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Sample records for affect substrate binding

  1. Aromatic amino acid mutagenesis at the substrate binding pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 affects its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guilong; Liu, Zimin; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F) were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16) and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12) to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10). The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  2. Binding of cellulose binding modules reveal differences between cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    Arola, Suvi; Linder, Markus B.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulase enzymes and their substrates is of central importance to several technological and scientific challenges. Here we report that the binding of cellulose binding modules (CBM) from Trichoderma reesei cellulases Cel6A and Cel7A show a major difference in how they interact with substrates originating from wood compared to bacterial cellulose. We found that the CBM from TrCel7A recognizes the two substrates differently and as a consequence shows an unexpected way of binding. We show that the substrate has a large impact on the exchange rate of the studied CBM, and moreover, CBM-TrCel7A seems to have an additional mode of binding on wood derived cellulose but not on cellulose originating from bacterial source. This mode is not seen in double CBM (DCBM) constructs comprising both CBM-TrCel7A and CBM-TrCel6A. The linker length of DCBMs affects the binding properties, and slows down the exchange rates of the proteins and thus, can be used to analyze the differences between the single CBM. These results have impact on the cellulase research and offer new understanding on how these industrially relevant enzymes act. PMID:27748440

  3. Mutations within the mepA operator affect binding of the MepR regulatory protein and its induction by MepA substrates in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Seo, Susan M; Birukou, Ivan; Brennan, Richard G; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2015-03-01

    The expression of mepA, encoding the Staphylococcus aureus MepA multidrug efflux protein, is repressed by the MarR homologue MepR. Repression occurs through binding of two MepR dimers to an operator with two homologous and closely approximated pseudopalindromic binding sites (site 1 [S1] and site 2 [S2]). MepR binding is impeded in the presence of pentamidine, a MepA substrate. The effects of various mepA operator mutations on MepR binding were determined using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry, and an in vivo confirmation of the effects observed was established for a fully palindromic operator mutant. Altering the S1-S2 spacing by 1 to 4 bp severely impaired S2 binding, likely due to a physical collision between adjacent MepR dimers. Extension of the spacing to 9 bp eliminated the S1 binding-mediated DNA allostery required for efficient S2 binding, consistent with positive cooperative binding of MepR dimers. Binding of a single dimer to S1 was maintained when S2 was disrupted, whereas disruption of S1 eliminated any significant binding to S2, also consistent with positive cooperativity. Palindromization of binding sites, especially S2, enhanced MepR affinity for the mepA operator and reduced MepA substrate-mediated MepR induction. As a result, the on-off equilibrium between MepR and its binding sites was shifted toward the on state, resulting in less free MepR being available for interaction with inducing ligand. The selective pressure(s) under which mepA expression is advantageous likely contributed to the accumulation of mutations in the mepA operator, resulting in the current sequence from which MepR is readily induced by MepA substrates.

  4. Substrate binding to mammalian 15-lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, Lea; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M.; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2011-09-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOs) are implicated in the regulation of metabolic processes and in several human diseases. Revealing their exact role is hindered by an incomplete understanding of their activity, including substrate specificity and substrate alignment in the active site. Recently, it has been proposed that the change in substrate specificity for arachidonic acid (AA) or linoleic acid (LA) could be part of an auto-regulatory mechanism related to cancer grow. Kinetic differences between reactions of 15-hLO with AA and LA have also led to the suggestion that the two substrates could present mechanistic differences. In the absence of a crystal structure for the substrate:15-LO complex, here we present an atomic-level study of catalytically competent binding modes for LA to rabbit 15-LO (15-rLO-1) and compare the results to our previous work on AA. Docking calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, re-docking and cross-docking calculations are all used to analyze the differences and similarities between the binding modes of the two substrates. Interestingly, LA seems to adapt more easily to the enzyme structure and differs from AA on some dynamical aspects that could introduce kinetic differences, as observed experimentally. Still, our study concludes that, despite the different chain lengths and number of insaturations between these two physiological substrates of 15-rLO-1, the enzyme seems to catalyze their hydroperoxidation by binding them with a common binding mode that leads to similar catalytically competent complexes.

  5. EGFR kinase possesses a broad specificity for ErbB phosphorylation sites, and ligand increases catalytic-centre activity without affecting substrate binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We previously found that EGF (epidermal growth factor) increases the EGFR (EGF receptor) kinase-binding affinity towards the major tyrosine phosphorylation sites in downstream adaptor proteins such as Gab1 (Grb2-associated binding protein 1) and Shc [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and collagen containing protein], but not that towards EGFR autophosphorylation sites [Fan, Wong, Deb and Johnson (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 38143–38150]. EGFR activation can also result in transphosphorylation of tyrosine resides in the C-terminal region of the related receptors ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 in heterodimers which are formed upon ligand stimulation. In the present study, we investigated the specificity of EGFR kinase by comparing the steady state kinetic parameters for peptides derived from all four ErbBs in the absence or presence of EGF. Our results demonstrated that (i) EGFR kinase can efficiently phosphorylate a broad range of diverse peptide sequences representing ErbB sites; (ii) certain ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 sites had higher specificity constants than any EGFR sequence and (iii) EGF stimulation consistently increases the kcat approx. 5-fold, but does not significantly alter the Km for any ErbB peptides. Furthermore, peptides containing lysine at position −2 or −3 N-terminal to the target tyrosine were found to be poor EGFR kinase substrates, and substitution of these lysines with glutamine decreased the Km and increased the kcat for these substrates. We conclude that EGFR kinase-mediated ErbB transphosphorylations are mostly controlled at the level of oligomerization, and not by a preference of the EGFR kinase for phosphorylation sites in any particular ErbB. The results also demonstrated that, unlike phosphorylation sites in select downstream targets, EGF does not regulate the recognition of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of any of the ErbBs. PMID:16122376

  6. Substrate Binding Mechanism of a Type I Extradiol Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo Je; Kim, Kyungsun; Sohn, Seo Yean; Cho, Ha Yeon; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Dockyu; Kim, Eungbin; Kang, Beom Sik

    2010-01-01

    A meta-cleavage pathway for the aerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons is catalyzed by extradiol dioxygenases via a two-step mechanism: catechol substrate binding and dioxygen incorporation. The binding of substrate triggers the release of water, thereby opening a coordination site for molecular oxygen. The crystal structures of AkbC, a type I extradiol dioxygenase, and the enzyme substrate (3-methylcatechol) complex revealed the substrate binding process of extradiol dioxygenase. AkbC is composed of an N-domain and an active C-domain, which contains iron coordinated by a 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad motif. The C-domain includes a β-hairpin structure and a C-terminal tail. In substrate-bound AkbC, 3-methylcatechol interacts with the iron via a single hydroxyl group, which represents an intermediate stage in the substrate binding process. Structure-based mutagenesis revealed that the C-terminal tail and β-hairpin form part of the substrate binding pocket that is responsible for substrate specificity by blocking substrate entry. Once a substrate enters the active site, these structural elements also play a role in the correct positioning of the substrate. Based on the results presented here, a putative substrate binding mechanism is proposed. PMID:20810655

  7. Substrate and drug binding sites in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Nyola, Ajeeta; Karpowich, Nathan K; Zhen, Juan; Marden, Jennifer; Reith, Maarten E; Wang, Da-Neng

    2010-08-01

    LeuT is a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family, which includes the neuronal transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The original crystal structure of LeuT shows a primary leucine-binding site at the center of the protein. LeuT is inhibited by different classes of antidepressants that act as potent inhibitors of the serotonin transporter. The newly determined crystal structures of LeuT-antidepressant complexes provide opportunities to probe drug binding in the serotonin transporter, of which the exact position remains controversial. Structure of a LeuT-tryptophan complex shows an overlapping binding site with the primary substrate site. A secondary substrate binding site was recently identified, where the binding of a leucine triggers the cytoplasmic release of the primary substrate. This two binding site model presents opportunities for a better understanding of drug binding and the mechanism of inhibition for mammalian transporters.

  8. Involvement of Tyr24 and Trp108 in substrate binding and substrate specificity of glycolate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, K; Clausen, T; Lindqvist, Y; Macheroux, P

    1995-03-01

    Tyr24 and Trp108 are located in the active site of spinach glycolate oxidase. To elucidate their function in substrate binding and catalysis, they were replaced by phenylalanine and serine, respectively. The [Y24F]glycolate oxidase mutant enzyme showed a tenfold higher Km value for glycolate. L-lactate and DL-2-hydroxybutyrate also showed higher Km values, however, the substrate specificity was unchanged as compared to the wild-type enzyme (Km increases in the order glycolate < DL-2-hydroxybutyrate < L-lactate < L-mandelate). The turnover number and the rate of reduction, found to be rate limiting in catalysis, were only slightly affected by the deletion of the hydroxyl group. These findings suggest that Tyr24 is mostly involved in substrate binding. The spectral features of the [Y24F]glycolate oxidase suggest that a fraction (50-80%) of the protein bears a flavin N(5) adduct instead of the oxidized cofactor. Crystals obtained from the isolated [Y24F]glycolate oxidase mutant protein allowed the determination of the three-dimensional structure. Although the structure was low resolution (0.3 nm), it is evident that the structure determined is that of the N(5) adduct species. In addition to the lacking hydroxyl group of Tyr24, we also observed movements of the amino acid side chains of Arg164 and Trp108, the latter replacing a water molecule in the substrate-binding pocket. Other features predominantly found in the class of flavoprotein oxidases, such as stabilization of the covalent N(5)-sulfite adduct and of the paraquinoid form of 8-mercapto-FMN, were found to be conserved. [W108S]Glycolate oxidase, in contrast, showed dramatic effects on both the Km of substrates as well as the turnover number. The Km for glycolate was increased some hundred fold and the turnover number was decreased 500-fold. In addition, it was found that the higher homologs of glycolate, L-lactate and DL-2-hydroxybutyrate had turnover numbers similar to those found with the wild-type enzyme

  9. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate-peptide complex structures.

    PubMed

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Skerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-10-16

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the 'water retention site', suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  11. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  12. Human OGA binds substrates in a conserved peptide recognition groove.

    PubMed

    Schimpl, Marianne; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W; Borodkin, Vladimir S; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2010-11-15

    Modification of cellular proteins with O-GlcNAc (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) competes with protein phosphorylation and regulates a plethora of cellular processes. O-GlcNAcylation is orchestrated by two opposing enzymes, O-GlcNAc transferase and OGA (O-GlcNAcase or β-N-acetylglucosaminidase), which recognize their target proteins via as yet unidentified mechanisms. In the present study, we uncovered the first insights into the mechanism of substrate recognition by human OGA. The structure of a novel bacterial OGA orthologue reveals a putative substrate-binding groove, conserved in metazoan OGAs. Guided by this structure, conserved amino acids lining this groove in human OGA were mutated and the activity on three different substrate proteins [TAB1 (transforming growth factor-β-activated protein kinase 1-binding protein 1), FoxO1 (forkhead box O1) and CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein)] was tested in an in vitro deglycosylation assay. The results provide the first evidence that human OGA may possess a substrate-recognition mechanism that involves interactions with O-GlcNAcylated proteins beyond the GlcNAc-binding site, with possible implications for differential regulation of cycling of O-GlcNAc on different proteins.

  13. A novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting residues that bind the substrate peptide.

    PubMed

    Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Hisami; Parker, Lorien; Yuki, Hitomi; Taruya, Shigenao; Nakagawa, Yukari; Kamei, Daisuke; Mori, Masumi; Ogawa, Naoko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Honma, Teruki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-03-30

    A new screening method using fluorescent correlation spectroscopy was developed to select kinase inhibitors that competitively inhibit the binding of a fluorescently labeled substrate peptide. Using the method, among approximately 700 candidate compounds selected by virtual screening, we identified a novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting its peptide binding residues. X-ray crystal analysis of the complex structure of Pim-1 with the inhibitor indicated that the inhibitor actually binds to the ATP-binding site and also forms direct interactions with residues (Asp128 and Glu171) that bind the substrate peptide. These interactions, which cause small side-chain movements, seem to affect the binding ability of the fluorescently labeled substrate. The compound inhibited Pim-1 kinase in vitro, with an IC(50) value of 150 nM. Treatment of cultured leukemia cells with the compound reduced the amount of p21 and increased the amount of p27, due to Pim-1 inhibition, and then triggered apoptosis after cell-cycle arrest at the G(1)/S phase. This screening method may be widely applicable for the identification of various new Pim-1 kinase inhibitors targeting the residues that bind the substrate peptide.

  14. Cognitive Psychophysiological Substrates of Affective Temperaments.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Sakallı Kani, Ayşe; Aksoy Poyraz, Cana; Öcek Baş, Tuba; Arıkan, Mehmet Kemal

    2017-03-01

    Affective temperaments are the subclinical manifestations or phenotypes of mood states and hypothetically represent one healthy end of the mood disorder spectrum. However, there is a scarcity of studies investigating the neurobiological basis of affective temperaments. One fundamental aspect of temperament is the behavioral reactivity to environmental stimuli, which can be effectively evaluated by use of cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) reflecting the diversity of information processing. The aim of the present study is to explore the associations between P300 and the affective temperamental traits in healthy individuals. We recorded the P300 ERP waves using an auditory oddball paradigm in 50 medical student volunteers (23 females, 27 males). Participants' affective temperaments were evaluated using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego-auto questionnaire version (TEMPS-A). In bivariate analyses, depressive temperament score was significantly correlated with P300 latency ( rs = 0.37, P < .01). In a multiple linear regression analysis, P300 latency showed a significant positive correlation with scores of depressive temperament (β = 0.40, P < .01) and a significant negative one with scores of cyclothymic temperament (β = -0.29, P = .03). Affective temperament scores were not associated with P300 amplitude and reaction times. These results indicate that affective temperaments are related to information processing in the brain. Depressive temperament may be characterized by decreased physiological arousal and slower information processing, while the opposite was observed for cyclothymic temperament.

  15. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  16. Protein NMR Studies of substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas; Grimm, Lena Lisbeth; Weissbach, Sophie; Flügge, Friedemann; Begemann, Nora; Palcic, Monica

    2017-03-03

    Donor and acceptor substrate binding to human blood group A and B glycosyltransferases (GTA, GTB) has been studied by a variety of protein NMR experiments. Prior crystallographic studies have shown these enzymes to adopt an open conformation in the absence of substrates. Binding of either the donor substrate UDP-Gal, or of UDP induces a semi-closed conformation. In the presence of both, donor- and acceptor substrates, the enzymes shift towards a closed conformation with ordering of an internal loop and the C-terminal residues, which then completely cover the donor-binding pocket. Chemical shift titrations of uniformly 2H,15N labeled GTA or GTB with UDP affected about 20% of all cross peaks in 1H,15N-TROSY-HSQC spectra reflecting substantial plasticity of the enzymes. On the other hand, it is this conformational flexibility that impedes NH backbone assignments. Chemical shift perturbation experiments using 1-13C-methyl Ile labeled samples revealed two Ile residues, Ile123 at the bottom of the UDP binding pocket, and Ile192 as part of the internal loop that were significantly disturbed upon stepwise addition of UDP and H-disaccharide, also revealing long-range perturbations. Finally, methyl TROSY based relaxation dispersion experiments do not reveal s to ms time scale motions. Although this study reveals substantial conformational plasticity of GTA and GTB it remains enigmatic how binding of substrates shifts the enzymes into catalytically competent states.

  17. Ligand Binding and Substrate Discrimination by UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Borrok, M. Jack; Westler, William M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Galactofuranose (Galf) residues are present in cell wall glycoconjugates of numerous pathogenic microbes. Uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate (UDP) Galf, the biosynthetic precursor of Galf-containing glycoconjugates, is produced from UDP-galactopyranose (UDP-Galp) by the flavoenzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM). The gene encoding UGM (glf) is essential for the viability of pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this finding underscores the need to understand how UGM functions. Considerable effort has been devoted to elucidating the catalytic mechanism of UGM, but progress has been hindered by a lack of structural data for an enzyme-substrate complex. Such data could reveal not only substrate binding interactions but how UGM can act preferentially on two very different substrates, UDP-Galp and UDP-Galf, yet avoid other structurally related UDP sugars present in the cell. Herein, we describe the first structure of a UGM-ligand complex, which provides insight into the catalytic mechanism and molecular basis for substrate selectivity. The structure of UGM from Klebsiella pneumoniae bound to the substrate analog UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) was solved by X-ray crystallographic methods and refined to 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. The ligand is proximal to the cofactor, a finding that is consistent with a proposed mechanism in which the reduced flavin engages in covalent catalysis. Despite this proximity, the glucose ring of the substrate analog is positioned such that it disfavors covalent catalysis. This orientation is consistent with data indicating that UDP-Glc is not a substrate for UGM. The relative binding orientations of UDP-Galp and UDP-Glc were compared using saturation transfer difference NMR. The results indicate that the uridine moiety occupies a similar location in both ligand complexes, and this relevant binding mode is defined by our structural data. In contrast, the orientations of the glucose and galactose sugar moieties differ. To understand the

  18. The productive cellulase binding capacity of cellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Karuna, Nardrapee; Jeoh, Tina

    2017-03-01

    Cellulosic biomass is the most promising feedstock for renewable biofuel production; however, the mechanisms of the heterogeneous cellulose saccharification reaction are still unsolved. As cellulases need to bind isolated molecules of cellulose at the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils or larger aggregated cellulose structures in order to hydrolyze glycosidic bonds, the "accessibility of cellulose to cellulases" is considered to be a reaction limiting property of cellulose. We have defined the accessibility of cellulose to cellulases as the productive binding capacity of cellulose, that is, the concentration of productive binding sites on cellulose that are accessible for binding and hydrolysis by cellulases. Productive cellulase binding to cellulose results in hydrolysis and can be quantified by measuring hydrolysis rates. In this study, we measured the productive Trichoderma reesei Cel7A (TrCel7A) binding capacity of five cellulosic substrates from different sources and processing histories. Swollen filter paper and bacterial cellulose had higher productive binding capacities of ∼6 µmol/g while filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, and algal cellulose had lower productive binding capacities of ∼3 µmol/g. Swelling and regenerating filter paper using phosphoric acid increased the initial accessibility of the reducing ends to TrCel7A from 4 to 6 µmol/g. Moreover, this increase in initial productive binding capacity accounted in large part for the difference in the overall digestibility between filter paper and swollen filter paper. We further demonstrated that an understanding of how the productive binding capacity declines over the course of the hydrolysis reaction has the potential to predict overall saccharification time courses. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 533-542. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Rearrangement of substrate secondary structure facilitates binding to the Neurospora VS ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Zamel, Ricardo; Collins, Richard A

    2002-12-13

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme differs from other small, naturally occurring ribozymes in that it recognizes for trans cleavage or ligation a substrate that consists largely of a stem-loop structure. We have previously found that cleavage or ligation by the VS ribozyme requires substantial rearrangement of the secondary structure of stem-loop I, which contains the cleavage/ligation site. This rearrangement includes breaking the top base-pair of stem-loop I, allowing formation of a kissing interaction with loop V, and changing the partners of at least three other base-pairs within stem-loop I to adopt a conformation termed shifted. In the work presented, we have designed a binding assay and used mutational analysis to investigate the contribution of each of these structural changes to binding and ligation. We find that the loop I-V kissing interaction is necessary but not sufficient for binding and ligation. Constitutive opening of the top base-pair of stem-loop I has little, if any, effect on either activity. In contrast, the ability to adopt the shifted conformation of stem-loop I is a major determinant of binding: mutants that cannot adopt this conformation bind much more weakly than wild-type and mutants with a constitutively shifted stem-loop I bind much more strongly. These results implicate the adoption of the shifted structure of stem-loop I as an important process at the binding step in the VS ribozyme reaction pathway. Further investigation of features near the cleavage/ligation site revealed that sulphur substitution of the non-bridging phosphate oxygen atoms immediately downstream of the cleavage/ligation site, implicated in a putative metal ion binding site, significantly altered the cleavage/ligation equilibrium but did not perturb substrate binding significantly. This indicates that the substituted oxygen atoms, or an associated metal ion, affect a step that occurs after binding and that they influence the rates of cleavage and ligation differently.

  20. Structural basis for substrate discrimination and integrin binding by autotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, Jens; Kamtekar, Satwik; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Day, Jacqueline E.; Wu, Tao; Fulkerson, Zachary; Albers, Harald M.H.G.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Houben, Anna; van Zeijl, Leonie; Jansen, Silvia; Andries, Maria; Hall, Troii; Pegg, Lyle E.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kasiem, Mobien; Harlos, Karl; Vander Kooi, Craig; Smyth, Susan S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bollen, Mathieu; Morris, Andrew J.; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2010-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) or ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-2 (ENPP2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogen and chemo-attractant for many cell types. ATX-LPA signaling has roles in various pathologies including tumour progression and inflammation. However, the molecular basis of substrate recognition and catalysis, and the mechanism of interaction with target cells, has been elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of ATX, alone and in complex with a small-molecule inhibitor. We identify a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and map key residues required for catalysis and selection between nucleotide and phospholipid substrates. We show that ATX interacts with cell-surface integrins via its N-terminal somatomedin-B-like domains, using an atypical mechanism. Our results define determinants of substrate discrimination by the ENPP family, suggest how ATX promotes localized LPA signaling, and enable new approaches to target ATX with small-molecule therapeutics. PMID:21240271

  1. Structural basis of substrate discrimination and integrin binding by autotaxin

    SciTech Connect

    Hausmann, Jens; Kamtekar, Satwik; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Day, Jacqueline E.; Wu, Tao; Fulkerson, Zachary; Albers, Harald M.H.G.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Houben, Anna J.S.; van Zeijl, Leonie; Jansen, Silvia; Andries, Maria; Hall, Troii; Pegg, Lyle E.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kasiem, Mobien; Harlos, Karl; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Smyth, Susan S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bollen, Mathieu; Morris, Andrew J.; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2013-09-25

    Autotaxin (ATX, also known as ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-2, ENPP2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogen and chemoattractant for many cell types. ATX-LPA signaling is involved in various pathologies including tumor progression and inflammation. However, the molecular basis of substrate recognition and catalysis by ATX and the mechanism by which it interacts with target cells are unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of ATX, alone and in complex with a small-molecule inhibitor. We have identified a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and mapped key residues for catalysis and selection between nucleotide and phospholipid substrates. We have shown that ATX interacts with cell-surface integrins through its N-terminal somatomedin B-like domains, using an atypical mechanism. Our results define determinants of substrate discrimination by the ENPP family, suggest how ATX promotes localized LPA signaling and suggest new approaches for targeting ATX with small-molecule therapeutic agents.

  2. Biochar affects macronutrient leaching from a soilless substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Byproducts of pyrolysis, known collectively as biochar, are becoming more common and readily available as ventures into alternative energy generation are explored. Little is known about how these materials affect greenhouse substrates. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of ...

  3. Multifunctionality is affected by interactions between green roof plant species, substrate depth, and substrate type.

    PubMed

    Dusza, Yann; Barot, Sébastien; Kraepiel, Yvan; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Abbadie, Luc; Raynaud, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services through evapotranspiration and nutrient cycling that depend, among others, on plant species, substrate type, and substrate depth. However, no study has assessed thoroughly how interactions between these factors alter ecosystem functions and multifunctionality of green roofs. We simulated some green roof conditions in a pot experiment. We planted 20 plant species from 10 genera and five families (Asteraceae, Caryophyllaceae, Crassulaceae, Fabaceae, and Poaceae) on two substrate types (natural vs. artificial) and two substrate depths (10 cm vs. 30 cm). As indicators of major ecosystem functions, we measured aboveground and belowground biomasses, foliar nitrogen and carbon content, foliar transpiration, substrate water retention, and dissolved organic carbon and nitrates in leachates. Interactions between substrate type and depth strongly affected ecosystem functions. Biomass production was increased in the artificial substrate and deeper substrates, as was water retention in most cases. In contrast, dissolved organic carbon leaching was higher in the artificial substrates. Except for the Fabaceae species, nitrate leaching was reduced in deep, natural soils. The highest transpiration rates were associated with natural soils. All functions were modulated by plant families or species. Plant effects differed according to the observed function and the type and depth of the substrate. Fabaceae species grown on natural soils had the most noticeable patterns, allowing high biomass production and high water retention but also high nitrate leaching from deep pots. No single combination of factors enhanced simultaneously all studied ecosystem functions, highlighting that soil-plant interactions induce trade-offs between ecosystem functions. Substrate type and depth interactions are major drivers for green roof multifunctionality.

  4. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Young, Iris D; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Stan, Claudiu A; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Vo Pham, Long; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S; Lane, Thomas J; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Waterman, David G; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T; Zwart, Petrus H; Adams, Paul D; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-12-15

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4), in which S1 is the dark-stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  5. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S.; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A.; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T.; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M.; Glownia, James M.; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S.; Lane, Thomas J.; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E.; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Waterman, David G.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I.; Brunger, Axel T.; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment-protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction center with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) (Fig. 1a, Extended Data Fig. 1). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S0 to S4)1, where S1 is the dark stable state and S3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O2 evolution2,3. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and elucidating the structures of the OEC in the different S-states, as well as the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site4-6, is a prerequisite for this purpose. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage free, room temperature (RT) structures of dark-adapted (S1), two-flash illuminated (2F; S3-enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH3; S3-enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å structure of PS II7 at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S1 state, RT measurements are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions8,9, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analog, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 and S3 states10. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site10-13. Thus, this approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms. PMID:27871088

  6. Oligosaccharyltransferase Subunits Bind Polypeptide Substrate to Locally Enhance N-glycosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, M. Fairuz B.; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Schulz, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferase is a multiprotein complex that catalyzes asparagine-linked glycosylation of diverse proteins. Using yeast genetics and glycoproteomics, we found that transient interactions between nascent polypeptide and Ost3p/Ost6p, homologous subunits of oligosaccharyltransferase, were able to modulate glycosylation efficiency in a site-specific manner in vivo. These interactions were driven by hydrophobic and electrostatic complementarity between amino acids in the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p/Ost6p and the sequestered stretch of substrate polypeptide. Based on this dependence, we used in vivo scanning mutagenesis and in vitro biochemistry to map the precise interactions that affect site-specific glycosylation efficiency. We conclude that transient binding of substrate polypeptide by Ost3p/Ost6p increases glycosylation efficiency at asparagines proximal and C-terminal to sequestered sequences. We detail a novel mode of interaction between translocating nascent polypeptide and oligosaccharyltransferase in which binding to Ost3p/Ost6p segregates a short flexible loop of glycosylation-competent polypeptide substrate that is delivered to the oligosaccharyltransferase active site for efficient modification. PMID:25118247

  7. Measurement of internal substrate binding in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin by competition with the heme-fluoride binding equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Moretto, Justin; Le, Peter; Franzen, Stefan

    2015-02-19

    The application of fluoride anion as a probe for investigating the internal substrate binding has been developed and applied to dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata. By applying the fluoride titration strategy using UV-vis spectroscopy, we have studied series of halogenated phenols, other substituted phenols, halogenated indoles, and several natural amino acids that bind internally (and noncovalently) in the distal binding pocket of the heme. This approach has identified 2,4-dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) as the tightest binding substrate discovered thus far, with approximately 20-fold tighter binding affinity than that of 4-bromophenol (4-BP), a known internally binding inhibitor in DHP. Combined with resonance Raman spectroscopy, we have confirmed that competitive binding equilibria exist between fluoride anion and internally bound molecules. We have further investigated the hydrogen bonding network of the active site of DHP that stabilizes the exogenous fluoride ligand. These measurements demonstrate a general method for determination of differences in substrate binding affinity based on detection of a competitive fluoride binding equilibrium. The significance of the binding that 2,4-dibromophenol binds more tightly than any other substrate is evident when the structural and mechanistic data are taken into consideration.

  8. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  9. Identification of a second substrate-binding site in solute-sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ashley S E; Bracher, Susanne; Jung, Heinrich; Paz, Aviv; Kumar, Jay P; Abramson, Jeff; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-02

    The structure of the sodium/galactose transporter (vSGLT), a solute-sodium symporter (SSS) from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, shares a common structural fold with LeuT of the neurotransmitter-sodium symporter family. Structural alignments between LeuT and vSGLT reveal that the crystallographically identified galactose-binding site in vSGLT is located in a more extracellular location relative to the central substrate-binding site (S1) in LeuT. Our computational analyses suggest the existence of an additional galactose-binding site in vSGLT that aligns to the S1 site of LeuT. Radiolabeled galactose saturation binding experiments indicate that, like LeuT, vSGLT can simultaneously bind two substrate molecules under equilibrium conditions. Mutating key residues in the individual substrate-binding sites reduced the molar substrate-to-protein binding stoichiometry to ~1. In addition, the related and more experimentally tractable SSS member PutP (the Na(+)/proline transporter) also exhibits a binding stoichiometry of 2. Targeting residues in the proposed sites with mutations results in the reduction of the binding stoichiometry and is accompanied by severely impaired translocation of proline. Our data suggest that substrate transport by SSS members requires both substrate-binding sites, thereby implying that SSSs and neurotransmitter-sodium symporters share common mechanistic elements in substrate transport.

  10. Substrate stiffness affects skeletal myoblast differentiation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanazzo, Sara; Forte, Giancarlo; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Aoyagi, Takao; Traversa, Enrico; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the therapeutic efficacy of cardiac muscle constructs produced by stem cells and tissue engineering protocols, suitable scaffolds should be designed to recapitulate all the characteristics of native muscle and mimic the microenvironment encountered by cells in vivo. Moreover, so not to interfere with cardiac contractility, the scaffold should be deformable enough to withstand muscle contraction. Recently, it was suggested that the mechanical properties of scaffolds can interfere with stem/progenitor cell functions, and thus careful consideration is required when choosing polymers for targeted applications. In this study, cross-linked poly-ɛ-caprolactone membranes having similar chemical composition and controlled stiffness in a supra-physiological range were challenged with two sources of myoblasts to evaluate the suitability of substrates with different stiffness for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, muscle-specific and non-related feeder layers were prepared on stiff surfaces to reveal the contribution of biological and mechanical cues to skeletal muscle progenitor differentiation. We demonstrated that substrate stiffness does affect myogenic differentiation, meaning that softer substrates can promote differentiation and that a muscle-specific feeder layer can improve the degree of maturation in skeletal muscle stem cells.

  11. Stopped-flow analysis of substrate binding to neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Abu-Soud, H M; Wang, J; Rousseau, D L; Stuehr, D J

    1999-09-21

    The kinetics of binding L-arginine and three alternative substrates (homoarginine, N-methylarginine, and N-hydroxyarginine) to neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were characterized by conventional and stopped-flow spectroscopy. Because binding these substrates has only a small effect on the light absorbance spectrum of tetrahydrobiopterin-saturated nNOS, their binding was monitored by following displacement of imidazole, which displays a significant change in Soret absorbance from 427 to 398 nm. Rates of spectral change upon mixing Im-nNOS with increasing amounts of substrates were obtained and found to be monophasic in all cases. For each substrate, a plot of the apparent rate versus substrate concentration showed saturation at the higher concentrations. K(-)(1), k(2), k(-)(2), and the apparent dissociation constant were derived for each substrate from the kinetic data. The dissociation constants mostly agreed with those calculated from equilibrium spectral data obtained by titrating Im-nNOS with each substrate. We conclude that nNOS follows a two-step, reversible mechanism of substrate binding in which there is a rapid equilibrium between Im-nNOS and the substrate S followed by a slower isomerization process to generate nNOS'-S: Im-nNOS + S if Im-nNOS-S if nNOS'-S + Im. All four substrates followed this general mechanism, but differences in their kinetic values were significant and may contribute to their varying capacities to support NO synthesis.

  12. The N-terminal hybrid binding domain of RNase HI from Thermotoga maritima is important for substrate binding and Mg2+-dependent activity.

    PubMed

    Jongruja, Nujarin; You, Dong-Ju; Kanaya, Eiko; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2010-11-01

    Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease H (RNase H) I (Tma-RNase HI) contains a hybrid binding domain (HBD) at the N-terminal region. To analyze the role of this HBD, Tma-RNase HI, Tma-W22A with the single mutation at the HBD, the C-terminal RNase H domain (Tma-CD) and the N-terminal domain containing the HBD (Tma-ND) were overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Tma-RNase HI prefers Mg(2+) to Mn(2+) for activity, and specifically loses most of the Mg(2+)-dependent activity on removal of the HBD and 87% of it by the mutation at the HBD. Tma-CD lost the ability to suppress the RNase H deficiency of an E. coli rnhA mutant, indicating that the HBD is responsible for in vivo RNase H activity. The cleavage-site specificities of Tma-RNase HI are not significantly changed on removal of the HBD, regardless of the metal cofactor. Binding analyses of the proteins to the substrate using surface plasmon resonance indicate that the binding affinity of Tma-RNase HI is greatly reduced on removal of the HBD or the mutation. These results indicate that there is a correlation between Mg(2+)-dependent activity and substrate binding affinity. Tma-CD was as stable as Tma-RNase HI, indicating that the HBD is not important for stability. The HBD of Tma-RNase HI is important not only for substrate binding, but also for Mg(2+)-dependent activity, probably because the HBD affects the interaction between the substrate and enzyme at the active site, such that the scissile phosphate group of the substrate and the Mg(2+) ion are arranged ideally.

  13. Glutamate affects dendritic morphology of neurons grown on compliant substrates.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Brain stiffness changes in response to injury or disease. As a secondary consequence, glutamate is released from neurons and astroglia. Two types of glutamate receptors, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, sense mechanotransduction, leading to downstream signaling in neurons. Recently, our group reported that these two receptors affect dendrite morphology in hippocampal neurons grown on compliant substrates. Blocking receptor activity has distinct effects on dendrites, depending on whether neurons are grown on soft or stiff gels. In the current study, we examine whether exposure to glutamate itself alters stiffness-mediated changes to dendrites in hippocampal neurons. We find that glutamate augments changes seen when neurons are grown on soft gels of 300 or 600 Pa, but in contrast, glutamate attenuates changes seen when neurons are grown on stiff gels of 3,000 Pa. These results suggest that there is interplay between mechanosensing and glutamate receptor activation in determining dendrite morphology in neurons.

  14. Thermodynamic signature of substrates and substrate analogs binding to human blood group B galactosyltransferase from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments.

    PubMed

    Sindhuwinata, Nora; Grimm, Lena L; Weißbach, Sophie; Zinn, Sabrina; Munoz, Eva; Palcic, Monica M; Peters, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    It has been observed earlier that human blood group B galactosyltransferase (GTB) hydrolyzes its donor substrate UDP-Galactose (UDP-Gal) in the absence of acceptor substrate, and that this reaction is promoted by the presence of an acceptor substrate analog, α-L-Fuc-(1,2)-β-D-3-deoxy-Gal-O-octyl (3DD). This acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of UDP-Gal was traced back to an increased affinity of GTB toward the donor substrate in the presence of 3DD. Herein, we present new thermodynamic data from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) on the binding of donor and acceptor substrates and analogs to GTB. ITC data are supplemented by surface plasmon resonance and STD-NMR titration experiments. These new data validate mutual allosteric control of binding of donor and acceptor substrates to GTB. It is of note that ITC experiments reveal significant differences in enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding of the natural donor substrate UDP-Gal, when compared with its analog UDP-Glucose (UDP-Glc). This may reflect different degrees of ordering of an internal loop (amino acids 176-194) and the C-terminus (amino acids 346-354), which close the binding pocket on binding of UDP-Gal or UDP-Glc. As both ligands have rather similar dissociation constants KD and almost identical modes of binding this finding is unexpected. Another surprising finding is that an acceptor analog, α-L-Fuc-(1,2)-β-D-3-amino-3-deoxy-Gal-O-octyl (3AD) as well as the constituent monosaccharide β-D-3-amino-3-deoxy-Gal-O-octyl (3AM) effectively inhibit enzymatic hydrolysis of UDP-Gal. This is unexpected, too, because in analogy to the effects of 3DD one would have predicted acceleration of enzymatic hydrolysis of UDP-Gal. It is difficult to explain these observations based on structural data alone. Therefore, our results highlight that there is an urgent need of experimental studies into the dynamic properties of GTB.

  15. Coupling Substrate and Ion Binding to Extracellular Gate of a Sodium-Dependent Aspartate Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Boudker,O.; Ryan, R.; Yernool, D.; Shimamoto, K.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Secondary transporters are integral membrane proteins that catalyze the movement of substrate molecules across the lipid bilayer by coupling substrate transport to one or more ion gradients, thereby providing a mechanism for the concentrative uptake of substrates. Here we describe crystallographic and thermodynamic studies of Glt{sub Ph}, a sodium (Na{sup +})-coupled aspartate transporter, defining sites for aspartate, two sodium ions and D,L-threo-{beta}-benzyloxyaspartate, an inhibitor. We further show that helical hairpin 2 is the extracellular gate that controls access of substrate and ions to the internal binding sites. At least two sodium ions bind in close proximity to the substrate and these sodium-binding sites, together with the sodium-binding sites in another sodium-coupled transporter, LeuT, define an unwound {alpha}-helix as the central element of the ion-binding motif, a motif well suited to the binding of sodium and to participation in conformational changes that accompany ion binding and unbinding during the transport cycle.

  16. Regulation of rat liver phenylalanine hydroxylase. II. Substrate binding and the role of activation in the control of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Shiman, R; Xia, T; Hill, M A; Gray, D W

    1994-10-07

    Activation by phenylalanine and reduction by the co-factor (6R)-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for formation of active liver phenylalanine hydroxylase. This work describes effects of the activation and redox state on substrate and effector recognition of this enzyme, it establishes relationships among the pterin and phenylalanine binding sites on the different forms of the enzyme, and it provides a quantitative description of the enzyme's presumptive regulatory and catalytic sites. BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2), 6-methyltetrahydropterin, and 5-deaza-6-methyltetrahydropterin were found to bind to unactivated phenylalanine hydroxylase with a stoichiometry of 1/enzyme subunit and with hyperbolic kinetics; all appear to compete for the same binding site on the enzyme, and all appear to bind in the proximity of, but not to, the enzyme's non-heme iron. In the transition from unactivated to activated enzyme, phenylalanine and pterin binding is modified, a new site for phenylalanine is formed, and the pterin site is replaced by a site of greatly decreased affinity for BH4 and BH2, one which does not appear to recognize the dihydroxypropyl side chain of BH4 and BH2. The pterin- and phenylalanine-binding sites on activated phenylalanine hydroxylase appear to be part of the enzyme's active site. Despite large effects on substrate binding, neither chelator binding ability nor solvent accessibility of the iron are affected by activation; activation appears to affect the nearby environment of the enzyme's iron but not the iron itself. Studies of oxidized and reduced phenylalanine hydroxylase indicate that the redox state is not a major determinant of pterin and phenylalanine association with enzyme.

  17. Structural Analysis of Substrate and Effector Binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Sanghamitra; Burton, Rodney L.; Grant, Gregory A.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2008-08-20

    The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase has been solved with bound effector, L-serine, and substrate, hydroxypyruvic acid phosphate, at resolutions of 2.7 and 2.4 {angstrom}, respectively. The subunits display the same extreme asymmetry as seen in the apo-structure and provide insight into the mode of serine binding and closure of the active site. Mutagenesis studies confirm the identity of the main residues involved in serine binding and suggest that the poly glycine stretch in the loop that contains the locus for the 160{sup o} rotation that leads to subunit asymmetry may have a larger role in folding than in catalysis. The lack of electron density for the cofactor, NADH, in any of the crystals examined led us to study binding by stopped flow kinetic analysis. The kinetic data suggest that productive NADH binding, that would support catalytic turnover, is dependent on the presence of substrate. This observation, along with the binding of substrate in the active site, but in an unproductive conformation, suggests a possible mechanism where initial binding of substrate leads to enhanced interaction with cofactor accompanied by a rearrangement of catalytically critical residue side chains. Furthermore, comparison to the structure of a truncated form of human D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase with cofactor and a substrate analog, provides insight into the conformational changes that occur during catalysis.

  18. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  19. Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sethi, Anurag; Balan, Venkatesh; Gnanakaran, S; Dale, Bruce E

    2013-07-02

    Substrate binding is typically one of the rate-limiting steps preceding enzyme catalytic action during homogeneous reactions. However, interfacial-based enzyme catalysis on insoluble crystalline substrates, like cellulose, has additional bottlenecks of individual biopolymer chain decrystallization from the substrate interface followed by its processive depolymerization to soluble sugars. This additional decrystallization step has ramifications on the role of enzyme-substrate binding and its relationship to overall catalytic efficiency. We found that altering the crystalline structure of cellulose from its native allomorph I(β) to III(I) results in 40-50% lower binding partition coefficient for fungal cellulases, but surprisingly, it enhanced hydrolytic activity on the latter allomorph. We developed a comprehensive kinetic model for processive cellulases acting on insoluble substrates to explain this anomalous finding. Our model predicts that a reduction in the effective binding affinity to the substrate coupled with an increase in the decrystallization procession rate of individual cellulose chains from the substrate surface into the enzyme active site can reproduce our anomalous experimental findings.

  20. Increased enzyme binding to substrate is not necessary for more efficient cellulose hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dahai; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.; Sethi, Anurag; Balan, Venkatesh; Gnanakaran, S.; Dale, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Substrate binding is typically one of the rate-limiting steps preceding enzyme catalytic action during homogeneous reactions. However, interfacial-based enzyme catalysis on insoluble crystalline substrates, like cellulose, has additional bottlenecks of individual biopolymer chain decrystallization from the substrate interface followed by its processive depolymerization to soluble sugars. This additional decrystallization step has ramifications on the role of enzyme–substrate binding and its relationship to overall catalytic efficiency. We found that altering the crystalline structure of cellulose from its native allomorph Iβ to IIII results in 40–50% lower binding partition coefficient for fungal cellulases, but surprisingly, it enhanced hydrolytic activity on the latter allomorph. We developed a comprehensive kinetic model for processive cellulases acting on insoluble substrates to explain this anomalous finding. Our model predicts that a reduction in the effective binding affinity to the substrate coupled with an increase in the decrystallization procession rate of individual cellulose chains from the substrate surface into the enzyme active site can reproduce our anomalous experimental findings. PMID:23784776

  1. Mode of binding of methyl acceptor substrates to the adrenaline-synthesizing enzyme phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase: implications for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine L; Tyndall, Joel D A; Grunewald, Gary L; Wu, Qian; McLeish, Michael J; Martin, Jennifer L

    2005-12-27

    Here we report three crystal structure complexes of human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), one bound with a substrate that incorporates a flexible ethanolamine side chain (p-octopamine), a second bound with a semirigid analogue substrate [cis-(1R,2S)-2-amino-1-tetralol, cis-(1R,2S)-AT], and a third with trans-(1S,2S)-2-amino-1-tetralol [trans-(1S,2S)-AT] that acts as an inhibitor of PNMT rather than a substrate. A water-mediated interaction between the critical beta-hydroxyl of the flexible ethanolamine group of p-octopamine and an acidic residue, Asp267, is likely to play a key role in positioning the side chain correctly for methylation to occur at the amine. A second interaction with Glu219 may play a lesser role. Catalysis likely occurs via deprotonation of the amine through the action of Glu185; mutation of this residue significantly reduced the kcat without affecting the Km. The mode of binding of cis-(1R,2S)-AT supports the notion that this substrate is a conformationally restrained analogue of flexible PNMT substrates, in that it forms interactions with the enzyme similar to those observed for p-octopamine. By contrast, trans-(1S,2S)-AT, an inhibitor rather than a substrate, binds in an orientation that is flipped by 180 degrees compared with cis-(1R,2S)-AT. A consequence of this flipped binding mode is that the interactions between the hydroxyl and Asp267 and Glu219 are lost. However, the amines of inhibitor trans-(1S,2S)-AT and substrate cis-(1R,2S)-AT are both within methyl transfer distance of the cofactor. These results suggest that PNMT catalyzes transfer of methyl to ligand amines only when "anchor" interactions, such as those identified for the beta-hydroxyls of p-octopamine and cis-AT, are present.

  2. Insulin Receptor Substrate-4 Binds to Slingshot-1 Phosphatase and Promotes Cofilin Dephosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Yuta; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Sasaki, Kazutaka; Nishita, Michiru; Yasui, Akira; Asano, Tomoichiro; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Cofilin plays an essential role in cell migration and morphogenesis by enhancing actin filament dynamics via its actin filament-severing activity. Slingshot-1 (SSH1) is a protein phosphatase that plays a crucial role in regulating actin dynamics by dephosphorylating and reactivating cofilin. In this study, we identified insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-4 as a novel SSH1-binding protein. Co-precipitation assays revealed the direct endogenous binding of IRS4 to SSH1. IRS4, but not IRS1 or IRS2, was bound to SSH1. IRS4 was bound to SSH1 mainly through the unique region (amino acids 335–400) adjacent to the C terminus of the phosphotyrosine-binding domain of IRS4. The N-terminal A, B, and phosphatase domains of SSH1 were bound to IRS4 independently. Whereas in vitro phosphatase assays revealed that IRS4 does not directly affect the cofilin phosphatase activity of SSH1, knockdown of IRS4 increased cofilin phosphorylation in cultured cells. Knockdown of IRS4 decreased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, and treatment with an inhibitor of PI3K increased cofilin phosphorylation. Akt preferentially phosphorylated SSH1 at Thr-826, but expression of a non-phosphorylatable T826A mutant of SSH1 did not affect insulin-induced cofilin dephosphorylation, and an inhibitor of Akt did not increase cofilin phosphorylation. These results suggest that IRS4 promotes cofilin dephosphorylation through sequential activation of PI3K and SSH1 but not through Akt. In addition, IRS4 co-localized with SSH1 in F-actin-rich membrane protrusions in insulin-stimulated cells, which suggests that the association of IRS4 with SSH1 contributes to localized activation of cofilin in membrane protrusions. PMID:25100728

  3. Substrate binding properties of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Bilal; Tuncel, Aytug; Green, Abigail R; Koper, Kaan; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-06-04

    Substrate binding properties of the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were investigated by using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results clearly show that the wild type heterotetramer (S(WT)L(WT)) possesses two distinct types of ATP binding sites, whereas the homotetrameric LS and SS variant forms only exhibited properties of one of the two binding sites. The wild type enzyme also exhibited significantly increased affinity to this substrate compared to the homotetrameric enzyme forms. No stable binding was evident for the second substrate, glucose-1-phosphate, in the presence or absence of ATPγS suggesting that interaction of glucose-1-phosphate is dependent on hydrolysis of ATP and supports the Theorell-Chance bi bi reaction mechanism.

  4. Mitochondrial carriers in the cytoplasmic state have a common substrate binding site

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Alan J.; Kunji, Edmund R. S.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial carriers link biochemical pathways in the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix by transporting substrates across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Substrate recognition is specific for each carrier, but sequence similarities suggest the carriers have similar structures and mechanisms of substrate translocation. By considering conservation of amino acids, distance and chemical constraints, and by modeling family members on the known structure of the ADP/ATP translocase, we have identified a common substrate binding site. It explains substrate selectivity and proton coupling and provides a mechanistic link to carrier opening by substrate-induced perturbation of the salt bridges that seal the pathway to and from the mitochondrial matrix. It enables the substrate specificity of uncharacterized mitochondrial carriers to be predicted. PMID:16469842

  5. Conformational heterogeneity within the LID domain mediates substrate binding to Escherichia coli adenylate kinase: function follows fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Travis P; Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exist as dynamic ensembles of molecules, implying that protein amino acid sequences evolved to code for both the ground state structure as well as the entire energy landscape of excited states. Accumulating theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that enzymes use such conformational fluctuations to facilitate allosteric processes important for substrate binding and possibly catalysis. This phenomenon can be clearly demonstrated in Escherichia coli adenylate kinase, where experimentally observed local unfolding of the LID subdomain, as opposed to a more commonly postulated rigid-body opening motion, is related to substrate binding. Because "entropy promoting" glycine mutations designed to increase specifically the local unfolding of the LID domain also affect substrate binding, changes in the excited energy landscape effectively tune the function of this enzyme without changing the ground state structure or the catalytic site. Thus, additional thermodynamic information, above and beyond the single folded structure of an enzyme-substrate complex, is likely required for a full and quantitative understanding of how enzymes work.

  6. Progress on binding CO{sub 2} in mineral substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Wendt, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    Based on current estimates of reserves, coal could satisfy even a very much increased world energy demand for centuries, if only the emission of CO{sub 2} disposal that is based on combining CO{sub 2} chemically with abundant raw materials to form stable carbonate minerals. A major advantage of this method is that the resulting waste product is thermodynamically stable and environmentally neutral. It is therefore possible to store large quantities permanently with minimal environmental impact and without the danger of an accidental release of CO{sub 2} which has proven fatal in quantities far smaller than contemplated here. The raw materials to bind CO{sub 2} exist in nature in large quantities. They are readily accessible and far exceed what would be required to bind all CO{sub 2} that could possibly be generated by burning the entire fossil fuel reserves. In this paper the authors outline a specific process that they are currently investigating. The initial rough cost estimate of about 3{cents}/kWh is encouraging. The availability of a CO{sub 2} fixation technology would serve as insurance in case global warming, or the perception of global warming, would cause severe restrictions on CO{sub 2} emissions. If the increased energy demand of a growing world population is to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of such a technology would be unavoidable.

  7. Determination of the Substrate Binding Mode to the Active Site Iron of (S)-2-Hydroxypropylphosphonic Acid Epoxidase Using 17O-Enriched Substrates and Substrate Analogues†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Feng; Moon, Sung-Ju; Liu, Pinghua; Zhao, Zongbao; Lipscomb, John D.; Liu, Aimin; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HppE) is an O2-dependent, nonheme Fe(II)-containing oxidase that converts (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid ((S)-HPP) to the regio-and enantiomerically specific epoxide, fosfomycin. Use of (R)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid ((R)-HPP) yields the 2-keto-adduct rather than the epoxide. Here we report the chemical synthesis of a range of HPP analogs designed to probe the basis for this specificity. In past studies, NO has been used as an O2 surrogate to provide an EPR probe of the Fe(II) environment. These studies suggest that O2 binds to the iron, and substrates bind in a single orientation that strongly perturbs the iron environment. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure showed direct binding of the substrate to the iron, but both monodentate (via the phosphonate) and chelated (via the hydroxyl and phosphonate) orientations were observed. In the current study, hyperfine broadening of the homogeneous S = 3/2 EPR spectrum of the HppE-NO-HPP complex was observed when either the hydroxyl or the phosphonate group of HPP was enriched with 17O (I = 5/2). These results indicate that both functional groups of HPP bind to Fe(II) ion at the same time as NO, suggesting that the chelated substrate binding mode dominates in solution. (R)- and (S)-analog compounds that maintained the core structure of HPP but added bulky terminal groups were turned over to give products analogous to those from (R)- and (S)-HPP, respectively. In contrast, substrate analogs lacking either the phosphonate or hydroxyl group were not turned over. Elongation of the carbon chain between the hydroxyl and phosphonate allowed binding to the iron in a variety of orientations to give keto and diol products at positions determined by the hydroxyl substituent, but no stable epoxide was formed. These studies show the importance of the Fe(II)-substrate chelate structure to active antibiotic formation. This fixed orientation may align the substrate next to the iron

  8. DNA sequencing using polymerase substrate-binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Previte, Michael John Robert; Zhou, Chunhong; Kellinger, Matthew; Pantoja, Rigo; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shi, Jin; Wang, BeiBei; Kia, Amirali; Etchin, Sergey; Vieceli, John; Nikoomanzar, Ali; Bomati, Erin; Gloeckner, Christian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; He, Molly Min

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed genomic research by decreasing the cost of sequencing. However, whole-genome sequencing is still costly and complex for diagnostics purposes. In the clinical space, targeted sequencing has the advantage of allowing researchers to focus on specific genes of interest. Routine clinical use of targeted NGS mandates inexpensive instruments, fast turnaround time and an integrated and robust workflow. Here we demonstrate a version of the Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) chemistry that potentially can become a preferred targeted sequencing method in the clinical space. This sequencing chemistry uses natural nucleotides and is based on real-time recording of the differential polymerase/DNA-binding kinetics in the presence of correct or mismatch nucleotides. This ensemble SBS chemistry has been implemented on an existing Illumina sequencing platform with integrated cluster amplification. We discuss the advantages of this sequencing chemistry for targeted sequencing as well as its limitations for other applications. PMID:25612848

  9. Oligosaccharide and substrate binding in the starch debranching enzyme barley limit dextrinase.

    PubMed

    Møller, Marie S; Windahl, Michael S; Sim, Lyann; Bøjstrup, Marie; Abou Hachem, Maher; Hindsgaul, Ole; Palcic, Monica; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2015-03-27

    Complete hydrolytic degradation of starch requires hydrolysis of both the α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in amylopectin. Limit dextrinase (LD) is the only endogenous barley enzyme capable of hydrolyzing the α-1,6-glucosidic bond during seed germination, and impaired LD activity inevitably reduces the maltose and glucose yields from starch degradation. Crystal structures of barley LD and active-site mutants with natural substrates, products and substrate analogues were sought to better understand the facets of LD-substrate interactions that confine high activity of LD to branched maltooligosaccharides. For the first time, an intact α-1,6-glucosidically linked substrate spanning the active site of a LD or pullulanase has been trapped and characterized by crystallography. The crystal structure reveals both the branch and main-chain binding sites and is used to suggest a mechanism for nucleophilicity enhancement in the active site. The substrate, product and analogue complexes were further used to outline substrate binding subsites and substrate binding restraints and to suggest a mechanism for avoidance of dual α-1,6- and α-1,4-hydrolytic activity likely to be a biological necessity during starch synthesis.

  10. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A H; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G; Engen, John R; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J

    2016-02-19

    Hundreds of pathways for degradation converge at ubiquitin recognition by a proteasome. Here, we found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors in yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition and identified a sixth receptor, Rpn1. A site ( T1: ) in the Rpn1 toroid recognized ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ( UBL: ) domains of substrate shuttling factors. T1 structures with monoubiquitin or lysine 48 diubiquitin show three neighboring outer helices engaging two ubiquitins. T1 contributes a distinct substrate-binding pathway with preference for lysine 48-linked chains. Proximal to T1 within the Rpn1 toroid is a second UBL-binding site ( T2: ) that assists in ubiquitin chain disassembly, by binding the UBL of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6. Thus, a two-site recognition domain intrinsic to the proteasome uses distinct ubiquitin-fold ligands to assemble substrates, shuttling factors, and a deubiquitinating enzyme.

  11. Characterization of substrate binding of the WW domains in human WWP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahong; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-07-08

    WW domains harbor substrates containing proline-rich motifs, but the substrate specificity and binding mechanism remain elusive for those WW domains less amenable for structural studies, such as human WWP2 (hWWP2). Herein we have employed multiple techniques to investigate the second WW domain (WW2) in hWWP2. Our results show that hWWP2 is a specialized E3 for PPxY motif-containing substrates only and does not recognize other amino acids and phospho-residues. The strongest binding affinity of WW2, and the incompatibility between each WW domain, imply a novel relationship, and our SPR experiment reveals a dynamic binding mode in Class-I WW domains for the first time. The results from alanine-scanning mutagenesis and modeling further point to functionally conserved residues in WW2.

  12. Factors affecting early seedling development in whole pine tree substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wood-based materials derived from pine trees, such as processed whole pine tree (WPT), can be a viable option for producers looking to offset pine bark or peatmoss usage in container substrates. Reduced root development of stem cuttings rooted in WPT compared with pine bark (PB) has been observed, b...

