in inflammation and cancer cells. PMID:26553968

  1. Special AT-rich Binding Protein-2 (SATB2) Differentially Affects Disease-causing p63 Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jacky; Grant, R. Ian; Kaplan, David R.; Irwin, Meredith S.

    2011-01-01

    p63, a p53 family member, is critical for proper skin and limb development and directly regulates gene expression in the ectoderm. Mice lacking p63 exhibit skin and craniofacial defects including cleft palate. In humans p63 mutations are associated with several distinct developmental syndromes. p63 sterile-α-motif domain, AEC (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting)-associated mutations are associated with a high prevalence of orofacial clefting disorders, which are less common in EEC (ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting) patients with DNA binding domain p63 mutations. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations differentially influence p63 function remain unclear, and interactions with other proteins implicated in craniofacial development have not been identified. Here, we show that AEC p63 mutations affect the ability of the p63 protein to interact with special AT-rich binding protein-2 (SATB2), which has recently also been implicated in the development of cleft palate. p63 and SATB2 are co-expressed early in development in the ectoderm of the first and second branchial arches, two essential sites where signaling is required for craniofacial patterning. SATB2 attenuates p63-mediated gene expression of perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22), a critical downstream target gene during development, and specifically decreases p63 perp promoter binding. Interestingly, AEC but not EEC p63 mutations affect the ability of p63 to interact with SATB2 and the inhibitory effects of SATB2 on p63 transactivation of perp are most pronounced for AEC-associated p63 mutations. Our findings reveal a novel gain-of-function property of AEC-causing p63 mutations and identify SATB2 as the first p63 binding partner that differentially influences AEC and EEC p63 mutant proteins. PMID:21965674

  2. How hormone receptor-DNA binding affects nucleosomal DNA: the role of symmetry.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, T C; Kosztin, D; Schulten, K

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to determine the optimal conformation of an estrogen receptor DNA binding domain dimer bound to a consensus response element, ds(AGGTCACAGTGACCT), and to a nonconsensus response element, ds(AGAACACAGTGACCT). The structures simulated were derived from a crystallographic structure and solvated by a sphere (45-A radius) of explicit water and counterions. Long-range electrostatic interactions were accounted for during 100-ps simulations by means of a fast multipole expansion algorithm combined with a multiple time-step scheme in the molecular dynamics package NAMD. The simulations demonstrate that the dimer induces a bent and underwound (10.7 bp/turn) conformation in the DNA. The bending reflects the dyad symmetry of the receptor dimer and can be described as an S-shaped curve in the helical axis of DNA when projected onto a plane. A similar bent and underwound conformation is observed for nucleosomal DNA near the nucleosome's dyad axis that reflects the symmetry of the histone octamer. We propose that when a receptor dimer binds to a nucleosome, the most favorable dimer-DNA and histone-DNA interactions are achieved if the respective symmetry axes are aligned. Such positioning of a receptor dimer over the dyad of nucleosome B in the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter is in agreement with experiment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 PMID:9129808

  3. Mutations that affect coenzyme binding and dimer formation of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Brunskole, Mojca; Kristan, Katja; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2009-03-25

    The 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl) is an NADPH-dependent member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, and it functions as a dimer that is composed of two identical subunits. By constructing the appropriate mutants, we have examined the M204 residue that is situated in the coenzyme binding pocket, for its role in the binding of the coenzyme NADP(H). We have also studied the importance of hydrophobic interactions through F124, F132, F133 and F177 for 17beta-HSDcl dimer formation. The M204G substitution decreased the catalytic efficiency of 17beta-HSDcl, suggesting that M204 sterically coerces the nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme into the appropriate position for further hydride transfer. Phenylalanine substitutions introduced at the dimer interface produced inactive aggregates and oligomers with high molecular masses, suggesting that these hydrophobic interactions have important roles in the formation of the active dimer.

  4. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  5. Factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide; fenoterol hydrobromide pressurized-metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ninbovorl, Jenjira; Sawatdee, Somchai; Srichana, Teerapol

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide and fenoterol hydrobromide in a pressurized-metered dose inhaler (pMDI). A factorial design was applied to investigate the effects of three parameters (propellant, water, and ethanol) on the performance of 27 designed formulations of a solution-based pMDI. The formulations that contained a hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant lower than 72% v/v and an ethanol concentration higher than 27% v/v remained as clear solutions. Nine formulations that contained the HFA propellant higher than 74% v/v precipitated. The results indicated that it was not only the HFA propellant content of the formulations that was related to the formulation instability but also ethanol content. Only six formulations from the 18 formulations, that did not precipitate, produced drug contents that were within the acceptable range (80-120%). These six formulations generated aerosols with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of approximately 2 μm with a fine particle fraction (FPF; particle size, <6.4 μm) between 45% and 52%. The MMAD and FPF did not change significantly after 6 months of storage (P > 0.05).

  6. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions.

  7. Ca2+-stabilized adhesin helps an Antarctic bacterium reach out and bind ice.

    PubMed

    Vance, Tyler D R; Olijve, Luuk L C; Campbell, Robert L; Voets, Ilja K; Davies, Peter L; Guo, Shuaiqi

    2014-07-04

    The large size of a 1.5-MDa ice-binding adhesin [MpAFP (Marinomonas primoryensis antifreeze protein)] from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, M. primoryensis, is mainly due to its highly repetitive RII (Region II). MpAFP_RII contains roughly 120 tandem copies of an identical 104-residue repeat. We have previously determined that a single RII repeat folds as a Ca2+-dependent immunoglobulin-like domain. Here, we solved the crystal structure of RII tetra-tandemer (four tandem RII repeats) to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The RII tetra-tandemer reveals an extended (~190-Å × ~25-Å), rod-like structure with four RII-repeats aligned in series with each other. The inter-repeat regions of the RII tetra-tandemer are strengthened by Ca2+ bound to acidic residues. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) profiles indicate the RII tetra-tandemer is significantly rigidified upon Ca2+ binding, and that the protein's solution structure is in excellent agreement with its crystal structure. We hypothesize that >600 Ca2+ help rigidify the chain of ~120 104-residue repeats to form a ~0.6 μm rod-like structure in order to project the ice-binding domain of MpAFP away from the bacterial cell surface. The proposed extender role of RII can help the strictly aerobic, motile bacterium bind ice in the upper reaches of the Antarctic lake where oxygen and nutrients are most abundant. Ca2+-induced rigidity of tandem Ig-like repeats in large adhesins might be a general mechanism used by bacteria to bind to their substrates and help colonize specific niches.

  8. Metal ions in sugar binding, sugar specificity and structural stability of Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Joseph; Dileep, Kalarickal Vijayan; Palanimuthu, Muthusamy; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkotu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakath

    2013-08-01

    Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin (SPL) is a heterotetrameric lectin, with two α and two β monomers. In the crystal structure of SPL α monomer, two residues at positions 240 and 241 are missing. This region was modeled based on the positional and sequence similarities. The role of metal ions in SPL structure was analyzed by 10 ns molecular dynamics simulation. MD simulations were performed in the presence and absence of metal ions to explain the loss of haemagglutinating property of the lectin due to demetallization. Demetallized structure was found to deviate drastically at the metal binding loop region. Affinity of different sugars like N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc), D-galactose and lactose towards the native and demetallized protein was calculated by molecular docking studies. It was found that the sugar binding site got severely distorted in demetallized lectin. Consequently, sugar binding ability of lectin might be decreasing in the demetallized condition. Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis of the sugars in the presence of native and demetallized protein confirmed the in silico results. It was observed after molecular dynamics simulations, that significant structural deviations were not caused in the quaternary structure of demetallized lectin. It was confirmed that the structural changes modified the sugar binding ability, as well as sugar specificity of the present lectin. The role of metal ions in sugar binding is described based on the in silico studies and ITC analysis. A comprehensive analysis of the ITC data suggests that the sugar specificity of the metal bound lectin and the loss of sugar specificity due to metal chelation are not linear.

  9. Ca2+-stabilized adhesin helps an Antarctic bacterium reach out and bind ice

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Tyler D. R.; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Campbell, Robert L.; Voets, Ilja K.; Davies, Peter L.; Guo, Shuaiqi

    2014-01-01

    The large size of a 1.5-MDa ice-binding adhesin [MpAFP (Marinomonas primoryensis antifreeze protein)] from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, M. primoryensis, is mainly due to its highly repetitive RII (Region II). MpAFP_RII contains roughly 120 tandem copies of an identical 104-residue repeat. We have previously determined that a single RII repeat folds as a Ca2+-dependent immunoglobulin-like domain. Here, we solved the crystal structure of RII tetra-tandemer (four tandem RII repeats) to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The RII tetra-tandemer reveals an extended (~190-Å × ~25-Å), rod-like structure with four RII-repeats aligned in series with each other. The inter-repeat regions of the RII tetra-tandemer are strengthened by Ca2+ bound to acidic residues. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) profiles indicate the RII tetra-tandemer is significantly rigidified upon Ca2+ binding, and that the protein's solution structure is in excellent agreement with its crystal structure. We hypothesize that >600 Ca2+ help rigidify the chain of ~120 104-residue repeats to form a ~0.6 μm rod-like structure in order to project the ice-binding domain of MpAFP away from the bacterial cell surface. The proposed extender role of RII can help the strictly aerobic, motile bacterium bind ice in the upper reaches of the Antarctic lake where oxygen and nutrients are most abundant. Ca2+-induced rigidity of tandem Ig-like repeats in large adhesins might be a general mechanism used by bacteria to bind to their substrates and help colonize specific niches. PMID:24892750

  10. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  11. TANK-binding kinase-1 broadly affects oyster immune response to bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xueying; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-09-01

    As a benthic filter feeder of estuaries, the immune system of oysters provides one of the best models for studying the genetic and molecular basis of the innate immune pathway in marine invertebrates and examining the influence of environmental factors on the immune system. Here, the molecular function of molluscan TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1) (which we named CgTBK1) was studied in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Compared with known TBK1 proteins in other model organisms, CgTBK1 contains a conserved S-TKc domain and a coiled coil domain at the N- and C-terminals but lacks an important ubiquitin domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of CgTBK1 was ubiquitous in all selected tissues, with highest expression in the gills. CgTBK1 expression was significantly upregulated in response to infections with Vibrio alginolyticus, ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 reference strain and μvar), and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid sodium salt, suggesting its broad function in immune response. Subcellular localization showed the presence of CgTBK1 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells, suggesting its potential function as the signal transducer between the receptor and transcription factor. We further demonstrated that CgTBK1 interacted with CgSTING in HEK293T cells, providing evidence that CgTBK1 could be activated by direct binding to CgSTING. In summary, we characterized the TBK1 gene in C. gigas and demonstrated its role in the innate immune response to pathogen infections.

  12. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L; Granas, David M; Dutcher, Susan K

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating.

  13. Cavity filling mutations at the thyroxine-binding site dramatically increase transthyretin stability and prevent its aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Varejāo, Nathalia; Gallego, Pablo; Esperante, Sebastian; Ferreira, Priscila; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Palhano, Fernando L.; de Carvalho, Mamede; Foguel, Debora; Reverter, David; Saraiva, Maria João; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    More than a hundred different Transthyretin (TTR) mutations are associated with fatal systemic amyloidoses. They destabilize the protein tetrameric structure and promote the extracellular deposition of TTR as pathological amyloid fibrils. So far, only mutations R104H and T119M have been shown to stabilize significantly TTR, acting as disease suppressors. We describe a novel A108V non-pathogenic mutation found in a Portuguese subject. This variant is more stable than wild type TTR both in vitro and in human plasma, a feature that prevents its aggregation. The crystal structure of A108V reveals that this stabilization comes from novel intra and inter subunit contacts involving the thyroxine (T4) binding site. Exploiting this observation, we engineered a A108I mutation that fills the T4 binding cavity, as evidenced in the crystal structure. This synthetic protein becomes one of the most stable TTR variants described so far, with potential application in gene and protein replacement therapies. PMID:28338000

  14. Glutamine synthetase stabilizes the binding of GlnR to nitrogen fixation gene operators.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Gabriela de C; Hauf, Ksenia; Sant'Anna, Fernando H; Forchhammer, Karl; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2017-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a high energy demanding process carried out by diazotrophic microorganisms that supply combined nitrogen to the biosphere. The genes related to BNF are strictly regulated, but these mechanisms are poorly understood in gram-positive bacteria. The transcription factor GlnR was proposed to regulate nitrogen fixation-related genes based on Paenibacillus comparative genomics. In order to validate this proposal, we investigated BNF regulatory sequences in Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T) genome. We identified GlnR-binding sites flanking σ(A) -binding sites upstream from BNF-related genes. GlnR binding to these sites was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. GlnR-DNA affinity is greatly enhanced when GlnR is in complex with feedback-inhibited (glutamine-occupied) glutamine synthetase (GS). GlnR-GS complex formation is also modulated by ATP and AMP. Thereby, gene repression exerted by the GlnR-GS complex is coupled with nitrogen (glutamine levels) and energetic status (ATP and AMP). Finally, we propose a DNA-looping model based on multiple operator sites that represents a strong and strict regulation for these genes.

  15. Stabilization of an α/β-Hydrolase by Introducing Proline Residues: Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 from Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Jones, Bryan J; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2015-07-21

    α/β-Hydrolases are important enzymes for biocatalysis, but their stability often limits their application. We investigated a plant esterase, salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2), as a model α/β-hydrolase. SABP2 shows typical stability to urea (unfolding free energy 6.9 ± 1.5 kcal/mol) and to heat inactivation (T1/2 15min 49.2 ± 0.5 °C). Denaturation in urea occurs in two steps, but heat inactivation occurs in a single step. The first unfolding step in urea eliminates catalytic activity. Surprisingly, we found that the first unfolding likely corresponds to the unfolding of the larger catalytic domain. Replacing selected amino acid residues with proline stabilized SABP2. Proline restricts the flexibility of the unfolded protein, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the folded conformation. Seven locations for proline substitution were chosen either by amino acid sequence alignment with a more stable homologue or by targeting flexible regions in SABP2. Introducing proline in the catalytic domain stabilized SABP2 to the first unfolding in urea for three of five cases: L46P (+0.2 M urea), S70P (+0.1), and E215P (+0.9). Introducing proline in the cap domain did not stabilize SABP2 (two of two cases), supporting the assignment that the first unfolding corresponds to the catalytic domain. Proline substitutions in both domains stabilized SABP2 to heat inactivation: L46P (ΔT1/2 15min = +6.4 °C), S70P (+5.4), S115P (+1.8), S141P (+4.9), and E215P (+4.2). Combining substitutions did not further increase the stability to urea denaturation, but dramatically increased resistance to heat inactivation: L46P−S70P ΔT1/2 15min = +25.7 °C. This straightforward proline substitution approach may also stabilize other α/β-hydrolases.

  16. Coumarin-chalcone hybrid instigates DNA damage by minor groove binding and stabilizes p53 through post translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Raghib; Hamidullah; Hasanain, Mohammad; Pandey, Praveen; Maheshwari, Mayank; Singh, L. Ravithej; Siddiqui, M. Quadir; Konwar, Rituraj; Sashidhara, Koneni V.; Sarkar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    S009-131, a coumarin-chalcone hybrid, had been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-tumour effect by triggering apoptosis. In this report, we investigated role of DNA damage signalling pathway in S009-131 induced cancer cell death. Here we show that S009-131 causes DNA damage by potential binding to the minor groove which led to the phosphorylation and activation of ATM and DNA-PK, but not ATR, at earlier time points in order to initiate repair process. S009-131 induced DNA damage response triggered activation of p53 through phosphorylation at its key residues. Pharmacological inhibition of PIKKs abrogated S009-131 induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser 15. DNA damage induced phosphorylation resulted in reduced proteasomal degradation of p53 by disrupting p53-MDM2 interaction. Additionally, our docking studies revealed that S009-131 might also contribute to increased cellular p53 level by occupying p53 binding pocket of MDM2. Posttranslational modifications of p53 upon S009-131 treatment led to enhanced affinity of p53 towards responsive elements (p53-RE) in the promoter regions of target genes and increased transcriptional efficiency. Together, the results suggest that S009-131 cleaves DNA through minor groove binding and eventually activates PIKKs associated DNA damage response signalling to promote stabilization and enhanced transcriptional activity of p53 through posttranslational modifications at key residues. PMID:28349922

  17. The human liver fatty acid binding protein T94A variant alters the structure, stability, and interaction with fibrates.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-12-23

    Although the human liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in the complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to that seen with L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using the recombinant human wild-type (WT) T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Nonconservative replacement of the medium-sized, polar, uncharged T residue with a smaller, nonpolar, aliphatic A residue at position 94 of the human L-FABP significantly increased the L-FABP α-helical structure content at the expense of β-sheet content and concomitantly decreased the thermal stability. T94A did not alter the binding affinities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist ligands (phytanic acid, fenofibrate, and fenofibric acid). While T94A did not alter the impact of phytanic acid and only slightly altered that of fenofibrate on the human L-FABP secondary structure, the active metabolite fenofibric acid altered the T94A secondary structure much more than that of the WT T94T L-FABP. Finally, in cultured primary human hepatocytes, the T94A variant exhibited a significantly reduced extent of fibrate-mediated induction of PPARα-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, FATP5, and PPARα itself. Thus, while the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of the human L-FABP for PPARα agonist ligands, it significantly altered the human L-FABP structure, stability, and conformational and functional response to fibrate.

  18. Factors affecting the stability of the performance of ambient fine-particle concentrators.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Sioutas, C; Chang, M C; Gong, H

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a systematic evaluation of factors affecting the stability of the performance of Harvard ambient fine-particle concentrators, an essential requirement for controlled animal and human exposure studies that utilize these technologies. Phenomenological problems during the operation of the concentrator, including pressure drop increase and decrease in concentration enrichment, were statistically correlated with ambient air parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, PM2.5 mass concentration, and mass median diameter. The normalized hourly pressure drop across the concentrator was strongly associated (R2 = .81) with the product of ambient PM2.5 mass concentration and the difference between the vapor pressure downstream of the impactor nozzle and the saturation vapor pressure at the adiabatic expansion temperature (i.e., the temperature of the aerosol immediately downstream of the virtual impactors). From multiple regression analysis, the average enrichment factor was predicted reasonably well (R2 = .67) by aerosol mass median diameter and the normalized hourly pressure drop. Based on these results, we can anticipate in any given day whether an exposure study can be conducted without a considerable increase in the concentrator pressure drop, which might lead to an abrupt or premature termination of the exposure. As particle mass concentration and ambient dewpoint are the two main parameters responsible for raising the pressure drop across the concentrator, efforts should be made to either desiccate the ambient aerosol at days of high dewpoints, or to dilute the ambient PM at days of high concentrations, prior to drawing the aerosol through the virtual impactors. The latter approach is recommended on days of severe ambient pollution conditions because it is simpler and also makes it possible to maintain the appropriate concentration level delivered to the exposure chamber.

  19. Developmental changes affecting lectin binding in the vomeronasal organ of domestic pigs, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Park, Junwoo; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Chanwoo; Kim, Hwangryong; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Shin, Taekyun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the developmental changes of glycoconjugate patterns in the porcine vomeronasal organs (VNOs) and associated glands (Jacobson's glands) from prenatal (9 weeks of gestation) and postnatal (2 days after birth) to the sexually mature stage (6 months old). The VNO of pigs (Sus scrofa) was examined using the following: Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin isolectin B4 (BSI-B4), Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). At the fetal stage, all lectins examined were detected mainly in the free border of the vomeronasal epithelium, but few (WGA and UEA-I) and or absent in the VNO cell bodies. At the postnatal and sexually mature stages, the reactivity of some lectins, including WGA, UEA-I, DBA and SBA, were shown to increase in the VNO sensory epithelium as well as the free border. The increased reactivity of lectins as development progressed was also observed in Jacobson's gland acini. These findings suggest that binding sites of lectins, including those of WGA, UEA-I, DBA, and SBA, increase during development from fetal to postnatal growth, possibly contributing to the increased ability of chemoreception in the pig.

  20. Starch-binding domain affects catalysis in two Lactobacillus alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in alpha-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus alpha-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities.

  1. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease.

  2. A functional MiR-124 binding-site polymorphism in IQGAP1 affects human cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Rui; Li, Ming; Wu, Xujun; Wang, Jianhong; Huang, Lin; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Qingwei; Su, Bing

    2014-01-01

    As a product of the unique evolution of the human brain, human cognitive performance is largely a collection of heritable traits. Rather surprisingly, to date there have been no reported cases to highlight genes that underwent adaptive evolution in humans and which carry polymorphisms that have a marked effect on cognitive performance. IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), a scaffold protein, affects learning and memory in a dose-dependent manner. Its expression is regulated by miR-124 through the binding sites in the 3'UTR, where a SNP (rs1042538) exists in the core-binding motif. Here we showed that this SNP can influence the miR-target interaction both in vitro and in vivo. Individuals carrying the derived T alleles have higher IQGAP1 expression in the brain as compared to the ancestral A allele carriers. We observed a significant and male-specific association between rs1042538 and tactile performances in two independent cohorts. Males with the derived allele displayed higher tactual performances as compared to those with the ancestral allele. Furthermore, we found a highly diverged allele-frequency distribution of rs1042538 among world human populations, likely caused by natural selection and/or recent population expansion. These results suggest that current human populations still carry sequence variations that affect cognitive performances and that these genetic variants may likely have been subject to comparatively recent natural selection.

  3. Ultraviolet irradiation of diacetylenic liposomes as a strategy to improve size stability and to alter protein binding without cytotoxicity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Temprana, C Facundo; Amor, M Silvia; Femia, A Lis; Gasparri, Julieta; Taira, M Cristina; del Valle Alonso, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Membrane-modification effects, induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in diacetylenic liposomes, were analyzed upon contact with cells, biological membranes, and proteins. Liposomes formulated with mixtures of unsaturated 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and saturated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in a 1:1 molar ratio, were compared with those that were UV-irradiated and analyzed in several aspects. Membrane polymerization inherence on size stability was studied as well as its impact on mitochondrial and microsomal membrane peroxidation induction, hemolytic activity, and cell viability. Moreover, in order to gain insight about the possible irradiation effect on interfacial membrane properties, interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lyso), and apolipoprotein (apoA-I) was studied. Improved size stability was found for polymerized liposomes after a period of 30 days at 4°C. In addition, membrane irradiation had no marked effect on cell viability, hemolysis, or induction of microsomal and mitochondrial membrane peroxidation. Interfacial membrane characteristics were found to be altered after polymerization, since a differential protein binding for polymerized or nonpolymerized membranes was observed for BSA and Lyso, but not for apoA-I. The substantial contribution of this work is the finding that even when maintaining the same lipid composition, changes induced by UV irradiation are sufficient to increase size stability and establish differences in protein binding, in particular, reducing the amount of bound Lyso and BSA, without increasing formulation cytotoxicity. This work aimed at showing that the usage of diacetylenic lipids and UV modification of membrane interfacial properties should be strategies to be taken into consideration when designing new delivery systems.

  4. Combining Structural Modeling with Ensemble Machine Learning to Accurately Predict Protein Fold Stability and Binding Affinity Effects upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Lopez, Sebastian; Kim, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing have led to a rapid accumulation of mutations, some of which are associated with diseases. However, to draw mechanistic conclusions, a biochemical understanding of these mutations is necessary. For coding mutations, accurate prediction of significant changes in either the stability of proteins or their affinity to their binding partners is required. Traditional methods have used semi-empirical force fields, while newer methods employ machine learning of sequence and structural features. Here, we show how combining both of these approaches leads to a marked boost in accuracy. We introduce ELASPIC, a novel ensemble machine learning approach that is able to predict stability effects upon mutation in both, domain cores and domain-domain interfaces. We combine semi-empirical energy terms, sequence conservation, and a wide variety of molecular details with a Stochastic Gradient Boosting of Decision Trees (SGB-DT) algorithm. The accuracy of our predictions surpasses existing methods by a considerable margin, achieving correlation coefficients of 0.77 for stability, and 0.75 for affinity predictions. Notably, we integrated homology modeling to enable proteome-wide prediction and show that accurate prediction on modeled structures is possible. Lastly, ELASPIC showed significant differences between various types of disease-associated mutations, as well as between disease and common neutral mutations. Unlike pure sequence-based prediction methods that try to predict phenotypic effects of mutations, our predictions unravel the molecular details governing the protein instability, and help us better understand the molecular causes of diseases. PMID:25243403

  5. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    PubMed

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-02

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  6. Size-dependent stability toward dissociation and ligand binding energies of phosphine-ligated gold cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The stability of sub-nanometer size gold clusters ligated with organic molecules is of paramount importance to the scalable synthesis of monodisperse size-selected metal clusters with highly tunable chemical and physical properties. For the first time, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) equipped with surface induced dissociation (SID) has been employed to investigate the time and collision energy resolved fragmentation behavior of cationic doubly charged gold clusters containing 7-9 gold atoms and 6-7 triphenylphosphine (TPP) ligands prepared by reduction synthesis in solution. The TPP ligated gold clusters are demonstrated to fragment through three primary dissociation pathways: (1) Loss of a neutral TPP ligand from the precursor gold cluster, (2) asymmetric fission and (3) symmetric fission and charge separation of the gold core resulting in formation of complementary pairs of singly charged fragment ions. Threshold energies and activation entropies of these fragmentation pathways have been determined employing Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental SID data. It is demonstrated that the doubly charged cluster ion containing eight gold atoms and six TPP ligands, (8,6)2+, exhibits exceptional stability compared to the other cationic gold clusters examined in this study due to its large ligand binding energy of 1.76 eV. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic effect of the size and extent of ligation on the gas-phase stability and preferred fragmentation pathways of small TPP-ligated gold clusters.

  7. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  8. Soil-Structural Stability as Affected by Clay Mineralogy, Soil Texture and Polyacrylamide Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil-structural stability (expressed in terms of aggregate stability and pore size distribution) depends on (i) soil inherent properties, (ii) extrinsic condition prevailing in the soil that may vary temporally and spatially, and (iii) addition of soil amendments. Different soil management practices...

  9. Interaction Signatures Stabilizing the NAD(P)-Binding Rossmann Fold: A Structure Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Upadhyay, Roopali; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    The fidelity of the folding pathways being encoded in the amino acid sequence is met with challenge in instances where proteins with no sequence homology, performing different functions and no apparent evolutionary linkage, adopt a similar fold. The problem stated otherwise is that a limited fold space is available to a repertoire of diverse sequences. The key question is what factors lead to the formation of a fold from diverse sequences. Here, with the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold domains as a case study and using the concepts of network theory, we have unveiled the consensus structural features that drive the formation of this fold. We have proposed a graph theoretic formalism to capture the structural details in terms of the conserved atomic interactions in global milieu, and hence extract the essential topological features from diverse sequences. A unified mathematical representation of the different structures together with a judicious concoction of several network parameters enabled us to probe into the structural features driving the adoption of the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold. The atomic interactions at key positions seem to be better conserved in proteins, as compared to the residues participating in these interactions. We propose a “spatial motif” and several “fold specific hot spots” that form the signature structural blueprints of the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann fold domain. Excellent agreement of our data with previous experimental and theoretical studies validates the robustness and validity of the approach. Additionally, comparison of our results with statistical coupling analysis (SCA) provides further support. The methodology proposed here is general and can be applied to similar problems of interest. PMID:23284738

  10. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, J H

    1988-01-01

    Researchers in Utrecht, the Netherlands have studied the effects of different factors, such as oral contraceptives (OCs), on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in blood. The SHBG levels in women who continuously used OCs consisting only of .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) rose as high as 260% + or - 25% of those in women not using OCs. Further, mean SHBG levels of women using combination OCs of EE2 and levonorgestrel were 10-60% higher than women not using OCs. SHBG levels were significantly higher than the use of a sequential OC containing decreasing amounts of EE2 and increasing amounts of levonorgestrel than those cause by use of a continuous combined OC with .03 mg and .15 mg respectively. As the dosage of EE2 increased in combination OCs with 2.5 mg lynestrenol, the SHBG increased from 20% (.05 mg EE2) to 150% (.75 mg EE2). SHBG levels after taking EE2 and cyproterone acetate increased significantly more (240%) than levels after EE2 and desogestrel (170%), or after EE2 and gestoden (140%) [p.001]. SHBG levels of women who took OCs containing only .03 mg of levonorgestrel daily decreased 35% (p.01). These levels fell by 30% in women who received 150 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate intramuscularly every 3 months (p.001). SHBG concentrations increased when estrogens were taken orally for noncontraceptive purposes, but they did not change when they were administered percutaneously. As body weight increased the SHBG levels decreased despite hormonal status or sex. Further, the lower the fat content of one's diet the higher the SHBG levels and vice versa. SHBG levels are higher in males with flaccid lungs than they are in males with healthy lungs.

  11. Stabilization of an α/β-hydrolase by introducing proline residues: salicylic binding protein 2 from tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Jones, Bryan J.; Kazlauskas, Romas J.

    2015-01-01

    α/β-Hydrolases are important enzymes for biocatalysis, but their stability often limits their application. As a model α/β-hydrolase, we investigated a plant esterase, salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 shows typical stability to urea (unfolding free energy 6.9±1.5 kcal/mol) and to heat inactivation (T1/215 min 49.2±0.5 °C). Denaturation in urea occurs in two steps, but heat inactivation occurs in a single step. The first unfolding step in urea eliminates catalytic activity. Surprisingly, we found that the first unfolding likely corresponds to the unfolding of the larger catalytic domain. Replacing selected amino acid residues with proline stabilized SABP2. Proline restricts the flexibility of the unfolded protein, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the folded conformation. Seven locations for proline substitution were chosen either by amino acid sequence alignment with a more stable homolog or by targeting flexible regions in SABP2. Introducing proline in the catalytic domain stabilized SABP2 to the first unfolding in urea for three of five cases: L46P (+0.2 M urea), S70P (+0.1) and E215P (+0.9). Introducing proline in the cap domain did not (two of two cases), supporting the assignment that the first unfolding corresponds to the catalytic domain. Proline substitutions in both domains stabilized SABP2 to heat inactivation: L46P (ΔT1/215 min = +6.4 °C), S70P (+5.4), S115P (+1.8), S141P (+4.9), and E215P (+4.2). Combining substitutions did not further increase the stability to urea denaturation, but dramatically increased resistance to heat inactivation: L46P-S70P ΔT1/215 min = +25.7 °C. This straightforward proline substitution approach may also stabilize other α/β-hydrolases. PMID:26110207

  12. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Lam, Chan V; Leysen, Seppe F R; Meijer, Femke A; van Scheppingen, Daphne S; de Vries, Rens M J M; Carlile, Graeme W; Milroy, Lech G; Thomas, David Y; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein-protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3-CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics.

  13. Effect of lysine modification on the stability and cellular binding of human amyloidogenic light chains.

    PubMed

    Davern, S; Murphy, C L; O'Neill, H; Wall, J S; Weiss, D T; Solomon, A

    2011-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is characterized by the pathologic deposition as fibrils of monoclonal light chains (i.e., Bence Jones proteins [BJPs]) in particular organs and tissues. This phenomenon has been attributed to the presence in amyloidogenic proteins of particular amino acids that cause these molecules to become unstable, as well as post-translational modifications and, in regard to the latter, we have investigated the effect of biotinylation of lysyl residues on cell binding. We utilized an experimental system designed to test if BJPs obtained from patients with AL amyloidosis or, as a control, multiple myeloma (MM), bound human fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells. As documented by fluorescence microscopy and ELISA, the amyloidogenic BJPs, as compared with MM components, bound preferentially and this reactivity increased significantly after chemical modification of their lysyl residues with sulfo-NHS-biotin. Further, based on tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism data, it was apparent that their conformation was altered, which we hypothesize exposed a binding site not accessible on the native protein. The results of our studies indicate that post-translational structural modifications of pathologic light chains can enhance their capacity for cellular interaction and thus may contribute to the pathogenesis of AL amyloidosis and multiple myeloma.

