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  1. Factors affecting treatment adherence to atomoxetine in ADHD: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Treuer, Tamás; Méndez, Luis; Montgomery, William; Wu, Shenghu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the literature related to research about the factors affecting treatment adherence and discontinuation of atomoxetine in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Medline was systematically searched using the following prespecified terms: "ADHD", "Adherence", "Compliance", "Discontinuation", and "Atomoxetine". We identified 31 articles that met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. The findings from this review indicate that persistence and adherence to atomoxetine treatment were generally high. Factors found to influence adherence and nonadherence to atomoxetine treatment in ADHD in this review include age, sex, the definition of response used, length of treatment, initial dose of treatment, comorbid conditions, and reimbursement. Tolerability was cited as an important reason for treatment discontinuation. More research is needed to understand those factors that can help to identify patients at risk for poor adherence and interventions that could improve treatment adherence early in the stage of this illness to secure a better long-term prognosis.

  2. Factors affecting treatment adherence to atomoxetine in ADHD: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Treuer, Tamás; Méndez, Luis; Montgomery, William; Wu, Shenghu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the literature related to research about the factors affecting treatment adherence and discontinuation of atomoxetine in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Medline was systematically searched using the following prespecified terms: "ADHD", "Adherence", "Compliance", "Discontinuation", and "Atomoxetine". We identified 31 articles that met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. The findings from this review indicate that persistence and adherence to atomoxetine treatment were generally high. Factors found to influence adherence and nonadherence to atomoxetine treatment in ADHD in this review include age, sex, the definition of response used, length of treatment, initial dose of treatment, comorbid conditions, and reimbursement. Tolerability was cited as an important reason for treatment discontinuation. More research is needed to understand those factors that can help to identify patients at risk for poor adherence and interventions that could improve treatment adherence early in the stage of this illness to secure a better long-term prognosis. PMID:27217754

  3. Factors affecting treatment adherence to atomoxetine in ADHD: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Treuer, Tamás; Méndez, Luis; Montgomery, William; Wu, Shenghu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the literature related to research about the factors affecting treatment adherence and discontinuation of atomoxetine in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Medline was systematically searched using the following prespecified terms: “ADHD”, “Adherence”, “Compliance”, “Discontinuation”, and “Atomoxetine”. We identified 31 articles that met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. The findings from this review indicate that persistence and adherence to atomoxetine treatment were generally high. Factors found to influence adherence and nonadherence to atomoxetine treatment in ADHD in this review include age, sex, the definition of response used, length of treatment, initial dose of treatment, comorbid conditions, and reimbursement. Tolerability was cited as an important reason for treatment discontinuation. More research is needed to understand those factors that can help to identify patients at risk for poor adherence and interventions that could improve treatment adherence early in the stage of this illness to secure a better long-term prognosis. PMID:27217754

  4. Treatment adherence in psychoses.

    PubMed

    David, Anthony S

    2010-12-01

    A well-conducted randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve treatment adherence in psychosis published in this issue shows beneficial effects on self- and observer-rated adherence and trends towards fewer hospital readmissions. Partial adherence is the single most important barrier to optimal treatment. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines on adherence need to be revised.

  5. Adherence to Treatment and Factors Affecting Adherence of Epileptic Patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasiso, Temesgen Yohannes; Desse, Tigestu Alemu

    2016-01-01

    Background Non adherence of epileptic patients to antiepileptic medication often leads to an increased risk of seizures and worsening of disease, death and increased health care costs. Objective to assess adherence to treatment and factors affecting adherence of epileptic patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. Methods and Materials We conducted a cross-sectional study on epileptic patients from February 9 to 22, 2015. Data were collected from patients ≥18 years old. Adherence was measured using the eight-item Morisky’s medication adherence scale. All consecutive patients coming to epilepsy clinic during the study period were interviewed until the calculated sample size (210) was obtained. We collected patient demographics, perception about epilepsy and adherence to medication(s). We used chi-square tests and a binary logistic regression model for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered at P<0.05. Results out of a total of 210 participants, 194 were willing to participate and were studied. Of the 194 participants, 109 (56.2%) were males. The mean age of the participants was 33.62±11.44 years; range 18 to 66 years. The majority, 123(63.41%), of the participants were taking two antiepileptic medications. Sixty two (32%) of the participants were adherent to their treatment. The most common reported reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness 49(75.4%) and run out of pills 7(10.8%). Factors that affect medication adherence are epilepsy treatment for <1 year (P = 0.011), epilepsy treatment for 1–3 years (P = 0.002), epilepsy treatment for 3–5 years (P = 0.007), being married (P = 0.006), grade 9–12 education (P = 0.028), college or university education (P = 0.002) and absence of co-morbidity (P = 0.008). Conclusions The rate of adherence observed in this study was low. The most common reason for non- adherence was forgetfulness. Therefore, the hospital should devise strategies to improve adherence of epileptic patients