  13. Multiple binding modes of substrate to the catalytic RNA subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz Krummel, D A; Altman, S

    1999-01-01

    M1 RNA that contained 4'-thiouridine was photochemically cross-linked to different substrates and to a product of the reaction it governs. The locations of the cross-links in these photochemically induced complexes were identified. The cross-links indicated that different substrates share some contacts but have distinct binding modes to M1 RNA. The binding of some substrates also results in a substrate-dependent conformational change in the enzymatic RNA, as evidenced by the appearance of an M1 RNA intramolecular cross-link. The identification of the cross-links between M1 RNA and product indicate that they are shared with only one of the three cross-linked E-S complexes that were identified, an indication of noncompetitive inhibition by the product. We also examined whether the cross-linked complexes between M1 RNA and substrate(s) or product are altered in the presence of the enzyme's protein cofactor (C5 protein) and in the presence of different concentrations of divalent metal ions. C5 protein enhanced the yield of certain M1 RNA-substrate cross-linked complexes for both wild-type M1 RNA and a deletion mutant of M1 RNA (delta[273-281]), but not for the M1 RNA-product complex. High concentrations of Mg2+ increased the yield of all M1 RNA-substrate complexes but not the M1 RNA-product complex. PMID:10445877

  14. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    PubMed

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  15. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Kamela O; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J

    2016-03-10

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that 'aromatic clamps' formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such 'clamps' may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins.

  16. Xenon and halogenated alkanes track putative substrate binding cavities in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, D A; Rosenzweig, A C; Frederick, C A; Lippard, S J

    2001-03-27

    To investigate the role of protein cavities in facilitating movement of the substrates, methane and dioxygen, in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH), we determined the X-ray structures of MMOH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) cocrystallized with dibromomethane or iodoethane, or by using crystals pressurized with xenon gas. The halogenated alkanes bind in two cavities within the alpha-subunit that extend from one surface of the protein to the buried dinuclear iron active site. Two additional binding sites were located in the beta-subunit. Pressurization of two crystal forms of MMOH with xenon resulted in the identification of six binding sites located exclusively in the alpha-subunit. These results indicate that hydrophobic species bind preferentially in preexisting cavities in MMOH and support the hypothesis that such cavities may play a functional role in sequestering and enhancing the availability of the physiological substrates for reaction at the active site.

  17. Effects of organic solvents and substrate binding on trypsin in acetonitrile and hexane media.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yanyan; Yuan, Yuan; Zhu, Yanyan; Guo, Yanzhi; Li, Menglong; Wang, Zhimeng; Pu, Xuemei; Jiang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we used molecular dynamic (MD) simulation to study trypsin with and without a six-amino-acid peptide bound in three different solvents (water, acetonitrile and hexane) in order to provide molecular information for well understanding the structure and function of enzymes in non-aqueous media. The results show that the enzyme is more compact and less native-like in hexane than in the other two polar solvents. The substrate could stabilize the native protein structure in the two polar media, but not in the non-polar hexane. There are no significant differences in the conformation of the S1 pocket upon the substrate binding in water and acetonitrile media while a reverse behavior is observed in hexane media, implying a possible induced fit binding mechanism in the non-polar media. The substrate binding enhances the stability of catalytic H-bond network since it could expel the solvent molecules from the active site. The enzyme and the substrate appear to be more appropriate to the reactive conformation in the organic solvents compared with aqueous solution. There is much greater substrate binding strength in hexane media than the water and acetonitrile ones since the polar solvent significantly weakens electrostatic interactions, which are observed to be the main driving force to the binding. In addition, some residues of the S1 pocket could remain favorable contribution to the binding despite the solvent change, but with differences in the contribution extent, the number and the type of residues between the three media.

  18. Comparative Modeling of the Human Monoamine Transporters: Similarities in Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid compositions of the substrate binding pockets of the three human monoamine transporters are compared as is the orientation of the endogenous substrates, serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, bound in these. Through a combination of homology modeling, induced fit dockings, molecular dynamics simulations, and uptake experiments in mutant transporters, we propose a common binding mode for the three substrates. The longitudinal axis of the substrates is similarly oriented with these, forming an ionic interaction between the ammonium group and a highly conserved aspartate, Asp98 (serotonin transporter, hSERT), Asp79 (dopamine transporter, hDAT), and Asp75 (norepinephrine transporter, hNET). The 6-position of serotonin and the para-hydroxyl groups of dopamine and norepinephrine were found to face Ala173 in hSERT, Gly153 in hDAT, and Gly149 in hNET. Three rotations of the substrates around the longitudinal axis were identified. In each mode, an aromatic hydroxyl group of the substrates occupied equivalent volumes of the three binding pockets, where small changes in amino acid composition explains the differences in selectivity. Uptake experiments support that the 5-hydroxyl group of serotonin and the meta-hydroxyl group norepinephrine and dopamine are placed in the hydrophilic pocket around Ala173, Ser438, and Thr439 in hSERT corresponding to Gly149, Ser419, Ser420 in hNET and Gly153 Ser422 and Ala423 in hDAT. Furthermore, hDAT was found to possess an additional hydrophilic pocket around Ser149 to accommodate the para-hydroxyl group. Understanding these subtle differences between the binding site compositions of the three transporters is imperative for understanding the substrate selectivity, which could eventually aid in developing future selective medicines. PMID:23421681

  19. Discovery of the ammonium substrate site on glutamine synthetase, a third cation binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, S. H.; Kuo, I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to yield glutamine, ADP, and inorganic phosphate in the presence of divalent cations. Bacterial GS is an enzyme of 12 identical subunits, arranged in two rings of 6, with the active site between each pair of subunits in a ring. In earlier work, we have reported the locations within the funnel-shaped active site of the substrates glutamate and ATP and of the two divalent cations, but the site for ammonia (or ammonium) has remained elusive. Here we report the discovery by X-ray crystallography of a binding site on GS for monovalent cations, Tl+ and Cs+, which is probably the binding site for the substrate ammonium ion. Fourier difference maps show the following. (1) Tl+ and Cs+ bind at essentially the same site, with ligands being Glu 212, Tyr 179, Asp 50', Ser 53' of the adjacent subunit, and the substrate glutamate. From its position adjacent to the substrate glutamate and the cofactor ADP, we propose that this monovalent cation site is the substrate ammonium ion binding site. This proposal is supported by enzyme kinetics. Our kinetic measurements show that Tl+, Cs+, and NH4+ are competitive inhibitors to NH2OH in the gamma-glutamyl transfer reaction. (2) GS is a trimetallic enzyme containing two divalent cation sites (n1, n2) and one monovalent cation site per subunit. These three closely spaced ions are all at the active site: the distance between n1 and n2 is 6 A, between n1 and Tl+ is 4 A, and between n2 and Tl+ is 7 A. Glu 212 and the substrate glutamate are bridging ligands for the n1 ion and Tl+. (3) The presence of a monovalent cation in this site may enhance the structural stability of GS, because of its effect of balancing the negative charges of the substrate glutamate and its ligands and because of strengthening the "side-to-side" intersubunit interaction through the cation-protein bonding. (4) The presence of the cofactor ADP increases the Tl+ binding to GS

  20. Affective value and associative processing share a cortical substrate.

    PubMed

    Shenhav, Amitai; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Bar, Moshe

    2013-03-01

    The brain stores information in an associative manner so that contextually related entities are connected in memory. Such associative representations mediate the brain's ability to generate predictions about which other objects and events to expect in a given context. Likewise, the brain encodes and is able to rapidly retrieve the affective value of stimuli in our environment. That both contextual associations and affect serve as building blocks of numerous mental functions often makes interpretation of brain activation ambiguous. A critical brain region where such activation has often resulted in equivocal interpretation is the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC), which has been implicated separately in both affective and associative processing. To characterize its role more unequivocally, we tested whether activity in the mOFC was most directly attributable to affective processing, associative processing, or a combination of both. Subjects performed an object recognition task while undergoing fMRI scans. Objects varied independently in their affective valence and in their degree of association with other objects (associativity). Analyses revealed an overlapping sensitivity whereby the left mOFC responded both to increasingly positive affective value and to stronger associativity. These two properties individually accounted for mOFC response, even after controlling for their interrelationship. The role of the mOFC is either general enough to encompass associations that link stimuli both with reinforcing outcomes and with other stimuli or abstract enough to use both valence and associativity in conjunction to inform downstream processes related to perception and action. These results may further point to a fundamental relationship between associativity and positive affect.

  1. Unlocking the binding and reaction mechanism of hydroxyurea substrates as biological nitric oxide donors

    PubMed Central

    Vankayala, Sai Lakshmana; Hargis, Jacqueline C.; Woodcock, H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only FDA approved treatment of sickle cell disease. It is believed the primary mechanism of action is associated with the pharmacological elevation of nitric oxide in the blood; however, the exact details of this are still unclear. In the current work, we investigate the atomic level details of this process using a combination of flexible-ligand / flexible-receptor virtual screening coupled with energetic analysis that decomposes interaction energies. Utilizing these methods we were able to elucidate the previously unknown substrate binding modes of a series of hydroxyurea analogs to hemoglobin and the concomitant structural changes of the enzyme. We identify a backbone carbonyl that forms a hydrogen bond with bound substrates. Our results are consistent with kinetic and EPR measurements of hydroxyurea-hemoglobin reactions and a full mechanism is proposed that offers new insights into possibly improving substrate binding and/or reactivity. PMID:22519847

  2. Substrate binding and formation of an occluded state in the leucine transporter.

    PubMed

    Celik, Leyla; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-03-01

    Translocation through the extracellular vestibule and binding of leucine in the leucine transporter (LeuT) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. More than 0.1 mus of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on different combinations of LeuT, bound substrate, and bound structural Na(+) ions to describe molecular events involved in substrate binding and in the formation of the occluded state and to investigate the dynamics of this state. Three structural features are found to be directly involved in the initial steps of leucine transport: a Na(+) ion directly coordinated to leucine (Na-1), two aromatic residues closing the binding site toward the extracellular vestibule (Tyr-108 and Phe-253), and a salt bridge in the extracellular vestibule (Arg-30 and Asp-404). These features account for observed differences between simulations of LeuT with and without bound substrate and for a possible pathway for leucine binding and thereby formation of the occluded LeuT binding site.

  3. Comparison of three classes of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Emphasis on different substrate binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Eklund, H; Müller-Wille, P; Horjales, E; Futer, O; Holmquist, B; Vallee, B L; Höög, J O; Kaiser, R; Jörnvall, H

    1990-10-24

    Conformational models of the three characterized classes of mammalian liver alcohol dehydrogenase were constructed using computer graphics based on the known three-dimensional structure of the E subunit of the horse enzyme (class I) and the primary structures of the three human enzyme classes. This correlates the substrate-binding pockets of the class I subunits (alpha, beta and gamma in the human enzyme) with those of the class II and III subunits (pi and chi, respectively) for three enzymes that differ in substrate specificity, inhibition pattern and many other properties. The substrate-binding sites exhibit pronounced differences in both shape and properties. Comparing human class I subunits with those of class II and III subunits there are no less than 8 and 10 replacements, respectively, out of 11 residues in the substrate pocket, while in the human class I isozyme variants, only 1-3 of these 11 positions differ. A single residue, Val294, is conserved throughout. The liver alcohol dehydrogenases, with different substrate-specificity pockets, resemble the patterns of other enzyme families such as the pancreatic serine proteases. The inner part of the substrate cleft in the class II and III enzymes is smaller than in the horse class I enzyme, because both Ser48 and Phe93 are replaced by larger residues, Thr and Tyr, respectively. In class II, the residues in the substrate pocket are larger in about half of the positions. It is rich in aromatic residues, four Phe and one Tyr, making the substrate site distinctly smaller than in the class I subunits. In class III, the inner part of the substrate cleft is narrow but the outer part considerably wider and more polar than in the class I and II enzymes. In addition, Ser (or Thr) and Tyr in class II and III instead of His51 may influence proton abstraction/donation at the active site.

  4. Structural characterization of the Streptococcus pneumoniae carbohydrate substrate-binding protein SP0092

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Minzhe

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with infants and the elderly at the highest risk. S. pneumoniae relies entirely on carbohydrates as a source of carbon and dedicates a third of all uptake systems to carbohydrate import. The structure of the carbohydrate-free substrate-binding protein SP0092 at 1.61 Å resolution reveals it to belong to the newly proposed subclass G of substrate-binding proteins, with a ligand-binding pocket that is large enough to accommodate complex oligosaccharides. SP0092 is a dimer in solution and the crystal structure reveals a domain-swapped dimer with the monomer subunits in a closed conformation but in the absence of carbohydrate ligand. This closed conformation may be induced by dimer formation and could be used as a mechanism to regulate carbohydrate uptake. PMID:28045395

  5. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  6. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Wienk, Hans; Slootweg, Jack C; Speerstra, Sietske; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2013-07-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL is specifically recognized by the Fanconi anemia proteins FANCM and FAAP24, we determined the structure of the HhH domain of FAAP24. Although it resembles other HhH domains, the FAAP24 domain contains a canonical hairpin motif followed by distorted motif. The HhH domain can bind various DNA substrates; using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments, we demonstrate that the canonical HhH motif is required for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding, whereas the unstructured N-terminus can interact with single-stranded DNA. Both DNA binding surfaces are used for binding to ICL-like single/double-strand junction-containing DNA substrates. A structural model for FAAP24 bound to dsDNA has been made based on homology with the translesion polymerase iota. Site-directed mutagenesis, sequence conservation and charge distribution support the dsDNA-binding model. Analogous to other HhH domain-containing proteins, we suggest that multiple FAAP24 regions together contribute to binding to single/double-strand junction, which could contribute to specificity in ICL DNA recognition.

  7. Substrate binding by a bacterial ABC transporter involved in polysaccharide export

    SciTech Connect

    Cuthbertson, Leslie; Kimber, Matthew S.; Whitfield, Chris

    2008-04-02

    ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporters are responsible for the export of a wide variety of cell-surface glycoconjugates in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These include the O-antigenic polysaccharide (O-PS) portion of lipopolysaccharide, a crucial virulence determinant in Gram-negative pathogens. O-PSs are synthesized by one of two fundamentally different pathways. Escherichia coli O serotypes O8 and O9a provide the prototype systems for studying O-PS export via ABC transporters. The transporter is composed of the transmembrane component Wzm and the nucleotide-binding component Wzt. Although the N-terminal domain of Wzt is a conventional ABC protein, the C-terminal domain of Wzt (C-Wzt) is a unique structural element that determines the specificity of the transporter for either the O8 or O9a O-PS. We show here that the two domains of Wzt can function when expressed as separate polypeptides; both are essential for export. In vitro, C-Wzt binds its cognate O-PS by recognizing a residue located at the nonreducing end of the polymer. The crystal structure of C-WztO9a is reported here and reveals a {beta} sandwich with an immunoglobulin-like topology that contains the O-PS-binding pocket. Substrate interactions with nucleotide-binding domains have been demonstrated in an ABC exporter previously. However, to our knowledge substrate binding by a discrete, cytoplasmic accessory domain in an extended nucleotide-binding domain polypeptide has not previously been demonstrated. Elucidation of the substrate-recognition system involved in O-PS export provides insight into the mechanism that coordinates polymer biosynthesis, termination, and export.

  8. The noncompetitive inhibitor WW781 senses changes in erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1) transport site conformation and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Knauf, P A; Raha, N M; Spinelli, L J

    2000-02-01

    WW781 binds reversibly to red blood cell AE1 and inhibits anion exchange by a two-step mechanism, in which an initial complex (complex 1) is rapidly formed, and then there is a slower equilibration to form a second complex (complex 2) with a lower free energy. According to the ping-pong kinetic model, AE1 can exist in forms with the anion transport site facing either inward or outward, and the transition between these forms is greatly facilitated by binding of a transportable substrate such as Cl(-). Both the rapid initial binding of WW781 and the formation of complex 2 are strongly affected by the conformation of AE1, such that the forms with the transport site facing outward have higher affinity than those with the transport site facing inward. In addition, binding of Cl(-) seems to raise the free energy of complex 2 relative to complex 1, thereby reducing the equilibrium binding affinity, but Cl(-) does not compete directly with WW781. The WW781 binding site, therefore, reveals a part of the AE1 structure that is sensitive to Cl(-) binding and to transport site orientation, in addition to the disulfonic stilbene binding site. The relationship of the inhibitory potency of WW781 under different conditions to the affinities for the different forms of AE1 provides information on the possible asymmetric distributions of unloaded and Cl(-)-loaded transport sites that are consistent with the ping-pong model, and supports the conclusion from flux and nuclear magnetic resonance data that both the unloaded and Cl(-)-loaded sites are very asymmetrically distributed, with far more sites facing the cytoplasm than the outside medium. This asymmetry, together with the ability of WW781 to recruit toward the forms with outward-facing sites, implies that WW781 may be useful for changing the conformation of AE1 in studies of structure-function relationships.

  9. Mutational analysis of a Ser/Thr phosphatase. Identification of residues important in phosphoesterase substrate binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, S; Clemens, J C; Stone, R L; Dixon, J E

    1994-10-21

    The Ser/Thr phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPases) display similarities in amino acid sequence and biochemical properties. Most members of this family require transition metal ions for activity. The smallest family member, the bacteriophage lambda PPase (lambda-PPase), has been successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized (Zhuo, S., Clemens, J.C., Hakes, D.J., Barford, D., and Dixon, J. E. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 17754-17761). Site-directed mutagenesis has now been employed to define amino acid residues in lambda-PPase required for metal ion binding and catalysis. Conservative amino acid substitutions at residues Asp20, His22, Asp49, His76, and Glu77 affected lambda-PPase catalysis and metal ion binding, whereas substitutions at residues Arg53 and Arg73 affected catalysis and substrate binding. Each of these residues is invariant in all phosphoprotein phosphatases, suggesting that these residues may play important roles in binding and catalysis in all of the PPases. Computer-assisted sequence alignment further revealed that lambda-PPase residues Asp20, His22, Asp49, His76, Arg53, and Arg73 lie within three larger regions of PPase sequence identity with the consensus sequence (DXH-(approximately 25)-GDXXD-(approximately 25)-GNHD/E). This motif can be found in a wide variety of phosphoesterases unrelated to the PPases and defines structural and catalytic features utilized by a diverse group of enzymes for the hydrolysis of phosphate esters.

  10. The effect on structural and solvent water molecules of substrate binding to ferric horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Niall; Adamczyk, Katrin; Hithell, Gordon; Shaw, Daniel J; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Hunt, Neil T

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast, multi-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, in the form of 2D-IR and pump-probe measurements, has been employed to investigate the effect of substrate binding on the structural dynamics of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Using nitric oxide bound to the ferric haem of HRP as a sensitive probe of local dynamics, we report measurements of the frequency fluctuations (spectral diffusion) and vibrational lifetime of the NO stretching mode with benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) located in the substrate-binding position at the periphery of the haem pocket, in both D2O and H2O solvents. The results reveal that, with BHA bound to the enzyme, the local structural dynamics are insensitive to H/D exchange. These results are in stark contrast to those found in studies of the substrate-free enzyme, which demonstrated that the local chemical and dynamic environment of the haem ligand is influenced by water molecules. In light of the large changes in solvent accessibility caused by substrate binding, we discuss the potential for varying roles for the solvent in the haem pocket of HRP at different stages along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic mechanism.

  11. A role for the strained phenylalanine ring rotation induced by substrate binding to cytochrome CYP102A1.

    PubMed

    Haines, Donovan C

    2006-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures of CYP102A1 (P450BM-3) have shown that PHE87 rotates upon substrate binding and is in contact with the heme cofactor. Analysis of substrate binding data combined with DFT calculations suggest that the ring is rotated into an unfavorable interaction with the heme and this could drive active site rearrangement.

  12. Insight into the Role of Substrate-binding Residues in Conferring Substrate Specificity for the Multifunctional Polysaccharide Lyase Smlt1473

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Logan C.; Berger, Bryan W.

    2014-01-01

    Anionic polysaccharides are of growing interest in the biotechnology industry due to their potential pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery and wound treatment. Chemical composition and polymer length strongly influence the physical and biological properties of the polysaccharide and thus its potential industrial and medical applications. One promising approach to determining monomer composition and controlling the degree of polymerization involves the use of polysaccharide lyases, which catalyze the depolymerization of anionic polysaccharides via a β-elimination mechanism. Utilization of these enzymes for the production of custom-made oligosaccharides requires a high degree of control over substrate specificity. Previously, we characterized a polysaccharide lyase (Smlt1473) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia k279a, which exhibited significant activity against hyaluronan (HA), poly-β-d-glucuronic acid (poly-GlcUA), and poly-β-d-mannuronic acid (poly-ManA) in a pH-regulated manner. Here, we utilize a sequence structure guided approach based on a homology model of Smlt1473 to identify nine putative substrate-binding residues and examine their effect on substrate specificity via site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, single point mutations H221F and R312L resulted in increased activity and specificity toward poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA, respectively. Furthermore, a W171A mutant nearly eliminated HA activity, while increasing poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA activity by at least 35%. The effect of these mutations was analyzed by comparison with the high resolution structure of Sphingomonas sp. A1-III alginate lyase in complex with poly-ManA tetrasaccharide and by taking into account the structural differences between HA, poly-GlcUA, and poly-ManA. Overall, our results demonstrate that even minor changes in active site architecture have a significant effect on the substrate specificity of Smlt1473, whose structural plasticity could be applied to the design of highly

  13. Insight into the role of substrate-binding residues in conferring substrate specificity for the multifunctional polysaccharide lyase Smlt1473.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Logan C; Berger, Bryan W

    2014-06-27

    Anionic polysaccharides are of growing interest in the biotechnology industry due to their potential pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery and wound treatment. Chemical composition and polymer length strongly influence the physical and biological properties of the polysaccharide and thus its potential industrial and medical applications. One promising approach to determining monomer composition and controlling the degree of polymerization involves the use of polysaccharide lyases, which catalyze the depolymerization of anionic polysaccharides via a β-elimination mechanism. Utilization of these enzymes for the production of custom-made oligosaccharides requires a high degree of control over substrate specificity. Previously, we characterized a polysaccharide lyase (Smlt1473) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia k279a, which exhibited significant activity against hyaluronan (HA), poly-β-d-glucuronic acid (poly-GlcUA), and poly-β-d-mannuronic acid (poly-ManA) in a pH-regulated manner. Here, we utilize a sequence structure guided approach based on a homology model of Smlt1473 to identify nine putative substrate-binding residues and examine their effect on substrate specificity via site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, single point mutations H221F and R312L resulted in increased activity and specificity toward poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA, respectively. Furthermore, a W171A mutant nearly eliminated HA activity, while increasing poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA activity by at least 35%. The effect of these mutations was analyzed by comparison with the high resolution structure of Sphingomonas sp. A1-III alginate lyase in complex with poly-ManA tetrasaccharide and by taking into account the structural differences between HA, poly-GlcUA, and poly-ManA. Overall, our results demonstrate that even minor changes in active site architecture have a significant effect on the substrate specificity of Smlt1473, whose structural plasticity could be applied to the design of highly

  14. Binding Induced RNA Conformational Changes Control Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Thiostrepton Resistance Methyltransferase (Tsr)*

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Emily G.; Conn, Graeme L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) post-transcriptional modifications are essential for ribosome maturation, translational fidelity, and are one mechanism used by both antibiotic-producing and pathogenic bacteria to resist the effects of antibiotics that target the ribosome. The thiostrepton producer Streptomyces azureus prevents self-intoxication by expressing the thiostrepton-resistance methyltransferase (Tsr), which methylates the 2′-hydroxyl of 23 S rRNA nucleotide adenosine 1067 within the thiostrepton binding site. Tsr is a homodimer with each protomer containing an L30e-like amino-terminal domain (NTD) and a SPOUT methyltransferase family catalytic carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD). We show that both enzyme domains are required for high affinity RNA substrate binding. The Tsr-CTD has intrinsic, weak RNA affinity that is necessary to direct the specific high-affinity Tsr-RNA interaction via NTDs, which have no detectable RNA affinity in isolation. RNA structure probing experiments identify the Tsr footprint on the RNA and structural changes in the substrate, induced specifically upon NTD binding, which are necessary for catalysis by the CTD. Additionally, we identify a key amino acid in each domain responsible for CTD-RNA binding and the observed NTD-dependent RNA structural changes. These studies allow us to develop a model for Tsr-RNA interaction in which the coordinated substrate recognition of each Tsr structural domain is an obligatory pre-catalytic recognition event. Our findings underscore the complexity of substrate recognition by RNA modification enzymes and the potential for direct involvement of the RNA substrate in controlling the process of its modification. PMID:25086036

  15. Crystal structure of Trypanosoma cruzi tyrosine aminotransferase: substrate specificity is influenced by cofactor binding mode.

    PubMed Central

    Blankenfeldt, W.; Nowicki, C.; Montemartini-Kalisz, M.; Kalisz, H. M.; Hecht, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) from the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which belongs to the aminotransferase subfamily Igamma, has been determined at 2.5 A resolution with the R-value R = 15.1%. T. cruzi TAT shares less than 15% sequence identity with aminotransferases of subfamily Ialpha but shows only two larger topological differences to the aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs). First, TAT contains a loop protruding from the enzyme surface in the larger cofactor-binding domain, where the AspATs have a kinked alpha-helix. Second, in the smaller substrate-binding domain, TAT has a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet instead of the two-stranded beta-sheet in the AspATs. The position of the aromatic ring of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor is very similar to the AspATs but the phosphate group, in contrast, is closer to the substrate-binding site with one of its oxygen atoms pointing toward the substrate. Differences in substrate specificities of T. cruzi TAT and subfamily Ialpha aminotransferases can be attributed by modeling of substrate complexes mainly to this different position of the cofactor-phosphate group. Absence of the arginine, which in the AspATs fixes the substrate side-chain carboxylate group by a salt bridge, contributes to the inability of T. cruzi TAT to transaminate acidic amino acids. The preference of TAT for tyrosine is probably related to the ability of Asn17 in TAT to form a hydrogen bond to the tyrosine side-chain hydroxyl group. PMID:10595543

  16. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  17. Bacterial chitin binding proteins show differential substrate binding and synergy with chitinases.

    PubMed

    Manjeet, Kaur; Purushotham, Pallinti; Neeraja, Chilukoti; Podile, Appa Rao

    2013-08-25

    Glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 18 chitinases (Chi) and family 33 chitin binding proteins (CBPs) from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki (BtChi and BtCBP), B. licheniformis DSM13 (BliChi and BliCBP) and Serratia proteamaculans 568 (SpChiB and SpCBP21) were used to study the efficiency and synergistic action of BtChi, BliChi and SpChiB individually with BtCBP, BliCBP or SpCBP21. Chitinase assay revealed that only BtChi and SpChiB showed synergism in hydrolysis of chitin, while there was no increase in products generated by BliChi, in the presence of the three above mentioned CBPs. This suggests that some (specific) CBPs are able to exert a synergistic effect on (specific) chitinases. A mutant of BliChi, designated as BliGH, was constructed by deleting the C-terminal fibronectin III (FnIII) and carbohydrate binding module 5 (CBM5) to assess the contribution of FnIII and CBM5 domains in the synergistic interactions of GH18 chitinases with CBPs. Chitinase assay with BliGH revealed that the accessory domains play a major role in making BliChi an efficient enzyme. We studied binding of BtCBP and BliCBP to α- and β-chitin. The BtCBP, BliCBP or SpCBP21 did not act synergistically with chitinases in hydrolysis of the chitin, interspersed with other polymers, present in fungal cell walls.

  18. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B.; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Engen, John R.; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract INTRODUCTION The ubiquitin-proteasome system comprises hundreds of distinct pathways of degradation, which converge at the step of ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. Five proteasomal ubiquitin receptors have been identified, two that are intrinsic to the proteasome (Rpn10 and Rpn13) and three reversibly associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors (Rad23, Dsk2, and Ddi1). RATIONALE We found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors of yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. We therefore screened for additional ubiquitin receptors in the proteasome and identified subunit Rpn1 as a candidate. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the structure of the binding site within Rpn1, which we term the T1 site. Mutational analysis of this site showed its functional importance within the context of intact proteasomes. T1 binds both ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (UBL) proteins, in particular the substrate-delivering shuttle factor Rad23. A second site within the Rpn1 toroid, T2, recognizes the UBL domain of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6, as determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis and validated by amino acid substitution and functional assays. The Rpn1 toroid thus serves a critical scaffolding role within the proteasome, helping to assemble multiple proteasome cofactors as well as substrates. RESULTS Our results indicate that proteasome subunit Rpn1 can recognize both ubiquitin and UBL domains of substrate shuttling factors that themselves bind ubiquitin and function as reversibly-associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors. Recognition is mediated by the T1 site within the Rpn1 toroid, which supports proteasome function in vivo. We found that the capacity of T1 to recognize both ubiquitin and UBL proteins was shared with Rpn10 and Rpn13. The surprising multiplicity of ubiquitin-recognition domains within the proteasome may promote enhanced

  19. Role of THR501 residue in substrate binding and catalytic activity of cytochrome P4501A1.

    PubMed

    Cvrk, T; Strobel, H W

    2001-05-01

    A putative binding region for cumene hydroperoxide in the active site of cytochrome P4501A1 was identified using photoaffinity labeling. Thr501 was determined as the most likely site of modification by azidocumene used as the photoaffinity label (T. Cvrk and H. W. Strobel, (1998) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 349, 95-104). To evaluate further the role of this amino acid residue a site-directed mutagenesis approach was employed. P4501A1 wild type and two mutants, P4501A1Glu501 and P4501A1Phe501, were expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli and used for kinetic analysis to confirm the role of Thr501 residue in cumene hydroperoxide binding. The mutation resulted in a two- to fourfold decrease in the rate of heme degradation in the presence of 0.5 mM cumene hydroperoxide. The mutations do not prevent or significantly alter binding of the tested substrates; however, binding of 2-phenyl-2-propanol (product generated from cumene hydroperoxide) to P4501A1Glu501 and P4501A1Phe501 exhibited four- and eightfold decreases, respectively, suggesting that the mutations strongly affected the affinity of cumene hydroperoxide for the P4501A1 active site. The kinetic analysis of cumene hydroperoxide-supported reactions showed that both mutants exhibit increased Km and decreased VMax values for all tested substrates. Furthermore, the mutations affected product distribution in testosterone hydroxylation. On the basis of P4501A1Glu501 and P4501A1Phe501 characterization, it can be concluded that Thr501 plays an important role in cumene hydroperoxide/P4501A1 interaction.

  20. Localization of the Substrate-binding Site in the Homodimeric Mannitol Transporter, EIImtl, of Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Opačić, Milena; Vos, Erwin P. P.; Hesp, Ben H.; Broos, Jaap

    2010-01-01

    The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EIImtl, belongs to a class of membrane proteins coupling the transport of substrates with their chemical modification. EIImtl is functional as a homodimer, and it harbors one high affinity mannitol-binding site in the membrane-embedded C domain (IICmtl). To localize this binding site, 19 single Trp-containing mutants of EIImtl were biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) and mixed with azi-mannitol, a substrate analog acting as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor. Typically, for mutants showing FRET, only one 5-FTrp was involved, whereas the 5-FTrp from the other monomer was too distant. This proves that the mannitol-binding site is asymmetrically positioned in dimeric IICmtl. Combined with the available two-dimensional projection maps of IICmtl, it is concluded that a second resting binding site is present in this transporter. Active transport of mannitol only takes place when EIImtl becomes phosphorylated at Cys384 in the cytoplasmic B domain. Stably phosphorylated EIImtl mutants were constructed, and FRET experiments showed that the position of mannitol in IICmtl remains the same. We conclude that during the transport cycle, the phosphorylated B domain has to move to the mannitol-binding site, located in the middle of the membrane, to phosphorylate mannitol. PMID:20522557

  1. Roles of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and of its activator Cdc20 in functional substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Esther; Moshe, Yakir; Braunstein, Ilana; Hershko, Avram

    2006-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a multisubunit ubiquitin-protein ligase that targets for degradation cell-cycle regulatory proteins during exit from mitosis and in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The activity of APC/C in mitosis and in G1 requires interaction with the activator proteins Cdc20 and Cdh1, respectively. Substrates of APC/C–Cdc20 contain a recognition motif called the “destruction box” (D-box). The mode of the action of APC/C activators and their possible role in substrate binding remain poorly understood. Several investigators suggested that Cdc20 and Cdh1 mediate substrate recognition, whereas others proposed that substrates bind to APC/C or to APC/C–activator complexes. All these studies used binding assays, which do not necessarily indicate that substrate binding is functional and leads to product formation. In the present investigation we examined this problem by an “isotope-trapping” approach that directly demonstrates productive substrate binding. With this method we found that the simultaneous presence of both APC/C and Cdc20 is required for functional substrate binding. By contrast, with conventional binding assays we found that either Cdc20 or APC/C can bind substrate by itself, but only at low affinity and relaxed selectivity for D-box. Our results are consistent with models in which interaction of substrate with specific binding sites on both APC/C and Cdc20 is involved in selective and productive substrate binding. PMID:16455800

  2. Structural domains in NADPH: Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases involved in catalysis and substrate binding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael P.

    1999-09-24

    Until recently little direct information was available about specific structural determinants within the light-dependent NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (PORs) required for substrate and cofactor binding, catalytic activity, and thylakoid membrane localization. Based on our previous DOE-funded studies, during the past year we brought to fruition a number of ongoing experiments, initiated several new avenues of investigations, and overall have made considerable progress towards establishing the basic structural parameters governing POR function. Our studies to date have defined residues and domains involved in substrate and cofactor binding and catalysis, and elaborated on the mechanism for membrane localization of POR in developing plastids. Our results and their significance, as well as our work in progress, are detailed.

  3. Studies on the mechanism of hydroxymethylbilane synthase concerning the role of arginine residues in substrate binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lander, M; Pitt, A R; Alefounder, P R; Bardy, D; Abell, C; Battersby, A R

    1991-01-01

    The role of conserved arginine residues in hydroxymethylbilane synthase was investigated by replacing these residues in the enzyme from Escherichia coli with leucine residues by using site-directed mutagenesis. The kinetic parameters for these mutant enzymes and studies on the formation of intermediate enzyme-substrate complexes indicate that several of these arginine residues are involved in binding the carboxylate side chains of the pyrromethane cofactor and the growing oligopyrrole chain. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2025226

  4. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  5. Binding of mouse immunoglobulin G to polylysine-coated glass substrate for immunodiagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Tewari, Rupinder; Bajpai, Ram Prakash; Bharadwaj, Lalit Mohan; Raiteri, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    We report a method for immobilizing mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) on polylysine-coated glass substrate for immunodiagnostic applications. Mouse IgG molecules were immobilized on polylysine-coated glass substrate employing 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and protein A. The amino groups of the polylysine-coated glass slide were cross linked to the carboxyl groups of protein A employing EDC crosslinker. Protein A was employed as it binds to the constant Fc region of antibodies keeping their antigen binding sites on the variable F ab region free to bind to antigens. The qualitative analysis of surface immobilized mouse IgG was done by fluorescent microscopy employing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled mouse IgG molecules. The immobilization densities of protein A and mouse IgG were determined by 3, 3', 4, 4'-tetramethyl benzidine (TMB) substrate assay employing horse radish peroxidise labelled molecules and were found to be 130 +/- 17 ng/cm2 and 596 +/- 31 ng/cm2 respectively. The biomolecular coatings analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were found to be uniform.

  6. Structure of a lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase suggests how conformational changes govern substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Anandhi; Evans, Genevieve L; Condic-Jurkic, Karmen; O'Mara, Megan L; John, Constance M; Phillips, Nancy J; Jarvis, Gary A; Wills, Siobhan S; Stubbs, Keith A; Moraes, Isabel; Kahler, Charlene M; Vrielink, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria have increased the prevalence of fatal sepsis in modern times. Colistin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) antibiotic that permeabilizes the bacterial outer membrane (OM) and has been used to treat these infections. The OM outer leaflet is comprised of endotoxin containing lipid A, which can be modified to increase resistance to CAMPs and prevent clearance by the innate immune response. One type of lipid A modification involves the addition of phosphoethanolamine to the 1 and 4' headgroup positions by phosphoethanolamine transferases. Previous structural work on a truncated form of this enzyme suggested that the full-length protein was required for correct lipid substrate binding and catalysis. We now report the crystal structure of a full-length lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase from Neisseria meningitidis, determined to 2.75-Å resolution. The structure reveals a previously uncharacterized helical membrane domain and a periplasmic facing soluble domain. The domains are linked by a helix that runs along the membrane surface interacting with the phospholipid head groups. Two helices located in a periplasmic loop between two transmembrane helices contain conserved charged residues and are implicated in substrate binding. Intrinsic fluorescence, limited proteolysis, and molecular dynamics studies suggest the protein may sample different conformational states to enable the binding of two very different- sized lipid substrates. These results provide insights into the mechanism of endotoxin modification and will aid a structure-guided rational drug design approach to treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  7. Ricin A-chain structural determinant for binding substrate analogues: a molecular dynamics simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Olson, M A

    1997-01-01

    Ricin A-chain is a cytotoxic protein that attacks ribosomes by hydrolyzing a specific adenine base from a highly conserved, single-stranded rRNA hairpin containing the tetraloop sequence GAGA. Molecular-dynamics simulation methods are used to analyze the structural determinant for three substrate analogues bound to the ricin A-chain molecule. Simulations were applied to the binding of the dinucleotide adenyl-3',5'-guanosine employing the x-ray crystal structure of the ricin complex and a modeled CGAGAG hexanucleotide loop taken from the NMR solution structure of a 29-mer oligonucleotide hairpin. A third simulation model is also presented describing a conformational search of the docked 29-mer structure by using a simulated-annealing method. Analysis of the structural interaction energies for each model shows the overall binding dominated by nonspecific interactions, which are mediated by specific arginine contracts from the highly basic region on the protein surface. The tetraloop conformation of the 29-mer was found to make specific interactions with conserved protein residues, in a manner that favored the GAGA sequence. A comparison of the two docked loop conformations with the NMR structure revealed significant positional deviations, suggesting that ricin may use an induced fit mechanism to recognize and bind the rRNA substrate. The conserved Tyr-80 may play an important conformational entropic role in the binding and release of the target adenine in the active site.

  8. Comparative study of substrate and product binding to the human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Soya, Naoto; Shoemaker, Glen K; Palcic, Monica M; Klassen, John S

    2009-11-01

    The first comparative thermodynamic study of the human blood group glycosyltransferases, alpha-(1-->3)-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and alpha-(1-->3)-galactosyltransferase (GTB), interacting with donor substrates, donor and acceptor analogs, and trisaccharide products in vitro is reported. The binding constants, measured at 24 degrees C with the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES-MS) assay, provide new insights into these model GTs and their interactions with substrate and product. Notably, the recombinant forms of GTA and GTB used in this study are shown to exist as homodimers, stabilized by noncovalent interactions at neutral pH. In the absence of divalent metal ion, neither GTA nor GTB exhibits any appreciable affinity for its native donors (UDP-GalNAc, UDP-Gal). Upon introduction of Mn(2+), both donors undergo enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis in the presence of either GTA or GTB. Hydrolysis of UDP-GalNAc in the presence of GTA proceeds very rapidly under the solution conditions investigated and a binding constant could not be directly measured. In contrast, the rate of hydrolysis of UDP-Gal in the presence of GTB is significantly slower and, utilizing a modified approach to analyze the ES-MS data, a binding constant of 2 x 10(4) M(-1) was established. GTA and GTB bind the donor analogs UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-Glc with affinities similar to those measured for UDP-Gal and UDP-GalNAc (GTB only), suggesting that the native donors and donor analogs bind to the GTA and GTB through similar interactions. The binding constant determined for GTA and UDP-GlcNAc (approximately 1 x 10(4) M(-1)), therefore, provides an estimate for the binding constant for GTA and UDP-GalNAc. Binding of GTA and GTB with the A and B trisaccharide products was also investigated for the first time. In the absence of UDP and Mn(2+), both GTA and GTB recognize their respective trisaccharide products but with a low affinity approximately 10(3) M(-1); the presence of UDP and Mn(2

  9. Behavior of lignin-binding cellulase in the presence of fresh cellulosic substrate.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ai; Funaoka, Masamitsu

    2013-05-01

    A model lignin-binding cellulase was prepared from Trichoderma reesei cellulase and lignocresol, which was synthesized from softwood or hardwood lignin. Filter paper was incubated with the lignocresol-cellulase complex, and it was observed that only a limited amount of cellulase migrated to the filter paper. The cellulase adsorption isotherms for the lignocresols and filter paper were fitted to a Langmuir absorption model, and the determined Langmuir constants were as follows: softwood lignocresol>hardwood lignocresol>filter paper. The calculations demonstrated that lignin-binding cellulase can potentially be recovered by the addition of a sufficient quantity of cellulosic substrate. As a result, the lignocresol-binding cellulase is highly stable and lignocresol can potentially be used for immobilizing cellulase in the active state.

  10. Multi-site substrate binding and interplay in barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, Eun-Seong; Bozonnet, Sophie; Aghajari, Nushin; Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Svensson, Birte

    2008-07-23

    Certain starch hydrolases possess secondary carbohydrate binding sites outside of the active site, suggesting that multi-site substrate interactions are functionally significant. In barley alpha-amylase both Tyr380, situated on a remote non-catalytic domain, and Tyr105 in subsite -6 of the active site cleft are principal carbohydrate binding residues. The dual active site/secondary site mutants Y105A/Y380A and Y105A/Y380M show that each of Tyr380 and Tyr105 is important, albeit not essential for binding, degradation, and multiple attack on polysaccharides, while Tyr105 predominates in oligosaccharide hydrolysis. Additional delicate structure/function relationships of the secondary site are uncovered using Y380A/H395A, Y380A, and H395A AMY1 mutants.

  11. Evidence that Asn542 of neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11) is involved in binding of the P2' residue of substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Dion, N; Le Moual, H; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P; Crine, P; Boileau, G

    1995-01-01

    Neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11) is a Zn2+ metallopeptidase involved in the degradation of biologically active peptides, e.g. enkephalins and atrial natriuretic peptide. The substrate specificity and catalytic activity of neprilysin resemble those of thermolysin, a crystallized bacterial Zn2+ metalloprotease. Despite little overall homology between the primary structures of thermolysin and neprilysin, many of the amino acid residues involved in catalysis, as well as Zn2+ and substrate binding, are highly conserved. Most of the active-site residues of neprilysin have their homologues in thermolysin and have been characterized by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, hydrophobic cluster analysis has revealed some other analogies between the neprilysin and thermolysin sequences [Benchetrit, Bissery, Mornon, Devault, Crine and Roques (1988) Biochemistry 27, 592-596]. According to this analysis the role of Asn542 in the neprilysin active site is analogous to that of Asn112 of thermolysin, which is to bind the substrate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change Asn542 to Gly or Gln residues. The effect of these mutations on substrate catalysis and inhibitor binding was examined with a series of thiorphan-like compounds containing various degrees of methylation at the P2' residue. For both mutated enzymes, determination of kinetic parameters with [D-Ala2,Leu5]enkephalin as substrate showed that the large decrease in activity was attributable to an increase in Km (14-16-fold) whereas kcat values were only slightly affected (2-3-fold decrease). This is in agreement with Asn542 being involved in substrate binding rather than directly in catalysis. Finally, the IC50 values for thiorphan and substituted thiorphans strongly suggest that Asn542 of neprilysin binds the substrate on the amino side of the P2' residue by formation of a unique hydrogen bond. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487905

  12. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  13. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; ...

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  14. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  15. Methylation-independent DNA Binding Modulates Specificity of Repressor of Silencing 1 (ROS1) and Facilitates Demethylation in Long Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ponferrada-Marín, María Isabel; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R.

    2010-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mark that promotes gene silencing and performs critical roles during reproduction and development in both plants and animals. The genomic distribution of DNA methylation is the dynamic outcome of opposing methylation and demethylation processes. In plants, active demethylation occurs through a base excision repair pathway initiated by 5-methycytosine (5-meC) DNA glycosylases of the REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1)/DEMETER (DME) family. To gain insight into the mechanism by which Arabidopsis ROS1 recognizes and excises 5-meC, we have identified those protein regions that are required for efficient DNA binding and catalysis. We have found that a short N-terminal lysine-rich domain conserved in members of the ROS1/DME family mediates strong methylation-independent binding of ROS1 to DNA and is required for efficient activity on 5-meC·G, but not for T·G processing. Removal of this domain does not significantly affect 5-meC excision from short molecules, but strongly decreases ROS1 activity on long DNA substrates. This region is not required for product binding and is not involved in the distributive behavior of the enzyme on substrates containing multiple 5-meC residues. Altogether, our results suggest that methylation-independent DNA binding allows ROS1 to perform a highly redundant search for efficient excision of a nondamaged, correctly paired base such as 5-meC in long stretches of DNA. These findings may have implications for understanding the evolution of structure and target specificity in DNA glycosylases. PMID:20489198

  16. Crystal structures of β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 enzyme reveal conformational changes and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Yuko; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K

    2013-11-01

    The β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 (β4GalT7) enzyme is involved in proteoglycan synthesis. In the presence of a manganese ion, it transfers galactose from UDP-galactose to xylose on a proteoglycan acceptor substrate. We present here the crystal structures of human β4GalT7 in open and closed conformations. A comparison of these crystal structures shows that, upon manganese and UDP or UDP-Gal binding, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes involving a small and a long loop. We also present the crystal structures of Drosophila wild-type β4GalT7 and D211N β4GalT7 mutant enzymes in the closed conformation in the presence of the acceptor substrate xylobiose and the donor substrate UDP-Gal, respectively. To understand the catalytic mechanism, we have crystallized the ternary complex of D211N β4GalT7 mutant enzyme in the presence of manganese with the donor and the acceptor substrates together in the same crystal structure. The galactose moiety of the bound UDP-Gal molecule forms seven hydrogen bonds with the protein molecule. The nonreducing end of the xylose moiety of xylobiose binds to the hydrophobic acceptor sugar binding pocket created by the conformational changes, whereas its extended xylose moiety forms hydrophobic interactions with a Tyr residue. In the ternary complex crystal structure, the nucleophile O4 oxygen atom of the xylose molecule is found in close proximity to the C1 and O5 atoms of the galactose moiety. This is the first time that a Michaelis complex of a glycosyltransferase has been described, and it clearly suggests an SN2 type catalytic mechanism for the β4GalT7 enzyme.

  17. Structural and mechanistic insight into covalent substrate binding by Escherichia coli dihydroxyacetone kinase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; McDonald, Laura; Cui, Qizhi; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw; Ekiel, Irena

    2011-01-25

    The Escherichia coli dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinase is an unusual kinase because (i) it uses the phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate: phosphotransferase system (PTS) as the source of high-energy phosphate, (ii) the active site is formed by two subunits, and (iii) the substrate is covalently bound to His218(K)* of the DhaK subunit. The PTS transfers phosphate to DhaM, which in turn phosphorylates the permanently bound ADP coenzyme of DhaL. This phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to the Dha substrate bound to DhaK. Here we report the crystal structure of the E. coli Dha kinase complex, DhaK-DhaL. The structure of the complex reveals that DhaK undergoes significant conformational changes to accommodate binding of DhaL. Combined mutagenesis and enzymatic activity studies of kinase mutants allow us to propose a catalytic mechanism for covalent Dha binding, phosphorylation, and release of the Dha-phosphate product. Our results show that His56(K) is involved in formation of the covalent hemiaminal bond with Dha. The structure of H56N(K) with noncovalently bound substrate reveals a somewhat different positioning of Dha in the binding pocket as compared to covalently bound Dha, showing that the covalent attachment to His218(K) orients the substrate optimally for phosphoryl transfer. Asp109(K) is critical for activity, likely acting as a general base activating the γ-OH of Dha. Our results provide a comprehensive picture of the roles of the highly conserved active site residues of dihydroxyacetone kinases.

  18. Conformational Changes in Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-Pentakisphosphate 2-Kinase upon Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Baños-Sanz, José Ignacio; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Whitfield, Hayley; Hamilton, Chris; Brearley, Charles A.; González, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (IP5 2-K) catalyzes the synthesis of inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate from ATP and IP5. Inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate is implicated in crucial processes such as mRNA export, DNA editing, and phosphorus storage in plants. We previously solved the first structure of an IP5 2-K, which shed light on aspects of substrate recognition. However, failure of IP5 2-K to crystallize in the absence of inositide prompted us to study putative conformational changes upon substrate binding. We have made mutations to residues on a region of the protein that produces a clasp over the active site. A W129A mutant allowed us to capture IP5 2-K in its different conformations by crystallography. Thus, the IP5 2-K apo-form structure displays an open conformation, whereas the nucleotide-bound form shows a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the inositide-bound form obtained previously in a closed conformation. Both nucleotide and inositide binding produce large conformational changes that can be understood as two rigid domain movements, although local changes were also observed. Changes in intrinsic fluorescence upon nucleotide and inositide binding are in agreement with the crystallographic findings. Our work suggests that the clasp might be involved in enzyme kinetics, with the N-terminal lobe being essential for inositide binding and subsequent conformational changes. We also show how IP5 2-K discriminates between inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate enantiomers and that substrate preference can be manipulated by Arg130 mutation. Altogether, these results provide a framework for rational design of specific inhibitors with potential applications as biological tools for in vivo studies, which could assist in the identification of novel roles for IP5 2-K in mammals. PMID:22745128

  19. A QM/MM study of the active species of the human cytochrome P450 3A4, and the influence thereof of the multiple substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Fishelovitch, Dan; Hazan, Carina; Hirao, Hajime; Wolfson, Haim J.; Nussinov, Ruth; Shaik, Sason

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 is involved in the metabolism of 50% of all swallowed drugs. The enzyme functions by means of a high-valent iron-oxo species, called Compound I (Cpd I), which is formed after entrance of the substrate to the active site. We explored the features of Cpd I using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations on various models that are either substrate-free or containing one and two molecules of diazepam as a substrate. Mössbauer parameters of Cpd I were computed. Our major finding shows that without the substrate, Cpd I tends to elongate its Fe-S bond, localize the radical on the sulfur, and form hydrogen bonds with A305 and T309, which may hypothetically lead to Cpd I consumption by H-abstraction. However, the positioning of diazepam close to Cpd I, as enforced by the effector molecule, was found to strengthen the NH---S interactions of the conserved I443 and G444 residues with the proximal cysteinate ligand. These interactions are known to stabilize the Fe-S bond, and as such, the presence of the substrate leads to a shorter Fe-S bond and it prevents the localization of the radical on the sulfur. This diazepam-Cpd I stabilization was manifested in the 1W0E conformer. The effector substrate did not influence Cpd I directly but rather by positioning the active substrate close to Cpd I, thus displacing the hydrogen bonds with A305 and T309, and thereby giving preference to substrate oxidation. It is hypothesized that these effects on Cpd I, promoted by the restrained substrate, may be behind the special metabolic behavior observed in cases of multiple substrate binding (called also cooperative binding). This restraint constitutes a mechanism whereby substrates stabilize Cpd I sufficiently long to affect monooxygenation by P450s at the expense of Cpd I destruction by the protein residues. PMID:18020326

  20. Structural Basis for Substrate Binding and the Catalytic Mechanism of Type III Pantothenate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kun; Strauss, Erick; Huerta, Carlos; Zhang, Hong

    2008-07-15

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the first step of the universal five-step coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway. The recently characterized type III PanK (PanK-III, encoded by the coaX gene) is distinct in sequence, structure and enzymatic properties from both the long-known bacterial type I PanK (PanK-I, exemplified by the Escherichia coli CoaA protein) and the predominantly eukaryotic type II PanK (PanK-II). PanK-III enzymes have an unusually high K{sub m} for ATP, are resistant to feedback inhibition by CoA, and are unable to utilize the N-alkylpantothenamide family of pantothenate analogues as alternative substrates, thus making type III PanK ineffective in generating CoA analogues as antimetabolites in vivo. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of the PanK-III from Thermotoga maritima and identified it as a member of the 'acetate and sugar kinase/heat shock protein 70/actin' (ASKHA) superfamily. Here we report the crystal structures of the same PanK-III in complex with one of its substrates (pantothenate), its product (phosphopantothenate) as well as a ternary complex structure of PanK-III with pantothenate and ADP. These results are combined with isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to present a detailed structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interactions between PanK-III and its substrates ATP and pantothenate. Comparison of substrate binding and catalytic sites of PanK-III with that of eukaryotic PanK-II revealed drastic differences in the binding modes for both ATP and pantothenate substrates, and suggests that these differences may be exploited in the development of new inhibitors specifically targeting PanK-III.

  1. A highly Conserved Aspartic Acid Residue of the Chitosanase from Bacillus Sp. TS Is Involved in the Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanping; Zhao, Shuangzhi; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhengying; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2016-11-01

    The chitosanase from Bacillus sp. TS (CsnTS) is an enzyme belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 8. The sequence of CsnTS shares 98 % identity with the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17. Crystallography analysis and site-direct mutagenesis of the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17 identified the important residues involved in the catalytic interaction and substrate binding. However, despite progress in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the chitosanase from the family GH8, the functional roles of some residues that are highly conserved throughout this family have not been fully elucidated. This study focused on one of these residues, i.e., the aspartic acid residue at position 318. We found that apart from asparagine, mutation of Asp318 resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. In-depth investigations showed that mutation of this residue not only impaired enzymatic activity but also affected substrate binding. Taken together, our results showed that Asp318 plays an important role in CsnTS activity.

  2. Structural and mechanistic insight into substrate binding from the conformational dynamics in apo and substrate-bound DapE enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debodyuti; Mishra, Sabyashachi

    2016-01-21

    Conformational dynamics in large biomolecular systems is often associated with their physiological roles. The dynamics of a dimeric microbial enzyme, DapE, with great potential as an antibiotic target, has been studied employing long molecular dynamics simulations of the enzyme in apo form and in substrate bound complex form. The essential dynamics of the apo enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex are extracted from the principal component analysis of the simulations of these two systems where the first two principal components are analyzed in detail. The essential motion of the enzyme in the substrate bound form exhibits a folding motion of its two catalytic domains over the two dimerization domains, which results in repulsion of water molecules away from the active site of the enzyme-substrate complex. This folding motion also leads to a stabilizing binding free energy of the substrate arising from the favorable interaction of the substrate and side chains of the enzyme. The dynamics in the enzyme-substrate complex results in stronger interaction between the catalytic and dimerization domains reflected by an increased number of inter-domain hydrogen bonds. The substrate, located in the catalytic domain of DapE, establishes contacts with the side chains of the dimerization domain of DapE by extended chains of hydrogen bonds, which emphasizes the role of the dimerization domain in substrate binding.

  3. Exciton binding energies in GaAs films on AlxGa1-xAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Chen, Lei; Tian, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    We use the fractional-dimensional approach (FDA) to study exciton binding energies in GaAs films on AlxGa1-xAs substrates. In this approach, the Schrödinger equation for a given anisotropic system is solved in a noninteger-dimensional space where the interactions are assumed to occur in an isotropic effective environment. The heavy-hole and light-hole exciton binding energies are calculated as functions of the film thickness and substrate thickness. The numerical results show that both the heavy-hole and light-hole exciton binding energies decrease monotonously as the film thickness increases. When the film thickness and the substrate thickness is relatively small, the change of substrate thickness has comparatively remarkable influence on both heavy-hole and light-hole exciton binding energies. As the substrate thickness increases, both the heavy-hole and light-hole exciton binding energies increase gradually. When the film thickness or the substrate thickness is relatively large, the change of substrate thickness has no significant influence on both heavy-hole and light-hole exciton binding energies.