  14. Effect of Lysine Modification on the Stability and Cellular Binding of Human Amyloidogenic Light Chains

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Davern, Sandra M.; Murphy, Charles L.; Wall, Jonathan; Deborah, Weiss T.; Solomon, Alan

    2011-01-01

    AL amyloidosis is characterized by the pathologic deposition as fibrils of monoclonal light chains (i.e., Bence Jones proteins [BJPs]) in particular organs and tissues. This phenomenon has been attributed to the presence in amyloidogenic proteins of particular amino acids that cause these molecules to become unstable, as well as post-translational modifications and, in regard to the latter, we have investigated the effect of biotinylation of lysyl residues on cell binding. We utilized an experimental system designed to test if BJPs obtained from patients with AL amyloidosis or, as a control, multiple myeloma (MM), bound human fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells. As documented by fluorescent microscopy and ELISA, the amyloidogenic BJPs, as compared with MM components, bound preferentially and this reactivity increased significantly after chemical modification of their lysyl residues with sulfo-NHS-biotin. Further, based on tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichorism data, it was apparent that their conformation was altered, which we hypothesize exposed a binding site not accessible on the native protein. The results of our studies indicate that post-translational structural modifications of pathologic light chains can enhance their capacity for cellular interaction and thus may contribute to the pathogenesis of AL amyloidosis and multiple myeloma.

  15. Binding of Alkyl Polyglucoside Surfactants to Bacteriorhodopsin and its Relation to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Lenhoff, Abraham M.; Kaler, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    The binding of alkyl polyglucoside surfactants to the integral membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the formation of protein-surfactant complexes are investigated by sedimentation equilibrium via analytical ultracentrifugation and by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Contrast variation techniques in SANS enable measurement of the composition of the protein-surfactant complexes and determination of the thickness of the surfactant shell bound to the protein. The results indicate that alkyl polyglucosides can bind to BR as single surfactant layers or as a thicker shell. The thickness of the surfactant shell increases with increasing surfactant tail length, and it is generally unrelated to the aggregation number of the micelles even for a small and predominantly hydrophobic membrane protein such as BR. The aggregation numbers determined by sedimentation equilibrium methods match those measured by SANS, which also allows reconstruction of the shape of the protein-detergent complex. When the surfactant is present as a single layer, the BR loses activity, as measured by absorption spectroscopy, more quickly than it does when the surfactant forms a thicker shell. PMID:18234822

  16. Binding of alkyl polyglucoside surfactants to bacteriorhodopsin and its relation to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Santonicola, M Gabriella; Lenhoff, Abraham M; Kaler, Eric W

    2008-05-01

    The binding of alkyl polyglucoside surfactants to the integral membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the formation of protein-surfactant complexes are investigated by sedimentation equilibrium via analytical ultracentrifugation and by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Contrast variation techniques in SANS enable measurement of the composition of the protein-surfactant complexes and determination of the thickness of the surfactant shell bound to the protein. The results indicate that alkyl polyglucosides can bind to BR as single surfactant layers or as a thicker shell. The thickness of the surfactant shell increases with increasing surfactant tail length, and it is generally unrelated to the aggregation number of the micelles even for a small and predominantly hydrophobic membrane protein such as BR. The aggregation numbers determined by sedimentation equilibrium methods match those measured by SANS, which also allows reconstruction of the shape of the protein-detergent complex. When the surfactant is present as a single layer, the BR loses activity, as measured by absorption spectroscopy, more quickly than it does when the surfactant forms a thicker shell.

  17. Unconventional miR-122 binding stabilizes the HCV genome by forming a trimolecular RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Stefanie A; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) typically downregulate protein expression from target mRNAs through limited base-pairing interactions between the 5' 'seed' region of the miRNA and the mRNA 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). In contrast to this established mode of action, the liver-specific human miR-122 binds at two sites within the hepatitis C viral (HCV) 5'UTR, leading to increased production of infectious virions. We show here that two copies of miR-122 interact with the HCV 5'UTR at partially overlapping positions near the 5' end of the viral transcript to form a stable ternary complex. Both miR-122 binding sites involve extensive base pairing outside of the seed sequence; yet, they have substantially different interaction affinities. Structural probing reveals changes in the architecture of the HCV 5'UTR that occur on interaction with miR-122. In contrast to previous reports, however, results using both the recombinant cytoplasmic exonuclease Xrn1 and liver cell extracts show that miR-122-mediated protection of the HCV RNA from degradation does not correlate with stimulation of viral propagation in vivo. Thus, the miR-122:HCV ternary complex likely functions at other steps critical to the viral life cycle.

  18. Post-translational phosphorylation affects the IgE binding capacity of caseins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, H; Meisel, H; Creminon, C; Wal, J M

    2000-02-11

    IgE response specific to those molecular regions of casein that contain a major phosphorylation site was analyzed using native and modified caseins and derived peptides. This study included (i) the naturally occurring common variants A1 and A from beta- and alphas2-caseins, respectively, which were purified in the native form and then dephosphorylated, (ii) a purified rare variant D of alphas2-casein which lacks one major phosphorylation site, and (iii) the native and dephosphorylated tryptic fragment f(1-25) from beta-casein. Direct and indirect ELISA using sera from patients allergic to milk showed that the IgE response to caseins is affected by modifying or eliminating the major phosphorylation site.

  19. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. The ties that bind: perceived social support, stress, and IBS in severely affected patients

    PubMed Central

    LACKNER, J. M.; BRASEL, A. M.; QUIGLEY, B M.; KEEFER, L.; KRASNER, S. S.; POWELL, C.; KATZ, L. A.; SITRIN, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the association between social support and the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in a sample of severely affected IBS patients recruited to an NIH-funded clinical trial. In addition, we examined if the effects of social support on IBS pain are mediated through the effects on stress. Methods Subjects were 105 Rome II diagnosed IBS patients (F = 85%) who completed seven questionnaires which were collected as part of a pretreatment baseline assessment. Key Results Partial correlations were conducted to clarify the relationships between social support and clinically relevant variables with baseline levels of psychopathology, holding constant number of comorbid medical diseases, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, and education. Analyses indicated that social support was inversely related to IBS symptom severity. Social support was positively related with less severe pain. A similar pattern of data was found for perceived stress but not quality of life impairment. Regression analyses examined if the effects of social support on pain are mediated by stress. The effects of social support on bodily pain were mediated by stress such that the greater the social support the less stress and the less pain. This effect did not hold for symptom severity, quality of life, or psychological distress. Conclusions & Inferences This study links the perceived adequacy of social support to the global severity of symptoms of IBS and its cardinal symptom (pain). It also suggests that the mechanism by which social support alleviates pain is through a reduction in stress levels. PMID:20465594

  1. A Rhizavidin Monomer with Nearly Multimeric Avidin-Like Binding Stability Against Biotin Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Jung A; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Lee, In Hwan; Ahn, Byungjun; Lee, Younghoon; Hsieh, Chia-Lung; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2016-03-01

    Developing a monomeric form of an avidin-like protein with highly stable biotin binding properties has been a major challenge in biotin-avidin linking technology. Here we report a monomeric avidin-like protein-enhanced monoavidin-with off-rates almost comparable to those of multimeric avidin proteins against various biotin conjugates. Enhanced monoavidin (eMA) was developed from naturally dimeric rhizavidin by optimally maintaining protein rigidity during monomerization and additionally shielding the bound biotin by diverse engineering of the surface residues. eMA allowed the monovalent and nonperturbing labeling of head-group-biotinylated lipids in bilayer membranes. In addition, we fabricated an unprecedented 24-meric avidin probe by fusing eMA to a multimeric cage protein. The 24-meric avidin and eMA were utilized to demonstrate how artificial clustering of cell-surface proteins greatly enhances the internalization rates of assembled proteins on live cells.

  2. Identification of novel microtubule-binding proteins by taxol-mediated microtubule stabilization and mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Xianfei; Liu, Zhu; He, Qianqian; Qin, Juan; Liu, Ningning; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Dengwen; Zhou, Jun; Shui, Wenqing; Liu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule-binding proteins (MBPs) are structurally and functionally diverse regulators of microtubule-mediated cellular processes. Alteration of MBPs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human diseases, including cancer. MBPs can stabilize or destabilize microtubules or move along microtubules to transport various cargoes. In addition, MBPs can control microtubule dynamics through direct interaction with microtubules or coordination with other proteins. To better understand microtubule structure and function, it is necessary to identify additional MBPs. In this study, we isolated microtubules and MBPs from mammalian cells by a taxol-based method and then profiled a panel of MBPs by mass spectrometry. We discovered a number of previously uncharacterized MBPs, including several membrane-associated proteins and proteins involved in post-translational modifications, in addition to several structural components. These results support the notion that microtubules have a wide range of functions and may undergo more exquisite regulation than previously recognized. PMID:26445615

  3. The removal of a disulfide bridge in CotA-laccase changes the slower motion dynamics involved in copper binding but has no effect on the thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, André T; Pereira, Manuela M; Silva, Catarina S; Lindley, Peter F; Bento, Isabel; Melo, Eduardo Pinho; Martins, Lígia O

    2011-04-01

    The contribution of the disulfide bridge in CotA-laccase from Bacillus subtilis is assessed with respect to the enzyme's functional and structural properties. The removal of the disulfide bond by site-directed mutagenesis, creating the C322A mutant, does not affect the spectroscopic or catalytic properties and, surprisingly, neither the long-term nor the thermodynamic stability parameters of the enzyme. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the C322A mutant indicates that the overall structure is essentially the same as that of the wild type, with only slight alterations evident in the immediate proximity of the mutation. In the mutant enzyme, the loop containing the C322 residue becomes less ordered, suggesting perturbations to the substrate binding pocket. Despite the wild type and the C322A mutant showing similar thermodynamic stability in equilibrium, the holo or apo forms of the mutant unfold at faster rates than the wild-type enzyme. The picosecond to nanosecond time range dynamics of the mutant enzyme was not affected as shown by acrylamide collisional fluorescence quenching analysis. Interestingly, copper uptake or copper release as measured by the stopped-flow technique also occurs more rapidly in the C322A mutant than in the wild-type enzyme. Overall the structural and kinetic data presented here suggest that the disulfide bridge in CotA-laccase contributes to the conformational dynamics of the protein on the microsecond to millisecond timescale, with implications for the rates of copper incorporation into and release from the catalytic centres.

  4. Polymorphisms in microRNA target sites modulate risk of lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias and affect microRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNA dysregulation is a common event in leukemia. Polymorphisms in microRNA-binding sites (miRSNPs) in target genes may alter the strength of microRNA interaction with target transcripts thereby affecting protein levels. In this study we aimed at identifying miRSNPs associated with leukemia risk and assessing impact of these miRSNPs on miRNA binding to target transcripts. Methods We analyzed with specialized algorithms the 3′ untranslated regions of 137 leukemia-associated genes and identified 111 putative miRSNPs, of which 10 were chosen for further investigation. We genotyped patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 87), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 140), childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 471). Association between SNPs and leukemia risk was calculated by estimating odds ratios in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. For miRSNPs that were associated with leukemia risk we performed luciferase reporter assays to examine whether they influence miRNA binding. Results Here we show that variant alleles of TLX1_rs2742038 and ETV6_rs1573613 were associated with increased risk of childhood ALL (OR (95% CI) = 3.97 (1.43-11.02) and 1.9 (1.16-3.11), respectively), while PML_rs9479 was associated with decreased ALL risk (OR = 0.55 (0.36-0.86). In adult myeloid leukemias we found significant associations between the variant allele of PML_rs9479 and decreased AML risk (OR = 0.61 (0.38-0.97), and between variant alleles of IRF8_ rs10514611 and ARHGAP26_rs187729 and increased CML risk (OR = 2.4 (1.12-5.15) and 1.63 (1.07-2.47), respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant trend for an increasing ALL and CML risk with the growing number of risk genotypes with OR = 13.91 (4.38-44.11) for carriers of ≥3 risk genotypes in ALL and OR = 4.9 (1.27-18.85) for carriers of 2 risk genotypes in CML. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that the C allele of ARHGAP

  5. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-03-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3'-5' exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing.

  6. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-01-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3′-5′ exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing. PMID:27881476

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies reveal stabilization of parallel G-quadruplex DNA [d(T2G4T)]4 upon binding to protoberberine alkaloid coralyne.

    PubMed

    Padmapriya, Kumar; Barthwal, Ritu

    2016-10-15

    Stabilization of G-quadruplex DNA structures in human telomeric and proto-oncogenic promoter regions upon ligand binding has evolved as a viable anti-cancer strategy. We have studied interaction of coralyne, a human telomerase inhibiting protoberberine alkaloid, with parallel stranded tetrameric G-quadruplex DNA [d(T2G4T)]4 using Circular Dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Appearance of induced CD band and the Diffusion Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY) experiments confirm the formation of well defined coralyne-DNA complex. (1)H and (31)P NMR studies reveal that coralyne specifically recognizes T2pG3 and G6pT7 steps in DNA. Guanine imino protons indicate that coralyne binding induces thermal stabilization of the G-quadruplex DNA by >20°C. The observed specific changes and thermal stabilization of DNA upon binding may be attributed to inhibition of telomerase by coralyne.

  8. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  9. Protein kinase B/Akt binds and phosphorylates PED/PEA-15, stabilizing its antiapoptotic action.

    PubMed

    Trencia, Alessandra; Perfetti, Anna; Cassese, Angela; Vigliotta, Giovanni; Miele, Claudia; Oriente, Francesco; Santopietro, Stefania; Giacco, Ferdinando; Condorelli, Gerolama; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    The antiapoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 features an Akt phosphorylation motif upstream from Ser(116). In vitro, recombinant PED/PEA-15 was phosphorylated by Akt with a stoichiometry close to 1. Based on Western blotting with specific phospho-Ser(116) PED/PEA-15 antibodies, Akt phosphorylation of PED/PEA-15 occurred mainly at Ser(116). In addition, a mutant of PED/PEA-15 featuring the substitution of Ser(116)-->Gly (PED(S116-->G)) showed 10-fold-decreased phosphorylation by Akt. In intact 293 cells, Akt also induced phosphorylation of PED/PEA-15 at Ser(116). Based on pull-down and coprecipitation assays, PED/PEA-15 specifically bound Akt, independently of Akt activity. Serum activation of Akt as well as BAD phosphorylation by Akt showed no difference in 293 cells transfected with PED/PEA-15 and in untransfected cells (which express no endogenous PED/PEA-15). However, the antiapoptotic action of PED/PEA-15 was almost twofold reduced in PED(S116-->G) compared to that in PED/PEA-15(WT) cells. PED/PEA-15 stability closely paralleled Akt activation by serum in 293 cells. In these cells, the nonphosphorylatable PED(S116-->G) mutant exhibited a degradation rate threefold greater than that observed with wild-type PED/PEA-15. In the U373MG glioma cells, blocking Akt also reduced PED/PEA-15 levels and induced sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand apoptosis. Thus, phosphorylation by Akt regulates the antiapoptotic function of PED/PEA-15 at least in part by controlling the stability of PED/PEA-15. In part, Akt survival signaling may be mediated by PED/PEA-15.

  10. Relevance of the flavin binding to the stability and folding of engineered cholesterol oxidase containing noncovalently bound FAD

    PubMed Central

    Caldinelli, Laura; Iametti, Stefania; Barbiroli, Alberto; Fessas, Dimitrios; Bonomi, Francesco; Piubelli, Luciano; Molla, Gianluca; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2008-01-01

    The flavoprotein cholesterol oxidase (CO) from Brevibacterium sterolicum is a monomeric flavoenzyme containing one molecule of FAD cofactor covalently linked to His69. The elimination of the covalent link following the His69Ala substitution was demonstrated to result in a significant decrease in activity, in the midpoint redox potential of the flavin, and in stability with respect to the wild-type enzyme, but does not modify the overall structure of the enzyme. We used CO as a model system to dissect the changes due to the elimination of the covalent link between the flavin and the protein (by comparing the wild-type and H69A CO holoproteins) with those due to the elimination of the cofactor (by comparing the holo- and apoprotein forms of H69A CO). The apoprotein of H69A CO lacks the characteristic tertiary structure of the holoprotein and displays larger hydrophobic surfaces; its urea-induced unfolding does not occur by a simple two-state mechanism and is largely nonreversible. Minor alterations in the flavin binding region are evident between the native and the refolded proteins, and are likely responsible for the low refolding yield observed. A model for the equilibrium unfolding of H69A CO that also takes into consideration the effects of cofactor binding and dissociation, and thus may be of general significance in terms of the relationships between cofactor uptake and folding in flavoproteins, is presented. PMID:18218720

  11. Plakophilins 1 and 3 Bind to FXR1 and Thereby Influence the mRNA Stability of Desmosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kešo, Regina; Breuninger, Sonja; Hofmann, Sarah; Henn, Manuela; Röhrig, Theresa; Ströbel, Philipp; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilins 1 and 3 (PKP1/3) are members of the arm repeat family of catenin proteins and serve as structural components of desmosomes, which are important for cell-cell-adhesion. In addition, PKP1/3 occur as soluble proteins outside desmosomes, yet their role in the cytoplasm is not known. We found that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 coprecipitated with the RNA-binding proteins FXR1, G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1, and these PKP1/3 complexes also comprised desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNAs. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of PKP1/3 with G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1 but not with FXR1 was RNase sensitive. To address the cytoplasmic function of PKP1/3, we performed gain-and-loss-of-function studies. Both PKP1 and PKP3 knockdown cell lines showed reduced protein and mRNA levels for desmoplakin and PKP2. Whereas global rates of translation were unaffected, desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNA were destabilized. Furthermore, binding of PKP1/3 to FXR1 was RNA independent, and both PKP3 and FXR1 stabilized PKP2 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 are components of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. PMID:25225333

  12. Cooperative Stabilization of Zn2+:DNA Complexes Through Netropsin Binding in the Minor Groove of FdU-Substituted DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Supratim; Salsbury, Freddie R.; Horita, David A.; Gmeiner, William H.

    2013-01-01

    The simultaneous binding of netropsin in the minor groove and Zn2+ in the major groove of a DNA hairpin that includes 10 consecutive FdU nucleotides at the 3′-terminus (3’FdU) was demonstrated based upon NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and computational modeling studies. The resulting Zn2+ /netropsin:3’FdU complex had very high thermal stability with aspects of the complex intact at 85 °C, conditions that result in complete dissociation of Mg2+ complexes. CD and 19F NMR spectroscopy were consistent with Zn2+ binding in the major groove of the DNA duplex and utilizing F5 and O4 of consecutive FdU nucleotides as ligands with FdU nucleotides hemi-deprotonated in the complex. Netropsin is bound in the minor groove of the DNA duplex based upon 2D NOESY data demonstrating contacts between AH2 1H and netropsin 1H resonances. The Zn2+/netropsin:3’FdU complex displayed increased cytotoxicity towards PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells relative to the constituent components or separate complexes (e.g. Zn2+:3’FdU) indicating that this new structural motif may be therapeutically useful for PCa treatment. PMID:23153072

  13. Role of Cysteines in Stabilizing the Randomized Receptor Binding Domains within Feline Leukemia Virus Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso-Torres, Leonardo; Sarangi, Anindita; Whidby, Jillian; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retargeting of gammaretroviral envelope proteins has shown promising results in the isolation of novel isolates with therapeutic potential. However, the optimal conditions required to obtain high-affinity retargeted envelope proteins with narrow tropism are not understood. This study highlights the advantage of constrained peptides within receptor binding domains and validates the random library screening technique of obtaining novel retargeted Env proteins. Using a modified vector backbone to screen the envelope libraries on 143B osteosarcoma cells, three novel and unique retargeted envelopes were isolated. The use of complex disulfide bonds within variable regions required for receptor binding is found within natural gammaretroviral envelope isolates. Interestingly, two of the isolates, named AII and BV2, have a pair of cysteines located within the randomized region of 11 amino acids similar to that identified within the CP Env, an isolate identified in a previous Env library screen on the human renal carcinoma Caki-1 cell line. The amino acids within the randomized region of AII and BV2 envelopes that are essential for viral infection have been identified in this study and include these cysteine residues. Through mutagenesis studies, the putative disulfide bond pairs including and beyond the randomized region were examined. In parallel, the disulfide bonds of CP Env were identified using mass spectrometry. The results indicate that this pair of cysteines creates the structural context to position key hydrophobic (F and W) and basic (K and H) residues critical for viral titer and suggest that AII, BV2, and CP internal cysteines bond together in distinct ways. IMPORTANCE Retargeted gammaretroviral particles have broad applications for therapeutic use. Although great advances have been achieved in identifying new Env-host cell receptor pairs, the rules for designing optimal Env libraries are still unclear. We have found that isolates with an additional

  14. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  15. The use of “stabilization exercises” to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term “core stability” is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. “stabilization exercise”, “motor control exercise”). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms “core stability” and “stabilization exercise”, 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process. PMID:24932016

  16. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved.

  17. Beta cyclodextrins bind, stabilize, and remove lipofuscin bisretinoids from retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nociari, Marcelo M.; Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Perez Bay, Andres E.; Radu, Roxana A.; Jiang, Zhichun; Goicochea, Shelby; Schreiner, Ryan; Warren, J. David; Shan, Jufang; Adam de Beaumais, Ségolène; Ménand, Mickaël; Sollogoub, Matthieu; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin bisretinoids (LBs) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the alleged cause of retinal degeneration in genetic blinding diseases (e.g., Stargardt) and a possible etiological agent for age-related macular degeneration. Currently, there are no approved treatments for these diseases; hence, agents that efficiently remove LBs from RPE would be valuable therapeutic candidates. Here, we show that beta cyclodextrins (β-CDs) bind LBs and protect them against oxidation. Computer modeling and biochemical data are consistent with the encapsulation of the retinoid arms of LBs within the hydrophobic cavity of β-CD. Importantly, β-CD treatment reduced by 73% and 48% the LB content of RPE cell cultures and of eyecups obtained from Abca4-Rdh8 double knock-out (DKO) mice, respectively. Furthermore, intravitreal administration of β-CDs reduced significantly the content of bisretinoids in the RPE of DKO animals. Thus, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of β-CDs to complex and remove LB deposits from RPE cells and provide crucial data to develop novel prophylactic approaches for retinal disorders elicited by LBs. PMID:24706818

  18. Differential stability of TATA box binding proteins from archaea with different optimal growth temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopitz, Annette; Soppa, Jörg; Krejtschi, Carsten; Hauser, Karin

    2009-09-01

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) is involved in promoter recognition, the first step of transcription initiation. TBP is universally conserved and essential in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, TBPs have to be stable and to function in species that cover an extremely wide range of optimal growth temperatures (OGTs), from below 0 °C to more than 100 °C. Thus, the archaeal TBP family is ideally suited to study the evolutionary adaptation of proteins to an extremely wide range of temperatures. We characterized the thermostability of one mesophilic and one thermophilic TBP by infrared spectroscopy. Transition temperatures ( Tms) of thermal unfolding have been determined using TBPs from Methanosarcina mazei (OGT 37 °C) and from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (OGT 65 °C). Furthermore, the influence of protein and salt concentration on thermostability has been characterized. Together with previous studies, our results reveal that the Tms of archaeal TBPs are closely correlated with the OGTs of the respective species. Noteworthy, this is also true for the TBP from M. mazei representing the first characterized TBP from a mesophilic archaeon. In contrast, the only characterized eukaryotic TBP of the mesophilic plant Arabidopsis thaliana has a Tm more than 40 °C above the OGT.

  19. Beta cyclodextrins bind, stabilize, and remove lipofuscin bisretinoids from retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nociari, Marcelo M; Lehmann, Guillermo L; Perez Bay, Andres E; Radu, Roxana A; Jiang, Zhichun; Goicochea, Shelby; Schreiner, Ryan; Warren, J David; Shan, Jufang; Adam de Beaumais, Ségolène; Ménand, Mickaël; Sollogoub, Matthieu; Maxfield, Frederick R; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2014-04-08

    Accumulation of lipofuscin bisretinoids (LBs) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the alleged cause of retinal degeneration in genetic blinding diseases (e.g., Stargardt) and a possible etiological agent for age-related macular degeneration. Currently, there are no approved treatments for these diseases; hence, agents that efficiently remove LBs from RPE would be valuable therapeutic candidates. Here, we show that beta cyclodextrins (β-CDs) bind LBs and protect them against oxidation. Computer modeling and biochemical data are consistent with the encapsulation of the retinoid arms of LBs within the hydrophobic cavity of β-CD. Importantly, β-CD treatment reduced by 73% and 48% the LB content of RPE cell cultures and of eyecups obtained from Abca4-Rdh8 double knock-out (DKO) mice, respectively. Furthermore, intravitreal administration of β-CDs reduced significantly the content of bisretinoids in the RPE of DKO animals. Thus, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of β-CDs to complex and remove LB deposits from RPE cells and provide crucial data to develop novel prophylactic approaches for retinal disorders elicited by LBs.

  20. 5-Stabilized phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate analogues bind Grp1 PH, inhibit phosphoinositide phosphatases, and block neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglu; He, Ju; Kutateladze, Tatiana G; Sakai, Takahiro; Sasaki, Takehiko; Markadieu, Nicolas; Erneux, Christophe; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2010-02-15

    Metabolically stabilized analogues of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 have shown long-lived agonist activity for cellular events and selective inhibition of lipid phosphatase activity. We describe an efficient asymmetric synthesis of two 5-phosphatase-resistant analogues of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, the 5-methylene phosphonate (MP) and 5-phosphorothioate (PT). Furthermore, we illustrate the biochemical and biological activities of five stabilized PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 analogues in four contexts. First, the relative binding affinities of the 3-MP, 3-PT, 5-MP, 5-PT, and 3,4,5-PT3 analogues to the Grp1 PH domain are shown, as determined by NMR spectroscopy. Second, the enzymology of the five analogues is explored, showing the relative efficiency of inhibition of SHIP1, SHIP2, and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), as well as the greatly reduced ability of these phosphatases to process these analogues as substrates as compared to PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Third, exogenously delivered analogues severely impair complement factor C5a-mediated polarization and migration of murine neutrophils. Finally, the new analogues show long-lived agonist activity in mimicking insulin action in sodium transport in A6 cells.

  1. C11orf83, a Mitochondrial Cardiolipin-Binding Protein Involved in bc1 Complex Assembly and Supercomplex Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Michelangelo; Raemy, Etienne; Vaz, Frédéric Maxime; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Bairoch, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria may contain up to 1,500 different proteins, and many of them have neither been confidently identified nor characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that C11orf83, which was lacking experimental characterization, is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. This protein is specifically associated with the bc1 complex of the electron transport chain and involved in the early stages of its assembly by stabilizing the bc1 core complex. C11orf83 displays some overlapping functions with Cbp4p, a yeast bc1 complex assembly factor. Therefore, we suggest that C11orf83, now called UQCC3, is the functional human equivalent of Cbp4p. In addition, C11orf83 depletion in HeLa cells caused abnormal crista morphology, higher sensitivity to apoptosis, a decreased ATP level due to impaired respiration and subtle, but significant, changes in cardiolipin composition. We showed that C11orf83 binds to cardiolipin by its α-helices 2 and 3 and is involved in the stabilization of bc1 complex-containing supercomplexes, especially the III2/IV supercomplex. We also demonstrated that the OMA1 metalloprotease cleaves C11orf83 in response to mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting a role in the selection of cells with damaged mitochondria for their subsequent elimination by apoptosis, as previously described for OPA1. PMID:25605331

  2. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-21

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. Furthermore, these results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  3. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  4. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2015-01-21

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. Furthermore, these results could serve asmore » guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.« less

  5. Cu(2+) affects amyloid-β (1-42) aggregation by increasing peptide-peptide binding forces.

    PubMed

    Hane, Francis; Tran, Gary; Attwood, Simon J; Leonenko, Zoya

    2013-01-01

    The link between metals, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its implicated protein, amyloid-β (Aβ), is complex and highly studied. AD is believed to occur as a result of the misfolding and aggregation of Aβ. The dyshomeostasis of metal ions and their propensity to interact with Aβ has also been implicated in AD. In this work, we use single molecule atomic force spectroscopy to measure the rupture force required to dissociate two Aβ (1-42) peptides in the presence of copper ions, Cu(2+). In addition, we use atomic force microscopy to resolve the aggregation of Aβ formed. Previous research has shown that metal ions decrease the lag time associated with Aβ aggregation. We show that with the addition of copper ions the unbinding force increases notably. This suggests that the reduction of lag time associated with Aβ aggregation occurs on a single molecule level as a result of an increase in binding forces during the very initial interactions between two Aβ peptides. We attribute these results to copper ions acting as a bridge between the two peptide molecules, increasing the stability of the peptide-peptide complex.

  6. Nitrogen transformation and nitrous oxide emissions affected by biochar amendment and fertilizer stabilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar as a soil amendment and the use of fertilizer stabilizers (N transformation inhibitors) have been shown to reduce N2O emissions, but the mechanisms or processes involved are not well understood. The objective of this research was to investigate N transformation processes and the relationship...

  7. Factors Affecting the Stability of Biodiesel Sold in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R. L.; Ratcliff, M.; Moens, L.; Lawrence, R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a survey of biodiesel quality and stability in the United States, 27 biodiesel (B100) samples were collected from blenders and distributor nationwide. For this sample set, 85% met all of the requirements of the industry standard for biodiesel, ASTM D6751.

  8. AN EVALUATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF HEAVY METAL SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification/stabilization (SIS) of hazardous waste involves mixing the waste with a binder material to enhance the physical properties of the waste and to immobilize contaminants that may be detrimental to the environment. Many hazardous wastes contain materials that are know...

  9. Temporal stability of soil water contents as affected by weather patterns: a simulation study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) is a natural phenomenon that recently attracts attention and finds multiple applications. Large variations in the interannual and interseasonal TS SWC have been encountered among locations studied by various authors. The objective of this work was ...