  6. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, Olukunle Ayodeji; Moodley, Deshendran; Pillay, Anban W; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is flexible and extendable and provides new insights into the nature of and interrelationship between factors that influence TB adherence. PMID:27175067

  7. Psychiatric Morbidity and Other Factors Affecting Treatment Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pachi, Argiro; Bratis, Dionisios; Moussas, Georgios; Tselebis, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients. PMID:23691305

  8. Factors affecting adherence to evidence-based guidelines in the treatment of URI, sinusitis, and pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Andrew; Alweis, Richard; Scheirer, Jorge; Schamel, Shannon; Wasser, Tom; Levingood, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sinus infections, sore throats, and upper respiratory tract infections (URI) are common reasons patients seek medical care. Well-established treatment guidelines exist for prescribing antibiotics in these clinical scenarios, but are not often followed. Objective The objective of this study is to determine practice patterns related to prescribing antibiotics for sinusitis, URI, and pharyngitis. The main hypothesis is that attending physicians improve their adherence to antibiotic guidelines with a learner present. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed on patients treated for URI, sinusitis, and pharyngitis at an ambulatory faculty practice. The use of relevant ICD-9 codes from January 1, 2008 to January 30, 2012 resulted in 1,548 patient encounters which were reviewed for guideline adherence. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression was performed for each outcome variable to determine if they influence antibiotic adherence. Variables studied were physician, presence of a learner, BMI, age, gender, day of the week, month, diabetes, immunosuppression, and COPD. Results Multivariate analysis showed the statistically significant variables were age (p=0.038) for pharyngitis and provider (p=0.013) for URI. There were no significant findings for sinusitis. Guideline adherence was 24% in patients with pharyngitis, 42% in acute sinusitis, 79% in URI, and 57% overall. Conclusion Guideline adherence varies depending on the treating physician and decreases when treating younger patients with pharyngitis. The presence of a learner did not improve prescribing habits. The reason for these findings remain unclear, but considerations for improvement could include following antibiotic adherence as a quality measure, giving patients handouts educating them about the impact of overprescribing antibiotics, and further education amongst faculty and residents about adhering to nationally recognized guidelines. PMID:23882403

  9. Adherence to treatment in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Taddeo, Danielle; Egedy, Maud; Frappier, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals must be alert to the high prevalence of low adherence to treatment during adolescence. Low adherence increases morbidity and medical complications, contributes to poorer quality of life and an overuse of the health care system. Many different factors have an impact on adherence. However, critical factors to consider in teens are their developmental stage and challenges, emotional issues and family dysfunction. Direct and indirect methods have been described to assess adherence. Eliciting an adherence history is the most useful way for clinicians to evaluate adherence, and could be the beginning of a constructive dialogue with the adolescent. Interventions to improve adherence are multiple – managing mental health issues appropriately, building a strong relationship, customizing the treatment regimen if possible, empowering the adolescent to deal with adherence issues, providing information, ensuring family and peer support, and motivational enhancement therapy. Evaluation of adherence at regular intervals should be an important aspect of health care for adolescents. PMID:19119348

  10. Stroke and TIA survivors' cognitive beliefs and affective responses regarding treatment and future stroke risk differentially predict medication adherence and categorised stroke risk.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L Alison; Diefenbach, Michael A; Abrams, Jessica; Horowitz, Carol R