  4. Planar substrate-binding site dictates the specificity of ECF-type nickel/cobalt transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You; Zhou, Mingze; Kirsch, Franziska; Xu, Congqiao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Zheng; Wang, Na; Li, Jun; Eitinger, Thomas; Yang, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    The energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters are multi-subunit protein complexes that mediate uptake of transition-metal ions and vitamins in about 50% of the prokaryotes, including bacteria and archaea. Biological and structural studies have been focused on ECF transporters for vitamins, but the molecular mechanism by which ECF systems transport metal ions from the environment remains unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of a NikM, TtNikM2, the substrate-binding component (S component) of an ECF-type nickel transporter from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis. In contrast to the structures of the vitamin-specific S proteins with six transmembrane segments (TSs), TtNikM2 possesses an additional TS at its N-terminal region, resulting in an extracellular N-terminus. The highly conserved N-terminal loop inserts into the center of TtNikM2 and occludes a region corresponding to the substrate-binding sites of the vitamin-specific S components. Nickel binds to NikM via its coordination to four nitrogen atoms, which are derived from Met1, His2 and His67 residues. These nitrogen atoms form an approximately square-planar geometry, similar to that of the metal ion-binding sites in the amino-terminal Cu2+- and Ni2+-binding (ATCUN) motif. Replacements of residues in NikM contributing to nickel coordination compromised the Ni-transport activity. Furthermore, systematic quantum chemical investigation indicated that this geometry enables NikM to also selectively recognize Co2+. Indeed, the structure of TtNikM2 containing a bound Co2+ ion has almost no conformational change compared to the structure that contains a nickel ion. Together, our data reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism underlying the metal selectivity of EcfS proteins, and provide insights into the ion-translocation process mediated by ECF transporters. PMID:24366337

  5. Substrate binding mode and reaction mechanism of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase deduced from crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sing-Yang; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Annie P-C; Wang, Andrew H-J; Liang, Po-Huang

    2004-04-01

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPs) catalyzes eight consecutive condensation reactions of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) with isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) to form a 55-carbon long-chain product. We previously reported the crystal structure of the apo-enzyme from Escherichia coli and the structure of UPPs in complex with sulfate ions (resembling pyrophosphate of substrate), Mg(2+), and two Triton molecules (product-like). In the present study, FPP substrate was soaked into the UPPs crystals, and the complex structure was solved. Based on the crystal structure, the pyrophosphate head group of FPP is bound to the backbone NHs of Gly29 and Arg30 as well as the side chains of Asn28, Arg30, and Arg39 through hydrogen bonds. His43 is close to the C2 carbon of FPP and may stabilize the farnesyl cation intermediate during catalysis. The hydrocarbon moiety of FPP is bound with hydrophobic amino acids including Leu85, Leu88, and Phe89, located on the alpha3 helix. The binding mode of FPP in cis-type UPPs is apparently different from that of trans-type and many other prenyltransferases which utilize Asprich motifs for substrate binding via Mg(2+). The new structure provides a plausible mechanism for the catalysis of UPPs.

  6. Binding of peroxiredoxin 6 to substrate determines differential phospholipid hydroperoxide peroxidase and phospholipase A2 activities

    PubMed Central

    Manevich, Yefim; Shuvaeva, Tea; Dodia, Chandra; Kazi, Altaf; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Fisher, Aron B.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) differs from other mammalian peroxiredoxins both in its ability to reduce phospholipid hydroperoxides at neutral pH and in having phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity that is maximal at acidic pH. We previously showed an active site C47 for peroxidase activity and a catalytic triad S32-H26-D140 necessary for binding of phospholipid and PLA2 activity. This study evaluated binding of reduced and oxidized phospholipid hydroperoxide to Prdx6 at cytosolic pH. Incubation of recombinant Prdx6 with 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine hydroperoxide (PLPCOOH) resulted in peroxidase activity, cys47 oxidation as detected with Prdx6-SO2(3) antibody, and a marked shift in the Prdx6 melting temperature by circular dichroism analysis indicating that PLPCOOH is a specific substrate for Prdx6. Preferential Prdx6 binding to oxidized liposomes was detected by changes in DNS-PE or bis-Pyr fluorescence and by ultrafiltration. Site-specific mutation of S32 or H26 in Prdx6 abolished binding while D140 mutation had no effect. Treatment of A549 cells with peroxides led to lipid peroxidation and translocation of Prdx6 from the cytosol to the cell membrane. Thus, the pH specificity for the two enzymatic activities of Prdx6 can be explained by the differential binding kinetics of the protein; Prdx6 binds to reduced phospholipid at acidic pH but at cytosolic pH binds only phospholipid that is oxidized compatible with a role for Prdx6 in the repair of peroxidized cell membranes. PMID:19236840

  7. Intermembrane contact affects calcium binding to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ekerdt, R; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1982-01-01

    Binding of Ca2+ to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) was analyzed by potentiometric titrations. Ca2+ binding to large unilamellar PtdSer vesicles was saturable at a stoichiometry of 1:2 (Ca2+/PtdSer). At approximately 6 X 10(-4) M [Ca2+]free, the binding curve exhibited a discontinuity that can be attributed to the formation of a Ca2+/PtdSer complex with a higher affinity. When both Ca2+ and Mg2+ are present, depending on the relative concentrations, Mg2+ can either complete or can enhance Ca2+ binding. Concomitant to the enhanced binding, the vesicle suspension was found to aggregate, suggesting that close contact of membranes is a prerequisite for the abrupt change in affinity. This concept was tested by binding studies with liposomes of mixed composition. It was found that the incorporation of 50 mol% phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) into PtdSer liposomes produced a similar binding pattern to that of pure PtdSer with a saturable stoichiometry of 1:2 (Ca2+/PtdSer). However, incorporation of 50 mol% phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) completely abolished the discontinuous shift in affinity and apparent saturation was reached at a stoichiometry of 1:4 (Ca2+/PtdSer). In addition, Ca2+ binding to PtdSer liposomes with 10 mol% galactosylcerebroside was not altered when compared to pure PtdSer, whereas 10 mol% of the glycolipid GL-4 abolished the increased binding. The results are closely correlated with recent findings on the role of the membrane composition in Ca2+-induced fusion of liposomes and argue in favor of a specific Ca2+/PtdSer complex (with 1:2 stoichiometry) forming only at points of close contact between membranes and serving as the trigger for membrane fusion. PMID:6954538

  8. Substrate-binding model of the chlorophyll biosynthetic magnesium chelatase BchH subunit.

    PubMed

    Sirijovski, Nickolche; Lundqvist, Joakim; Rosenbäck, Matilda; Elmlund, Hans; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Willows, Robert D; Hansson, Mats

    2008-04-25

    Photosynthetic organisms require chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll to harness light energy and to transform water and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and oxygen. The biosynthesis of these pigments is initiated by magnesium chelatase, an enzyme composed of BchI, BchD, and BchH proteins, which catalyzes the insertion of Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX (Proto) to produce Mg-protoporphyrin IX. BchI and BchD form an ATP-dependent AAA(+) complex that transiently interacts with the Proto-binding BchH subunit, at which point Mg(2+) is chelated. In this study, controlled proteolysis, electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens, and single-particle three-dimensional reconstruction have been used to probe the structure and substrate-binding mechanism of the BchH subunit to a resolution of 25A(.) The apo structure contains three major lobe-shaped domains connected at a single point with additional densities at the tip of two lobes termed the "thumb" and "finger." With the independent reconstruction of a substrate-bound BchH complex (BchH.Proto), we observed a distinct conformational change in the thumb and finger subdomains. Prolonged proteolysis of native apo-BchH produced a stable C-terminal fragment of 45 kDa, and Proto was shown to protect the full-length polypeptide from degradation. Fitting of a truncated BchH polypeptide reconstruction identified the N- and C-terminal domains. Our results show that the N- and C-terminal domains play crucial roles in the substrate-binding mechanism.

  9. Small Substrate Transport and Mechanism of a Molybdate ATP Binding Cassette Transporter in a Lipid Environment*

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Harrison, Alistair; Alvarez, Frances J. D.; Davidson, Amy L.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-01-01

    Embedded in the plasma membrane of all bacteria, ATP binding cassette (ABC) importers facilitate the uptake of several vital nutrients and cofactors. The ABC transporter, MolBC-A, imports molybdate by passing substrate from the binding protein MolA to a membrane-spanning translocation pathway of MolB. To understand the mechanism of transport in the biological membrane as a whole, the effects of the lipid bilayer on transport needed to be addressed. Continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and in vivo molybdate uptake studies were used to test the impact of the lipid environment on the mechanism and function of MolBC-A. Working with the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, we found that MolBC-A functions as a low affinity molybdate transporter in its native environment. In periods of high extracellular molybdate concentration, H. influenzae makes use of parallel molybdate transport systems (MolBC-A and ModBC-A) to take up a greater amount of molybdate than a strain with ModBC-A alone. In addition, the movement of the translocation pathway in response to nucleotide binding and hydrolysis in a lipid environment is conserved when compared with in-detergent analysis. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that a lipid environment restricts the flexibility of the MolBC translocation pathway. By combining continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and substrate uptake studies, we reveal details of molybdate transport and the logistics of uptake systems that employ multiple transporters for the same substrate, offering insight into the mechanisms of nutrient uptake in bacteria. PMID:24722984

  10. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD): A novel approach to study the effect of inhibitors on substrate binding to PPO.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Aditya Rao, S J; Kumar, Vadlapudi; Ramesh, C K

    2015-12-01

    Multiple ligand simultaneous docking, a computational approach is used to study the concurrent interactions between substrate and the macromolecule binding together in the presence of an inhibitor. The present investigation deals with the study of the effect of different inhibitors on binding of substrate to the protein Polyphenoloxidase (PPO). The protein was isolated from Mucuna pruriens and confirmed as tyrosinases involved in L-DOPA production. The activity was measured using different inhibitors at different concentrations taking catechol as substrate. A high-throughput binding study was conducted to compare the binding orientations of individual ligands and multiple ligands employing Autodock 4.2. The results of single substrate docking showed a better binding of urea with the binding energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) and inter molecular energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) while the results of MLSD revealed that ascorbic acid combined with the substrate showed better inhibition with a decreased binding energy of -2.37 kJ mol(-1).

  11. Melanocortin Receptor 4 Deficiency Affects Body Weight Regulation, Grooming Behavior, and Substrate Preference in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mul, Joram D.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Bergen, Dylan J.M.; Brans, Maike A.D.; Brakkee, Jan H.; Toonen, Pim W.; Garner, Keith M.; Adan, Roger A.H.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure and has become a major health-care problem in western society. The central melanocortin system plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding and energy expenditure, and functional loss of melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is the most common genetic cause of human obesity. In this study, we present the first functional Mc4r knockout model in the rat, resulting from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis–induced point mutation. In vitro observations revealed impaired membrane-binding and subsequent nonfunctionality of the receptor, whereas in vivo observations showed that functional loss of MC4R increased body weight, food intake, white adipose mass, and changed substrate preference. In addition, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of Agouti-Related Protein79–129 (AgRP79–129), an MC4R inverse agonist, or Melanotan-II (MTII), an MC4R agonist, did affect feeding behavior in wild-type rats but not in homozygous mutant rats, confirming complete loss of MC4R function in vivo. Finally, ICV administration of MTII induced excessive grooming behavior in wild-type rats, whereas this effect was absent in homozygous mutant rats, indicating that MTII-induced grooming behavior is exclusively regulated via MC4R pathways. Taken together, we expect that the MC4R rat model described here will be a valuable tool for studying monogenic obesity in humans. More specifically, the relative big size and increased cognitive capacity of rats as compared to mice will facilitate complex behavioral studies and detailed mechanistic studies regarding central function of MC4R, both of which ultimately may help to further understand the specific mechanisms that induce obesity during loss of MC4R function. PMID:21527895

  12. Melanocortin receptor 4 deficiency affects body weight regulation, grooming behavior, and substrate preference in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; van Boxtel, Ruben; Bergen, Dylan J M; Brans, Maike A D; Brakkee, Jan H; Toonen, Pim W; Garner, Keith M; Adan, Roger A H; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-03-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure and has become a major health-care problem in western society. The central melanocortin system plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding and energy expenditure, and functional loss of melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is the most common genetic cause of human obesity. In this study, we present the first functional Mc4r knockout model in the rat, resulting from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-induced point mutation. In vitro observations revealed impaired membrane-binding and subsequent nonfunctionality of the receptor, whereas in vivo observations showed that functional loss of MC4R increased body weight, food intake, white adipose mass, and changed substrate preference. In addition, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of Agouti-Related Protein(79-129) (AgRP(79-129)), an MC4R inverse agonist, or Melanotan-II (MTII), an MC4R agonist, did affect feeding behavior in wild-type rats but not in homozygous mutant rats, confirming complete loss of MC4R function in vivo. Finally, ICV administration of MTII induced excessive grooming behavior in wild-type rats, whereas this effect was absent in homozygous mutant rats, indicating that MTII-induced grooming behavior is exclusively regulated via MC4R pathways. Taken together, we expect that the MC4R rat model described here will be a valuable tool for studying monogenic obesity in humans. More specifically, the relative big size and increased cognitive capacity of rats as compared to mice will facilitate complex behavioral studies and detailed mechanistic studies regarding central function of MC4R, both of which ultimately may help to further understand the specific mechanisms that induce obesity during loss of MC4R function.

  13. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  14. Substrate Binding Mode and its Implication on Drug Design for Botulinum Neurotoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Rawat, R; Ahmed, A; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide 197QRATKM202 and its variant 197RRATKM202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5? sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197) chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1?-Arg198, occupies the S1? site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2? subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3? subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4?-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5?-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  15. Comparative thermodynamic studies on substrate and product binding of O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase reveals two different ligand recognition modes†

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The importance of understanding the detailed mechanism of cysteine biosynthesis in bacteria is underscored by the fact that cysteine is the only sulfur donor for all cellular components containing reduced sulfur. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) catalyzes this crucial last step in the cysteine biosynthesis and has been recognized as an important gene for the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Structural and kinetic studies have contributed to the understanding of mechanistic aspects of OASS, but details of ligand recognition features of OASS are not available. In the absence of any detailed study on the energetics of ligand binding, we have studied the thermodynamics of OASS from Salmonella typhimurium (StOASS), Haemophilus influenzae (HiOASS), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtOASS) binding to their substrate O-acetylserine (OAS), substrate analogue (methionine), and product (cysteine). Results Ligand binding properties of three OASS enzymes are studied under defined solution conditions. Both substrate and product binding is an exothermic reaction, but their thermodynamic signatures are very different. Cysteine binding to OASS shows that both enthalpy and entropy contribute significantly to the binding free energy at all temperatures (10-30°C) examined. The analyses of interaction between OASS with OAS (substrate) or methionine (substrate analogue) revealed a completely different mode of binding. Binding of both OAS and methionine to OASS is dominated by a favorable entropy change, with minor contribution from enthalpy change (ΔHSt-Met = -1.5 ± 0.1 kJ/mol; TΔSSt-Met = 8.2 kJ/mol) at 20°C. Our salt dependent ligand binding studies indicate that methionine binding affinity is more sensitive to [NaCl] as compared to cysteine affinity. Conclusions We show that OASS from three different pathogenic bacteria bind substrate and product through two different mechanisms. Results indicate that predominantly entropy driven methionine binding is

  16. Squeezing at entrance of proton transport pathway in proton-translocating pyrophosphatase upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Tzu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Lin, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yen-Wei; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lee, Ching-Hung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Pan, Rong-Long

    2013-07-05

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) is indispensable for many organisms in maintaining organellar pH homeostasis. This unique proton pump couples the hydrolysis of PPi to proton translocation across the membrane. H(+)-PPase consists of 14-16 relatively hydrophobic transmembrane domains presumably for proton translocation and hydrophilic loops primarily embedding a catalytic site. Several highly conserved polar residues located at or near the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase are essential for proton pumping activity. In this investigation single molecule FRET was employed to dissect the action at the pathway entrance in homodimeric Clostridium tetani H(+)-PPase upon ligand binding. The presence of the substrate analog, imidodiphosphate mediated two sites at the pathway entrance moving toward each other. Moreover, single molecule FRET analyses after the mutation at the first proton-carrying residue (Arg-169) demonstrated that conformational changes at the entrance are conceivably essential for the initial step of H(+)-PPase proton translocation. A working model is accordingly proposed to illustrate the squeeze at the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase upon substrate binding.

  17. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  18. Contribution of Gln9 and Phe80 to substrate binding in ribonuclease MC1 from bitter gourd seeds.

    PubMed

    Numata, T; Kimura, M

    2001-11-01

    Ribonuclease MC1 (RNase MC1) isolated from bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) seeds specifically cleaves phosphodiester bonds on the 5'-side of uridine. The crystal structures of RNase MC1 in complex with 2'-UMP or 3'-UMP reveal that Gln9, Asn71, Leu73, and Phe80 are involved in uridine binding by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions [Suzuki et al. (2000) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 275, 572-576]. To evaluate the contribution of Gln9 and Phe80 to uridine binding, Gln9 was replaced with Ala, Phe, Glu, or His, and Phe80 with Ala by site-directed mutagenesis. The kinetic properties of the resulting mutant enzymes were characterized using cytidylyl-3',5'-uridine (CpU) as a substrate. The mutant Q9A exhibited a 3.7-fold increased K(m) and 27.6-fold decreased k(cat), while three other mutations, Q9F, Q9E, and Q9H, predominantly affected the k(cat) value. Replacing Phe80 with Ala drastically reduced the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) with a minimum K(m) value equal to 8 mM. It was further found that the hydrolytic activities of the mutants toward cytidine-2',3'-cyclic monophosphate (cCMP) were reduced. These results demonstrate that Gln9 and Phe80 play essential roles not only in uridine binding but also in hydrolytic activity. Moreover, we produced double Ala substituted mutants at Gln9, Asn71, Leu73, and Phe80, and compared their kinetic properties with those of the corresponding single mutants. The results suggest that these four residues may contribute to uridine binding in a mutually independent manner.

  19. Structures of 5-Methylthioribose Kinase Reveal Substrate Specificity and Unusual Mode of Nucleotide Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Cornell, K.; Riscoe, M.; Behr, J.; Guillerm, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is ubiquitous in all organisms, but metabolic variations exist between bacteria and mammals. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme in methionine salvage in bacteria and the absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that it is a good target for the design of novel antibiotics. The structures of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis MTR kinase, as well as its ADP, ADP-PO4, AMPPCP, and AMPPCP-MTR complexes have been determined. MTR kinase has a bilobal eukaryotic protein kinase fold but exhibits a number of unique features. The protein lacks the DFG motif typically found at the beginning of the activation loop and instead coordinates magnesium via a DXE motif (Asp{sup 250}-Glu{sup 252}). In addition, the glycine-rich loop of the protein, analogous to the 'Gly triad' in protein kinases, does not interact extensively with the nucleotide. The MTR substrate-binding site consists of Asp{sup 233} of the catalytic HGD motif, a novel twin arginine motif (Arg{sup 340}/Arg{sup 341}), and a semi-conserved W-loop, which appears to regulate MTR binding specificity. No lobe closure is observed for MTR kinase upon substrate binding. This is probably because the enzyme lacks the lobe closure/inducing interactions between the C-lobe of the protein and the ribosyl moiety of the nucleotide that are typically responsible for lobe closure in protein kinases. The current structures suggest that MTR kinase has a dissociative mechanism.

  20. A substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-07-05

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp(590) and Tyr(628) and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes.

  1. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  2. Specificity profiling of dual specificity phosphatase vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) reveals two distinct substrate binding modes.

    PubMed

    Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Taha, Hashem A; Vyas, Shubham; Guan, Xiaoyan; Freitas, Michael A; Hadad, Christopher M; Pei, Dehua

    2013-03-01

    Vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) is a dual specificity phosphatase that consists of only a single catalytic domain. Although several protein substrates have been identified for VHR, the elements that control the in vivo substrate specificity of this enzyme remain unclear. In this work, the in vitro substrate specificity of VHR was systematically profiled by screening combinatorial peptide libraries. VHR exhibits more stringent substrate specificity than classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases and recognizes two distinct classes of Tyr(P) peptides. The class I substrates are similar to the Tyr(P) motifs derived from the VHR protein substrates, having sequences of (D/E/ϕ)(D/S/N/T/E)(P/I/M/S/A/V)pY(G/A/S/Q) or (D/E/ϕ)(T/S)(D/E)pY(G/A/S/Q) (where ϕ is a hydrophobic amino acid and pY is phosphotyrosine). The class II substrates have the consensus sequence of (V/A)P(I/L/M/V/F)X1-6pY (where X is any amino acid) with V/A preferably at the N terminus of the peptide. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies suggest that the class II peptides bind to VHR in an opposite orientation relative to the canonical binding mode of the class I substrates. In this alternative binding mode, the Tyr(P) side chain binds to the active site pocket, but the N terminus of the peptide interacts with the carboxylate side chain of Asp(164), which normally interacts with the Tyr(P) + 3 residue of a class I substrate. Proteins containing the class II motifs are efficient VHR substrates in vitro, suggesting that VHR may act on a novel class of yet unidentified Tyr(P) proteins in vivo.

  3. Localization of the substrate and oxalacetate binding site of succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kenney, W C; Mowery, P C; Seng, R L; Singer, T P

    1976-04-25

    Succinate dehydrogenase is composed of two subunits, one of molecular weight 70,000, containing FAD in covalent linkage to a histidyl residue of the polypeptide chain, the other subunit of molecular weight 30,000. The fact that substrate, substrate analogs, and oxalacetate prevent inactivation of the enzyme by thiol-specific agents indicates that a thiol group must be present in close proximity to the flavin. Comparison of the incorporation of radioactivity into each subunit in the presence and absence of succinate or malonate shows that both substrate and competitive inhibitors protect a sulfhydryl group of the 70,000-molecular weight subunit. This indicates that a thiol group of the flavoprotein subunit is part of the active site. Similar investigations using oxalacetate as a protecting agent indicate that the tight binding of oxalacetate to the deactivated enzyme also occurs in the flavoprotein subunit, and may involve the same thiol group which is protected by succinate from alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide. It is clear, therefore, that not only the flavin site but also an essential thiol residue are located in the 70,000-molecular weight subunit. A second thiol group, located in the 30,000-molecular weight subunit, also binds N-ethylmaleimide covalently under similar conditions, without being part of the active site. Succinate, malonate, and oxalacetate do not influence the binding of this inhibitor to the thiol group of the lower molecular weight subunit. Using maleimide derivatives of nitroxide-type spin labels, it has been possible to demonstrate the presence of two types of thiol groups in the enzyme which form covalent derivatives with the spin probe. When the enzyme is treated with an equimolar quantity of the spin probe, a largely isotropic electron spin resonance spectrum is obtained, indicating a high probe mobility. When this site is first blocked by treating the enzyme with an equimolar quantity of N-ethylmaleimide, followed by an equimolar amount of

  4. Structural Dynamics of the Heterodimeric ABC Transporter TM287/288 Induced by ATP and Substrate Binding.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tadaomi; Sato, Yukiko; Sakurai, Minoru

    2016-12-06

    TM287/288 is a heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, which harnesses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to transport a wide variety of molecules through the transmembrane domains (TMDs) by alternating inward- and outward-facing conformations. Here, we conducted multiple 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations of TM287/288 in different ATP- and substrate-bound states to elucidate the effects of ATP and substrate binding. As a result, the binding of two ATP molecules to the NBDs induced the formation of the consensus ATP-binding pocket (ABP2) or the NBD dimerization, whereas these processes did not occur in the presence of a single ATP molecule or when the protein was in its apo state. Moreover, binding of the substrate to the TMDs enhanced the formation of ABP2 through allosteric TMD-NBD communication. Furthermore, in the apo state, α-helical subdomains of the NBDs approached each other, acquiring a conformation with core half-pockets exposed to the solvent, appropriate for ATP binding. We propose a "core-exposed" model for this novel conformation found in the apo state of ABC transporters. These findings provide important insights into the structural dynamics of ABC transporters.

  5. Affinity electrophoresis as a method for determining substrate-binding specificity of carbohydrate-active enzymes for soluble polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is a simple and rapid tool for the analysis of protein-binding affinities to soluble polysaccharides. This approach is particularly suitable for the characterization of the carbohydrate-active enzymes that contain a carbohydrate-binding module and for their mutants and chimeras. Knowledge of the binding characteristics of these enzymes can be the first step to elucidate the enzymatic activity of a putative enzyme; moreover in some cases, enzymes are able to bind polysaccharides targets other than their specified substrate, and this knowledge can be essential to understand the basics of the intrinsic mechanism of these enzymes in their natural environment.

  6. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Mortensen, Jonas Sigurd; Geiger, Michel-Andreas; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Gether, Ulrik; Teilum, Kaare; Loland, Claus J

    2017-01-01

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been heavily debated. Here we used solid state NMR to specifically characterize the bound leucine ligand and probe the number of binding sites in LeuT. We were able to produce high-quality NMR spectra of substrate bound to microcrystalline LeuT samples and identify one set of sodium-dependent substrate-specific chemical shifts. Furthermore, our data show that the binding site mutants F253A and L400S, which probe the major S1 binding site and the proposed S2 binding site, respectively, retain sodium-dependent substrate binding in the S1 site similar to the wild-type protein. We conclude that under our experimental conditions there is only one detectable leucine molecule bound to LeuT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19314.001 PMID:28117663

  7. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Mortensen, Jonas Sigurd; Geiger, Michel-Andreas; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Gether, Ulrik; Teilum, Kaare; Loland, Claus J

    2017-01-24

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been heavily debated. Here we used solid state NMR to specifically characterize the bound leucine ligand and probe the number of binding sites in LeuT. We were able to produce high-quality NMR spectra of substrate bound to microcrystalline LeuT samples and identify one set of sodium-dependent substrate-specific chemical shifts. Furthermore, our data show that the binding site mutants F253A and L400S, which probe the major S1 binding site and the proposed S2 binding site, respectively, retain sodium-dependent substrate binding in the S1 site similar to the wild-type protein. We conclude that under our experimental conditions there is only one detectable leucine molecule bound to LeuT.

  8. Structural modelling of substrate binding and inhibition in penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Avinash, V S; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C G; Pundle, Archana V; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar

    2013-08-09

    Penicillin V acylases (PVAs) and bile salt hydrolases (BSHs) have considerable sequence and structural similarity; however, they vary significantly in their substrate specificity. We have identified a PVA from a Gram-negative organism, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA) that turned out to be a remote homolog of the PVAs and BSHs reported earlier. Even though the active site residues were conserved in PaPVA it showed high specificity towards penV and interestingly the penV acylase activity was inhibited by bile salts. Comparative modelling and docking studies were carried out to understand the structural differences of the binding site that confer this characteristic property. We show that PaPVA exhibits significant differences in structure, which are in contrast to those of known PVAs and such enzymes from Gram-negative bacteria require further investigation.

  9. Biochemical and Crystallographic Analysis of Substrate Binding and Conformational Changes in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Reger,A.; Carney, J.; Gulick, A.

    2007-01-01

    The adenylate-forming enzymes, including acyl-CoA synthetases, the adenylation domains of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and firefly luciferase, perform two half-reactions in a ping-pong mechanism. We have proposed a domain alternation mechanism for these enzymes whereby, upon completion of the initial adenylation reaction, the C-terminal domain of these enzymes undergoes a 140{sup o} rotation to perform the second thioester-forming half-reaction. Structural and kinetic data of mutant enzymes support this hypothesis. We present here mutations to Salmonella enterica acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and test the ability of the enzymes to catalyze the complete reaction and the adenylation half-reaction. Substitution of Lys609 with alanine results in an enzyme that is unable to catalyze the adenylate reaction, while the Gly524 to leucine substitution is unable to catalyze the complete reaction yet catalyzes the adenylation half-reaction with activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The positions of these two residues, which are located on the mobile C-terminal domain, strongly support the domain alternation hypothesis. We also present steady-state kinetic data of putative substrate-binding residues and demonstrate that no single residue plays a dominant role in dictating CoA binding. We have also created two mutations in the active site to alter the acyl substrate specificity. Finally, the crystallographic structures of wild-type Acs and mutants R194A, R584A, R584E, K609A, and V386A are presented to support the biochemical analysis.

  10. Successful prediction of substrate-binding pocket in SLC17 transporter sialin.

    PubMed

    Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Anne, Christine; Prescher, Horst; Ruivo, Raquel; Sagné, Corinne; Debacker, Cécile; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Brossmer, Reinhard; Acher, Francine; Gasnier, Bruno

    2012-03-30

    Secondary active transporters from the SLC17 protein family are required for excitatory and purinergic synaptic transmission, sialic acid metabolism, and renal function, and several members are associated with inherited neurological or metabolic diseases. However, molecular tools to investigate their function or correct their genetic defects are limited or absent. Using structure-activity, homology modeling, molecular docking, and mutagenesis studies, we have located the substrate-binding site of sialin (SLC17A5), a lysosomal sialic acid exporter also recently implicated in exocytotic release of aspartate. Human sialin is defective in two inherited sialic acid storage diseases and is responsible for metabolic incorporation of the dietary nonhuman sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid. We built cytosol-open and lumen-open three-dimensional models of sialin based on weak, but significant, sequence similarity with the glycerol-3-phosphate and fucose permeases from Escherichia coli, respectively. Molecular docking of 31 synthetic sialic acid analogues to both models was consistent with inhibition studies. Narrowing the sialic acid-binding site in the cytosol-open state by two phenylalanine to tyrosine mutations abrogated recognition of the most active analogue without impairing neuraminic acid transport. Moreover, a pilot virtual high-throughput screening of the cytosol-open model could identify a pseudopeptide competitive inhibitor showing >100-fold higher affinity than the natural substrate. This validated model of human sialin and sialin-guided models of other SLC17 transporters should pave the way for the identification of inhibitors, glycoengineering tools, pharmacological chaperones, and fluorescent false neurotransmitters targeted to these proteins.

  11. ALKBH7 Variant Related to Prostate Cancer Exhibits Altered Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Tina A.; Podolsky, Robert H.; Dyson, Gregory; Cisneros, Gerardo Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The search for prostate cancer biomarkers has received increased attention and several DNA repair related enzymes have been linked to this dysfunction. Here we report a targeted search for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and functional impact characterization of human ALKBH family dioxygenases related to prostate cancer. Our results uncovered a SNP of ALKBH7, rs7540, which is associated with prostate cancer disease in a statistically significantly manner in two separate cohorts, and maintained in African American men. Comparisons of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the wild-type and variant protein structures indicate that the resulting alteration in the enzyme induces a significant structural change that reduces ALKBH7’s ability to bind its cosubstrate. Experimental spectroscopy studies with purified proteins validate our MD predictions and corroborate the conclusion that this cancer-associated mutation affects productive cosubstrate binding in ALKBH7. PMID:28231280

  12. Structures of Two Coronavirus Main Proteases: Implications for Substrate Binding and Antiviral Drug Design

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongwei; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Fei; Wu, Zhixin; Shen, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhe; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe

    2008-07-21

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can infect humans and multiple species of animals, causing a wide spectrum of diseases. The coronavirus main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for anti-CoV drug design. In this study, the crystal structures of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) MP{sup pro} and a severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) M{sup pro} mutant (H41A), in complex with an N-terminal autocleavage substrate, were individually determined to elucidate the structural flexibility and substrate binding of M{sup pro}. A monomeric form of IBV M{sup pro} was identified for the first time in CoV M{sup pro} structures. A comparison of these two structures to other available M{sup pro} structures provides new insights for the design of substrate-based inhibitors targeting CoV M{sup pro}s. Furthermore, a Michael acceptor inhibitor (named N3) was cocrystallized with IBV M{sup pro} and was found to demonstrate in vitro inactivation of IBV M{sup pro} and potent antiviral activity against IBV in chicken embryos. This provides a feasible animal model for designing wide-spectrum inhibitors against CoV-associated diseases. The structure-based optimization of N3 has yielded two more efficacious lead compounds, N27 and H16, with potent inhibition against SARS-CoV M{sup pro}.

  13. Effect of Mutation and Substrate Binding on the Stability of Cytochrome P450BM3 Variants.

    PubMed

    Geronimo, Inacrist; Denning, Catherine A; Rogers, W Eric; Othman, Thaer; Huxford, Tom; Heidary, David K; Glazer, Edith C; Payne, Christina M

    2016-06-28

    Cytochrome P450BM3 is a heme-containing enzyme from Bacillus megaterium that exhibits high monooxygenase activity and has a self-sufficient electron transfer system in the full-length enzyme. Its potential synthetic applications drive protein engineering efforts to produce variants capable of oxidizing nonnative substrates such as pharmaceuticals and aromatic pollutants. However, promiscuous P450BM3 mutants often exhibit lower stability, thereby hindering their industrial application. This study demonstrated that the heme domain R47L/F87V/L188Q/E267V/F81I pentuple mutant (PM) is destabilized because of the disruption of hydrophobic contacts and salt bridge interactions. This was directly observed from crystal structures of PM in the presence and absence of ligands (palmitic acid and metyrapone). The instability of the tertiary structure and heme environment of substrate-free PM was confirmed by pulse proteolysis and circular dichroism, respectively. Binding of the inhibitor, metyrapone, significantly stabilized PM, but the presence of the native substrate, palmitic acid, had no effect. On the basis of high-temperature molecular dynamics simulations, the lid domain, β-sheet 1, and Cys ligand loop (a β-bulge segment connected to the heme) are the most labile regions and, thus, potential sites for stabilizing mutations. Possible approaches to stabilization include improvement of hydrophobic packing interactions in the lid domain and introduction of new salt bridges into β-sheet 1 and the heme region. An understanding of the molecular factors behind the loss of stability of P450BM3 variants therefore expedites site-directed mutagenesis studies aimed at developing thermostability.

  14. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  15. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  16. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  17. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  18. Redesign of substrate specificity and identification of aminoglycoside binding residues of Eis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Benjamin C.; Labby, Kristin J.; Green, Keith D.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The upsurge of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is an emerging global problem. Increased expression of the enhanced intracellular survival (Eis) protein is responsible for clinical resistance to aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Eis from M. tuberculosis (Eis_Mtb) and from M. smegmatis (Eis_Msm) both function as acetyltransferases capable of acetylating multiple amines of many AGs; however, these Eis homologs differ in AG substrate preference and number of acetylated amine groups per AG. The AG binding cavity of Eis_Mtb is divided into two narrow channels, whereas Eis_Msm contains one large cavity. Five bulky residues lining one of the AG binding channels of Eis_Mtb, His119, Ile268, Trp289, Gln291, and Glu401, have significantly smaller counterparts in Eis_Msm, Thr119, Gly266, Ala287, Ala289, and Gly401, respectively. To identify the residue(s) responsible for AG binding in Eis_Mtb and functional differences from Eis_Msm, we have generated single, double, triple, quadruple, and quintuple mutants of these residues in Eis_Mtb into their Eis_Msm counterparts and tested their acetylation activity with three structurally diverse AGs: kanamycin A (KAN), paromomyin (PAR), and apramycin (APR). We show that the penultimate C-terminal residue Glu401 plays a critical role in the overall activity of Eis_Mtb. We also demonstrate that the identities of residues Ile268, Trp289, and Gln291 (in Eis_Mtb nomenclature) dictate the differences between acetylation efficiencies of Eis_Mtb and Eis_Msm for KAN and PAR. Finally, we show that the mutation of Trp289 in Eis_Mtb into Ala plays a role in APR acetylation. PMID:23837529

  19. Mannose-binding lectin may affect pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Çalkavur, Şebnem; Erdemir, Gülin; Onay, Hüseyin; Altun Köroğlu, Özge; Yalaz, Mehmet; Zekioğlu, Osman; Aksu, Güzide; Özkınay, Ferda; Akercan, Fuat; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system and acts as a complement activator through the lectin pathway. Genetic variations of MBL and low MBL levels cause several infection problems, which may also be related to pregnancy problems. We aimed to investigate the role of MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels in pregnancy problems and premature delivery. In this prospective study, MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels were studied in 45 mothers who delivered earlier than 35 gestational weeks. The frequency of MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B was much higher (homozygous 4.4% and heterozygous 33.3%) in the study group mothers than the previously reported frequency in the healthy Turkish population (homozygous 2-6%, heterozygous 12-20%). MBL variant allele B frequency was closely related to low MBL levels (<0.1 μg/ml), vaginitis and increased IL-6 levels. The median MBL levels were lower than the critical level of 0.1 μg/ ml in study mothers who had recurrent miscarriage, infertility, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm premature rupture of membranes with duration of longer than 72 hours, tocolysis, histological chorioamnionitis, urinary tract infection and vaginitis. MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B is related to low serum MBL levels, increased IL-6 levels, genitourinary infections and may cause pregnancy-related problems such as infertility, recurrent miscarriage and preterm delivery.

  20. To be, or not to be two sites: that is the question about LeuT substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Nicolas; Tavoulari, Sotiria

    2011-10-01

    Transport proteins of the neurotransmitter sodium symporter (NSS) family regulate the extracellular concentration of several neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The only member of this family for which atomic-resolution structural data are available is the prokaryotic homologue LeuT. This protein has been used as a model system to study the molecular mechanism of transport of the NSS family. In this Journal Club, we discuss two strikingly different LeuT transport mechanisms: one involving a single high-affinity substrate binding site and one recently proposed alternative involving two high-affinity substrate binding sites that are allosterically coupled.

  1. The adsorption of substrate-binding domain of PHB depolymerases to the surface of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid).

    PubMed

    Shinomiya, M; Iwata, T; Doi, Y

    1998-04-01

    The binding characteristic of PHB depolymerase has been studied by using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with substrate-binding domain of three bacterial PHB depolymerases, Alcaligenes faecalis, Comamonas acidovorans and Comamonas testosteroni. Analysis using immuno-gold labeling technique and transmission electron microscopy indicated that a novel GST fusion protein derived from A. Faecalis enzyme adsorbed to the surface of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (P(3HB)) single crystals like other fusion proteins. Comparison of inhibiting degree of P(3HB) powder hydrolysis activity of PHB depolymerase by fusion proteins indicated that three fusion proteins bind to P(3HB) powder in the same degree. The measurement of the surface hydrophobicity of proteins suggests that the interaction of the substrate-binding domain with insoluble P(3HB) may include not only a hydrophobic effect but also molecule-specific contacts.

  2. Removal of the four C-terminal glycine-rich repeats enhances the thermostability and substrate binding affinity of barley beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y F; Eglinton, J K; Evans, D E; Logue, S J; Langridge, P

    2000-11-07

    Barley beta-amylase undergoes proteolytic cleavage in the C-terminal region after germination. The implication of the cleavage in the enzyme's characteristics is unclear. With purified native beta-amylases from both mature barley grain and germinated barley, we found that the beta-amylase from germinated barley had significantly higher thermostability and substrate binding affinity for starch than that from mature barley grain. To better understand the effect of the proteolytic cleavage on the enzyme's thermostability and substrate binding affinity for starch, recombinant barley beta-amylases with specific deletions at the C-terminal tail were generated. The complete deletion of the four C-terminal glycine-rich repeats significantly increased the enzyme's thermostability, but an incomplete deletion with one repeat remaining did not change the thermostability. Although different C-terminal deletions affect the thermostability differently, they all increased the enzyme's affinity for starch. The possible reasons for the increased thermostability and substrate binding affinity, due to the removal of the four C-terminal glycine-rich repeats, are discussed in terms of the three-dimensional structure of beta-amylase.

  3. The crystal structure of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase in complex with spermine provides insights into substrate binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Eric J; Hoffman, David W

    2008-09-02

    The enzyme spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) catalyzes the transfer of acetyl groups from acetylcoenzyme A to spermidine and spermine, as part of a polyamine degradation pathway. This work describes the crystal structure of SSAT in complex with coenzyme A, with and without bound spermine. The complex with spermine provides a direct view of substrate binding by an SSAT and demonstrates structural plasticity near the active site of the enzyme. Associated water molecules bridge several of the intermolecular contacts between spermine and the enzyme and form a "proton wire" between the side chain of Glu92 and the N1 amine of spermine. A single water molecule can also be seen forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of Glu92, Asp93, and the N4 amine of spermine. Site-directed mutation of Glu92 to glutamine had a detrimental effect on both substrate binding and catalysis and shifted the optimal pH for enzyme activity further into alkaline solution conditions, while mutation of Asp93 to asparagine affected both substrate binding and catalysis without changing the pH dependence of the enzyme. Considered together, the structural and kinetic data suggest that Glu92 functions as a catalytic base to drive an otherwise unfavorable deprotonation step at physiological pH.

  4. The second-shell metal ligands of human arginase affect coordination of the nucleophile and substrate.

    PubMed

    Stone, Everett M; Chantranupong, Lynne; Georgiou, George

    2010-12-14

    The active sites of eukaryotic arginase enzymes are strictly conserved, especially the first- and second-shell ligands that coordinate the two divalent metal cations that generate a hydroxide molecule for nucleophilic attack on the guanidinium carbon of l-arginine and the subsequent production of urea and l-ornithine. Here by using comprehensive pairwise saturation mutagenesis of the first- and second-shell metal ligands in human arginase I, we demonstrate that several metal binding ligands are actually quite tolerant to amino acid substitutions. Of >2800 double mutants of first- and second-shell residues analyzed, we found more than 80 unique amino acid substitutions, of which four were in first-shell residues. Remarkably, certain second-shell mutations could modulate the binding of both the nucleophilic water/hydroxide molecule and substrate or product ligands, resulting in activity greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. The data presented here constitute the first comprehensive saturation mutagenesis analysis of a metallohydrolase active site and reveal that the strict conservation of the second-shell metal binding residues in eukaryotic arginases does not reflect kinetic optimization of the enzyme during the course of evolution.

  5. Molecular dynamics investigations of regioselectivity of anionic/aromatic substrates by a family of enzymes: a case study of diclofenac binding in CYP2C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying-Lu; Xu, Fang; Wu, Rongling

    2016-06-29

    The CYP2C subfamily is of particular importance in the metabolism of drugs, food toxins, and procarcinogens. Like other P450 subfamilies, 2C enzymes share a high sequence identity, but significantly contribute in different ways to hepatic capacity to metabolize drugs. They often metabolize the same substrate to more than one product with different catalytic sites. Because it is challenging to characterize experimentally, much still remains unknown about the reason for why the substrate regioselectivity of these closely related subfamily members is different. Here, we have investigated the structural features of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 bound with their shared substrate diclofenac to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism for the substrate regioselectivity of CYP2C subfamily enzymes. The obtained results demonstrate how a sequence divergence for the active site residues causes heterogeneous variations in the secondary structures and in major tunnel selections, and further affects the shape and chemical properties of the substrate-binding site. Structural analysis and free energy calculations showed that the most important determinants of regioselectivity among the CYP2C isoforms are the geometrical features of the active sites, as well as the hydrogen bonds and the hydrophobic interactions, mainly presenting as the various locations of Arg108 and substitutions of Phe205 for Ile205 in CYP2C8. The MM-GB/SA calculations combined with PMF results accord well with the experimental KM values, bridging the gap between the theory and the experimentally observed results of binding affinity differences. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of CYP2C subfamily enzymes, the knowledge of ligand binding characteristics and key residue contributions could guide future experimental and computational work on the synthesis of drugs with better pharmacokinetic properties so that CYP interactions could be avoided.

  6. Phosphoenolpyruvate- and ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinases: covalent substrate-binding and kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F; Siebold, Christian; Nyffeler, Therese Lüthi; Flükiger-Brühwiler, Karin; Schneider, Philipp; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Baumann, Ulrich; Erni, Bernhard

    2004-10-19

    Dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases are a sequence-conserved family of enzymes, which utilize two different phosphoryldonors, ATP in animals, plants, and some bacteria, and a multiphosphoprotein of the phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) in most bacteria. Here, we compare the PTS-dependent kinase of Escherichia coli and the ATP-dependent kinase of Citrobacter freundii. They display 30% sequence identity. The binding constants of the E. coli kinase for eleven short-chain carbonyl compounds were determined by acetone precipitation of the enzyme-substrate complexes. They are 3.4 microM for Dha, 780 microM for Dha-phosphate (DhaP), 50 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde (GA), and 90 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. The k(cat) for Dha of the PTS-dependent kinase is 290 min(-1), and that of the ATP-dependent kinase is 1050 min(-1). The Km for Dha of both kinases is <6 microM. The X-ray structures of the enzyme-GA and the enzyme-DhaP complex show that substrates as well as products are bound in hemiaminal linkage to an active-site histidine. Quantum-mechanical calculations offer no indication for activation of the reacting hydroxyl group by the formation of the hemiaminal. However, the formation of the hemiaminal bond allows selection for short-chain carbonyl compounds and discrimination against structurally similar polyols. The Dha kinase remains fully active in the presence of 2 M glycerol, and phosphorylates trace impurities of carbonyl compounds present in glycerol.

  7. Probing of the substrate binding domain of lactose permease by a proton pulse.

    PubMed

    Nachliel, E; Gutman, M

    2001-09-03

    The lactose permease of Escherichia coli coupled proton transfer across the bacterial inner membrane with the uptake of beta-galactosides. In the present study we have used the cysteine-less C148 mutant that was selectively labeled by fluorescein maleimide on the C148 residue, which is an active component of the substrate transporting cavity. Measurements of the protonation dynamics of the bound pH indicator in the time resolved domain allowed us to probe the binding site by a free diffusing proton. The measured signal was reconstructed by numeric integration of differential rate equations that comply with the detailed balance principle and account for all proton transfer reactions taking place in the reaction mixture. This analysis yields the rate constants and pK values of all residues participating in the fast proton transfer reaction between the bulk and the protein's surface, revealing the exposed residues that react with free protons in a diffusion controlled reaction and how they transfer protons among themselves. The magnitudes of these rate constants were finally evaluated by comparison with the rate predicted by the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The analysis of the kinetic and pK values indicated that the protein-fluorescein adduct assumes two conformation states. One is dominant above pH 7.4, while the other exists only below 7.1. In the high pH range, the enzyme assumes a constrained configuration and the rate constant of the reaction of a free diffusing proton with the bound dye is 10 times slower than a diffusion controlled reaction. In this state, the carboxylate moiety of residue E126 is in close proximity to the dye and exchanges a proton with it at a very fast rate. Below pH 7.1, the substrate binding domain is in a relaxed configuration and freely accessed by bulk protons, and the rate of proton exchange between the dye and E126 is 100,000 times slower. The relevance of these observations to the catalytic cycle is discussed.

  8. Flow variation and substrate type affect dislodgement of the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malakauskas, David M.; Wilson, Sarah J.; Wilzbach, Margaret A.; Som, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    We quantified microscale flow forces and their ability to entrain the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, the intermediate host for 2 myxozoan parasites (Ceratomyxa shasta and Parvicapsula minibicornis) that cause substantial mortalities in salmonid fishes in the Pacific Northwest. In a laboratory flume, we measured the shear stress associated with 2 mean flow velocities and 3 substrates and quantified associated dislodgement of polychaetes, evaluated survivorship of dislodged polychaetes, and observed behavioral responses of the polychaetes in response to increased flow. We used a generalized linear mixed model to estimate the probability of polychaete dislodgement for treatment combinations of velocity (mean flow velocity  =  55 cm/s with a shear velocity  =  3 cm/s, mean flow velocity  =  140 cm/s with a shear velocity  =  5 cm/s) and substrate type (depositional sediments and analogs of rock faces and the filamentous alga, Cladophora). Few polychaetes were dislodged at shear velocities <3 cm/s on any substrate. Above this level of shear, probability of dislodgement was strongly affected by both substrate type and velocity. After accounting for substrate, odds of dislodgement were 8× greater at the higher flow. After accounting for velocity, probability of dislodgement was greatest from fine sediments, intermediate from rock faces, and negligible from Cladophora. Survivorship of dislodged polychaetes was high. Polychaetes exhibited a variety of behaviors for avoiding increases in flow, including extrusion of mucus, burrowing into sediments, and movement to lower-flow microhabitats. Our findings suggest that polychaete populations probably exhibit high resilience to flow-mediated disturbances.

  9. Poly (ADP-Ribose) synthetase. Separation and identification of three proteolytic fragments as the substrate-binding domain, the DNA-binding domain, and the automodification domain.

    PubMed

    Kameshita, I; Matsuda, Z; Taniguchi, T; Shizuta, Y

    1984-04-25

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase of Mr = 120,000 is cleaved by limited proteolysis with alpha-chymotrypsin into two fragments of Mr = 54,000 (54K) and Mr = 66,000 (66K). When the native enzyme is modified with 3-(bromoacetyl)pyridine, both portions of the enzyme are alkylated; however, alkylation of the 54K portions of the enzyme is protected by the addition of the substrate, NAD, or its analog, nicotinamide, suggesting that the substrate-binding site is localized in the 54K fragment. When the enzyme previously automodified with a low concentration of [adenine-U-14C] NAD is digested with alpha-chymotrypsin, the radioactivity is detected exclusively in the 66K fragment. The 66K fragment thus labeled is further cleaved with papain into two fragments of Mr = 46,000 and Mr = 22,000. With these two fragments, the label is detected only in the 22K fragment, but not in the 46K fragment. The 46K fragment binds to a DNA-cellulose column with the same affinity as that of the native enzyme, while the 22K fragment and the 54K fragment have little affinity for the DNA ligand. These results indicate that poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase contains three separable domains, the first possessing the site for binding of the substrate, NAD, the second containing the site for binding of DNA, and the third acting as the site(s) for accepting poly(ADP-ribose).

  10. Molecular Interplay between the Dimer Interface and the Substrate-Binding Site of Human Peptidylarginine Deiminase 4

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Yun; Lin, Chu-Cheng; Liu, Yi-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that the fully active form of Peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) should be a dimer and not a monomer. This paper provides a plausible mechanism for the control of PAD4 catalysis by molecular interplay between its dimer-interface loop (I-loop) and its substrate-binding loop (S-loop). Mutagenesis studies revealed that two hydrophobic residues, W347 and V469, are critical for substrate binding at the active site; mutating these two residues led to a severe reduction in the catalytic activity. We also identified several hydrophobic amino acid residues (L6, L279 and V283) at the dimer interface. Ultracentrifugation analysis revealed that interruption of the hydrophobicity of this region decreases dimer formation and, consequently, enzyme activity. Molecular dynamic simulations and mutagenesis studies suggested that the dimer interface and the substrate-binding site of PAD4, which consist of the I-loop and the S-loop, respectively, are responsible for substrate binding and dimer stabilization. We identified five residues with crucial roles in PAD4 catalysis and dimerization: Y435 and R441 in the I-loop, D465 and V469 in the S-loop, and W548, which stabilizes the I-loop via van der Waals interactions with C434 and Y435. The molecular interplay between the S-loop and the I-loop is crucial for PAD4 catalysis. PMID:28209966

  11. How do ADARs bind RNA? New protein-RNA structures illuminate substrate recognition by the RNA editing ADARs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justin M; Beal, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Deamination of adenosine in RNA to form inosine has wide ranging consequences on RNA function including amino acid substitution to give proteins not encoded in the genome. What determines which adenosines in an mRNA are subject to this modification reaction? The answer lies in an understanding of the mechanism and substrate recognition properties of adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). Our recent publication of X-ray crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to RNA editing substrates shed considerable light on how the catalytic domains of these enzymes bind RNA and promote adenosine deamination. Here we review in detail the deaminase domain-RNA contact surfaces and present models of how full length ADARs, bearing double stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) and deaminase domains, could process naturally occurring substrate RNAs.

  12. Tyr-301 Phosphorylation Inhibits Pyruvate Dehydrogenase by Blocking Substrate Binding and Promotes the Warburg Effect*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Shan, Changliang; Elf, Shannon; Lin, Ruiting; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boggon, Titus J.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a crucial role in regulation of glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. PDC flux depends on catalytic activity of the most important enzyme component pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). PDH kinase inactivates PDC by phosphorylating PDH at specific serine residues, including Ser-293, whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase restores PDC activity. The current understanding suggests that Ser-293 phosphorylation of PDH impedes active site accessibility to its substrate pyruvate. Here, we report that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue Tyr-301 also inhibits PDH α 1 (PDHA1) by blocking pyruvate binding through a novel mechanism in addition to Ser-293 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate PDHA1 at Tyr-301, and Tyr-301 phosphorylation of PDHA1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells as well as diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from human patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDHA1 Y301F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at distinct serine and tyrosine residues inhibits PDHA1 through distinct mechanisms to impact active site accessibility, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect. PMID:25104357

  13. Tyr-301 phosphorylation inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase by blocking substrate binding and promotes the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Shan, Changliang; Elf, Shannon; Lin, Ruiting; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Boggon, Titus J; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-09-19

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a crucial role in regulation of glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. PDC flux depends on catalytic activity of the most important enzyme component pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). PDH kinase inactivates PDC by phosphorylating PDH at specific serine residues, including Ser-293, whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase restores PDC activity. The current understanding suggests that Ser-293 phosphorylation of PDH impedes active site accessibility to its substrate pyruvate. Here, we report that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue Tyr-301 also inhibits PDH α 1 (PDHA1) by blocking pyruvate binding through a novel mechanism in addition to Ser-293 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate PDHA1 at Tyr-301, and Tyr-301 phosphorylation of PDHA1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells as well as diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from human patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDHA1 Y301F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at distinct serine and tyrosine residues inhibits PDHA1 through distinct mechanisms to impact active site accessibility, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect.

  14. Monitoring conformational heterogeneity of the lid of DnaK substrate-binding domain during its chaperone cycle.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Peter, Joshua Jebakumar; Kumar, Vignesh; Mapa, Koyeli

    2016-08-01

    DnaK or Hsp70 of Escherichia coli is a master regulator of the bacterial proteostasis network. Allosteric communication between the two functional domains of DnaK, the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and the C-terminal substrate- or peptide-binding domain (SBD) regulate its activity. X-ray crystallography and NMR studies have provided snapshots of distinct conformations of Hsp70 proteins in various physiological states; however, the conformational heterogeneity and dynamics of allostery-driven Hsp70 activity remains underexplored. In this work, we employed single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements to capture distinct intradomain conformational states of a region within the DnaK-SBD known as the lid. Our data conclusively demonstrate prominent conformational heterogeneity of the DnaK lid in ADP-bound states; in contrast, the ATP-bound open conformations are homogeneous. Interestingly, a nonhydrolysable ATP analogue, AMP-PNP, imparts heterogeneity to the lid conformations mimicking the ADP-bound state. The cochaperone DnaJ confers ADP-like heterogeneous lid conformations to DnaK, although the presence of the cochaperone accelerates the substrate-binding rate by a hitherto unknown mechanism. Irrespective of the presence of DnaJ, binding of a peptide substrate to the DnaK-SBD leads to prominent lid closure. Lid closure is only partial upon binding to molten globule-like authentic cellular substrates, probably to accommodate non-native substrate proteins of varied structures.

  15. Conformational changes in inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase upon substrate binding: role of N-terminal lobe and enantiomeric substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Baños-Sanz, José Ignacio; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; Whitfield, Hayley; Hamilton, Chris; Brearley, Charles A; González, Beatriz

    2012-08-24

    Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (IP(5) 2-K) catalyzes the synthesis of inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate from ATP and IP(5). Inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate is implicated in crucial processes such as mRNA export, DNA editing, and phosphorus storage in plants. We previously solved the first structure of an IP(5) 2-K, which shed light on aspects of substrate recognition. However, failure of IP(5) 2-K to crystallize in the absence of inositide prompted us to study putative conformational changes upon substrate binding. We have made mutations to residues on a region of the protein that produces a clasp over the active site. A W129A mutant allowed us to capture IP(5) 2-K in its different conformations by crystallography. Thus, the IP(5) 2-K apo-form structure displays an open conformation, whereas the nucleotide-bound form shows a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the inositide-bound form obtained previously in a closed conformation. Both nucleotide and inositide binding produce large conformational changes that can be understood as two rigid domain movements, although local changes were also observed. Changes in intrinsic fluorescence upon nucleotide and inositide binding are in agreement with the crystallographic findings. Our work suggests that the clasp might be involved in enzyme kinetics, with the N-terminal lobe being essential for inositide binding and subsequent conformational changes. We also show how IP(5) 2-K discriminates between inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate enantiomers and that substrate preference can be manipulated by Arg(130) mutation. Altogether, these results provide a framework for rational design of specific inhibitors with potential applications as biological tools for in vivo studies, which could assist in the identification of novel roles for IP(5) 2-K in mammals.