  10. An Evaluation of Factors Affecting the Solidification/Stabilization of Heavy Metal Sludge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Regression Analysis of UCS and CI ...... ............... .. 63 Wet/ Dry Testing ............... ........................ .. 70 Permeability...wet/ dry test . . . 89 53 Wet/dry cycling for the LFA solidified/stabilized samples with grease interference .......... ................... .. 90 54...one wet/ dry test . Disintegration of over 70 percent of the original sample was recorded as failure of a product. Sample A was carried through this

  11. Sublethal concentrations of silver nanoparticles affect the mechanical stability of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Grün, Alexandra Y; Meier, Jutta; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Manz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are most likely confronted with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as a pollutant stressor in aquatic systems. In this study, biofilms of Aquabacterium citratiphilum were exposed for 20 h to 30 and 70 nm citrate stabilized Ag NPs in low-dose concentrations ranging from 600 to 2400 μg l(-1), and the Ag NP-mediated effects on descriptive, structural, and functional biofilm characteristics, including viability, protein content, architecture, and mechanical stability, were investigated. Viability, based on the bacterial cell membrane integrity of A. citratiphilum, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy, remained unaffected after Ag NP exposure. Moreover, in contrast to information in the current literature, protein contents of cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and biofilm architecture, including dry mass, thickness, and density, were not significantly impacted by exposure to Ag NPs. However, the biofilms themselves served as effective sinks for Ag NPs, exhibiting enrichment factors from 5 to 8. Biofilms showed a greater capacity to accumulate 30 nm sized Ag NPs than 70 nm Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs significantly threatened the mechanical stability of biofilms, as determined by a newly developed assay. For 30 nm Ag NPs, the mechanical stability of biofilms decreased as the Ag NP concentrations applied to them increased. In contrast, 70 nm Ag NPs produced a similar decrease in mechanical stability for each applied concentration. Overall, this finding demonstrates that exposure to Ag NPs triggers remarkable changes in biofilm adhesion and/or cohesiveness. Because of biofilm-mediated ecological services, this response raises environmental concerns regarding Ag NP release into freshwater systems, even in sublethal concentrations.

  12. Stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates affected by application of apatite, lime, and charcoal.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongbiao; Ma, Kaiqiang; Fan, Yuchao; Peng, Xinhua; Mao, Jingdong; Zhou, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhongbin; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Only a few studies have been reported on the stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates after soil treatments to reduce the availability of heavy metals. In this study, apatite (22.3 t ha(-1)), lime (4.45 t ha(-1)), and charcoal (66.8 t ha(-1)) were applied to a heavy metal-contaminated soil for 4 years. The stability and heavy metal distribution of soil aggregates were investigated by dry and wet sieving. No significant change in the dry mean weight diameter was observed in any treatments. Compared with the control, three-amendment treatments significantly increased the wet mean weight diameter, but only charcoal treatment significantly increased the wet aggregate stability. The soil treatments increased the content of soil organic carbon, and the fraction 0.25-2 mm contained the highest content of soil organic carbon. Amendments' application slightly increased soil total Cu and Cd, but decreased the concentrations of CaCl2 -extractable Cu and Cd except for the fraction <0.053 mm. The fractions >2 and 0.25-2 mm contained the highest concentrations of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd, accounted for about 74.5-86.8 % of CaCl2-extractable Cu and Cd in soil. The results indicated that amendments' application increased the wet soil aggregate stability and decreased the available Cu and Cd. The distribution of available heavy metals in wet soil aggregates was not controlled by soil aggregate stability, but possibly by soil organic carbon.

  13. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories. Part I: A necessary and sufficient condition for the stability of general molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I.; Lions, P.L. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors study here the binding of atoms and molecules and the stability of general molecular systems including molecular ions. This is the first paper of a series devoted to the study of these general problems. The authors obtain here a general necessary and sufficient condition for the stability of a general molecular system in the context of Thomas-Fermi-Von Weizsaecker, Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Von Weizsaecker, Hartree or Hartree-Fock theories. 20 refs.

  14. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-03-07

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions.

  15. ceRNA crosstalk stabilizes protein expression and affects the correlation pattern of interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; De Martino, Andrea; Pagnani, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process and several mechanisms, both transcriptional and post-transcriptional, can stabilize protein levels in cells. Much work has focused on the role of miRNAs, showing in particular that miRNA-mediated regulation can buffer expression noise for lowly expressed genes. Here, using in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that miRNAs can exert a much broader influence on protein levels by orchestrating competition-induced crosstalk between mRNAs. Most notably, we find that miRNA-mediated cross-talk (i) can stabilize protein levels across the full range of gene expression rates, and (ii) modifies the correlation pattern of co-regulated interacting proteins, changing the sign of correlations from negative to positive. The latter feature may constitute a potentially robust signature of the existence of RNA crosstalk induced by endogenous competition for miRNAs in standard cellular conditions. PMID:28266541

  16. Factors affecting the stability of drug-loaded polymeric micelles and strategies for improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weisai; Li, Caibin; Wang, Zhiyu; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Polymeric micelles (PMs) self-assembled by amphiphilic block copolymers have been used as promising nanocarriers for tumor-targeted delivery due to their favorable properties, such as excellent biocompatibility, prolonged circulation time, favorable particle sizes (10-100 nm) to utilize enhanced permeability and retention effect and the possibility for functionalization. However, PMs can be easily destroyed due to dilution of body fluid and the absorption of proteins in system circulation, which may induce drug leakage from these micelles before reaching the target sites and compromise the therapeutic effect. This paper reviewed the factors that influence stability of micelles in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics consist of the critical micelle concentration of block copolymers, glass transition temperature of hydrophobic segments and polymer-polymer and polymer-cargo interaction. In addition, some effective strategies to improve the stability of micelles were also summarized.

  17. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-05-05

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using (13)C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems.

  18. Changing Folding and Binding Stability in a Viral Coat Protein: A Comparison between Substitutions Accessible through Mutation and Those Fixed by Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wichman, Holly A.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that most random amino acid substitutions destabilize protein folding (i.e. increase the folding free energy). No analogous studies have been carried out for protein-protein binding. Here we use a structure-based model of the major coat protein in a simple virus, bacteriophage φX174, to estimate the free energy of folding of a single coat protein and binding of five coat proteins within a pentameric unit. We confirm and extend previous work in finding that most accessible substitutions destabilize both protein folding and protein-protein binding. We compare the pool of accessible substitutions with those observed among the φX174-like wild phage and in experimental evolution with φX174. We find that observed substitutions have smaller effects on stability than expected by chance. An analysis of adaptations at high temperatures suggests that selection favors either substitutions with no effect on stability or those that simultaneously stabilize protein folding and slightly destabilize protein binding. We speculate that these mutations might involve adjusting the rate of capsid assembly. At normal laboratory temperature there is little evidence of directional selection. Finally, we show that cumulative changes in stability are highly variable; sometimes they are well beyond the bounds of single substitution changes and sometimes they are not. The variation leads us to conclude that phenotype selection acts on more than just stability. Instances of larger cumulative stability change (never via a single substitution despite their availability) lead us to conclude that selection views stability at a local, not a global, level. PMID:25405628

  19. How Does Functional Soccer Training on Uneven Ground Affect Dynamic Stability of Lower Limbs in Young Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Plenzler, Marcin; Mrozińska, Natalia; Mierzwińska, Anna; Korbolewska, Olga; Mejnartowicz, Daria; Popieluch, Marcin; Śmigielski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    the supporting limb after the preparatory period, during which a stability and proprioception training was completed. The significance of these results is even greater when the parallel substantial increase of the physical body height of these young players is taken into account (the taller the player is, the harder it is for him to keep the balance). The players’ tests results are, also, statistically lower than the control group’s data. That, in turn, means that the players had better stability in comparison to the control group. This co-dependence regarding the overall stability was mainly affected by the A/P stability indexes taken in a sagittal plane. Also, no new injuries were recorded within the young players group. Conclusion: 1. The exercised functional training significantly improved stability results of the supporting limb among the young players. 2. The results encourage to continue the study, and, in the later stage, check whether there is an actual relationship between the dynamic stability results and sports achievements combined with the frequency of injuries.

  20. Remarkable enhancement in photocytotoxicity and hydrolytic stability of curcumin on binding to an oxovanadium(IV) moiety.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Pant, Ila; Khan, Imran; Prasad, Puja; Hussain, Akhtar; Kondaiah, Paturu; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2015-03-07

    Oxovanadium(IV) complexes of polypyridyl and curcumin-based ligands, viz. [VO(cur)(L)Cl] (1, 2) and [VO(scur)(L)Cl] (3, 4), where L is 1,10-phenanthroline (phen in 1 and 3), dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz in 2 and 4), Hcur is curcumin and Hscur is diglucosylcurcumin, were synthesized and characterized and their cellular uptake, photocytotoxicity, intracellular localization, DNA binding, and DNA photo-cleavage activity studied. Complex [VO(cur)(phen)Cl] (1) has V(IV)N2O3Cl distorted octahedral geometry as evidenced from its crystal structure. The sugar appended complexes show significantly higher uptake into the cancer cells compared to their normal analogues. The complexes are remarkably photocytotoxic in visible light (400-700 nm) giving an IC50 value of <5 μM in HeLa, HaCaT and MCF-7 cells with no significant dark toxicity. The green emission of the complexes was used for cellular imaging. Predominant cytosolic localization of the complexes 1-4 to a lesser extent into the nucleus was evidenced from confocal imaging. The complexes as strong binders of calf thymus DNA displayed photocleavage of supercoiled pUC19 DNA in red light by generating ˙OH radicals as the ROS. The cell death is via an apoptotic pathway involving the ROS. Binding to the VO(2+) moiety has resulted in stability against any hydrolytic degradation of curcumin along with an enhancement of its photocytotoxicity.

  1. Core binding factor β of osteoblasts maintains cortical bone mass via stabilization of Runx2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Eun; Park, Na-Rae; Che, Xiangguo; Han, Min-Su; Jeong, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Park, Clara Yongjoo; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kim, Jung-Eun; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Choi, Je-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Core binding factor beta (Cbfβ), the partner protein of Runx family transcription factors, enhances Runx function by increasing the binding of Runx to DNA. Null mutations of Cbfb result in embryonic death, which can be rescued by restoring fetal hematopoiesis but only until birth, where bone formation is still nearly absent. Here, we address a direct role of Cbfβ in skeletal homeostasis by generating osteoblast-specific Cbfβ-deficient mice (Cbfb(Δob/Δob) ) from Cbfb-floxed mice crossed with mice expressing Cre from the Col1a1 promoter. Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice showed normal growth and development but exhibited reduced bone mass, particularly of cortical bone. The reduction of bone mass in Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice is similar to the phenotype of mice with haploinsufficiency of Runx2. Although the number of osteoblasts remained unchanged, the number of active osteoblasts decreased in Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice and resulted in lower mineral apposition rate. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression of osteogenic markers, including Runx2, osterix, osteocalcin, and osteopontin, was significantly repressed in Cbfb(Δob/Δob) mice compared with wild-type mice. Cbfβ deficiency also reduced Runx2 protein levels in osteoblasts. The mechanism was revealed by forced expression of Cbfβ, which increased Runx2 protein levels in vitro by inhibiting polyubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation. Collectively, these findings indicate that Cbfβ stabilizes Runx2 in osteoblasts by forming a complex and thus facilitates the proper maintenance of bone mass, particularly cortical bone.

  2. Stability of the Stevia-Derived Sweetener Rebaudioside A in Solution as Affected by Ultraviolet Light Exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiewen; Bell, Leonard N

    2017-04-01

    Rebaudioside A is a natural noncaloric high-potency sweetener extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. With rebaudioside A use increasing in foods, understanding the factors affecting its stability is necessary. This project evaluated the degradation rate constants of rebaudioside A in water, 0.1 M phosphate buffer, and 0.1 M citrate buffer at pH 3 and 7 as a function of ultraviolet (UV) light intensity (365 nm, 0 μW/cm(2) for dark conditions, 27 μW/cm(2) for low intensity, and 190 μW/cm(2) for high intensity) at 32.5 °C. Rebaudioside A stability was adversely affected by light exposure. The pseudo-1st-order degradation rate constants increased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing light intensity in all solutions. Under dark conditions, rebaudioside A in phosphate buffers was more susceptible to breakdown than in water and citrate buffers at both pH levels. However, exposure to UV light resulted in rebaudioside A degradation occurring approximately 10 times faster in citrate than in phosphate buffers at both pH levels. The sensitivity of rebaudioside A to UV light was greater in citrate buffers than in water or phosphate buffers. The use of light-protective packaging for beverages containing rebaudioside A will improve its stability.

  3. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Stevers, Loes M.; Lam, Chan V.; Leysen, Seppe F. R.; Meijer, Femke A.; van Scheppingen, Daphne S.; de Vries, Rens M. J. M.; Carlile, Graeme W.; Milroy, Lech G.; Thomas, David Y.; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein–protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3–CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics. PMID:26888287

  4. Factors affecting the thermal shock behavior of yttria stabilized hafnia based graphite and tungsten composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineback, L. D.; Manning, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Hafnia-based composites containing either graphite or tungsten were investigated as rocket nozzle throat inserts in solid propellant rocket engines. The thermal shock resistance of these materials is considered in terms of macroscopic thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, modulus of elasticity, and compressive fracture stress. The effect of degree of hafnia stabilization, density, and graphite or tungsten content upon these parameters is discussed. The variation of the ratio of elastic modulus to compressive fracture stress with density and its effect upon thermal shock resistance of these materials are discussed in detail.

  5. Tree species affect cation exchange capacity (CEC) and cation binding properties of organic matter in acid forest soils.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Piotr; Mulder, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soil is of major importance for cation binding and acid buffering, but its characteristics may differ among soils under different tree species. We investigated acidity, cation exchange properties and Al bonding to SOM in stands of Scots pine, pedunculate oak, Norway spruce, European beech and common hornbeam in southern Poland. The content of total carbon (Ct) was by far the major contributor to total cation exchange capacity (CECt) even in loamy soils and a strong relationship between Ct and CECt was found. The slope of the regression of CECt to Ct increased in the order hornbeam≈oakstabilization of SOM via saturation of functional groups by Al and H.

  6. FANCI-FANCD2 stabilizes the RAD51-DNA complex by binding RAD51 and protects the 5′-DNA end

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koichi; Shimomuki, Mayo; Katsuki, Yoko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ishiai, Masamichi; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The FANCI-FANCD2 (I-D) complex is considered to work with RAD51 to protect the damaged DNA in the stalled replication fork. However, the means by which this DNA protection is accomplished have remained elusive. In the present study, we found that the I-D complex directly binds to RAD51, and stabilizes the RAD51-DNA filament. Unexpectedly, the DNA binding activity of FANCI, but not FANCD2, is explicitly required for the I-D complex-mediated RAD51-DNA filament stabilization. The RAD51 filament stabilized by the I-D complex actually protects the DNA end from nucleolytic degradation by an FA-associated nuclease, FAN1. This DNA end protection is not observed with the RAD51 mutant from FANCR patient cells. These results clearly answer the currently enigmatic question of how RAD51 functions with the I-D complex to prevent genomic instability at the stalled replication fork. PMID:27694619

  7. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder — Self-binding directives and self-determination

    PubMed Central

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S.

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being ‘protected’ through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician–patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research. PMID:25939286

  8. Redefining a Bizarre Situation: Relative Concept Stability in Affect Control Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    I analyze the process by which we react cognitively to information that contradicts our culturally held sentiments in the context of affect control theory. When bizarre, unanticipated events come to our attention and we have no opportunity to act so as to alter them, we must reidentify at least one event component: the actor, the behavior, or the…

  9. Heat stability and acid gelation properties of calcium-enriched reconstituted skim milk affected by ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Bui, Don; Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-05-01

    The aggregation of proteins after heating of calcium-fortified milks has been an ongoing problem in the dairy industry. This undesirable effect restricts the manufacture of calcium rich dairy products. To overcome this problem, a completely new approach in controlling the heat stability of dairy protein solutions, developed in our lab, has been employed. In this approach, high intensity, low frequency ultrasound is applied for a very short duration after a pre-heating step at ⩾70 °C. The ultrasound breaks apart whey/whey and whey/casein aggregates through the process of acoustic cavitation. Protein aggregates do not reform on subsequent post-heating, thereby making the systems heat stable. In this paper, the acid gelation properties of ultrasonicated calcium-enriched skim milks have also been investigated. It is shown that ultrasonication alone does not change the gelation properties significantly whereas a sequence of preheating (72 °C/1 min) followed by ultrasonication leads to decreased gelation times, decreased gel syneresis and increased skim milk viscosity in comparison to heating alone. Overall, ultrasonication has the potential to provide calcium-fortified dairy products with increased heat stability. However, enhanced gelation properties can only be achieved when ultrasonication is completed in conjunction with heating.

  10. Dissecting the Factors Affecting the Fluorescence Stability of Quantum Dots in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shu-Lin; Hu, Yuan-Jun; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-04-06

    Labeling and imaging of live cells with quantum dots (QDs) has attracted great attention in the biomedical field over the past two decades. Maintenance of the fluorescence of QDs in a biological environment is crucial for performing long-term cell tracking to investigate the proliferation and functional evolution of cells. The cell-penetrating peptide transactivator of transcription (TAT) is a well-studied peptide to efficiently enhance the transmembrane delivery. Here, we used TAT peptide-conjugated QDs (TAT-QDs) as a model system to examine the fluorescence stability of QDs in live cells. By confocal microscopy, we found that TAT-QDs were internalized into cells by endocytosis, and transported into the cytoplasm via the mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and lysosomes. More importantly, the fluorescence of TAT-QDs in live cells was decreased mainly by cell proliferation, and the low pH value in the lysosomes could also lower the fluorescence intensity of intracellular QDs. Quantitative analysis of the amount of QDs in the extracellular region and whole cells indicated that the exocytosis was not the primary cause of fluorescence decay of intracellular QDs. This work facilitates a better understanding of the fluorescence stability of QDs for cell imaging and long-term tracking in live cells. Also, it provides insights into the utility of TAT for transmembrane transportation, and the preparation and modification of QDs for cell imaging and tracking.

  11. Vestibular ablation and a semicircular canal prosthesis affect postural stability during head turns.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lara A; Haburcakova, Csilla; Lewis, Richard F

    2016-11-01

    In our study, we examined postural stability during head turns for two rhesus monkeys: one animal study contrasted normal and mild bilateral vestibular ablation and a second animal study contrasted severe bilateral vestibular ablation with and without prosthetic stimulation. The monkeys freely stood, unrestrained on a balance platform and made voluntary head turns between visual targets. To quantify each animals' posture, motions of the head and trunk, as well as torque about the body's center of mass, were measured. In the mildly ablated animal, we observed less foretrunk sway in comparison with the normal state. When the canal prosthesis provided electric stimulation to the severely ablated animal, it showed a decrease in trunk sway during head turns. Because the rhesus monkey with severe bilateral vestibular loss exhibited a decrease in trunk sway when receiving vestibular prosthetic stimulation, we propose that the prosthetic electrical stimulation partially restored head velocity information. Our results provide an indication that a semicircular canal prosthesis may be an effective way to improve postural stability in patients with severe peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

  12. Vestibular ablation and a semicircular canal prosthesis affect postural stability during head turns

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lara A.; Haburcakova, Csilla; Lewis, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    In our study, we examined postural stability during head turns for two rhesus monkeys: one, single animal study contrasted normal and mild bilateral vestibular ablation and a second animal study contrasted severe bilateral vestibular ablation with and without prosthetic stimulation. The monkeys freely stood, unrestrained on a balance platform and made voluntary head turns between visual targets. To quantify each animals’ posture, motions of the head and trunk, as well as torque about the body’s center-of-mass, were measured. In the mildly ablated animal, we observed less foretrunk sway in comparison to the normal state. When the canal prosthesis provided electric stimulation to the severely ablated animal, it showed a decrease in trunk sway during head turns. Because the rhesus monkey with severe bilateral vestibular loss exhibited a decrease in trunk sway when receiving vestibular prosthetic stimulation, we propose that the prosthetic electrical stimulation partially restored head velocity information. Our results provide an indication that a semicircular canal prosthesis may be an effective way to improve postural stability in patients with severe peripheral vestibular dysfunction. PMID:27405997

  13. RIM-binding protein links synaptic homeostasis to the stabilization and replenishment of high release probability vesicles.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin; Genç, Özgür; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-03-04

    Here we define activities of RIM-binding protein (RBP) that are essential for baseline neurotransmission and presynaptic homeostatic plasticity. At baseline, rbp mutants have a ∼10-fold decrease in the apparent Ca(2+) sensitivity of release that we attribute to (1) impaired presynaptic Ca(2+) influx, (2) looser coupling of vesicles to Ca(2+) influx, and (3) limited access to the readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP). During homeostatic plasticity, RBP is necessary for the potentiation of Ca(2+) influx and the expansion of the RRP. Remarkably, rbp mutants also reveal a rate-limiting stage required for the replenishment of high release probability (p) vesicles following vesicle depletion. This rate slows ∼4-fold at baseline and nearly 7-fold during homeostatic signaling in rbp. These effects are independent of altered Ca(2+) influx and RRP size. We propose that RBP stabilizes synaptic efficacy and homeostatic plasticity through coordinated control of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx and the dynamics of a high-p vesicle pool.

  14. Glycosylation changes in the globular head of H3N2 influenza hemagglutinin modulate receptor binding without affecting virus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alymova, Irina V.; York, Ian A.; Air, Gillian M.; Cipollo, John F.; Gulati, Shelly; Baranovich, Tatiana; Kumar, Amrita; Zeng, Hui; Gansebom, Shane; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the emergence of human H3N2 influenza A viruses in the pandemic of 1968, these viruses have become established as strains of moderate severity. A decline in virulence has been accompanied by glycan accumulation on the hemagglutinin globular head, and hemagglutinin receptor binding has changed from recognition of a broad spectrum of glycan receptors to a narrower spectrum. The relationship between increased glycosylation, binding changes, and reduction in H3N2 virulence is not clear. We evaluated the effect of hemagglutinin glycosylation on receptor binding and virulence of engineered H3N2 viruses. We demonstrate that low-binding virus is as virulent as higher binding counterparts, suggesting that H3N2 infection does not require either recognition of a wide variety of, or high avidity binding to, receptors. Among the few glycans recognized with low-binding virus, there were two structures that were bound by the vast majority of H3N2 viruses isolated between 1968 and 2012. We suggest that these two structures support physiologically relevant binding of H3N2 hemagglutinin and that this physiologically relevant binding has not changed since the 1968 pandemic. Therefore binding changes did not contribute to reduced severity of seasonal H3N2 viruses. This work will help direct the search for factors enhancing influenza virulence. PMID:27796371

  15. Stability of micronutrients and phytochemicals of grapefruit jam as affected by the obtention process.

    PubMed

    Igual, M; García-Martínez, E; Camacho, M M; Martínez-Navarrete, N

    2016-04-01

    Fruits are widely revered for their micronutrient properties. They serve as a primary source of vitamins and minerals as well as of natural phytonutrients with antioxidant properties. Jam constitutes an interesting way to preserve fruit. Traditionally, this product is obtained by intense heat treatment that may cause irreversible loss of these bioactive compounds responsible for the health-related properties of fruits. In this work, different grapefruit jams obtained by conventional, osmotic dehydration (OD) without thermal treatment and/or microwave (MW) techniques were compared in terms of their vitamin, organic acid and phytochemical content and their stability through three months of storage. If compared with heating, osmotic treatments lead to a greater loss of organic acids and vitamin C during both processing and storage. MW treatments permit jam to be obtained which has a similar nutritional and functional value than that obtained when using a conventional heating method, but in a much shorter time.

  16. Water making hot rocks soft: How hydrothermal alteration affects volcano stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    My research involves using numerical models of groundwater flow and slope stability to determine how long-term hydrothermal alteration in stratovolcanoes can cause increases in pore fluid pressure that lead to edifice collapse. Or in simpler terms: We can use computers to figure out how and why water that moves through hot rocks changes them into softer rocks that want to fall down. It's important to pay attention to the soft rocks even if they look safe because this can happen a long time after the stuff that makes them hot goes away or becomes cool. Wet soft rocks can go very far from high places and run over people in their way. I want show where the soft wet rocks are and how they might fall down so people will be safer.

  17. Electricity and colloidal stability: how charge distribution in the tissue can affects wound healing.

    PubMed

    Farber, Paulo Luiz; Hochman, Bernardo; Furtado, Fabianne; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2014-02-01

    The role of endogenous electric fields in wound healing is still not fully understood. Electric fields are of fundamental importance in various biological processes, ranging from embryonic development to disease progression, as described by many investigators in the last century. This hypothesis brings together some relevant literature on the importance of electric fields in physiology and pathology, the theory of biologically closed electric circuits, skin battery (a phenomenon that occurs after skin injury and seems to be involved in tissue repair), the relationship between electric charge and interstitial exclusion, and how skin tissues can be regarded as colloidal systems. The importance of electric charges, as established in the early works on the subject and the relevance of zeta potential and colloid stability are also analyzed, and together bring a new light for the physics involved in the wound repair of all the body tissues.

  18. Stabilization of Oncostatin-M mRNA by Binding of Nucleolin to a GC-Rich Element in Its 3'UTR.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sucharita; Chakraborty, Alina; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita Sengupta

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin-M (OSM) is a patho-physiologically important pleiotropic, multifunctional cytokine. OSM mRNA sequence analysis revealed that its 3'UTR contains three highly conserved GC-rich cis-elements (GCREs) whose role in mRNA stability is unidentified. In the present study, the functional role of the proximal GC-rich region of osm 3'-UTR (GCRE-1) in post-transcriptional regulation of osm expression in U937 cells was assessed by transfecting construct containing GCRE-1 at 3'-end of a fairly stable reporter gene followed by analysis of the expression of the reporter. GCRE-1 showed mRNA destabilizing activity; however, upon PMA treatment the reporter message containing GCRE-1 was stabilized. This stabilization is owing to a time-dependent progressive binding of trans-factors (at least five proteins) to GCRE-1 post-PMA treatment. Nucleolin was identified as one of the proteins in the RNP complex of GCRE-1 with PMA-treated U937 cytosolic extracts by oligo-dT affinity chromatography of poly-adenylated GCRE-1. Immuno-blot revealed time-dependent enhancement of nucleolin in the cytoplasm which in turn directly binds GCRE-1. RNA co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the GCRE-1-nucleolin interaction in vivo. To elucidate the functional role of nucleolin in stabilization of osm mRNA, nucleolin was overexpressed in U937 cells and found to stabilize the intrinsic osm mRNA, where co-transfection with the reporter containing GCRE-1 confirms the role of GCRE-1 in stabilization of the reporter mRNA. Thus, in conclusion, the results asserted that PMA treatment in U937 cells leads to cytoplasmic translocation of nucleolin that directly binds GCRE-1, one of the major GC-rich instability elements, thereby stabilizing the osm mRNA.

  19. Unique Structure and Stability of HmuY, a Novel Heme-Binding Protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Halina; Guevara, Tibisay; Tallant, Cynthia; Olczak, Mariusz; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Solà, Maria; Olczak, Teresa; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Infection, survival, and proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in humans depend on their capacity to impair host responses and acquire nutrients in a hostile environment. Among such nutrients is heme, a co-factor for oxygen storage, electron transport, photosynthesis, and redox biochemistry, which is indispensable for life. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe periodontitis. It recruits heme through HmuY, which sequesters heme from host carriers and delivers it to its cognate outer-membrane transporter, the TonB-dependent receptor HmuR. Here we report that heme binding does not significantly affect the secondary structure of HmuY. The crystal structure of heme-bound HmuY reveals a new all-β fold mimicking a right hand. The thumb and fingers pinch heme iron through two apical histidine residues, giving rise to highly symmetric octahedral iron co-ordination. The tetrameric quaternary arrangement of the protein found in the crystal structure is consistent with experiments in solution. It shows that thumbs and fingertips, and, by extension, the bound heme groups, are shielded from competing heme-binding proteins from the host. This may also facilitate heme transport to HmuR for internalization. HmuY, both in its apo- and in its heme-bound forms, is resistant to proteolytic digestion by trypsin and the major secreted proteases of P. gingivalis, gingipains K and R. It is also stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. In conclusion, these studies reveal novel molecular properties of HmuY that are consistent with its role as a putative virulence factor during bacterial infection. PMID:19424422

  20. Chemical properties and oxidative stability of perilla oils obtained from roasted perilla seeds as affected by extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong Min; Yoon, Suk Hoo; Jung, Mun Yhung

    2012-12-01

    The chemical properties and oxidative stability of perilla oils obtained from roasted perilla seeds as affected by extraction methods (supercritical carbon dioxide [SC-CO(2)], mechanical press, and solvent extraction) were studied. The SC-CO(2) extraction at 420 bar and 50 °C and hexane extraction showed significantly higher oil yield than mechanical press extraction (P < 0.05). The fatty acid compositions in the oils were virtually identical regardless of the extraction methods. The contents of tocopherol, sterol, policosanol, and phosphorus in the perilla oils greatly varied with the extraction methods. The SC-CO(2) -extracted perilla oils contained significantly higher contents of tocopherols, sterols, and policosanols than the mechanical press-extracted and hexane-extracted oils (P < 0.05). The SC-CO(2) -extracted oil showed the greatly lower oxidative stability than press-extracted and hexane-extracted oils during the storage in the oven under dark at 60 °C. However, the photooxidative stabilities of the oils were not considerably different with extraction methods.

  1. Negative energy balance affects imprint stability in oocytes recovered from postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Alan M; O'Gorman, Aoife; al Naib, Abdullah; Brennan, Lorraine; Daly, Edward; Duffy, Pat; Fair, Trudee

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian follicle development in post-partum, high-producing dairy cows, occurs in a compromised endogenous metabolic environment (referred to as negative energy balance, NEB). Key events that occur during oocyte/follicle growth, such as the vital process of genomic imprinting, may be detrimentally affected by this altered ovarian environment. Imprinting is crucial for placental function and regulation of fetal growth, therefore failure to establish and maintain imprints during oocyte growth may contribute to early embryonic loss. Using ovum pick-up (OPU), oocytes and follicular fluid samples were recovered from cows between days 20 and 115 post-calving, encompassing the NEB period. In a complimentary study, cumulus oocyte complexes were in vitro matured under high non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and in the presence of the methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Pyrosequencing revealed the loss of methylation at several imprinted loci in the OPU derived oocytes. The loss of DNA methylation was observed at the PLAGL1 locus in oocytes, following in vitro maturation (IVM) in the presence of elevated NEFAs and SAM. Finally, metabolomic analysis of postpartum follicular fluid samples revealed significant differences in several branched chain amino acids, with fatty acid profiles bearing similarities to those characteristic of lactating dairy cows. These results provide the first evidence that (1) the postpartum ovarian environment may affect maternal imprint acquisition and (2) elevated NEFAs during IVM can lead to the loss of imprinted gene methylation in bovine oocytes.

  2. Habitat stability and predation pressure affect temperament behaviours in populations of three-spined sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Nichola M; Colegrave, Nick; Heathcote, Robert J P; Braithwaite, Victoria A

    2008-03-01

    1. There is growing interest in the causes and consequences of animal temperaments. Temperament behaviours often have heritable components, but ecological variables can also affect them. Numerous variables are likely to differ between habitats, and these may interact to influence temperament behaviours. 2. Temperament behaviours may be correlated within populations (behavioural syndromes), although the underlying causes of such correlations are currently unclear. 3. We analysed three different temperament behaviours and learning ability in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, to determine how different ecological variables influence them both within and between populations. We selected populations from four ponds and four rivers that varied naturally in their exposure to predators. 4. High-predation river populations were significantly less bold than a high-predation pond and low-predation river populations, and low-predation pond populations were significantly less bold than a high-predation pond population. Within populations, temperament behaviours were correlated in one high-predation river population only. 5. These results suggest that multiple ecological factors can interact to affect temperament behaviours between populations, and also correlations in those behaviours within populations.