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive beliefs and affective responses to illness and treatment are known to independently predict health behaviours. The purpose of the current study is to assess the relative importance of four psychological domains - specifically, affective illness, cognitive illness, affective treatment and cognitive treatment - for predicting stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) survivors' adherence to stroke prevention medications as well as their objective, categorised stroke risk. We assessed these domains among stroke/TIA survivors (n = 600), and conducted correlation and regression analyses with concurrent and prospective outcomes to determine the relative importance of each cognitive and affective domain for adherence and stroke risk. As hypothesised, patients' affective treatment responses explained the greatest unique variance in baseline and six-month adherence reports (8 and 5%, respectively, of the variance in adherence, compared to 1-3% explained by other domains). Counter to hypotheses, patients' cognitive illness beliefs explained the greatest unique variance in baseline and six-month objective categorised stroke risk (3 and 2%, respectively, compared to 0-1% explained by other domains). Results indicate that domain type (i.e. cognitive and affective) and domain referent (illness and treatment) may be differentially important for providers to assess when treating patients for stroke/TIA. More research is required to further distinguish between these domains and their relative importance for stroke prevention. PMID:25220292

  11. Factors affecting adherence to treatment and follow-up of burns in children: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Aydın, Osman Enver; Ançı, Yuksel; Kara, Murat; Tan, Onder; Kok, Ahmet Nezih

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Children are prone to burn injury. Burns can be seen as a part of child abuse. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting adherence to the treatment of burn patients, and to emphasize the role of the physician in identifying children's non-accidental burn injuries. Materials and Methods: Children who were hospitalized in the burn unit were analyzed retrospectively. Results were assessed for significance using the Chi-square test. Results: A total of 189 patients were included. Some patients (n = 52; 27.5%) were discharged against medical advice (DAMA) before completion of treatment. Although we could not demonstrate a relationship between non-accidental etiology and DAMA group, it was significant that these patients did not contact the outpatient clinic after discharge. It was evident from records that two of these cases were abused. The reasoning of the parents in the DAMA group for the early discharge was siblings at home, financial and accommodation problems. Conclusion: Although burns in children commonly occur due to an accident, each burn case should be examined for a non-accidental etiology and findings suggesting abuse should be noted. Physicians should be alert for the detection of signs of burn related child abuse. PMID:26807393

  12. Measurement of Psychiatric Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Velligan, Dawn; Weiden, Peter J.; Valenstein, Marcia; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence to medications for mental disorders substantially limits treatment effectiveness and results in higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and disability. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important not only in adherence research, but also in clinical trials in which medications are being evaluated, and in clinical practice where failure to detect nonadherence results in premature medication changes, unnecessary polypharmacy, and greater likelihoods of functional deteriorations and hospitalizations. This is a review of psychiatric treatment adherence methods and measures arising from a meeting on “Methodological Challenges in Psychiatric Treatment Adherence Research” held on September 27-28, 2007 in Bethesda, MD and organized by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Methods This paper reviews the range of modalities currently available for assessing adherence behavior including pill counts, pharmacy records, technology-assisted monitoring, biological assays, and a range of self-report and interviewer-rated scales. Measures of adherence attitudes are also reviewed. Results Each of the adherence measures described are imperfect estimates of actual medication ingestion but each provides informative estimates of adherence or the attitudinal factors associated with adherence. Measure selection depends on a range of factors including the patient sample, the context in which the measure is being used, and the clinical outcomes expected from various levels of nonadherence. The use of multiple measures of adherence is encouraged to balance the limitations of individual measures. Conclusion While adherence assessment has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years there remains a need for refinement and expansion on currently available methods and measures. PMID:21109048

  13. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alexander, Tiffany M; Nadkarni, Anish; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. PMID:27784999