  16. Do circadian genes and ambient temperature affect substrate-borne signalling during Drosophila courtship?

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Izarne; Casal, José; Fabre, Caroline C. G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Courtship vibratory signals can be air-borne or substrate-borne. They convey distinct and species-specific information from one individual to its prospective partner. Here, we study the substrate-borne vibratory signals generated by the abdominal quivers of the Drosophila male during courtship; these vibrations travel through the ground towards courted females and coincide with female immobility. It is not known which physical parameters of the vibrations encode the information that is received by the females and induces them to pause. We examined the intervals between each vibratory pulse, a feature that was reported to carry information for animal communication. We were unable to find evidence of periodic variations in the lengths of these intervals, as has been reported for fly acoustical signals. Because it was suggested that the genes involved in the circadian clock may also regulate shorter rhythms, we search for effects of period on the interval lengths. Males that are mutant for the period gene produced vibrations with significantly altered interpulse intervals; also, treating wild type males with constant light results in similar alterations to the interpulse intervals. Our results suggest that both the clock and light/dark cycles have input into the interpulse intervals of these vibrations. We wondered if we could alter the interpulse intervals by other means, and found that ambient temperature also had a strong effect. However, behavioural analysis suggests that only extreme ambient temperatures can affect the strong correlation between female immobility and substrate-borne vibrations. PMID:26519517

  17. Binding of polychlorinated biphenyls to aquatic humic substances: The role of substrate and sorbate properties on partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhle, M.E.; Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.R.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1999-01-01

    Two ortho- (2,2',5 and 2,2',5,6') and a non-ortho- (3,3',4,4') substituted polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were used to study the effects of sorbate structure in binding processes to two lacustrine fulvic acids. Binding constants were determined by solubility enhancement of the solutes by the fulvic acids. The binding of the ortho-trichlorobiphenyl was significantly less than the non-ortho-substituted tetrachlorobiphenyl to both fulvic acids. Surprisingly, the measured ortho-trichlorobiphenyl binding constant to both fulvic acids was approximately the same as the ortho- substituted tetrachlorobiphenyl. The effect of the chlorines in the ortho position inhibits free rotation around the 1,1' carbon bond, thereby making the molecule less able to interact effectively with the fulvic acid substrate relative to its non-ortho-substituted congeners. Finally, binding of all three PCBs to the Great Dismal Swamp fulvic acid was significantly higher than for the Pony Lake sample. This observation is attributable to the former substrate's higher degree of aromaticity and polarizability, which can potentially interact more favorably with the PCBs through an increase in van der Waals type interactions.Two ortho- (2,2???,5 and 2,2???,5,6???) and a non-ortho- (3,3???,4,4???) substituted polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were used to study the effects of sorbate structure in binding processes to two lacustrine fulvic acids. Binding constants were determined by solubility enhancement of the solutes by the fulvic acids. The binding of the ortho-trichlorobiphenyl was significantly less than the non-ortho-substituted tetrachlorobiphenyl to both fulvic acids. Surprisingly, the measured ortho-trichlorobiphenyl binding constant to both fulvic acids was approximately the same as the ortho-substituted tetrachlorobiphenyl. The effect of the chlorines in the ortho position inhibits free rotation around the 1,1??? carbon bond, thereby making the molecule less able to interact

  18. Structure and function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: role of critical amino acids in co-substrate binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Anupam; Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Mukherjee, Prasenjit K; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2009-01-01

    The malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal glycine motif, which forms a characteristic Rossman dinucleotide-binding fold in the co-substrate binding pocket, differentiates PfMDH (GlyXGlyXXGly) from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic malate dehydrogenases (GlyXXGlyXXGly). The amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket are completely conserved in MDHs from different species of human, primate and rodent malaria parasites. Based on this knowledge and conserved domains among prokaryotic and eukaryotic MDH, the role of critical amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket was analyzed in catalytic functions of PfMDH using site-directed mutagenesis. Insertion of Ala at the 9th or 10th position, which converts the N-terminal GlyXGlyXXGly motif (characteristic of malarial MDH and LDH) to GlyXXGlyXXGly (as in bacterial and eukaryotic MDH), uncoupled regulation of the enzyme through substrate inhibition. The dinucleotide fold GlyXGlyXXGly motif seems not to be responsible for the distinct affinity of PfMDH to 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (APAD, a synthetic analog of NAD), since Ala9 and Ala10 insertion mutants still utilized APADH. The Gln11Met mutation, which converts the signature glycine motif in PfMDH to that of PfLDH, did not change the enzyme function. However, the Gln11Gly mutant showed approximately a 5-fold increase in catalytic activity, and higher susceptibility to inhibition with gossypol. Asn119 and His174 participate in binding of both co-substrate and substrate. The Asn119Gly mutant exhibited approximately a 3-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency, while mutation of His174 to Asn or Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. These studies provide critical insights into the co-substrate

  19. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  20. The response of an egg parasitoid to substrate-borne semiochemicals is affected by previous experience

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Ezio; Salerno, Gianandrea; Slimani, Takoua; Frati, Francesca; Conti, Eric; Colazza, Stefano; Cusumano, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Animals can adjust their behaviour according to previous experience gained during foraging. In parasitoids, experience plays a key role in host location, a hierarchical process in which air-borne and substrate-borne semiochemicals are used to find hosts. In nature, chemical traces deposited by herbivore hosts when walking on the plant are adsorbed by leaf surfaces and perceived as substrate-borne semiochemicals by parasitoids. Chemical traces left on cabbage leaves by adults of the harlequin bug (Murgantia histrionica) induce an innate arrestment response in the egg parasitoid Trissolcus brochymenae characterized by an intense searching behaviour on host-contaminated areas. Here we investigated whether the T. brochymenae response to host walking traces left on leaf surfaces is affected by previous experience in the context of parasitoid foraging behaviour. We found that: 1) an unrewarded experience (successive encounters with host-contaminated areas without successful oviposition) decreased the intensity of the parasitoid response; 2) a rewarded experience (successful oviposition) acted as a reinforcing stimulus; 3) the elapsed time between two consecutive unrewarded events affected the parasitoid response in a host-gender specific manner. The ecological role of these results to the host location process of egg parasitoids is discussed. PMID:27250870

  1. Hsp70 Oligomerization Is Mediated by an Interaction between the Interdomain Linker and the Substrate-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Francesco A.; Dhulesia, Anne; Stengel, Florian; Roodveldt, Cintia; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Tortora, Paolo; Robinson, Carol V.; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M.; Cremades, Nunilo

    2013-01-01

    Oligomerization in the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 family has been extensively documented both in vitro and in vivo, although the mechanism, the identity of the specific protein regions involved and the physiological relevance of this process are still unclear. We have studied the oligomeric properties of a series of human Hsp70 variants by means of nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy and quantitative size exclusion chromatography. Our results show that Hsp70 oligomerization takes place through a specific interaction between the interdomain linker of one molecule and the substrate-binding domain of a different molecule, generating dimers and higher-order oligomers. We have found that substrate binding shifts the oligomerization equilibrium towards the accumulation of functional monomeric protein, probably by sequestering the helical lid sub-domain needed to stabilize the chaperone: substrate complex. Taken together, these findings suggest a possible role of chaperone oligomerization as a mechanism for regulating the availability of the active monomeric form of the chaperone and for the control of substrate binding and release. PMID:23840795

  2. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Manabendra D.; Modi, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide. PMID:25276800

  3. Structural comparison, substrate specificity, and inhibitor binding of AGPase small subunit from monocot and dicot: present insight and future potential.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Kishore; Sen, Priyabrata; Barooah, Madhumita; Choudhury, Manabendra D; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Modi, Mahendra K

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  4. On the induced-fit mechanism of substrate-enzyme binding structures of nylon-oligomer hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Baba, Takeshi; Harada, Ryuhei; Nakano, Masayoshi; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2014-06-15

    We present a detailed computational investigation of the induced-fit motion in a nylon-oligomer hydrolase (NylB) upon substrate binding. To this aim, we resort on the recently introduced parallel cascade selection molecular dynamics approach, allowing for an accelerated access to the set of conformational changes from an open- to a closed-state structure to form the enzyme-substrate complex in a specific induce-fit mechanism. The structural investigation is quantitatively complemented by free energy analyses within the umbrella sampling algorithm accompanied by weighted histogram analysis. We find that the stabilization free energy is about 1.4 kcal/mol, whereas the highest free energy barrier to be overcome is about 2.3 kcal/mol. Conversely, the energetic contribution for the substrate binding is about 20 kcal/mol, as estimated from Generalized Born/Surface Area. This means that the open-close induced-fit motion could occur frequently once the substrate binds to the open state of NylB.

  5. Substrate Binding Mode and Molecular Basis of a Specificity Switch in Oxalate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    mediate the formation of Mn(III) for catalysis upon substrate binding. PMID:27014926

  6. Substrate binds in the S1 site of the F253A mutant of LeuT, a neurotransmitter sodium symporter homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-10

    LeuT serves as the model protein for understanding the relationships between structure, mechanism and pharmacology in neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs). At the present time, however, there is a vigorous debate over whether there is a single high-affinity substrate site (S1) located at the original, crystallographically determined substrate site or whether there are two high-affinity substrates sites, one at the primary or S1 site and the other at a second site (S2) located at the base of the extracellular vestibule. In an effort to address the controversy over the number of high-affinity substrate sites in LeuT, one group studied the F253A mutant of LeuT and asserted that in this mutant substrate binds exclusively to the S2 site and that 1 mM clomipramine entirely ablates substrate binding to the S2 site. Here we study the binding of substrate to the F253A mutant of LeuT using ligand binding and X-ray crystallographic methods. Both experimental methods unambiguously show that substrate binds to the S1 site of the F253A mutant and that binding is retained in the presence of 1 mM clomipramine. These studies, in combination with previous work, are consistent with a mechanism ofr LeuT that involves a single high-affinity substrate binding site.

  7. Substrate binds in the S1 site of the F253A mutant of LeuT, a neurotransmitter sodium symporter homologue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-09-01

    LeuT serves as the model protein for understanding the relationships between structure, mechanism and pharmacology in neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs). At the present time, however, there is a vigorous debate over whether there is a single high-affinity substrate site (S1) located at the original, crystallographically determined substrate site or whether there are two high-affinity substrates sites, one at the primary or S1 site and the other at a second site (S2) located at the base of the extracellular vestibule. In an effort to address the controversy over the number of high-affinity substrate sites in LeuT, one group studied the F253A mutant of LeuT and asserted that in this mutant substrate binds exclusively to the S2 site and that 1 mM clomipramine entirely ablates substrate binding to the S2 site. Here we study the binding of substrate to the F253A mutant of LeuT using ligand binding and X-ray crystallographic methods. Both experimental methods unambiguously show that substrate binds to the S1 site of the F253A mutant and that binding is retained in the presence of 1 mM clomipramine. These studies, in combination with previous work, are consistent with a mechanism for LeuT that involves a single high-affinity substrate binding site.

  8. Molecular basis of P450 OleTJE: an investigation of substrate binding mechanism and major pathways.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Liu, Lin; Guo, Li Zhong; Yao, Xiao Jun; Yang, Jian Ming

    2017-03-25

    Cytochrome P450 OleTJE has attracted much attention for its ability to catalyze the decarboxylation of long chain fatty acids to generate alkenes, which are not only biofuel molecule, but also can be used broadly for making lubricants, polymers and detergents. In this study, the molecular basis of the binding mechanism of P450 OleTJE for arachidic acid, myristic acid, and caprylic acid was investigated by utilizing conventional molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations. Moreover, random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations were performed to uncover the most probable access/egress channels for different fatty acids. The predicted binding free energy shows an order of arachidic acid < myristic acid < caprylic acid. Key residues interacting with three substrates and residues specifically binding to one of them were identified. The RAMD results suggest the most likely channel for arachidic acid, myristic acid, and caprylic acid are 2e/2b, 2a and 2f/2a, respectively. It is suggested that the reaction is easier to carry out in myristic acid bound system than those in arachidic acid and caprylic acid bound system based on the distance of Hβ atom of substrate relative to P450 OleTJE Compound I states. This study provided novel insight to understand the substrate preference mechanism of P450 OleTJE and valuable information for rational enzyme design for short chain fatty acid decarboxylation.

  9. The Aspergillus nidulans Proline Permease as a Model for Understanding the Factors Determining Substrate Binding and Specificity of Fungal Amino Acid Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Gournas, Christos; Evangelidis, Thomas; Athanasopoulos, Alexandros; Mikros, Emmanuel; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in fungi is mediated by general and specialized members of the yeast amino acid transporter (YAT) family, a branch of the amino acid polyamine organocation (APC) transporter superfamily. PrnB, a highly specific l-proline transporter, only weakly recognizes other Put4p substrates, its Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologue. Taking advantage of the high sequence similarity between the two transporters, we combined molecular modeling, induced fit docking, genetic, and biochemical approaches to investigate the molecular basis of this difference and identify residues governing substrate binding and specificity. We demonstrate that l-proline is recognized by PrnB via interactions with residues within TMS1 (Gly56, Thr57), TMS3 (Glu138), and TMS6 (Phe248), which are evolutionary conserved in YATs, whereas specificity is achieved by subtle amino acid substitutions in variable residues. Put4p-mimicking substitutions in TMS3 (S130C), TMS6 (F252L, S253G), TMS8 (W351F), and TMS10 (T414S) broadened the specificity of PrnB, enabling it to recognize more efficiently l-alanine, l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, and glycine without significantly affecting the apparent Km for l-proline. S253G and W351F could transport l-alanine, whereas T414S, despite displaying reduced proline uptake, could transport l-alanine and glycine, a phenotype suppressed by the S130C mutation. A combination of all five Put4p-ressembling substitutions resulted in a functional allele that could also transport l-alanine and glycine, displaying a specificity profile impressively similar to that of Put4p. Our results support a model where residues in these positions determine specificity by interacting with the substrates, acting as gating elements, altering the flexibility of the substrate binding core, or affecting conformational changes of the transport cycle. PMID:25572393

  10. Well-being and affective style: neural substrates and biobehavioural correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    One of the most salient features of emotion is the pronounced variability among individuals in their reactions to emotional incentives and in their dispositional mood. Collectively, these individual differences have been described as affective style. Recent research has begun to dissect the constituents of affective style. The search for these components is guided by the neural systems that instantiate emotion and emotion regulation. In this article, this body of research and theory is applied specifically to positive affect and well-being. The central substrates and peripheral biological correlates of well-being are described. A resilient affective style is associated with high levels of left prefrontal activation, effective modulation of activation in the amygdala and fast recovery in response to negative and stressful events. In peripheral biology, these central patterns are associated with lower levels of basal cortisol and with higher levels of antibody titres to influenza vaccine. The article concludes with a consideration of whether these patterns of central and peripheral biology can be modified by training and shifted toward a more salubrious direction. PMID:15347531

  11. Probing the substrate binding site of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Regina; Leitgeb, Stefan; Wilson, David K; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about how substrates bind to CtXR (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; AKR2B5) and other members of the AKR (aldo-keto reductase) protein superfamily. Modelling of xylose into the active site of CtXR suggested that Trp23, Asp50 and Asn309 are the main components of pentose-specific substrate-binding recognition. Kinetic consequences of site-directed substitutions of these residues are reported. The mutants W23F and W23Y catalysed NADH-dependent reduction of xylose with only 4 and 1% of the wild-type efficiency (kcat/K(m)) respectively, but improved the wild-type selectivity for utilization of ketones, relative to xylose, by factors of 156 and 471 respectively. Comparison of multiple sequence alignment with reported specificities of AKR members emphasizes a conserved role of Trp23 in determining aldehyde-versus-ketone substrate selectivity. D50A showed 31 and 18% of the wild-type catalytic-centre activities for xylose reduction and xylitol oxidation respectively, consistent with a decrease in the rates of the chemical steps caused by the mutation, but no change in the apparent substrate binding constants and the pattern of substrate specificities. The 30-fold preference of the wild-type for D-galactose compared with 2-deoxy-D-galactose was lost completely in N309A and N309D mutants. Comparison of the 2.4 A (1 A=0.1 nm) X-ray crystal structure of mutant N309D bound to NAD+ with the previous structure of the wild-type holoenzyme reveals no major structural perturbations. The results suggest that replacement of Asn309 with alanine or aspartic acid disrupts the function of the original side chain in donating a hydrogen atom for bonding with the substrate C-2(R) hydroxy group, thus causing a loss of transition-state stabilization energy of 8-9 kJ/mol.

  12. Structures of LeuT in bicelles define conformation and substrate binding in a membrane-like context

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Elferich, Johannes; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-02-13

    Neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs) catalyze the uptake of neurotransmitters into cells, terminating neurotransmission at chemical synapses. Consistent with the role of NSSs in the central nervous system, they are implicated in multiple diseases and disorders. LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, is a prokaryotic ortholog of the NSS family and has contributed to our understanding of the structure, mechanism and pharmacology of NSSs. At present, however, the functional state of LeuT in crystals grown in the presence of n-octyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside ({beta}-OG) and the number of substrate binding sites are controversial issues. Here we present crystal structures of LeuT grown in DMPC-CHAPSO bicelles and demonstrate that the conformations of LeuT-substrate complexes in lipid bicelles and in {beta}-OG detergent micelles are nearly identical. Furthermore, using crystals grown in bicelles and the substrate leucine or the substrate analog selenomethionine, we find only a single substrate molecule in the primary binding site.

  13. Structures of LeuT in bicelles define conformation and substrate binding in a membrane-like context.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Elferich, Johannes; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-01-15

    Neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs) catalyze the uptake of neurotransmitters into cells, terminating neurotransmission at chemical synapses. Consistent with the role of NSSs in the central nervous system, they are implicated in multiple diseases and disorders. LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, is a prokaryotic ortholog of the NSS family and has contributed to our understanding of the structure, mechanism and pharmacology of NSSs. At present, however, the functional state of LeuT in crystals grown in the presence of n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (β-OG) and the number of substrate binding sites are controversial issues. Here we present crystal structures of LeuT grown in DMPC-CHAPSO bicelles and demonstrate that the conformations of LeuT-substrate complexes in lipid bicelles and in β-OG detergent micelles are nearly identical. Furthermore, using crystals grown in bicelles and the substrate leucine or the substrate analog selenomethionine, we find only a single substrate molecule in the primary binding site.

  14. Structural insights into conserved L-arabinose metabolic enzymes reveal the substrate binding site of a thermophilic L-arabinose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2014-03-18

    Structural genomics demonstrates that despite low levels of structural similarity of proteins comprising a metabolic pathway, their substrate binding regions are likely to be conserved. Herein based on the 3D-structures of the α/β-fold proteins involved in the ara operon, we attempted to predict the substrate binding residues of thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase (GSAI) with no 3D-structure available. Comparison of the structures of L-arabinose catabolic enzymes revealed a conserved feature to form the substrate-binding modules, which can be extended to predict the substrate binding site of GSAI (i.e., D195, E261 and E333). Moreover, these data implicated that proteins in the l-arabinose metabolic pathway might retain their substrate binding niches as the modular structure through conserved molecular evolution even with totally different structural scaffolds.

  15. Identical phosphatase mechanisms achieved through distinct modes of binding phosphoprotein substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pazy, Y.; Motaleb, M.A.; Guarnieri, M.T.; Charon, N.W.; Zhao, R.; Silversmith, R.E.

    2010-04-05

    Two-component signal transduction systems are widespread in prokaryotes and control numerous cellular processes. Extensive investigation of sensor kinase and response regulator proteins from many two-component systems has established conserved sequence, structural, and mechanistic features within each family. In contrast, the phosphatases which catalyze hydrolysis of the response regulator phosphoryl group to terminate signal transduction are poorly understood. Here we present structural and functional characterization of a representative of the CheC/CheX/FliY phosphatase family. The X-ray crystal structure of Borrelia burgdorferi CheX complexed with its CheY3 substrate and the phosphoryl analogue BeF{sub 3}{sup -} reveals a binding orientation between a response regulator and an auxiliary protein different from that shared by every previously characterized example. The surface of CheY3 containing the phosphoryl group interacts directly with a long helix of CheX which bears the conserved (E - X{sub 2} - N) motif. Conserved CheX residues Glu96 and Asn99, separated by a single helical turn, insert into the CheY3 active site. Structural and functional data indicate that CheX Asn99 and CheY3 Thr81 orient a water molecule for hydrolytic attack. The catalytic residues of the CheX-CheY3 complex are virtually superimposable on those of the Escherichia coli CheZ phosphatase complexed with CheY, even though the active site helices of CheX and CheZ are oriented nearly perpendicular to one other. Thus, evolution has found two structural solutions to achieve the same catalytic mechanism through different helical spacing and side chain lengths of the conserved acid/amide residues in CheX and CheZ.

  16. Crystallographic structure and substrate-binding interactions of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz-Pérez, Carolina; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Luís Carlos Souza; Neshich, Goran; Gonçalves Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    In Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac or X. citri), the modA gene codes for a periplasmic protein (ModA) that is capable of binding molybdate and tungstate as part of the ABC-type transporter required for the uptake of micronutrients. In this study, we report the crystallographic structure of the Xac ModA protein with bound molybdate. The Xac ModA structure is similar to orthologs with known three-dimensional structures and consists of two nearly symmetrical domains separated by a hinge region where the oxyanion-binding site lies. Phylogenetic analysis of different ModA orthologs based on sequence alignments revealed three groups of molybdate-binding proteins: bacterial phytopathogens, enterobacteria and soil bacteria. Even though the ModA orthologs are segregated into different groups, the ligand-binding hydrogen bonds are mostly conserved, except for Archaeglobus fulgidus ModA. A detailed discussion of hydrophobic interactions in the active site is presented and two new residues, Ala38 and Ser151, are shown to be part of the ligand-binding pocket.

  17. Local entropy difference upon a substrate binding of a psychrophilic α-amylase and a mesophilic homologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Takahiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2011-01-01

    Psychrophilic α-amylase from the antarctic bacterium pseudoalteromonashaloplanktis (AHA) and its mesophilic homologue, porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) are theoretically investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We carried out 240-ns MD simulations for four systems, AHA and PPA with/without the bound substrate, and examined protein conformational entropy changes upon the substrate binding. We developed an analysis that decomposes the entropy changes into contributions of individual amino acids, and successfully identified protein regions responsible for the entropy changes. The results provide a molecular insight into the structural flexibilities of those enzymes related to the temperature dependences of the enzymatic activity.

  18. Platelet (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding in affective disorders: trait versus state characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Barkai, A.; Gruen, R.; Peselow, E.; Fieve, R.R.; Quitkin, F.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet (3H)imipramine binding (Bmax) was determined in 67 patients with major affective illness (33 euthymic bipolar, 34 depressed unipolar) and 58 normal control subjects. Bipolar patients had significantly lower Bmax values than did control subjects. The mean Bmax in the unipolar patients was lower than in the control subjects, but the difference was not statistically significant. Dissociation constant (Kd) values did not distinguish patients in either category from control subjects. The significantly lower Bmax in euthymic bipolar patients and the apparent state independence of Bmax in some but not all unipolar patients suggest that platelet imipramine binding may be a trait marker in a subset of affective disorders.

  19. Kinetic modeling of the interactions between 4-methylumbelliferone, 1-naphthol, and zidovudine glucuronidation by udp-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 (UGT2B7) provides evidence for multiple substrate binding and effector sites.

    PubMed

    Uchaipichat, Verawan; Galetin, Aleksandra; Houston, J Brian; Mackenzie, Peter I; Williams, J Andrew; Miners, John O

    2008-10-01

    Interactions between the UGT2B7-catalyzed glucuronidation of zidovudine (AZT), 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU), and 1-naphthol (1NP) were analyzed using multisite and empirical kinetic models to explore the existence of multiple substrate and effector binding sites within this important drug metabolizing enzyme. 4MU and 1NP glucuronidation by UGT2B7 exhibit sigmoidal kinetics characteristic of homotropic cooperativity (autoactivation), which may be modeled assuming the existence of two equivalent, interacting substrate binding sites. In contrast, UGT2B7-catalyzed AZT glucuronidation follows hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics. Although 4MU and 1NP decreased the binding affinity of AZT, the kinetics of AZT glucuronidation changed from hyperbolic to sigmoidal in the presence of both modifiers. Data were well described by a generic two-substrate binding site model in which there is no interaction between the sites in the absence of 4MU or 1NP, but heterotropic cooperativity results from the binding of modifier. Inhibition of 4MU and 1NP glucuronidation by AZT and interactions between 4MU and 1NP required more complex three-site models, where the modifier acts via a distinct effector site to alter either substrate binding affinity or Vmax without affecting the homotropic cooperativity characteristic of 4MU and 1NP glucuronidation. It is noteworthy that 1NP inhibited 4MU glucuronidation, whereas 4MU activated 1NP glucuronidation. The results are consistent with the existence of two "catalytic" sites for each substrate within the UGT2B7 active site, along with multiple effector sites. The multiplicity of binding and effector sites results in complex kinetic interactions between UGT2B7 substrates, which potentially complicates inhibition screening studies.

  20. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  1. Reward expectancy-related prefrontal neuronal activities: are they neural substrates of "affective" working memory?

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masataka; Hikosaka, Kazuo; Sakagami, Masamichi; Shirakawa, Shu-ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Primate prefrontal delay neurons are involved in retaining task-relevant cognitive information in working memory (WM). Recent studies have also revealed primate prefrontal delay neurons that are related to reward/omission-of-reward expectancy. Such reward-related delay activities might constitute "affective WM" (Davidson, 2002). "Affective" and "cognitive" WM are both concerned with representing not what is currently being presented, but rather what was presented previously or might be presented in the future. However, according to the original and widely accepted definition, WM is the "temporary storage and manipulation of information for complex cognitive tasks". Reward/omission-of-reward expectancy-related neuronal activity is neither prerequisite nor essential for accurate task performance; thus, such activity is not considered to comprise the neural substrates of WM. Also, "affective WM" might not be an appropriate usage of the term "WM". We propose that WM- and reward/omission-of-reward expectancy-related neuronal activity are concerned with representing which response should be performed in order to attain a goal (reward) and the goal of the response, respectively. We further suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a crucial role in the integration of cognitive (for example, WM-related) and motivational (for example, reward expectancy-related) operations for goal-directed behaviour. The PFC could then send this integrated information to other brain areas to control the behaviour.

  2. Foliar Substrate Affects Cuticular Hydrocarbon Profiles and Intraspecific Aggression in the Leafcutter Ant Atta sexdens

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Lohan; Nascimento, Daniela; Nascimento, Fabio S.

    2015-01-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are traditionally considered to be one of the most important chemical cues used in the nestmate recognition process of social hymenopterans. However, it has been suggested that in the leafcutter ant genus Atta, it is not the CHCs, but the alarm pheromone that is involved in the nestmate recognition process. In this study we used a laboratory population of Atta sexdens to explore the association between their CHC profile variation and intraspecific aggression. In the first part of the experiment, four colonies were divided into two groups with distinct diets to stimulate differentiation of their CHC profiles. In the second part of the experiment, all colonies received the same diet to examine resemblance of chemical profiles. At the end of each part of the experiment we extracted the CHCs from workers. The results demonstrated that colonies that shared the same food resource had similar cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. Furthermore, colonies were significantly more aggressive towards conspecifics that used a different foliar substrate and consequently had greater differences in their cuticular chemical composition. This study suggests that the CHC profiles of A. sexdens can be affected by the foliar substrates used, and that the CHCs are used in the nestmate recognition process of this species. PMID:26463072

  3. The role of substrate specificity and metal binding in defining the activity and structure of an intracellular subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Michael; Künze, Georg; Brancale, Andrea; Wilson, Keith S; Jones, D Dafydd

    2012-01-01

    The dimeric intracellular subtilisin proteases (ISPs) found throughout Gram-positive bacteria are a structurally distinct class of the subtilase family. Unlike the vast majority of subtilisin-like proteases, the ISPs function exclusively within the cell, contributing the majority of observed cellular proteolytic activity. Given that they are active within the cell, little is known about substrate specificity and the role of stress signals such as divalent metal ions in modulating ISP function. We demonstrate that both play roles in defining the proteolytic activity of Bacillus clausii ISP and propose the molecular basis of their effects. Enzyme kinetics reveal that one particular synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA, is hydrolysed with a catalytic efficiency ∼100-fold higher than any other tested. Heat-denatured whole proteins were found to be better substrates for ISP than the native forms. Substrate binding simulations suggest that the S1, S2 and S4 sites form defined binding pockets. The deep S1 cavity and wide S4 site are fully occupied by the hydrophobic aromatic side-chains of Phe. Divalent metal ions, probably Ca(2+), are proposed to be important for ISP activity through structural changes. The presence of >0.01 mM EDTA inactivates ISP, with CD and SEC suggesting that the protein becomes less structured and potentially monomeric. Removal of Ca(2+) at sites close to the dimer interface and the S1 pocket are thought to be responsible for the effect. These studies provide a new insight into the potential physiological function of ISPs, by reconciling substrate specificity and divalent metal binding to associate ISP with the unfolded protein response under stress conditions.

  4. The role of substrate specificity and metal binding in defining the activity and structure of an intracellular subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Michael; Künze, Georg; Brancale, Andrea; Wilson, Keith S.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2012-01-01

    The dimeric intracellular subtilisin proteases (ISPs) found throughout Gram-positive bacteria are a structurally distinct class of the subtilase family. Unlike the vast majority of subtilisin-like proteases, the ISPs function exclusively within the cell, contributing the majority of observed cellular proteolytic activity. Given that they are active within the cell, little is known about substrate specificity and the role of stress signals such as divalent metal ions in modulating ISP function. We demonstrate that both play roles in defining the proteolytic activity of Bacillus clausii ISP and propose the molecular basis of their effects. Enzyme kinetics reveal that one particular synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, Phe-Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA, is hydrolysed with a catalytic efficiency ∼100-fold higher than any other tested. Heat-denatured whole proteins were found to be better substrates for ISP than the native forms. Substrate binding simulations suggest that the S1, S2 and S4 sites form defined binding pockets. The deep S1 cavity and wide S4 site are fully occupied by the hydrophobic aromatic side-chains of Phe. Divalent metal ions, probably Ca2+, are proposed to be important for ISP activity through structural changes. The presence of >0.01 mM EDTA inactivates ISP, with CD and SEC suggesting that the protein becomes less structured and potentially monomeric. Removal of Ca2+ at sites close to the dimer interface and the S1 pocket are thought to be responsible for the effect. These studies provide a new insight into the potential physiological function of ISPs, by reconciling substrate specificity and divalent metal binding to associate ISP with the unfolded protein response under stress conditions. PMID:23650602

  5. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Grauffel, Cédric; Abboud, Angèle; Liszczak, Glen; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas; Reuter, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p). To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG), hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE). Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic), hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic), hNaa30p (basic) and hNaa50p (hydrophobic). We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide-enzyme interactions

  6. Feature binding and affect: emotional modulation of visuo-motor integration.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-28

    The primate cortex represents the external world in a distributed fashion, which calls for a mechanism that integrates and binds the features of a perceived or processed event. Animal and patients studies provide evidence that feature binding in the visual cortex is driven by the muscarinic-cholinergic system, whereas visuo-motor integration may be under dopaminergic control. Consistent with this scenario, we present indication that the binding of visual and action features is modulated by emotions through the probable stimulation of the dopaminergic system. Interestingly, the impact of emotions on binding was restricted to tasks in which shape was task-relevant, suggesting that extracting affective information is not automatic but requires attention to shape.

  7. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the oxygen binding and substrate hydroxylation step in AlkB repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-07

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N(1) -methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)-oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ- and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained.

  8. Enzyme-substrate binding landscapes in the process of nitrile biodegradation mediated by nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zeng, Zhuotong; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Xuanming; Chen, Ming; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Zhifeng; Xie, Gengxin

    2013-08-01

    The continuing discharge of nitriles in various industrial processes has caused serious environmental consequences of nitrile pollution. Microorganisms possess several nitrile-degrading pathways by direct interactions of nitriles with nitrile-degrading enzymes. However, these interactions are largely unknown and difficult to experimentally determine but important for interpretation of nitrile metabolisms and design of nitrile-degrading enzymes with better nitrile-converting activity. Here, we undertook a molecular modeling study of enzyme-substrate binding modes in the bi-enzyme pathway for degradation of nitrile to acid. Docking results showed that the top substrates having favorable interactions with nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 (ReNHase), nitrile hydratase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase), and amidase from Rhodococcus sp. N-771 (RhAmidase) were benzonitrile, 3-cyanopyridine, and L-methioninamide, respectively. We further analyzed the interactional profiles of these top poses with corresponding enzymes, showing that specific residues within the enzyme's binding pockets formed diverse contacts with substrates. This information on binding landscapes and interactional profiles is of great importance for the design of nitrile-degrading enzyme mutants with better oxidation activity toward nitriles or amides in the process of pollutant treatments.

  9. Investigating the Turing conditions for diffusion-driven instability in the presence of a binding immobile substrate.

    PubMed

    Korvasová, K; Gaffney, E A; Maini, P K; Ferreira, M A; Klika, V

    2015-02-21

    Turing's diffusion-driven instability for the standard two species reaction-diffusion system is only achievable under well-known and rather restrictive conditions on both the diffusion rates and the kinetic parameters, which necessitates the pairing of a self-activator with a self-inhibitor. In this study we generalize the standard two-species model by considering the case where the reactants can bind to an immobile substrate, for instance extra-cellular matrix, and investigate the influence of this dynamics on Turing's diffusion-driven instability. Such systems have been previously studied on the grounds that binding of the self-activator to a substrate may effectively reduce its diffusion rate and thus induce a Turing instability for species with equal diffusion coefficients, as originally demonstrated by Lengyel and Epstein (1992) under the assumption that the bound state dynamics occurs on a fast timescale. We, however, analyse the full system without any separation of timescales and demonstrate that the full system also allows a relaxation of the standard constraints on the reaction kinetics for the Turing instability, increasing the type of interactions that could give rise to spatial patterning. In particular, we show that two self-activators can undertake a diffusively driven instability in the presence of a binding immobile substrate, highlighting that the interactions required of a putative biological Turing instability need not be associated with a self-activator-self-inhibitor morphogen pair.

  10. Detection of distinct α-helical rearrangements of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase upon substrate binding by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, I M Mahaputra; Zhang, Yu; Iwata, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junpei; Hitomi, Kenichi; Iwai, Shigenori; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kandori, Hideki

    2013-02-12

    Photolyases (PHRs) utilize near-ultraviolet (UV)-blue light to specifically repair the major photoproducts (PPs) of UV-induced damaged DNA. The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer PHR (CPD-PHR) from Escherichia coli binds flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor and 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate as a light-harvesting pigment and specifically repairs CPD lesions. By comparison, a second photolyase known as (6-4) PHR, present in a range of higher organisms, uniquely repairs (6-4) PPs. To understand the repair mechanism and the substrate specificity that distinguish CPD-PHR from (6-4) PHR, we applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to bacterial CPD-PHR in the presence or absence of a well-defined DNA substrate, as we have studied previously for vertebrate (6-4) PHR. PHRs show light-induced reduction of FAD, and photorepair by CPD-PHR involves the transfer of an electron from the photoexcited reduced FAD to the damaged DNA for cleaving the dimers to maintain the DNA's integrity. Here, we measured and analyzed difference FTIR spectra for the photoactivation and DNA photorepair processes of CPD-PHR. We identified light-dependent signals only in the presence of substrate. The signals, presumably arising from a protonated carboxylic acid or the DNA substrate, implicate conformational rearrangements of the protein and substrate during the repair process. Deuterium exchange FTIR measurements of CPD-PHR highlight potential differences in the photoactivation and photorepair mechanisms in comparison to those of (6-4) PHR. Although CPD-PHR and (6-4) PHR appear to exhibit similar overall structures, our studies indicate that distinct conformational rearrangements, especially in the α-helices, are initiated within these enzymes upon binding of their respective DNA substrates.

  11. A Conserved Phenylalanine of Motif IV in Superfamily 2 Helicases Is Required for Cooperative, ATP-Dependent Binding of RNA Substrates in DEAD-Box Proteins▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Banroques, Josette; Cordin, Olivier; Doère, Monique; Linder, Patrick; Tanner, N. Kyle

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a highly conserved phenylalanine in motif IV of the DEAD-box helicases that is important for their enzymatic activities. In vivo analyses of essential proteins in yeast showed that mutants of this residue had severe growth phenotypes. Most of the mutants also were temperature sensitive, which suggested that the mutations altered the conformational stability. Intragenic suppressors of the F405L mutation in yeast Ded1 mapped close to regions of the protein involved in ATP or RNA binding in DEAD-box crystal structures, which implicated a defect at this level. In vitro experiments showed that these mutations affected ATP binding and hydrolysis as well as strand displacement activity. However, the most pronounced effect was the loss of the ATP-dependent cooperative binding of the RNA substrates. Sequence analyses and an examination of the Protein Data Bank showed that the motif IV phenylalanine is conserved among superfamily 2 helicases. The phenylalanine appears to be an anchor that maintains the rigidity of the RecA-like domain. For DEAD-box proteins, the phenylalanine also aligns a highly conserved arginine of motif VI through van der Waals and cation-π interactions, thereby helping to maintain the network of interactions that exist between the different motifs involved in ATP and RNA binding. PMID:18332124

  12. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract.

  13. Trypanosoma brucei 20 S Editosomes Have One RNA Substrate-binding Site and Execute RNA Unwinding Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Cordula; Katari, Venkata Subbaraju; Brecht, Michael; Göringer, H. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Editing of mitochondrial pre-mRNAs in African trypanosomes generates full-length transcripts by the site-specific insertion and deletion of uridylate nucleotides. The reaction is catalyzed by a 0.8 MDa multienzyme complex, the editosome. Although the binding of substrate pre-edited mRNAs and cognate guide RNAs (gRNAs) represents the first step in the reaction cycle, the biochemical and biophysical details of the editosome/RNA interaction are not understood. Here we show that editosomes bind full-length substrate mRNAs with nanomolar affinity in a nonselective fashion. The complexes do not discriminate–neither kinetically nor thermodynamically–between different mitochondrial pre-mRNAs or between edited and unedited versions of the same transcript. They also bind gRNAs and gRNA/pre-mRNA hybrid RNAs with similar affinities and association rate constants. Gold labeling of editosome-bound RNA in combination with transmission electron microscopy identified a single RNA-binding site per editosome. However, atomic force microscopy of individual pre-mRNA-editosome complexes revealed that multiple editosomes can interact with one pre-mRNA. Lastly, we demonstrate a so far unknown activity of the editing machinery: editosome-bound RNA becomes unfolded by a chaperone-type RNA unwinding activity. PMID:22661715

  14. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of plant adenylate isopentenyltransferase from Humulus lupulus: distinctive binding affinity for purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsing-Mao; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2010-03-01

    Cytokinins are important plant hormones, and their biosynthesis most begins with the transfer of isopentenyl group from dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to the N6-amino group of adenine by either adenylate isopentenyltransferase (AIPT) or tRNA-IPT. Plant AIPTs use ATP/ADP as an isopentenyl acceptor and bacterial AIPTs prefer AMP, whereas tRNA-IPTs act on specific sites of tRNA. Here, we present the crystal structure of an AIPT-ATP complex from Humulus lupulus (HlAIPT), which is similar to the previous structures of Agrobacterium AIPT and yeast tRNA-IPT. The enzyme is structurally homologous to the NTP-binding kinase family of proteins but forms a solvent-accessible channel that binds to the donor substrate DMAPP, which is directed toward the acceptor substrate ATP/ADP. When measured with isothermal titration calorimetry, some nucleotides displayed different binding affinities to HlAIPT with an order of ATP > dATP approximately ADP > GTP > CTP > UTP. Two basic residues Lys275 and Lys220 in HlAIPT interact with the beta and gamma-phosphate of ATP. By contrast, the interactions are absent in Agrobacterium AIPT because they are replaced by the acidic residues Asp221 and Asp171. Despite its structural similarity to the yeast tRNA-IPT, HlAIPT has evolved with a different binding strategy for adenylate.

  15. Substrate adaptabilities of Thermotogae mannan binding proteins as a function of their evolutionary histories.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Nathalie; Noll, Kenneth M

    2016-09-01

    The Thermotogae possess a large number of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including two mannan binding proteins, ManD and CelE (previously called ManE). We show that a gene encoding an ancestor of these was acquired by the Thermotogae from the archaea followed by gene duplication. To address the functional evolution of these proteins as a consequence of their evolutionary histories, we measured the binding affinities of ManD and CelE orthologs from representative Thermotogae. Both proteins bind cellobiose, cellotriose, cellotetraose, β-1,4-mannotriose, and β-1,4-mannotetraose. The CelE orthologs additionally bind β-1,4-mannobiose, laminaribiose, laminaritriose and sophorose while the ManD orthologs additionally only weakly bind β-1,4-mannobiose. The CelE orthologs have higher unfolding temperatures than the ManD orthologs. An examination of codon sites under positive selection revealed that many of these encode residues located near or in the binding site, suggesting that the proteins experienced selective pressures in regions that might have changed their functions. The gene arrangement, phylogeny, binding properties, and putative regulatory networks suggest that the ancestral mannan binding protein was a CelE ortholog which gave rise to the ManD orthologs. This study provides a window on how one class of proteins adapted to new functions and temperatures to fit the physiologies of their new hosts.

  16. Effective Quenchers Are Required to Eliminate the Interference of Substrate: Cofactor Binding in the HAT Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Liza; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) mediate the transfer of an acetyl group from the cofactor, acetyl-CoA, to the side chain amino group of specific lysines in diverse protein substrates, most notably nuclear histones. The deregulation of HATs is connected to a number of disease states. Reliable and rapid biochemical assays for HATs are critical for understanding biological functions of protein acetylation, as well as for screening small-molecule inhibitors of HAT enzymes. In this report, we present a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for the measurement of HAT enzymatic activities. The acetyl donor was [3H]Ac-CoA, and a biotin-modified histone peptide served as the HAT substrate. After the HAT reaction, streptavidin-coated beads were added to induce proximity of acetylated substrate to the scintillant molecules. However, we observed strong nonspecific binding between the cofactor and the histone peptide substrates, which adversely complicated the SPA performance. To prevent this problem, a set of chemical agents were evaluated to eliminate the cofactor–substrate interaction, thus providing reliable SPA readings. With optimization, the SPA showed consistent and robust performance for HAT activity measurement and HAT inhibitor evaluation. Overall, this mix-and-measure assay does not require any washing procedure, can be utilized in the microplate format, and is well suited for high-throughput screening of HAT chemical modulators. PMID:26065557

  17. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  18. An alternative mechanism for the catalysis of peptide bond formation by L/F transferase: substrate binding and orientation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela W; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Abeysundara, Heshani; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Fahlman, Richard P

    2011-06-17

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase (L/F transferase) catalyzes the transfer of a leucine or a phenylalanine from an aminoacyl-tRNA to the N-terminus of a protein substrate. This N-terminal addition of an amino acid is analogous to that of peptide synthesis by ribosomes. A previously proposed catalytic mechanism for Escherichia coli L/F transferase identified the conserved aspartate 186 (D186) and glutamine 188 (Q188) as key catalytic residues. We have reassessed the role of D186 and Q188 by investigating the enzymatic reactions and kinetics of enzymes possessing mutations to these active-site residues. Additionally three other amino acids proposed to be involved in aminoacyl-tRNA substrate binding are investigated for comparison. By quantitatively measuring product formation using a quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based assay, our results clearly demonstrate that, despite significant reduction in enzymatic activity as a result of different point mutations introduced into the active site of L/F transferase, the formation of product is still observed upon extended incubations. Our kinetic data and existing X-ray crystal structures result in a proposal that the critical roles of D186 and Q188, like the other amino acids in the active site, are for substrate binding and orientation and do not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Overall, we propose that L/F transferase does not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation but catalyzes the reaction by binding and orientating the substrates for reaction in an analogous mechanism that has been described for ribosomes.

  19. Insights into Phosphate Cooperativity and Influence of Substrate Modifications on Binding and Catalysis of Hexameric Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    PubMed Central

    de Giuseppe, Priscila O.; Martins, Nadia H.; Meza, Andreia N.; dos Santos, Camila R.; Pereira, Humberto D’Muniz; Murakami, Mario T.

    2012-01-01

    The hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis (BsPNP233) displays great potential to produce nucleoside analogues in industry and can be exploited in the development of new anti-tumor gene therapies. In order to provide structural basis for enzyme and substrates rational optimization, aiming at those applications, the present work shows a thorough and detailed structural description of the binding mode of substrates and nucleoside analogues to the active site of the hexameric BsPNP233. Here we report the crystal structure of BsPNP233 in the apo form and in complex with 11 ligands, including clinically relevant compounds. The crystal structure of six ligands (adenine, 2′deoxyguanosine, aciclovir, ganciclovir, 8-bromoguanosine, 6-chloroguanosine) in complex with a hexameric PNP are presented for the first time. Our data showed that free bases adopt alternative conformations in the BsPNP233 active site and indicated that binding of the co-substrate (2′deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate might contribute for stabilizing the bases in a favorable orientation for catalysis. The BsPNP233-adenosine complex revealed that a hydrogen bond between the 5′ hydroxyl group of adenosine and Arg43* side chain contributes for the ribosyl radical to adopt an unusual C3’-endo conformation. The structures with 6-chloroguanosine and 8-bromoguanosine pointed out that the Cl6 and Br8 substrate modifications seem to be detrimental for catalysis and can be explored in the design of inhibitors for hexameric PNPs from pathogens. Our data also corroborated the competitive inhibition mechanism of hexameric PNPs by tubercidin and suggested that the acyclic nucleoside ganciclovir is a better inhibitor for hexameric PNPs than aciclovir. Furthermore, comparative structural analyses indicated that the replacement of Ser90 by a threonine in the B. cereus hexameric adenosine phosphorylase (Thr91) is responsible for the lack of negative cooperativity of phosphate binding in this

  20. Steel slag affects pH and Si content of container substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A substrate representing a typical greenhouse potting mix was prepared using 85% sphagnum peat and 15% perlite. The substrate was filled into 10 cm wide containers. A pulverized steel slag (SS) from a basic oxygen furnace, and dolomitic limestone (DL) were amended to the base substrate at a rate o...

  1. Substrate-dependent, non-hyperbolic kinetics of pig brain prolyl oligopeptidase and its tight binding inhibition by JTP-4819.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Jarkko I; Juvonen, Risto O; Forsberg, Markus M; Garcia-Horsman, Arturo; Poso, Antti; Wallen, Erik A A; Gynther, Jukka; Männistö, Pekka T

    2002-08-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a cytosolic serine protease that hydrolyses small peptides at the carboxyl end of the proline residue. It has raised pharmaceutical interest, since its inhibitors have been shown to have antiamnesic properties. We studied prolyl oligopeptidase kinetics with two 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin derivatives: Z-Gly-Pro-AMC and Suc-Gly-Pro-AMC. Z-Gly-Pro-AMC was found to obey standard Henri-Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a K(m) of 30+/-3 microM, whereas Suc-Gly-Pro-AMC exhibited substrate inhibition kinetics with K(m) and K(is) of 510+/-150 and 270+/-90 microM, respectively. Autodock simulations revealed that either the succinyl or the AMC-end of Suc-Gly-Pro-AMC may bind to the S'1 subsite of the active site. We believe that non-specifically bound Suc-Gly-Pro-AMC allows the simultaneous binding of second substrate molecule to the active site and this leads in substrate inhibition. In addition, we demonstrated that the inhibition type of a well characterized prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitor, JTP-4819, is competitive tight binding with a K(ic) of 0.045+/-0.008 nM. We suggest that due to the high concentration of prolyl oligopeptidase in the brain (0.12 nmol/g pig brain), the tight binding nature of the inhibition should be considered when using brain homogenate as the enzyme source in prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition measurements. This is of importance in studying structure-activity relationships of potent prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitors.

  2. Probing the substrate binding site of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) with site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Regina; Leitgeb, Stefan; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how substrates bind to CtXR (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; AKR2B5) and other members of the AKR (aldo–keto reductase) protein superfamily. Modelling of xylose into the active site of CtXR suggested that Trp23, Asp50 and Asn309 are the main components of pentose-specific substrate-binding recognition. Kinetic consequences of site-directed substitutions of these residues are reported. The mutants W23F and W23Y catalysed NADH-dependent reduction of xylose with only 4 and 1% of the wild-type efficiency (kcat/Km) respectively, but improved the wild-type selectivity for utilization of ketones, relative to xylose, by factors of 156 and 471 respectively. Comparison of multiple sequence alignment with reported specificities of AKR members emphasizes a conserved role of Trp23 in determining aldehyde-versus-ketone substrate selectivity. D50A showed 31 and 18% of the wild-type catalytic-centre activities for xylose reduction and xylitol oxidation respectively, consistent with a decrease in the rates of the chemical steps caused by the mutation, but no change in the apparent substrate binding constants and the pattern of substrate specificities. The 30-fold preference of the wild-type for D-galactose compared with 2-deoxy-D-galactose was lost completely in N309A and N309D mutants. Comparison of the 2.4 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) X-ray crystal structure of mutant N309D bound to NAD+ with the previous structure of the wild-type holoenzyme reveals no major structural perturbations. The results suggest that replacement of Asn309 with alanine or aspartic acid disrupts the function of the original side chain in donating a hydrogen atom for bonding with the substrate C-2(R) hydroxy group, thus causing a loss of transition-state stabilization energy of 8–9 kJ/mol. PMID:16336198

  3. Affect influences feature binding in memory: Trading between richness and strength of memory representations.

    PubMed

    Spachtholz, Philipp; Kuhbandner, Christof; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Research has shown that long-term memory representations of objects are formed as a natural product of perception even without any intentional memorization. It is not known, however, how rich these representations are in terms of the number of bound object features. In particular, because feature binding rests on resource-limited processes, there may be a context-dependent trade-off between the quantity of stored features and their memory strength. The authors examined whether affective state may bring about such a trade-off. Participants incidentally encoded pictures of real-world objects while experiencing positive or negative affect, and the authors later measured memory for 2 features. Results showed that participants traded between richness and strength of memory representations as a function of affect, with positive affect tuning memory formation toward richness and negative affect tuning memory formation toward strength. These findings demonstrate that memory binding is a flexible process that is modulated by affective state. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Pig pancreatic anhydro-elastase. Role of the serine-195 hydroxy group in the binding of inhibitors and substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, H R; Lin, T Y; Navia, M A; Springer, J P; Hoogsteen, K

    1987-01-01

    The binding constants of a number of ligands were measured for pancreatic elastase (PE) and anhydro-elastase (AE) in order to assess the contribution of Ser-195 to substrate and inhibitor binding by PE. AE was purified by affinity chromatography on a column containing immobilized turkey ovomucoid inhibitor. The AE had 0.1 +/- 0.1% of the activity of the native enzyme and contained 0.8 +/- 0.06 residue of dehydroalanine per molecule. A difference electron-density map, derived from an X-ray crystallographic analysis of AE, showed that the modified residue was Ser-195. The complexing of 3-carboxypropionyl-Ala-Ala-Ala-p-nitroanilide (SAN) to the active site of AE was also demonstrated by X-ray-diffraction analysis of an AE crystal soaked overnight with substrate. The nitroanilide moiety was not observed in the difference map. AE was shown to bind turkey ovomucoid inhibitor with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.3 +/- 0.06 microM compared with 0.10 microM for PE. The Kd of the AE-SAN complex (0.2 mM) was comparable with the Michaelis constant for SAN with PE (1.0 mM). A number of inhibitors, such as elastatinal, which forms a hemiketal adduct with PE, while others such as the beta-lactams, which function as acylators of the active-site serine residue, bound AE with a lower affinity than to PE. The binding of a peptidylchloromethane (acetyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-CH2Cl) to AE occurs without evidence for alkylation of histidine. The binding constants for benzoisothiazolinone and 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin to PE differed from their binding constants to AE by less than a factor of 4.0-fold. The contribution of the hydroxy group of Ser-195 to the binding of these inhibitors to PE in their non-covalent complexes is relatively small, even though they inactivate PE by an acylation mechanism. These results suggest that the hydroxy group on Ser-195 in PE is of secondary importance in the energetics of ligand binding, in contrast with its essential role in the catalytic properties of the

  5. Molecular dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis KasA: implications for inhibitor and substrate binding and consequences for drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Benjamin; Kisker, Caroline; Sotriffer, Christoph A.

    2011-11-01

    Inhibition of the production of fatty acids as essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall has been an established way of fighting tuberculosis for decades. However, increasing resistances and an outdated medical treatment call for the validation of new targets involved in this crucial pathway. In this regard, the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase KasA is a promising enzyme. In this study, three molecular dynamics simulations based on the wildtype crystal structures of inhibitor bound and unbound KasA were performed in order to investigate the flexibility and conformational space of this target. We present an exhaustive analysis of the binding-site flexibility and representative pocket conformations that may serve as new starting points for structure-based drug design. We also revealed a mechanism which may account for the comparatively low binding affinity of thiolactomycin. Furthermore, we examined the behavior of water molecules within the binding pocket and provide recommendations how to handle them in the drug design process. Finally, we analyzed the dynamics of a channel that accommodates the long-chain fatty acid substrates and, thereby, propose a mechanism of substrate access to this channel and how products are most likely released.

  6. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-03-20

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT.

  7. Interactions of human P-glycoprotein transport substrates and inhibitors at the drug binding domain: Functional and molecular docking analyses.

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Onat; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Valoti, Massimo; Frosini, Maria; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Rhodamine 123 (R123) transport substrate sensitizes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to inhibition by compound 2c (cis-cis) N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl ester isomer in a concentration-dependent manner in human MDR1-gene transfected mouse T-lymphoma L5178 cells as shown previously. By contrast, epirubicin (EPI) concentration changes left unaltered 2c IC50 values of EPI efflux. To clarify this discrepancy, defined molecular docking (DMD) analyses of 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters, the highly flexible aryl ester analog 4, and several P-gp substrate/non-substrate inhibitors were performed on human P-gp drug- or nucleotide-binding domains (DBD or NBD). DMD measurements yielded lowest binding energy (LBE, kcal/mol) values (mean ± SD) ranging from -11.8 ± 0.54 (valspodar) to -3.98 ± 0.01 (4). Lys234, Ser952 and Tyr953 residues formed H-bonds with most of the compounds. Only 2c docked also at ATP binding site (LBE value of -6.9 ± 0.30 kcal/mol). Inhibition of P-gp-mediated R123 efflux by 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters and 4 significantly correlated with LBE values. DMD analysis of EPI, (3)H-1EPI, (3)H-2EPI, (14)C-1EPI, (14)C-2EPI, R123 and 2c before and after previous docking of each of them indicated that pre-docking of either 2c or EPI significantly reduced LBE of both EPI and R123, and that of both (3)H-2EPI and (14)C-2EPI, respectively. Since the clusters of DBD amino acid residues interacting with EPI were different, if EPI docked alone or after pre-docking of EPI or 2c, the existence of alternative secondary binding site for EPI on P-gp is credible. In conclusion, 2c may allocate the drug-binding pocket and reduce strong binding of EPI and R123 in agreement with P-gp inhibition experiments, where 2c reduced efflux of EPI and R123.

  8. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Luis E; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2014-07-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor.