  3. Uner Tan syndrome caused by a homozygous TUBB2B mutation affecting microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Nguyen, Thai; Srivatsan, Anjana; Leca, Ines; Tian, Guoling; Fritz, Tanja; Hansen, Andi H; Musaev, Damir; McEvoy-Venneri, Jennifer; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Tan, Uner; Kolodner, Richard D; Cowan, Nicholas J; Keays, David A; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-12-23

    The integrity and dynamic properties of the microtubule cytoskeleton are indispensable for the development of the mammalian brain. Consequently, mutations in the genes that encode the structural component (the α/β-tubulin heterodimer) can give rise to severe, sporadic neurodevelopmental disorders. These are commonly referred to as the tubulinopathies. Here we report the addition of recessive quadrupedalism, also known as Uner Tan syndrome (UTS), to the growing list of diseases caused by tubulin variants. Analysis of a consanguineous UTS family identified a biallelic TUBB2B mutation, resulting in a p.R390Q amino acid substitution. In addition to the identifying quadrupedal locomotion, all three patients showed severe cerebellar hypoplasia. None, however, displayed the basal ganglia malformations typically associated with TUBB2B mutations. Functional analysis of the R390Q substitution revealed that it did not affect the ability of β-tubulin to fold or become assembled into the α/β-heterodimer, nor did it influence the incorporation of mutant-containing heterodimers into microtubule polymers. The 390Q mutation in S. cerevisiae TUB2 did not affect growth under basal conditions, but did result in increased sensitivity to microtubule-depolymerizing drugs, indicative of a mild impact of this mutation on microtubule function. The TUBB2B mutation described here represents an unusual recessive mode of inheritance for missense-mediated tubulinopathies and reinforces the sensitivity of the developing cerebellum to microtubule defects.

  4. Phytochemical stability in dried tomato pulp and peel as affected by moisture properties.

    PubMed

    Lavelli, Vera; Kerr, William; Sri Harsha, P S C

    2013-01-23

    Phytochemical stability was studied in dried tomato pulp and dried tomato peel stored at 30 °C with various water activity (a(w)) levels and related to glass transition temperature (T(g)) and water mobility. At a(w) < 0.32, the values for T(g) were >30 °C for both the pulp and peel, indicating that they were in the glassy state, with little molecular mobility. At a(w) = 0.56, T(g) was <30 °C, indicating the samples were in the rubbery state, with decreased viscosity and increased molecular mobility. The hydrophilic antioxidants (hydroxycinnamic acids and naringenin) were stable for samples in the glassy state, but were unstable for samples in the rubbery state. In contrast, the lipophilic antioxidants lycopene and α-tocopherol were mostly unstable for samples in the glassy state. These results could be used to optimize phytochemical contents in tomato products that must be dried prior to further processing.

  5. Enzyme bread improvers affect the stability of deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside during breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Arnau; Ambrosio, Asier; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J; Marín, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    The stability of deoxynivalenol (DON) and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-glucoside) during the breadmaking process was studied. Some enzymes used in the bakery industry were examined to evaluate their effects on DON and DON-3-glucoside. The level of DON in breads without added enzymes was reduced (17-21%). Similarly, the addition of cellulase, protease, lipase and glucose-oxidase did not modify this decreasing trend. The effect of xylanase and α-amylase on DON content depended on the fermentation temperature. These enzymes reduced the DON content by 10-14% at 45°C. In contrast, at 30°C, these enzymes increased the DON content by 13-23%. DON-3-glucoside levels decreased at the end of fermentation, with a final reduction of 19-48% when no enzymes were used. However, the presence of xylanase, α-amylase, cellulase and lipase resulted in bread with greater quantities of DON-3-glucoside when fermentation occurred at 30°C. The results showed that wheat bran and flour may contain hidden DON that may be enzymatically released during the breadmaking process when the fermentation temperature is close to 30°C.

  6. Sulfur bacteria in wastewater stabilization ponds periodically affected by the 'red-water' phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Belila, Abdelaziz; Abbas, Ben; Fazaa, Imed; Saidi, Neila; Snoussi, Mejdi; Hassen, Abdennaceur; Muyzer, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Several wastewater stabilization ponds (WSP) in Tunisia suffer periodically from the 'red-water' phenomenon due to blooming of purple sulfur bacteria, indicating that sulfur cycle is one of the main element cycles in these ponds. In this study, we investigated the microbial diversity of the El Menzeh WSP and focused in particular on the different functional groups of sulfur bacteria. For this purpose, we used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fragments of the 16S rRNA gene and of different functional genes involved in microbial sulfur metabolism (dsrB, aprA, and pufM). Analyses of the 16S rRNA revealed a relatively high microbial diversity where Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria constitute the major bacterial groups. The dsrB and aprA gene analysis revealed the presence of deltaproteobacterial sulfate-reducing bacteria (i.e., Desulfobacter and Desulfobulbus), while the analysis of 16S rRNA, aprA, and pufM genes assigned the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria community to the photosynthetic representatives belonging to the Chlorobi (green sulfur bacteria) and the Proteobacteria (purple sulfur and non sulfur bacteria) phyla. These results point on the diversity of the metabolic processes within this wastewater plant and/or the availability of sulfate and diverse electron donors.

  7. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils. PMID:27113269

  8. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jeng-Ting; Lee, Lin-Wen; Lin, Che-Tong

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs), and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF) can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability. PMID:25884030

  9. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils.

  10. Modifications of the C terminus Affect Functionality and Stability of Yeast Triacylglycerol Lipase Tgl3p*

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Ploier, Birgit; Daum, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets are specific organelles for the storage of triacylglycerols and steryl esters. They are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer with a small but specific set of proteins embedded. Assembly and insertion of proteins into this surface membrane is an intriguing question of lipid droplet biology. To address this question we studied the topology of Tgl3p, the major triacylglycerol lipase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on lipid droplets. Employing the method of limited proteolysis of lipid droplet surface proteins, we found that the C terminus of Tgl3p faces the inside of the organelle, whereas the N terminus is exposed at the cytosolic side of lipid droplets. Detailed analysis of the C terminus revealed a stretch of seven amino acids that are critical for protein stability and functionality. The negative charge of two aspartate residues within this stretch is crucial for lipase activity of Tgl3p. A portion of Tgl3p, which is located to the endoplasmic reticulum, exhibits a different topology. In the phospholipid bilayer of the endoplasmic reticulum the C terminus faces the cytosol, which results in instability of the protein. Thus, the topology of Tgl3p is important for its function and strongly dependent on the membrane environment. PMID:24847060

  11. Residue Asn277 affects the stability and substrate specificity of the SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa.

    PubMed

    Lan, Dongming; Wang, Qian; Xu, Jinxin; Zhou, Pengfei; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-03-31

    Thermostability and substrate specificity are important characteristics of enzymes for industrial application, which can be improved by protein engineering. SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase (MDL) that shows activity toward mono- and diacylglycerols, but no activity toward triacylglycerols. SMG1 lipase is considered a potential biocatalyst applied in oil/fat modification and its crystal structure revealed that an interesting residue-Asn277 may contribute to stabilize loop 273-278 and the 3104 helix which are important to enzyme characterization. In this study, to explore its role in affecting the stability and catalytic activity, mutagenesis of N277 with Asp (D), Val (V), Leu (L) and Phe (F) was conducted. Circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis and half-life measurement showed that the N277D mutant has better thermostability. The melting temperature and half-life of the N277D mutant were 56.6 °C and 187 min, respectively, while that was 54.6 °C and 121 min for SMG1 wild type (WT). Biochemical characterization of SMG1 mutants were carried out to test whether catalytic properties were affected by mutagenesis. N277D had similar enzymatic properties as SMG1 WT, but N277F showed a different substrate selectivity profile as compared to other SMG1 mutants. Analysis of the SMG1 3D model suggested that N277D formed a salt bridge via its negative charged carboxyl group with a positively charged guanidino group of R227, which might contribute to confer N277D higher temperature stability. These findings not only provide some clues to understand the molecular basis of the lipase structure/function relationship but also lay the framework for engineering suitable MDL lipases for industrial applications.

  12. Point mutations in Staphylococcus aureus PBP 2 gene affect penicillin-binding kinetics and are associated with resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, C J; Kocagoz, T; Kocagoz, S; Chambers, H F

    1995-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) has been implicated in non-PBP 2a-mediated methicillin resistance. The PBP 2 gene (pbpB) was cloned from an expression library of a methicillin-susceptible strain of S. aureus (209P), and its entire sequence was compared with that of the pbpB gene from strains BB255, BB255R, and CDC6. Point mutations that resulted in amino acid substitutions near the conserved penicillin-binding motifs were detected in BB255R and CDC6, two low-level methicillin-resistant strains. Penicillin binding to PBP 2 in both BB255R and CDC6 is altered, and kinetic analysis indicated that altered binding of PBP 2 by penicillin was due to both lower binding affinity and more rapid release of bound drug. These structural and biochemical changes may contribute to the strains' resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:7695289

  13. Factors affecting the stability and conformation of Locusta migratoria apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Weers, P M; Kay, C M; Oikawa, K; Wientzek, M; Van der Horst, D J; Ryan, R O

    1994-03-29

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, represents the only full-length apolipoprotein whose three-dimensional structure has been solved. In the present study, spectroscopic methods have been employed to investigate the effects of deglycosylation (via endoglycosidase F treatment) and complexation with lipid on the stability and conformation of this protein. Addition of isolated lipid-free apoLp-III to sonicated vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) resulted in the formation of relatively uniform disklike complexes with an average Strokes diameter of 13.5 nm. Flotation equilibrium experiments conducted in the analytical ultracentrifuge revealed a particle molecular mass of 588 500 Da. Chemical cross-linking and compositional analysis of apoLp-III.DMPC complexes indicated five apoLp-III molecules per disk and an overall DMPC:apoLp-III molar ratio of 122:1. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of apoLp-III samples suggested a loss of alpha-helical structure upon deglycosylation, while complexation with DMPC did not significantly alter the helix content (estimated to be > 75%). Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the apoLp-III tryptophan fluorescence emission maximum was blue-shifted from 347 to 332 and 321 nm upon deglycosylation and complexation with DMPC, respectively. In quenching experiments with native apoLp-III, tryptophan residues were shielded from the positively charged quencher, CsCl. Increased exposure to KI, CsCl, and acrylamide was observed upon deglycosylation, whereas complexation with DMPC yielded lower Ksv values for KI and acrylamide and an increased value for CsCl versus native lipid-free apoLp-III. In guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies monitored by CD or fluorescence, native, lipid-free apoLp-III displayed a denaturation midpoint of 0.60 M, and delta GDH2O = 5.37 kcal/mol was calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The molecular chaperone HSP70 binds to and stabilizes NOD2, an important protein involved in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler

    2014-07-04

    Microbes are detected by the pathogen-associated molecular patterns through specific host pattern recognition receptors. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that recognizes fragments of the bacterial cell wall. NOD2 is important to human biology; when it is mutated it loses the ability to respond properly to bacterial cell wall fragments. To determine the mechanisms of misactivation in the NOD2 Crohn mutants, we developed a cell-based system to screen for protein-protein interactors of NOD2. We identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a protein interactor of both wild type and Crohn mutant NOD2. HSP70 has previously been linked to inflammation, especially in the regulation of anti-inflammatory molecules. Induced HSP70 expression in cells increased the response of NOD2 to bacterial cell wall fragments. In addition, an HSP70 inhibitor, KNK437, was capable of decreasing NOD2-mediated NF-κB activation in response to bacterial cell wall stimulation. We found HSP70 to regulate the half-life of NOD2, as increasing the HSP70 level in cells increased the half-life of NOD2, and down-regulating HSP70 decreased the half-life of NOD2. The expression levels of the Crohn-associated NOD2 variants were less compared with wild type. The overexpression of HSP70 significantly increased NOD2 levels as well as the signaling capacity of the mutants. Thus, our study shows that restoring the stability of the NOD2 Crohn mutants is sufficient for rescuing the ability of these mutations to signal the presence of a bacterial cell wall ligand.

  15. Feeding dried distillers grains with solubles affects composition but not oxidative stability of milk.

    PubMed

    Testroet, E D; Li, G; Beitz, D C; Clark, S

    2015-05-01

    detected off-flavor scores were less than 1.5cm on a 15-cm line scale, indicating that the differences are not practically significant. Peroxide values support the findings by the sensory panel that both feeding DDGS at 10 and 25% and vitamin E and C fortification did not practically change the oxidative stability of milk. These results, taken together, indicate that feeding DDGS under our experimental conditions modified milk composition, but did not contribute to the development of off-flavors in milk.

  16. Phosphorylation of CREB affects its binding to high and low affinity sites: implications for cAMP induced gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Weih, F; Schmid, W; DeVack, C; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Luckow, B; Boshart, M; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP treatment of hepatoma cells leads to increased protein binding at the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in vivo, as revealed by genomic footprinting, whereas no increase is observed at the CRE of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Several criteria establish that the 43 kDa CREB protein is interacting with both of these sites. Two classes of CRE with different affinity for CREB are described. One class, including the TATCRE, is characterized by asymmetric and weak binding sites (CGTCA), whereas the second class containing symmetrical TGACGTCA sites shows a much higher binding affinity for CREB. Both classes show an increase in binding after phosphorylation of CREB by protein kinase A (PKA). An in vivo phosphorylation-dependent change in binding of CREB increases the occupancy of weak binding sites used for transactivation, such as the TATCRE, while high affinity sites may have constitutive binding of transcriptionally active and inactive CREB dimers, as demonstrated by in vivo footprinting at the PEPCK CRE. Thus, lower basal level and higher relative stimulation of transcription by cyclic AMP through low affinity CREs should result, allowing finely tuned control of gene activation. Images PMID:1354612

  17. Post-translational modification and conformational state of Heat Shock Protein 90 differentially affect binding of chemically diverse small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Kristin; Mollapour, Mehdi; Scroggins, Bradley; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Xu, Wanping; Tokita, Mari; Taldone, Tony; Pullen, Lester; Zierer, Bettina K.; Lee, Min-Jung; Trepel, Jane; Buchner, Johannes; Bolon, Daniel; Chiosis, Gabriela; Neckers, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes that facilitates the conformational maturation and function of a diverse protein clientele, including aberrant and/or over-expressed proteins that are involved in cancer growth and survival. A role for Hsp90 in supporting the protein homeostasis of cancer cells has buoyed interest in the utility of Hsp90 inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. Despite the fact that all clinically evaluated Hsp90 inhibitors target an identical nucleotide-binding pocket in the N domain of the chaperone, the precise determinants that affect drug binding in the cellular environment remain unclear, and it is possible that chemically distinct inhibitors may not share similar binding preferences. Here we demonstrate that two chemically unrelated Hsp90 inhibitors, the benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin and the purine analog PU-H71, select for overlapping but not identical subpopulations of total cellular Hsp90, even though both inhibitors bind to an amino terminal nucleotide pocket and prevent N domain dimerization. Our data also suggest that PU-H71 is able to access a broader range of N domain undimerized Hsp90 conformations than is geldanamycin and is less affected by Hsp90 phosphorylation, consistent with its broader and more potent anti-tumor activity. A more complete understanding of the impact of the cellular milieu on small molecule inhibitor binding to Hsp90 should facilitate their more effective use in the clinic. PMID:23867252

  18. Alkaline decontamination of sputum specimens adversely affects stability of mycobacterial mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Desjardin, L E; Perkins, M D; Teixeira, L; Cave, M D; Eisenach, K D

    1996-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) is an important tool for Mycobacterium tuberculosis research and diagnostics. A standard procedure using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC) and NaOH has been widely adopted for digestion and decontamination of sputum specimens for mycobacterial culture. The objective of this study was to determine the compatibility of this method with the recovery of RNA for RT-PCR assays. Nineteen sputum specimens were collected from smear-positive, pretreatment tuberculosis patients. After homogenization with NALC and glass beads, specimens were further processed by the addition of either NaOH, as per the standard decontamination protocol, or phosphate buffer. RNA was prepared by using a modified guanidine-phenol extraction method developed specifically for sputum sediments. DNA was isolated from the same specimens. Reverse transcriptions of alpha antigen (85B protein) mRNA and 16S rRNA were performed together, and aliquots were removed for separate PCRs. In all specimens, the 85B mRNA target was greatly diminished by treatment with NaOH; however, the 16S rRNA target remained unaffected. Storing sputum specimens for 48 h at 4 degrees C before processing did not seem to affect the integrity or yield of RNA; however, some degradation occurred by 72 h. Data suggest that the NaOH-NALC method for processing sputum samples is not suitable for detecting mRNA targets in RT-PCR assays. PMID:8880495

  19. Low concentrations of ethanol do not affect radioligand binding to the delta-subunit-containing GABAA receptors in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ashok K; Marutha Ravindran, C R; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-08-24

    In the present study, we investigated the co-localization pattern of the delta subunit with other subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the rat brain using immunoprecipitation and Western blotting techniques. Furthermore, we investigated whether low concentrations of ethanol affect the delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor assemblies in the rat brain using radioligand binding to the rat brain membrane homogenates as well as to the immunoprecipitated receptor assemblies. Our results revealed that delta subunit is not co-localized with gamma(2) subunit but it is associated with the alpha(1), alpha(4) or alpha(6), beta(2) and/or beta(3) subunit(s) of GABA(A) receptors in the rat brain. Ethanol (1-50 mM) neither affected [(3)H]muscimol (3 nM) binding nor diazepam-insensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 (2 nM) binding in the rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex membranes. However, a higher concentration of ethanol (500 mM) inhibited the binding of these radioligands to the GABA(A) receptors partially in the rat cerebellum and cerebral cortex. Similarly, ethanol (up to 50 mM) did not affect [(3)H]muscimol (15 nM) binding to the immunoprecipitated delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor assemblies in the rat cerebellum and hippocampus but it inhibited the binding partially at a higher concentration (500 mM). These results suggest that the native delta-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors do not play a major role in the pharmacology of clinically relevant low concentrations of ethanol.

  20. Dynamics of aggregate stability and soil organic C distribution as affected by climatic aggressiveness: a mesocosm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Barbetti, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Pasqui, Massimiliano; Tomozeiu, Rodica; Razzaghi, Somayyeh; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of a research project aimed at evaluating the adaptation scenarios of the Italian agriculture to the current climate change, a mesocosm experiment under controlled conditions was set up for studying the dynamics of soil aggregate stability and organic C in different size fractions. Three alluvial loamy soils (BOV - Typic Haplustalfs coarse-loamy; CAS - Typic Haplustalfs fine-loamy; MED - Typic Hapludalfs fine-loamy) along a climatic gradient (from dryer to moister pedoclimatic conditions) in the river Po valley (northern Italy), under crop rotation for animal husbandry from more than 40 years, were selected. The Ap horizons (0-30cm) were taken and placed in 9 climatic chambers under controlled temperature and rainfall. Each soil was subjected to three different climate scenarios in terms of erosivity index obtained by combining Modified Fournier and Bagnouls-Gaussen indexes: i) typical (TYP), the median year of each site related to the 1961-1990 reference period; ii) maximum aggressive year (MAX) observed in the same period, and iii) the simulated climate (SIM), obtained by projections of climate change precipitation and temperature for the period 2021-2050 as provided by the IPCC-A1B emission scenario. In the climatic chambers the year climate was reduced to six months. The soils were analyzed for particle size distribution, aggregate stability by wet and dry sieving, and organic C content at the beginning and at the end of the trial. The soils showed different behaviour in terms of aggregate stability and dynamics of organic C in the diverse size fractions. The soils significantly differed in terms of initial mean weight diameter (MWD) (CAS>MED>BOV). A general reduction of MWD in all sites was observed at the end of the experiment, with the increase of the smallest aggregate fractions (0.250-0.05 mm). In particular, BOV showed the maximum decrease of the aggregate stability and MED the lowest. C distribution in aggregate fractions significantly

  1. How can climate, soil, and monitoring schedule affect temporal stability of soil water contents?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, G.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal stability (TS) of soil water content (SWC) reflects the spatio-temporal organization of soil water. The TS SWC was originally recognized as a phenomenon that can be used to provide temporal average SWC of an area of interest from observations at a representative location(s). Currently application fields of TS SWC are numerous, e.g. up- and downscaling SWC, SWC monitoring and data assimilation, precision farming, and sensor network design and optimization. However, the factors that control the SWC organization and TS SWC are not completely understood. Among these factors are soil hydraulic properties that are considered as local controls, weather patterns, and the monitoring schedule. The objective of this work was to use modeling to assess the effect of these factors on the spatio-temporal patterns of SWC. We ran the HYDRUS6 code to simulate four years of SWC in 4-m long soil columns. The columns were assumed homogeneous, soil hydraulic conductivity was drawn from lognormal distributions. Sets of columns were generated separately for sandy loam and loamy soils, soil water retention was set to typical values for those soil textures. Simulations were carried out for four climates present at the continental US. The climate-specific weather patterns were obtained with the CLIGEN code using climate-specific weather observation locations that were humid subtropical from College Station (TX), humid continental from Indianapolis (IN), cold semiarid from Moscow (ID) and hot semiarid from Tucson (AZ). We evaluated the TS and representative location (RL) selections by comparing i) different climates; ii) for the same climates different years; iii) different time intervals between samplings; iv) one year duration surveys vs. one month summer campaigns; and v) different seasons of the same year. Spatial variability of the mean relative differences (MRD) differed among climates for both soils, as the probability of observing the same variance in the MRD was lower than

  2. Liming effects on cadmium stabilization in upland soil affected by gold mining activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Lee, Do Kyoung; Chung, Doug Young; Kim, Pil Joo

    2007-05-01

    To reduce cadmium (Cd) uptake of plants cultivated in heavy metal-contaminated soil, the best liming material was selected in the incubation test. The effect of the selected material was evaluated in the field. In the incubation experimentation, CaCO(3), Ca(OH)(2), CaSO(4).2H(2)O, and oyster shell meal were mixed with soil at rates corresponding to 0, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 mg Ca kg(-1). The limed soil was moistened to 70% of field moisture capacity, and incubated at 25 degrees C for 4 weeks. Ca(OH)(2) was found to be more efficient on reducing soil NH(4)OAc extractable Cd concentration, due to pH increase induced net negative charge. The selected Ca(OH)(2) was applied at rates 0, 2, 4, 8 Mg ha(-1) and then cultivated radish (Raphanus sativa L.) in the field. NH(4)OAc extractable Cd concentration of soil and plant Cd concentration decreased significantly with increasing Ca(OH)(2) rate, since alkaline-liming material markedly increased net negative charge of soil induced by pH increase, and decreased bioavailable Cd fractions (exchangeable + acidic and reducible Cd fraction) during radish cultivation. Cadmium uptake of radish could be reduced by about 50% by amending with about 5 Mg ha(-1) Ca(OH)(2) without adverse effect on radish yield and growth. The increase of net negative charge of soil by Ca(OH)(2) application may suppress Cd uptake and the competition between Ca(2+) and Cd(2+) may additionally affect the suppression of Cd uptake.

  3. Binding of the sphingolipid S1P to hTERT stabilizes telomerase at the nuclear periphery by allosterically mimicking protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Panneer Selvam, Shanmugam; De Palma, Ryan M; Oaks, Joshua J; Oleinik, Natalia; Peterson, Yuri K; Stahelin, Robert V; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Smith, Charles D; Ogretmen, Besim

    2015-06-16

    During DNA replication, the enzyme telomerase maintains the ends of chromosomes, called telomeres. Shortened telomeres trigger cell senescence, and cancer cells often have increased telomerase activity to promote their ability to proliferate indefinitely. The catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), is stabilized by phosphorylation. We found that the lysophospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2), bound hTERT at the nuclear periphery in human and mouse fibroblasts. Docking predictions and mutational analyses revealed that binding occurred between a hydroxyl group (C'3-OH) in S1P and Asp(684) in hTERT. Inhibiting or depleting SK2 or mutating the S1P binding site decreased the stability of hTERT in cultured cells and promoted senescence and loss of telomere integrity. S1P binding inhibited the interaction of hTERT with makorin ring finger protein 1 (MKRN1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that tags hTERT for degradation. Murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells formed smaller tumors in mice lacking SK2 than in wild-type mice, and knocking down SK2 in LLC cells before implantation into mice suppressed their growth. Pharmacologically inhibiting SK2 decreased the growth of subcutaneous A549 lung cancer cell-derived xenografts in mice, and expression of wild-type hTERT, but not an S1P-binding mutant, restored tumor growth. Thus, our data suggest that S1P binding to hTERT allosterically mimicks phosphorylation, promoting telomerase stability and hence telomere maintenance, cell proliferation, and tumor growth.

  4. Imipramine treatment differentially affects platelet /sup 3/H-imipramine binding and serotonin uptake in depressed patients

    SciTech Connect

    Suranyi-Cadotte, B.E.; Quirion, R.; Nair, N.P.V.; Lafaille, F.; Schwartz, G.

    1985-02-25

    Uptake of serotonin and /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in platelets of depressed patients were investigated simultaneously with changes in clinical state. Both V/sub max/ for serotonin uptake and B/sub max/ for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding were significantly lower in unmedicated depressed patients with respect to normal subjects. Successful treatment with imipramine led to a significant increase in B/sub max/ for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding, without significant change in V/sub max/ for serotonin uptake. B/sub max/ values increased to the normal range following complete, rather than partial clinical improvement. These data indicate that successful antidepressant treatment may increase the density of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites on platelets by a process which is independent of the uptake of serotonin. 29 references, 1 table.

  5. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  6. Heat Shock Protein 90 Modulates Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating the Stability and Function of Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and SREBP Cleavage-activating Protein.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-02-17

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are the key transcription factors that modulate lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are synthesized as endoplasmic reticulum-bound precursors that require proteolytic activation in the Golgi apparatus. The stability and maturation of precursor SREBPs depend on their binding to SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which escorts the SCAP-SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus. In this study, we identified heat shock protein (HSP) 90 as a novel SREBP regulator that binds to and stabilizes SCAP-SREBP. In HepG2 cells, HSP90 inhibition led to proteasome-dependent degradation of SCAP-SREBP, which resulted in the down-regulation of SREBP target genes and the reduction in intracellular triglyceride and cholesterol levels. We also demonstrated in vivo that HSP90 inhibition decreased SCAP-SREBP protein, down-regulated SREBP target genes, and reduced lipids levels in mouse livers. We propose that HSP90 plays an indispensable role in SREBP regulation by stabilizing the SCAP-SREBP complex, facilitating the activation of SREBP to maintain lipids homeostasis.

  7. Current Metabolic Status Affects Urinary Liver-Type Fatty-Acid Binding Protein in Normoalbuminuric Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hitomi; Nakashima, Mina; Takaki, Akifusa; Yukawa, Chiduko; Matsumoto, Suzuko; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to study the association between urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a biomarker of tubulointerstitial injury, and the clinical characteristics of normoalbuminuric and albuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes in order to detect the factors affecting urinary L-FABP. Methods Urinary L-FABP levels were measured in 788 patients with type 2 diabetes and again in 666 patients at 6 months after the initial measurement. The association between the urinary L-FABP level and the clinical parameters was investigated in a retrospective cross-sectional study and a subsequent observation. Results The HbA1c (odds ratio (OR): 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11 - 1.79; P < 0.01), systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.05; P < 0.01) levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96 - 1.00; P = 0.01) were significantly associated with the high levels of urinary L-FABP (> 8.4 μg/gCr) in normoalbuminuric patients. However, a logistic regression analysis revealed that use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors (OR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.16 - 4.89; P = 0.02), urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.01; P < 0.01) and serum HDL-cholesterol concentration (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.11 - 0.89; P = 0.03) were significantly associated in albuminuric patients. In the follow-up observation, the change in urinary L-FABP was found to be significantly (P < 0.01) influenced by the change in the HbA1c level in both the normoalbuminuric and albuminuric patients. Conclusions High urinary L-FABP is associated with part of the current metabolic abnormalities, including high levels of HbA1c and systolic blood pressure among normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28270898

  8. The Mn-binding proteins of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex are decreased in date palms affected by brittle leaf disease.

    PubMed

    Marqués, Jorge; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Brittle leaf disease or maladie des feuilles cassantes (MFC) is a disorder affecting date palms (Phoenix dactylifera L.) which after a long declining process eventually leads to the death of the plant. No causal agent for the disease has been found so far but leaflets of affected palms are Mn-deficient despite the existence of adequate exchangeable Mn in the soils in which affected palms grow. The disease is specifically associated with an increase in a series of chloroplastic RNAs. A proteomic analysis of leaflets of affected and unaffected date palms showed differences in quantities of several proteins. Mn-binding PSBO and PSBP proteins, components of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II, were decreased in affected tissue, reinforcing the relation between MFC and Mn deficiency. The quantities of other proteins were increased by disease suggesting a response to stress.

  9. Cognitive vulnerability to depression during middle childhood: Stability and associations with maternal affective styles and parental depression.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Elizabeth P; Olino, Thomas M; Mackrell, Sarah V M; Jordan, Patricia L; Desjardins, Jasmine; Katsiroumbas, Patrice

    2013-11-01

    Theories of cognitive vulnerability to depression (CVD) imply that CVD is early-emerging and trait-like; however, little longitudinal work has tested this premise in middle childhood, or examined theoretically relevant predictors of child CVD. We examined test-retest correlations of self-referent encoding task performance and self-reported attributional styles and their associations with parental characteristics in 205 seven-year-olds. At baseline, child CVD was assessed, structured clinical interviews were conducted with parents, and ratings of observed maternal affective styles were made. Children's CVD was re-assessed approximately one and two years later. Both measures of children's CVD were prospectively and concurrently associated with children's depressive symptoms and showed modest stability. Multilevel modeling indicated that maternal criticism and paternal depression were related to children's CVD. Findings indicate that even early-emerging CVD is a valid marker of children's depression risk.

  10. The fatty acid amide hydrolase C385A variant affects brain binding of the positron emission tomography tracer [11C]CURB.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Isabelle; Tyndale, Rachel F; Williams, Belinda; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Westwood, Duncan J; Le Foll, Bernard; Rusjan, Pablo M; Mizrahi, Romina; De Luca, Vincenzo; Zhou, Qian; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J; Tong, Junchao

    2015-08-01

    The common functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs324420, C385A) of the endocannabinoid inactivating enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been associated with anxiety disorder relevant phenotype and risk for addictions. Here, we tested whether the FAAH polymorphism affects in vivo binding of the FAAH positron emission tomography (PET) probe [(11)C]CURB ([(11)C-carbonyl]-6-hydroxy-[1,10-biphenyl]-3-yl cyclohexylcarbamate (URB694)). Participants (n=24) completed one [(11)C]CURB/PET scan and were genotyped for rs324420. Relative to C/C (58%), A-allele carriers (42%) had 23% lower [(11)C]CURB binding (λk3) in brain. We report evidence that the genetic variant rs324420 in FAAH is associated with measurable differences in brain FAAH binding as per PET [(11)C]CURB measurement.