  14. Factors affecting medication adherence in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyekyung; Kim, Yeonhee; Rhie, Sandy Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the functional health literacy (FHL) associated with medication adherence in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine the FHL among older adults and identify influencing factors that can predict medication adherence. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey. Participants (n=160) aged 65 years and older were selected from outpatient clinics of 3 tertiary care hospitals, 6 community pharmacies, and 2 senior centers between November 1 and 30, 2014. The participants’ FHL was measured using the Korean Functional Health Literacy Test, which consists of 15 items including 8 numeracy and 7 reading comprehension items. Medication adherence was measured by the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results The mean score of the total FHL was 7.72±3.51 (range 0–15). The percentage of the total number of correct answers for the reading comprehension subtest and numeracy subtest were 48.1% and 54.4%, respectively. Among 160 participants, 52.5% showed low adherence to medication. The factors affecting medication adherence included the patient’s degree of satisfaction with the service (β=−0.215, P=0.022), sufficient explanation of medication counseling (β=−0.335, P=0.000), education level (β=−0.153, P=0.045), health-related problems (β=−0.239, P=0.004), and dosing frequency (β=0.189, P=0.018). Conclusion In this study, we found medication adherence of elderly patients was associated with education level, health-related problems, dosing frequency, satisfaction with patient counseling, and explanation of medication, but no association was found with FHL. Pharmacists should consider elderly patients’ individual characteristics such as educational background and specific patient-related health problems, provide sufficient information and explanation of medication, and ensure patient

  15. Bisphosphonates adherence for treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a disease of bone metabolism in which bisphosphonates (BPS) are the most common medications used in its treatment, whose main objective is to reduce the risk of fractures. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis. Methods Systematic review of articles on BPs adherence for treatment of osteoporosis, indexed on MEDLINE (via PubMed) databases, from inception of databases until January 2013. Search terms were “Adherence, Medication” (MeSH term), “Bisphosphonates” (MeSH term), and “Osteoporosis” (MeSH term). Results Of the 78 identified studies, 27 met the eligibility criteria. Identified studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding adherence and associated factors, adherence and fracture, adherence and BPs dosage. The studies are mostly observational, conducted with women over 45 years old, showing low rates of adherence to treatment. Several factors may influence adherence: socio-economic and cultural, participation of physicians when guidance is given to the patient, the use of bone turnover markers, and use of generic drugs. The monthly dosage is associated with greater adherence compared to weekly dosage. Conclusions Considering the methodological differences between the studies, the results converge to show that adherence to treatment of osteoporosis with BPs is still inadequate. Further experimental studies are needed to evaluate the adherence and suggest new treatment options. PMID:23705998

  16. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches.

  17. [Treatment adherence and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Tahri, Nabil

    2007-09-01

    For inflammatory bowel disease, unlike other chronic illnesses, there are sparse data available about patients' adherence to medication. The few studies vary widely, but noncompliance rates tend to be high, about 30-40%. Psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety, and poor patient-physician relationships are the most common causes of these patients' lack of adherence. Failure to adhere to prescribed medications increases risk of relapse and of colorectal cancer. Strategies that can improve adherence include establishing a partnership with the patient, simplifying the treatment regimen and increasing awareness through education and feedback.

  18. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits.

  19. Motivating patient adherence to allergic rhinitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2015-03-01

    Patient nonadherence significantly burdens the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR). Fewer than half of prescribed doses of intranasal corticosteroid medication are taken. The challenges for immunotherapies are even greater. While sustained treatment for 3 to 5 years is required for full benefit, most patients receiving immunotherapy, either subcutaneous or sublingual, stop treatment within the first year. Although research into interventions to improve AR adherence is lacking, lessons learned from adherence interventions in other chronic health conditions can be applied to AR. Two well-established, overriding models of care-the chronic care model and patient-centered care-can improve adherence. The patient-centered care model includes important lessons for allergy providers in their daily practice, including understanding and targeting modifiable barriers to adherence. Additionally, recent studies have begun to leverage health information and communication technologies to reach out to patients and promote adherence, extending patient-centered interventions initiated by providers during office visits. PMID:25956611

  20. The old problem of adherence: research on treatment adherence and its relevance for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wright, M T

    2000-12-01

    The international published research on patient adherence was selectively reviewed with the goal of determining its relevance for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Results show that not adhering to treatment regimes is so widespread that no combination of sociodemographic variables is reliably predictive of patients' not following doctors' orders. Achieving 100% adherence for any treatment or patient group does not appear to be realistic. Characteristics of the patient's situation, of the given therapy, and of the disease itself affect adherence. In addition, the patient-doctor relationship and the context of the treatment are important. Often overlooked are the existential dimensions of meaning, self-determination and quality of life which are particularly important for the chronically ill. Treatment needs to be negotiated individually with each patient on the basis of an open therapeutic relationship and with the help of multidimensional interventions. Lessons from the discourse on safer sex can steer adherence research and practice away from a behavioural and reductionist approach toward the context and meaning of treatment. PMID:11177448