  9. Mutations in arrestin-3 differentially affect binding to neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Babilon, Stefanie; Wanka, Lizzy; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity in arrestins and the phylogenetic analysis of the arrestin (arr) family, we introduced fifteen mutations of receptor-discriminator residues in arr-3, which were identified previously using mutagenesis, in vitro binding, and BRET-based recruitment assay in intact cells. The effects of these mutations were tested using neuropeptide Y receptors Y1R and Y2R. NPY-elicited arr-3 recruitment to Y1R was not affected by these mutations, or even alanine substitution of all ten residues (arr-3-NCA), which prevented arr-3 binding to other receptors tested so far. However, NCA and two other mutations prevented agonist-independent arr-3 pre-docking to Y1R. In contrast, eight out of 15 mutations significantly reduced agonist-dependent arr-3 recruitment to Y2R. NCA eliminated arr-3 binding to active Y2R, whereas Tyr239Thr reduced it ~7-fold. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface generates arr-3 with high preference for Y1R over Y2R. Several mutations differentially affect arr-3 pre-docking and agonist-induced recruitment. Thus, arr-3 recruitment to the receptor involves several mechanistically distinct steps. Targeted mutagenesis can fine-tune arrestins directing them to specific receptors and particular activation states of the same receptor. PMID:24686081

  10. The ABBA motif binds APC/C activators and is shared by APC/C substrates and regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hagting, Anja; Izawa, Daisuke; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gibson, Toby J.; Pines, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    The APC/C is the ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis by targeting specific proteins for degradation at specific times under the control of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC). How the APC/C recognises its different substrates is a key problem in the control of cell division. Here, we have identified the ABBA motif in Cyclin A, BUBR1, BUB1 and Acm1, and show that it binds to the APC/C co-activator CDC20. The ABBA motif in Cyclin A is required for its proper degradation in prometaphase through competing with BUBR1 for the same site on CDC20. Moreover, the ABBA motifs in BUBR1 and BUB1 are necessary for the SAC to work at full strength and to recruit CDC20 to kinetochores. Thus, we have identified a conserved motif integral to the proper control of mitosis that connects APC/C substrate recognition with the SAC. PMID:25669885

  11. Crystal Structure of StnA for the Biosynthesis of Antitumor Drug Streptonigrin Reveals a Unique Substrate Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tianle; Wo, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Song, Quanwei; Feng, Guoqiang; Luo, Ray; Lin, Shuangjin; Wu, Geng; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Streptonigrin methylesterase A (StnA) is one of the tailoring enzymes that modify the aminoquinone skeleton in the biosynthesis pathway of Streptomyces species. Although StnA has no significant sequence homology with the reported α/β-fold hydrolases, it shows typical hydrolytic activity in vivo and in vitro. In order to reveal its functional characteristics, the crystal structures of the selenomethionine substituted StnA (SeMet-StnA) and the complex (S185A mutant) with its substrate were resolved to the resolution of 2.71 Å and 2.90 Å, respectively. The overall structure of StnA can be described as an α-helix cap domain on top of a common α/β hydrolase domain. The substrate methyl ester of 10′-demethoxystreptonigrin binds in a hydrophobic pocket that mainly consists of cap domain residues and is close to the catalytic triad Ser185-His349-Asp308. The transition state is stabilized by an oxyanion hole formed by the backbone amides of Ala102 and Leu186. The substrate binding appears to be dominated by interactions with several specific hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonds in the cap domain. The molecular dynamics simulation and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the important roles of the key interacting residues in the cap domain. Structural alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis indicate that StnA represents a new subfamily of lipolytic enzymes with the specific binding pocket located at the cap domain instead of the interface between the two domains. PMID:28074848

  12. Single-stranded DNA Binding by the Helix-Hairpin-Helix Domain of XPF Protein Contributes to the Substrate Specificity of the ERCC1-XPF Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Faridounnia, Maryam; Kovacic, Lidija; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2017-02-17

    The nucleotide excision repair protein complex ERCC1-XPF is required for incision of DNA upstream of DNA damage. Functional studies have provided insights into the binding of ERCC1-XPF to various DNA substrates. However, because no structure for the ERCC1-XPF-DNA complex has been determined, the mechanism of substrate recognition remains elusive. Here we biochemically characterize the substrate preferences of the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains of XPF and ERCC-XPF and show that the binding to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/dsDNA junctions is dependent on joint binding to the DNA binding domain of ERCC1 and XPF. We reveal that the homodimeric XPF is able to bind various ssDNA sequences but with a clear preference for guanine-containing substrates. NMR titration experiments and in vitro DNA binding assays also show that, within the heterodimeric ERCC1-XPF complex, XPF specifically recognizes ssDNA. On the other hand, the HhH domain of ERCC1 preferentially binds dsDNA through the hairpin region. The two separate non-overlapping DNA binding domains in the ERCC1-XPF heterodimer jointly bind to an ssDNA/dsDNA substrate and, thereby, at least partially dictate the incision position during damage removal. Based on structural models, NMR titrations, DNA-binding studies, site-directed mutagenesis, charge distribution, and sequence conservation, we propose that the HhH domain of ERCC1 binds to dsDNA upstream of the damage, and XPF binds to the non-damaged strand within a repair bubble.

  13. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in F. vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging. PMID:26483826

  14. Purification and characterization of Ak.1 protease, a thermostable subtilisin with a disulphide bond in the substrate-binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Toogood, H S; Smith, C A; Baker, E N; Daniel, R M

    2000-08-15

    Ak.1 protease, a thermostable subtilisin isolated originally from Bacillus st. Ak.1, was purified to homogeneity from the Escherichia coli clone PB5517. It is active against substrates containing neutral or hydrophobic branched-chain amino acids at the P(1) site, such as valine, alanine or phenylalanine. The K(m) and k(cat) of the enzyme decrease with decreasing temperature, though not to the same degree with all substrates, suggesting that specificity changes with temperature. The protease is markedly stabilized by Ca(2+) ions. At 70 degrees C, a 10-fold increase in Ca(2+) concentration increases the half-life by three orders of magnitude. Ak.1 protease is stabilized by Ca(2+) to a greater extent than is thermitase. This may be due, in part, to the presence of an extra Ca(2+)-binding site in Ak.1 protease. Other metal ions, such as Sr(2+), increase the thermostability of the enzyme, but to a significantly lower degree than does Ca(2+). The structure of the protease showed the presence of a disulphide bond located within the active-site cleft. This bond influences both enzyme activity and thermostability. The disulphide bond appears to have a dual role: maintaining the integrity of the substrate-binding cleft and increasing the thermostability of the protease. The protease was originally investigated to determine its usefulness in the clean-up of DNA at high temperatures. However, it was found that this protease has a limited substrate specificity, so this application was not explored further.

  15. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid: the forgotten detection substrate for ligand-binding assay-based bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Gregor; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Heinrich, Julia; Staack, Roland F

    2017-02-01

    Ligand-binding assays are ideal for routine bioanalysis, but we reason that the straightforward replacement of the conventional chromogenic horseradish peroxidase substrate, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid, of a routinely used preclinical immunoassay to detect hIgG, with the fluorogenic 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid would broaden the narrow dynamic range. The replacement leads to a sensitivity of 0.47 (minimum required dilution [MRD] 10) and 1.02 (MRD 50) ng/ml, and dynamic ranges of 3.3 (MRD 10) and 3.6 (MRD 50) orders of magnitude, and thereby had improved sensitivity and dynamic range compared with other conventional colorimetric ELISAs, other ligand-binding assay technologies or LC-MS assays. Improvements in sensitivity and dynamic range were achieved for the sera of horse, mice and monkeys without assay optimization.

  16. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  17. Small heat shock protein IbpB acts as a robust chaperone in living cells by hierarchically activating its multi-type substrate-binding residues.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinmiao; Shi, Xiaodong; Yin, Linxiang; Liu, Jiafeng; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Chang, Zengyi

    2013-04-26

    As ubiquitous molecular chaperones, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are crucial for protein homeostasis. It is not clear why sHSPs are able to bind a wide spectrum of non-native substrate proteins and how such binding is enhanced by heat shock. Here, by utilizing a genetically incorporated photo-cross-linker (p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine), we systematically characterized the substrate-binding residues in IbpB (a sHSP from Escherichia coli) in living cells over a wide spectrum of temperatures (from 20 to 50 °C). A total of 20 and 48 residues were identified at normal and heat shock temperatures, respectively. They are not necessarily hydrophobic and can be classified into three types: types I and II were activated at low and normal temperatures, respectively, and type III mediated oligomerization at low temperature but switched to substrate binding at heat shock temperature. In addition, substrate binding of IbpB in living cells began at temperatures as low as 25 °C and was further enhanced upon temperature elevation. Together, these in vivo data provide novel structural insights into the wide substrate spectrum of sHSPs and suggest that sHSP is able to hierarchically activate its multi-type substrate-binding residues and thus act as a robust chaperone in cells under fluctuating growth conditions.

  18. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Hachem, Maher Abou; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Kramhøft, Birte; Svensson, Birte

    2006-09-18

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites as binding barriers. Barley alpha-amylase 1 mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in alpha-amylases.

  19. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  20. SNP2TFBS - a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-04

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/.

  1. Substrate masking: binding of RNA by EGTA-inactivated micrococcal nuclease results in artifactual inhibition of RNA processing reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M J; Gegenheimer, P

    1990-01-01

    Inhibition of an RNA processing reaction after treatment with the Ca2(+)-dependent micrococcal nuclease (MN) is often used as a criterion for the presence of a required RNA or ribonucleoprotein component in the system. Following MN digestion, the nuclease is inactivated with EGTA and radiolabeled substrate is added to assay for remaining RNA processing activity. We found previously that inhibition of RNA processing by MN need not involve RNA hydrolysis: EGTA-inactivated MN can suppress RNA processing if the assay is performed in the absence of carrier RNA. We now demonstrate both by native gel electrophoresis and by nitrocellulose filter retention that EGTA-inactivated MN forms a complex with free RNA which can be dissociated by addition of synthetic polynucleotides or heparin. In the absence of Ca2+, nuclease binds to precursor tRNA with an apparent KD congruent to 1.4 x 10(-6) M, comparable to its reported affinity for DNA. In an assay for endonucleolytic tRNA maturation, inactivated MN bound to radiolabeled pre-tRNA physically blocks the sites of endonuclease cleavage and prevents tRNA processing. We call this phenomenon 'substrate masking'. Addition of excess carrier RNA competes with pre-tRNA for MN binding and restores normal processing. Images PMID:2123540

  2. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions.

  3. Crystal structure of tyrosine decarboxylase and identification of key residues involved in conformational swing and substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haixia; Xu, Guochao; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xudong; Han, Ruizhi; Zhou, Jiahai; Ni, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) is a pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and is mainly responsible for the synthesis of tyramine, an important biogenic amine. In this study, the crystal structures of the apo and holo forms of Lactobacillus brevis TDC (LbTDC) were determined. The LbTDC displays only 25% sequence identity with the only reported TDC structure. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conformationally flexible sites and catalytic center was performed to investigate the potential catalytic mechanism. It was found that H241 in the active site plays an important role in PLP binding because it has different conformations in the apo and holo structures of LbTDC. After binding to PLP, H241 rotated to the position adjacent to the PLP pyridine ring. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed several crucial regions that determine the substrate specificity and catalytic activity. Among the mutants, the S586A variant displayed increased catalytic efficiency and substrate affinity, which is attributed to decreased steric hindrance and increased hydrophobicity, as verified by the saturation mutagenesis at S586. Our results provide structural information about the residues important for the protein engineering of TDC to improve catalytic efficiency in the green manufacturing of tyramine. PMID:27292129

  4. Molecular modeling and docking of novel laccase from multiple serotype of Yersinia enterocolitica suggests differential and multiple substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Sharma, Krishna Kant; Dhar, Mahesh Shanker; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2014-06-20

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are widely distributed in bacteria, where they are responsible for metal homeostasis, acquisition and oxidation. Using specific primers, yacK coding for MCO was amplified from different serotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1A. Homology modeling of the protein followed by docking with five well-known substrates for different MCO's (viz., 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid [ABTS], syringaldazine, L-tyrosine, ammonium ferrous sulfate and guaiacol), lignin monomers (Coniferyl alcohol, p-coumaryl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol) and two inhibitors i.e., kojic acid and N-hydroxyglycine was done. The docking gave maximum GoldScore i.e., 91.93 and 72.64 with ammonium ferrous sulfate and ABTS, respectively. Similarly, docking with ICM gave -82.10 and -83.61 docking score, confirming the protein to be true laccase with ferroxidase activity. Further, validation with ammonium ferrous sulfate as substrate gave laccase activity of 0.36Units/L/min. Guaiacol, L-tyrosine, and lignin monomers showed good binding affinity with protein models with GoldScores of 35.89, 41.82, 40.41, 41.12 and 43.10, respectively. The sequence study of all the cloned Yack genes showed serotype specific clade in dendrogram. There was distinct discrimination in the ligand binding affinity of Y. enterocolitica laccase, among strains of same clonal groups, suggesting it as a tool for phylogenetic studies.

  5. QM/MM computational studies of substrate water binding to the oxygen-evolving centre of photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Sproviero, Eduardo M; Shinopoulos, Katherine; Gascón, José A; McEvoy, James P; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports computational studies of substrate water binding to the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII), completely ligated by amino acid residues, water, hydroxide and chloride. The calculations are based on quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics hybrid models of the OEC of PSII, recently developed in conjunction with the X-ray crystal structure of PSII from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The model OEC involves a cuboidal Mn3CaO4Mn metal cluster with three closely associated manganese ions linked to a single μ4-oxo-ligated Mn ion, often called the ‘dangling manganese’. Two water molecules bound to calcium and the dangling manganese are postulated to be substrate molecules, responsible for dioxygen formation. It is found that the energy barriers for the Mn(4)-bound water agree nicely with those of model complexes. However, the barriers for Ca-bound waters are substantially larger. Water binding is not simply correlated to the formal oxidation states of the metal centres but rather to their corresponding electrostatic potential atomic charges as modulated by charge-transfer interactions. The calculations of structural rearrangements during water exchange provide support for the experimental finding that the exchange rates with bulk 18O-labelled water should be smaller for water molecules coordinated to calcium than for water molecules attached to the dangling manganese. The models also predict that the S1→S2 transition should produce opposite effects on the two water-exchange rates. PMID:17971333

  6. Ionic contacts at DnaK substrate binding domain involved in the allosteric regulation of lid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Moro, Fernando; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Acebrón, Sergio P; Muga, Arturo

    2006-03-17

    To gain further insight into the interactions involved in the allosteric transition of DnaK we have characterized wild-type (wt) protein and three mutants in which ionic interactions at the interface between the two subdomains of the substrate binding domain, and within the lid subdomain have been disrupted. Our data show that ionic contacts, most likely forming an electrically charged network, between the N-terminal region of helix B and an inner loop of the beta-sandwich are involved in maintaining the position of the lid relative to the beta-subdomain in the ADP state but not in the ATP state of the protein. Disruption of the ionic interactions between the C-terminal region of helix B and the outer loops of the beta-sandwich, known as the latch, does not have the same conformational consequences but results equally in an inactive protein. This indicates that a variety of mechanisms can inactivate this complex allosteric machine. Our results identify the ionic contacts at the subdomain and interdomain interfaces that are part of the hinge region involved in the ATP-induced allosteric displacement of the lid away from the peptide binding site. These interactions also stabilize peptide-Hsp70 complexes at physiological (37 degrees C) and stress (42 degrees C) temperatures, a requirement for productive substrate (re)folding.

  7. On the functional role of Arg172 in substrate binding and allosteric transition in Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Lucumí-Moreno, Armando; Calcagno, Mario L

    2005-10-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (EC 3.5.99.6) is an allosteric enzyme, activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate, which converts glucosamine-6-phosphate into fructose 6-phosphate and ammonia. X-ray crystallographic structural models have showed that Arg172 and Lys208, together with the segment 41-44 of the main chain backbone, are involved in binding the substrate phospho group when the enzyme is in the R activated state. A set of mutants of the enzyme involving the targeted residues were constructed to analyze the role of Arg172 and Lys208 in deaminase allosteric function. The mutant enzymes were characterized by kinetic, chemical, and spectrometric methods, revealing conspicuous changes in their allosteric properties. The study of these mutants indicated that Arg172 which is located in the highly flexible motif 158-187 forming the active site lid has a specific role in binding the substrate to the enzyme in the T state. The possible role of this interaction in the conformational coupling of the active and the allosteric sites is discussed.

  8. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement.

  9. Characterization of substrate binding and catalysis in the potential antibacterial target N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU)

    PubMed Central

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Zhu, Yaqi; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Spessard, Cindy; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Banotai, Craig; Melnick, Michael; McDowell, Laura

    2007-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) catalyzes the first step in peptidoglycan biosynthesis in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The products of the GlmU reaction are essential for bacterial survival, making this enzyme an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. A series of Haemophilus influenzae GlmU (hiGlmU) structures were determined by X-ray crystallography in order to provide structural and functional insights into GlmU activity and inhibition. The information derived from these structures was combined with biochemical characterization of the K25A, Q76A, D105A, Y103A, V223A, and E224A hiGlmU mutants in order to map these active-site residues to catalytic activity of the enzyme and refine the mechanistic model of the GlmU uridyltransferase reaction. These studies suggest that GlmU activity follows a sequential substrate-binding order that begins with UTP binding noncovalently to the GlmU enzyme. The uridyltransferase active site then remains in an open apo-like conformation until N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate (GlcNAc-1-P) binds and induces a conformational change at the GlcNAc-binding subsite. Following the binding of GlcNAc-1-P to the UTP-charged uridyltransferase active site, the non-esterified oxygen of GlcNAc-1-P performs a nucleophilic attack on the α-phosphate group of UTP. The new data strongly suggest that the mechanism of phosphotransfer in the uridyltransferase reaction in GlmU is primarily through an associative mechanism with a pentavalent phosphate intermediate and an inversion of stereochemistry. Finally, the structural and biochemical characterization of the uridyltransferase active site and catalytic mechanism described herein provides a basis for the structure-guided design of novel antibacterial agents targeting GlmU activity. PMID:18029420

  10. Function of Phe-259 and Thr-314 within the Substrate Binding Pocket of the Juvenile Hormone Esterase of Manduca sexta†

    PubMed Central

    Kamita, Shizuo G.; Wogulis, Mark D.; Law, Christopher S.; Morisseau, Christophe; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Huang, Huazhang; Wilson, David K.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key insect developmental hormone that is found at low nanomolar levels in larval insects. The methyl ester of JH is hydrolyzed in many insects by an esterase that shows high specificity for JH. We have previously determined a crystal structure of the JH esterase (JHE) of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta (MsJHE) [Wogulis, M., Wheelock, C. E., Kamita, S. G., Hinton, A. C., Whetstone, P. A., Hammock, B. D., and Wilson, D. K. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 4045-4057]. Our molecular modeling indicates that JH fits very tightly within the substrate binding pocket of MsJHE. This tight fit places two non-catalytic amino acid residues, Phe-259 and Thr-314, within the appropriate distance and geometry to potentially interact with the α,β-unsaturated ester and epoxide, respectively, of JH. These residues are highly conserved in numerous biologically active JHEs. Kinetic analyses of mutants of Phe-259 or Thr-314 indicate that these residues contribute to the low KM that MsJHE shows for JH. This low KM, however, comes at the cost of reduced substrate turnover. Neither nucleophilic attack of the resonance stabilized ester by the catalytic serine nor the availability of a water molecule for attack of the acyl-enzyme intermediate appear to be a rate-determining step in the hydrolysis of JH by MsJHE. We hypothesize that the release of the JH acid metabolite from the substrate binding pocket limits the catalytic cycle. Our findings also demonstrate that chemical bond strength does not necessarily correlate with how reactive the bond will be to metabolism. PMID:20307057

  11. Rational design of a carboxylic esterase RhEst1 based on computational analysis of substrate binding

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng -Jiao; Yu, Hui -Lei; ...

    2015-10-31

    A new carboxylic esterase RhEst1 which catalyzes the hydrolysis of (S)-(+)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate (S-DmCpCe), the key chiral building block of cilastatin, was identified and subsequently crystallized in our previous work. Mutant RhEst1A147I/V148F/G254A was found to show a 5-fold increase in the catalytic activity. In this work, molecular dynamic simulations were performed to elucidate the molecular determinant of the enzyme activity. Our simulations show that the substrate binds much more strongly in the A147I/V148F/G254A mutant than in wild type, with more hydrogen bonds formed between the substrate and the catalytic triad and the oxyanion hole. The OH group of the catalytic residue Ser101more » in the mutant is better positioned to initiate the nucleophilic attack on S-DmCpCe. Interestingly, the "170-179" loop which is involved in shaping the catalytic sites and facilitating the product release shows remarkable dynamic differences in the two systems. Based on the simulation results, six residues were identified as potential "hot-spots" for further experimental testing. Consequently, the G126S and R133L mutants show higher catalytic efficiency as compared with the wild type. In conclusion, this work provides molecular-level insights into the substrate binding mechanism of carboxylic esterase RhEst1, facilitating future experimental efforts toward developing more efficient RhEst1 variants for industrial applications.« less

  12. Rational design of a carboxylic esterase RhEst1 based on computational analysis of substrate binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng -Jiao; Yu, Hui -Lei; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian -He

    2015-10-31

    A new carboxylic esterase RhEst1 which catalyzes the hydrolysis of (S)-(+)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate (S-DmCpCe), the key chiral building block of cilastatin, was identified and subsequently crystallized in our previous work. Mutant RhEst1A147I/V148F/G254A was found to show a 5-fold increase in the catalytic activity. In this work, molecular dynamic simulations were performed to elucidate the molecular determinant of the enzyme activity. Our simulations show that the substrate binds much more strongly in the A147I/V148F/G254A mutant than in wild type, with more hydrogen bonds formed between the substrate and the catalytic triad and the oxyanion hole. The OH group of the catalytic residue Ser101 in the mutant is better positioned to initiate the nucleophilic attack on S-DmCpCe. Interestingly, the "170-179" loop which is involved in shaping the catalytic sites and facilitating the product release shows remarkable dynamic differences in the two systems. Based on the simulation results, six residues were identified as potential "hot-spots" for further experimental testing. Consequently, the G126S and R133L mutants show higher catalytic efficiency as compared with the wild type. In conclusion, this work provides molecular-level insights into the substrate binding mechanism of carboxylic esterase RhEst1, facilitating future experimental efforts toward developing more efficient RhEst1 variants for industrial applications.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG binds and unwinds model DNA substrates with a preference for Holliday junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Balasingham, Seetha V.; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Homberset, Håvard

    2012-01-01

    The RecG enzyme, a superfamily 2 helicase, is present in nearly all bacteria. Here we report for the first time that the recG gene is also present in the genomes of most vascular plants as well as in green algae, but is not found in other eukaryotes or archaea. The precise function of RecG is poorly understood, although ample evidence shows that it plays critical roles in DNA repair, recombination and replication. We further demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG (RecGMtb) DNA binding activity had a broad substrate specificity, whereas it only unwound branched-DNA substrates such as Holliday junctions (HJs), replication forks, D-loops and R-loops, with a strong preference for the HJ as a helicase substrate. In addition, RecGMtb preferentially bound relatively long (≥40 nt) ssDNA, exhibiting a higher affinity for the homopolymeric nucleotides poly(dT), poly(dG) and poly(dC) than for poly(dA). RecGMtb helicase activity was supported by hydrolysis of ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, Cu2+ or Fe2+. Like its Escherichia coli orthologue, RecGMtb is also a strictly DNA-dependent ATPase. PMID:22628485

  14. Two RNA-binding sites in plant fibrillarin provide interactions with various RNA substrates

    PubMed Central

    Rakitina, D. V.; Taliansky, Michael; Brown, J. W. S.; Kalinina, N. O.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrillarin, one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, plays several essential roles in ribosome biogenesis including pre-rRNA processing and 2′-O-ribose methylation of rRNA and snRNAs. Recently, it has been shown that fibrillarin plays a role in virus infections and is associated with viral RNPs. Here, we demonstrate the ability of recombinant fibrillarin 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtFib2) to interact with RNAs of different lengths and types including rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA, siRNA and viral RNAs in vitro. Our data also indicate that AtFib2 possesses two RNA-binding sites in the central (138–179 amino acids) and C-terminal (225–281 amino acids) parts of the protein, respectively. The conserved GCVYAVEF octamer does not bind RNA directly as suggested earlier, but may assist with the proper folding of the central RNA-binding site. PMID:21785141

  15. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin.

  16. Insights into substrate binding to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II from ammonia inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-01-20

    Water oxidation in Photosystem II occurs at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which cycles through distinct intermediates, S0-S4. The inhibitor ammonia selectively binds to the S2 state at an unresolved site that is not competitive with substrate water. By monitoring the yields of flash-induced oxygen production, we show that ammonia decreases the net efficiency of OEC turnover and slows the decay kinetics of S2 to S1. The temperature dependence of biphasic S2 decay kinetics provides activation energies that do not vary in control and ammonia conditions. We interpret our data in the broader context of previous studies by introducing a kinetic model for both the formation and decay of ammonia-bound S2. The model predicts ammonia binds to S2 rapidly (t1/2 = 1 ms) with a large equilibrium constant. This finding implies that ammonia decreases the reduction potential of S2 by at least 2.7 kcal mol(-1) (>120 mV), which is not consistent with ammonia substitution of a terminal water ligand of Mn(IV). Instead, these data support the proposal that ammonia binds as a bridging ligand between two Mn atoms. Implications for the mechanism of O-O bond formation are discussed.

  17. Influence of donor substrate on kinetic parameters of thiamine diphosphate binding to transketolase.

    PubMed

    Ospanov, R V; Kochetov, G A; Kurganov, B I

    2007-01-01

    The two-step mechanism of interaction of thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) with transketolase (TK) has been studied: TK + ThDP <--> TK...ThDP <--> TK*-ThDP. The scheme involves the formation of inactive intermediate complex TK...ThDP followed by its transformation into catalytically active holoenzyme, TK*-ThDP. The dissociation and kinetic constants for individual stages of this process have been determined. The values of forward and backward rate constants change in the presence of the donor substrate hydroxypyruvate. This finally leads to an increase in the overall affinity of the coenzyme to TK.

  18. The RNA-binding protein RNP29 is an unusual Toc159 transport substrate

    PubMed Central

    Grimmer, Julia; Rödiger, Anja; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Baginsky, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    The precursors of RNP29 and Ferredoxin (Fd2) were previously identified in the cytosol of ppi2 plant cells with their N-terminal amino acid acetylated. Here, we explore whether precursor accumulation in ppi2 is characteristic for Toc159 client proteins, by characterizing the import properties of the RNP29 precursor in comparison to Fd2 and other Toc159-dependent or independent substrates. We find specific accumulation of the RNP29 precursor in ppi2 but not in wild type or ppi1 protoplasts. With the exception of Lhcb4, precursor accumulation is also detected with all other tested constructs in ppi2. However, RNP29 is clearly different from the other proteins because only precursor but almost no mature protein is detectable in protoplast extracts. Co-transformation of RNP29 with Toc159 complements its plastid import, supporting the hypothesis that RNP29 is a Toc159-dependent substrate. Exchange of the second amino acid in the RNP29 transit peptide to Glu or Asn prevents methionine excision but not N-terminal acetylation, suggesting that different N-acetyltransferases may act on chloroplast precursor proteins in vivo. All different RNP29 constructs are efficiently imported into wild type but not into ppi2 plastids, arguing for a minor impact of the N-terminal amino acid on the import process. PMID:24982663

  19. Grip it and rip it: structural mechanisms of DNA helicase substrate binding and unwinding.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; Keck, James L

    2014-11-01

    Maintenance and faithful transmission of genomic information depends on the efficient execution of numerous DNA replication, recombination, and repair pathways. Many of the enzymes that catalyze steps within these pathways require access to sequence information that is buried in the interior of the DNA double helix, which makes DNA unwinding an essential cellular reaction. The unwinding process is mediated by specialized molecular motors called DNA helicases that couple the chemical energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to the otherwise non-spontaneous unwinding reaction. An impressive number of high-resolution helicase structures are now available that, together with equally important mechanistic studies, have begun to define the features that allow this class of enzymes to function as molecular motors. In this review, we explore the structural features within DNA helicases that are used to bind and unwind DNA. We focus in particular on "aromatic-rich loops" that allow some helicases to couple single-stranded DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis and "wedge/pin" elements that provide mechanical tools for DNA strand separation when connected to translocating motor domains.

  20. Coordination of substrate binding and ATP hydrolysis in Vps4-mediated ESCRT-III disassembly.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brian A; Azmi, Ishara F; Payne, Johanna; Shestakova, Anna; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Babst, Markus; Katzmann, David J

    2010-10-01

    ESCRT-III undergoes dynamic assembly and disassembly to facilitate membrane exvagination processes including multivesicular body (MVB) formation, enveloped virus budding, and membrane abscission during cytokinesis. The AAA-ATPase Vps4 is required for ESCRT-III disassembly, however the coordination of Vps4 ATP hydrolysis with ESCRT-III binding and disassembly is not understood. Vps4 ATP hydrolysis has been proposed to execute ESCRT-III disassembly as either a stable oligomer or an unstable oligomer whose dissociation drives ESCRT-III disassembly. An in vitro ESCRT-III disassembly assay was developed to analyze Vps4 function during this process. The studies presented here support a model in which Vps4 acts as a stable oligomer during ATP hydrolysis and ESCRT-III disassembly. Moreover, Vps4 oligomer binding to ESCRT-III induces coordination of ATP hydrolysis at the level of individual Vps4 subunits. These results suggest that Vps4 functions as a stable oligomer that acts upon individual ESCRT-III subunits to facilitate ESCRT-III disassembly.

  1. Probing the substrate-binding sites of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with the procion dye green HE-4BD.

    PubMed Central

    McArdell, J E; Duffield, M; Atkinson, T

    1989-01-01

    A reactive bis-dichloro derivative of the Procion dye Green HE-4BD was shown to inactivate irreversibly methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MTS) from Escherichia coli and also tryptophyl-tRNA synthetase (WTS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YTS) from Bacillus stearothermophilus at pH 8.5 and 37 degrees C. At a 5-fold excess of reactive dye over enzyme subunit concentration MTS was quantitatively inactivated within 20 min in the ATP/pyrophosphate exchange assay, whereas WTS and YTS show an 80% loss of activity over the same time period. The inactivation is affected by the addition of substrates, which either protect (WTS and YTS) or promote (YTS with tyrosine) the dye-mediated enzyme inactivation. Green HE-4BD-OH was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of MTS with respect to MgATP, methionine and tRNA substrates. PMID:2658972

  2. 2.0A resolution crystal structures of the ternary complexes of human phenylalanine hydroxylase catalytic domain with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine or L-norleucine: substrate specificity and molecular motions related to substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Stokka, Anne J; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2003-10-31

    The crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH) in complex with the physiological cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the substrate analogues 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) or L-norleucine (NLE) have been determined at 2.0A resolution. The ternary THA complex confirms a previous 2.5A structure, and the ternary NLE complex shows that similar large conformational changes occur on binding of NLE as those observed for THA. Both structures demonstrate that substrate binding triggers structural changes throughout the entire protomer, including the displacement of Tyr138 from a surface position to a buried position at the active site, with a maximum displacement of 20.7A for its hydroxyl group. Two hinge-bending regions, centred at Leu197 and Asn223, act in consort upon substrate binding to create further large structural changes for parts of the C terminus. Thus, THA/L-Phe binding to the active site is likely to represent the epicentre of the global conformational changes observed in the full-length tetrameric enzyme. The carboxyl and amino groups of THA and NLE are positioned identically in the two structures, supporting the conclusion that these groups are of key importance in substrate binding, thus explaining the broad non-physiological substrate specificity observed for artificially activated forms of the enzyme. However, the specific activity with NLE as the substrate was only about 5% of that with THA, which is explained by the different affinities of binding and different catalytic turnover.

  3. Structural Basis of Substrate-Binding Specificity of Human Arylamine N-acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,H.; Dombrovsky, L.; Tempel, W.; Martin, F.; Loppnau, P.; Goodfellow, G.; Grant, D.; Plotnikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    The human arylamine N-acetyltransferases NAT1 and NAT2 play an important role in the biotransformation of a plethora of aromatic amine and hydrazine drugs. They are also able to participate in the bioactivation of several known carcinogens. Each of these enzymes is genetically variable in human populations, and polymorphisms in NAT genes have been associated with various cancers. Here we have solved the high resolution crystal structures of human NAT1 and NAT2, including NAT1 in complex with the irreversible inhibitor 2-bromoacetanilide, a NAT1 active site mutant, and NAT2 in complex with CoA, and have refined them to 1.7-, 1.8-, and 1.9- Angstroms resolution, respectively. The crystal structures reveal novel structural features unique to human NATs and provide insights into the structural basis of the substrate specificity and genetic polymorphism of these enzymes.

  4. The 'pair of sugar tongs' site on the non-catalytic domain C of barley alpha-amylase participates in substrate binding and activity.

    PubMed

    Bozonnet, Sophie; Jensen, Morten T; Nielsen, Morten M; Aghajari, Nushin; Jensen, Malene H; Kramhøft, Birte; Willemoës, Martin; Tranier, Samuel; Haser, Richard; Svensson, Birte

    2007-10-01

    Some starch-degrading enzymes accommodate carbohydrates at sites situated at a certain distance from the active site. In the crystal structure of barley alpha-amylase 1, oligosaccharide is thus bound to the 'sugar tongs' site. This site on the non-catalytic domain C in the C-terminal part of the molecule contains a key residue, Tyr380, which has numerous contacts with the oligosaccharide. The mutant enzymes Y380A and Y380M failed to bind to beta-cyclodextrin-Sepharose, a starch-mimic resin used for alpha-amylase affinity purification. The K(d) for beta-cyclodextrin binding to Y380A and Y380M was 1.4 mm compared to 0.20-0.25 mm for the wild-type, S378P and S378T enzymes. The substitution in the S378P enzyme mimics Pro376 in the barley alpha-amylase 2 isozyme, which in spite of its conserved Tyr378 did not bind oligosaccharide at the 'sugar tongs' in the structure. Crystal structures of both wild-type and S378P enzymes, but not the Y380A enzyme, showed binding of the pseudotetrasaccharide acarbose at the 'sugar tongs' site. The 'sugar tongs' site also contributed importantly to the adsorption to starch granules, as Kd = 0.47 mg.mL(-1) for the wild-type enzyme increased to 5.9 mg.mL(-1) for Y380A, which moreover catalyzed the release of soluble oligosaccharides from starch granules with only 10% of the wild-type activity. beta-cyclodextrin both inhibited binding to and suppressed activity on starch granules for wild-type and S378P enzymes, but did not affect these properties of Y380A, reflecting the functional role of Tyr380. In addition, the Y380A enzyme hydrolyzed amylose with reduced multiple attack, emphasizing that the 'sugar tongs' participates in multivalent binding of polysaccharide substrates.

  5. Microseconds simulations reveal a new sodium-binding site and the mechanism of sodium-coupled substrate uptake by LeuT.

    PubMed

    Zomot, Elia; Gur, Mert; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-02

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine/alanine transporter LeuT is broadly used as a model system for studying the transport mechanism of neurotransmitters because of its structural and functional homology to mammalian transporters such as serotonin, dopamine, or norepinephrine transporters, and because of the resolution of its structure in different states. Although the binding sites (S1 for substrate, and Na1 and Na2 for two co-transported sodium ions) have been resolved, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of coupled Na(+)- and substrate-binding events. We present here results from extensive (>20 μs) unbiased molecular dynamics simulations generated using the latest computing technology. Simulations show that sodium binds initially the Na1 site, but not Na2, and, consistently, sodium unbinding/escape to the extracellular (EC) region first takes place at Na2, succeeded by Na1. Na2 diffusion back to the EC medium requires prior dissociation of substrate from S1. Significantly, Na(+) binding (and unbinding) consistently involves a transient binding to a newly discovered site, Na1″, near S1, as an intermediate state. A robust sequence of substrate uptake events coupled to sodium bindings and translocations between those sites assisted by hydration emerges from the simulations: (i) bindings of a first Na(+) to Na1″, translocation to Na1, a second Na(+) to vacated Na1″ and then to Na2, and substrate to S1; (ii) rotation of Phe(253) aromatic group to seclude the substrate from the EC region; and (iii) concerted tilting of TM1b and TM6a toward TM3 and TM8 to close the EC vestibule.

  6. Binding-induced Folding of Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-like Protein on the Mycobacterium Proteasomal ATPase Targets Substrates for Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    T Wang; K Heran Darwin; H Li

    2011-12-31

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  7. Binding-induced folding of prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein on the mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase targets substrates for degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H.; Darwin, K. H.

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses a proteasome system that is analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and is required for pathogenesis. However, the bacterial analog of ubiquitin, prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), is an intrinsically disordered protein that bears little sequence or structural resemblance to the highly structured ubiquitin. Thus, it was unknown how pupylated proteins were recruited to the proteasome. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium proteasomal ATPase (Mpa) has three pairs of tentacle-like coiled coils that recognize Pup. Mpa bound unstructured Pup through hydrophobic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of an {alpha}-helix in Pup. Our work describes a binding-induced folding recognition mechanism in the Pup-proteasome system that differs mechanistically from substrate recognition in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This key difference between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems could be exploited for the development of a small molecule-based treatment for tuberculosis.

  8. Substituting pine wood for pine bark affects physical properties of nursery substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pine bark (PB) is currently imported from southern U.S. states to those in the upper Midwest and Northeast U.S. Alternatives to pine bark that are regionally abundant and sustainable are needed for nursery substrates. The objective of this research was to determine the influence of chipped and hamm...

  9. Identification of catalysis, substrate, and coenzyme binding sites and improvement catalytic efficiency of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Lin, Peng; Yang, Ruonan; Fang, Baishan

    2016-10-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are continually used for the cofactor regeneration in biocatalysis and biotransformation with hiring NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases. Major weaknesses of most native FDHs are their low activity and operational stability in the catalytic reaction. In this work, the FDH from Candida boidinii (CboFDH) was engineered in order to gain an enzyme with high activity and better operational stability. Through comparing and analyzing its spatial structure with other FDHs, the catalysis, substrate, and coenzyme binding sites of the CboFDH were identified. To improve its performance, amino acids, which concentrated on the enzyme active site or in the conserved NAD(+) and substrate binding motif, were mutated. The mutant V120S had the highest catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m ) with COONH4 as it enhanced the catalytic velocity (k cat) and k cat/K m 3.48-fold and 1.60-fold, respectively, than that of the wild type. And, the double-mutant V120S-N187D had the highest k cat/K m with NAD(+) as it displayed an approximately 1.50-fold increase in k cat/K m . The mutants showed higher catalytic efficiency than other reported FDHs, suggesting that the mutation has achieved good results. The single and double mutants exhibited higher thermostability than the wild type. The structure-function relationship of single and double mutants was analyzed by homology models and site parsing. Asymmetric synthesis of L-tert-leucine was executed to evaluate the ability of cofactor regeneration of the mutants with about 100 % conversion rates. This work provides a helpful theoretical reference for the evolution of an enzyme in vitro and promotion of the industrial production of chiral compounds, e.g., amino acid and chiral amine.

  10. Homology modeling of Homo sapiens Lipoic acid Synthase: substrate docking and insights on its binding mode.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ezhilarasi; Hassan, Sameer; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Padmalayam, Indira; Rajaram, Rama; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2016-10-04

    Lipoic acid synthase (LIAS) is an iron-sulfur cluster mitochondrial enzyme which catalyzes the final step in the de novo pathway for the biosynthesis of lipoic acid, a potent antioxidant. Recently there has been significant interest in its role in metabolic diseases and its deficiency in LIAS expression has been linked to conditions such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and neonatal-onset epilepsy, suggesting a strong inverse correlation between LIAS reduction and disease status. In this study we use a bioinformatics approach to predict its structure, which would be helpful to understanding its role. A homology model for LIAS protein was generated using X - ray crystallographic structure of Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 (PDB ID: 4U0P). The predicted structure has 93% of the residues in the most favour region of Ramachandran plot. The active site of LIAS protein was mapped and docked with S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAM) using GOLD software. The LIAS - SAM complex was further refined using molecular dynamics simulation within the subsite 1 and subsite 3 of the active site. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report a reliable homology model of LIAS protein. This study will facilitate a better understanding mode of action of the enzyme-substrate complex for future studies in designing drugs that can target LIAS protein.

  11. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of substrate-competitive inhibitors of C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP).

    PubMed

    Korwar, Sudha; Morris, Benjamin L; Parikh, Hardik I; Coover, Robert A; Doughty, Tyler W; Love, Ian M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Royer, William E; Kellogg, Glen E; Grossman, Steven R; Ellis, Keith C

    2016-06-15

    C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional co-regulator that downregulates the expression of many tumor-suppressor genes. Utilizing a crystal structure of CtBP with its substrate 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) and NAD(+) as a guide, we have designed, synthesized, and tested a series of small molecule inhibitors of CtBP. From our first round of compounds, we identified 2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoic acid as a potent CtBP inhibitor (IC50=0.24μM). A structure-activity relationship study of this compound further identified the 4-chloro- (IC50=0.18μM) and 3-chloro- (IC50=0.17μM) analogues as additional potent CtBP inhibitors. Evaluation of the hydroxyimine analogues in a short-term cell growth/viability assay showed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-analogues are 2-fold and 4-fold more potent, respectively, than the MTOB control. A functional cellular assay using a CtBP-specific transcriptional readout revealed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-hydroxyimine analogues were able to block CtBP transcriptional repression activity. This data suggests that substrate-competitive inhibition of CtBP dehydrogenase activity is a potential mechanism to reactivate tumor-suppressor gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for cancer.

  12. The Effect of Substrate Microstructure on the Heat-Affected Zone Size in Sn-Zn Alloys Due to Adjoining Ni-Al Reactive Multilayer Foil Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, R. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; ...

    2015-08-05

    The rapid release of energy from reactive multilayer foils can create extreme local temperature gradients near substrate materials. To fully exploit the potential of these materials, a better understanding of the interaction between the substrate or filler material and the foil is needed. In particular, this work investigates how variations in local properties within the substrate (i.e. differences between properties in constituent phases) can affect heat transport into the substrate. Furthermore, this can affect the microstructural evolution observed within the substrate, which may affect the final joint properties. The effect of the initial substrate microstructure on microstructural evolution within themore » heat-affected zone is evaluated experimentally in two Sn-Zn alloys and numerical techniques are utilized to inform the analysis.« less

  13. The Effect of Substrate Microstructure on the Heat-Affected Zone Size in Sn-Zn Alloys Due to Adjoining Ni-Al Reactive Multilayer Foil Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, R. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-08-05

    The rapid release of energy from reactive multilayer foils can create extreme local temperature gradients near substrate materials. To fully exploit the potential of these materials, a better understanding of the interaction between the substrate or filler material and the foil is needed. In particular, this work investigates how variations in local properties within the substrate (i.e. differences between properties in constituent phases) can affect heat transport into the substrate. Furthermore, this can affect the microstructural evolution observed within the substrate, which may affect the final joint properties. The effect of the initial substrate microstructure on microstructural evolution within the heat-affected zone is evaluated experimentally in two Sn-Zn alloys and numerical techniques are utilized to inform the analysis.

  14. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Cesar L.; Yang, Linda; Dacks, Penny A.; Isoda, Fumiko; van Deursen, Jan M. A.; Mobbs, Charles V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance. Recent GWAS and network analyses have also implicated Cbp as the most connected gene in protein-protein interactions in human Type 2 diabetes. The present studies address mechanisms mediating the role of Cbp in diabetes by inhibiting hypothalamic Cbp using a Cre-lox strategy. Inhibition of hypothalamic Cbp results in profound obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis, increased food intake, and decreased body temperature. In addition, these changes are accompanied by molecular evidence in the hypothalamus for impaired leptin and insulin signaling, a shift from glucose to lipid metabolism, and decreased Pomc mRNA, with no effect on locomotion. Further assessment of the significance of the metabolic switch demonstrated that enhanced expression of hypothalamic Cpt1a, which promotes lipid metabolism, similarly resulted in increased body weight and reduced Pomc mRNA. PMID:27832201

  15. Changes in dynamics upon oligomerization regulate substrate binding and allostery in amino acid kinase family members.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Enrique; Crehuet, Ramon; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-09-01

    Oligomerization is a functional requirement for many proteins. The interfacial interactions and the overall packing geometry of the individual monomers are viewed as important determinants of the thermodynamic stability and allosteric regulation of oligomers. The present study focuses on the role of the interfacial interactions and overall contact topology in the dynamic features acquired in the oligomeric state. To this aim, the collective dynamics of enzymes belonging to the amino acid kinase family both in dimeric and hexameric forms are examined by means of an elastic network model, and the softest collective motions (i.e., lowest frequency or global modes of motions) favored by the overall architecture are analyzed. Notably, the lowest-frequency modes accessible to the individual subunits in the absence of multimerization are conserved to a large extent in the oligomer, suggesting that the oligomer takes advantage of the intrinsic dynamics of the individual monomers. At the same time, oligomerization stiffens the interfacial regions of the monomers and confers new cooperative modes that exploit the rigid-body translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the intact monomers. The present study sheds light on the mechanism of cooperative inhibition of hexameric N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase by arginine and on the allosteric regulation of UMP kinases. It also highlights the significance of the particular quaternary design in selectively determining the oligomer dynamics congruent with required ligand-binding and allosteric activities.

  16. Evaluation of normalized energy recovery (NER) in microbial fuel cells affected by reactor dimensions and substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Ge, Zheng; Kelly, Patrick; Zhang, Fei; He, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to provide an initial evaluation of normalized energy recovery (NER - a new parameter for presenting energy performance) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through investigation of the effects of reactor dimensions and anode substrates. Although the larger-size MFCs generally have lower maximum power densities, their maximum NER is comparable to that of the smaller MFCs at the same anolyte flow rate. The mixed messages obtained from the MFC size tests suggest that MFCs can be further scaled up without decreasing energy recovery under certain conditions. The low-strength substrates seem to be more suitable for MFC treatment of wastewater, in terms of both energy recovery and organic removal. However, because the MFCs could not achieve the maximum NER and the maximum organic removal efficiency at the same time, one must determine a major goal for MFCs treating wastewater between energy recovery and contaminant removal.

  17. Substrate utilization during brisk walking is affected by glycemic index and fructose content of a pre-exercise meal.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng-Hua; Wong, Stephen Heung-Sang; Huang, Ya-Jun; Chen, Ya-Jun; Tsang, Ka-Fai

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether both glycemic index (GI) and fructose content of a pre-exercise meal would affect substrate utilization during subsequent brisk walking. Ten healthy young males completed 60 min of 46% [Formula: see text] brisk walking 2 h after they consumed one of three breakfasts: a low-GI meal without fructose (LGI), a low-GI meal including fructose (LGIF), and a high-GI meal without fructose (HGI). The calculated GI values for the three meals were 41, 39, and 72, respectively. Substrate utilization was measured using indirect respiratory calorimetry method. During the postprandial period, the incremental area under the blood response curve values of glucose and insulin were higher in the HGI trial, compared with those in the LGI and LGIF trials (HGI vs. LGI and LGIF: Glucose 223.6 ± 19.1 vs. 70.2 ± 7.4 and 114.1 ± 16.4 mmol min L(-1); Insulin 4257 ± 932 vs. 920 ± 319 and 1487 ± 348 mU min L(-1)). During exercise, substrate preference was distinct based on different pre-exercise carbohydrate meals. Higher fat and lower carbohydrate oxidation was observed in the LGI trial, whereas both the HGI and LGIF trials were characterized by higher carbohydrate and lower fat oxidation (LGI vs. LGIF and HGI: Carbohydrate 59.3 ± 2.4 vs. 69.8 ± 3.9 and 72.7 ± 3.9 g; Fat 22.7 ± 2.0 vs. 18.5 ± 1.7 and 17.6 ± 1.3 g; P < 0.05). In conclusion, the presence of fructose in a LGI breakfast resulted in similar substrate utilization during subsequent brisk walking with that induced by a HGI breakfast. It appears that both the GI and fructose content in a breakfast individually affect substrate utilization during subsequent moderate intensity exercise.

  18. Histidines in potential substrate recognition sites affect thyroid hormone transport by monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8).

    PubMed

    Braun, Doreen; Lelios, Iva; Krause, Gerd; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8; SLC16A2) cause the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, a severe X-linked psychomotor retardation syndrome. MCT8 belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of 12 transmembrane-spanning proteins and transports thyroid hormones across the blood-brain barrier and into neurons. How MCT8 distinguishes thyroid hormone substrates from structurally closely related compounds is not known. The goal of this study was to identify critical amino acids along the transport channel cavity, which participate in thyroid hormone recognition. The fact that T3 is bound between a His-Arg clamp in the crystal structure of the T3 receptor/T3 complex prompted us to investigate whether such a motif might potentially be relevant for T3 recognition in MCT8. We therefore replaced candidate histidines and arginines by site-directed mutagenesis and performed activity assays in MDCK-1 cells and Xenopus oocytes. Histidines were replaced by alanine, phenylalanine, and glutamine to probe for molecular properties like aromatic ring structure and H-bonding properties. It was found that some mutations in His192 and His415 significantly changed substrate transport kinetics. Arg301 at the intracellular end of the substrate channel is at an ideal distance to His415 to participate in a His-Arg clamp and mutation to alanine-abrogated hormone transport. Molecular modeling demonstrates a perfect fit of T3 poised into the substrate channel between His415 and Arg301 and observing the same geometry as in the T3 receptor.

  19. The mechanism of nitrogenase. Computed details of the site and geometry of binding of alkyne and alkene substrates and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2004-09-29

    The chemical mechanism by which the enzyme nitrogenase effects the remarkable reduction of N(2) to NH(3) under ambient conditions continues to be enigmatic, because no intermediate has been observed directly. Recent experimental investigation of the enzymatic consequences of the valine --> alanine modification of residue alpha-70 of the component MoFe protein on the reduction of alkynes, together with EPR and ENDOR spectroscopic characterization of a trappable intermediate in the reduction of propargyl alcohol or propargyl amine (HCC[triple bond]C-CH(2)OH/NH(2)), has localized the site of binding and reduction of these substrates on the FeMo-cofactor and led to proposed eta(2)-Fe coordination geometry. Here these experimental data are modeled using density functional calculations of the allyl alcohol/amine intermediates and the propargyl alcohol/amine reactants coordinated to the FeMo-cofactor, together with force-field calculations of the interactions of these models with the surrounding MoFe protein. The results support and elaborate the earlier proposals, with the most probable binding site and geometry being eta(2)-coordination at Fe6 of the FeMo-cofactor (crystal structure in the Protein Database), in a position that is intermediate between the exo and endo coordination extremes at Fe6. The models described account for (1) the steric influence of the alpha-70 residue, (2) the crucial hydrogen bonding with Nepsilon of alpha-195(His), (3) the spectroscopic symmetry of the allyl-alcohol intermediate, and (4) the preferential stabilization of the allyl alcohol/amine relative to propargyl alcohol/amine. Alternative binding sites and geometries for ethyne and ethene, relevant to the wild-type protein, are described. This model defines the location and scene for detailed investigation of the mechanism of nitrogenase.

  20. An Effective Approach for Clustering InhA Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Using Substrate-Binding Cavity Features.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D A; Norberto de Souza, Osmar

    2015-01-01

    Protein receptor conformations, obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have become a promising treatment of its explicit flexibility in molecular docking experiments applied to drug discovery and development. However, incorporating the entire ensemble of MD conformations in docking experiments to screen large candidate compound libraries is currently an unfeasible task. Clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce such ensembles to a manageable size. Most studies investigate different algorithms using pairwise Root-Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) values for all, or part of the MD conformations. Nevertheless, the RMSD only may not be the most appropriate gauge to cluster conformations when the target receptor has a plastic active site, since they are influenced by changes that occur on other parts of the structure. Hence, we have applied two partitioning methods (k-means and k-medoids) and four agglomerative hierarchical methods (Complete linkage, Ward's, Unweighted Pair Group Method and Weighted Pair Group Method) to analyze and compare the quality of partitions between a data set composed of properties from an enzyme receptor substrate-binding cavity and two data sets created using different RMSD approaches. Ensembles of representative MD conformations were generated by selecting a medoid of each group from all partitions analyzed. We investigated the performance of our new method for evaluating binding conformation of drug candidates to the InhA enzyme, which were performed by cross-docking experiments between a 20 ns MD trajectory and 20 different ligands. Statistical analyses showed that the novel ensemble, which is represented by only 0.48% of the MD conformations, was able to reproduce 75% of all dynamic behaviors within the binding cavity for the docking experiments performed. Moreover, this new approach not only outperforms the other two RMSD-clustering solutions, but it also shows to be a promising strategy to distill

  1. An Effective Approach for Clustering InhA Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Using Substrate-Binding Cavity Features

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Duncan D. A.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar

    2015-01-01

    Protein receptor conformations, obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have become a promising treatment of its explicit flexibility in molecular docking experiments applied to drug discovery and development. However, incorporating the entire ensemble of MD conformations in docking experiments to screen large candidate compound libraries is currently an unfeasible task. Clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce such ensembles to a manageable size. Most studies investigate different algorithms using pairwise Root-Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) values for all, or part of the MD conformations. Nevertheless, the RMSD only may not be the most appropriate gauge to cluster conformations when the target receptor has a plastic active site, since they are influenced by changes that occur on other parts of the structure. Hence, we have applied two partitioning methods (k-means and k-medoids) and four agglomerative hierarchical methods (Complete linkage, Ward’s, Unweighted Pair Group Method and Weighted Pair Group Method) to analyze and compare the quality of partitions between a data set composed of properties from an enzyme receptor substrate-binding cavity and two data sets created using different RMSD approaches. Ensembles of representative MD conformations were generated by selecting a medoid of each group from all partitions analyzed. We investigated the performance of our new method for evaluating binding conformation of drug candidates to the InhA enzyme, which were performed by cross-docking experiments between a 20 ns MD trajectory and 20 different ligands. Statistical analyses showed that the novel ensemble, which is represented by only 0.48% of the MD conformations, was able to reproduce 75% of all dynamic behaviors within the binding cavity for the docking experiments performed. Moreover, this new approach not only outperforms the other two RMSD-clustering solutions, but it also shows to be a promising strategy to distill

  2. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  4. The CREB-binding protein affects the circadian regulation of behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Christian; Winter, Tobias; Chen, Siwei; Hung, Hsiu-Cheng; Weber, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Rhythmic changes in light and temperature conditions form the primary environmental cues that synchronize the molecular circadian clock of most species with the external cycles of day and night. Previous studies established a role for the CREB-binding protein (CBP) in molecular clock function by coactivation of circadian transcription. Here, we report that moderately increased levels of CBP strongly dampen circadian behavioural rhythms without affecting molecular oscillations of circadian transcription. Interestingly, light-dark cycles as well as high temperature facilitated a circadian control of behavioural activity. Based on these observations we propose that in addition to its coactivator function for circadian transcription, CBP is involved in the regulation of circadian behaviour down-stream of the circadian clock.

  5. Biodegradation of 3-chlorobenzoate as affected by rhizodeposition and selected carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Haby, P.A.; Crowley, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The plant rhizosphere has been hypothesized to generally increase the population numbers and activity of soil microorganisms that degrade various xenobiotic contaminants. However, the relative importance of increased C availability in the rhizosphere to microorganisms that directly metabolize xenobiotics as a C source for growth or that degrade xenobiotics through growth-linked metabolism and cometabolism is not well understood. We hypothesized that when a xenobiotic can be used directly as a growth substrate, the rhizosphere would have relatively little influence on the catabolizer population since the substrate provides an independent nutritional niche. However, increased C levels in the rhizosphere might enhance the numbers of microorganisms that degrade the xenobiotic through cometabolism or metabolism that is linked to growth on other substrates. To further examine this hypothesis, experiments were conducted with soil containing indigneous microorganisms capable of degrading the model compound 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB). The results showed degradation of 3-CB in 1:1 soil/water slurries from ryegrass rhizosphere soil that had not been previously exposed to 3-CB had a faster initial rate of 3-CB degradation than nonrhizosphere soil using glucose, mannitol, or benzoate. A long-term experiment further showed that the population size of microorganisms that degraded 3-CB in the absence of supplemental C (catabolizers), and those that degraded 3-CB in the rpesence of supplemental C, for example, via growth-linked metabolism or cometabolism, were enriched by 40- and 250-fold, respectively, in rhizosphere soil. In contrast, planted and nonplanted microcosms that were repeatedly exposed to 3-CB over 24 wk were similarly enriched for 3-CB degraders, which had a MPN of 4 x 10{sup 8} g{sup {minus}1} soil. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  6. CTCF-mediated reduction of vigilin binding affects the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Yan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Wei, Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ran; Yang, Wen-Li; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Wen-Quan; Huang, Yuan; Qin, Yang

    2014-05-02

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in numerous aspects of chromosome biology, and vigilin, a multi-KH-domain protein, participates in heterochromatin formation and chromosome segregation. We previously showed that CTCF interacts with vigilin. Here, we show that human vigilin, but not CTCF, colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. CTCF up-regulates the transcription of satellite 2, while vigilin down-regulates it. Vigilin depletion or CTCF overexpression reduces the binding of HP1α on the satellite 2 locus. Furthermore, overexpression of CTCF resists the loading of vigilin onto the satellite 2 locus. Thus CTCF may regulate vigilin behavior and thus indirectly influence the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

  7. Substrate diameter and compliance affect the gripping strategies and locomotor mode of climbing boa constrictors.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C

    2010-12-15

    Arboreal habitats pose unique challenges for locomotion as a result of their narrow cylindrical surfaces and discontinuities between branches. Decreased diameter of branches increases compliance, which can pose additional challenges, including effects on stability and energy damping. However, the combined effects of substrate diameter and compliance are poorly understood for any animal. We quantified performance, kinematics and substrate deformation while boa constrictors (Boa constrictor) climbed vertical ropes with three diameters (3, 6 and 9 mm) and four tensions (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 body weights). Mean forward velocity decreased significantly with both decreased diameter and increased compliance. Both diameter and compliance had numerous effects on locomotor kinematics, but diameter had larger and more pervasive effects than compliance. Locomotion on the largest diameter had a larger forward excursion per cycle, and the locomotor mode and gripping strategy differed from that on the smaller diameters. On larger diameters, snakes primarily applied opposing forces at the same location on the rope to grip. By contrast, on smaller diameters forces were applied in opposite directions at different locations along the rope, resulting in increased rope deformation. Although energy is likely to be lost during deformation, snakes might use increased surface deformation as a strategy to enhance their ability to grip.