  11. The fatty acid amide hydrolase C385A variant affects brain binding of the positron emission tomography tracer [11C]CURB

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Isabelle; Tyndale, Rachel F; Williams, Belinda; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Westwood, Duncan J; Foll, Bernard Le; Rusjan, Pablo M; Mizrahi, Romina; De Luca, Vincenzo; Zhou, Qian; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Kish, Stephen J; Tong, Junchao

    2015-01-01

    The common functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs324420, C385A) of the endocannabinoid inactivating enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been associated with anxiety disorder relevant phenotype and risk for addictions. Here, we tested whether the FAAH polymorphism affects in vivo binding of the FAAH positron emission tomography (PET) probe [11C]CURB ([11C-carbonyl]-6-hydroxy-[1,10-biphenyl]-3-yl cyclohexylcarbamate (URB694)). Participants (n=24) completed one [11C]CURB/PET scan and were genotyped for rs324420. Relative to C/C (58%), A-allele carriers (42%) had 23% lower [11C]CURB binding (λk3) in brain. We report evidence that the genetic variant rs324420 in FAAH is associated with measurable differences in brain FAAH binding as per PET [11C]CURB measurement. PMID:26036940

  12. ATP binding and hydrolysis steps of the uni-site catalysis by the mitochondrial F(1)-ATPase are affected by inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Yakov M

    2010-10-01

    The effect of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) on uni-site ATP binding and hydrolysis by the nucleotide-depleted F(1)-ATPase from beef heart mitochondria (ndMF(1)) has been investigated. It is shown for the first time that P(i) decreases the apparent rate constant of uni-site ATP binding by ndMF(1) 3-fold with the K(d) of 0.38+/-0.14mM. During uni-site ATP hydrolysis, P(i) also shifts equilibrium between bound ATP and ADP+P(i) in the direction of ATP synthesis with the K(d) of 0.17+/-0.03mM. However, 10mM P(i) does not significantly affect ATP binding during multi-site catalysis.

  13. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  14. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation decreases long-term potentiation stability and affects some glutamatergic signaling proteins during hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J; Roffwarg, H P; Dreher, A; Bissette, G; Karolewicz, B; Shaffery, J P

    2008-04-22

    Development of the mammalian CNS requires formation and stabilization of neuronal circuits and synaptic connections. Sensory stimulation provided by the environment orchestrates neuronal circuit formation in the waking state. Endogenous sources of activation are also implicated in these processes. Accordingly we hypothesized that sleep, especially rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), the stage characterized by high neuronal activity that is more prominent in development than adulthood, provides endogenous stimulation, which, like sensory input, helps to stabilize and refine neuronal circuits during CNS development. Young (Y: postnatal day (PN) 16) and adolescent (A: PN44) rats were rapid eye movement sleep-deprived (REMSD) by gentle cage-shaking for only 4 h on 3 consecutive days (total 12 h). The effect of REMS deprivation in Y and A rats was tested 3-7 days after the last deprivation session (Y, PN21-25; A, PN49-53) and was compared with younger (immature, I, PN9-12) untreated, age-matched, treated and normal control groups. REMS deprivation negatively affected the stability of long-term potentiation (LTP) in Y but not A animals. LTP instability in Y-REMSD animals was similar to the instability in even the more immature, untreated animals. Utilizing immunoblots, we identified changes in molecular components of glutamatergic synapses known to participate in mechanisms of synaptic refinement and plasticity. Overall, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2A, AMPA receptor subunit 1 (GluR1), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and calcium/calmodulin kinase II tended to be lower in Y REMSD animals (NR2B, GluR1 and PSD-95 were significantly lower) compared with controls, an effect not present in the A animals. Taken together, these data indicate that early-life REMS deprivation reduces stability of hippocampal neuronal circuits, possibly by hindering expression of mature glutamatergic synaptic components. The findings

  16. Cleavage of the sarcin–ricin loop of 23S rRNA differentially affects EF-G and EF-Tu binding

    PubMed Central

    García-Ortega, Lucía; Álvarez-García, Elisa; Gavilanes, José G.; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Ribotoxins are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis and inactivate ribosomes from a variety of organisms. The ribotoxin α-sarcin cleaves the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at the universally conserved sarcin–ricin loop (SRL) leading to complete inactivation of the ribosome and cellular death. The SRL interacts with translation factors that hydrolyze GTP, and it is important for their binding to the ribosome, but its precise role is not yet understood. We studied the effect of α-sarcin on defined steps of translation by the bacterial ribosome. α-Sarcin-treated ribosomes showed no defects in mRNA and tRNA binding, peptide-bond formation and sparsomycin-dependent translocation. Cleavage of SRL slightly affected binding of elongation factor Tu ternary complex (EF-Tu•GTP•tRNA) to the ribosome. In contrast, the activity of elongation factor G (EF-G) was strongly impaired in α-sarcin-treated ribosomes. Importantly, cleavage of SRL inhibited EF-G binding, and consequently GTP hydrolysis and mRNA–tRNA translocation. These results suggest that the SRL is more critical in EF-G than ternary complex binding to the ribosome implicating different requirements in this region of the ribosome during protein elongation. PMID:20215430

  17. Crystal Structure of OXA-58 with the Substrate-Binding Cleft in a Closed State: Insights into the Mobility and Stability of the OXA-58 Structure

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Hiromichi; Sugiyabu, Tomohiro; Ueno, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Miyano, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    OXA-58 is a class D β-lactamase from the multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. We determined the crystal structure of OXA-58 in a novel crystal, and revealed the structure of the substrate-binding cleft in a closed state, distinct from a previously reported OXA-58 crystal structure with the binding cleft in an open state. In the closed state, the movement of three loops (α3–α4, β6–β7, and β8–α10) forms an arch-like architecture over the binding cleft through interaction between the Phe113 residues of α3–α4 and Met225 of β6–β7. This structure suggests the involvement of these flexible loops in OXA-58 substrate binding. In contrast to the mobile loops, the Ω-loop appeared static, including the conserved loop residues and their hydrogen bonds; the pivotal residue Trp169 within the Ω-loop, ζ-carbamic acid of the modified base catalyst residue Lys86, and nucleophilic residue Ser83. The stability of OXA-58 was enhanced concomitant with an increase in the hydrolytic activity catalyzed by NaHCO3-dependent ζ-carbamic acid formation, with an EC50 of 0.34 mM. The W169A mutant enzyme was significantly thermally unstable even in the presence of 100 mM NaHCO3, whereas the S83A mutant was stabilized with NaHCO3-dependent activation. The ζ-carbamic acid was shown to increase not only OXA-58 hydrolytic activity but also OXA-58 stability through the formation of a hydrogen bond network connected to the Ω-loop with Ser83 and Trp169. Thus, the static Ω-loop is important for OXA-58 stability, whereas the mobile loops of the substrate-binding cleft form the basis for accommodation of the various substituents of β-lactam backbone. PMID:26701320

  18. Cross Talk between β1 and αV Integrins: β1 Affects β3 mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Retta, Saverio Francesco; Cassarà, Georgia; D'Amato, Monica; Alessandro, Riccardo; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Degani, Simona; De Leo, Giacomo; Silengo, Lorenzo; Tarone, Guido

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a fine-tuned integrin cross talk can generate a high degree of specificity in cell adhesion, suggesting that spatially and temporally coordinated expression and activation of integrins are more important for regulated cell adhesive functions than the intrinsic specificity of individual receptors. However, little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms of integrin cross talk. With the use of β1-null GD25 cells ectopically expressing the β1A integrin subunit, we provide evidence for the existence of a cross talk between β1 and αV integrins that affects the ratio of αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrin cell surface levels. In particular, we demonstrate that a down-regulation of αVβ3 and an up-regulation of αVβ5 occur as a consequence of β1A expression. Moreover, with the use of GD25 cells expressing the integrin isoforms β1B and β1D, as well as two β1 cytoplasmic domain deletion mutants lacking either the entire cytoplasmic domain (β1TR) or only its “variable” region (β1COM), we show that the effects of β1 over αV integrins take place irrespective of the type of β1 isoform, but require the presence of the “common” region of the β1 cytoplasmic domain. In an attempt to establish the regulatory mechanism(s) whereby β1 integrins exert their trans-acting functions, we have found that the down-regulation of αVβ3 is due to a decreased β3 subunit mRNA stability, whereas the up-regulation of αVβ5 is mainly due to translational or posttranslational events. These findings provide the first evidence for an integrin cross talk based on the regulation of mRNA stability. PMID:11598197

  19. The stability and the hydrological behavior of biological soil crusts is significantly affected by the complex nature of their polysaccharidic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Philippis, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Biological crusts (BSCs) are complex microbial associations constituted by cells and microbial filaments embedded in a polysaccharidic matrix (EPS) that binds them together and with soil particles. EPSs of BSCs play a key role in structuring the soil and in affecting the hydrological processes taking place at the topsoil in desert environments. Recently, the amphiphilic nature of the EPSs, due to the contemporaneous presence in the macromolecules of hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents, was put in relation with their capability to contribute to the structuring of the soil particles in BSCs and to hydrological behavior of the crusts. Indeed, in the EPSs the hydrophobicity due to the non-polar constituents (i.e. deoxysugars, ester-linked fatty acids, non polar aminoacids) was associated with the adhesion of the microbial cells to solid surfaces and to the clogging of micropores in the crusts. On the other hand, the hydrophilic constituents of the EPSs (i.e. acidic sugars, ketal-linked pyruvic acid, sulphate groups etc) were suggested to determine the final water content and distribution in the soil. The presence of BSCs facilitates the uptake of moisture from the atmosphere and at the same time contributes to enriching the soils with organic matter. In this lecture, the role of the EPSs in affecting the hydrological behavior of BSCs will be discussed by comparing the results obtained with natural and artificially induced BSCs also in relation with the texture of the soils. Furthermore, the contribution to the structuring of the soils of the polysaccharidic matrix of the crusts will be discussed moving from the different characteristics of two operationally-defined EPS fractions, the colloidal (C-EPS) and the EDTA extractable (tightly bound, TB-EPS) fractions. In BSCs, C-EPSs are loosely bound to cells and sediments while TB-EPSs are tightly bound to the crustal biotic and abiotic constituents of the crusts. The results obtained in a recent study suggest that the

  20. Low operational stability of enzymes in dry organic solvents: changes in the active site might affect catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vibha; Delgado, Yamixa; Legault, Marc; Barletta, Gabriel

    2012-02-14

    The potential of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents for synthetic applications has been overshadowed by the fact that their catalytic properties are affected by organic solvents. In addition, it has recently been shown that an enzyme's initial activity diminishes considerably after prolonged exposure to organic media. Studies geared towards understanding this last drawback have yielded unclear results. In the present work we decided to use electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) to study the motion of an active site spin label (a nitroxide free radical) during 96 h of exposure of the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg to four different organic solvents. Our EPR data shows a typical two component spectra that was quantified by the ratio of the anisotropic and isotropic signals. The isotropic component, associated with a mobile nitroxide free radical, increases during prolonged exposure to all solvents used in the study. The maximum increase (of 43%) was observed in 1,4-dioxane. Based on these and previous studies we suggest that prolonged exposure of the enzyme to these solvents provokes a cascade of events that could induce substrates to adopt different binding conformations. This is the first EPR study of the motion of an active-site spin label during prolonged exposure of an enzyme to organic solvents ever reported.

  1. Fine mapping of inhibitory anti-alpha5 monoclonal antibody epitopes that differentially affect integrin-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, L; Clark, K; Mould, A P; Humphries, M J

    1999-01-01

    The high-affinity interaction of integrin alpha5beta1 with the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin requires both the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence (in the tenth type III repeat) and a second site Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) in the adjacent ninth type III repeat, which synergizes with RGD. Arg-Arg-Glu-Thr-Ala-Trp-Ala (RRETAWA) is a novel peptidic ligand for alpha5beta1, identified by phage display, which blocks alpha5beta1-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin. A key question is the location of the binding sites for these ligand sequences within the integrin. In this study we have identified residues that form part of the epitopes of three inhibitory anti-alpha5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs): 16, P1D6 and SNAKA52. These mAbs have distinct functional properties. mAb 16 blocks the recognition of RGD and RRETAWA, whereas P1D6 blocks binding to the synergy sequence. The binding of SNAKA52 is inhibited by anti-beta1 mAbs, indicating that its epitope is close to the interface between the alpha and beta subunits. Residues in human alpha5 were replaced with the corresponding residues in mouse alpha5 by site-directed mutagenesis; wild-type or mutant human alpha5 was expressed on the surface of alpha5-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. mAb binding was assessed by flow cytometry and by adhesion to the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin or RRETAWA by cell attachment assay. All three epitopes were located to different putative loops in the N-terminal domain of alpha5. As expected, disruption of these epitopes had no effect on ligand recognition by alpha5beta1. The locations of these epitopes are consistent with the beta-propeller model for integrin alpha-subunit structure and allow us to propose a topological image of the integrin-ligand complex. PMID:10567237

  2. Preparation of /sup 125/I-labeled human growth hormone of high quality binding properties endowed with long-term stability

    SciTech Connect

    Biscayart, P.L.; Paladini, A.C.; Vita, N.; Roguin, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 125/I-labeled human growth hormone (/sup 125/I-labeled.hGH) was prepared by using two variants of the chloramine T labelling procedure and purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of the reaction mixture. Variant A produced a tracer with high specific activity (100 +/- 10 microCi/microgram), high maximal binding capacity to antibodies (93%) and long-term stability (at least 150 days at -20/degree/C). No diiodinated tyrosil residues could be detected in this tracer. Variant B was devised to obtain higher yields of labeled hormone. The electrophoresis of the iodination mixture revealed two radioactive components with Rm values of 0.49 and 0.55 which result from the iodination of hGH variants preexisting in the starting material. Both tracers had similar specific activities (70 +/- 10 microCi/microgram), high maximal binding capacity to antibodies or receptors (80-100%, after 80 days of their obtention) and high stability (at least 100 days at -20/degree/C). It is concluded that the iododerivatives of hGH obtained by either method are adequate to perform radioimmunoassay and receptor studies and have long-term stability.

  3. Binding of curcumin with bovine serum albumin in the presence of ι-carrageenan and implications on the stability and antioxidant activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingling; Wu, Yue; Li, Jinbing; Zhou, Haibo; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2013-07-24

    This work studied the influences of formation of BSA/ι-carrageenan complexes on the binding, stability, and antioxidant activity of curcumin. In the presence of BSA and ι-carrageenan, curcumin gives higher intensities of absorption and fluorescence than free curcumin and curcumin only combined with BSA. The added ι-carrageenan is observed to promote curcumin for quenching the instrinsic fluorescence of BSA. These results are explained in terms of the formation of BSA/ι-carrageenan complexes, which help to stabilize the folded structure of BSA for providing curcumin with a more hydrophobic microenvironment. The small difference in anisotropy values of curcumin with BSA alone and of BSA/ι-carrageenan complexes suggests that ι-carrageenan acts as outer stretch conformation in BSA/ι-carrageenan complexes but does not directly disturb the hydrophobic pockets inside BSA, where curcumin is hydrophobically located. The determined values of the binding constant are higher for curcumin with BSA/ι-carrageenan complexes than with BSA alone. Moreover, BSA/ι-carrageenan complexes are found to be superior to single BSA for enhancing the stability and DPPH radical-scavenging ability of curcumin.

  4. Disordered Cold Regulated15 Proteins Protect Chloroplast Membranes during Freezing through Binding and Folding, But Do Not Stabilize Chloroplast Enzymes in Vivo1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, Anja; Bryant, Gary; Sulpice, Ronan; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2014-01-01

    Freezing can severely damage plants, limiting geographical distribution of natural populations and leading to major agronomical losses. Plants native to cold climates acquire increased freezing tolerance during exposure to low nonfreezing temperatures in a process termed cold acclimation. This involves many adaptative responses, including global changes in metabolite content and gene expression, and the accumulation of cold-regulated (COR) proteins, whose functions are largely unknown. Here we report that the chloroplast proteins COR15A and COR15B are necessary for full cold acclimation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). They protect cell membranes, as indicated by electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Recombinant COR15 proteins stabilize lactate dehydrogenase during freezing in vitro. However, a transgenic approach shows that they have no influence on the stability of selected plastidic enzymes in vivo, although cold acclimation results in increased enzyme stability. This indicates that enzymes are stabilized by other mechanisms. Recombinant COR15 proteins are disordered in water, but fold into amphipathic α-helices at high osmolyte concentrations in the presence of membranes, a condition mimicking molecular crowding induced by dehydration during freezing. X-ray scattering experiments indicate protein-membrane interactions specifically under such crowding conditions. The COR15-membrane interactions lead to liposome stabilization during freezing. Collectively, our data demonstrate the requirement for COR15 accumulation for full cold acclimation of Arabidopsis. The function of these intrinsically disordered proteins is the stabilization of chloroplast membranes during freezing through a folding and binding mechanism, but not the stabilization of chloroplastic enzymes. This indicates a high functional specificity of these disordered plant proteins. PMID:25096979

  5. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to gonadal tissue: comparison of limited-point saturation analyses to Scatchard analyses for determining binding capacities and factors affecting estimates of binding capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, L.J.; Ireland, J.J.

    1986-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare gonadotropin binding capacity calculated from limited-point saturation analyses to those obtained from Scatchard analyses, and to test the effects of membrane purity and source of gonadotropin receptors on determining the maximum percentage of radioiodinated hormone bound to receptors (maximum bindability). One- to four-point saturation analyses gave results comparable to results by Scatchard analyses when examining relative binding capacities of receptors. Crude testicular homogenates had lower estimates of maximum bindability of /sup 125/I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin than more purified gonadotropin receptor preparations. Under similar preparation techniques, some gonadotropin receptor sources exhibited low maximum bindability.

  6. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  7. Genetic variation at the 8q24.21 renal cancer susceptibility locus affects HIF binding to a MYC enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Grampp, Steffen; Platt, James L.; Lauer, Victoria; Salama, Rafik; Kranz, Franziska; Neumann, Viviana K.; Wach, Sven; Stöhr, Christine; Hartmann, Arndt; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Mole, David R.; Schödel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by loss of function of the von Hippel–Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL) and unrestrained activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Genetic and epigenetic determinants have an impact on HIF pathways. A recent genome-wide association study on renal cancer susceptibility identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an intergenic region located between the oncogenes MYC and PVT1. Here using assays of chromatin conformation, allele-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome editing, we show that HIF binding to this regulatory element is necessary to trans-activate MYC and PVT1 expression specifically in cells of renal tubular origins. Moreover, we demonstrate that the risk-associated polymorphisms increase chromatin accessibility and activity as well as HIF binding to the enhancer. These findings provide further evidence that genetic variation at HIF-binding sites modulates the oncogenic transcriptional output of the VHL–HIF axis and provide a functional explanation for the disease-associated effects of SNPs in ccRCC. PMID:27774982

  8. FK506-binding protein mutational analysis: defining the active-site residue contributions to catalysis and the stability of ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    DeCenzo, M T; Park, S T; Jarrett, B P; Aldape, R A; Futer, O; Murcko, M A; Livingston, D J

    1996-02-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein FKBP12 is a cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that binds the macrolides FK506 and rapamycin. We have examined the role of the binding pocket residues of FKBP12 in protein-ligand interactions by making conservative substitutions of 12 of these residues by site-directed mutagenesis. For each mutant FKBP12, we measured the affinity for FK506 and rapamycin and the catalytic efficiency in the cis-frans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase reaction. The mutation of Trp59 or Phe99 generates an FKBP12 with a significantly lower affinity for FK506 than wild-type protein. Tyr26 and Tyr82 mutants are enzymatically active, demonstrating that hydrogen bonding by these residues is not required for catalysis of the cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase reaction, although these mutations alter the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We conclude that hydrophobic interactions in the active site dominate in the stabilization of FKBP12 binding to macrolide ligands and to the twisted-amide peptidyl-prolyl substrate intermediate.

  9. Genetic stability of murine pluripotent and somatic hybrid cells may be affected by conditions of their cultivation.

    PubMed

    Ivanovna, Shramova Elena; Alekseevich, Larionov Oleg; Mikhailovich, Khodarovich Yurii; Vladimirovna, Zatsepina Olga

    2011-01-01

    Using mouse pluripotent teratocarcinoma PCC4azal cells and proliferating spleen lymphocytes we obtained a new type of hybrids, in which marker lymphocyte genes were suppressed, but expression the Oct-4 gene was not effected; the hybrid cells were able to differentiate to cardiomyocytes. In order to specify the environmental factors which may affect the genetic stability and other hybrid properties, we analyzed the total chromosome number and differentiation potencies of hybrids respectively to conditions of their cultivation. Particular attention was paid to the number and transcription activity of chromosomal nucleolus organizing regions (NORs), which harbor the most actively transcribed - ribosomal - genes. The results showed that the hybrids obtained are characterized by a relatively stable chromosome number which diminished less than in 5% during 27 passages. However, a long-term cultivation of hybrid cells in non-selective conditions resulted in preferential elimination of some NO- chromosomes, whereas the number of active NORs per cell was increased due to activation of latent NORs. On the contrary, in selective conditions, i.e. in the presence of hypoxantine, aminopterin and thymidine, the total number of NOR-bearing chromosomes was not changed, but a partial inactivation of remaining NORs was observed. The higher number of active NORs directly correlated with the capability of hybrid cells for differentiation to cardiomyocytes.

  10. The FlgT Protein Is Involved in Aeromonas hydrophila Polar Flagella Stability and Not Affects Anchorage of Lateral Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila sodium-driven polar flagellum has a complex stator-motor. Consist of two sets of redundant and non-exchangeable proteins (PomA/PomB and PomA2/PomB2), which are homologs to other sodium-conducting polar flagellum stator motors; and also two essential proteins (MotX and MotY), that they interact with one of those two redundant pairs of proteins and form the T-ring. In this work, we described an essential protein for polar flagellum stability and rotation which is orthologs to Vibrio spp. FlgT and it is encoded outside of the A. hydrophila polar flagellum regions. The flgT was present in all mesophilic Aeromonas strains tested and also in the non-motile Aeromonas salmonicida. The A. hydrophila ΔflgT mutant is able to assemble the polar flagellum but is more unstable and released into the culture supernatant from the cell upon completion assembly. Presence of FlgT in purified polar hook-basal bodies (HBB) of wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting and electron microscopy observations showed an outer ring of the T-ring (H-ring) which is not present in the ΔflgT mutant. Anchoring and motility of proton-driven lateral flagella was not affected in the ΔflgT mutant and specific antibodies did not detect FlgT in purified lateral HBB of wild type strain. PMID:27507965

  11. Does the temperature of beverages affect the surface roughness, hardness, and color stability of a composite resin?

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Karaman, Emel; Firat, Esra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of beverages’ temperature on the surface roughness, hardness, and color stability of a composite resin. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of the Filtek Z250 composite (3M ESPE, Dental Products, St.Paul, MN, USA) were prepared and initial roughness, microhardness, and color were measured. Then the specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 10 specimens each: Coffee at 70°C, coffee at 37°C, cola at 10°C, cola at 37°C, and artificial saliva (control). After the samples were subjected to 15 min × 3 cycles per day of exposure to the solutions for 30 days, the final measurements were recorded. Results: After immersion in beverages, the artificial saliva group showed hardness values higher than those of the other groups (P < 0.001) and the microhardness values were significantly different from the initial values in all groups except for the control group. Both cola groups showed roughness values higher than the baseline values (P < 0.05), while the other groups showed values similar to the baseline measurements. When ΔE measurements were examined, the 70°C coffee group showed the highest color change among all the groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: High-temperature solutions caused alterations in certain properties of composites, such as increased color change, although they did not affect the hardness or roughness of the composite resin material tested. PMID:24883021

  12. Interaction of octahedral ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)](2+) with poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) triplex: Increasing third-strand stabilization of the triplex without affecting the stability of the duplex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Peng, Mengna; Zhang, Jingwen; Tan, Lifeng

    2017-04-01

    Triple-helical RNA are of interest because of possible biological roles as well as the potential therapeutic uses of these structures, while the stability of triplexes is usually weaker than that of the Watson-Crick base pairing duplex strand due to the electrostatic repulsion between three polyanionic strands. Therefore, how to increase the stability of the specific sequences of triplexes are of importance. In this paper the binding of a Ru(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)](2+) (bpy=2.2'-bipyridine, PIP=2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f]- [1,10]-phenanthroline), with poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) triplex has been investigated by spectrophotometry, spectrofluorometry, viscosimetry and circular dichroism. The results suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)](2+) as a metallointercalator can stabilize poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) triplex (where · denotes the Watson-Crick base pairing and * denotes the Hoogsteen base pairing),while it stabilizes third-strand with no obvious effect on the duplex of poly(U)·poly(A), reflecting the binding of this complex with the triplex is favored by the Hoogsteen paired poly(U) third strand to a great extent.

  13. NLRP7 affects trophoblast lineage differentiation, binds to overexpressed YY1 and alters CpG methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal-effect mutations in NLRP7 cause rare biparentally inherited hydatidiform moles (BiHMs), abnormal pregnancies containing hypertrophic vesicular trophoblast but no embryo. BiHM trophoblasts display abnormal DNA methylation patterns affecting maternally methylated germline differentially methy...

  14. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  15. Glycosylation of Skp1 affects its conformation and promotes binding to a model f-box protein.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M Osman; Schafer, Christopher M; Powell, John T; Rodgers, Karla K; Mooers, Blaine H M; West, Christopher M

    2014-03-18

    In the social amoeba Dictyostelium, Skp1 is hydroxylated on proline 143 and further modified by three cytosolic glycosyltransferases to yield an O-linked pentasaccharide that contributes to O2 regulation of development. Skp1 is an adapter in the Skp1/cullin1/F-box protein family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that targets specific proteins for polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. To investigate the biochemical consequences of glycosylation, untagged full-length Skp1 and several of its posttranslationally modified isoforms were expressed and purified to near homogeneity using recombinant and in vitro strategies. Interaction studies with the soluble mammalian F-box protein Fbs1/Fbg1/OCP1 revealed preferential binding to the glycosylated isoforms of Skp1. This difference correlated with the increased α-helical and decreased β-sheet content of glycosylated Skp1s based on circular dichroism and increased folding order based on small-angle X-ray scattering. A comparison of the molecular envelopes of fully glycosylated Skp1 and the apoprotein indicated that both isoforms exist as an antiparallel dimer that is more compact and extended in the glycosylated state. Analytical gel filtration and chemical cross-linking studies showed a growing tendency of less modified isoforms to dimerize. Considering that regions of free Skp1 are intrinsically disordered and Skp1 can adopt distinct folds when bound to F-box proteins, we propose that glycosylation, which occurs adjacent to the F-box binding site, influences the spectrum of energetically similar conformations that vary inversely in their propensity to dock with Fbs1 or another Skp1. Glycosylation may thus influence Skp1 function by modulating F-box protein binding in cells.

  16. Copper(II) interaction with peptide fragments of histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein: Speciation, stability and binding details.

    PubMed

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Santoro, Anna Maria; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    GHHPH is the peptide repeat present in histidine-proline rich glycoprotein (HPRG), a plasma glycoprotein involved in angiogenesis process. The copper(II) ions interaction with mono (Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2)) and its bis-repeat (Ac-GHHPHGHHPHG-NH(2)) was investigated by means of potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. To single out the copper(II) coordination environments of different species formed with Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2), three single point mutated peptides were also synthesized and their ability to coordinate Cu(2+) investigated. Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2) binds Cu(2+) by the imidazole side chain and the amide nitrogen deprotonation that takes place towards the N-terminus. The bis-repeat is able to bind Cu(2+) more efficiently than Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2). This difference is not only due to the number of His residues in the sequence but also to the different binding sites. In fact, the comparison of the potentiometric and spectroscopic data of the copper(II) complexes with a bis-repeatPeg construct Ac-(GHHPHG)-Peg-(GHHPHG)-NH(2) and those of the metal complexes with Ac-HGHH-NH(2), indicates that the central HGHH amino acid sequence is the main copper(II) binding site.

  17. Simultaneous prenatal ethanol and nicotine exposure affect ethanol consumption, ethanol preference and oxytocin receptor binding in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah K; Cox, Elizabeth T; McMurray, Matthew S; Fay, Emily E; Jarrett, Thomas M; Walker, Cheryl H; Overstreet, David H; Johns, Josephine M

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol consumption and smoking during pregnancy are common, despite the known adverse effects on the fetus. The teratogenicity of each drug independently is well established; however, the effects of concurrent exposure to ethanol and nicotine in preclinical models remain unclear. This study examined the impact of simultaneous prenatal exposure to both ethanol and nicotine on offspring ethanol preference behaviors and oxytocin system dynamics. Rat dams were given liquid diet (17% ethanol derived calories (EDC)) on gestational day (GD) 5 and 35% EDC from GD 6-20 and concurrently an osmotic minipump delivered nicotine (3-6mg/kg/day) from GD 4-postpartum day 10. Offspring were tested for ethanol preference during adolescence (postnatal day (PND) 30-43) and again at adulthood (PND 60-73), followed by assays for oxytocin mRNA expression and receptor binding in relevant brain regions. Prenatal exposure decreased ethanol preference in males during adolescence, and decreased consumption and preference in females during adulthood compared to controls. Oxytocin receptor binding in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus was increased in adult prenatally exposed males only. Prenatal exposure to these drugs sex-specifically decreased ethanol preference behavior in offspring unlike reports for either drug separately. The possible role of oxytocin in reduction of ethanol consumption behavior is highlighted.

  18. Human cytokines interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-6 affect the growth and insulin binding of the unicellular organism Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Kovács, P; Falus, A

    1995-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-6 significantly increase the growth rate of the unicellular organism, Tetrahymena. The effect elicited by IL-3 is long lasting as it was also detectable after 20 generations. Effect of IL-6 was detectable as long as the substance was present in the cell culture. Pretreatment with IL-3 did not enhance the proliferative response to subsequent IL-3 treatment, but the second exposure to IL-3 considerably depressed the active proliferation of Tetrahymena cells. However, a positive 'priming effect' elicited by IL-6 resulted in an increased growth rate following repeated IL-6 stimulation. Insulin binding to the plasma membrane of Tetrahymena was increased by IL-6 but not by IL-3 after 24 hours, and this enhancement appeared even after one hour incubation. If the cells were pretreated with insulin, IL-6 did not influence insulin binding, while an inhibition by IL-3 was observed. These results direct attention to the similarities of actions induced by IL-3 and IL-6 at different levels of phylogeny probably due to the presence of cytokine receptor-like structures on this unicellular organism.

  19. How conformational changes can affect catalysis, inhibition and drug resistance of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism such as the HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hemmateenejad, Bahram

    2013-05-01

    A central question is how the conformational changes of proteins affect their function and the inhibition of this function by drug molecules. Many enzymes change from an open to a closed conformation upon binding of substrate or inhibitor molecules. These conformational changes have been suggested to follow an induced-fit mechanism in which the molecules first bind in the open conformation in those cases where binding in the closed conformation appears to be sterically obstructed such as for the HIV-1 protease. In this article, we present a general model for the catalysis and inhibition of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism. We derive general expressions that specify how the overall catalytic rate of the enzymes depends on the rates for binding, for the conformational changes, and for the chemical reaction. Based on these expressions, we analyze the effect of mutations that mainly shift the conformational equilibrium on catalysis and inhibition. If the overall catalytic rate is limited by product unbinding, we find that mutations that destabilize the closed conformation relative to the open conformation increase the catalytic rate in the presence of inhibitors by a factor exp(ΔΔGC/RT) where ΔΔGC is the mutation-induced shift of the free-energy difference between the conformations. This increase in the catalytic rate due to changes in the conformational equilibrium is independent of the inhibitor molecule and, thus, may help to understand how non-active-site mutations can contribute to the multi-drug-resistance that has been observed for the HIV-1 protease. A comparison to experimental data for the non-active-site mutation L90M of the HIV-1 protease indicates that the mutation slightly destabilizes the closed conformation of the enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly.