  1. Patient Related Factors Affecting Adherence to Antimalarial Medication in an Urban Estate in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amponsah, Alexandria O.; Vosper, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the adherence to Artemisinin based Combination Therapy and to determine patient related factors that affect adherence. Three hundred (300) patients receiving ACT treatment dispensed from the community pharmacy were randomly selected and followed up on the fourth day after the start of their three-day therapy to assess adherence. Adherence was measured by pill count. Quantitative interviews using a semistructured questionnaire were used to assess patients' knowledge and beliefs on malaria and its treatment. Adherence levels to the ACTs were 57.3%. Patient related factors that affected adherence to ACTs were patients' knowledge on the dosage (P = 0.007; v = 0.457), efficacy (P = 0.009; v = 0.377), and side effects (P = 0.000; v = 0.403) of the ACTs used for the management of malaria, patients' awareness of the consequences of not completing the doses of antimalarial dispensed (P = 0.001; v = 0.309), and patients' belief that “natural remedies are safer than medicines” and “prescribers place too much trust in medicines.” There was no significant relationship between adherence and patients' knowledge on the causes, signs, and symptoms of malaria. There is the need for pharmacy staff to stress on these variables when counseling patients on antimalarials as these affect adherence levels. PMID:25767736

  2. Treatment non-adherence in pseudo-refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brodtkorb, Eylert; Samsonsen, Christian; Sund, Janne Kutschera; Bråthen, Geir; Helde, Grethe; Reimers, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Non-adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment strongly affects the outcome of epilepsy and is frequently clinically unrecognized. This review addresses current knowledge on medication-taking behavior in people with epilepsy, as well as the importance of tailoring interventions to the individual patterns of non-adherence. Non-adherence can be categorized as non-initiation, poor execution (accidental or intentional) or non-persistence and are related to clinical characteristics and health care barriers. All available methods to assess adherence are hampered by shortcomings. Self-reports are indirect and subjective. Pill-counts, electronic bottle-tops and pharmacy records are objective, but indirect measures of drug ingestion. Therapeutic drug monitoring is both direct and objective, but pharmacokinetic and diurnal variability must be taken into account. Young adults with generalized epilepsy may be particularly vulnerable to non-adherence. The drug burden in the form of polytherapy, multiple dosing and side effects are obvious obstacles. Poor understanding of the principles of prophylactic treatment as well as drug costs may be important in people with low socioeconomic status. Depression is also associated with low adherence. In people with multihandicaps, failed oral intake may be due to behavioral or physical problems, as well as insufficient education of the caregivers. Non-adherence often results in seizure breakthrough and hospital admissions, but the consequences may be more dramatic. It is the leading cause of status epilepticus in people with epilepsy, and the association with sudden death (SUDEP) is clear. The management of poor drug-taking behavior should be based on the identification of the specific causes in each individual and corresponding multiprofessional interventions. Non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs needs more clinical and scientific attention. PMID:26897547

  3. Do weight loss and adherence cluster within behavioral treatment groups?

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.; Leahey, Tricia; Jeffery, Robert; Johnson, Karen C.; Hill, James O.; Coday, Mace; Espeland, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Weight loss programs are often conducted in a group format, but it is unclear whether weight losses or adherence cluster within treatment group and whether characteristics of the group (e.g. size or homogeneity) affect outcomes. We examined these questions within Look AHEAD, a multicenter study of the effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Design and Methods Weight losses and adherence (attendance, use of meal replacement products, and minutes of activity) were examined over one year of intervention in 2329 ILI participants in 209 treatment groups, which all received the same weight loss program. Results Weight losses did not cluster among members of a treatment group (intra-class correlation [ICC] of .007), whereas measures of adherence had small/moderate clustering (ICCs of .05–.11). The 209 groups varied in weight losses, with a mean of 8.64 % (SD=2.35 %, interquartile range=6.82%, 10.32%), but neither size nor baseline homogeneity of members affected the outcome. Conclusions Although these findings suggest that it may not be necessary to control for clustering in behavioral weight loss studies, they also indicate that merely treating individuals in groups is not sufficient to harness social influences on weight loss. PMID:23804576

  4. Assessing adherence factors in patients under topical treatment: development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ).