  8. Binding of an octylglucoside detergent molecule in the second substrate (S2) site of LeuT establishes an inhibitor-bound conformation.

    PubMed

    Quick, Matthias; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Shi, Lei; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2009-04-07

    The first crystal structure of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter homolog LeuT revealed an occluded binding pocket containing leucine and 2 Na(+); later structures showed tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in an extracellular vestibule approximately 11 A above the bound leucine and 2 Na(+). We recently found this region to be a second binding (S2) site and that binding of substrate to this site triggers Na(+)-coupled substrate symport. Here, we show a profound inhibitory effect of n-octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (OG), the detergent used for LeuT crystallization, on substrate binding to the S2 site. In parallel, we determined at 2.8 A the structure of LeuT-E290S, a mutant that, like LeuT-WT, binds 2 substrate molecules. This structure was similar to that of WT and clearly revealed an OG molecule in the S2 site. We also observed electron density at the S2 site in LeuT-WT crystals, and this also was accounted for by an OG molecule in that site. Computational analyses, based on the available crystal structures of LeuT, indicated the nature of structural arrangements in the extracellular region of LeuT that differentiate the actions of substrates from inhibitors bound in the S2 site. We conclude that the current LeuT crystal structures, all of which have been solved in OG, represent functionally blocked forms of the transporter, whereas a substrate bound in the S2 site will promote a different state that is essential for Na(+)-coupled symport.

  9. Evidence of Distinct Channel Conformations and Substrate Binding Affinities for the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein Translocase Pore Tom40.

    PubMed

    Kuszak, Adam J; Jacobs, Daniel; Gurnev, Philip A; Shiota, Takuya; Louis, John M; Lithgow, Trevor; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Buchanan, Susan K

    2015-10-23

    Nearly all mitochondrial proteins are coded by the nuclear genome and must be transported into mitochondria by the translocase of the outer membrane complex. Tom40 is the central subunit of the translocase complex and forms a pore in the mitochondrial outer membrane. To date, the mechanism it utilizes for protein transport remains unclear. Tom40 is predicted to comprise a membrane-spanning β-barrel domain with conserved α-helical domains at both the N and C termini. To investigate Tom40 function, including the role of the N- and C-terminal domains, recombinant forms of the Tom40 protein from the yeast Candida glabrata, and truncated constructs lacking the N- and/or C-terminal domains, were functionally characterized in planar lipid membranes. Our results demonstrate that each of these Tom40 constructs exhibits at least four distinct conductive levels and that full-length and truncated Tom40 constructs specifically interact with a presequence peptide in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. Therefore, neither the first 51 amino acids of the N terminus nor the last 13 amino acids of the C terminus are required for Tom40 channel formation or for the interaction with a presequence peptide. Unexpectedly, substrate binding affinity was dependent upon the Tom40 state corresponding to a particular conductive level. A model where two Tom40 pores act in concert as a dimeric protein complex best accounts for the observed biochemical and electrophysiological data. These results provide the first evidence for structurally distinct Tom40 conformations playing a role in substrate recognition and therefore in transport function.

  10. Evidence of Distinct Channel Conformations and Substrate Binding Affinities for the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein Translocase Pore Tom40*

    PubMed Central

    Kuszak, Adam J.; Jacobs, Daniel; Gurnev, Philip A.; Shiota, Takuya; Louis, John M.; Lithgow, Trevor; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all mitochondrial proteins are coded by the nuclear genome and must be transported into mitochondria by the translocase of the outer membrane complex. Tom40 is the central subunit of the translocase complex and forms a pore in the mitochondrial outer membrane. To date, the mechanism it utilizes for protein transport remains unclear. Tom40 is predicted to comprise a membrane-spanning β-barrel domain with conserved α-helical domains at both the N and C termini. To investigate Tom40 function, including the role of the N- and C-terminal domains, recombinant forms of the Tom40 protein from the yeast Candida glabrata, and truncated constructs lacking the N- and/or C-terminal domains, were functionally characterized in planar lipid membranes. Our results demonstrate that each of these Tom40 constructs exhibits at least four distinct conductive levels and that full-length and truncated Tom40 constructs specifically interact with a presequence peptide in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. Therefore, neither the first 51 amino acids of the N terminus nor the last 13 amino acids of the C terminus are required for Tom40 channel formation or for the interaction with a presequence peptide. Unexpectedly, substrate binding affinity was dependent upon the Tom40 state corresponding to a particular conductive level. A model where two Tom40 pores act in concert as a dimeric protein complex best accounts for the observed biochemical and electrophysiological data. These results provide the first evidence for structurally distinct Tom40 conformations playing a role in substrate recognition and therefore in transport function. PMID:26336107

  11. Human placental estradiol 17. beta. -dehydrogenase: evidence for inverted substrate orientation (wrong-way binding) at the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, G.L.; Warren, J.C.; Sweet, F.

    1988-06-14

    Human placental estradiol 17..beta..-dehydrogenase was affinity labeled with 17lambda-estradiol 17-(bromo(2-/sup 14/C)acetate) (10 ..mu..M) or 17..beta..-estradiol 17-(bromo(2-/sup 14/C)acetate) (10 ..mu..M). The steroid bromoacetates competitively inhibit the enzyme (against 17..beta..-estradiol) with K/sub i/ values of 90 ..mu..M (17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate) and 134 ..mu..M(17..beta.. bromoacetate). Inactivation of the enzyme followed pseudo-first-order kinetics with t/sub 1/2/ = 110 min (17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate) and t/sub 1/2/ = 220 min (17..beta.. bromoacetate). Amino acid analysis of the affinity radioalkylated enzyme samples from the two bromoacetates revealed that N/sup ..pi../-(carboxy(/sup 14/C)methyl histidine was the modified amino acid labeled in each case. Digestion with trypsin produced peptides that were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and found to contain N/sup ..pi../-(carboxy(/sup 14/C)methyl)histidine. Both the 17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate and also the 17..beta.. bromoacetate modified the same histidine in the peptide Phe-Tyr-Gln-Tyr-Leu-Ala-His(..pi..CM)-Ser-Lys. Previously, the same histidine had been exclusively labeled by estrone 3-(bromoacetate) and shown not to be directly involve in catalytic hydrogen transfer at the D-ring of estradiol. Therefore, this histidine was presumed to proximate the A-ring of the bound steroid substrate. The present results suggest that the 17..cap alpha.. bromoacetate and 17..beta.. bromoacetate D-ring analogue of estradiol react with the same active site histidine residue as estrone 3-(bromoacetate), the A-ring analogue of estrone. Moreover, as each of the estradiol 17-(bromoacetates) undergoes the reversible binding step at the enzyme active site, its D-ring is in a reversed binding position relative to that of the natural substrate 17..beta..-estradiol as it undergoes catalytic hydrogen transfer at the same active site.

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF A MEMBRANE-LOCALIZED CYSTEINE CLUSTER NEAR THE SUBSTRATE BINDING SITES OF THE STREPTOCOCCUS EQUISIMILIS HYALURONAN SYNTHASE

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Kshama; Weigel, Paul H.

    2005-01-01

    The membrane-bound hyaluronan synthase (HAS) from Streptococcus equisimilis (seHAS), which is the smallest Class I HAS, has four cysteine residues (positions 226, 262, 281, and 367) that are generally conserved within this family. Although Cys-null seHAS is still active, chemical modification of cysteine residues causes inhibition of wildtype enzyme (Kumari et al., J. Biol. Chem. 277, 13943, 2002). Here we studied the effects of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) treatment on a panel of seHAS Cys-mutants to examine the structural and functional roles of the four cysteine residues in the activity of the enzyme. We found that Cys226, Cys262, and Cys281 are reactive with NEM, but that Cys367 is not. Substrate protection studies of wildtype seHAS and a variety of Cys-mutants revealed that binding of UDP-GlcUA, UDP-GlcNAc or UDP can protect Cys226 and Cys262 from NEM inhibition. Inhibition of the six double Cys-mutants of seHAS by sodium arsenite, which can crosslink vicinyl sulfhydryl groups, also supported the conclusion that Cys262 and Cys281 are close enough to be crosslinked. Similar results indicated that Cys281 and Cys367 are also very close in the active enzyme. We conclude that three of the four Cys residues in seHAS (Cys262, Cys281, and Cys367 ) are clustered very close together, that these Cys residues and Cys226 are located at the inner surface of the cell membrane, and that Cys226 and Cys262 are located in or near a UDP binding site. PMID:15616126

  13. Enhanced Binding Affinity for an i-Motif DNA Substrate Exhibited by a Protein Containing Nucleobase Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoguang; Talukder, Poulami; Daskalova, Sasha M; Roy, Basab; Chen, Shengxi; Li, Zhongxian; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-17

    Several variants of a nucleic acid binding motif (RRM1) of putative transcription factor hnRNP LL containing nucleobase amino acids at specific positions have been prepared and used to study binding affinity for the BCL2 i-motif DNA. Molecular modeling suggested a number of amino acids in RRM1 likely to be involved in interaction with the i-motif DNA, and His24 and Arg26 were chosen for modification based on their potential ability to interact with G14 of the i-motif DNA. Four nucleobase amino acids were introduced into RRM1 at one or both of positions 24 and 26. The introduction of cytosine nucleobase 2 into position 24 of RRM1 increased the affinity of the modified protein for the i-motif DNA, consistent with the possible Watson-Crick interaction of 2 and G14. In comparison, the introduction of uracil nucleobase 3 had a minimal effect on DNA affinity. Two structurally simplified nucleobase analogues (1 and 4) lacking both the N-1 and the 2-oxo substituents were also introduced in lieu of His24. Again, the RRM1 analogue containing 1 exhibited enhanced affinity for the i-motif DNA, while the protein analogue containing 4 bound less tightly to the DNA substrate. Finally, the modified protein containing 1 in lieu of Arg26 also bound to the i-motif DNA more strongly than the wild-type protein, but a protein containing 1 both at positions 24 and 26 bound to the DNA less strongly than wild type. The results support the idea of using nucleobase amino acids as protein constituents for controlling and enhancing DNA-protein interaction. Finally, modification of the i-motif DNA at G14 diminished RRM1-DNA interaction, as well as the ability of nucleobase amino acid 1 to stabilize RRM1-DNA interaction.

  14. Presteady-state kinetics of Bacillus 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase: binding and hydrolysis of a 4-methylumbelliferyl trisaccharide substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Abel, M; Planas, A; Christensen, U

    2001-01-01

    In the present study the first stopped-flow experiments performed on Bacillus 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanases are reported. The presteady-state kinetics of the binding of 4-methylumbelliferyl 3-O-beta-cellobiosyl-beta-D-glucoside to the inactive mutant E134A, and the wild-type-catalysed hydrolysis of the same substrate, were studied by measuring changes in the fluorescence of bound substrate or 4-methylumbelliferone produced. The presteady-state traces all showed an initial lag phase followed by a fast monoexponential phase leading to equilibration (for binding to E134A) or to steady state product formation (for the wild-type reaction). The lag phase, with a rate constant of the order of 100 s(-1), was independent of the substrate concentration; apparently an induced-fit mechanism governs the formation of enzyme-substrate complexes. The concentration dependencies of the observed rate constant of the second presteady-state phase were analysed according to a number of reaction models. For the reaction of the wild-type enzyme, it is shown that the fast product formation observed before steady state is not due to a rate-determining deglycosylation step. A model that can explain the observed results involves, in addition to the induced fit, a conformational change of the productive ES complex into a form that binds a second substrate molecule in a non-productive mode. PMID:11415449

  15. SR-like RNA-binding protein Slr1 affects Candida albicans filamentation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ariyachet, Chaiyaboot; Solis, Norma V; Liu, Yaoping; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Filler, Scott G; McBride, Anne E

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans causes both mucosal and disseminated infections, and its capacity to grow as both yeast and hyphae is a key virulence factor. Hyphal formation is a type of polarized growth, and members of the SR (serine-arginine) family of RNA-binding proteins influence polarized growth of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Therefore, we investigated whether SR-like proteins affect filamentous growth and virulence of C. albicans. BLAST searches with S. cerevisiae SR-like protein Npl3 (ScNpl3) identified two C. albicans proteins: CaNpl3, an apparent ScNpl3 ortholog, and Slr1, another SR-like RNA-binding protein with no close S. cerevisiae ortholog. Whereas ScNpl3 was critical for growth, deletion of NPL3 in C. albicans resulted in few phenotypic changes. In contrast, the slr1Δ/Δ mutant had a reduced growth rate in vitro, decreased filamentation, and impaired capacity to damage epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro. Mice infected intravenously with the slr1Δ/Δ mutant strain had significantly prolonged survival compared to that of mice infected with the wild-type or slr1Δ/Δ mutant complemented with SLR1 (slr1Δ/Δ+SLR1) strain, without a concomitant decrease in kidney fungal burden. Histopathology, however, revealed differential localization of slr1Δ/Δ hyphal and yeast morphologies within the kidney. Mice infected with slr1Δ/Δ cells also had an increased brain fungal burden, which correlated with increased invasion of brain, but not umbilical vein, endothelial cells in vitro. The enhanced brain endothelial cell invasion was likely due to the increased surface exposure of the Als3 adhesin on slr1Δ/Δ cells. Our results indicate that Slr1 is an SR-like protein that influences C. albicans growth, filamentation, host cell interactions, and virulence.

  16. High Resolution Structures of Periplasmic Glucose-binding Protein of Pseudomonas putida CSV86 Reveal Structural Basis of Its Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suman; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-04-08

    Periplasmic substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) bind to the specific ligand with high affinity and mediate their transport into the cytoplasm via the cognate inner membrane ATP-binding cassette proteins. Because of low sequence identities, understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by SBPs has remained very challenging. There are several structures available for the ligand-bound sugar SBPs, but very few unliganded structures are reported. No structural data are available for sugar SBPs fromPseudomonassp. to date. This study reports the first high resolution crystal structures of periplasmic glucose-binding protein fromPseudomonas putidaCSV86 (ppGBP) in unliganded form (2.5 Å) and complexed with glucose (1.25 Å) and galactose (1.8 Å). Asymmetric domain closure of ppGBP was observed upon substrate binding. The ppGBP was found to have an affinity of ∼ 0.3 μmfor glucose. The structural analysis showed that the sugars are bound to the protein mainly by hydrogen bonds, and the loss of two strong hydrogen bonds between ppGBP and galactose compared with glucose may be responsible for lowering its affinity toward galactose. The higher stability of ppGBP-glucose complex was also indicated by an 8 °C increase in the melting temperature compared with unliganded form and ppGBP-galactose complex. ppGBP binds to monosaccharide, but the structural features revealed it to have an oligosaccharide-binding protein fold, indicating that during evolution the sugar binding pocket may have undergone structural modulation to accommodate monosaccharide only.

  17. Picosecond-Resolved Fluorescence Studies of Substrate and Cofactor-Binding Domain Mutants in a Thermophilic Alcohol Dehydrogenase Uncover an Extended Network of Communication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence dynamics are investigated in two mutants of a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ht-ADH): Y25A (at the dimer interface) and V260A (at the cofactor-binding domain). These residues, ca. 32 Å apart, are shown to exhibit opposing low-temperature effects on the hydride tunneling step. Using single-tryptophan constructs at the active site (Trp87) and a remote, surface-exposed site (Trp167), time-dependent Stokes shifts and collisional quenching data allow an analysis of intra-protein dynamical communication. A double mutant, Y25A:V260A, was also inserted into each single-Trp construct and analyzed accordingly. None of the mutations affect fluorescence lifetimes, Stokes shift relaxation rates, and quenching data for the surface-exposed Trp167 to an appreciable extent. By contrast, fluorescent probes of the active-site tryptophan 87 reveal distinctive forms of dynamical communication. Stokes shifts show that the distal Y25A increases active-site flexibility, V260A introduces a temperature-dependent equilibration process not previously reported by such measurements, and the double mutant (Y25A:V260A) eliminates the temperature-dependent transition sensed by the active-site tryptophan in the presence of V260A. Collisional quenching data at Trp87 further show a structural change in the active-site environment/solvation for V260A. In the aggregate, the temperature dependencies of the fluorescence data are distinct from the breaks in behavior previously reported for catalysis and hydrogen/deuterium exchange, attributed to time scales for the interconversion of protein conformational substates that are slower and more global than the local motions monitored within. An extended network of dynamical communication between the protein dimer surface and substrate- and cofactor-binding domains emerges from the flourescent data. PMID:25314615

  18. Structure of Methylobacterium extorquens malyl-CoA lyase: CoA-substrate binding correlates with domain shift.

    PubMed

    González, Javier M; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo; Chen, Julian C H; Unkefer, Clifford J

    2017-02-01

    Malyl-CoA lyase (MCL) is an Mg(2+)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (2S)-4-malyl-CoA to yield acetyl-CoA and glyoxylate. MCL enzymes, which are found in a variety of bacteria, are members of the citrate lyase-like family and are involved in the assimilation of one- and two-carbon compounds. Here, the 1.56 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of MCL from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 with bound Mg(2+) is presented. Structural alignment with the closely related Rhodobacter sphaeroides malyl-CoA lyase complexed with Mg(2+), oxalate and CoA allows a detailed analysis of the domain motion of the enzyme caused by substrate binding. Alignment of the structures shows that a simple hinge motion centered on the conserved residues Phe268 and Thr269 moves the C-terminal domain by about 30° relative to the rest of the molecule. This domain motion positions a conserved aspartate residue located in the C-terminal domain in the active site of the adjacent monomer, which may serve as a general acid/base in the catalytic mechanism.

  19. Structure of Methylobacterium extorquens malyl-CoA lyase: CoA-substrate binding correlates with domain shift

    DOE PAGES

    Gonzalez, Javier M.; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo; Chen, Julian C. -H.; ...

    2017-01-27

    Malyl-CoA lyase (MCL) is an Mg2+-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (2S)-4-malyl-CoA to yield acetyl-CoA and glyoxylate. MCL enzymes, which are found in a variety of bacteria, are members of the citrate lyase-like family and are involved in the assimilation of one- and two-carbon compounds. Here, the 1.56 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of MCL from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 with bound Mg2+is presented. Structural alignment with the closely related Rhodobacter sphaeroides malyl-CoA lyase complexed with Mg2+, oxalate and CoA allows a detailed analysis of the domain motion of the enzyme caused by substrate binding. Alignment of the structuresmore » shows that a simple hinge motion centered on the conserved residues Phe268 and Thr269 moves the C-terminal domain by about 30° relative to the rest of the molecule. Furthermore, this domain motion positions a conserved aspartate residue located in the C-terminal domain in the active site of the adjacent monomer, which may serve as a general acid/base in the catalytic mechanism.« less

  20. Positive cooperativity in substrate binding of human prostatic acid phosphatase entrapped in AOT-isooctane-water reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Luchter-Wasylewska, Ewa; Iciek, Małgorzata

    2004-05-15

    The kinetics of 1-naphthyl phosphate and phenyl phosphate hydrolysis, catalyzed by human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) entrapped in AOT-isooctane-water reverse micelles, has been studied over surfactant hydration degree (w0) range 5 to 35. Continuous spectrophotometric acid phosphatase assays, previously prepared, were employed. PAP was catalytically active over the whole w0 studied range. In order to determine steady-state reaction constants the experimental data were fitted to Hill rate equation. Positive cooperativity in substrate binding was observed, as it was earlier found in aqueous solutions. The extent of cooperativity (expressed as the value of the Hill cooperation coefficient h) increased from 1 to 4, when the micellar water-pool size was growing, at fixed enzyme concentration. In the plots of catalytic activity (kcat) versus w0, the maxima have been found at w0=10 (pH 5.6) and 23 (pH 3.8). It is suggested that catalytically active monomeric and dimeric PAP forms are entrapped in reverse micelles of w0=10 and 23, respectively.

  1. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  2. Allosteric transition and substrate binding are entropy-driven in glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, I; Calcagno, M L

    2001-10-15

    Glucosamine-6P-deaminase (EC 3.5.99.6, formerly glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase, EC 5.3.1.10) from Escherichia coli is an attractive experimental model for the study of allosteric transitions because it is both kinetically and structurally well-known, and follows rapid equilibrium random kinetics, so that the kinetic K(m) values are true thermodynamic equilibrium constants. The enzyme is a typical allosteric K-system activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-P and displays an allosteric behavior that can be well described by the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. This thermodynamic study based on the temperature dependence of allosteric parameters derived from this model shows that substrate binding and allosteric transition are both entropy-driven processes in E. coli GlcN6P deaminase. The analysis of this result in the light of the crystallographic structure of the enzyme implicates the active-site lid as the structural motif that could contribute significantly to this entropic component of the allosteric transition because of the remarkable change in its crystallographic B factors.

  3. Evaluation of Substrate and Inhibitor Binding to Yeast and Human Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferases (Icmts) using Biotinylated Benzophenone-containing Photoaffinity Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Kalub; Vervacke, Jeffery; Shrestha, Liza; Donelson, James L.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Distefano, Mark D.; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases (Icmts) are a class of integral membrane protein methyltransferases localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane in eukaryotes. The Icmts from human (hIcmt) and S. cerevisae (Ste14p) catalyze the α-carboxyl methyl esterification step in the post-translational processing of CaaX proteins, including the yeast a-factor mating pheromones and both human and yeast Ras proteins. Herein, we evaluated synthetic analogs of two well-characterized Icmt substrates, N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine (AFC) and the yeast a-factor peptide mating pheromone, that contain photoactive benzophenone moieties in either the lipid or peptide portion of the molecule. The AFC based-compounds were substrates for both hIcmt and Ste14p, whereas the a-factor analogs were only substrates for Ste14p. However, the a-factor analogs were found to be micromolar inhibitors of hIcmt. Together, these data suggest that the Icmt substrate binding site is dependent upon features in both the isoprenyl moiety and upstream amino acid composition and that hIcmt and Ste14p have overlapping, yet distinct, substrate specificities. Photocrosslinking and neutravidin-agarose capture experiments with these analogs revealed that both hIcmt and Ste14p were specifically photolabeled to varying degrees with all of the compounds tested. These data suggest that these analogs will be useful for the future identification of the Icmt substrate binding sites. PMID:22634004

  4. Evaluation of substrate and inhibitor binding to yeast and human isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases (Icmts) using biotinylated benzophenone-containing photoaffinity probes.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Kalub; Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Shrestha, Liza; Donelson, James L; Gibbs, Richard A; Distefano, Mark D; Hrycyna, Christine A

    2012-06-22

    Isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases (Icmts) are a class of integral membrane protein methyltransferases localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane in eukaryotes. The Icmts from human (hIcmt) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ste14p) catalyze the α-carboxyl methyl esterification step in the post-translational processing of CaaX proteins, including the yeast a-factor mating pheromones and both human and yeast Ras proteins. Herein, we evaluated synthetic analogs of two well-characterized Icmt substrates, N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine (AFC) and the yeast a-factor peptide mating pheromone, that contain photoactive benzophenone moieties in either the lipid or peptide portion of the molecule. The AFC based-compounds were substrates for both hIcmt and Ste14p, whereas the a-factor analogs were only substrates for Ste14p. However, the a-factor analogs were found to be micromolar inhibitors of hIcmt. Together, these data suggest that the Icmt substrate binding site is dependent upon features in both the isoprenyl moiety and upstream amino acid composition. Furthermore, these data suggest that hIcmt and Ste14p have overlapping, yet distinct, substrate specificities. Photocrosslinking and neutravidin-agarose capture experiments with these analogs revealed that both hIcmt and Ste14p were specifically photolabeled to varying degrees with all of the compounds tested. Our data suggest that these analogs will be useful for the future identification of the Icmt substrate binding sites.

  5. Caffeine Affects Time to Exhaustion and Substrate Oxidation during Cycling at Maximal Lactate Steady State.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Turnes, Tiago; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme Antonacci; Beneke, Ralph; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2015-06-30

    This study analyzed the effects of caffeine intake on whole-body substrate metabolism and exercise tolerance during cycling by using a more individualized intensity for merging the subjects into homogeneous metabolic responses (the workload associated with the maximal lactate steady state-MLSS). MLSS was firstly determined in eight active males (25 ± 4 years, 176 ± 7 cm, 77 ± 11 kg) using from two to four constant-load tests of 30 min. On two following occasions, participants performed a test until exhaustion at the MLSS workload 1 h after taking either 6 mg/kg of body mass of caffeine or placebo (dextrose), in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Respiratory exchange ratio was calculated from gas exchange measurements. There was an improvement of 22.7% in time to exhaustion at MLSS workload following caffeine ingestion (95% confidence limits of ±10.3%, p = 0.002), which was accompanied by decrease in respiratory exchange ratio (p = 0.001). These results reinforce findings indicating that sparing of the endogenous carbohydrate stores could be one of the several physiological effects of caffeine during submaximal performance around 1 h.

  6. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype.

  7. Short-time dynamics of pH-dependent conformation and substrate binding in the active site of beta-glucosidases: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, David F; Aoki, Thalia G; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2015-09-01

    The complete degradation of cellulose to glucose is essential to carbon turnover in terrestrial ecosystems and to engineered biofuel production. A rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalyzed by beta-glucosidase (BG) enzymes, which convert cellulobiose into two glucose molecules. The activity of these enzymes has been shown to vary with solution pH. However, it is not well understood how pH influences the enzyme conformation required for catalytic action on the substrate. A structural understanding of this pH effect is important for predicting shifts in BG activity in bioreactors and environmental matrices, in addition to informing targeted protein engineering. Here we applied molecular dynamics simulations to explore conformational and substrate binding dynamics in two well-characterized BGs of bacterial (Clostridium cellulovorans) and fungal (Trichoderma reesei) origins as a function of pH. The enzymes were simulated in an explicit solvated environment, with NaCl as electrolytes, at their prominent ionization states obtained at pH 5, 6, 7, and 7.5. Our findings indicated that pH-dependent changes in the ionization states of non-catalytic residues localized outside of the immediate active site led to pH-dependent disruption of the active site conformation. This disruption interferes with favorable H-bonding interactions with catalytic residues required to initiate catalysis on the substrate. We also identified specific non-catalytic residues that are involved in stabilizing the substrate at the optimal pH for enzyme activity. The simulations further revealed the dynamics of water-bridging interactions both outside and inside the substrate binding cleft during structural changes in the enzyme-substrate complex. These findings provide new structural insights into the pH-dependent substrate binding specificity in BGs.

  8. Larval Habitat Substrates Could Affect the Biology and Vectorial Capacity of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Shah, Rizwan Mustafa; Ali, Qasim; Alam, Mehboob; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Majeed, Shahid; Riaz, Muhammad; Binyameen, Muhammad

    2016-12-25

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say is an important disease vector throughout much of the world. Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of different larval habitat substrates on the fitness and biting efficiency of Cx. quinquefasciatus adults. Our findings indicate that the development time (egg to adult) of larvae reared in irrigation water was 8.63 d while that of larvae reared in distilled water was 17.10 d (Effect size = 0.95). However, the rate of adult emergence was similar for all the tested treatments. Furthermore, the mean weight of an egg raft varied between larval habitats: distilled water (1.83 mg), rainfall water (1.25 mg), irrigation water (1.52 mg), and sewerage water (2.52 mg) (Effect size = 0.91). But, the fecundity (eggs per female) and hatchability (%) were statistically similar in all the rearing mediums (Effect size = 0.79). Longevity of females in all the tested populations did not differ significantly (Effect size = 0.91). The mean relative growth rates of larvae reared in tap water (0.80) and distilled water (0.86) habitats were lower than growth rates in all other rearing habitats (Effect size = 0.96). The intrinsic rate of natural increase in tap water (0.27) and irrigation water (0.35) was significantly higher than that in distilled water (0.09) and sewerage water (0.16) (Effect size = 0.84). Adults reared in rain water had the highest biting efficiency among all the tested populations. These results provide useful information for the management of Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  9. Phosphoramidate pronucleotides: a comparison of the phosphoramidase substrate specificity of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tsui-Fen; Baraniak, Janina; Kaczmarek, Renata; Zhou, Xin; Cheng, Jilin; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate the delivery of nucleotide-based therapeutics to cells and tissues, a variety of pronucleotide approaches have been developed. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that nucleoside phosphoramidates can be activated intracellularly to the corresponding 5'-monophosphate nucleotide and that histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints) are potentially responsible for their bioactivation. Hints are conserved and ubiquitous enzymes that hydrolyze phosphoramidate bonds between nucleoside 5'-monophosphate and an amine leaving group. On the basis of the ability of nucleosides to quench the fluorescence of covalently linked amines containing indole, a sensitive, continuous fluorescence-based assay was developed. A series of substrates linking the naturally fluorogenic indole derivatives to nucleoside 5'-monophosphates were synthesized, and their steady state kinetic parameters of hydrolysis by human Hint1 and Escherichia coli hinT were evaluated. To characterize the elemental and stereochemical effect on the reaction, two P-diastereoisomers of adenosine or guanosine phosphoramidothioates were synthesized and studied to reveal a 15-200-fold decrease in the specificity constant (kcat/Km) when the phosphoryl oxygen is replaced with sulfur. While a stereochemical preference was not observed for E. coli hinT, hHint1 exhibited a 300-fold preference for d-tryptophan phosphoramidates over l-isomers. The most efficient substrates evaluated to date are those that contain the less sterically hindering amine leaving group, tryptamine, with kcat and Km values comparable to those found for adenosine kinase. The apparent second-order rate constants (kcat/Km) for adenosine tryptamine phosphoramidate monoester were found to be 107 M-1 s-1 for hHint1 and 106 M-1 s-1 for E. coli hinT. Both the human and E. coli enzymes preferred purine over pyrimidine analogues. Consistent with observed hydrogen bonding between the 2'-OH group of adenosine monophosphate and the

  10. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Nanog RNA-binding proteins YBX1 and ILF3 affect pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuanliang; Xue, Yan; Yang, Guanheng; Yin, Shang; Shi, Wansheng; Cheng, Yan; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Fan, Shuyue; Zhang, Huijun; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-08-01

    Nanog is a well-known transcription factor that plays a fundamental role in stem cell self-renewal and the maintenance of their pluripotent cell identity. There remains a large data gap with respect to the spectrum of the key pluripotency transcription factors' interaction partners. Limited information is available concerning Nanog-associated RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the intrinsic protein-RNA interactions characteristic of the regulatory activities of Nanog. Herein, we used an improved affinity protocol to purify Nanog-interacting RBPs from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and 49 RBPs of Nanog were identified. Among them, the interaction of YBX1 and ILF3 with Nanog mRNA was further confirmed by in vitro assays, such as Western blot, RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), and ex vivo methods, such as immunofluorescence staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), MS2 in vivo biotin-tagged RNA affinity purification (MS2-BioTRAP). Interestingly, RNAi studies revealed that YBX1 and ILF3 positively affected the expression of Nanog and other pluripotency-related genes. Particularly, downregulation of YBX1 or ILF3 resulted in high expression of mesoderm markers. Thus, a reduction in the expression of YBX1 and ILF3 controls the expression of pluripotency-related genes in ESCs, suggesting their roles in further regulation of the pluripotent state of ESCs.

  12. Cellular glycosylation affects Herceptin binding and sensitivity of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Diluka; Spector, Alexander F.; Lomax-Browne, Hannah; Azimi, Tayebeh; Ramesh, Bala; Loizidou, Marilena; Welch, Hazel; Dwek, Miriam V.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in protein glycosylation are a key feature of oncogenesis and have been shown to affect cancer cell behaviour perturbing cell adhesion, favouring cell migration and metastasis. This study investigated the effect of N-linked glycosylation on the binding of Herceptin to HER2 protein in breast cancer and on the sensitivity of cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DXR) and growth factors (EGF and IGF-1). The interaction between Herceptin and recombinant HER2 protein and cancer cell surfaces (on-rate/off-rate) was assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance biosensor revealing an increase in the accessibility of HER2 to Herceptin following deglycosylation of cell membrane proteins (deglycosylated cells Bmax: 6.83 Hz; glycosylated cells Bmax: 7.35 Hz). The sensitivity of cells to DXR and to growth factors was evaluated using an MTT assay. Maintenance of SKBR-3 cells in tunicamycin (an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation) resulted in an increase in sensitivity to DXR (0.1 μM DXR P < 0.001) and a decrease in sensitivity to IGF-1 alone and to IGF-1 supplemented with EGF (P < 0.001). This report illustrates the importance of N-linked glycosylation in modulating the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic and biological treatments and highlights the potential of glycosylation inhibitors as future combination treatments for breast cancer. PMID:28223691

  13. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    SciTech Connect

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal ({beta}/a)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth {beta}-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ?T196, ?S197 and ?G198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the phosphate

  14. How conformational changes can affect catalysis, inhibition and drug resistance of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism such as the HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hemmateenejad, Bahram

    2013-05-01

    A central question is how the conformational changes of proteins affect their function and the inhibition of this function by drug molecules. Many enzymes change from an open to a closed conformation upon binding of substrate or inhibitor molecules. These conformational changes have been suggested to follow an induced-fit mechanism in which the molecules first bind in the open conformation in those cases where binding in the closed conformation appears to be sterically obstructed such as for the HIV-1 protease. In this article, we present a general model for the catalysis and inhibition of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism. We derive general expressions that specify how the overall catalytic rate of the enzymes depends on the rates for binding, for the conformational changes, and for the chemical reaction. Based on these expressions, we analyze the effect of mutations that mainly shift the conformational equilibrium on catalysis and inhibition. If the overall catalytic rate is limited by product unbinding, we find that mutations that destabilize the closed conformation relative to the open conformation increase the catalytic rate in the presence of inhibitors by a factor exp(ΔΔGC/RT) where ΔΔGC is the mutation-induced shift of the free-energy difference between the conformations. This increase in the catalytic rate due to changes in the conformational equilibrium is independent of the inhibitor molecule and, thus, may help to understand how non-active-site mutations can contribute to the multi-drug-resistance that has been observed for the HIV-1 protease. A comparison to experimental data for the non-active-site mutation L90M of the HIV-1 protease indicates that the mutation slightly destabilizes the closed conformation of the enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly.

  15. Insights into the molecular basis for substrate binding and specificity of the wild-type L-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC

    PubMed Central

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Gapsys, Vytautas; Ucurum, Zöhre; de Groot, Bert L.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic enterobacteria need to survive the extreme acidity of the stomach to successfully colonize the human gut. Enteric bacteria circumvent the gastric acid barrier by activating extreme acid-resistance responses, such as the arginine-dependent acid resistance system. In this response, l-arginine is decarboxylated to agmatine, thereby consuming one proton from the cytoplasm. In Escherichia coli, the l-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC facilitates the export of agmatine in exchange of l-arginine, thus providing substrates for further removal of protons from the cytoplasm and balancing the intracellular pH. We have solved the crystal structures of wild-type AdiC in the presence and absence of the substrate agmatine at 2.6-Å and 2.2-Å resolution, respectively. The high-resolution structures made possible the identification of crucial water molecules in the substrate-binding sites, unveiling their functional roles for agmatine release and structure stabilization, which was further corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Structural analysis combined with site-directed mutagenesis and the scintillation proximity radioligand binding assay improved our understanding of substrate binding and specificity of the wild-type l-arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Finally, we present a potential mechanism for conformational changes of the AdiC transport cycle involved in the release of agmatine into the periplasmic space of E. coli. PMID:27582465

  16. Crystal structures of antibiotic-bound complexes of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa highlight the diversity in substrate binding modes among aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Houston, Douglas R; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-07-19

    Aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa [APH(2'')-IVa] is a member of a family of bacterial enzymes responsible for medically relevant resistance to antibiotics. APH(2'')-IVa confers high-level resistance against several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics in various pathogenic Enterococcus species by phosphorylating the drug, thereby preventing it from binding to its ribosomal target and producing a bactericidal effect. We describe here three crystal structures of APH(2'')-IVa, one in its apo form and two in complex with a bound antibiotic, tobramycin and kanamycin A. The apo structure was refined to a resolution of 2.05 Å, and the APH(2'')-IVa structures with tobramycin and kanamycin A bound were refined to resolutions of 1.80 and 2.15 Å, respectively. Comparison among the structures provides insight concerning the substrate selectivity of this enzyme. In particular, conformational changes upon substrate binding, involving rotational shifts of two distinct segments of the enzyme, are observed. These substrate-induced shifts may also rationalize the altered substrate preference of APH(2'')-IVa in comparison to those of other members of the APH(2'') subfamily, which are structurally closely related. Finally, analysis of the interactions between the enzyme and aminoglycoside reveals a distinct binding mode as compared to the intended ribosomal target. The differences in the pattern of interactions can be utilized as a structural basis for the development of improved aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to these resistance factors.

  17. Lysine-21 of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase participates in substrate binding through charge-charge interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. T.; Levy, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) was isolated in high yield and purified to homogeneity from a newly constructed strain of Escherichia coli which lacks its own glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. Lys-21 is one of two lysyl residues in the enzyme previously modified by the affinity labels pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and pyridoxal 5'-diphosphate-5'-adenosine, which are competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with respect to glucose 6-phosphate (LaDine, J.R., Carlow, D., Lee, W.T., Cross, R.L., Flynn, T.G., & Levy, H.R., 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5558-5562). K21R and K21Q mutants of the enzyme were purified to homogeneity and characterized kinetically to determine the function of Lys-21. Both mutant enzymes showed increased Km-values for glucose 6-phosphate compared to wild-type enzyme: 1.4-fold (NAD-linked reaction) and 2.1-fold (NADP-linked reaction) for the K21R enzyme, and 36-fold (NAD-linked reaction) and 53-fold (NADP-linked reaction) for the K21Q enzyme. The Km for NADP+ was unchanged in both mutant enzymes. The Km for NAD+ was increased 1.5- and 3.2-fold, compared to the wild-type enzyme, in the K21R and K21Q enzymes, respectively. For the K21R enzyme the kcat for the NAD- and NADP-linked reactions was unchanged. The kcat for the K21Q enzyme was increased in the NAD-linked reaction by 26% and decreased by 30% in the NADP-linked reaction from the values for the wild-type enzyme. The data are consistent with Lys-21 participating in the binding of the phosphate group of the substrate to the enzyme via charge-charge interaction. PMID:1304341

  18. Degradation and recycling of the substrate-binding subunit of type II iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Farwell, A P; Safran, M; Dubord, S; Leonard, J L

    1996-07-05

    Thyroxine dynamically regulates levels of type II iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase (5'D-II) by modulating enzyme inactivation and targeting the enzyme to different pathways of internalization. 5'D-II is an approximately 200-kDa multimeric protein containing a 29-kDa substrate-binding subunit (p29) and an unknown number of other subunits. In the absence of thyroxine (T4), p29 is slowly endocytosed and transported to the lysosomes. T4 treatment rapidly activates an actin-mediated endocytotic pathway and targets the enzyme to the endosomes. In this study, we have characterized the influence of T4 on the intracellular trafficking of 5'D-II. We show that T4 accelerates the rate of 5'D-II inactivation by translocating the enzyme to the interior of the cell and by sequestering p29 in the endosomal pool without accelerating the rate of degradation of p29. This dichotomy between the rapid inactivation of catalytic activity and the much slower degradation of p29 is consistent with the reuse of p29 in the production of 5'D-II activity. Immunocytochemical analysis with a specific anti-p29 IgG shows that pulse affinity-labeled p29 reappears on the plasma membrane approximately 2 h after enzyme internalization in the presence of T4, indicating that p29 is recycled. Despite the ability of p29 to be recycled in the T4-treated cell, 5'D-II catalytic activity requires ongoing protein synthesis, presumably of another enzyme component(s) or an accessory enzyme-related protein. In the absence of T4, enzyme inactivation and p29 degradation are temporally linked, and pulse affinity-labeled p29 is internalized and sequestered in discrete intracellular pools. These data suggest that T4 regulates fundamental processes involved with the turnover of integral membrane proteins and participates in regulating the inter-relationships between the degradation, recycling, and synthetic pathways.

  19. Kinetic and X-Ray Structural Evidence for Negative Cooperativity in Substrate Binding to Nicotinate Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase (NMAT) from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Sershon, Valerie C.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2009-08-07

    Biosynthesis of NAD(P) in bacteria occurs either de novo or through one of the salvage pathways that converge at the point where the reaction of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) with ATP is coupled to the formation of nicotinate adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) and inorganic pyrophosphate. This reaction is catalyzed by nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMAT), which is essential for bacterial growth, making it an attractive drug target for the development of new antibiotics. Steady-state kinetic and direct binding studies on NMAT from Bacillus anthracis suggest a random sequential Bi-Bi kinetic mechanism. Interestingly, the interactions of NaMN and ATP with NMAT were observed to exhibit negative cooperativity, i.e. Hill coefficients <1.0. Negative cooperativity in binding is supported by the results of X-ray crystallographic studies. X-ray structures of the B. anthracis NMAT apoenzyme, and the NaMN- and NaAD-bound complexes were determined to resolutions of 2.50 A, 2.60 A and 1.75 A, respectively. The X-ray structure of the NMAT-NaMN complex revealed only one NaMN molecule bound in the biological dimer, supporting negative cooperativity in substrate binding. The kinetic, direct-binding, and X-ray structural studies support a model in which the binding affinity of substrates to the first monomer of NMAT is stronger than that to the second, and analysis of the three X-ray structures reveals significant conformational changes of NMAT along the enzymatic reaction coordinate. The negative cooperativity observed in B. anthracis NMAT substrate binding is a unique property that has not been observed in other prokaryotic NMAT enzymes. We propose that regulation of the NAD(P) biosynthetic pathway may occur, in part, at the reaction catalyzed by NMAT.

  20. Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) Succession in Different Substrates as Affected by the Co-Application of Three Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali, Alessandra; Pizzeghello, Diego; Zanin, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In intensive agriculture areas the use of pesticides can alter soil properties and microbial community structure with the risk of reducing soil quality. Materials and Methods In this study the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) evolution has been studied in a factorial lab experiment combining five substrates (a soil, two aged composts and their mixtures) treated with a co-application of three pesticides (azoxystrobin, chlorotoluron and epoxiconazole), with two extraction methods, and two incubation times (0 and 58 days). FAMEs extraction followed the microbial identification system (MIDI) and ester-linked method (EL). Results and Discussion The pesticides showed high persistence, as revealed by half-life (t1/2) values ranging from 168 to 298 days, which confirms their recalcitrance to degradation. However, t1/2 values were affected by substrate and compost age down to 8 days for chlorotoluron in S and up to 453 days for epoxiconazole in 12M. Fifty-six FAMEs were detected. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the EL method detected a higher number of FAMEs and unique FAMEs than the MIDI one, whereas principal component analysis (PCA) highlighted that the monosaturated 18:1ω9c and cyclopropane 19:0ω10c/19ω6 were the most significant FAMEs grouping by extraction method. The cyclopropyl to monoenoic acids ratio evidenced higher stress conditions when pesticides were applied to compost and compost+soil than solely soil, as well as with final time. Conclusion Overall, FAMEs profiles showed the importance of the extraction method for both substrate and incubation time, the t1/2 values highlighted the effectiveness of solely soil and the less mature compost in reducing the persistence of pesticides. PMID:26694029

  1. Inhibition of Multidrug Resistance-Linked P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1) Function by 5′-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5′-Adenosine: Evidence for an ATP Analog That Interacts With Both Drug-Substrate- and Nucleotide-Binding Sites†

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Shinobu; Chufan, Eduardo; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Ettore; Sauna, Zuben E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2011-01-01

    5′-fluorosulfonylbenzonyl 5′-adenosine (FSBA) is an ATP analog that covalently modifies several residues in the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of several ATPases, kinases and other proteins. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of amphipathic anticancer agents from cancer cells. We investigated the interactions of FSBA with P-gp to study the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis. Incubation of P-gp with FSBA inhibited ATP hydrolysis (IC50= 0.21 mM) and the binding of 8-azido[α–32P]ATP (IC50= 0.68 mM). In addition, 14C-FSBA crosslinks to P-gp, suggesting that FSBA-mediated inhibition of ATP hydrolysis is irreversible due to covalent modification of P-gp. However, when the NBDs were occupied with a saturating concentration of ATP prior to treatment, FSBA stimulated ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Furthermore, FSBA inhibited the photocrosslinking of P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryl-azidoprazosin (IAAP; IC50 = 0.17 mM). As IAAP is a transport substrate for P-gp, this suggests that FSBA affects not only the NBDs, but also the transport-substrate site in the transmembrane domains. Consistent with these results, FSBA blocked efflux of rhodamine 123 from P-gp-expressing cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis identified FSBA crosslinks to residues within or nearby the NBDs but not in the transmembrane domains and docking of FSBA in a homology model of human P-gp NBDs supports the biochemical studies. Thus, FSBA is an ATP analog that interacts with both the drug-binding and ATP-binding sites of P-gp, but fluorosulfonyl-mediated crosslinking is observed only at the NBDs. PMID:21452853

  2. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages.

  3. Residue Asn277 affects the stability and substrate specificity of the SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa.

    PubMed

    Lan, Dongming; Wang, Qian; Xu, Jinxin; Zhou, Pengfei; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-03-31

    Thermostability and substrate specificity are important characteristics of enzymes for industrial application, which can be improved by protein engineering. SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase (MDL) that shows activity toward mono- and diacylglycerols, but no activity toward triacylglycerols. SMG1 lipase is considered a potential biocatalyst applied in oil/fat modification and its crystal structure revealed that an interesting residue-Asn277 may contribute to stabilize loop 273-278 and the 3104 helix which are important to enzyme characterization. In this study, to explore its role in affecting the stability and catalytic activity, mutagenesis of N277 with Asp (D), Val (V), Leu (L) and Phe (F) was conducted. Circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis and half-life measurement showed that the N277D mutant has better thermostability. The melting temperature and half-life of the N277D mutant were 56.6 °C and 187 min, respectively, while that was 54.6 °C and 121 min for SMG1 wild type (WT). Biochemical characterization of SMG1 mutants were carried out to test whether catalytic properties were affected by mutagenesis. N277D had similar enzymatic properties as SMG1 WT, but N277F showed a different substrate selectivity profile as compared to other SMG1 mutants. Analysis of the SMG1 3D model suggested that N277D formed a salt bridge via its negative charged carboxyl group with a positively charged guanidino group of R227, which might contribute to confer N277D higher temperature stability. These findings not only provide some clues to understand the molecular basis of the lipase structure/function relationship but also lay the framework for engineering suitable MDL lipases for industrial applications.

  4. Refinement of the Central Steps of Substrate Transport by the Aspartate Transporter GltPh: Elucidating the Role of the Na2 Sodium Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, SanthoshKannan; Saha, Kusumika; Sohail, Azmat; Sandtner, Walter; Freissmuth, Michael; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Sitte, Harald H.; Stockner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate homeostasis in the brain is maintained by glutamate transporter mediated accumulation. Impaired transport is associated with several neurological disorders, including stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Crystal structures of the homolog transporter GltPh from Pyrococcus horikoshii revealed large structural changes. Substrate uptake at the atomic level and the mechanism of ion gradient conversion into directional transport remained enigmatic. We observed in repeated simulations that two local structural changes regulated transport. The first change led to formation of the transient Na2 sodium binding site, triggered by side chain rotation of T308. The second change destabilized cytoplasmic ionic interactions. We found that sodium binding to the transiently formed Na2 site energized substrate uptake through reshaping of the energy hypersurface. Uptake experiments in reconstituted proteoliposomes confirmed the proposed mechanism. We reproduced the results in the human glutamate transporter EAAT3 indicating a conserved mechanics from archaea to humans. PMID:26485255

  5. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  6. An RNA aptamer possessing a novel monovalent cation-mediated fold inhibits lysozyme catalysis by inhibiting the binding of long natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Padlan, Camille S; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Almo, Steve C; Levy, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    RNA aptamers are being developed as inhibitors of macromolecular and cellular function, diagnostic tools, and potential therapeutics. Our understanding of the physical nature of this emerging class of nucleic acid-protein complexes is limited; few atomic resolution structures have been reported for aptamers bound to their protein target. Guided by chemical mapping, we systematically minimized an RNA aptamer (Lys1) selected against hen egg white lysozyme. The resultant 59-nucleotide compact aptamer (Lys1.2minE) retains nanomolar binding affinity and the ability to inhibit lysozyme's catalytic activity. Our 2.0-Å crystal structure of the aptamer-protein complex reveals a helical stem stabilizing two loops to form a protein binding platform that binds lysozyme distal to the catalytic cleft. This structure along with complementary solution analyses illuminate a novel protein-nucleic acid interface; (1) only 410 Å(2) of solvent accessible surface are buried by aptamer binding; (2) an unusually small fraction (∼18%) of the RNA-protein interaction is electrostatic, consistent with the limited protein phosphate backbone contacts observed in the structure; (3) a single Na(+) stabilizes the loops that constitute the protein-binding platform, and consistent with this observation, Lys1.2minE-lysozyme complex formation takes up rather than displaces cations at low ionic strength; (4) Lys1.2minE inhibits catalysis of large cell wall substrates but not catalysis of small model substrates; and (5) the helical stem of Lys1.2minE can be shortened to four base pairs (Lys1.2minF) without compromising binding affinity, yielding a 45-nucleotide aptamer whose structure may be an adaptable protein binding platform.

  7. Probing the role of aromatic residues at the secondary saccharide binding sites of human salivary α-amylase in substrate hydrolysis and bacterial binding

    PubMed Central

    Ragunath, Chandran; Manuel, Suba G.A.; Venkataraman, Venkat; Sait, Hameetha B.R.; Kasinathan, Chinnasamy; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Human salivary α-amylase (HSAmy) has three distinct functions relevant to oral health: 1) hydrolysis of starch; 2) binding to hydroxyapatite; and 3) binding to bacteria (e.g. viridans streptococci). Although the active site of HSAmy for starch hydrolysis is well characterized, the regions responsible for the bacterial binding are yet to be defined. Since HSAmy possesses several secondary saccharide-binding sites in which aromatic residues are prominently located, we hypothesized that one or more of the secondary saccharide binding sites harboring the aromatic residues may play an important role in bacterial binding. To test this hypothesis, the aromatic residues at five secondary binding sites were mutated to alanine to generate six mutants representing either single (W203A, Y276A and W284A), double (Y276A/W284A and W316A/W388A) or multiple (HSAmy-ar; W134A/W203A/Y276A/W284A/W316A/W388A) mutations. The crystal structure of HSAmy-ar was determined at a resolution of 1.5 Å as an acarbose complex and compared with the existing wild type acarbose complex. The wild type and the mutant enzymes were characterized for their abilities to exhibit enzyme activity, starch binding, hydroxyapatite and bacterial binding activities. Our results clearly showed that 1) mutation of aromatic residues does not alter the overall conformation of the molecule; 2) the single or double mutants showed either moderate or minimal changes in both starch and bacterial binding activities activity whereas the HSAmy-ar showed significant reduction in these activities; 3) the starch hydrolytic activity was reduced 10-fold in HSAmy-ar; 4) oligosaccharide hydrolytic activity was reduced in all the mutants but the action pattern was similar to that of the wild type enzyme; and 5) the hydroxyaptite binding was unaffected in HSAmy-ar. These results clearly show that the aromatic residues at the secondary saccharide binding sites in HSAmy play a critical role in bacterial binding and starch

  8. The role of binding domains for dsRNA and Z-DNA in the in vivo editing of minimal substrates by ADAR1

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Alan; Rich, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing changes the read-out of genetic information, increasing the number of different protein products that can be made from a single gene. One form involves the deamination of adenosine to form inosine, which is subsequently translated as guanosine. The reaction requires a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrate and is catalyzed by the adenosine deaminase that act on dsRNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. These enzymes possess dsRNA-binding domains (DRBM) and a catalytic domain. ADAR1 so far has been found only in vertebrates and is characterized by two Z-DNA-binding motifs, the biological function of which remains unknown. Here the role of the various functional domains of ADAR1 in determining the editing efficiency and specificity of ADAR1 is examined in cell-based assays. A variety of dsRNA substrates was tested. It was found that a 15-bp dsRNA stem with a single base mismatch was sufficient for editing. The particular adenosine modified could be varied by changing the position of the mismatch. Editing efficiency could be increased by placing multiple pyrimidines 5′ to the edited adenosine. With longer substrates, editing efficiency also increased and was partly due to the use of DRBMs. Additional editing sites were also observed that clustered on the complementary strand 11–15 bp from the first. An unexpected finding was that the DRBMs are not necessary for the editing of the shorter 15-bp substrates. However, mutation of the Z-DNA-binding domains of ADAR1 decreased the efficiency with which such a substrate was edited. PMID:11593027

  9. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a ‘holding trap’ rather than a ‘folding trap’ mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16177.001 PMID:27343349

  10. UV cross-link mapping of the substrate-binding site of an RNase P ribozyme to a target mRNA sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, A F; Liu, F

    1999-01-01

    RNase P ribozyme cleaves an RNA helix that resembles the acceptor stem and T-stem structure of its natural ptRNA substrate. When covalently linked with a guide sequence, the ribozyme can function as a sequence-specific endonuclease and cleave any target RNA sequences that base pair with the guide sequence. Using a site-directed ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking approach, we have mapped the regions of the ribozyme that are in close proximity to a substrate that contains the mRNA sequence encoding thymidine kinase of human herpes simplex virus 1. Our data suggest that the cleavage site of the mRNA substrate is positioned at the same regions of the ribozyme that bind to the cleavage site of a ptRNA. The mRNA-binding domains include regions that interact with the acceptor stem and T-stem and in addition, regions that are unique and not in close contact with a ptRNA. Identification of the mRNA-binding site provides a foundation to study how RNase P ribozymes achieve their sequence specificity and facilitates the development of gene-targeting ribozymes. PMID:10496224

  11. Enzyme-substrate complexes of the quinate/shikimate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum enable new insights in substrate and cofactor binding, specificity, and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Astrid; Schomburg, Dietmar; Niefind, Karsten

    2013-11-01

    Quinate dehydrogenase (QDH) catalyzes the reversible oxidation of quinate to 3-dehydroquinate by nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and is involved in the catabolic quinate metabolism required for the degradation of lignin. The enzyme is a member of the family of shikimate/quinate dehydrogenases (SDH/QDH) occurring in bacteria and plants. We characterized the dual-substrate quinate/shikimate dehydrogenase (QSDH) from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CglQSDH) kinetically and revealed a clear substrate preference of CglQSDH for quinate compared with shikimate both at the pH optimum and in a physiological pH range, which is a remarkable contrast to closely related SDH/QDH enzymes. With respect to the cosubstrate, CglQSDH is strictly NAD(H) dependent. These substrate and cosubstrate profiles correlate well with the details of three atomic resolution crystal structures of CglQSDH in different functional states we report here: with bound NAD+ (binary complex) and as ternary complexes with NADH plus either shikimate or quinate. The CglQSDH-NADH-quinate structure is the first complex structure of any member of the SDH/QDH family with quinate. Based on this novel structural information and systematic sequence and structure comparisons with closely related enzymes, we can explain the strict NAD(H) dependency of CglQSDH as well as its discrimination between shikimate and quinate.