  20. Oligomerization domains in the glycan-binding receptors DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR: Sequence variation and stability differences.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ália; Hadjivasiliou, Andreas; Ossa, Felipe; Lim, Novandy K; Turgut, Aylin; Taylor, Maureen E; Drickamer, Kurt

    2017-02-01

    Human dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-1 grabbing nonintegrin, DC-SIGN, and the sinusoidal endothelial cell receptor DC-SIGNR or L-SIGN, are closely related sugar-binding receptors. DC-SIGN acts both as a pathogen-binding endocytic receptor and as a cell adhesion molecule, while DC-SIGNR has only the pathogen-binding function. In addition to differences in the sugar-binding properties of the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the two receptors, there are sequence differences in the adjacent neck domains, which are coiled-coil tetramerization domains comprised largely of 23-amino acid repeat units. A series of model polypeptides consisting of uniform repeat units have been characterized by gel filtration, differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism. The results demonstrate that two features characterize repeat units which form more stable tetramers: a leucine reside in the first position of the heptad pattern of hydrophobic residues that pack on the inside of the coiled coil and an arginine residue on the surface of the coiled coil that forms a salt bridge with a glutamic acid residue in the same polypeptide chain. In DC-SIGNR from all primates, very stable repeat units predominate, so the carbohydrate-recognition domains must be held relatively closely together. In contrast, stable repeat units are found only near the membrane in DC-SIGN. The presence of residues that disrupt tetramer formation in repeat units near the carbohydrate-recognition domains of DC-SIGN would allow these domains to splay further apart. Thus, the neck domains of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR can contribute to the different functions of these receptors by presenting the sugar-binding sites in different contexts.

  1. Oligomerization domains in the glycan‐binding receptors DC‐SIGN and DC‐SIGNR: Sequence variation and stability differences

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ália; Hadjivasiliou, Andreas; Ossa, Felipe; Lim, Novandy K.; Turgut, Aylin; Taylor, Maureen E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human dendritic cell‐specific intercellular adhesion molecule‐1 grabbing nonintegrin, DC‐SIGN, and the sinusoidal endothelial cell receptor DC‐SIGNR or L‐SIGN, are closely related sugar‐binding receptors. DC‐SIGN acts both as a pathogen‐binding endocytic receptor and as a cell adhesion molecule, while DC‐SIGNR has only the pathogen‐binding function. In addition to differences in the sugar‐binding properties of the carbohydrate‐recognition domains in the two receptors, there are sequence differences in the adjacent neck domains, which are coiled‐coil tetramerization domains comprised largely of 23‐amino acid repeat units. A series of model polypeptides consisting of uniform repeat units have been characterized by gel filtration, differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism. The results demonstrate that two features characterize repeat units which form more stable tetramers: a leucine reside in the first position of the heptad pattern of hydrophobic residues that pack on the inside of the coiled coil and an arginine residue on the surface of the coiled coil that forms a salt bridge with a glutamic acid residue in the same polypeptide chain. In DC‐SIGNR from all primates, very stable repeat units predominate, so the carbohydrate‐recognition domains must be held relatively closely together. In contrast, stable repeat units are found only near the membrane in DC‐SIGN. The presence of residues that disrupt tetramer formation in repeat units near the carbohydrate‐recognition domains of DC‐SIGN would allow these domains to splay further apart. Thus, the neck domains of DC‐SIGN and DC‐SIGNR can contribute to the different functions of these receptors by presenting the sugar‐binding sites in different contexts. PMID:27859859

  2. How the local geometry of the Cu-binding site determines the thermal stability of blue copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Chaboy, Jesús; Díaz-Moreno, Sofía; Díaz-Moreno, I; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2011-01-28

    Identifying the factors that govern the thermal resistance of cupredoxins is essential for understanding their folding and stability, and for improving our ability to design highly stable enzymes with potential biotechnological applications. Here, we show that the thermal unfolding of plastocyanins from two cyanobacteria--the mesophilic Synechocystis and the thermophilic Phormidium--is closely related to the short-range structure around the copper center. Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the bond length between Cu and the S atom from the cysteine ligand is a key structural factor that correlates with the thermal stability of the cupredoxins in both oxidized and reduced states. These findings were confirmed by an additional study of a site-directed mutant of Phormidium plastocyanin showing a reverse effect of the redox state on the thermal stability of the protein.

  3. Phosphorylation of poly(rC) binding protein 1 (PCBP1) contributes to stabilization of mu opioid receptor (MOR) mRNA via interaction with AU-rich element RNA-binding protein 1 (AUF1) and poly A binding protein (PABP)

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Wagley, Yadav; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H.

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level is frequently based on cis- and trans-acting factors on target mRNAs. We found a C-rich element (CRE) in mu-opioid receptor (MOR) 3′-untranslated region (UTR) to which poly (rC) binding protein 1 (PCBP1) binds, resulting in MOR mRNA stabilization. RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA EMSA revealed the formation of PCBP1-RNA complexes at the element. Knockdown of PCBP1 decreased MOR mRNA half-life and protein expression. Stimulation by forskolin increased cytoplasmic localization of PCBP1 and PCBP1/MOR 3′-UTR interactions via increased serine phosphorylation that was blocked by protein kinase A (PKA) or (phosphatidyl inositol-3) PI3-kinase inhibitors. The forskolin treatment also enhanced serine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation of AU-rich element binding protein (AUF1), concurrent with its increased binding to the CRE, and led to an increased interaction of poly A binding protein (PABP) with the CRE and poly(A) sites. AUF1 phosphorylation also led to an increased interaction with PCBP1. These findings suggest that a single co-regulator, PCBP1, plays a crucial role in stabilizing MOR mRNA, and is induced by PKA signaling by conforming to AUF1 and PABP. PMID:27836661

  4. Fas-activated Ser/Thr phosphoprotein (FAST) is a eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein that regulates mRNA stability and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ivanov, Pavel; Anderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of T cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) by Fas-activated Ser/Thr phosphoprotein (FAST) results in prolonged cell survival by inducing the expression of inhibitors of apoptosis. Here we show that the functional effects of FAST are dependent on its interactions with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) which is the major cytosolic cap binding protein in cells. FAST binds to eIF4E via a consensus motif (428YXXXXLL433) that is also found in eIF4G, 4E-BP1/2/3, 4E-T, and cup. A point mutation within this motif at Y428 dampens the ability of FAST to recognize eIF4E. Wild-type (WT) FAST, but not its Y428G mutant, increases the expression of co-transfected cellular inhibitor of apoptosis-1 (cIAP-1) and β-gal mRNA and protein, but inhibits the Fas-induced activation of caspase-3. Increased expression of the co-transfected proteins results, in part, from stabilization of mRNA, suggesting that FAST:eIF4E interactions can inhibit mRNA decay. We propose that eIF4E:FAST:TIA-1 complexes regulate the translation and stability of specific mRNAs that encode proteins important for cell survival. PMID:26824015

  5. RhoGDIα Acetylation at K127 and K141 Affects Binding toward Nonprenylated RhoA.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Nora; Wroblowski, Sarah; Scislowski, Lukas; Lammers, Michael

    2016-01-19

    Rho proteins are major regulators of the cytoskeleton. As most Ras-related proteins, they switch between an active, GTP-bound and an inactive, GDP-bound conformation. Rho proteins are targeted to the plasma membrane via a polybasic region and a prenyl group attached to a C-terminal cysteine residue. To distribute Rho proteins in the cell, the molecular chaperone RhoGDIα binds to the prenylated Rho proteins forming a cytosolic pool of mainly GDP-loaded Rho. Most studies characterized the interaction of prenylated Rho proteins and RhoGDIα. However, RhoGDIα was also shown to bind to nonprenylated Rho proteins with physiologically relevant micomolar affinities. Recently, it was discovered that RhoGDIα is targeted by post-translational lysine acetylation. For one site, K141, it was hypothesized that acetylation might lead to increased levels of formation of filamentous actin and filopodia in mammalian cells. The functional consequences of lysine acetylation for the interplay with nonprenylated RhoA have not been investigated. Here, we report that lysine acetylation at lysines K127 and K141 in the RhoGDIα immunoglobulin domain interferes with the interaction toward nonprenylated RhoA using a combined biochemical and biophysical approach. We determined the first crystal structure of a doubly acetylated protein, RhoGDIα, in complex with RhoA·GDP. We discover that the C-terminus of RhoA adopts a different conformation forming an intermolecular β-sheet with the RhoGDIα immunoglobulin domain.

  6. Amphotericin B severely affects expression and activity of the endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase involving altered mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Suschek, Christoph Viktor; Bonmann, Eckhard; Kleinert, Hartmut; Wenzel, Michael; Mahotka, Csaba; Kolb, Hubert; Förstermann, Ulrich; Gerharz, Claus-Dieter; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic use of the antifungal drug amphotericin B (AmB) is limited due to severe side effects like glomerular vasoconstriction and risk of renal failure during AmB administration. As nitric oxide (NO) has substantial functions in renal autoregulation, we have determined the effects of AmB on endothelial constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) expression and activity in human and rat endothelial cell cultures.AmB used at concentrations of 0.6 to 1.25 μg ml−1 led to increases in ecNOS mRNA and protein expression as well as NO production. This was the result of an increased ecNOS mRNA half-life. In contrast, incubation of cells with higher albeit subtoxic concentrations of AmB (2.5–5.0 μg ml−1) resulted in a decrease or respectively in completely abolished ecNOS mRNA and protein expression with a strongly reduced or inhibited ecNOS activity, due to a decrease of ecNOS mRNA half-life. None of the AmB concentrations affected promoter activity as found with a reporter gene construct stably transfected into ECV304 cells.Thus, our experiments show a concentration-dependent biphasic effect of AmB on expression and activity of ecNOS, an effect best explained by AmB influencing ecNOS mRNA stability. In view of the known renal accumulation of this drug the results reported here could help to elucidate its renal toxicity. PMID:11015297

  7. Improvement of thermal stability of a mutagenised α-amylase by manipulation of the calcium-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ghollasi, Marzieh; Ghanbari-Safari, Maryam; Khajeh, Khosro

    2013-12-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of an α-amylase isolated from Bacillus megaterium WHO has been performed to evaluate the roles of the calcium binding site residues in enzyme thermostability. The strategy used was to replace residues in the hypothetical calcium binding loops of B. megaterium WHO α-amylase (BMW-amylase) by equivalent positions at Halothermothrix orenii α-amylase (AmyA) as a thermophilic amylase by QuikChange site directed mutagenesis. Asn-75, Ser-76, and His-77 were mutated in the second calcium binding site which resulted in an increase in thermostability. All mutants retained their hydrolytic activity although their kcat parameter decreased in compare to the wild type and in the presence of calcium ions. In S76P and H77E, the Km for starch decreases while overall activity (kcat/Km) was increased. In the presence of calcium, conversion of His-77 to Glu resulted in a 4-fold enhancement in enzyme half life and a 9°C upward shift in T50, which was observed in compare to the wild type. Further analysis suggested the H77E mutant as the most stable which increased the affinity of the enzyme for calcium ion and its optimum temperature was 5°C higher than the wild type.

  8. FK506 binding protein mutational analysis. Defining the surface residue contributions to stability of the calcineurin co-complex.

    PubMed

    Futer, O; DeCenzo, M T; Aldape, R A; Livingston, D J

    1995-08-11

    The 12- and 13-kDa FK506 binding proteins (FKBP12 and FKBP13) are cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerases that bind the macrolides FK506 (Tacrolimus) and rapamycin (Sirolimus). The FKBP12.FK506 complex is immunosuppressive, acting as an inhibitor of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. We have examined the role of the key surface residues of FKBP12 and FKBP13 in calcineurin interactions by generating substitutions at these residues by site-directed mutagenesis. All mutants are active catalysts of the prolyl isomerase reaction, and bind FK506 or rapamycin with high affinity. Mutations at FKBP12 residues Asp-37, Arg-42, His-87, and Ile-90 decrease calcineurin affinity of the mutant FKBP12.FK506 complex by as much as 2600-fold in the case of I90K. Replacement of three FKBP13 surface residues (Gln-50, Ala-95, and Lys-98) with the corresponding homologous FKBP12 residues (Arg-42, His-87, and Ile-90) generates an FKBP13 variant that is equivalent to FKBP12 in its affinity for FK506, rapamycin, and calcineurin. These results confirm the role of two loop regions of FKBP12 (residues 40-44 and 84-91) as part of the effector face that interacts with calcineurin.

  9. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL regulates mRNA splicing and stability during B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing; Li, Bin; Rao, Anjana

    2015-04-14

    Posttranscriptional regulation is a major mechanism to rewire transcriptomes during differentiation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein LL (hnRNPLL) is specifically induced in terminally differentiated lymphocytes, including effector T cells and plasma cells. To study the molecular functions of hnRNPLL at a genome-wide level, we identified hnRNPLL RNA targets and binding sites in plasma cells through integrated Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and RNA sequencing. hnRNPLL preferentially recognizes CA dinucleotide-containing sequences in introns and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), promotes exon inclusion or exclusion in a context-dependent manner, and stabilizes mRNA when associated with 3' UTRs. During differentiation of primary B cells to plasma cells, hnRNPLL mediates a genome-wide switch of RNA processing, resulting in loss of B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) expression and increased Ig production--both hallmarks of plasma-cell maturation. Our data identify previously unknown functions of hnRNPLL in B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation and demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL has a critical role in tuning transcriptomes of terminally differentiating B lymphocytes.

  10. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-03-06

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3'UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3(-/-) mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally.

  11. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3′UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3−/− mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally. PMID:28262838

  12. Relationship between a point mutation S97C in CK1δ protein and its affect on ATP-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ambuj; Rajendran, Vidya; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    CK1δ (Casein kinase I isoform delta) is a member of CK1 kinase family protein that mediates neurite outgrowth and the function as brain-specific microtubule-associated protein. ATP binding kinase domain of CK1δ is essential for regulating several key cell cycle signal transduction pathways. Mutation in CK1δ protein is reported to cause cancers and affects normal brain development. S97C mutation in kinase domain of CK1δ protein has been involved to induce breast cancer and ductal carcinoma. We performed molecular docking studies to examine the effect of this mutation on its ATP-binding affinity. Further, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to understand the structural consequences of S97C mutation over the kinase domain of CK1δ protein. Docking results indicated the loss of ATP-binding affinity of mutant structure, which were further rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations, where a notable loss in 3-D conformation of CK1δ kinase domain was observed in mutant as compared to native. Our results explained the underlying molecular mechanism behind the observed cancer associated phenotype caused by S97C mutation in CK1δ protein.

  13. RNA-binding protein Hermes/RBPMS inversely affects synapse density and axon arbor formation in retinal ganglion cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hörnberg, Hanna; Horck, Francis Wollerton-van; Maurus, Daniel; Zwart, Maarten; Svoboda, Hanno; Harris, William A.; Holt, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein, Hermes (RBPMS), is expressed exclusively in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the CNS, but its function in these cells is not known. Here we show that Hermes protein translocates in granules from RGC bodies down the growing axons. Hermes loss-of-function in both Xenopus laevis and zebrafish embryos leads to a significant reduction in retinal axon arbor complexity in the optic tectum, and expression of a dominant acting mutant Hermes protein, defective in RNA-granule localisation, causes similar defects in arborisation. Time-lapse analysis of branch dynamics reveals that the decrease in arbor complexity is caused by a reduction in new branches rather than a decrease in branch stability. Surprisingly, Hermes depletion also leads to enhanced early visual behaviour and an increase in the density of pre-synaptic puncta suggesting that reduced arborisation is accompanied by increased synaptogenesis to maintain synapse number. PMID:23785151

  14. Single amino acid changes in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIAb delta-endotoxin affect irreversible binding to Manduca sexta midgut membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, F; Alcantara, E; Lee, M K; Chen, X J; Curtiss, A; Dean, D H

    1995-01-01

    Deletion of amino acid residues 370 to 375 (D2) and single alanine substitutions between residues 371 and 375 (FNIGI) of lepidopteran-active Bacillus thuringiensis CryIAb delta-endotoxin were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. All mutants, except that with the I-to-A change at position 373 (I373A), produced delta-endotoxin as CryIAb and were stable upon activation either by Manduca sexta gut enzymes or by trypsin. Mutants D2, F371A, and G374A lost most of the toxicity (400 times less) for M. sexta larvae, whereas N372A and I375A were only 2 times less toxic than CryIAb. The results of homologous and heterologous competition binding assays to M. sexta midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) revealed that the binding curves for all mutant toxins were similar to those for the wild-type toxin. However, a significant difference in irreversible binding was observed between the toxic (CryIAb, N372A, and I375A) and less-toxic (D2, F371A, and G374A) proteins. Only 20 to 25% of bound, radiolabeled CryIAb, N372A, and I375A toxins was dissociated from BBMV, whereas about 50 to 55% of the less-toxic mutants, D2, F371A, and G374A, was dissociated from their binding sites by the addition of excess nonlabeled ligand. Voltage clamping experiments provided further evidence that the insecticidal property (inhibition of short-circuit current across the M. sexta midgut) was directly correlated to irreversible interaction of the toxin with the BBMV. We have also shown that CryIAb and mutant toxins recognize 210- and 120-kDa peptides in ligand blotting. Our results imply that mutations in residues 370 to 375 of domain II of CrylAb do not affect overall binding but do affect the irreversible association of the toxin to the midgut columnar epithelial cells of M. sexta. PMID:7730254

  15. Binding of the wheat germ lectin to Cryptococcus neoformans chitooligomers affects multiple mechanisms required for fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Silva, Fernanda D.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Frases, Susana; Staats, Charley C.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2015-01-01

    The principal capsular component of Cryptococcus neoformans, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), interacts with surface glycans, including chitin-like oligomers. Although the role of GXM in cryptococcal infection has been well explored, there is no information on how chitooligomers affect fungal pathogenesis. In this study, surface chitooligomers of C. neoformans were blocked through the use of the wheat germ lectin (WGA) and the effects on animal pathogenesis, interaction with host cells, fungal growth and capsule formation were analyzed. Treatment of C. neoformans cells with WGA followed by infection of mice delayed mortality relative to animals infected with untreated fungal cells. This observation was associated with reduced brain colonization by lectin-treated cryptococci. Blocking chitooligomers also rendered yeast cells less efficient in their ability to associate with phagocytes. WGA did not affect fungal viability, but inhibited GXM release to the extracellular space and capsule formation. In WGA-treated yeast cells, genes that are involved in capsule formation and GXM traffic had their transcription levels decreased in comparison with untreated cells. Our results suggest that cellular pathways required for capsule formation and pathogenic mechanisms are affected by blocking chitin-derived structures at the cell surface of C. neoformans. Targeting chitooligomers with specific ligands may reveal new therapeutic alternatives to control cryptococcosis. PMID:23608320

  16. How do how internal and external processes affect the behaviors of coupled marsh mudflat systems; infill, stabilize, retreat, or drown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; Mariotti, G.; Wiberg, P.; Fagherazzi, S.; McGlathery, K.

    2013-12-01

    an eventual lateral equilibrium are possible only with large allochthonous sediment supply. Once marshes expanded, marsh retreat can be prevented by a sediment supply smaller than the one that filled the basin. At the GCE, the Altamaha River allows for enhanced allochthonous supply directly to the salt marsh platform, reducing the importance of waves on the tidal flat. As a result, infilling or retreat become the prevalent behaviors. For the VCR, the presence of seagrass decreases near bed shear stresses and sediment flux to the salt marsh platform, however, seagrass also reduces the wave energy acting on the boundary of the marsh reducing boundary erosion. Results indicate that the reduction in wave power allows for seagrass to provide a strong stabilizing affect on the coupled salt marsh tidal flat system, but as external sediment supply increases and light conditions decline the system reverts to that of a bare tidal flat. Across all systems and with current rates of sea level rise, retreat is a more likely marsh loss modality than drowning.

  17. Redistribution of the Lamin B1 genomic binding profile affects rearrangement of heterochromatic domains and SAHF formation during senescence

    PubMed Central

    Sadaie, Mahito; Salama, Rafik; Carroll, Thomas; Tomimatsu, Kosuke; Chandra, Tamir; Young, Andrew R.J.; Narita, Masako; Pérez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Chong, Heung; Kimura, Hiroshi; Narita, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a stress-responsive form of stable cell cycle exit. Senescent cells have a distinct gene expression profile, which is often accompanied by the spatial redistribution of heterochromatin into senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHFs). Studying a key component of the nuclear lamina lamin B1 (LMNB1), we report dynamic alterations in its genomic profile and their implications for SAHF formation and gene regulation during senescence. Genome-wide mapping reveals that LMNB1 is depleted during senescence, preferentially from the central regions of lamina-associated domains (LADs), which are enriched for Lys9 trimethylation on histone H3 (H3K9me3). LMNB1 knockdown facilitates the spatial relocalization of perinuclear H3K9me3-positive heterochromatin, thus promoting SAHF formation, which could be inhibited by ectopic LMNB1 expression. Furthermore, despite the global reduction in LMNB1 protein levels, LMNB1 binding increases during senescence in a small subset of gene-rich regions where H3K27me3 also increases and gene expression becomes repressed. These results suggest that LMNB1 may contribute to senescence in at least two ways due to its uneven genome-wide redistribution: first, through the spatial reorganization of chromatin and, second, through gene repression. PMID:23964094

  18. Aromatic amino acid mutagenesis at the substrate binding pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 affects its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guilong; Liu, Zimin; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F) were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16) and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12) to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10). The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  19. SpyB, a Small Heme-Binding Protein, Affects the Composition of the Cell Wall in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Rebecca J.; Chen, Jing; Kant, Sashi; Rechkina, Elena; Rush, Jeffrey S.; Forsberg, Lennart S.; Jaehrig, Bernhard; Azadi, Parastoo; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Zhu, Haining; Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Pancholi, Vijay; Korotkova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a hemolytic human pathogen associated with a wide variety of infections ranging from minor skin and throat infections to life-threatening invasive diseases. The cell wall of GAS consists of peptidoglycan sacculus decorated with a carbohydrate comprising a polyrhamnose backbone with immunodominant N-acetylglucosamine side-chains. All GAS genomes contain the spyBA operon, which encodes a 35-amino-acid membrane protein SpyB, and a membrane-bound C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferase SpyA. In this study, we addressed the function of SpyB in GAS. Phenotypic analysis of a spyB deletion mutant revealed increased bacterial aggregation, and reduced sensitivity to β-lactams of the cephalosporin class and peptidoglycan hydrolase PlyC. Glycosyl composition analysis of cell wall isolated from the spyB mutant suggested an altered carbohydrate structure compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that SpyB associates with heme and protoporphyrin IX. Heme binding induces SpyB dimerization, which involves disulfide bond formation between the subunits. Thus, our data suggest the possibility that SpyB activity is regulated by heme. PMID:27790410

  20. Identification of a Ubiquinone-binding Site That Affects Autophosphorylation of the Sensor Kinase RegB*S

    PubMed Central

    Swem, Lee R.; Gong, Xing; Yu, Chang-An; Bauer, Carl E.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus regulates many metabolic processes in response to the level of environmental oxygen and the energy state of the cell. One of the key global redox regulators of the cell’s metabolic physiology is the sensor kinase RegB that controls the synthesis of numerous energy generation and utilization processes. In this study, we have succeeded in purifying full-length RegB containing six transmembrane-spanning elements. Exogenous addition of excess oxidized coenzyme Q1 is capable of inhibiting RegB autophosphorylation ~6-fold. However, the addition of reduced coenzyme Q1 exhibits no inhibitory effect on kinase activity. A ubiquinone-binding site, as defined by azidoquinone photo affinity cross-linking, was determined to lie within a periplasmic loop between transmembrane helices 3 and 4 that contains a fully conserved heptapeptide sequence of GGXXNPF. Mutation of the phenylalanine in this heptapeptide renders RegB constitutively active in vivo, indicating that this domain is responsible for sensing the redox state of the ubiquinone pool and subsequently controlling RegB autophosphorylation. PMID:16407278

  1. A protein with simultaneous capsid scaffolding and dsRNA-binding activities enhances the birnavirus capsid mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Johann; Casado, Santiago; Mata, Carlos P.; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2015-01-01

    Viral capsids are metastable structures that perform many essential processes; they also act as robust cages during the extracellular phase. Viruses can use multifunctional proteins to optimize resources (e.g., VP3 in avian infectious bursal disease virus, IBDV). The IBDV genome is organized as ribonucleoproteins (RNP) of dsRNA with VP3, which also acts as a scaffold during capsid assembly. We characterized mechanical properties of IBDV populations with different RNP content (ranging from none to four RNP). The IBDV population with the greatest RNP number (and best fitness) showed greatest capsid rigidity. When bound to dsRNA, VP3 reinforces virus stiffness. These contacts involve interactions with capsid structural subunits that differ from the initial interactions during capsid assembly. Our results suggest that RNP dimers are the basic stabilization units of the virion, provide better understanding of multifunctional proteins, and highlight the duality of RNP as capsid-stabilizing and genetic information platforms. PMID:26336920

  2. Pin1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 increases Sp1 stability and decreases its DNA-binding activity during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang-Che; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-16

    We have shown that Sp1 phosphorylation at Thr739 decreases its DNA-binding activity. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of Sp1 at Thr739 alone is necessary, but not sufficient for the inhibition of its DNA-binding activity during mitosis. We demonstrated that Pin1 could be recruited to the Thr739(p)-Pro motif of Sp1 to modulate the interaction between phospho-Sp1 and CDK1, thereby facilitating CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 at Ser720, Thr723 and Thr737 during mitosis. Loss of the C-terminal end of Sp1 (amino acids 741-785) significantly increased Sp1 phosphorylation, implying that the C-terminus inhibits CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation. Binding analysis of Sp1 peptides to Pin1 by isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that Pin1 interacts with Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide but not with Thr739-Sp1 peptide. X-ray crystallography data showed that the Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide occupies the active site of Pin1. Increased Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 during mitosis not only stabilized Sp1 levels by decreasing interaction with ubiquitin E3-ligase RNF4 but also caused Sp1 to move out of the chromosomes completely by decreasing its DNA-binding activity, thereby facilitating cell cycle progression. Thus, Pin1-mediated conformational changes in the C-terminal region of Sp1 are critical for increased CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation to facilitate cell cycle progression during mitosis.

  3. Stabilizing chromophore binding on TiO2 for long-term stability of dye-sensitized solar cells using multicomponent atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Han; Losego, Mark D; Hanson, Kenneth; Alibabaei, Leila; Lee, Kyoungmi; Meyer, Thomas J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-05-14

    Ambient humidity and high temperature are known to degrade dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) via chromophore desorption. Recently, enhanced dye-attachment to TiO2 surfaces has been realized by coating molecularly functionalized surfaces with inorganic atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings. Here, we apply this ALD approach to DSSCs and demonstrate that high energy conversion efficiencies can be maintained while significantly extending device lifetimes. While single component ALD layers show improved high-temperature stability, it significantly degraded up to 45% of initial DSSC performance right after ALD. We, however, find that mixed component ALD layers provide initial efficiencies within 90% of their untreated counterparts while still extending device lifetimes. Optimized ALD protection schemes maintain 80% of their initial efficiency after 500 h of thermal aging at 80 °C whereas efficiency of DSSCs with no ALD protection drop below 60% of their initial efficiencies. IR spectroscopy conducted in situ during ALD reveals that carboxylate linker groups transition from unbound or weakly-bound states, respectively, to more strongly bound bidentate structures. This strategy to improve dye-attachment by ALD while maintaining high performance is novel and promising for extending the functional lifetime for DSSCs and other related devices.

  4. Far Upstream Element Binding Protein Plays a Crucial Role in Embryonic Development, Hematopoiesis, and Stabilizing Myc Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weixin; Chung, Yang Jo; Parrilla Castellar, Edgardo R.; Zheng, Ying; Chung, Hye-Jung; Bandle, Russell; Liu, Juhong; Tessarollo, Lino; Batchelor, Eric; Aplan, Peter D.; Levens, David

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor far upstream element binding protein (FBP) binds and activates the MYC promoter when far upstream element is via TFIIH helicase activity early in the transcription cycle. The fundamental biology and pathology of FBP are complex. In some tumors FBP seems pro-oncogenic, whereas in others it is a tumor suppressor. We generated an FBP knockout (Fubp1−/−) mouse to study FBP deficiency. FBP is embryo lethal from embryonic day 10.5 to birth. A spectrum of pathology is associated with FBP loss; besides cerebral hyperplasia and pulmonary hypoplasia, pale livers, hypoplastic spleen, thymus, and bone marrow, cardiac hypertrophy, placental distress, and small size were all indicative of anemia. Immunophenotyping of hematopoietic cells in wild-type versus knockout livers revealed irregular trilineage anemia, with deficits in colony formation. Despite normal numbers of hematopoietic stem cells, transplantation of Fubp1−/− hematopoietic stem cells into irradiated mice entirely failed to reconstitute hematopoiesis. In competitive transplantation assays against wild-type donor bone marrow, Fubp1−/− hematopoietic stem cells functioned only sporadically at a low level. Although cultures of wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts set Myc levels precisely, Myc levels of mouse varied wildly between fibroblasts harvested from different Fubp1−/− embryos, suggesting that FBP contributes to Myc set point fixation. FBP helps to hold multiple physiologic processes to close tolerances, at least in part by constraining Myc expression. PMID:26774856

  5. Mutations affecting the BHLHA9 DNA-binding domain cause MSSD, mesoaxial synostotic syndactyly with phalangeal reduction, Malik-Percin type.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sajid; Percin, Ferda E; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Albrecht, Beate; Percesepe, Antonio; Koch, Manuela C; Landi, Antonio; Fritz, Barbara; Khan, Rizwan; Mumtaz, Sara; Akarsu, Nurten A; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2014-12-04

    Mesoaxial synostotic syndactyly, Malik-Percin type (MSSD) (syndactyly type IX) is a rare autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic digit anomaly with only two affected families reported so far. We previously showed that the trait is genetically distinct from other syndactyly types, and through autozygosity mapping we had identified a locus on chromosome 17p13.3 for this unique limb malformation. Here, we extend the number of independent pedigrees from various geographic regions segregating MSSD to a total of six. We demonstrate that three neighboring missense mutations affecting the highly conserved DNA-binding region of the basic helix-loop-helix A9 transcription factor (BHLHA9) are associated with this phenotype. Recombinant BHLHA9 generated by transient gene expression is shown to be located in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus. Transcription factors 3, 4, and 12, members of the E protein (class I) family of helix-loop-helix transcription factors, are highlighted in yeast two-hybrid analysis as potential dimerization partners for BHLHA9. In the presence of BHLHA9, the potential of these three proteins to activate expression of an E-box-regulated target gene is reduced considerably. BHLHA9 harboring one of the three substitutions detected in MSSD-affected individuals eliminates entirely the transcription activation by these class I bHLH proteins. We conclude that by dimerizing with other bHLH protein monomers, BHLHA9 could fine tune the expression of regulatory factors governing determination of central limb mesenchyme cells, a function made impossible by altering critical amino acids in the DNA binding domain. These findings identify BHLHA9 as an essential player in the regulatory network governing limb morphogenesis in humans.