    PubMed

    Zschocke, Ina; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Lotzin, Annett; Karakasili, Eleni; Reich, Kristian

    2014-04-01

    Medication adherence rates strongly depend on favorable disease outcomes. It is known that medication adherence rates are lower for topical treatment than for systemic treatment. However, to date no validated instrument for the assessment of adherence factors in topical treatment is available. The aim of this study was to develop a new questionnaire to assess adherence risk factors in topical treatment. The development of the Topical Therapy Adherence Questionnaire (TTAQ) and Patient Preference Questionnaire (PPQ) was based on a systematic literature review, and qualitative patient focus interviews and expert focus groups' input. The psychometric properties and comprehensibility of the TTAQ and PPQ were assessed in a feasibility study with 59 psoriasis patients. Our first preliminary results indicate that the TTAQ and PPQ are psychometrically sound and reliable measures for the assessment of factors influencing topical treatment adherence. The questionnaires are currently being further developed and various parameters (e.g., time point of assessment) are currently being tested in an exploratory pilot study with ca. 2,000 psoriasis patients receiving topical treatment in a European clinical trial. The use of the final versions of TTAQ and PPQ in clinical practice may facilitate the early identification of specific non-adherence factors in patients under topical treatment, which could enable designing and applying adherence-enhancing interventions according to the patient's individual needs.

  5. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Prabhpreet; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those factors that might be modifiable to improve adherence, and the measures the health care provider can take to optimize adherence to therapy and thereby improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27350744

  6. Cognitive function and adherence to anticoagulation treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Katarzyna, Lomper; Lidia, Alberska; Joanna, Jaroch; Dudek, Krzysztof; Izabella, Uchmanowicz

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is an integral part of the comprehensive care of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) receiving oral anticoagulations (OACs) therapy. Many patients with AF are elderly and may suffer from some form of cognitive impairment. This study was conducted to investigate whether cognitive impairment affects the level of adherence to anticoagulation treatment in AF patients. Methods The study involved 111 AF patients (mean age, 73.5 ± 8.3 years) treated with OACs. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). The level of adherence was assessed by the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Scores on the MMAS-8 range from 0 to 8, with scores < 6 reflecting low adherence, 6 to < 8 medium adherence, and 8 high adherence. Results 46.9% of AF patients had low adherence, 18.8% had moderate adherence, and 33.3% had high adherence to OACs. Patients with lower adherence were older than those with moderate or high adherence (76.6 ± 8.7 vs. 71.3 ± 6.4 vs. 71.1 ± 6.7 years) and obtained low MMSE scores, indicating cognitive disorders or dementia (MMSE = 22.3 ± 4.2). Patients with moderate or high adherence obtained high MMSE test results (27.5 ± 1.7 and 27.5 ± 3.6). According to Spearman's rank correlation, worse adherence to treatment with OACs was determined by older age (rS = −0.372) and lower MMSE scores (rS = 0.717). According to multivariate regression analysis, the level of cognitive function was a significant independent predictor of adherence (b = 1.139). Conclusions Cognitive impairment is an independent determinant of compliance with pharmacological therapy in elderly patients with AF. Lower adherence, beyond the assessment of cognitive function, is related to the age of patients. PMID:27605935

  7. [e-Health interventions and improvement in treatment adherence].

    PubMed

    Sieben, Angelien; Bredie, S J H Bas; van Laarhoven, C J H M Kees; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Burger, David M; van Onzenoort, Hein A W

    2014-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication is one of the most important determinants in the treatment of patients with chronic disorders. e-Health-based interventions may be able to improve treatment adherence. This article gives an overview of the available e-Health interventions and the extent to which they can improve adherence. We searched in the PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, and Embase databases for e-Health interventions that aimed at improving adherence to treatment. Of the 16 included studies, 15 used a website and one used an app. Ten studies showed a significant improvement in treatment adherence by using the intervention. e-Health interventions were generally complex. Simple interventions were the most successful in improving treatment adherence.