  12. Probing the location of the substrate binding site of ascorbate oxidase near type 1 copper: an investigation through spectroscopic, inhibition and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Santagostini, Laura; Gullotti, Michele; De Gioia, Luca; Fantucci, Piercarlo; Franzini, Elena; Marchesini, Augusto; Monzani, Enrico; Casella, Luigi

    2004-05-01

    The present investigation addresses the problem of the binding mode of phenolic inhibitors and the substrate ascorbate to the active site of ascorbate oxidase. The results from both types of compounds indicate that the binding site is located in a pocket near the type 1 copper center. This information is of general interest for blue multicopper oxidases. Docking calculations performed on the ascorbate oxidase-ascorbate complex show that binding of the substrate occurs in a pocket near type 1 Cu, and is stabilized by at least five hydrogen bonding interactions with protein residues, one of which involves the His512 Cu ligand. Similar docking studies show that the isomeric fluorophenols, which act as competitive inhibitors toward ascorbate, bind to the enzyme in a manner similar to ascorbate. The docking calculations are supported by 19F NMR relaxation measurements performed on fluorophenols in the presence of the enzyme, which show that the bound inhibitors undergo enhanced relaxation by the paramagnetic effect of a nearby Cu center. Unambiguous support to the location of the inhibitor close to type 1 Cu was obtained by comparative relaxation measurements of the fluorophenols in the presence of the ascorbate oxidase derivative where a Zn atom selectively replaces the paramagnetic type 2 Cu. The latter experiments show that contribution to relaxation of the bound inhibitors by the type 2 Cu site is negligible.

  13. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.

  14. Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae PiaA and Its Complex with Ferrichrome Reveal Insights into the Substrate Binding and Release of High Affinity Iron Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wang; Li, Qiong; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing

    2013-01-01

    Iron scarcity is one of the nutrition limitations that the Gram-positive infectious pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae encounter in the human host. To guarantee sufficient iron supply, the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Pia is employed to uptake iron chelated by hydroxamate siderophore, via the membrane-anchored substrate-binding protein PiaA. The high affinity towards ferrichrome enables PiaA to capture iron at a very low concentration in the host. We presented here the crystal structures of PiaA in both apo and ferrichrome-complexed forms at 2.7 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. Similar to other class III substrate binding proteins, PiaA is composed of an N-terminal and a C-terminal domain bridged by an α-helix. At the inter-domain cleft, a molecule of ferrichrome is stabilized by a number of highly conserved residues. Upon ferrichrome binding, two highly flexible segments at the entrance of the cleft undergo significant conformational changes, indicating their contribution to the binding and/or release of ferrichrome. Superposition to the structure of Escherichia coli ABC transporter BtuF enabled us to define two conserved residues: Glu119 and Glu262, which were proposed to form salt bridges with two arginines of the permease subunits. Further structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the ferrichrome binding pattern is highly conserved in a series of PiaA homologs encoded by both Gram-positive and negative bacteria, which were predicted to be sensitive to albomycin, a sideromycin antibiotic derived from ferrichrome. PMID:23951167

  15. Phosphorylation states of translational initiation factors affect mRNA cap binding in wheat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2004-07-20

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translational initiation factors (eIFs) has been shown to be an important means of regulating protein synthesis. Plant initiation factors undergo phosphorylation/dephosphorylation under a variety of stress and growth conditions. We have shown that recombinant wheat cap-binding protein, eIF(iso)4E, produced from E. coli can be phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of eIF(iso)4E has effects on m(7)G cap-binding affinity similar to those of phosphorylation of mammalian eIF4E even though eIF(iso)4E lacks an amino acid that can be phosphorylated at the residue corresponding to Ser-209, the phosphorylation site in mammalian eIF4E. The cap-binding affinity was reduced 1.2-2.6-fold when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated. The in vitro phosphorylation site for wheat eIF(iso)4E was identified as Ser-207. Addition of eIF(iso)4G and eIF4B that had also been phosphorylated in vitro further reduced cap-binding affinity. Temperature-dependent studies showed that DeltaH(degrees) was favorable for cap binding regardless of the phosphorylation state of the initiation factors. The entropy, however, was unfavorable (negative) except when eIF(iso)4E was phosphorylated and interacting with eIF(iso)4G. Phosphorylation may modulate not only cap-binding activity, but other functions of eukaryotic initiation factors as well.

  16. Identification of Residues in Domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin That Affect Binding and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Kyong; You, Taek H.; Gould, Fred L.; Dean, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    Alanine substitution mutations in the Cry1Ac domain III region, from amino acid residues 503 to 525, were constructed to study the functional role of domain III in the toxicity and receptor binding of the protein to Lymantria dispar, Manduca sexta, and Heliothis virescens. Five sets of alanine block mutants were generated at the residues 503SS504, 506NNI508, 509QNR511, 522ST523, and 524ST525. Single alanine substitutions were made at the residues 509Q, 510N, 511R, and 513Y. All mutant proteins produced stable toxic fragments as judged by trypsin digestion, midgut enzyme digestion, and circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The mutations, 503SS504-AA, 506NNI508-AAA, 522ST523-AA, 524ST525-AA, and 510N-A affected neither the protein’s toxicity nor its binding to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from these insects. Toward L. dispar and M. sexta, the 509QNR511-AAA, 509Q-A, 511R-A, and 513Y-A mutant toxins showed 4- to 10-fold reductions in binding affinities to BBMV, with 2- to 3-fold reductions in toxicity. Toward H. virescens, the 509QNR511-AAA, 509Q-A, 511R-A, and 513Y-mutant toxins showed 8- to 22-fold reductions in binding affinities, but only 509QNR511-AAA and 511R-A mutant toxins reduced toxicity by approximately three to four times. In the present study, greater loss in binding affinity relative to toxicity has been observed. These data suggest that the residues 509Q, 511R, and 513Y in domain III might be only involved in initial binding to the receptor and that the initial binding step becomes rate limiting only when it is reduced more than fivefold. PMID:10508083

  17. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array

    PubMed Central

    Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2013-01-01

    Our perception of an object’s size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour – a binding ring – and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation) by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size. PMID:24555042

  18. A new locus affects cell motility, cellulose binding, and degradation by Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Xu, Yuanxi; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Ning; Lu, Xuemei

    2012-10-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a Gram-negative gliding bacterium, which can rapidly degrade crystalline cellulose via a novel strategy without any recognizable processive cellulases. Its mechanism of cellulose binding and degradation is still a mystery. In this study, the mutagenesis of C. hutchinsonii with the mariner-based transposon HimarEm3 and gene complementation with the oriC-based plasmid carrying the antibiotic resistance gene cfxA or tetQ were reported for the first time to provide valuable tools for mutagenesis and genetic manipulation of the bacterium. Mutant A-4 with a transposon mutation in gene CHU_0134, which encodes a putative thiol-disulfide isomerase exhibits defects in cell motility and cellulose degradation. The cellulose binding ability of A-4 was only half of that of the wild-type strain, while the endo-cellulase activity of the cell-free supernatants and on the intact cell surface of A-4 decreased by 40%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins binding to cellulose in the outer membrane showed that most of them were significantly decreased or disappeared in A-4 including some Gld proteins and hypothetical proteins, indicating that these proteins might play an important role in cell motility and cellulose binding and degradation by the bacterium.

  19. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1.

    PubMed

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  20. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J Daniel; Kupitz, Colin; Caplovitz, Gideon P

    2013-01-01

    Our perception of an object's size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour - a binding ring - and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation) by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size.

  1. CacyBP/SIP binds ERK1/2 and affects transcriptional activity of Elk-1

    SciTech Connect

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Slawomir; Jastrzebska, Beata; Filipek, Anna

    2009-02-27

    In this work we showed for the first time that mouse CacyBP/SIP interacts with extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). We also established that a calcium binding protein, S100A6, competes for this interaction. Moreover, the E217K mutant of CacyBP/SIP does not bind significantly to ERK1/2 although it retains the ability to interact with S100A6. Molecular modeling shows that the E217K mutation in the 189-219 CacyBP/SIP fragment markedly changes its electrostatic potential, suggesting that the binding with ERK1/2 might have an electrostatic character. We also demonstrate that CacyBP/SIP-ERK1/2 interaction inhibits phosphorylation of the Elk-1 transcription factor in vitro and in the nuclear fraction of NB2a cells. Altogether, our data suggest that the binding of CacyBP/SIP with ERK1/2 might regulate Elk-1 phosphorylation/transcriptional activity and that S100A6 might further modulate this effect via Ca{sup 2+}-dependent interaction with CacyBP/SIP and competition with ERK1/2.

  2. Odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes affect host specificity in a fig-pollinator mutualistic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Wang, N X; Niu, L M; Bian, S N; Xiao, J H; Huang, D W

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between figs and their pollinating wasps is regarded as a model system for studying specialized co-evolved mutualism. Chemoreception of fig wasps plays an important role in this interaction, and odorant-binding proteins (OBP) function in the first step of odorant detection. The OBP repertoire of the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi is reported to be one of the smallest among insects; however, it is unknown how these OBPs are related to the complicated mating process occurring within the fig cavity and the extreme host specificity of the species. In the present study, we combined a structural analysis of the conserved cysteine pattern and motif order, a phylogenetic analysis, and previous studies on ligand-binding assays to deduce the function of OBPs. We also quantified the expression of OBP genes in different life stages of female and male fig wasps by using real-time quantitative PCR, which can help to predict the function of these genes. The results indicated that CsolOBP1 and CsolOBP2 (or CsolOBP5) in males may bind to pheromones and play important roles in mate choice, whereas CsolOBP4 and CsolOBP5 may primarily function in host localization by females through binding of volatile compounds emitted by receptive figs.

  3. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  4. Occupancy of the Zinc-binding Site by Transition Metals Decreases the Substrate Affinity of the Human Dopamine Transporter by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Mayer, Felix P.; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Burtscher, Verena; Schicker, Klaus; Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The human dopamine transporter (DAT) has a tetrahedral Zn2+-binding site. Zn2+-binding sites are also recognized by other first-row transition metals. Excessive accumulation of manganese or of copper can lead to parkinsonism because of dopamine deficiency. Accordingly, we examined the effect of Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ on transport-associated currents through DAT and DAT-H193K, a mutant with a disrupted Zn2+-binding site. All transition metals except Mn2+ modulated the transport cycle of wild-type DAT with affinities in the low micromolar range. In this concentration range, they were devoid of any action on DAT-H193K. The active transition metals reduced the affinity of DAT for dopamine. The affinity shift was most pronounced for Cu2+, followed by Ni2+ and Zn2+ (= Co2+). The extent of the affinity shift and the reciprocal effect of substrate on metal affinity accounted for the different modes of action: Ni2+ and Cu2+ uniformly stimulated and inhibited, respectively, the substrate-induced steady-state currents through DAT. In contrast, Zn2+ elicited biphasic effects on transport, i.e. stimulation at 1 μm and inhibition at 10 μm. A kinetic model that posited preferential binding of transition metal ions to the outward-facing apo state of DAT and a reciprocal interaction of dopamine and transition metals recapitulated all experimental findings. Allosteric activation of DAT via the Zn2+-binding site may be of interest to restore transport in loss-of-function mutants. PMID:28096460

  5. In-Silico Analysis of Binding Site Features and Substrate Selectivity in Plant Flavonoid-3-O Glycosyltransferases (F3GT) through Molecular Modeling, Docking and Dynamics Simulation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ranu; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of plant secondary metabolites that act as storage molecules, chemical messengers, as well as participate in homeostasis and defense processes. They possess pharmaceutical properties important for cancer treatment such as antioxidant and anti-tumor activities. The drug-related properties of flavonoids can be improved by glycosylation. The enzymes glycosyltransferases (GTs) glycosylate acceptor molecules in a regiospecific manner with the help of nucleotide sugar donor molecules. Several plant GTs have been characterized and their amino acid sequences determined. However, three-dimensional structures of only a few are reported. Here, phylogenetic analysis using amino acid sequences have identified a group of GTs with the same regiospecific activity. The structures of these closely related GTs were modeled using homologous GT structures. Their substrate binding sites were elaborated by docking flavonoid acceptor and UDP-sugar donor molecules in the modeled structures. Eight regions near the acceptor binding site in the N- and C- terminal domain of GTs have been identified that bind and specifically glycosylate the 3-OH group of acceptor flavonoids. Similarly, a conserved motif in the C-terminal domain is known to bind a sugar donor substrate. In certain GTs, the substitution of a specific glutamine by histidine in this domain changes the preference of sugar from glucose to galactose as a result of changed pattern of interactions. The molecular modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies have revealed the chemical and topological features of the binding site and thus provided insights into the basis of acceptor and donor recognition by GTs. PMID:24667893

  6. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-05

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  7. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas avirulence protein AvrPphB: A papain-like fold with a distinct substrate binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, M.; Shao, F.; Innes, R.W.; Dixon, J.E.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    AvrPphB is an avirulence (Avr) protein from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae that can trigger a disease-resistance response in a number of host plants including Arabidopsis. AvrPphB belongs to a novel family of cysteine proteases with the charter member of this family being the Yersinia effector protein YopT. AvrPphB has a very stringent substrate specificity, catalyzing a single proteolytic cleavage in the Arabidopsis serine/threonine kinase PBS1. We have determined the crystal structure of AvrPphB by x-ray crystallography at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. The structure is composed of a central antiparallel {beta}-sheet, with {alpha}-helices packing on both sides of the sheet to form a two-lobe structure. The core of this structure resembles the papain-like cysteine proteases. The similarity includes the AvrPphB active site catalytic triad of Cys-98, His-212, and Asp-227 and the oxyanion hole residue Asn-93. Based on analogy with inhibitor complexes of the papain-like proteases, we propose a model for the substrate-binding mechanism of AvrPphB. A deep and positively charged pocket (S2) and a neighboring shallow surface (S3) likely bind to aspartic acid and glycine residues in the substrate located two (P2) and three (P3) residues N terminal to the cleavage site, respectively. Further implications about the specificity of plant pathogen recognition are also discussed.

  8. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V.; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  9. Crystal structures of yeast beta-alanine synthase complexes reveal the mode of substrate binding and large scale domain closure movements.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piskur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-12-07

    Beta-alanine synthase is the final enzyme of the reductive pyrimidine catabolic pathway, which is responsible for the breakdown of uracil and thymine in higher organisms. The fold of the homodimeric enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri identifies it as a member of the AcyI/M20 family of metallopeptidases. Its subunit consists of a catalytic domain harboring a di-zinc center and a smaller dimerization domain. The present site-directed mutagenesis studies identify Glu(159) and Arg(322) as crucial for catalysis and His(262) and His(397) as functionally important but not essential. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type beta-alanine synthase in complex with the reaction product beta-alanine, and of the mutant E159A with the substrate N-carbamyl-beta-alanine, revealing the closed state of a dimeric AcyI/M20 metallopeptidase-like enzyme. Subunit closure is achieved by a approximately 30 degrees rigid body domain rotation, which completes the active site by integration of substrate binding residues that belong to the dimerization domain of the same or the partner subunit. Substrate binding is achieved via a salt bridge, a number of hydrogen bonds, and coordination to one of the zinc ions of the di-metal center.

  10. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W.; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two 13C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change. PMID:25960162

  11. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W.; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two 13C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  12. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-05-11

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two (13)C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  13. Prediction of binding modes between protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase and peptide substrates including isomerized aspartic acid residues using in silico analytic methods for the substrate screening.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Noji, Ikuhiko; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-12-10

    Because the aspartic acid (Asp) residues in proteins are occasionally isomerized in the human body, not only l-α-Asp but also l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp and D-β-Asp are found in human proteins. In these isomerized aspartic acids, the proportion of D-β-Asp is the largest and the proportions of l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp found in human proteins are comparatively small. To explain the proportions of aspartic acid isomers, the possibility of an enzyme able to repair l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp is frequently considered. The protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is considered one of the possible repair enzymes for l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp. Human PIMT is an enzyme that recognizes both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp, and catalyzes the methylation of their side chains. In this study, the binding modes between PIMT and peptide substrates containing l-β-Asp or D-α-Asp residues were investigated using computational protein-ligand docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that carboxyl groups of both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp were recognized in similar modes by PIMT and that the C-terminal regions of substrate peptides were located in similar positions on PIMT for both the l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp peptides. In contrast, for peptides containing l-α-Asp or D-β-Asp residues, which are not substrates of PIMT, the computationally constructed binding modes between PIMT and peptides greatly differed from those between PIMT and substrates. In the nonsubstrate peptides, not inter- but intra-molecular hydrogen bonds were observed, and the conformations of peptides were more rigid than those of substrates. Thus, the in silico analytical methods were able to distinguish substrates from nonsubstrates and the computational methods are expected to complement experimental analytical methods.

  14. Insights from molecular dynamics: the binding site of cocaine in the dopamine transporter and permeation pathways of substrates in the leucine and dopamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Bonnie A.; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) facilitates the regulation of synaptic neurotransmitter levels. As a target for therapeutic and illicit psycho-stimulant drugs like antidepressants and cocaine, DAT has been studied intensively. Despite a wealth of mutational and physiological data regarding DAT, the structure remains unsolved and details of the transport mechanism, binding sites and conformational changes remain debated. A bacterial homologue of DAT, the leucine transporter (LeuTAa) has been used as a template and framework for modeling and understanding DAT. Free energy profiles obtained from Multi-Configuration Thermodynamic Integration allowed us to correctly identify the primary and secondary binding pockets of LeuTAa. A comparison of free energy profiles for dopamine and cocaine in DAT suggests that the binding site of cocaine is located in a secondary pocket, not the primary substrate site. Two recurring primary pathways for intracellular substrate release from the primary pocket are identified in both transporters using the Random Acceleration Molecular Dynamics method. One pathway appears to follow transmembranes (TMs) 1a and 6b while the other pathway follows along TMs 6b and 8. Interestingly, we observe that a single sodium ion is co-transported with leucine during both simulations types. PMID:23079638

  15. Breast Cancer Anti-estrogen Resistance 3 (BCAR3) Protein Augments Binding of the c-Src SH3 Domain to Crk-associated Substrate (p130cas)*

    PubMed Central

    Makkinje, Anthony; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Near, Richard I.; Patel, Prayag S.; Lerner, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The focal adhesion adapter protein p130cas regulates adhesion and growth factor-related signaling, in part through Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of p130cas. AND-34/BCAR3, one of three NSP family members, binds the p130cas carboxyl terminus, adjacent to a bipartite p130cas Src-binding domain (SBD) and induces anti-estrogen resistance in breast cancer cell lines as well as phosphorylation of p130cas. Only a subset of the signaling properties of BCAR3, specifically augmented motility, are dependent upon formation of the BCAR3-p130cas complex. Using GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation studies, we show that among NSP family members, only BCAR3 augments the ability of p130cas to bind the Src SH3 domain through an RPLPSPP motif in the p130cas SBD. Although our prior work identified phosphorylation of the serine within the p130cas RPLPSPP motif, mutation of this residue to alanine or glutamic acid did not alter BCAR3-induced Src SH3 domain binding to p130cas. The ability of BCAR3 to augment Src SH3 binding requires formation of a BCAR3-p130cas complex because mutations that reduce association between these two proteins block augmentation of Src SH3 domain binding. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, BCAR3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the p130cas substrate domain, previously shown to be Src-dependent, was reduced by an R743A mutation that blocks BCAR3 association with p130cas. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that BCAR3 expression alters the intracellular location of both p130cas and Src and that all three proteins co-localize. Our work suggests that BCAR3 expression may regulate Src signaling in a BCAR3-p130cas complex-dependent fashion by altering the ability of the Src SH3 domain to bind the p130cas SBD. PMID:22711540

  16. Cell surface sialylation affects binding of enterovirus 71 to rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), and infection of EV71 to central nerve system (CNS) may result in a high mortality in children less than 2 years old. Although there are two highly glycosylated membrane proteins, SCARB2 and PSGL-1, which have been identified as the cellular and functional receptors of EV71, the role of glycosylation in EV71 infection is still unclear. Results We demonstrated that the attachment of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells was diminished after the removal of cell surface sialic acids by neuraminidase. Sialic acid specific lectins, Maackia amurensis (MAA) and Sambucus Nigra (SNA), could compete with EV71 and restrained the binding of EV71 significantly. Preincubation of RD cells with fetuin also reduced the binding of EV71. In addition, we found that SCARB2 was a sialylated glycoprotein and interaction between SCARB2 and EV71 was retarded after desialylation. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that cell surface sialic acids assist in the attachment of EV71 to host cells. Cell surface sialylation should be a key regulator that facilitates the binding and infection of EV71 to RD and SK-N-SH cells. PMID:22853823

  17. Nucleotide binding affects intrinsic dynamics and structural communication in Ras GTPases.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Francesca; Raimondi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The Ras superfamily comprises many guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that are essential to intracellular signal transduction. These proteins act biologically as molecular switches, which, cycling between OFF and ON states, play fundamental role in cell biology. This review article summarizes the inferences from the widest computational analyses done so far on Ras GTPases aimed at providing a comprehensive structural/dynamic view of the trans-family and family-specific functioning mechanisms. These variegated comparative analyses could infer the evolutionary and intrinsic flexibilities as well as the structural communication features in the most representative G protein families in different functional states. In spite of the low sequence similarities, the members of the Ras superfamily share the topology of the Ras-like domain, including the nucleotide binding site. GDP and GTP make very similar interactions in all GTPases and differences in their binding modes are localized around the γ-phosphate of GTP. Remarkably, such subtle local differences result in significant differences in the functional dynamics and structural communication features of the protein. In Ras GTPases, the nucleotide plays a central and active role in dictating functional dynamics, establishing the major structure network, and mediating the communication paths instrumental in function retention and specialization. Collectively, the results of these studies support the speculation that an "extended conformational selection model" that embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes is likely more suitable to describe the nucleotide behavior in these important molecular switches.

  18. The neurofibromin recruitment factor Spred1 binds to the GAP related domain without affecting Ras inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Mercado, Ellen L.; Maly, Karl; McCormick, Frank; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Legius syndrome are related diseases with partially overlapping symptoms caused by alterations of the tumor suppressor genes NF1 (encoding the protein neurofibromin) and SPRED1 (encoding sprouty-related, EVH1 domain-containing protein 1, Spred1), respectively. Both proteins are negative regulators of Ras/MAPK signaling with neurofibromin functioning as a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (GAP) and Spred1 acting on hitherto undefined components of the pathway. Importantly, neurofibromin has been identified as a key protein in the development of cancer, as it is genetically altered in a large number of sporadic human malignancies unrelated to NF1. Spred1 has previously been demonstrated to interact with neurofibromin via its N-terminal Ena/VASP Homology 1 (EVH1) domain and to mediate membrane translocation of its target dependent on its C-terminal Sprouty domain. However, the region of neurofibromin required for the interaction with Spred1 has remained unclear. Here we show that the EVH1 domain of Spred1 binds to the noncatalytic (GAPex) portion of the GAP-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin. Binding is compatible with simultaneous binding of Ras and does not interfere with GAP activity. Our study points to a potential targeting function of the GAPex subdomain of neurofibromin that is present in all known canonical RasGAPs. PMID:27313208

  19. Amino acid polymorphisms in the fibronectin-binding repeats of fibronectin-binding protein A affect bond strength and fibronectin conformation.

    PubMed

    Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Cruz, Carlos H B; Lins, Roberto D; DiBartola, Alex C; Howard, Jessica; Liang, Xiaowen; Höök, Magnus; Viana, Isabelle F T; Sierra-Hernández, M Roxana; Lower, Steven K

    2017-04-11

    The Staphylococcus aureus cell surface contains cell wall-anchored proteins such as fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) that bind to host ligands (e.g. fibronectin; Fn) present in the extracellular matrix of tissue or coatings on cardiac implants. Recent clinical studies have found a correlation between cardiovascular infections caused by S. aureus and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FnBPA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and molecular simulations were used to investigate interactions between Fn and each of eight, 20-mer peptide variants containing amino acids A, H, I, K, N, and Q at positions equivalent to 782 and/or 786 in Fn-binding repeat-9 (FnBR-9) of FnBPA. Experimentally measured bond lifetimes (1/koff ) and dissociation constants (Kd = koff / kon ), determined by mechanically dissociating the Fn-peptide complex at loading rates relevant to the cardiovascular system varied from the lowest-affinity H782A+K786A peptide (0.011 sec, 747 µM) to the highest-affinity H782Q+K786N peptide (0.192 sec, 15.7 µM). These AFM results tracked remarkably well to metadynamics simulations in which peptide detachment was defined solely by the free-energy landscape. Simulations and SPR experiments suggested that an Fn conformational change may enhance the stability of the binding complex for peptides with K786I or H782Q+K786I (Kd(app) = 0.2 to 0.5 µM. as determined by SPR) compared with the lowest-affinity double alanine peptide (Kd(app) = 3.8 µM). Together, these findings demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in FnBR-9 can significantly affect bond strength and influence the conformation of Fn upon binding. They provide a mechanistic explanation for the observation of nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA) among clinical isolates of S. aureus that cause endovascular infections.

  20. X-ray Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum: Structural Organization and Substrate Recognition by Endoglucanases That Lack Cellulose Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Prates, Érica T.; Stankovic, Ivana; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Liberato, Marcelo V.; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Pereira, Nei; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S.

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass holds a promise for the production of second-generation ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis, but its utilization as a biofuel resource is currently limited to a large extent by the cost and low efficiency of the cellulolytic enzymes. Considerable efforts have been dedicated to elucidate the mechanisms of the enzymatic process. It is well known that most cellulases possess a catalytic core domain and a carbohydrate binding module (CBM), without which the enzymatic activity can be drastically reduced. However, Cel12A members of the glycosyl hydrolases family 12 (GHF12) do not bear a CBM and yet are able to hydrolyze amorphous cellulose quite efficiently. Here, we use X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the molecular basis underlying the catalytic capability of endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum (ThEG3), a member of the GHF12 enzymes that lacks a CBM. A comparative analysis with the Cellulomonas fimi CBM identifies important residues mediating interactions of EG3s with amorphous regions of the cellulose. For instance, three aromatic residues constitute a harboring wall of hydrophobic contacts with the substrate in both ThEG3 and CfCBM structures. Moreover, residues at the entrance of the active site cleft of ThEG3 are identified, which might hydrogen bond to the substrate. We advocate that the ThEG3 residues Asn152 and Glu201 interact with the substrate similarly to the corresponding CfCBM residues Asn81 and Arg75. Altogether, these results show that CBM motifs are incorporated within the ThEG3 catalytic domain and suggest that the enzymatic efficiency is associated with the length and position of the substrate chain, being higher when the substrate interact with the aromatic residues at the entrance of the cleft and the catalytic triad. Our results provide guidelines for rational protein engineering aiming to improve interactions of GHF12 enzymes with cellulosic substrates. PMID:23516599

  1. Kinetic characterization of factor Xa binding using a quenched fluorescent substrate based on the reactive site of factor Xa inhibitor from Bauhinia ungulata seeds.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L V; Andrade, S A; Juliano, M A; Sallai, R C; Torquato, R J; Sampaio, M U; Pott, V J; Sampaio, C A M

    2003-07-01

    The specific Kunitz Bauhinia ungulata factor Xa inhibitor (BuXI) and the Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) blocked the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin, plasma kallikrein and factor XIIa, and factor Xa inhibition was achieved only by BuXI (K(i) 14 nM). BuXI and BvTI are highly homologous (70%). The major differences are the methionine residues at BuXI reactive site, which are involved in the inhibition, since the oxidized protein no longer inhibits factor Xa but maintains the trypsin inhibition. Quenched fluorescent substrates based on the reactive site sequence of the inhibitors were synthesized and the kinetic parameters of the hydrolysis were determined using factor Xa and trypsin. The catalytic efficiency k(cat)/K(m) 4.3 x 10(7) M(-1)sec(>-1) for Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp (lead peptide) hydrolysis by factor Xa was 10(4)-fold higher than that of Boc-Ile-Glu-Gly-Arg-AMC, widely used as factor Xa substrate. Lengthening of the substrate changed its susceptibility to factor Xa hydrolysis. Both methionine residues in the substrate influence the binding to factor Xa. Serine replacement of threonine (P(1)') decreases the catalytic efficiency by four orders of magnitude. Factor Xa did not hydrolyze the substrate containing the reactive site sequence of BvTI, that inhibits trypsin inhibitor but not factor Xa. Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp prolonged both the prothrombin time and the activated partial thromboplastin time, and the other modified substrates used in this experiment altered blood-clotting assays.

  2. Acute changes in substrate oxidation do not affect short-term food intake in healthy boys and men.

    PubMed

    Hunschede, Sascha; El Khoury, Dalia; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie; Smith, Christopher; Thomas, Scott; Anderson, G Harvey

    2015-02-01

    The acute relationship between substrate oxidation as measured by respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and food intake (FI) has not been defined. The purpose of the study was to determine acute relationships between RER, modified by exercise and a glucose load, and FI and net energy balance (NEB) in physically active normal-weight boys and men. In a crossover design, 15 boys (aged 9-12 years) and 15 men (aged 20-30 years) were randomly assigned to 4 conditions: (i) water and rest, (ii) glucose-drink and rest, (iii) water and exercise, and (iv) glucose-drink and exercise. Indirect calorimetry was used to determine RER, energy expenditure, and carbohydrate and fat oxidation. Subjective appetite and blood glucose were also measured. RER was higher after glucose (0.91 ± 0.01) compared with water (0.87 ± 0.01) (p < 0.0001), and after exercise (0.91 ± 0.01) compared with rest (0.88 ± 0.01) (p = 0.0043) in men (0.91 ± 0.01) compared with boys (0.88 ± 0.01) (p = 0.0002). FI (kcal·m(-2)) did not differ between boys and men. Glucose (582 ± 24 kcal·m(-2)) reduced FI compared with water (689 ± 25 kcal·m(-2)) (p < 0.0001), and further decreased FI when combined with exercise (554 ± 34 kcal·m(-2)) (p = 0.0303). NEB was reduced with exercise (573 ± 25 kcal·m(-2)) compared with the sedentary condition (686 ± 24 kcal·m(-2)) (p < 0.0001), but was higher after the glucose drink (654 ± 27 kcal·m(-2)) compared with water (605 ± 25 kcal·m(-2)) (p = 0.0267). No correlations were found between RER and FI or NEB in boys and men, except in the control condition of resting with water. In conclusion, the short-term modification of substrate oxidation by glucose and/or exercise in normal weight and active boys and men did not affect FI and NEB.

  3. Clostridium botulinum type C hemagglutinin affects the morphology and viability of cultured mammalian cells via binding to the ganglioside GM3.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yo; Iwamori, Masao; Matsumura, Takuhiro; Yutani, Masahiro; Amatsu, Sho; Fujinaga, Yukako

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A-G, and is produced as large protein complexes through associations with non-toxic components, such as hemagglutinin (HA) and non-toxic non-HA. These non-toxic proteins dramatically enhance the oral toxicity of the toxin complex. HA is considered to have a role in toxin transport through the intestinal epithelium by carbohydrate binding and epithelial barrier-disrupting activity. Type A and B HAs disrupt E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion, and, in turn, the intercellular epithelial barrier. Type C HA (HA/C) disrupts the barrier function by affecting cell morphology and viability, the mechanism of which remains unknown. In this study, we identified GM3 as the target molecule of HA/C. We found that sialic acid binding of HA is essential for the activity. It was abolished when cells were pre-treated with an inhibitor of ganglioside synthesis. Consistent with this, HA/C bound to a-series gangliosides in a glycan array. In parallel, we isolated clones resistant to HA/C activity from a susceptible mouse fibroblast strain. These cells lacked expression of ST-I, the enzyme that transfers sialic acid to lactosylceramide to yield GM3. These clones became sensitive to HA/C activity when GM3 was expressed by transfection with the ST-I gene. The sensitivity of fibroblasts to HA/C was reduced by expressing ganglioside synthesis genes whose products utilize GM3 as a substrate and consequently generate other a-series gangliosides, suggesting a GM3-specific mechanism. Our results demonstrate that HA/C affects cells in a GM3-dependent manner.

  4. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Brushes as Peptide/Protein Microarray Substrate for Improving Protein Binding and Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Gao, Jiaxue; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-04-27

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) polymer-brush substrate for protein and peptide microarray fabrication, and this substrate was facilely prepared by copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomers via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on a glass slide. The performance of obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (P(GMA-HEMA)) brush substrate was assessed by binding of human IgG with rabbit antihuman IgG antibodies on a protein microarray and by the determination of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities on a peptide microarray. The P(GMA-HEMA) brush substrate exhibited higher immobilization capacities for proteins and peptides than those of a two-dimensional (2D) planar epoxy slide. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based microarray on rabbit antihuman IgG antibody detection was much higher than that of its 2D counterpart. The enzyme activities of MMPs were determined specifically with a low detection limit of 6.0 pg mL(-1) for MMP-2 and 5.7 pg mL(-1) for MMP-9. By taking advantage of the biocompatibility of PHEMA, the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based peptide microarray was also employed to evaluate the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by cells cultured off the chip or directly on the chip, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  5. Roles of Ile66 and Ala107 of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens in binding O6 of its substrate, D-fructose.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Lim, Byung-Chul; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Yeong-Su; Kim, Dooil; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2010-01-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the roles of Ile66 and Ala107 of D: -psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens in binding O6 of its true substrate, D: -fructose. When Ile66 was substituted with alanine, glycine, cysteine, leucine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine or valine, all the mutants dramatically increased the K (m) for D: -tagatose but slightly decreased the K (m) for D: -fructose, indicating that Ile66 is involved in substrate recognition. When Ala107 was substituted by either isoleucine or valine, the substituted mutants had lower thermostability than the wild-type enzyme whereas the proline-substituted mutant had higher thermostability. Thus, Ala107 is involved in enzyme stability.

  6. Contributions of the substrate-binding arginine residues to maleate-induced closure of the active site of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Matharu, A; Hayashi, H; Kagamiyama, H; Maras, B; John, R A

    2001-03-01

    Crystallography shows that aspartate aminotransferase binds dicarboxylate substrate analogues by bonds to Arg292 and Arg386, respectively [Jager, J, Moser, M. Sauder, U. & Jansonius, J. N. (1994) J. Mol. Biol., 239, 285-305]. The contribution of each interaction to the conformational change that the enzyme undergoes when it binds ligands via these residues, is assessed by probing mutant forms of the enzyme lacking either or both arginines. The probes used are NaH(3)BCN which reduces the cofactor imine, the reactive substrate analogue, cysteine sulfinate and proteolysis by trypsin. The unreactive substrate analogue, maleate, is used to induce closure. Each single mutant reacted only 2.5-fold more slowly with NaH(3)BCN than the wild-type indicating that charge repulsion by the arginines contributes little to maintaining the open conformation. Maleate lowered the rate of reduction of the wild-type enzyme more than 300-fold but had little effect on the reaction of the mutant enzymes indicating that the ability of this dicarboxylate analogue to bridge the arginines precisely makes the major contribution to closure. The R292L mutant reacted 20 times more rapidly with cysteine sulfinate than R386L but 5 x 10(4) times more slowly than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the proposal that enzyme's catalytic abilities are not developed unless closure is induced by bridging of the arginines. Proteolysis of the mutants with trypsin showed that, in the wild-type enzyme, the bonds most susceptible to trypsin are those contributed by Arg292 and Arg386. Proteolysis of the next most susceptible bond, at Arg25 in the double mutant, was protected by maleate demonstrating the presence of an additional site on the enzyme for binding dicarboxylates.

  7. Crystal complexes of a predicted S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase reveal a typical AdoMet binding domain and a substrate recognition domain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Ouellette, N.; Evodokimova, E.; Savchenko, A.; Edwards, A.; Anderson, W.F.

    2010-03-08

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MTs) are abundant, and highly conserved across phylogeny. These enzymes use the cofactor AdoMet to methylate a wide variety of molecular targets, thereby modulating important cellular and metabolic activities. Thermotoga maritima protein 0872 (TM0872) belongs to a large sequence family of predicted MTs, ranging phylogenetically from relatively simple bacteria to humans. The genes for many of the bacterial homologs are located within operons involved in cell wall synthesis and cell division. Despite preliminary biochemical studies in E. coli and B. subtilis, the substrate specificity of this group of more than 150 proteins is unknown. As part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics initiative (www.mcsg.anl.gov), we have determined the structure of TM0872 in complexes with AdoMet and with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy). As predicted, TM0872 has a typical MT domain, and binds endogenous AdoMet, or co-crystallized AdoHcy, in a manner consistent with other known MT structures. In addition, TM0872 has a second domain that is novel among MTs in both its location in the sequence and its structure. The second domain likely acts in substrate recognition and binding, and there is a potential substrate-binding cleft spanning the two domains. This long and narrow cleft is lined with positively charged residues which are located opposite the S{sup +}-CH{sub 3} bond, suggesting that a negatively charged molecule might be targeted for catalysis. However, AdoMet and AdoHcy are both buried, and access to the methyl group would presumably require structural rearrangement. These TM0872 crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this phylogenetically conserved sequence family.

  8. An active-site phenylalanine directs substrate binding and C-H cleavage in the alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase TauD.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Kevin P; Klinman, Judith P

    2010-04-14

    Enzymes that cleave C-H bonds are often found to depend on well-packed hydrophobic cores that influence the distance between the hydrogen donor and acceptor. Residue F159 in taurine alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (TauD) is demonstrated to play an important role in the binding and orientation of its substrate, which undergoes a hydrogen atom transfer to the active site Fe(IV)=O. Mutation of F159 to smaller hydrophobic side chains (L, V, A) leads to substantially reduced rates for substrate binding and for C-H bond cleavage, as well as increased contribution of the chemical step to k(cat) under steady-state turnover conditions. The greater sensitivity of these substrate-dependent processes to mutation at position 159 than observed for the oxygen activation process supports a previous conclusion of modularity of function within the active site of TauD (McCusker, K. P.; Klinman, J. P. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2009, 106, 19791-19795). Extraction of intrinsic deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) using single turnover transients shows 2- to 4-fold increase in the size of the KIE for F159V in relation to wild-type and F159L. It appears that there is a break in behavior following removal of a single methylene from the side chain of F159L to generate F159V, whereby the protein active site loses its ability to restore the internuclear distance between substrate and Fe(IV)=O that supports optimal hydrogenic wave function overlap.

  9. Dolomitic lime amendment affects pine bark substrate pH, nutrient availability, and plant growth: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dolomitic lime (DL) is one of the most commonly used fertilizer amendments in nursery container substrates. It is used to adjust pH of pine bark substrates from their native pH, 4.1 to 5.1, up to about pH 6. Additions of DL have been shown to be beneficial, inconsequential, or detrimental dependin...

  10. Rice LGD1 containing RNA binding activity affects growth and development through alternative promoters.

    PubMed

    Thangasamy, Saminathan; Chen, Pei-Wei; Lai, Ming-Hsing; Chen, Jychian; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2012-07-01

    Tiller initiation and panicle development are important agronomical traits for grain production in Oryza sativa L. (rice), but their regulatory mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this study, T-DNA mutant and RNAi transgenic approaches were used to functionally characterize a unique rice gene, LAGGING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 (LGD1). The lgd1 mutant showed slow growth, reduced tiller number and plant height, altered panicle architecture and reduced grain yield. The fewer unelongated internodes and cells in lgd1 led to respective reductions in tiller number and to semi-dwarfism. Several independent LGD1-RNAi lines exhibited defective phenotypes similar to those observed in lgd1. Interestingly, LGD1 encodes multiple transcripts with different transcription start sites (TSSs), which were validated by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Additionally, GUS assays and a luciferase promoter assay confirmed the promoter activities of LGD1.1 and LGD1.5. LGD1 encoding a von Willebrand factor type A (vWA) domain containing protein is a single gene in rice that is seemingly specific to grasses. GFP-tagged LGD1 isoforms were predominantly detected in the nucleus, and weakly in the cytoplasm. In vitro northwestern analysis showed the RNA-binding activity of the recombinant C-terminal LGD1 protein. Our results demonstrated that LGD1 pleiotropically regulated rice vegetative growth and development through both the distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns of its multiple transcripts and RNA binding activity. Hence, the study of LGD1 will strengthen our understanding of the molecular basis of the multiple transcripts, and their corresponding polypeptides with RNA binding activity, that regulate pleiotropic effects in rice.

  11. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase.

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of new water soluble Mn(II)(2) and Mg(II)(2) complexes for the substrate binding models of xylose/glucose isomerases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ayan; Bera, Manindranath

    2014-01-30

    In methanol, the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of Mn(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H(3)hpnbpda [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in the presence of NaOH, afforded a new water soluble dinuclear manganese(II) complex, [Mn2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1). Similarly, the reaction of Mg(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H3hpnbpda in the presence of NaOH, in methanol, yielded a new water soluble dinuclear magnesium(II) complex, [Mg2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)(H2O)2] (2). DFT calculations have been performed for the structural optimization of complexes 1 and 2. The DFT optimized structure of complex 1 shows that two manganese(II) centers are in a distorted square pyramidal geometry, whereas the DFT optimized structure of complex 2 reveals that two magnesium(II) centers adopt a six-coordinate distorted octahedral geometry. To understand the mode of substrate binding and the mechanistic details of the active site metals in xylose/glucose isomerases (XGI), we have investigated the binding interactions of biologically important monosaccharides d-glucose and d-xylose with complexes 1 and 2, in aqueous alkaline solution by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence spectra show the binding-induced gradual decrease in emission of complexes 1 and 2 accompanied by a significant blue shift upon increasing the concentration of sugar substrates. The binding modes of d-glucose and d-xylose with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for C1 and C2 carbon atoms.

  13. Crystal Structure of OXA-58 with the Substrate-Binding Cleft in a Closed State: Insights into the Mobility and Stability of the OXA-58 Structure

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Hiromichi; Sugiyabu, Tomohiro; Ueno, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Miyano, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    OXA-58 is a class D β-lactamase from the multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. We determined the crystal structure of OXA-58 in a novel crystal, and revealed the structure of the substrate-binding cleft in a closed state, distinct from a previously reported OXA-58 crystal structure with the binding cleft in an open state. In the closed state, the movement of three loops (α3–α4, β6–β7, and β8–α10) forms an arch-like architecture over the binding cleft through interaction between the Phe113 residues of α3–α4 and Met225 of β6–β7. This structure suggests the involvement of these flexible loops in OXA-58 substrate binding. In contrast to the mobile loops, the Ω-loop appeared static, including the conserved loop residues and their hydrogen bonds; the pivotal residue Trp169 within the Ω-loop, ζ-carbamic acid of the modified base catalyst residue Lys86, and nucleophilic residue Ser83. The stability of OXA-58 was enhanced concomitant with an increase in the hydrolytic activity catalyzed by NaHCO3-dependent ζ-carbamic acid formation, with an EC50 of 0.34 mM. The W169A mutant enzyme was significantly thermally unstable even in the presence of 100 mM NaHCO3, whereas the S83A mutant was stabilized with NaHCO3-dependent activation. The ζ-carbamic acid was shown to increase not only OXA-58 hydrolytic activity but also OXA-58 stability through the formation of a hydrogen bond network connected to the Ω-loop with Ser83 and Trp169. Thus, the static Ω-loop is important for OXA-58 stability, whereas the mobile loops of the substrate-binding cleft form the basis for accommodation of the various substituents of β-lactam backbone. PMID:26701320

  14. Xenopus laevis FGF receptor substrate 3 (XFrs3) is important for eye development and mediates Pax6 expression in lens placode through its Shp2-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Jin; Bahn, Minjin; Kim, Yong Hwan; Shin, Jee-Yoon; Cheong, Seon-Woo; Ju, Bong-Gun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yeo, Chang-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family play important roles during various developmental processes including eye development. FRS (FGF receptor substrate) proteins bind to FGFR and serve as adapters for coordinated assembly of multi-protein complexes involved in Ras/MAPK and PI3 kinase/Akt pathways. Here, we identified Xenopus laevis Frs3 (XFrs3), a homolog of vertebrate Frs3, and investigated its roles during embryogenesis. XFrs3 is expressed maternally and zygotically with specific expression patterns throughout the early development. Knockdown of XFrs3 using a specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) caused reduction of Pax6 expression in the lens placode, and defects in the eye ranging from microphthalmia to anophthalmia. XFrs3 MO-induced defects were alleviated by wild type XFrs3 or a mutant XFrs3 (XFrs3-4YF), in which the putative tyrosine phosphorylation sites served as Grb2-binding sites are mutated. However, another XFrs3 mutant (XFrs3-2YF), in which the putative Shp2-binding sites are mutated, could not rescue the defects of XFrs3 morphants. In addition, we found that XFrs3 is important for FGF or IGF-induced ERK activation in ectodermal tissue. Taken together, our results suggest that signaling through Shp2-binding sites of XFrs3 is necessary for the eye development in Xenopus laevis.

  15. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A.; Pulido, David; Nogués, M. Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His15, His122 and Gln14) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His36, His39, Arg66 and His67). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein–nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5′ end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His36–His39 dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  16. The Crystal Structure Analysis of Group B Streptococcus Sortase C1: A Model for the ;Lid; Movement upon Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.

    2012-02-07

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible 'lid' anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the 'lid' displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its 'lid' mutant and proposed a role of the 'lid' as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  17. The crystal structure analysis of group B Streptococcus sortase C1: a model for the "lid" movement upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V L

    2011-12-09

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible "lid" anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the "lid" displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its "lid" mutant and proposed a role of the "lid" as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  18. Parallel modulation of brown adipose tissue GDP-binding, substrate uptake and (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zamora, F; Alemany, M; Arola, L

    1991-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase activity, in vitro glucose uptake and 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake, as well as mitochondrial GDP-binding and succinate dehydrogenase activity were determined in order to study the relationship between these parameters in control, cold acclimated and cafeteria-fed rats. GDP-binding, (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase and glucose uptake were increased in interscapular brown adipose tissue from cold-acclimated and cafeteria-fed rats, whereas 2-aminoisobutyric acid uptake was only increased in cafeteria-fed rats. GDP-binding and (Na(+)-K+)-ATPase activity showed a high correlation coefficient suggesting a parallel modulation of both systems, which would probably share a common regulation mechanism.

  19. Special AT-rich Binding Protein-2 (SATB2) Differentially Affects Disease-causing p63 Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jacky; Grant, R. Ian; Kaplan, David R.; Irwin, Meredith S.

    2011-01-01

    p63, a p53 family member, is critical for proper skin and limb development and directly regulates gene expression in the ectoderm. Mice lacking p63 exhibit skin and craniofacial defects including cleft palate. In humans p63 mutations are associated with several distinct developmental syndromes. p63 sterile-α-motif domain, AEC (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting)-associated mutations are associated with a high prevalence of orofacial clefting disorders, which are less common in EEC (ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting) patients with DNA binding domain p63 mutations. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations differentially influence p63 function remain unclear, and interactions with other proteins implicated in craniofacial development have not been identified. Here, we show that AEC p63 mutations affect the ability of the p63 protein to interact with special AT-rich binding protein-2 (SATB2), which has recently also been implicated in the development of cleft palate. p63 and SATB2 are co-expressed early in development in the ectoderm of the first and second branchial arches, two essential sites where signaling is required for craniofacial patterning. SATB2 attenuates p63-mediated gene expression of perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22), a critical downstream target gene during development, and specifically decreases p63 perp promoter binding. Interestingly, AEC but not EEC p63 mutations affect the ability of p63 to interact with SATB2 and the inhibitory effects of SATB2 on p63 transactivation of perp are most pronounced for AEC-associated p63 mutations. Our findings reveal a novel gain-of-function property of AEC-causing p63 mutations and identify SATB2 as the first p63 binding partner that differentially influences AEC and EEC p63 mutant proteins. PMID:21965674

  20. How hormone receptor-DNA binding affects nucleosomal DNA: the role of symmetry.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, T C; Kosztin, D; Schulten, K

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to determine the optimal conformation of an estrogen receptor DNA binding domain dimer bound to a consensus response element, ds(AGGTCACAGTGACCT), and to a nonconsensus response element, ds(AGAACACAGTGACCT). The structures simulated were derived from a crystallographic structure and solvated by a sphere (45-A radius) of explicit water and counterions. Long-range electrostatic interactions were accounted for during 100-ps simulations by means of a fast multipole expansion algorithm combined with a multiple time-step scheme in the molecular dynamics package NAMD. The simulations demonstrate that the dimer induces a bent and underwound (10.7 bp/turn) conformation in the DNA. The bending reflects the dyad symmetry of the receptor dimer and can be described as an S-shaped curve in the helical axis of DNA when projected onto a plane. A similar bent and underwound conformation is observed for nucleosomal DNA near the nucleosome's dyad axis that reflects the symmetry of the histone octamer. We propose that when a receptor dimer binds to a nucleosome, the most favorable dimer-DNA and histone-DNA interactions are achieved if the respective symmetry axes are aligned. Such positioning of a receptor dimer over the dyad of nucleosome B in the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter is in agreement with experiment. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 PMID:9129808

  1. Mutations that affect coenzyme binding and dimer formation of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Brunskole, Mojca; Kristan, Katja; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2009-03-25

    The 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl) is an NADPH-dependent member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, and it functions as a dimer that is composed of two identical subunits. By constructing the appropriate mutants, we have examined the M204 residue that is situated in the coenzyme binding pocket, for its role in the binding of the coenzyme NADP(H). We have also studied the importance of hydrophobic interactions through F124, F132, F133 and F177 for 17beta-HSDcl dimer formation. The M204G substitution decreased the catalytic efficiency of 17beta-HSDcl, suggesting that M204 sterically coerces the nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme into the appropriate position for further hydride transfer. Phenylalanine substitutions introduced at the dimer interface produced inactive aggregates and oligomers with high molecular masses, suggesting that these hydrophobic interactions have important roles in the formation of the active dimer.

  2. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  3. Crystal Structure of a Putative Cytochrome P450 Alkane Hydroxylase (CYP153D17) from Sphingomonas sp. PAMC 26605 and Its Conformational Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Woo; Yu, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Joo-Ho; Park, Sun-Ha; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic alkane hydroxylation reactions are useful for producing pharmaceutical and agricultural chemical intermediates from hydrocarbons. Several cytochrome P450 enzymes catalyze the regio- and stereo-specific hydroxylation of alkanes. We evaluated the substrate binding of a putative CYP alkane hydroxylase (CYP153D17) from the bacterium Sphingomonas sp. PAMC 26605. Substrate affinities to C10–C12 n-alkanes and C10–C14 fatty acids with Kd values varied from 0.42 to 0.59 μM. A longer alkane (C12) bound more strongly than a shorter alkane (C10), while shorter fatty acids (C10, capric acid; C12, lauric acid) bound more strongly than a longer fatty acid (C14, myristic acid). These data displayed a broad substrate specificity of CYP153D17, hence it was named as a putative CYP alkane hydroxylase. Moreover, the crystal structure of CYP153D17 was determined at 3.1 Å resolution. This is the first study to provide structural information for the CYP153D family. Structural analysis showed that a co-purified alkane-like compound bound near the active-site heme group. The alkane-like substrate is in the hydrophobic pocket containing Thr74, Met90, Ala175, Ile240, Leu241, Val244, Leu292, Met295, and Phe393. Comparison with other CYP structures suggested that conformational changes in the β1–β2, α3–α4, and α6–α7 connecting loop are important for incorporating the long hydrophobic alkane-like substrate. These results improve the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of CYP153D17 and provide valuable information for future protein engineering studies. PMID:27941697

  4. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  5. TANK-binding kinase-1 broadly affects oyster immune response to bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xueying; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-09-01

    As a benthic filter feeder of estuaries, the immune system of oysters provides one of the best models for studying the genetic and molecular basis of the innate immune pathway in marine invertebrates and examining the influence of environmental factors on the immune system. Here, the molecular function of molluscan TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1) (which we named CgTBK1) was studied in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Compared with known TBK1 proteins in other model organisms, CgTBK1 contains a conserved S-TKc domain and a coiled coil domain at the N- and C-terminals but lacks an important ubiquitin domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of CgTBK1 was ubiquitous in all selected tissues, with highest expression in the gills. CgTBK1 expression was significantly upregulated in response to infections with Vibrio alginolyticus, ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 reference strain and μvar), and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid sodium salt, suggesting its broad function in immune response. Subcellular localization showed the presence of CgTBK1 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells, suggesting its potential function as the signal transducer between the receptor and transcription factor. We further demonstrated that CgTBK1 interacted with CgSTING in HEK293T cells, providing evidence that CgTBK1 could be activated by direct binding to CgSTING. In summary, we characterized the TBK1 gene in C. gigas and demonstrated its role in the innate immune response to pathogen infections.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of the active matrix metalloproteinase-2: positioning of the N-terminal fragment and binding of a small peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2008-07-01

    Herein we use different computational methods to study the structure and energetic stability of the catalytic domain of the active MMP-2 enzyme considering two different orientations of its N-terminal coil. The first orientation is largely solvent accessible and corresponds to that observed in the 1CK7 crystal structure of the proenzyme. In the second orientation, the N-terminal coil is packed against the Omega-loop and the alpha3-helix of the MMP-2 enzyme likewise in the so-called "superactivated" form of other MMPs. Binding to the MMP-2 catalytic domain of a short peptide substrate, which mimics the sequence of the alpha1 chain of collagen type I, is also examined considering again the two configurations of the N-terminal coil. All these MMP-2 models are subject to 20 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by MM-PBSA (Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area) calculations. The positioning of the N-terminal coil in the "superactivated" form is found to be energetically favored for the MMP-2 enzyme. Moreover, this configuration of the N-terminal moiety can facilitate the binding of peptide substrates. Globally, the results obtained in this study could be relevant for the structural-based design of specific MMP inhibitors.

  7. Identification of Myb-binding protein 1A (MYBBP1A) as a novel substrate for aurora B kinase.

    PubMed

    Perrera, Claudia; Colombo, Riccardo; Valsasina, Barbara; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Troiani, Sonia; Modugno, Michele; Gianellini, Laura; Cappella, Paolo; Isacchi, Antonella; Moll, Jurgen; Rusconi, Luisa

    2010-04-16

    Aurora kinases are mitotic enzymes involved in centrosome maturation and separation, spindle assembly and stability, and chromosome condensation, segregation, and cytokinesis and represent well known targets for cancer therapy because their deregulation has been linked to tumorigenesis. The availability of suitable markers is of crucial importance to investigate the functions of Auroras and monitor kinase inhibition in in vivo models and in clinical trials. Extending the knowledge on Aurora substrates could help to better understand their biology and could be a source for clinical biomarkers. Using biochemical, mass spectrometric, and cellular approaches, we identified MYBBP1A as a novel Aurora B substrate and serine 1303 as the major phosphorylation site. MYBBP1A is phosphorylated in nocodazole-arrested cells and is dephosphorylated upon Aurora B silencing or by treatment with Danusertib, a small molecule inhibitor of Aurora kinases. Furthermore, we show that MYBBP1A depletion by RNA interference causes mitotic progression delay and spindle assembly defects. MYBBP1A has until now been described as a nucleolar protein, mainly involved in transcriptional regulation. The results presented herein show MYBBP1A as a novel Aurora B kinase substrate and reveal a not yet recognized link of this nucleolar protein to mitosis.

  8. Deletion of N-terminal amino acids from human lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase differentially affects enzyme activity toward alpha- and beta-substrate lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vickaryous, Nicola K; Teh, Evelyn M; Stewart, Bruce; Dolphin, Peter J; Too, Catherine K L; McLeod, Roger S

    2003-03-21

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the enzyme responsible for generation of the majority of the cholesteryl esters (CE) in human plasma. Although most plasma cholesterol esterification occurs on high-density lipoprotein (HDL), via alpha-LCAT activity, esterification also occurs on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) via the beta-activity of the enzyme. Computer threading techniques have provided a three-dimensional model for use in the structure-function analysis of the core and catalytic site of the LCAT protein, but the model does not extend to the N-terminal region of the enzyme, which may mediate LCAT interaction with lipoprotein substrates. In the present study, we have examined the functional consequences of deletion of the highly conserved hydrophobic N-terminal amino acids (residues 1-5) of human LCAT. Western blot analysis showed that the mutant proteins (Delta 1-Delta 5) were synthesized and secreted from transfected COS-7 cells at levels approximately equivalent to those of wild-type hLCAT. The secreted proteins had apparent molecular weights of 67 kDa, indicating that they were correctly processed and glycosylated during cellular transit. However, deletion of the first residue of the mature LCAT protein (Delta 1 mutant) resulted in a dramatic loss of alpha-LCAT activity (5% of wild type using reconstituted HDL substrate, rHDL), although this mutant retained full beta-LCAT activity (108% of wild-type using human LDL substrate). Removal of residues 1 and 2 (Delta 2 mutant) abolished alpha-LCAT activity and reduced beta-LCAT activity to 12% of wild type. Nevertheless, LCAT Delta 1 and Delta 2 mutants retained their ability to bind to rHDL and LDL lipoprotein substrates. The dramatic loss of enzyme activity suggests that the N-terminal residues of LCAT may be involved in maintaining the conformation of the lid domain and influence activation by the alpha-LCAT cofactor apoA-I (in Delta 1) and/or loss of enzyme activity (in Delta 1-Delta 5). Since the

  9. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  10. Structures of Human Cyctochrome P450 2E1: Insights Into the Binding of Inhibitors And Both Small Molecular Weight And Fatty Acid Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Porubsky, P.R.; Meneely, K.M.; Scott, E.E.