  6. Sequences near the Active Site in Chimeric Penicillin Binding Proteins 5 and 6 Affect Uniform Morphology of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anindya S.; Young, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    Penicillin binding protein (PBP) 5, a dd-carboxypeptidase that removes the terminal d-alanine from peptide side chains of peptidoglycan, plays an important role in creating and maintaining the uniform cell shape of Escherichia coli. PBP 6, a highly similar homologue, cannot substitute for PBP 5 in this respect. Previously, we localized the shape-maintaining characteristics of PBP 5 to the globular domain that contains the active site (domain I), where PBPs 5 and 6 share substantial identity. To identify the specific segment of domain I responsible for shape control, we created a set of hybrids and determined which ones complemented the aberrant morphology of a misshapen PBP mutant, E. coli CS703-1. Fusion proteins were constructed in which 47, 199 and 228 amino-terminal amino acids of one PBP were fused to the corresponding carboxy-terminal amino acids of the other. The morphological phenotype was reversed only by hybrid proteins containing PBP 5 residues 200 to 228, which are located next to the KTG motif of the active site. Because residues 220 to 228 were identical in these proteins, the morphological effect was determined by alterations in amino acids 200 to 219. To confirm the importance of this segment, we constructed mosaic proteins in which these 20 amino acids were grafted from PBP 5 into PBP 6 and vice versa. The PBP 6/5/6 mosaic complemented the aberrant morphology of CS703-1, whereas PBP 5/6/5 did not. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the Asp218 and Lys219 residues were important for shape maintenance by these mosaic PBPs, but the same mutations in wild-type PBP 5 did not eliminate its shape-promoting activity. Homologous enzymes from five other bacteria also complemented the phenotype of CS703-1. The overall conclusion is that creation of a bacterial cell of regular diameter and uniform contour apparently depends primarily on a slight alteration of the enzymatic activity or substrate accessibility at the active site of E. coli PBP 5. PMID

  7. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Ron L; Chepurny, Oleg G; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Holz, George G; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-09-08

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R). Stability studies reveal that Ex-4 is digested by pancreatic proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin and by the kidney endopeptidase meprin β. Prebinding the B12 conjugate to IF, however, resulted in up to a 4-fold greater activity of the B12-Ex-4 conjugate relative to Ex-4, when the IF-B12-Ex-4 complex was exposed to 22 μg/mL of trypsin, 2.3-fold greater activity when exposed to 1.25 μg/mL of chymotrypsin, and there was no decrease in function at up to 5 μg/mL of meprin β.

  8. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  9. Overexpression of Sna3 stabilizes tryptophan permease Tat2, potentially competing for the WW domain of Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase with its binding protein Bul1.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Toshiki; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2010-01-04

    Tryptophan permease Tat2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes Rsp5-dependent degradation upon exposure to high hydrostatic pressure and it limits the growth of tryptophan auxotrophs. Overexpression of SNA3 encoding an endosomal/vacuolar protein possessing the PPAY motif allowed growth at 25 MPa, which was potentiated by marked stabilization of Tat2. This appeared to depend on the PPAY motif, which interacted with the WW domain of Rsp5. Subcellular localization of Rsp5 was unchanged by overexpression of either SNA3 or SNA3-AAAY. While the loss of Bul1, a binding protein of Rsp5, or the rsp5-ww3 mutation allowed high-pressure growth, overexpression of BUL1 abolished the Sna3-mediated growth at 25 MPa. These results suggest that Sna3 and Bul1 compete for the WW domain of Rsp5 upon Tat2 ubiquitination.

  10. Molecular crowding affects diffusion and binding of nuclear proteins in heterochromatin and reveals the fractal organization of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bancaud, Aurélien; Huet, Sébastien; Daigle, Nathalie; Mozziconacci, Julien; Beaudouin, Joël; Ellenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus of eukaryotes is organized into functional compartments, the two most prominent being heterochromatin and nucleoli. These structures are highly enriched in DNA, proteins or RNA, and thus thought to be crowded. In vitro, molecular crowding induces volume exclusion, hinders diffusion and enhances association, but whether these effects are relevant in vivo remains unclear. Here, we establish that volume exclusion and diffusive hindrance occur in dense nuclear compartments by probing the diffusive behaviour of inert fluorescent tracers in living cells. We also demonstrate that chromatin-interacting proteins remain transiently trapped in heterochromatin due to crowding induced enhanced affinity. The kinetic signatures of these crowding consequences allow us to derive a fractal model of chromatin organization, which explains why the dynamics of soluble nuclear proteins are affected independently of their size. This model further shows that the fractal architecture differs between heterochromatin and euchromatin, and predicts that chromatin proteins use different target-search strategies in the two compartments. We propose that fractal crowding is a fundamental principle of nuclear organization, particularly of heterochromatin maintenance. PMID:19927119

  11. Binding intensity and metal partitioning in soils affected by mining and smelting activities in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, G; Costa, E T S; Penido, E S; Sparks, D L; Guilherme, L R G

    2015-09-01

    Mining and smelting activities are potential sources of heavy metal contamination, which pose a threat to human health and ecological systems. This study investigated single and sequential extractions of Zn, Pb, and Cd in Brazilian soils affected by mining and smelting activities. Soils from a Zn mining area (soils A, B, C, D, E, and the control soil) and a tailing from a smelting area were collected in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The samples were subjected to single (using Mehlich I solution) and sequential extractions. The risk assessment code (RAC), the redistribution index (U ts ), and the reduced partition index (I R ) have been applied to the sequential extraction data. Zinc and Cd, in soil samples from the mining area, were found mainly associated with carbonate forms. This same pattern did not occur for Pb. Moreover, the Fe-Mn oxides and residual fractions had important contributions for Zn and Pb in those soils. For the tailing, more than 70 % of Zn and Cd were released in the exchangeable fraction, showing a much higher mobility and availability of these metals at this site, which was also supported by results of RAC and I R . These differences in terms of mobility might be due to different chemical forms of the metals in the two sites, which are attributable to natural occurrence as well as ore processing.

  12. The affective tie that binds: Examining the contribution of positive emotions and anxiety to relationship formation in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles T; Pearlstein, Sarah L; Stein, Murray B

    2017-03-31

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) have difficulty forming social relationships. The prevailing clinical perspective is that negative emotions such as anxiety inhibit one's capacity to develop satisfying social connections. However, empirical findings from social psychology and affective neuroscience suggest that positive emotional experiences are fundamental to establishing new social bonds. To reconcile these perspectives, we collected repeated measurements of anxiety, positive emotions (pleasantness), and connectedness over the course of a controlled relationship formation encounter in 56 participants diagnosed with SAD (64% female; Mage=23.3, SD=4.7). Participants experienced both increases in positive emotions and decreases in anxiety throughout the interaction. Change in positive emotions was the most robust predictor of subsequent increases in connectedness, as well as a greater desire to engage one's partner in future social activities, above and beyond reductions in anxiety (medium to large sized effects). Those findings suggest that anxiety-based models alone may not fully explain difficulties in relationship formation in SAD, and underscore the potential value of considering positive emotional experiences in conceptual and treatment models of SAD.

  13. Molecular crowding affects diffusion and binding of nuclear proteins in heterochromatin and reveals the fractal organization of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Bancaud, Aurélien; Huet, Sébastien; Daigle, Nathalie; Mozziconacci, Julien; Beaudouin, Joël; Ellenberg, Jan

    2009-12-16

    The nucleus of eukaryotes is organized into functional compartments, the two most prominent being heterochromatin and nucleoli. These structures are highly enriched in DNA, proteins or RNA, and thus thought to be crowded. In vitro, molecular crowding induces volume exclusion, hinders diffusion and enhances association, but whether these effects are relevant in vivo remains unclear. Here, we establish that volume exclusion and diffusive hindrance occur in dense nuclear compartments by probing the diffusive behaviour of inert fluorescent tracers in living cells. We also demonstrate that chromatin-interacting proteins remain transiently trapped in heterochromatin due to crowding induced enhanced affinity. The kinetic signatures of these crowding consequences allow us to derive a fractal model of chromatin organization, which explains why the dynamics of soluble nuclear proteins are affected independently of their size. This model further shows that the fractal architecture differs between heterochromatin and euchromatin, and predicts that chromatin proteins use different target-search strategies in the two compartments. We propose that fractal crowding is a fundamental principle of nuclear organization, particularly of heterochromatin maintenance.

  14. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  15. Heme protein assisted dispersion of gold nanoparticle multilayers on chips: from stabilization to high-density double-stranded DNAs fabricated in situ for protein/DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Li, Chun-Wei; Sung, Wang-Chou; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2009-05-15

    Heme proteins in general are shown to be an effective linking agent in stabilizing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and thus facilitate the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) AuNP multilayers on a chip, resulting in a higher coating density than that on polymer linker anchored surfaces for analytical applications. With the use of electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) measurements, a lower oxidation state of Au(0) and dramatic changes among multiple chemical states of N1s are detected upon coating AuNPs with heme proteins but not detected upon coating AuNPs with non-heme proteins. Thus, we propose that the stabilization power arises from pi-conjugation between AuNPs and the heme group. We also propose that such conjugation must be facilitated by the exposure of the heme group through a conformational change of the protein as well as interactions of other functional groups with AuNPs to bring the heme moiety to a close face-to-face distance with the AuNPs. A high-density double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) composed of a sequence of estrogen response element (ERE) is then fabricated on heme protein anchored chips. An in situ hybridization and tracking method is developed based on hybridization-induced fluorescence restoration associated with AuNPs and assists in the subsequent detection of DNA/protein binding on the same chip. The AuNP ERE chips are shown to have high sensitivity and specificity for quantitative detection of ERE binding with its two transcription factor isoforms, estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERalpha and ERbeta), in cell lysates with reduced reagents and reaction time.

  16. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  17. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Crow, T.J.

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Estrogen receptor alpha somatic mutations Y537S and D538G confer breast cancer endocrine resistance by stabilizing the activating function-2 binding conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, Sean W; Mayne, Christopher G; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Carlson, Kathryn E; Martin, Teresa A; Novick, Scott J; Toy, Weiyi; Green, Bradley; Panchamukhi, Srinivas; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Griffin, Patrick R; Shen, Yang; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) gene (ESR1), especially Y537S and D538G, have been linked to acquired resistance to endocrine therapies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that these mutants confer ERα constitutive activity and antiestrogen resistance and suggest that ligand-binding domain dysfunction leads to endocrine therapy resistance. Here, we integrate biophysical and structural biology data to reveal how these mutations lead to a constitutively active and antiestrogen-resistant ERα. We show that these mutant ERs recruit coactivator in the absence of hormone while their affinities for estrogen agonist (estradiol) and antagonist (4-hydroxytamoxifen) are reduced. Further, they confer antiestrogen resistance by altering the conformational dynamics of the loop connecting Helix 11 and Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which leads to a stabilized agonist state and an altered antagonist state that resists inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12792.001 PMID:26836308

  19. Exploring the affinity binding of alkylmaltoside surfactants to bovine serum albumin and their effect on the protein stability: A spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Hierrezuelo, J M; Carnero Ruiz, C

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence together with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies was performed to examine the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two alkylmaltoside surfactants, i.e. n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C10G2) and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C12G2), having identical structures but different tail lengths. Changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA from static as well as dynamic measurements revealed a weak protein-surfactant interaction and gave the corresponding binding curves, suggesting that the binding mechanism of surfactants to protein is essentially cooperative in nature. The behavior of both surfactants is similar, so that the differences detected were attributed to the more hydrophobic nature of β-C12G2, which favors the adsorption of micelle-like aggregates onto the protein surface. These observations were substantially demonstrated by data derived from synchronous, three-dimensional and anisotropy fluorescence experiments. Changes in the secondary structure of the protein induced by the interaction with surfactants were analyzed by CD to determine the contents of α-helix and β-strand. It was noted that whereas the addition of β-C10G2 appears to stabilize the secondary structure of the protein, β-C12G2 causes a marginal denaturation of BSA for a protein:surfactant molar ratio as high as 1 to 100.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  1. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon mutants containing two histidyl binding sites inside peptide chain structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Kadej, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-12-21

    Mononuclear and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations, H1A/H12A H2N-A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G-COOH, H1A/H9A H2N-A(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G-COOH, and H1A/H6A H2N-A(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G-COOH, have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, and EPR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1 was obtained. Over a wide 6-8 pH range, including physiological pH 7.4, and a 1 : 1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio, the peptides studied formed a CuH-1L complex with the 4N{NH2,N(-),2NIm} coordination mode. The presence of the 4N binding site for the CuH-1L complexes prevented the deprotonation and coordination of the second amide nitrogen atom to copper(II) ions (pK-1/-2 7.83-8.07) compared to that of pentaGly (6.81). The amine nitrogen donor and two imidazole nitrogen atoms (H(6)H(9), H(6)H(12) and H(9)H(12)) can be considered to be independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. As a consequence, di- and trinuclear complexes for the metal-to-ligand 2 : 1 and 3 : 1 molar ratios dominate in the solution, respectively. For the Cu(II)-H1A/H9A and Cu(II)-H1A/H12A systems, the Cu3H-9L complexes are likely formed by the coordination of amide nitrogen atoms towards C-termini with ring sizes (7,5,5).

  2. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins. PMID:27941824

  3. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  4. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-12-12

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 10(4) in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  5. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Conor M.; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Federolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to 1) test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2) investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding’s hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG) signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA). Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05). The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants. PMID:27203597

  6. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  7. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  8. Clostridium botulinum type C hemagglutinin affects the morphology and viability of cultured mammalian cells via binding to the ganglioside GM3.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yo; Iwamori, Masao; Matsumura, Takuhiro; Yutani, Masahiro; Amatsu, Sho; Fujinaga, Yukako

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A-G, and is produced as large protein complexes through associations with non-toxic components, such as hemagglutinin (HA) and non-toxic non-HA. These non-toxic proteins dramatically enhance the oral toxicity of the toxin complex. HA is considered to have a role in toxin transport through the intestinal epithelium by carbohydrate binding and epithelial barrier-disrupting activity. Type A and B HAs disrupt E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion, and, in turn, the intercellular epithelial barrier. Type C HA (HA/C) disrupts the barrier function by affecting cell morphology and viability, the mechanism of which remains unknown. In this study, we identified GM3 as the target molecule of HA/C. We found that sialic acid binding of HA is essential for the activity. It was abolished when cells were pre-treated with an inhibitor of ganglioside synthesis. Consistent with this, HA/C bound to a-series gangliosides in a glycan array. In parallel, we isolated clones resistant to HA/C activity from a susceptible mouse fibroblast strain. These cells lacked expression of ST-I, the enzyme that transfers sialic acid to lactosylceramide to yield GM3. These clones became sensitive to HA/C activity when GM3 was expressed by transfection with the ST-I gene. The sensitivity of fibroblasts to HA/C was reduced by expressing ganglioside synthesis genes whose products utilize GM3 as a substrate and consequently generate other a-series gangliosides, suggesting a GM3-specific mechanism. Our results demonstrate that HA/C affects cells in a GM3-dependent manner.

  9. TET2 mutations affect non-CpG island DNA methylation at enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R.; Godley, Lucy A.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently-modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites (28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGIs) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGIs)). TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. By contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and non-promoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1, and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor binding sites. PMID:25972343

  10. Cofactor binding modulates the conformational stabilities and unfolding patterns of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Thermus scotoductus.

    PubMed

    Georlette, Daphné; Blaise, Vinciane; Dohmen, Christophe; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Damien, Benjamin; Depiereux, Eric; Gerday, Charles; Uversky, Vladimir N; Feller, Georges

    2003-12-12

    DNA ligases are important enzymes required for cellular processes such as DNA replication, recombination, and repair. NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases are essentially restricted to eubacteria, thus constituting an attractive target in the development of novel antibiotics. Although such a project might involve the systematic testing of a vast number of chemical compounds, it can essentially gain from the preliminary deciphering of the conformational stability and structural perturbations associated with the formation of the catalytically active adenylated enzyme. We have, therefore, investigated the adenylation-induced conformational changes in the mesophilic Escherichia coli and thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD(+)-DNA ligases, and the resistance of these enzymes to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results clearly demonstrate that anchoring of the cofactor induces a conformational rearrangement within the active site of both mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes accompanied by their partial compaction. Furthermore, the adenylation of enzymes increases their resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, establishing a thermodynamic link between cofactor binding and conformational stability enhancement. Finally, guanidine hydrochloride-induced unfolding of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases is shown to be a complex process that involves accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and its precursor.

  11. Lipid membranes and acyl-CoA esters promote opposing effects on acyl-CoA binding protein structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Micheletto, Mariana C; Mendes, Luís F S; Basso, Luis G M; Fonseca, Raquel G; Costa-Filho, Antonio J

    2017-04-05

    Acyl-CoA Binding Proteins (ACBP) form a housekeeping family of proteins that is responsible for the buffering of long chain acyl-coenzyme A esters (LCFA-CoA) inside the cell. Even though numerous studies have focused on the characterization of different members of the ACBP family, the knowledge about the impact of both LCFA-CoA and phospholipids on ACBP structure and stability remains scarce. Besides, there are still controversies regarding the possible interaction of ACBP with biological membranes, even though this might be essential for the cargo capture and delivery. In this study, we observed that LCFA-CoA and phospholipids play opposite roles on protein stability and that the interaction with the membrane is dictated by electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the results support the hypothesis that the LCFA-CoA delivery is driven by the increase of the negative charge on the membrane surface. The combined influence played by the different molecules on ACBP structure is discussed on the light of cargo capture/delivery giving new insights about this important process.

  12. Factors affecting stability of z-ligustilide in the volatile oil of radix angelicae sinensis and ligusticum chuanxiong and its stability prediction.

    PubMed

    Cui, F; Feng, L; Hu, J

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to obtain a suitable vehicle for Z-ligustilide in the volatile oil of Radix Angelicae Sinensis and Ligusticum Chuanxiong in which it is stable enough for the application in pharmaceutics, to investigate its degradation laws, and to predict its shelf-life at 25 degrees C. Factors including temperature, light, pH value, co-solvents and antioxidants can all influence the stability of Z-ligustilide, thereinto antioxidants could markedly improve its stability in aqueous solution by almost 35%. The suitable vehicle for Z-ligustilide contains 1.5% tween-80, 0.3% Vitamin C, and 20% propylene glycol (PG). Furthermore, the degradation rates of Z-ligustilide were found to conform to a rate equation following Weibull probability distribution within a range of degradation ratio, and the equation could be expressed as follow: ln ln (1/1-alpha) = ln k + m ln t. Where alpha is degradation ratio; t is time; m and k are constants relating to the degradation rate. The degradation rate will get greater as the increasing of parameter k. According to the degradation law obtained from the equation, the drug shelf-life (10% of active ingredient degraded, T90) in this vehicle was predicted to be more than 1.77 years at 25 degrees C through Arrehenius equation and accelerating experiments. The present investigation was undertaken to propose a kinetic treatment that may be applicable to any type of degradation of the active ingredient of pharmaceutical formulation, and also could provide a good foundation for the new drug development of Z-ligustilide, especially for injection formulation.

  13. New Evidence That Nonlinear Source-Filter Coupling Affects Harmonic Intensity and fo Stability During Instances of Harmonics Crossing Formants.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, Lynn; Palaparthi, Anil; Titze, Ingo

    2017-03-01

    The traditional source-filter theory of voice production describes a linear relationship between the source (glottal flow pulse) and the filter (vocal tract). Such a linear relationship does not allow for nor explain how changes in the filter may impact the stability and regularity of the source. The objective of this experiment was to examine what effect unpredictable changes to vocal tract dimensions could have on fo stability and individual harmonic intensities in situations in which low frequency harmonics cross formants in a fundamental frequency glide. To determine these effects, eight human subjects (five male, three female) were recorded producing fo glides while their vocal tracts were artificially lengthened by a section of vinyl tubing inserted into the mouth. It was hypothesized that if the source and filter operated as a purely linear system, harmonic intensities would increase and decrease at nearly the same rates as they passed through a formant bandwidth, resulting in a relatively symmetric peak on an intensity-time contour. Additionally, fo stability should not be predictably perturbed by formant/harmonic crossings in a linear system. Acoustic analysis of these recordings, however, revealed that harmonic intensity peaks were asymmetric in 76% of cases, and that 85% of fo instabilities aligned with a crossing of one of the first four harmonics with the first three formants. These results provide further evidence that nonlinear dynamics in the source-filter relationship can impact fo stability as well as harmonic intensities as harmonics cross through formant bandwidths.

  14. Suspension stability and aggregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as affected by dissolved organic matters extracted from agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Li, Helian; Qiu, Yanhua; Wang, Xiaonuan; Liu, Wenhao; Chen, Guangcai; Ma, Yibing; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved organic matters (DOMs) extracted from wheat straw (SDOM) and cow manure (MDOM) were used to investigate their effects on the suspension stability and aggregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Two types of DOM can effectively disperse and stabilize the MWCNTs. At initial MWCNT concentration of 500 mg/L, suspended MWCNT concentration ranged from 8.0 to 17.9 mg/L as DOM were varied from 50 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values were estimated to be 41.4 mM NaCl and 5.3 mM CaCl2 in the absence of DOM. The presence of SDOM and MDOM significantly retarded the aggregation rate of MWCNTs. The CCC values increased to 120 mM NaCl and 14.8 mM CaCl2 at SDOM concentration of 20 mg/L DOC. Due to its higher aromaticity and molecular weight, MDOM showed higher ability to stabilize MWCNTs, with CCC values of 201 mM and 15.8 mM at 20 mg/L DOC. These findings revealed that DOMs originated from agricultural wastes will have great impact on the dispersion and stabilization of MWCNTs, thus their fate in the aquatic environment.

  15. Does Implant Design Affect Implant Primary Stability? A Resonance Frequency Analysis-Based Randomized Split-Mouth Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; da Silva, Ulisses Tavares; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess implant stability in relation to implant design (conical vs. semiconical and wide-pitch vs narrow-pitch) using resonance frequency analysis. Twenty patients with bilateral edentulous maxillary premolar region were selected. In one hemiarch, conical implants with wide pitch (group 1) were installed; in the other hemiarch, semiconical implants with narrow pitch were installed (group 2). The implant allocation was randomized. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) was measured by resonance frequency analysis immediately following implant placement to assess primary stability (time 1) and at 90 days after placement (time 2). In group 1, the mean and standard deviation ISQ for time 1 was 65.8 ± 6.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 55 to 80), and for time 2, it was 68.0 ± 5.52 (95% CI, 57 to 77). In group 2, the mean and standard deviation ISQ was 63.6 ± 5.95 (95% CI, 52 to 78) for time 1 and 67.0 ± 5.71 (95% CI, 58 to 78) for time 2. The statistical analysis demonstrated significant difference in the ISQ values between groups at time 1 (P = .007) and no statistical difference at time 2 (P = .54). The greater primary stability of conical implants with wide pitch compared with semiconical implants with narrow pitch might suggest a preference for the former in case of the adoption of immediate or early loading protocols.

  16. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  17. Disruption of a hydrogen bond network in human versus spider monkey cytochrome c affects heme crevice stability.

    PubMed

    Goldes, Matthew E; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E; McClelland, Levi J; Mou, Tung-Chung; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-01

    The hypothesis that the recent rapid evolution of primate cytochromes c, which primarily involves residues in the least stable Ω-loop (Ω-loop C, residues 40-57), stabilizes the heme crevice of cytochrome c relative to other mammals, is tested. To accomplish this goal, we have compared the properties of human and spider monkey cytochrome c and a set of four variants produced in the process of converting human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability of all variants has been measured by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation. The stability of the heme crevice has been assessed with the alkaline conformational transition. Structural insight into the effects of the five amino acid substitutions needed to convert human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c is provided by a 1.15Å resolution structure of spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability for all variants is near 9.0kcal/mol at 25°C and pH7, which is higher than that observed for other mammalian cytochromes c. The heme crevice stability is more sensitive to the substitutions required to produce spider monkey cytochrome c with decreases of up to 0.5 units in the apparent pKa of the alkaline conformational transition relative to human cytochrome c. The structure of spider monkey cytochrome c indicates that the Y46F substitution destabilizes the heme crevice by disrupting an extensive hydrogen bond network that connects three surface loops including Ω-loop D (residues 70-85), which contains the Met80 heme ligand.

  18. Water Retention and Structure Stability in Smectitic or Kaolinitic Loam and Clay Soils Affected by Polyacrylamide Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Amirakh; Levy, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Studying the effects of polyacrylamide (PAM) on soil aggregate and structure stability is important in developing effective soil and water conservation practices and in sustaining soil and water quality. Five concentrations of an anionic PAM (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1) with a high molecular weight were tested on loam and clay soils having either a predominant smectitic or kaolinitic clay mineralogy. The effects of the PAM and of soil texture on soil water retention at near saturation and on aggregate and structure stability were investigated using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC) method. The S-shaped water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980) model that provided: (i) the model parameters α and n, which represent the location of the inflection point and the steepness of the water retention curve, respectively; and (ii) the soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS, where VDP is the volume of drainable pores, an indicator of the quantity of water released by a soil over the range of applied suctions (0-5 J kg-1), and MS is the modal suction representing the most frequent pore sizes (> 60 μm). In general, the treatments tested (clay mineralogy, soil type and PAM concentration) resulted in: (i) a considerable modification of the shape of the water retention curves as indicated by the changes in the α and n values; and; (ii) substantial effects on the stability indices and other model parameters. The contribution of PAM concentration to soil structure stability depended on the clay mineralogy, being more effective in the smectitic soils than in the kaolinitic ones. Although kaolinitic soils are usually more stable than smectitic soils, when the latter were treated with PAM (25-200 mg L-1) the opposite trend was observed. In the loam soils, increasing the PAM concentration notably decreased the differences between values of the stability indices of the smectitic and kaolinitic samples. The

  19. CNT loading into cationic cholesterol suspensions show improved DNA binding and serum stability and ability to internalize into cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhikara, Bhupender S.; Misra, Santosh K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2012-02-01

    Methods which disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water as ‘debundled’, while maintaining their unique physical properties are highly useful. We present here a family of cationic cholesterol compounds (Chol+) {Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl pyridinium bromide (Chol-PB+), Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl N-methyl pyrrolidinium bromide (Chol-MPB+), Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl N-methyl morpholinium bromide (Chol-MMB+) and Cholest-5en-3β-oxyethyl diazabicyclo octanium bromide (Chol-DOB+)}. Each of these could be easily dispersed in water. The resulting cationic cholesterol (Chol+) suspensions solubilized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by the non-specific physical adsorption of Chol+ to form stable, transparent, dark aqueous suspensions at room temperature. Electron microscopy reveals the existence of highly segregated CNTs in these samples. Zeta potential measurements showed an increase in potential of cationic cholesterol aggregates on addition of CNTs. The CNT-Chol+ suspensions were capable of forming stable complexes with genes (DNA) efficiently. The release of double-helical DNA from such CNT-Chol+ complexes could be induced upon the addition of anionic micellar solution of SDS. Furthermore, the CNT-based DNA complexes containing cationic cholesterol aggregates showed higher stability in fetal bovine serum media at physiological conditions. Confocal studies confirm that CNT-Chol+ formulations adhere to HeLa cell surfaces and get internalized more efficiently than the cationic cholesterol suspensions alone (devoid of any CNTs). These cationic cholesterol-CNT suspensions therefore appear to be a promising system for further use in biological applications.

  20. Neurotransmitter Release Can Be Stabilized by a Mechanism That Prevents Voltage Changes Near the End of Action Potentials from Affecting Calcium Currents.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Stephen G; Scarnati, Matthew S; Paradiso, Kenneth G

    2016-11-09

    At chemical synapses, presynaptic action potentials (APs) activate voltage-gated calcium channels, allowing calcium to enter and trigger neurotransmitter release. The duration, peak amplitude, and shape of the AP falling phase alter calcium entry, which can affect neurotransmitter release significantly. In many neurons, APs do not immediately return to the resting potential, but instead exhibit a period of depolarization or hyperpolarization referred to as an afterpotential. We hypothesized that presynaptic afterpotentials should alter neurotransmitter release by affecting the electrical driving force for calcium entry and calcium channel gating. In support of this, presynaptic calcium entry is affected by afterpotentials after standard instant voltage jumps. Here, we used the mouse calyx of Held synapse, which allows simultaneous presynaptic and postsynaptic patch-clamp recording, to show that the postsynaptic response is affected significantly by presynaptic afterpotentials after voltage jumps. We therefore tested the effects of presynaptic afterpotentials using simultaneous presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings and AP waveforms or real APs. Surprisingly, presynaptic afterpotentials after AP stimuli did not alter calcium channel responses or neurotransmitter release appreciably. We show that the AP repolarization time course causes afterpotential-induced changes in calcium driving force and changes in calcium channel gating to effectively cancel each other out. This mechanism, in which electrical driving force is balanced by channel gating, prevents changes in calcium influx from occurring at the end of the AP and therefore acts to stabilize synaptic transmission. In addition, this mechanism can act to stabilize neurotransmitter release when the presynaptic resting potential changes.

  1. The gene transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein: role in positive and negative affective states of alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Subhash C

    2004-10-01

    The gene transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-responsive element binding (CREB) protein is a nuclear protein that regulates synaptic plasticity via modulating the expression of several (cAMP)-inducible genes. Alcohol addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder and is characterized by a compulsive and uncontrolled pattern of alcohol drinking by an individual in spite of the adverse consequences of its abuse. Ethanol produces both euphoric (reward and reinforcing) and dysphoric (negative withdrawal reactions) effects and these are most likely involved in the initiation and maintenance of alcohol use and abuse. Several neurotransmitter systems in the brain might be involved in the effects of alcohol but the exact molecular mechanisms of both the positive and negative affective states of alcohol abuse are still unclear. Recent research in molecular neurosciences using animal models have identified the role of extended amygdaloid (shell structures of nucleus accumbens [NAc] and central and medial amygdaloid nuclei) CREB signaling in positive and negative affective states of alcohol drinking behaviors. This review article highlights the current findings on the role of nucleus accumbal and amygdaloid CREB signaling in behavioral consequences of alcohol use and abuse.

  2. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  3. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  4. The N-terminal tails of the H2A-H2B histones affect dimer structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Placek, Brandon J; Gloss, Lisa M

    2002-12-17

    The histone proteins of the core nucleosome are highly basic and form heterodimers in a "handshake motif." The N-terminal tails of the histones extend beyond the canonical histone fold of the hand-shake motif and are the sites of posttranslational modifications, including lysine acetylations and serine phosphorylations, which influence chromatin structure and activity as well as alter the charge state of the tails. However, it is not well understood if these modifications are signals for recruitment of other cellular factors or if the removal of net positive charge from the N-terminal tail plays a role in the overall structure of chromatin. To elucidate the effects of the N-terminal tails on the structure and stability of histones, the highly charged N-terminal tails were truncated from the H2A and H2B histones. Three mutant dimers were studied: DeltaN-H2A/WT H2B; WT H2A/DeltaN-H2B, and DeltaN-H2A/DeltaN-H2B. The CD spectra, stabilities to urea-denaturation, and the salt-dependent stabilization of the three truncated dimers were compared with those of the wild-type dimer. The data support four conclusions regarding the effects of the N-terminal tails of H2A and H2B: (1) Removal of the N-terminal tails of H2A and H2B enhance the helical structure of the mutant heterodimers. (2) Relative to the full-length WT heterodimer, the DeltaN-H2A/WT H2B dimer is destabilized, while the WT H2A/DeltaN-H2B and DeltaN-H2A/DeltaN-H2B dimers are slightly stabilized. (3) The truncated dimers exhibit decreased m values, relative to the WT dimer, supporting the hypothesis that the N-terminal tails in the isolated dimer adopt a collapsed structure. (4) Electrostatic repulsion in the N-terminal tails decreases the stability of the H2A-H2B dimer.

  5. The influence of somatosensory and muscular deficits on postural stabilization: Insights from an instrumented analysis of subjects affected by different types of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Tiziana; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Rabuffetti, Marco; Bovi, Gabriele; Calabrese, Daniela; Aiello, Alessia; Di Sipio, Enrica; Padua, Luca; Diverio, Manuela; Pareyson, Davide; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary neuromuscular disorder. CMT1 is primarily demyelinating, CMT2 is primarily axonal, and CMTX1 is characterized by both axonal and demyelinating abnormalities. We investigated the role of somatosensory and muscular deficits on quiet standing and postural stabilization in patients affected by different forms of CMT, comparing their performances with those of healthy subjects. Seventy-six CMT subjects (CMT1A, CMT2 and CMTX1) and 41 healthy controls were evaluated during a sit-to-stand transition and the subsequent quiet upright posture by means of a dynamometric platform. All CMT patients showed altered balance and postural stabilization compared to controls. Multivariate analysis showed that in CMT patients worsening of postural stabilization was related to vibration sense deficit and to dorsi-flexor's weakness, while quiet standing instability was related to the reduction of pinprick sensibility and to plantar-flexor's weakness. Our results show that specific sensory and muscular deficits play different roles in balance impairment of CMT patients, both during postural stabilization and in static posture. An accurate evaluation of residual sensory and muscular functions is therefore necessary to plan for the appropriate balance rehabilitation treatment for each patient, besides the CMT type.

  6. Acid-base and metal-ion-binding properties of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) in aqueous solution: complex stabilities, isomeric equilibria, and extent of macrochelation.

    PubMed

    Sigel, Helmut; Massoud, Salah S; Song, Bin; Griesser, Rolf; Knobloch, Bernd; Operschall, Bert P

    2006-10-25

    The four acidity constants of threefold protonated xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, H3(XMP)+, reveal that at the physiological pH of 7.5 (XMP-H)(3-) strongly dominates (and not XMP(2-) as given in textbooks); this is in contrast to the related inosine (IMP(2-)) and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP(2-)) and it means that XMP should better be named as xanthosinate 5'-monophosphate. In addition, evidence is provided for a tautomeric (XMP-HN1)(3-)/(XMP-HN3)(3-) equilibrium. The stability constants of the M(H;XMP)+ species were estimated and those of the M(XMP) and M(XMP-H)- complexes (M2+=Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+) measured potentiometrically in aqueous solution. The primary M2+ binding site in M(XMP) is (mostly) N7 of the monodeprotonated xanthine residue, the proton being at the phosphate group. The corresponding macrochelates involving P(O)2(OH)- (most likely outer-sphere) are formed to approximately 65% for nearly all M2+. In M(XMP-H)- the primary M2+ binding site is (mostly) the phosphate group; here the formation degree of the N7 macrochelates varies widely from close to zero for the alkaline earth ions, to approximately 50% for Mn2+, and approximately 90% or more for Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. Because for (XMP-H)(3-) the micro stability constants quantifying the M2+ affinity of the xanthosinate and PO3(2-) residues are known, one may apply a recently developed quantification method for the chelate effect to the corresponding macrochelates; this chelate effect is close to zero for the alkaline earth ions and it amounts to about one log unit for Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+. This method also allows calculation of the formation degrees of the monodentatally coordinated isomers; this information is of relevance for biological systems because it demonstrates how metal ions can switch from one site to another through macrochelate formation. These insights are meaningful for metal-ion-dependent reactions of XMP in metabolic pathways; previous

  7. AlFx affects the formation of focal complexes by stabilizing the Arf-GAP ASAP1 in a complex with Arf1.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stéphanie; Franco, Michel; Chardin, Pierre; Luton, Frédéric

    2005-10-24

    Aluminum fluoride (AlFx) is known to activate directly the alpha subunit of G-proteins but not the homologous small GTP-binding proteins. However, AlFx can stabilize complexes formed between Ras, RhoA or Cdc42 and their corresponding GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here, we demonstrate that Arf1GDP can be converted into an active conformation by AlFx to form a complex with the Arf-GAP ASAP1 in vitro and in vivo. Within this complex ASAP1, which GAP activity is inoperative, can still alter the recruitment of paxillin to the focal complexes, thus indicating that ASAP1 interferes with focal complexes independently of its GAP activity.

  8. Reduced oxide sites and surface corrugation affecting the reactivity, thermal stability, and selectivity of supported Au-Pd bimetallic clusters on SiO2/Si(100).

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Sorek, Elishama; Murugadoss, Arumugam; Asscher, Micha

    2013-05-21

    The morphology and surface elemental composition of Au-Pd bimetallic nanoclusters are reported to be sensitive to and affected by reduced silicon defect sites and structural corrugation on SiO2/Si(100), generated by argon ion sputtering under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Metastable structures of the bimetallic clusters, where Au atoms are depleted from the top surface upon annealing, are stabilized by the interaction with the reduced silica sites, as indicated from CO temperature programmed desorption (TPD) titration measurements. Acetylene conversion to ethylene and benzene has been studied as a probe reaction, revealing the modification of selectivity and reactivity enhancement in addition to improved thermal stability on substrates rich in reduced-silica sites. These observations suggest that these unique sites play an important role in anchoring thermodynamically metastable conformations of supported Au-Pd bimetallic catalysts and dictate their high-temperature activity.

  9. The Smallest Capsid Protein Mediates Binding of the Essential Tegument Protein pp150 to Stabilize DNA-Containing Capsids in Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinghong; Yu, Xuekui; Gong, Hao; Jiang, Xiaohong; Abenes, Gerrado; Liu, Hongrong; Shivakoti, Sakar; Britt, William J.; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Fenyong; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP), while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM), we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150) and virion (with pp150) at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting “SCP-deficient” viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion. PMID:23966856

  10. Functional SNPs of INCENP Affect Semen Quality by Alternative Splicing Mode and Binding Affinity with the Target Bta-miR-378 in Chinese Holstein Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Qiang; Huang, Jinming; Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2016-01-01

    Inner centromere protein (INCENP) plays an important role in mitosis and meiosis as the main member of chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC). To investigate the functional markers of the INCENP gene associated with semen quality, the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) g.19970 A>G and g.34078 T>G were identified and analyzed. The new splice variant INCENP-TV is characterized by the deletion of exon 12. The g.19970 A>G in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) motif region results in an aberrant splice variant by constructing two minigene expression vectors using the pSPL3 exon capturing vector and transfecting vectors into MLTC-1 cells. INCENP-TV was more highly expressed than INCENP-reference in adult bull testes. The g.34078 T>G located in the binding region of bta-miR-378 could affect the expression of INCENP, which was verified by luciferase assay. To analyze comprehensively the correlation of SNPs with sperm quality, haplotype combinations constructed by g.19970 A>G and g.34078 T>G, as well as g.-692 C>T and g.-556 G>T reported in our previous studies, were analyzed. The bulls with H1H12 and H2H2 exhibited a higher ejaculate volume than those with H2H10 and H9H12, respectively (P < 0.05). Bulls with H11H11 and H2H10 exhibited higher initial sperm motility than those with H2H2 (P < 0.05). The expression levels of INCENP in bulls with H1H12 and H11H11 were significantly higher than those in bulls with H9H12 (P < 0.05), as determined by qRT-PCR. Findings suggest that g.19970 A>G and g.34078 T>G in INCENP both of which appear to change the molecular and biological characteristics of the mRNA transcribed from the locus may serve as a biomarkers of male bovine fertility by affecting alternative splicing mode and binding affinity with the target bta-miR-378. PMID:27669152

  11. The cellular energization state affects peripheral stalk stability of plant vacuolar H+-ATPase and impairs vacuolar acidification.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Daniel; Seidel, Thorsten; Sander, Tim; Golldack, Dortje; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2011-05-01

    The plant vacuolar H(+)-ATPase takes part in acidifying compartments of the endomembrane system including the secretory pathway and the vacuoles. The structural variability of the V-ATPase complex as well as its presence in different compartments and tissues involves multiple isoforms of V-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, a versatile regulation is essential to allow for organelle- and tissue-specific fine tuning. In this study, results from V-ATPase complex disassembly with a chaotropic reagent, immunodetection and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses point to a regulatory mechanism in plants, which depends on energization and involves the stability of the peripheral stalks as well. Lowering of cellular ATP by feeding 2-deoxyglucose resulted in structural alterations within the V-ATPase, as monitored by changes in FRET efficiency between subunits VHA-E and VHA-C. Potassium iodide-mediated disassembly revealed a reduced stability of V-ATPase after 2-deoxyglucose treatment of the cells, but neither the complete V(1)-sector nor VHA-C was released from the membrane in response to 2-deoxyglucose treatment, precluding a reversible dissociation mechanism like in yeast. These data suggest the existence of a regulatory mechanism of plant V-ATPase by modification of the peripheral stator structure that is linked to the cellular energization state. This mechanism is distinct from reversible dissociation as reported for the yeast V-ATPase, but might represent an evolutionary precursor of reversible dissociation.

  12. SUMF1 mutations affecting stability and activity of formylglycine generating enzyme predict clinical outcome in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Ennemann, Eva Charlotte; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Chakrapani, Anupam; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Moser, Hugo; Steinmann, Beat; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is caused by mutations in the sulfatase-modifying factor 1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE post translationally activates all newly synthesized sulfatases by generating the catalytic residue formylglycine. Impaired FGE function leads to reduced sulfatase activities. Patients display combined clinical symptoms of single sulfatase deficiencies. For ten MSD patients, we determined the clinical phenotype, FGE expression, localization and stability, as well as residual FGE and sulfatase activities. A neonatal, very severe clinical phenotype resulted from a combination of two nonsense mutations leading to almost fully abrogated FGE activity, highly unstable FGE protein and nearly undetectable sulfatase activities. A late infantile mild phenotype resulted from FGE G263V leading to unstable protein but high residual FGE activity. Other missense mutations resulted in a late infantile severe phenotype because of unstable protein with low residual FGE activity. Patients with identical mutations displayed comparable clinical phenotypes. These data confirm the hypothesis that the phenotypic outcome in MSD depends on both residual FGE activity as well as protein stability. Predicting the clinical course in case of molecularly characterized mutations seems feasible, which will be helpful for genetic counseling and developing therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancement of FGE.

  13. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  14. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  15. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  16. Long non-coding RNA stabilizes the Y-box-binding protein 1 and regulates the epidermal growth factor receptor to promote lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Chao; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Zhao, Xin-Chun; Pan, Hong-Li; Qu, Li-Wei; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Xin; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Indoor and outdoor air pollution has been classified as group I carcinogen in humans, but the underlying tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here, we screened for abnormal long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in lung cancers from patients living in Xuanwei city which has the highest lung cancer incidence in China due to smoky coal combustion-generated air pollution. We reported that Xuanwei patients had much more dysregulated lncRNAs than patients from control regions where smoky coal was not used. The lncRNA CAR intergenic 10 (CAR10) was up-regulated in 39/62 (62.9%) of the Xuanwei patients, which was much higher than in patients from control regions (32/86, 37.2%; p=0.002). A multivariate regression analysis showed an association between CAR10 overexpression and air pollution, and a smoky coal combustion-generated carcinogen dibenz[a,h]anthracene up-regulated CAR10 by increasing transcription factor FoxF2 expression. CAR10 bound and stabilized transcription factor Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), leading to up-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and proliferation of lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CAR10 inhibited cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. These results demonstrate the role of lncRNAs in environmental lung carcinogenesis, and CAR10-YB-1 represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27322209

  17. Site-specific replacement of the thymine methyl group by fluorine in thrombin binding aptamer significantly improves structural stability and anticoagulant activity

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Antonella; Petraccone, Luigi; Vellecco, Valentina; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Varra, Michela; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Pepe, Antonietta; Mayol, Luciano; Esposito, Veronica; Galeone, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Here we report investigations, based on circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, molecular modelling, differential scanning calorimetry and prothrombin time assay, on analogues of the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) in which individual thymidines were replaced by 5-fluoro-2′-deoxyuridine residues. The whole of the data clearly indicate that all derivatives are able to fold in a G-quadruplex structure very similar to the ‘chair-like’ conformation typical of the TBA. However, only ODNs TBA-F4 and TBA-F13 have shown a remarkable improvement both in the melting temperature (ΔTm ≈ +10) and in the anticoagulant activity in comparison with the original TBA. These findings are unusual, particularly considering previously reported studies in which modifications of T4 and T13 residues in TBA sequence have clearly proven to be always detrimental for the structural stability and biological activity of the aptamer. Our results strongly suggest the possibility to enhance TBA properties through tiny straightforward modifications. PMID:26582916

  18. The γ-Protocadherin-C3 isoform inhibits canonical Wnt signalling by binding to and stabilizing Axin1 at the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Kar Men; Houston, Douglas W.; Weiner, Joshua A.

    2016-01-01

    The 22 γ-Protocadherin (γ-Pcdh) adhesion molecules encoded by the Pcdhg gene cluster play critical roles in nervous system development, including regulation of dendrite arborisation, neuronal survival, and synaptogenesis. Recently, they have been implicated in suppression of tumour cell growth by inhibition of canonical Wnt signalling, though the mechanisms through which this occurs remain unknown. Here, we show differential regulation of Wnt signalling by individual γ-Pcdhs: The C3 isoform uniquely inhibits the pathway, whilst 13 other isoforms upregulate signalling. Focusing on the C3 isoform, we show that its unique variable cytoplasmic domain (VCD) is the critical one for Wnt pathway inhibition. γ-Pcdh-C3, but not other isoforms, physically interacts with Axin1, a key component of the canonical Wnt pathway. The C3 VCD competes with Dishevelled for binding to the DIX domain of Axin1, which stabilizes Axin1 at the membrane and leads to reduced phosphorylation of Wnt co-receptor Lrp6. Finally, we present evidence that Wnt pathway activity can be modulated up (by γ-Pcdh-A1) or down (by γ-Pcdh-C3) in the cerebral cortex in vivo, using conditional transgenic alleles. Together, these data delineate opposing roles for γ-Pcdh isoforms in regulating Wnt signalling and identify Axin1 as a novel protein interactor of the widely-expressed γ-Pcdh-C3 isoform. PMID:27530555

  19. Does the personal lift-assist device affect the local dynamic stability of the spine during lifting?

    PubMed

    Graham, Ryan B; Sadler, Erin M; Stevenson, Joan M

    2011-02-03

    The personal lift-assist device (PLAD) is an on-body ergonomic aid that reduces low back physical demands through the restorative moment of an external spring element, which possesses a mechanical advantage over the erector spinae. Although the PLAD has proven effective at reducing low back muscular demand, spinal moments, and localized muscular fatigue during laboratory and industrial tasks, the effects of the device on the neuromuscular control of spinal stability during lifting have yet to be assessed. Thirty healthy subjects (15M, 15F) performed repetitive lifting for three minutes, at a rate of 10 lifts per minute, with and without the PLAD. Maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents, representing short-term (λ(max-s)) and long-term (λ(max-l)) divergence were calculated from the measured trunk kinematics to estimate the local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine. Using a mixed-design repeated-measures ANOVA, it was determined that wearing the PLAD did not significantly change λ(max-s) (μ(NP)=0.335, μ(P)=0.321, p=0.225), but did significantly reduce λ(max-l) (μ(NP)=0.0024, μ(P)=-0.0011, p=0.014, η(2)=0.197). There were no between-subject effects of sex, or significant interactions (p>0.720). The present results indicated that λ(max-s) was not statistically different between the device conditions, but that the PLAD significantly reduced λ(max-l) to a negative (stable) value. This shows that subjects' neuromuscular systems were able to respond to local perturbations more effectively when wearing the device, reflecting a more stable control of spinal movements. These findings are important when recommending the PLAD for long-term industrial or clinical use.

  20. Stability of psychological impairment: two year follow-up of former microelectronics workers' affective and personality disturbance.

    PubMed

    Bowler, R M; Mergler, D; Rauch, S S; Bowler, R P

    1992-01-01

    For the past twenty years women's complaints in the microelectronics industry have often been diagnosed as mass psychogenic illness, despite evidence of potential exposure to organic solvents, which have been associated with affect and mood changes. In the present study, the standard version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) was used to evaluate affective and personality disturbance among 63 former microelectronics workers (56 women and 7 men) over a two-year period of time. In both 1986 and 1988, the former workers obtained mean scale score elevations beyond two standard deviations above the normative sample (T = greater than 70) on the MMPI clinical scales of schizophrenia, hypochondriasis, psychasthenia, depression and hysteria. For most scales, 86-88 mean score differences did not attain the 0.05 significance level (two-tailed paired t-test) and no significant differences were observed for 86-88 comparison scale scores = greater than 70 (McNemar paired statistic). Although there were too few men to perform gender comparisons, men scored higher than women on 5 scales and all of the men had scores = greater than 70 on hypochondriasis, depression, hysteria, psychasthenia and schizophrenia. These findings reveal that these former microelectronics workers manifested affective and personality disturbances, consistent with organic solvent toxicity, which persisted over a two year period, indicating that they were not reactive, transient hysterical neurosis.

  1. Amino Acid Residues in the Putative Transmembrane Domain 11 of Human Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Dictate Transporter Substrate Binding, Stability, and Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weifang; Wu, Zhixuan; Fang, Zihui; Huang, Jiujiu; Huang, Hong; Hong, Mei

    2015-12-07

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs, gene symbol SLCO) are membrane proteins that mediate the sodium-independent transport of a wide range of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Due to their broad substrate specificity, wide tissue distribution, and involvement in drug-drug interactions, OATPs have been considered as key players in drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. Transmembrane domains (TMs) are crucial structural features involved in proper functions of many transporters. According to computer-based modeling and previous studies of our laboratory and others, TM11 of OATP1B1 may face the substrate interaction pocket and thus play an important role in the transport function of the protein. Alanine-scanning of the transmembrane domain identified seven critical amino acid residues within the region. Further analysis revealed that alanine substitution of these residues resulted in reduced protein stability, which led to significantly decreased protein expression on the plasma membrane. In addition, all mutants exhibited an altered Km for ES uptake (either high affinity or low affinity component, or both), though Km for taurocholate transport only changed in R580A, G584A, and F591A. These results suggested that critical residues in TM11 not only affect protein stability of the transporter, but its interaction with substrates as well. The identification of seven essential residues out of 21 TM amino acids highlighted the importance of this transmembrane domain in the proper function of OATP1B1.

  2. Recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 into specific intranuclear compartments depends on tyrosine phosphorylation that affects its DNA-binding and transactivation potential.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistaki, E; Ktistakis, N T; Papadogeorgaki, E; Talianidis, I

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a prominent member of the family of liver-enriched transcription factors, playing a role in the expression of a large number of liver-specific genes. We report here that HNF-4 is a phosphoprotein and that phosphorylation at tyrosine residue(s) is important for its DNA-binding activity and, consequently, for its transactivation potential both in cell-free systems and in cultured cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation did not affect the transport of HNF-4 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus but had a dramatic effect on its subnuclear localization. HNF-4 was concentrated in distinct nuclear compartments, as evidenced by in situ immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. This compartmentalization disappeared when tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by genistein. The correlation between the intranuclear distribution of HNF-4 and its ability to activate endogenous target genes demonstrates a phosphorylation signal-dependent pathway in the regulation of transcription factor activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7568236

  3. The Staphylococcus aureus Chaperone PrsA Is a New Auxiliary Factor of Oxacillin Resistance Affecting Penicillin-Binding Protein 2A.

    PubMed

    Jousselin, Ambre; Manzano, Caroline; Biette, Alexandra; Reed, Patricia; Pinho, Mariana G; Rosato, Adriana E; Kelley, William L; Renzoni, Adriana

    2015-12-28

    Expression of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) phenotype results from the expression of the extra penicillin-binding protein 2A (PBP2A), which is encoded by mecA and acquired horizontally on part of the SCCmec cassette. PBP2A can catalyze dd-transpeptidation of peptidoglycan (PG) because of its low affinity for β-lactam antibiotics and can functionally cooperate with the PBP2 transglycosylase in the biosynthesis of PG. Here, we focus upon the role of the membrane-bound PrsA foldase protein as a regulator of β-lactam resistance expression. Deletion of prsA altered oxacillin resistance in three different SCCmec backgrounds and, more importantly, caused a decrease in PBP2A membrane amounts without affecting mecA mRNA levels. The N- and C-terminal domains of PrsA were found to be critical features for PBP2A protein membrane levels and oxacillin resistance. We propose that PrsA has a role in posttranscriptional maturation of PBP2A, possibly in the export and/or folding of newly synthesized PBP2A. This additional level of control in the expression of the mecA-dependent MRSA phenotype constitutes an opportunity to expand the strategies to design anti-infective agents.

  4. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo.

  5. Octamer-binding protein 4 affects the cell biology and phenotypic transition of lung cancer cells involving β-catenin/E-cadherin complex degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Shu; Ling, Dong-Jin; Zhang, Yang-De; Feng, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Shi, Tian-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Clinical studies have reported evidence for the involvement of octamer‑binding protein 4 (Oct4) in the tumorigenicity and progression of lung cancer; however, the role of Oct4 in lung cancer cell biology in vitro and its mechanism of action remain to be elucidated. Mortality among lung cancer patients is more frequently due to metastasis rather than their primary tumors. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a prominent biological event for the induction of epithelial cancer metastasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Oct4 had the capacity to induce lung cancer cell metastasis via the promoting the EMT in vitro. Moreover, the effect of Oct4 on the β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex, associated with EMT, was examined using immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays as well as western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that Oct4 enhanced cell invasion and adhesion accompanied by the downregulation of epithelial marker cytokeratin, and upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N‑cadherin. Furthermore, Oct4 induced EMT of lung cancer cells by promoting β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex degradation and regulating nuclear localization of β‑catenin. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Oct4 affected the cell biology of lung cancer cells in vitro through promoting lung cancer cell metastasis via EMT; in addition, the results suggested that the association and degradation of the β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex was regulated by Oct4 during the process of EMT.

  6. Permeability models affecting nonlinear stability in the asymptotic suction boundary layer: the Forchheimer versus the Darcy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedin, Håkan; Cherubini, Stefania

    2016-12-01

    The asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) is used for studying two permeability models, namely the Darcy and the Forchheimer model, the latter being more physically correct according to the literature. The term that defines the two apart is a function of the non-Darcian wall permeability {\\hat{K}}2 and of the wall suction {\\hat{V}}0, whereas the Darcian wall permeability {\\hat{K}}1 is common to the two models. The underlying interest of the study lies in the field of transition to turbulence where focus is put on two-dimensional nonlinear traveling waves (TWs) and their three-dimensional linear stability. Following a previous study by Wedin et al (2015 Phys. Rev. E 92 013022), where only the Darcy model was considered, the present work aims at comparing the two models, assessing where in the parameter space they cease to produce the same results. For low values of {\\hat{K}}1 both models produce almost identical TW solutions. However, when both increasing the suction {\\hat{V}}0 to sufficiently high amplitudes (i.e. lowering the Reynolds number Re, based on the displacement thickness) and using large values of the wall porosity, differences are observed. In terms of the non-dimensional Darcian wall permeability parameter, a, strong differences in the overall shape of the bifurcation curves are observed for a≳ 0.70, with the emergence of a new family of solutions at Re lower than 100. For these large values of a, a Forchheimer number {{Fo}}\\max ≳ 0.5 is found, where Fo expresses the ratio between the kinetic and viscous forces acting on the porous wall. Moreover, the minimum Reynolds number, {{Re}}g, for which the Navier-Stokes equations allow for nonlinear solutions, decreases for increasing values of a. Fixing the streamwise wavenumber to α = 0.154, as used in the study by Wedin et al referenced above, we find that {{Re}}g is lowered from Re ≈ 3000 for zero permeability, to below 50 for a = 0.80 for both permeability models. Finally, the stability of

  7. The maize (Zea mays L.) nucleoside diphosphate kinase1 (ZmNDPK1) gene encodes a human NM23-H2 homologue that binds and stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Kopylov, Mykhailo; Bass, Hank W; Stroupe, M Elizabeth

    2015-03-10

    Noncanonical forms of DNA like the guanine quadruplex (G4) play important roles in regulating transcription and translation through interactions with their protein partners. Although potential G4 elements have been identified in or near genes from species diverse as bacteria, mammals, and plants, little is known about how they might function as cis-regulatory elements or as binding sites for trans-acting protein partners. In fact, until now no G4 binding partners have been identified in the plant kingdom. Here, we report on the cloning and characterization of the first plant-kingdom gene known to encode a G4-binding protein, maize (Zea mays L.) nucleoside diphosphate kinase1 (ZmNDPK1). Structural characterization by X-ray crystallography reveals that it is a homohexamer, akin to other known NDPKs like the human homologue NM23-H2. Further probing into the G4-binding properties of both NDPK homologues suggests that ZmNDPK1 possesses properties distinct from that of NM23-H2, which is known to interact with a G-rich sequence element upstream of the c-myc gene and, in doing so, modulate its expression. Indeed, ZmNDPK1 binds the folded G4 with low nanomolar affinity but corresponding unfolded G-rich DNA more weakly, whereas NM23-H2 binds both folded and unfolded G4 with low nanomolar affinities; nonetheless, both homologues appear to stabilize folded DNAs whether they were prefolded or not. We also demonstrate that the G4-binding activity of ZmNDPK1 is independent of nucleotide binding and kinase activity, suggesting that the G4-binding region and the enzyme active sites are separate. Together, these findings establish a broad evolutionary conservation of some NDPKs as G4-DNA binding enzymes, but with potentially distinct biochemical properties that may reflect divergent evolution or species-specific deployment of these elements in gene regulatory processes.

  8. ALS as a distal axonopathy: molecular mechanisms affecting neuromuscular junction stability in the presymptomatic stages of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Elizabeth B.; de Winter, Fred; Verhaagen, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is being redefined as a distal axonopathy, in that many molecular changes influencing motor neuron degeneration occur at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) at very early stages of the disease prior to symptom onset. A huge variety of genetic and environmental causes have been associated with ALS, and interestingly, although the cause of the disease can differ, both sporadic and familial forms of ALS show a remarkable similarity in terms of disease progression and clinical manifestation. The NMJ is a highly specialized synapse, allowing for controlled signaling between muscle and nerve necessary for skeletal muscle function. In this review we will evaluate the clinical, animal experimental and cellular/molecular evidence that supports the idea of ALS as a distal axonopathy. We will discuss the early molecular mechanisms that occur at the NMJ, which alter the functional abilities of the NMJ. Specifically, we focus on the role of axon guidance molecules on the stability of the cytoskeleton and how these molecules may directly influence the cells of the NMJ in a way that may initiate or facilitate the dismantling of the neuromuscular synapse in the presymptomatic stages of ALS. PMID:25177267

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle.

  10. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  11. Storage Stability of Kinnow Fruit (Citrus reticulata) as Affected by CMC and Guar Gum-Based Silver Nanoparticle Coatings.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Wasim Ahmad; Jahangir, Muhammad; Qaisar, Muhammad; Khan, Sher Aslam; Mahmood, Talat; Saeed, Muhammad; Farid, Abid; Liaquat, Muhammad

    2015-12-18

    The influence of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) and guargum-based coatings containing silver nanoparticles was studied on the postharvest storage stability of the kinnow mandarin (Citrus reticulata cv. Blanco) for a period of 120 days (85%-90% relative humidity) at 4 °C and 10 °C. Physicochemical and microbiological qualities were monitored after every 15 days of storage. Overall results revealed an increase in total soluble solid (TSS), total sugars, reducing sugars and weight loss but this increase was comparatively less significant in coated fruits stored at 4 °C. Ascorbic acid, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity was significantly enhanced in coated fruits stored at 4 °C. Titratable acidity significantly decreased during storage except for coated kinnow stored at 4 °C. In control samples stored at 10 °C, high intensity of fruit rotting and no chilling injury was observed. Total aerobic psychrotrophic bacteria and yeast and molds were noticed in all treatments during storage but the growth was not significant in coated fruits at 4 °C. Kinnow fruit can be kept in good quality after coating for four months at 4 °C and for 2 months at 10 °C.

  12. Mutational Analysis of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Protein Kinase Together with Kinome-Wide Binding and Stability Studies Suggests Context-Dependent Recognition of Kinases by the Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Yue; Williton, Kelly; Taylor, Lorne; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Woodgett, James R.; Pawson, Tony; Colwill, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and cell division cycle 37 (CDC37) chaperones are key regulators of protein kinase folding and maturation. Recent evidence suggests that thermodynamic properties of kinases, rather than primary sequences, are recognized by the chaperones. In concordance, we observed a striking difference in HSP90 binding between wild-type (WT) and kinase-dead (KD) glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) forms. Using model cell lines stably expressing these two GSK3β forms, we observed no interaction between WT GSK3β and HSP90, in stark contrast to KD GSK3β forming a stable complex with HSP90 at a 1:1 ratio. In a survey of 91 ectopically expressed kinases in DLD-1 cells, we compared two parameters to measure HSP90 dependency: static binding and kinase stability following HSP90 inhibition. We observed no correlation between HSP90 binding and reduced stability of a kinase after pharmacological inhibition of HSP90. We expanded our stability study to >50 endogenous kinases across four cell lines and demonstrated that HSP90 dependency is context dependent. These observations suggest that HSP90 binds to its kinase client in a particular conformation that we hypothesize to be associated with the nucleotide-processing cycle. Lastly, we performed proteomics profiling of kinases and phosphopeptides in DLD-1 cells to globally define the impact of HSP90 inhibition on the kinome. PMID:26755559

  13. Ethylene oxide inhalation at different exposure-rates affects binding levels in mouse germ cells and hemoglobin. Possible explanation for the effect.

    PubMed

    Sega, G A; Brimer, P A; Generoso, E E

    1991-08-01

    Male mice were exposed to [3H]EtO by inhalation at different exposure rates (300 parts per million (ppm) of EtO for 1 h: 150 ppm for 2 h: 75 ppm for 4 h). The total exposure was fixed at 300 ppm-h. The amount of EtO binding to developing spermatogenic stages, to sperm DNA, to testis DNA and to hemoglobin was then measured as a function of the EtO exposure rate. Generally, as the exposure rate increased there was an increase in the amount of EtO binding to the targets. For example, alkylation of sperm from the caudal epididymides 6 d posttreatment, of DNA from the vas sperm (averaged over 4 time points), of testis DNA (90 min posttreatment), and of hemoglobin (averaged over 4 time points), was 2.0 +/- 0.2 (SD), 1.8 +/- 0.4, 2.9 +/- 0.3, and 1.5 +/- 0.1 times greater, respectively, after an exposure to 300 ppm for 1 h than after an exposure to 75 ppm for 4 h. The testicular DNA from animals exposed to 300 ppm of [3H]EtO for 1 h was also analyzed for the presence of N7-hydroxyethylguanine (N7HEG) and O6-hydroxyethylguanine (O6HEG). The half-life (T1 2) of the N7HEG in the testis DNA was calculated to be 2.8 d. This lesion was removed relatively rapidly from the testis DNA and was probably excised by enzymatic repair. No formation of O6HEG was detected in any of the testis DNA samples analyzed. Additional experiments showed that the exposure rate effect was the result of less total EtO being taken in by the mice over long exposure times compared to that taken in during shorter exposure times at higher concentrations. This result argues against the idea that the exposure rate effect is the result of physiological/enzymological changes affecting transport or metabolism of the chemical within the animals under different exposure rate conditions.

  14. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the