    2009-05-21

    Human microsomal cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1) monooxygenates >70 low molecular weight xenobiotic compounds, as well as much larger endogenous fatty acid signaling molecules such as arachidonic acid. In the process, CYP2E1 can generate toxic or carcinogenic compounds, as occurs with acetaminophen overdose, nitrosamines in cigarette smoke, and reactive oxygen species from uncoupled catalysis. Thus, the diverse roles that CYP2E1 has in normal physiology, toxicity, and drug metabolism are related to its ability to metabolize diverse classes of ligands, but the structural basis for this was previously unknown. Structures of human CYP2E1 have been solved to 2.2 {angstrom} for an indazole complex and 2.6 {angstrom} for a 4-methylpyrazole complex. Both inhibitors bind to the heme iron and hydrogen bond to Thr{sup 303} within the active site. Complementing its small molecular weight substrates, the hydrophobic CYP2E1 active site is the smallest yet observed for a human cytochrome P-450. The CYP2E1 active site also has two adjacent voids: one enclosed above the I helix and the other forming a channel to the protein surface. Minor repositioning of the Phe{sup 478} aromatic ring that separates the active site and access channel would allow the carboxylate of fatty acid substrates to interact with conserved {sup 216}QXXNN{sup 220} residues in the access channel while positioning the hydrocarbon terminus in the active site, consistent with experimentally observed {omega}-1 hydroxylation of saturated fatty acids. Thus, these structures provide insights into the ability of CYP2E1 to effectively bind and metabolize both small molecule substrates and fatty acids.

  11. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  12. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  13. Crystal Structure of Human Liver delta {4}-3-Ketosteroid 5 beta-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Drury, J.; Penning, T.; Christianson, D.

    2008-01-01

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all 4-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an a,{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a 4-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90 bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human 4-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP+ at 1.79- and 1.35- Angstroms resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP+ and cortisone at 1.90- Angstroms resolution, NADP+ and progesterone at 2.03- Angstroms resolution, and NADP+ and testosterone at 1.62- Angstroms resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr58 and Glu120. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  14. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  15. Biochemical and structural characterization of quinoprotein aldose sugar dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HJ6: Mutational analysis of Tyr156 in the substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Woo; Wang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Ae-Kyung; Park, Hyun; Jeon, Sung-Jong

    2016-10-15

    The gene encoding a quinoprotein aldose sugar dehydrogenase (ASD) from Thermus thermophilus HJ6 (Tt_ASD) was cloned and sequenced; it comprised 1059 nucleotides encoding a protein containing 352 amino acids that had a predicted molecular mass of 38.9 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 42.9% and 33.9% identities to the ASD proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical properties of Tt_ASD were characterized. The optimum pH for the oxidation of glucose was 7.0-7.5 and the optimum temperature was 70 °C. The half-life of heat inactivation for the apoenzyme was about 25 min at 85 °C. The enzyme was highly thermostable, and the activity of the pyrroloquinoline quinone-bound holoenzyme was not lost after incubation at 85 °C for 100 min. Tt_ASD could oxidize various sugars, including hexoses, pentoses, disaccharides, and polysaccharides, in addition to alcohols. Structural analysis suggested that Tyr156 would be the substrate-binding residue. Two mutants, Y156A and Y156K, had impaired activities and affinities for all substrates and completely lost their activities for alcohols. This structural and mutational analysis of Tt_ASD demonstrates the crucial role of Tyr156 in determining substrate specificity.

  16. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  17. The contribution of methionine to the stability of the Escherichia coli MetNIQ ABC transporter - substrate binding protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phong T.; Li, Qi Wen; Kadaba, Neena S.; Lai, Jeffrey Y.; Yang, Janet G.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous role of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) importers in nutrient uptake, only the E. coli maltose and vitamin B12 ABC transporters have been structurally characterized in multiple conformations relevant to the alternating access transport mechanism. To complement our previous structure determination of the E. coli MetNI methionine importer in the inward facing conformation (Kadaba et al. (2008) Science 321, 250–253), we have explored conditions stabilizing the outward facing conformation. Using two variants, the Walker B E166Q mutation with ATP+EDTA to stabilize MetNI in the ATP-bound conformation and the N229A variant of the binding protein MetQ, shown in this work to disrupt methionine binding, a high affinity MetNIQ complex was formed with a dissociation constant measured to be 27 nM. Using wild type MetQ containing a co-purified methionine (for which the crystal structure is reported at 1.6 Å resolution), the dissociation constant for complex formation with MetNI is measured to be ~40-fold weaker, indicating that complex formation lowers the affinity of MetQ for methionine by this amount. Preparation of a stable MetNIQ complex is an essential step towards the crystallographic analysis of the outward facing conformation, a key intermediate in the uptake of methionine by this transport system. PMID:25803078

  18. Contributions of ionic interactions and protein dynamics to cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrate and inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, An; Stout, C David; Zhang, Qinghai; Johnson, Eric F

    2015-02-20

    P450 2D6 contributes significantly to the metabolism of >15% of the 200 most marketed drugs. Open and closed crystal structures of P450 2D6 thioridazine complexes were obtained using different crystallization conditions. The protonated piperidine moiety of thioridazine forms a charge-stabilized hydrogen bond with Asp-301 in the active sites of both complexes. The more open conformation exhibits a second molecule of thioridazine bound in an expanded substrate access channel antechamber with its piperidine moiety forming a charge-stabilized hydrogen bond with Glu-222. Incubation of the crystalline open thioridazine complex with alternative ligands, prinomastat, quinidine, quinine, or ajmalicine, displaced both thioridazines. Quinine and ajmalicine formed charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds with Glu-216, whereas the protonated nitrogen of quinidine is equidistant from Asp-301 and Glu-216 with protonated nitrogen H-bonded to a water molecule in the access channel. Prinomastat is not ionized. Adaptations of active site side-chain rotamers and polypeptide conformations were evident between the complexes, with the binding of ajmalicine eliciting a closure of the open structure reflecting in part the inward movement of Glu-216 to form a hydrogen bond with ajmalicine as well as sparse lattice restraints that would hinder adaptations. These results indicate that P450 2D6 exhibits sufficient elasticity within the crystal lattice to allow the passage of compounds between the active site and bulk solvent and to adopt a more closed form that adapts for binding alternative ligands with different degrees of closure. These crystals provide a means to characterize substrate and inhibitor binding to the enzyme after replacement of thioridazine with alternative compounds.

  19. Roles of phosphate recognition in inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (IPK1) substrate binding and activation.

    PubMed

    Gosein, Varin; Miller, Gregory J

    2013-09-13

    Inositol phosphate kinases (IPKs) sequentially phosphorylate inositol phosphates (IPs) to yield a group of small signaling molecules involved in diverse cellular processes. IPK1 (inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase) phosphorylates inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate to inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate; however, the mechanism of IP recognition employed by IPK1 is currently unresolved. We demonstrated previously that IPK1 possesses an unstable N-terminal lobe in the absence of IP, which led us to propose that the phosphate profile of the IP was linked to stabilization of IPK1. Here, we describe a systematic study to determine the roles of the 1-, 3-, 5-, and 6-phosphate groups of inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate in IP binding and IPK1 activation. The 5- and 6-phosphate groups were the most important for IP binding to IPK1, and the 1- and 3-phosphate groups were more important for IPK1 activation than the others. Moreover, we demonstrate that there are three critical residues (Arg-130, Lys-170, and Lys-411) necessary for IPK1 activity. Arg-130 is the only substrate-binding N-terminal lobe residue that can render IPK1 inactive; its 1-phosphate is critical for full IPK1 activity and for stabilization of the active conformation of IPK1. Taken together, our results support the model for recognition of the IP substrate by IPK1 in which (i) the 4-, 5-, and 6-phosphates are initially recognized by the C-terminal lobe, and subsequently, (ii) the interaction between the 1-phosphate and Arg-130 stabilizes the N-terminal lobe and activates IPK1. This model of IP recognition, believed to be unique among IPKs, could be exploited for selective inhibition of IPK1 in future studies that investigate the role of higher IPs.

  20. Developmental changes affecting lectin binding in the vomeronasal organ of domestic pigs, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Park, Junwoo; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Chanwoo; Kim, Hwangryong; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Shin, Taekyun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the developmental changes of glycoconjugate patterns in the porcine vomeronasal organs (VNOs) and associated glands (Jacobson's glands) from prenatal (9 weeks of gestation) and postnatal (2 days after birth) to the sexually mature stage (6 months old). The VNO of pigs (Sus scrofa) was examined using the following: Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin isolectin B4 (BSI-B4), Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). At the fetal stage, all lectins examined were detected mainly in the free border of the vomeronasal epithelium, but few (WGA and UEA-I) and or absent in the VNO cell bodies. At the postnatal and sexually mature stages, the reactivity of some lectins, including WGA, UEA-I, DBA and SBA, were shown to increase in the VNO sensory epithelium as well as the free border. The increased reactivity of lectins as development progressed was also observed in Jacobson's gland acini. These findings suggest that binding sites of lectins, including those of WGA, UEA-I, DBA, and SBA, increase during development from fetal to postnatal growth, possibly contributing to the increased ability of chemoreception in the pig.

  1. Starch-binding domain affects catalysis in two Lactobacillus alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in alpha-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus alpha-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities.

  2. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease.

  3. A functional MiR-124 binding-site polymorphism in IQGAP1 affects human cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Rui; Li, Ming; Wu, Xujun; Wang, Jianhong; Huang, Lin; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Qingwei; Su, Bing

    2014-01-01

    As a product of the unique evolution of the human brain, human cognitive performance is largely a collection of heritable traits. Rather surprisingly, to date there have been no reported cases to highlight genes that underwent adaptive evolution in humans and which carry polymorphisms that have a marked effect on cognitive performance. IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), a scaffold protein, affects learning and memory in a dose-dependent manner. Its expression is regulated by miR-124 through the binding sites in the 3'UTR, where a SNP (rs1042538) exists in the core-binding motif. Here we showed that this SNP can influence the miR-target interaction both in vitro and in vivo. Individuals carrying the derived T alleles have higher IQGAP1 expression in the brain as compared to the ancestral A allele carriers. We observed a significant and male-specific association between rs1042538 and tactile performances in two independent cohorts. Males with the derived allele displayed higher tactual performances as compared to those with the ancestral allele. Furthermore, we found a highly diverged allele-frequency distribution of rs1042538 among world human populations, likely caused by natural selection and/or recent population expansion. These results suggest that current human populations still carry sequence variations that affect cognitive performances and that these genetic variants may likely have been subject to comparatively recent natural selection.

  4. Computational and Biochemical Docking of the Irreversible Cocaine Analog RTI 82 Directly Demonstrates Ligand Positioning in the Dopamine Transporter Central Substrate-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D.; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4′-azido-3′-iodophenylethyl ester ([125I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [125I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  5. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors.

  6. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Nrdp1/FLRF Identifies the Binding Site for the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ErbB3

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain,S.; Leahy, D.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  7. Structure-based mutagenesis of the substrate-recognition domain of Nrdp1/FLRF identifies the binding site for the receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB3

    PubMed Central

    Bouyain, Samuel; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 Å crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species. PMID:17384230

  8. Structure-based mutagenesis of the substrate-recognition domain of Nrdp1/FLRF identifies the binding site for the receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB3.

    PubMed

    Bouyain, Samuel; Leahy, Daniel J

    2007-04-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  9. An alternative domain near the nucleotide-binding site of Drosophila muscle myosin affects ATPase kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Becky M; Zhang, Shuxing; Suggs, Jennifer A; Swank, Douglas M; Littlefield, Kimberly P; Knowles, Aileen F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2005-10-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster expression of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms occurs by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The exon 7 domain is one of four variable regions in the catalytic head and is located near the nucleotide-binding site. To ascribe a functional role to this domain, we created two chimeric myosin isoforms (indirect flight isoform-exon 7a and embryonic-exon 7d) that differ from the native indirect flight muscle and embryonic body-wall muscle isoforms only in the exon 7 region. Germline transformation and subsequent expression of the chimeric myosins in the indirect flight muscle of myosin-null Drosophila allowed us to purify the myosin for in vitro studies and to assess in vivo structure and function of transgenic muscles. Intriguingly, in vitro experiments show the exon 7 domain modulates myosin ATPase activity but has no effect on actin filament velocity, a novel result compared to similar studies with other Drosophila variable exons. Transgenic flies expressing the indirect flight isoform-exon 7a have normal indirect flight muscle structure, and flight and jump ability. However, expression of the embryonic-exon 7d chimeric isoform yields flightless flies that show improvements in both the structural stability of the indirect flight muscle and in locomotor abilities as compared to flies expressing the embryonic isoform. Overall, our results suggest the exon 7 domain participates in the regulation of the attachment of myosin to actin in order to fine-tune the physiological properties of Drosophila myosin isoforms.

  10. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, J H

    1988-01-01

    Researchers in Utrecht, the Netherlands have studied the effects of different factors, such as oral contraceptives (OCs), on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in blood. The SHBG levels in women who continuously used OCs consisting only of .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) rose as high as 260% + or - 25% of those in women not using OCs. Further, mean SHBG levels of women using combination OCs of EE2 and levonorgestrel were 10-60% higher than women not using OCs. SHBG levels were significantly higher than the use of a sequential OC containing decreasing amounts of EE2 and increasing amounts of levonorgestrel than those cause by use of a continuous combined OC with .03 mg and .15 mg respectively. As the dosage of EE2 increased in combination OCs with 2.5 mg lynestrenol, the SHBG increased from 20% (.05 mg EE2) to 150% (.75 mg EE2). SHBG levels after taking EE2 and cyproterone acetate increased significantly more (240%) than levels after EE2 and desogestrel (170%), or after EE2 and gestoden (140%) [p.001]. SHBG levels of women who took OCs containing only .03 mg of levonorgestrel daily decreased 35% (p.01). These levels fell by 30% in women who received 150 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate intramuscularly every 3 months (p.001). SHBG concentrations increased when estrogens were taken orally for noncontraceptive purposes, but they did not change when they were administered percutaneously. As body weight increased the SHBG levels decreased despite hormonal status or sex. Further, the lower the fat content of one's diet the higher the SHBG levels and vice versa. SHBG levels are higher in males with flaccid lungs than they are in males with healthy lungs.

  11. Flexibility of the Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Pro-domain Enables Productive Binding of Protein Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Valnickova, Zuzana; Sanglas, Laura; Arolas, Joan L.; Petersen, Steen V.; Schar, Christine; Otzen, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) exhibits intrinsic proteolytic activity toward large peptides. The structural basis for this observation was clarified by the crystal structures of human and bovine TAFI. These structures evinced a significant rotation of the pro-domain away from the catalytic moiety when compared with other pro-carboxypeptidases, thus enabling access of large peptide substrates to the active site cleft. Here, we further investigated the flexible nature of the pro-domain and demonstrated that TAFI forms productive complexes with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors from potato, leech, and tick (PCI, LCI, and TCI, respectively). We determined the crystal structure of the bovine TAFI-TCI complex, revealing that the pro-domain was completely displaced from the position observed in the TAFI structure. It protruded into the bulk solvent and was disordered, whereas TCI occupied the position previously held by the pro-domain. The authentic nature of the presently studied TAFI-inhibitor complexes was supported by the trimming of the C-terminal residues from the three inhibitors upon complex formation. This finding suggests that the inhibitors interact with the active site of TAFI in a substrate-like manner. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TAFI is able to form a bona fide complex with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors. This underlines the unusually flexible nature of the pro-domain and implies a possible mechanism for regulation of TAFI intrinsic proteolytic activity in vivo. PMID:20880845

  12. Isolation and characterisation of transport-defective substrate-binding mutants of the tetracycline antiporter TetA(B)

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David J.; Tate, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The tetracycline antiporter TetA(B) is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily which confers tetracycline resistance to cells by coupling the efflux of tetracycline to the influx of protons down their chemical potential gradient. Although it is a medically important transporter, its structure has yet to be determined. One possibility for why this has proven difficult is that the transporter may be conformationally heterogeneous in the purified state. To overcome this, we developed two strategies to rapidly identify TetA(B) mutants that were transport-defective and that could still bind tetracycline. Up to 9 amino acid residues could be deleted from the loop between transmembrane α-helices 6 and 7 with only a slight decrease in affinity of tetracycline binding as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, although the mutant was transport-defective. Scanning mutagenesis where all the residues between 2 and 389 were mutated to either valine, alanine or glycine (VAG scan) identified 15 mutants that were significantly impaired in tetracycline transport. Of these mutants, 12 showed no evidence of tetracycline binding by isothermal titration calorimetry performed on the purified transporters. In contrast, the mutants G44V and G346V bound tetracycline 4–5 fold more weakly than TetA(B), with Kds of 28 μM and 36 μM, respectively, whereas the mutant R70G bound tetracycline 3-fold more strongly (Kd 2.1 μM). Systematic mutagenesis is thus an effective strategy for isolating transporter mutants that may be conformationally constrained and which represent attractive targets for crystallisation and structure determination. PMID:26143388

  13. Post-translational phosphorylation affects the IgE binding capacity of caseins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, H; Meisel, H; Creminon, C; Wal, J M

    2000-02-11

    IgE response specific to those molecular regions of casein that contain a major phosphorylation site was analyzed using native and modified caseins and derived peptides. This study included (i) the naturally occurring common variants A1 and A from beta- and alphas2-caseins, respectively, which were purified in the native form and then dephosphorylated, (ii) a purified rare variant D of alphas2-casein which lacks one major phosphorylation site, and (iii) the native and dephosphorylated tryptic fragment f(1-25) from beta-casein. Direct and indirect ELISA using sera from patients allergic to milk showed that the IgE response to caseins is affected by modifying or eliminating the major phosphorylation site.

  14. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Collagen-Gelatin Mixtures as Wound Model, and Substrates for VEGF-Mimetic Peptide Binding and Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tania R.; Stahl, Patrick J.; Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In humans, high level of collagen remodeling is seen during normal physiological events such as bone renewal, as well as in pathological conditions, such as arthritis, tumor growth and other chronic wounds. Our lab recently discovered that collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) is able to hybridize with denatured collagens at these collagen remodeling sites with high affinity. Here, we show that the CMP's high binding affinity to denatured collagens can be utilized to deliver angiogenic signals to scaffolds composed of heat-denatured collagens (gelatins). We first demonstrate hybridization between denatured collagens and QKCMP, a CMP with pro-angiogenic QK domain. We show that high levels of QKCMP can be immobilized to a new artificial matrix containing both fibrous type I collagen and heat denatured collagen through triple helix hybridization, and that the QKCMP is able to stimulate early angiogenic response of endothelial cells (ECs). We also show that the QKCMP can bind to excised tissues from burn injuries in cutaneous mouse model, suggesting its potential for promoting neovascularization of burn wounds. PMID:25584990

  16. Homo-timeric structural model of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 and characterization of its substrate/inhibitor binding interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Li; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Frazier, Ronald B.; Davies, Michael S.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Weinberg, Robin A.; Gierse, James K.; Caspers, Nicole; Carter, Jeffrey S.; McDonald, Joseph J.; Moore, William M.; Vazquez, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Inducible, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1), the terminal enzyme in the prostaglandin (PG) biosynthetic pathway, constitutes a promising therapeutic target for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. To elucidate structure-function relationships and to enable structure-based design, an mPGES-1 homology model was developed using the three-dimensional structure of the closest homologue of the MAPEG family (Membrane Associated Proteins in Eicosanoid and Glutathione metabolism), mGST-1. The ensuing model of mPGES-1 is a homo-trimer, with each monomer consisting of four membrane-spanning segments. Extensive structure refinement revealed an inter-monomer salt bridge (K26-E77) as well as inter-helical interactions within each monomer, including polar hydrogen bonds (e.g. T78-R110-T129) and hydrophobic π-stacking (F82-F103-F106), all contributing to the overall stability of the homo-trimer of mPGES-1. Catalytic co-factor glutathione (GSH) was docked into the mPGES-1 model by flexible optimization of both the ligand and the protein conformations, starting from the initial location ascertained from the mGST-1 structure. Possible binding site for the substrate, prostaglandin H2 (PGH2), was identified by systematically probing the refined molecular structure of mPGES-1. A binding model was generated by induced fit docking of PGH2 in the presence of GSH. The homology model prescribes three potential inhibitor binding sites per mPGES-1 trimer. This was further confirmed experimentally by equilibrium dialysis study which generated a binding stoichiometric ratio of approximately three inhibitor molecules to three mPGES-1 monomers. The structural model that we have derived could serve as a useful tool for structure-guided design of inhibitors for this emergently important therapeutic target.

  17. Osteopontin is cleaved at multiple sites close to its integrin-binding motifs in milk and is a novel substrate for plasmin and cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Brian; Schack, Lotte; Kläning, Eva; Sørensen, Esben S

    2010-03-12

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a highly modified integrin-binding protein present in most tissues and body fluids where it has been implicated in numerous biological processes. A significant regulation of OPN function is mediated through phosphorylation and proteolytic processing. Proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and matrix metalloproteinases close to the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp sequence modulates the function of OPN and its integrin binding properties. In this study, seven N-terminal OPN fragments originating from proteolytic cleavage have been characterized from human milk. Identification of the cleavage sites revealed that all fragments contained the Arg-Gly-Asp(145) sequence and were generated by cleavage of the Leu(151)-Arg(152), Arg(152)-Ser(153), Ser(153)-Lys(154), Lys(154)-Ser(155), Ser(155)-Lys(156), Lys(156)-Lys(157), or Phe(158)-Arg(159) peptide bonds. Six cleavages cannot be ascribed to thrombin or matrix metalloproteinase activity, whereas the cleavage at Arg(152)-Ser(153) matches thrombin specificity for OPN. The principal protease in milk, plasmin, hydrolyzed the same peptide bond as thrombin, but its main cleavage site was identified to be Lys(154)-Ser(155). Another endogenous milk protease, cathepsin D, cleaved the Leu(151)-Arg(152) bond. OPN fragments corresponding to plasmin activity were also identified in urine showing that plasmin cleavage of OPN is not restricted to milk. Plasmin, but not cathepsin D, cleavage of OPN increased cell adhesion mediated by the alpha(V)beta(3)- or alpha(5)beta(1)-integrins. Similar cellular adhesion was mediated by plasmin and thrombin-cleaved OPN showing that plasmin can be a potent regulator of OPN activity. These data show that OPN is highly susceptible to cleavage near its integrin-binding motifs, and the protein is a novel substrate for plasmin and cathepsin D.

  18. The M17 leucine aminopeptidase of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: importance of active site metal ions in the binding of substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maric, Selma; Donnelly, Sheila M; Robinson, Mark W; Skinner-Adams, Tina; Trenholme, Katharine R; Gardiner, Donald L; Dalton, John P; Stack, Colin M; Lowther, Jonathan

    2009-06-16

    The M17 leucine aminopeptidase of the intraerythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfLAP) plays a role in releasing amino acids from host hemoglobin that are used for parasite protein synthesis, growth, and development. This enzyme represents a target at which new antimalarials could be designed since metalloaminopeptidase inhibitors prevent the growth of the parasites in vitro and in vivo. A study on the metal ion binding characteristics of recombinant P. falciparum M17 leucine aminopeptidase (rPfLAP) shows that the active site of this exopeptidase contains two metal-binding sites, a readily exchangeable site (site 1) and a tight binding site (site 2). The enzyme retains activity when the metal ion is removed from site 1, while removal of metal ions from both sites results in an inactive apoenzyme that cannot be reactivated by the addition of divalent metal cations. The metal ion at site 1 is readily exchangeable with several divalent metal ions and displays a preference in the order of preference Zn(2+) > Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mg(2+). While it is likely that native PfLAP contains a Zn(2+) in site 2, the metal ion located in site 1 may be dependent on the type and concentration of metal ions in the cytosolic compartment of the parasite. Importantly, the type of metal ion present at site 1 influences not only the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for peptide substrates but also the mode of binding by bestatin, a metal-chelating inhibitor of M17 aminopeptidases with antimalarial activity.

  19. Putative implication of alpha-amylase loop 7 in the mechanism of substrate binding and reaction products release.

    PubMed

    André, G; Tran, V

    2004-10-05

    Alpha-amylases are widespread endo-enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1,4) glycosidic linkages of starch polymers. Molecular modeling of amylose-amylase interactions is a step toward enzymatic mechanism understanding and rational design of new enzymes. From the crystallographic complex of barley alpha-amylase AMY2-acarbose, the static aspects of amylose-amylase docking have been characterized with a model of maltododecaose (DP12) (G. André, A. Buléon, R. Haser, and V. Tran, Biopolymers 1999, Vol. 50, pp. 751-762; G. André and V. Tran, Special Publication no. 246 1999, The Royal Society of Chemistry, H. J. Gilbert, G. J. Davies, B. Henrissat, and B. Svensson, Eds., Cambridge, pp. 165-174). These studies, consistent with the experimental subsite mapping (K. Bak-Jensen, G. André, V. Tran, and B. Svensson, Journal of Biological Chemistry, to be published), propose a propagation scheme for an amylose chain in the active cleft of AMY2. The topographical overview of alpha-amylases identified loop 7 as a conserved segment flanking the active site. Since some crystallographic experiments suspected its high flexibility, its putative motion was explored through a robotic scheme, an alternate route to dynamics simulations that consume CPU time. The present article describes the characteristics of the flexibility of loop 7: location and motion in AMY2. A back-and-forth motion with a large amplitude of more than 0.6 nm was evaluated. This movement could be triggered by two hinge residues. It results in the loop flipping over the active site to enhance the docking of the native helical substrate through specific interactions, it positions the catalytic residues, it distorts the substrate towards its transition state geometry, and finally monitors the release of the products after hydrolysis. The residues involved in the process are now rational mutation points in the hands of molecular biologists.

  20. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone.

  1. Changes in substrate access did not affect early feather-pecking behavior in two strains of laying hen chicks.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Laura M; Duncan, Ian J H

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking, commonly found in flocks of laying hens (Gallus gallus), is detrimental to bird welfare. Thought to cause this problem is the normal housing of layers without a floor substrate. Some evidence suggests that early substrate access decreases later feather pecking. However, there has been little research on the immediate effects of a change in substrate availability on bird welfare, although environmental modifications like this are often done when brooding and rearing laying hen chicks. To investigate this, the behavior of two strains of laying hen chicks was recorded for 4 weeks. The study kept the birds on either wire or peat moss for 14 days and then switched half the chicks to the other flooring. Early feather pecking was not significantly different for birds started on peat moss and switched to wire than for birds only on wire (p > .05). Because moving chicks from peat moss to wire did not cause additional welfare problems, the study recommends that chicks be kept on a substrate when young as feather-pecking levels are lower and immediate welfare is improved compared with birds kept only on wire.

  2. The ties that bind: perceived social support, stress, and IBS in severely affected patients

    PubMed Central

    LACKNER, J. M.; BRASEL, A. M.; QUIGLEY, B M.; KEEFER, L.; KRASNER, S. S.; POWELL, C.; KATZ, L. A.; SITRIN, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the association between social support and the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in a sample of severely affected IBS patients recruited to an NIH-funded clinical trial. In addition, we examined if the effects of social support on IBS pain are mediated through the effects on stress. Methods Subjects were 105 Rome II diagnosed IBS patients (F = 85%) who completed seven questionnaires which were collected as part of a pretreatment baseline assessment. Key Results Partial correlations were conducted to clarify the relationships between social support and clinically relevant variables with baseline levels of psychopathology, holding constant number of comorbid medical diseases, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, and education. Analyses indicated that social support was inversely related to IBS symptom severity. Social support was positively related with less severe pain. A similar pattern of data was found for perceived stress but not quality of life impairment. Regression analyses examined if the effects of social support on pain are mediated by stress. The effects of social support on bodily pain were mediated by stress such that the greater the social support the less stress and the less pain. This effect did not hold for symptom severity, quality of life, or psychological distress. Conclusions & Inferences This study links the perceived adequacy of social support to the global severity of symptoms of IBS and its cardinal symptom (pain). It also suggests that the mechanism by which social support alleviates pain is through a reduction in stress levels. PMID:20465594

  3. "DNA Binding Region" of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress.

  4. “DNA Binding Region” of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress. PMID:26884712

  5. Explaining an Unusually Fast Parasitic Enzyme: Folate Tail-Binding Residues Dictate Substrate Positioning and Catalysis in Cryptosporidium hominis Thymidylate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Martucci,W.; Vargo, M.; Anderson, K.

    2008-01-01

    The essential enzyme TS-DHFR from Cryptosporidium hominis undergoes an unusually rapid rate of catalysis at the conserved TS domain, facilitated by two nonconserved residues, Ala287 and Ser290, in the folate tail-binding region. Mutation of these two residues to their conserved counterparts drastically affects multiple steps of the TS catalytic cycle. We have determined the crystal structures of all three mutants (A287F, S290G, and A287F/S290G) in complex with active site ligands dUMP and CB3717. The structural data show two effects of the mutations: an increased distance between the ligands in the active site and increased flexibility of the folate ligand in the partially open enzyme state that precedes conformational change to the active catalytic state. The latter effect is able to be rescued by the mutants containing the A287F mutation. In addition, the conserved water network of TS is altered in each of the mutants. The structural results point to a role of the folate tail-binding residues in closely positioning ChTS ligands and restricting ligand flexibility in the partially open state to allow for a rapid transition to the active closed state and enhanced rate of catalysis. These results provide an explanation on how folate tail-binding residues at one end of the active site affect long-range interactions throughout the TS active site and validate these residues as targets for species-specific drug design.

  6. Polymorphisms in microRNA target sites modulate risk of lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias and affect microRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNA dysregulation is a common event in leukemia. Polymorphisms in microRNA-binding sites (miRSNPs) in target genes may alter the strength of microRNA interaction with target transcripts thereby affecting protein levels. In this study we aimed at identifying miRSNPs associated with leukemia risk and assessing impact of these miRSNPs on miRNA binding to target transcripts. Methods We analyzed with specialized algorithms the 3′ untranslated regions of 137 leukemia-associated genes and identified 111 putative miRSNPs, of which 10 were chosen for further investigation. We genotyped patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 87), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 140), childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 471). Association between SNPs and leukemia risk was calculated by estimating odds ratios in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. For miRSNPs that were associated with leukemia risk we performed luciferase reporter assays to examine whether they influence miRNA binding. Results Here we show that variant alleles of TLX1_rs2742038 and ETV6_rs1573613 were associated with increased risk of childhood ALL (OR (95% CI) = 3.97 (1.43-11.02) and 1.9 (1.16-3.11), respectively), while PML_rs9479 was associated with decreased ALL risk (OR = 0.55 (0.36-0.86). In adult myeloid leukemias we found significant associations between the variant allele of PML_rs9479 and decreased AML risk (OR = 0.61 (0.38-0.97), and between variant alleles of IRF8_ rs10514611 and ARHGAP26_rs187729 and increased CML risk (OR = 2.4 (1.12-5.15) and 1.63 (1.07-2.47), respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant trend for an increasing ALL and CML risk with the growing number of risk genotypes with OR = 13.91 (4.38-44.11) for carriers of ≥3 risk genotypes in ALL and OR = 4.9 (1.27-18.85) for carriers of 2 risk genotypes in CML. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that the C allele of ARHGAP

  7. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-03-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3'-5' exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing.

  8. Lin28a uses distinct mechanisms of binding to RNA and affects miRNA levels positively and negatively

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jakub Stanislaw; Hobor, Fruzsina; Downie Ruiz Velasco, Angela; Choudhury, Nila Roy; Heikel, Gregory; Kerr, Alastair; Ramos, Andres; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2017-01-01

    Lin28a inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs by triggering the polyuridylation and degradation of their precursors by terminal uridylyltransferases TUT4/7 and 3′-5′ exoribonuclease Dis3l2, respectively. Previously, we showed that Lin28a also controls the production of neuro-specific miRNA-9 via a polyuridylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal that the sequences and structural characteristics of pre-let-7 and pre-miRNA-9 are eliciting two distinct modes of binding to Lin28a. We present evidence that Dis3l2 controls miRNA-9 production. Finally, we show that the constitutive expression of untagged Lin28a during neuronal differentiation in vitro positively and negatively affects numerous other miRNAs. Our findings shed light on the role of Lin28a in differentiating cells and on the ways in which one RNA-binding protein can perform multiple roles in the regulation of RNA processing. PMID:27881476

  9. Structural and Kinetic Analysis of Schwanniomyces occidentalis Invertase Reveals a New Oligomerization Pattern and the Role of Its Supplementary Domain in Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Polo, Aitana; González, Beatriz; Fernández-Lobato, María; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Schwanniomyces occidentalis invertase is an extracellular enzyme that hydrolizes sucrose and releases β-fructose from various oligosaccharides and essential storage fructan polymers such as inulin. We report here the three-dimensional structure of Sw. occidentalis invertase at 2.9 Å resolution and its complex with fructose at 1.9 Å resolution. The monomer presents a bimodular arrangement common to other GH32 enzymes, with an N-terminal 5-fold β-propeller catalytic domain and a C-terminal β-sandwich domain for which the function has been unknown until now. However, the dimeric nature of Sw. occidentalis invertase reveals a unique active site cleft shaped by both subunits that may be representative of other yeast enzymes reported to be multimeric. Binding of the tetrasaccharide nystose and the polymer inulin was explored by docking analysis, which suggested that medium size and long substrates are recognized by residues from both subunits. The identified residues were mutated, and the enzymatic activity of the mutants against sucrose, nystose, and inulin were investigated by kinetic analysis. The replacements that showed the largest effect on catalytic efficiency were Q228V, a residue putatively involved in nystose and inulin binding, and S281I, involved in a polar link at the dimer interface. Moreover, a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency against inulin was observed in the mutants Q435A and Y462A, both located in the β-sandwich domain of the second monomer. This highlights the essential function that oligomerization plays in substrate specificity and assigns, for the first time, a direct catalytic role to the supplementary domain of a GH32 enzyme. PMID:20181943

  10. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  11. Crystal Structure of Cytochrome P450 (CYP105P2) from Streptomyces peucetius and Its Conformational Changes in Response to Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Woo; Lee, Joo-Ho; Rimal, Hemraj; Park, Hyun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP, EC 1.14.14.1) belong to a large family of enzymes that catalyze the hydroxylation of various substrates. Here, we present the crystal structure of CYP105P2 isolated from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC27952 at a 2.1 Å resolution. The structure shows the presence of a pseudo-ligand molecule in the active site, which was co-purified fortuitously and is presumed to be a biphenyl derivative. Comparison with previously determined substrate-bound CYP structures showed that binding of the ligand produces large and distinctive conformational changes in α2–α3, α7–α9, and the C-terminal loop regions. This structural flexibility confirms our previous observation that CYP105P2 can accommodate a broad range of ligands. The structure complexed with a pseudo-ligand provides the first molecular view of CYP105P2–ligand interactions, and it indicates the involvement of hydrophobic residues (Pro82, Ala181, Met187, Leu189, Leu193, and Ile236) in the interactions between hydrophobic ligands and CYP105P2. These results provide useful insights into the structural changes involved in the recognition of different ligands by CYP105P2. PMID:27231902

  12. Morphology and enzyme production of Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 are affected by the physical and structural characteristics of cellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Peciulyte, Ausra; Anasontzis, George E; Karlström, Katarina; Larsson, Per Tomas; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2014-11-01

    The industrial production of cellulolytic enzymes is dominated by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina). In order to develop optimal enzymatic cocktail, it is of importance to understand the natural regulation of the enzyme profile as response to the growth substrate. The influence of the complexity of cellulose on enzyme production by the microorganisms is not understood. In the present study we attempted to understand how different physical and structural properties of cellulose-rich substrates affected the levels and profiles of extracellular enzymes produced by T. reesei. Enzyme production by T. reesei Rut C-30 was studied in submerged cultures on five different cellulose-rich substrates, namely, commercial cellulose Avicel® and industrial-like cellulosic pulp substrates which consist mainly of cellulose, but also contain residual hemicellulose and lignin. In order to evaluate the hydrolysis of the substrates by the fungal enzymes, the spatial polymer distributions were characterised by cross-polarisation magic angle spinning carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS (13)C-NMR) in combination with spectral fitting. Proteins in culture supernatants at early and late stages of enzyme production were labeled by Tandem Mass Tags (TMT) and protein profiles were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001304. In total 124 proteins were identified and quantified in the culture supernatants, including cellulases, hemicellulases, other glycoside hydrolases, lignin-degrading enzymes, auxiliary activity 9 (AA9) family (formerly GH61), supporting activities of proteins and enzymes acting on cellulose, proteases, intracellular proteins and several hypothetical proteins. Surprisingly, substantial differences in the enzyme profiles were found even though there were minor differences in the chemical composition between the cellulose-rich substrates.

  13. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions.

  14. Purification and crystallization of the ABC-type transport substrate-binding protein OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Jinlan; Li, Xiaolu; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Bo; Miao, Shiying; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We truncated the signal peptide of OppA{sub TTE0054} to make it express in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystals of OppA{sub TTE0054} were grown by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal of OppA{sub TTE0054} diffracted to 2.25 A. -- Abstract: Di- and oligopeptide- binding protein OppAs play important roles in solute and nutrient uptake, sporulation, biofilm formation, cell wall muropeptides recycling, peptide-dependent quorum-sensing responses, adherence to host cells, and a variety of other biological processes. Soluble OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was found to be >95% pure with SDS-PAGE after a series of purification steps and the purity was further verified by mass spectrometry. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as the precipitant. Crystal diffraction extended to 2.25 A. The crystal belonged to space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters of a = 69.395, b = 199.572, c = 131.673 A, and {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90 Degree-Sign .

  15. Structural studies of ROK fructokinase YdhR from Bacillus subtilis : insights into substrate binding and fructose specificity.

    SciTech Connect

    Nocek, B.; Stein, A.; Jedrzejczak, R.; Cuff, M.; Li, H.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2011-02-18

    The main pathway of bacterial sugar phosphorylation utilizes specific phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) enzymes. In addition to the classic PTS system, a PTS-independent secondary system has been described in which nucleotide-dependent sugar kinases are used for monosaccharide phosphorylation. Fructokinase (FK), which phosphorylates d-fructose with ATP as a cofactor, has been shown to be a member of this secondary system. Bioinformatic analysis has shown that FK is a member of the 'ROK' (bacterial Repressors, uncharacterized Open reading frames, and sugar Kinases) sequence family. In this study, we report the crystal structures of ROK FK from Bacillus subtilis (YdhR) (a) apo and in the presence of (b) ADP and (c) ADP/d-fructose. All structures show that YdhR is a homodimer with a monomer composed of two similar {alpha}/{beta} domains forming a large cleft between domains that bind ADP and d-fructose. Enzymatic activity assays support YdhR function as an ATP-dependent fructose kinase.

  16. Simulating the slow to fast switch in cytochrome c oxidase catalysis by introducing a loop flip near to the enzyme's cytochrome c (substrate) binding site.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, Trevor; Ignacio, Diane N; Sampson, Valerie B; Ashe, Damian; Wilson, Michael

    2016-08-04

    The mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase catalyses the reduction of molecular oxygen in the critical step of oxidative phosphorylation that links the oxidation of food consumed to ATP production in cells. The enzyme catalyses the reduction of oxygen at two vastly different rates that are thought to be linked to two different conformations but the conformation of the 'fast enzyme' remains obscure. In this study we demonstrated how oxygen binding at haem a3 could trigger long distance conformational changes and then simulated a conformational change in an eight residue loop near to the enzyme's substrate (cytochrome c) binding site. We then used this modified COX to simulate a stable COX-cytochrome c ES-complex. Compared to ES-complexes formed in the absence of the conformation change, the distance between the redox centres of the two proteins was reduced by half and instead of nine, only four COX amino acid residues were found along the axis linking the electron entry point and the CuA redox centre of COX: We proposed that intramolecular electron transfer in COX occurs via a charge/hydrogen relay system involving these four residues. We suggest that the conformational change and resulting shortened electron pathway are features of fast-acting COX. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel virus-like particle based on hepatitis B core antigen and substrate-binding domain of bacterial molecular chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Jun; Gu, Kai; Xiong, Qi Yan; Shen, Liang; Cao, Rong Yue; Li, Ming Hui; Li, Tai Ming; Wu, Jie; Liu, Jing Jing

    2009-12-09

    Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein has been proved to be an attractive carrier for foreign epitopes, and can display green fluorescent protein (GFP) on its surface. The structure of substrate-binding domain of DnaK [DnaK (394-504 aa), DnaK SBD] is similar to GFP, we therefore reasoned that DnaK SBD might also be tolerated. Electron microscopic observations suggested that the chimeric proteins containing the truncated HBc (HBcDelta) and DnaK SBD could self-assemble into virus-like particle (VLP). Then the accessibility of DnaK SBD and the adjuvanticity of VLP HBcDelta-SBD were demonstrated by two recombinant peptide vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GhM and GhMNR. The latter carries in addition the peptide motif NRLLLTG which is known to bind to DnaK and DnaK SBD. The combination of VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhMNR elicited stronger humoral responses and caused further testicular atrophy than the combinations of VLP HBcDelta and GhMNR or VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhM in Balb/c mice. These findings indicate VLP HBcDelta-SBD might serve as an excellent carrier for GhMNR and some other peptide vaccines.

  18. The serine protease motif of Pic mediates a dose-dependent mucolytic activity after binding to sugar constituents of the mucin substrate.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Javier; Arciniega, Ivonne; Navarro-García, Fernando

    2008-08-01

    The pic gene is harbored on the chromosomes of three important pathogens: enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), and Shigella flexneri. Since Pic is secreted into the intestinal lumen during EAEC infection, we sought to identify intestinal-mucosal substrates for Pic. Pic did not damage epithelial cells, cleave fodrin, or degrade host defense proteins embedded in the mucus layer (sIgA, lactoferrin and lysozyme). However, by using a solid-phase assay to evaluate the mucinolytic activity of EAEC Pic, we documented a specific, dose-dependent mucinolytic activity. A serine protease inhibitor and an enzymatically inactive variant of Pic were used to show that the Pic serine protease motif is required for mucinolytic activity. Pic binds mucin, and this binding was blocked in competition assays using monosaccharide constituents of the oligosaccharide side chains of mucin. Moreover, Pic mucinolytic activity decreased when sialic acid was removed from mucin. Thus, Pic is a mucinase with lectin-like activity that can be related to its reported hemagglutinin activity. Our results suggest that EAEC may secrete Pic into the intestinal lumen as a strategy for penetrating the gel-like mucus layer during EAEC colonization.

  19. The Vaccine Candidate Substrate Binding Protein SBP2 Plays a Key Role in Arginine Uptake, Which Is Required for Growth of Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Taketo; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is an exclusively human pathogen that is an important cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous global impact in reducing morbidity resulting from these infections. Substrate binding protein 2 (SBP2) of an ABC transporter system has recently been identified as a promising vaccine candidate antigen on the bacterial surface of M. catarrhalis. In this study, we showed that SBP1, -2, and -3 individually bind different basic amino acids with exquisite specificity. We engineered mutants that each expressed a single SBP from this gene cluster and showed in growth experiments that SBP1, -2, and -3 serve a nutritional function through acquisition of amino acids for the bacterium. SBP2 mediates uptake of arginine, a strict growth requirement of M. catarrhalis. Adherence and invasion assays demonstrated that SBP1 and SBP3 play a role in invasion of human respiratory epithelial cells, consistent with a nutritional role in intracellular survival in the human respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that the SBPs of an ABC transporter system function in the uptake of basic amino acids to support growth of M. catarrhalis. The critical role of SBP2 in arginine uptake may contribute to its potential as a vaccine antigen. PMID:26597985

  20. Amino Acid Residues in the Putative Transmembrane Domain 11 of Human Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Dictate Transporter Substrate Binding, Stability, and Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weifang; Wu, Zhixuan; Fang, Zihui; Huang, Jiujiu; Huang, Hong; Hong, Mei

    2015-12-07

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs, gene symbol SLCO) are membrane proteins that mediate the sodium-independent transport of a wide range of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Due to their broad substrate specificity, wide tissue distribution, and involvement in drug-drug interactions, OATPs have been considered as key players in drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. Transmembrane domains (TMs) are crucial structural features involved in proper functions of many transporters. According to computer-based modeling and previous studies of our laboratory and others, TM11 of OATP1B1 may face the substrate interaction pocket and thus play an important role in the transport function of the protein. Alanine-scanning of the transmembrane domain identified seven critical amino acid residues within the region. Further analysis revealed that alanine substitution of these residues resulted in reduced protein stability, which led to significantly decreased protein expression on the plasma membrane. In addition, all mutants exhibited an altered Km for ES uptake (either high affinity or low affinity component, or both), though Km for taurocholate transport only changed in R580A, G584A, and F591A. These results suggested that critical residues in TM11 not only affect protein stability of the transporter, but its interaction with substrates as well. The identification of seven essential residues out of 21 TM amino acids highlighted the importance of this transmembrane domain in the proper function of OATP1B1.

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Liver [delta][superscript 4]-3-Ketosteroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Drury, Jason E.; Penning, Trevor M.; Christianson, David W.

    2008-07-15

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90{sup o} bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP{sup +} at 1.79- and 1.35-{angstrom} resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP{sup +} and cortisone at 1.90-{angstrom} resolution, NADP{sup +} and progesterone at 2.03-{angstrom} resolution, and NADP{sup +} and testosterone at 1.62-{angstrom} resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP{sup +}. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr{sup 58} and Glu{sup 120}. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  2. Extrapolation of Inter Domain Communications and Substrate Binding Cavity of Camel HSP70 1A: A Molecular Modeling and Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; De, Sachinandan; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is an important chaperone, involved in protein folding, refolding, translocation and complex remodeling reactions under normal as well as stress conditions. However, expression of HSPA1A gene in heat and cold stress conditions associates with other chaperons and perform its function. Experimental structure for Camel HSP70 protein (cHSP70) has not been reported so far. Hence, we constructed 3D models of cHSP70 through multi- template comparative modeling with HSP110 protein of S. cerevisiae (open state) and with HSP70 protein of E. coli 70kDa DnaK (close state) and relaxed them for 100 nanoseconds (ns) using all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation. Two stable conformations of cHSP70 with Substrate Binding Domain (SBD) in open and close states were obtained. The collective mode analysis of different transitions of open state to close state and vice versa was examined via Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Minimum Distance Matrix (MDM). The results provide mechanistic representation of the communication between Nucleotide Binding Domain (NBD) and SBD to identify the role of sub domains in conformational change mechanism, which leads the chaperone cycle of cHSP70. Further, residues present in the chaperon functioning site were also identified through protein-peptide docking. This study provides an overall insight into the inter domain communication mechanism and identification of the chaperon binding cavity, which explains the underlying mechanism involved during heat and cold stress conditions in camel. PMID:26313938

  3. On the mechanism of biological methane formation: structural evidence for conformational changes in methyl-coenzyme M reductase upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Grabarse, W; Mahlert, F; Duin, E C; Goubeaud, M; Shima, S; Thauer, R K; Lamzin, V; Ermler, U

    2001-05-25

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the final reaction of the energy conserving pathway of methanogenic archaea in which methylcoenzyme M and coenzyme B are converted to methane and the heterodisulfide CoM-S-S-CoB. It operates under strictly anaerobic conditions and contains the nickel porphinoid F430 which is present in the nickel (I) oxidation state in the active enzyme. The known crystal structures of the inactive nickel (II) enzyme in complex with coenzyme M and coenzyme B (MCR-ox1-silent) and in complex with the heterodisulfide CoM-S-S-CoB (MCR-silent) were now refined at 1.16 A and 1.8 A resolution, respectively. The atomic resolution structure of MCR-ox1-silent describes the exact geometry of the cofactor F430, of the active site residues and of the modified amino acid residues. Moreover, the observation of 18 Mg2+ and 9 Na+ ions at the protein surface of the 300 kDa enzyme specifies typical constituents of binding sites for either ion. The MCR-silent and MCR-ox1-silent structures differed in the occupancy of bound water molecules near the active site indicating that a water chain is involved in the replenishment of the active site with water molecules. The structure of the novel enzyme state MCR-red1-silent at 1.8 A resolution revealed an active site only partially occupied by coenzyme M and coenzyme B. Increased flexibility and distinct alternate conformations were observed near the active site and the substrate channel. The electron density of the MCR-red1-silent state aerobically co-crystallized with coenzyme M displayed a fully occupied coenzyme M-binding site with no alternate conformations. Therefore, the structure was very similar to the MCR-ox1-silent state. As a consequence, the binding of coenzyme M induced specific conformational changes that postulate a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme ensures that methylcoenzyme M enters the substrate channel prior to coenzyme B as required by the active-site geometry. The three different

  4. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Asp kinase toward its natural substrates and feedback inhibitors: a docking and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, M; Babajan, B; Anuradha, C M; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, C; Madhusudana, P; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem, compounded by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-TB co-infection and recent emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB. In this context, aspartokinase of mycobacterium tuberculosis has drawn attention for designing novel anti-TB drugs. Asp kinase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate and involved in the branched biosynthetic pathway leading to the synthesis of amino acids lysine, threonine, methionine and isoleucine. An intermediate of lysine biosynthetic branch, mesodiaminopimelate is also a component of the peptidoglycan which is a component of bacterial cell wall. To interfere with the production of all these amino acids and cell wall, it is possible to inhibit Asp kinase activity. This can be achieved using Asp kinase inhibitors. In order to design novel Asp kinase inhibitors as effective anti-TB drugs, it is necessary to have an understanding of the binding sites of Asp kinase. As no crystal structure of the enzyme has yet been published, we built a homology model of Asp kinase using the crystallized Asp kinase from M. Jannaschii, as template structures (2HMF and 3C1M). After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and VERIFY-3D. The results of molecular docking studies with natural substrates, products and feedback inhibitors are in agreement with the published data and showed that ACT domain plays an important role in binding to ligands. Based on the docking conformations, pharmacophore model can be developed by probing the common features of ligands. By analyzing the results, ACT domain architecture, certain key residues that are responsible for binding to feedback inhibitors and natural substrates were identified. This would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Asp kinase and providing insights

  5. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  6. Crystal structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase bound to inhibitory analogs reveal new insight into substrate binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Barta, Michael L; Skaff, D Andrew; McWhorter, William J; Herdendorf, Timothy J; Miziorko, Henry M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2011-07-08

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 Å resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 Å resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 Å resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K(i) values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser(192) as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser → Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k(cat) by ∼10(3)-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 Å cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  7. Age-associated mitochondrial oxidative decay: Improvement of carnitine acetyltransferase substrate-binding affinity and activity in brain by feeding old rats acetyl-l- carnitine and/or R-α-lipoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Killilea, David W.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2002-01-01

    We test whether the dysfunction with age of carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT), a key mitochondrial enzyme for fuel utilization, is due to decreased binding affinity for substrate and whether this substrate, fed to old rats, restores CAT activity. The kinetics of CAT were analyzed by using the brains of young and old rats and of old rats supplemented for 7 weeks with the CAT substrate acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) and/or the mitochondrial antioxidant precursor R-α-lipoic acid (LA). Old rats, compared with young rats, showed a decrease in CAT activity and in CAT-binding affinity for both substrates, ALCAR and CoA. Feeding ALCAR or ALCAR plus LA to old rats significantly restored CAT-binding affinity for ALCAR and CoA, and CAT activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, lipid peroxidation and total iron and copper levels were assayed; all increased in old rats. Feeding old rats LA or LA plus ALCAR inhibited lipid peroxidation but did not decrease iron and copper levels. Ex vivo oxidation of young-rat brain with Fe(II) caused loss of CAT activity and binding affinity. In vitro oxidation of purified CAT with Fe(II) inactivated the enzyme but did not alter binding affinity. However, in vitro treatment of CAT with the lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxy-nonenal caused a decrease in CAT-binding affinity and activity, thus mimicking age-related change. Preincubation of CAT with ALCAR or CoA prevented malondialdehyde-induced dysfunction. Thus, feeding old rats high levels of key mitochondrial metabolites can ameliorate oxidative damage, enzyme activity, substrate-binding affinity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:11854488

  8. Pharmacophore, QSAR, and binding mode studies of substrates of human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) using molecular docking and virtual mutations and an application to chinese herbal medicine screening.

    PubMed

    Mo, Sui-Lin; Liu, Wei-Feng; Li, Chun-Guang; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Luo, Hai-Bin; Chew, Helen; Liang, Jun; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2012-07-01

    The highly polymorphic human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes about 25% of currently used drugs. In this study, we have explored the interaction of a large number of substrates (n = 120) with wild-type and mutated CYP2D6 by molecular docking using the CDOCKER module. Before we conducted the molecular docking and virtual mutations, the pharmacophore and QSAR models of CYP2D6 substrates were developed and validated. Finally, we explored the interaction of a traditional Chinese herbal formula, Fangjifuling decoction, with CYP2D6 by virtual screening. The optimized pharmacophore model derived from 20 substrates of CYP2D6 contained two hydrophobic features and one hydrogen bond acceptor feature, giving a relevance ratio of 76% when a validation set of substrates were tested. However, our QSAR models gave poor prediction of the binding affinity of substrates. Our docking study demonstrated that 117 out of 120 substrates could be docked into the active site of CYP2D6. Forty one out of 117 substrates (35.04%) formed hydrogen bonds with various active site residues of CYP2D6 and 53 (45.30%) substrates formed a strong π-π interaction with Phe120 (53/54), with only carvedilol showing π-π interaction with Phe483. The active site residues involving hydrogen bond formation with substrates included Leu213, Lys214, Glu216, Ser217, Gln244, Asp301, Ser304, Ala305, Phe483, and Phe484. Furthermore, the CDOCKER algorithm was further applied to study the impact of mutations of 28 active site residues (mostly non-conserved) of CYP2D6 on substrate binding modes using five probe substrates including bufuralol, debrisoquine, dextromethorphan, sparteine, and tramadol. All mutations of the residues examined altered the hydrogen bond formation and/or aromatic interactions, depending on the probe used in molecular docking. Apparent changes of the binding modes have been observed with the Glu216Asp and Asp301Glu mutants. Overall, 60 compounds out of 130 from Fangjifuling decoction

  9. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  10. Removal from the membrane affects the interaction of rat osseous plate ecto-nucleosidetriphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 with substrates and ions.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Daniela P; Masui, Douglas C; Furriel, Rosa P M; Leone, Francisco A

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the kinetic properties of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (E-NTPDase1) from rat osseous plate membranes. A novel finding of the present study is that the solubilized enzyme shows high- and low-affinity sites for the substrate in contrast with a single substrate site for the membrane-bound enzyme. In addition, contrary to the Michaelian chraracteristics of the membrane-bound enzyme, the site-site interactions after solubilization with 0.5% digitonin plus 0.1% lysolecithin resulted in a less active ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase, showing activity of about 398.3 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1). The solubilized enzyme has M (r) of 66-72 kDa, and its catalytic efficiency was significantly increased by magnesium and calcium ions; but the ATP/ADP activity ratio was always <2.0. Partial purification and kinetic characterization of the rat osseous plate E-NTPDase1 in a solubilized form may lead to a better understanding of a possible function of the enzyme as a modulator of nucleotidase activity or purinergic signaling