  8. Treatment Adherence among Latina Female Adolescent Suicide Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Piacentini, John; Van Rossem, Ronan; Graae, Flemming; Cantwell, Coleen; Castro-Blanco, David; Feldman, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Disenfranchised Latina adolescents (N=140) and their mothers presenting at a large urban emergency room after a suicide attempt by the adolescent were assessed to examine treatment adherence. Predictor variables for treatment adherence were established. Results are discussed in relation to treatment session attendance. Implications for the…

  9. Adherence to treatment and monitoring tools: what's new?

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Maria; Baiardini, Ilaria; Solidoro, Paolo; Braido, Fulvio

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a serious global health problem affecting all age groups, with global prevalence. Although controller medications are usually highly-effective asthma treatments, patient adherence remains poor, and under-use is associated with greater health resource use, morbidity, and mortality. Up to 70-80% of patients cannot use their inhaler correctly, and similar proportions of health professionals are unable to demonstrate its correct use. A recent paper by Foster et al. explored the effectiveness of two briefs GPs' delivered intervention in improving adherence to asthma treatment and diseases control in patients with uncontrolled moderate/severe persistent asthma, in real-community setting. The results suggested that inhaler reminders may represent an effective strategy for improving adherence in primary care compared with a behavioral intervention or usual care, although this may not be reflected in differences in levels of asthma control. Studies in larger population are needed in order to test the efficacy of available technology on asthma outcomes in all age stages. PMID:27427393

  10. A Review of Treatment Adherence Measurement Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity measurement is critical for testing the effectiveness and implementation in practice of psychosocial interventions. Adherence is a critical component of fidelity. The purposes of this review were to catalogue adherence measurement methods and assess existing evidence for the valid and reliable use of the scores that they generate and the…

  11. Evidence-based Assessment of Adherence to Medical Treatments in Pediatric Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Avani C.; Lemanek, Kathleen L.; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Rapoff, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to medical regimens for children and adolescents with chronic conditions is generally below 50% and is considered the single, greatest cause of treatment failure. As the prevalence of chronic illnesses in pediatric populations increases and awareness of the negative consequences of poor adherence become clearer, the need for reliable and valid measures of adherence has grown. Methods This review evaluated empirical evidence for 18 measures utilizing three assessment methods: (a) self-report or structured interviews, (b) daily diary methods, and (c) electronic monitors. Results Ten measures met the “well-established” evidence-based (EBA) criteria. Conclusions Several recommendations for improving adherence assessment were made. In particular, consideration should be given to the use of innovative technologies that provide a window into the “real time” behaviors of patients and families. Providing written treatment plans, identifying barriers to good adherence, and examining racial and ethnic differences in attitudes, beliefs and behaviors affecting adherence were strongly recommended. PMID:17846042

  12. Adherence to Pharmacological Treatment for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drotar, Dennis; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Demeter, Christine A.; McNamara, Nora K.; Stansbrey, Robert J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Stange, Jonathan; Vijay, Priya; Findling, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of adherence to divalproex sodium (DVPX) and lithium carbonate (Li) combination treatment during the initial stabilization treatment phase. Method: Adherence to Li/DVPX combination therapy was measured by the presence or absence of minimum serum concentrations of…

  13. Treatment non-adherence in teenage and young adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kondryn, Helena J; Edmondson, Claire L; Hill, Jonathan; Eden, Tim O B

    2011-01-01

    Adhering to treatment can be a significant issue for many patients diagnosed with chronic health conditions and this has been reported to be greater during the adolescent years. However, little is known about treatment adherence in teenage and young adult (TYA) patients with cancer. To increase awareness of the adherence challenges faced by these patients, we have reviewed the published work. The available evidence suggests that a substantial proportion of TYA patients with cancer do have difficulties, with reports that up to 63% of patients do not adhere to their treatment regimens. However, with inconsistent findings across studies, the true extent of non-adherence for these young patients is still unclear. Furthermore, it is apparent that there are many components of the cancer treatment regimen that have yet to be assessed in relation to patient adherence. Factors that have been shown to affect treatment adherence in TYA patients include patient emotional functioning (depression and self-esteem), patient health beliefs (perceived illness severity and vulnerability), and family environment (parental support and parent-child concordance). Strategies that foster greater patient adherence are also identified. These strategies are multifactorial, targeting not only the patient, but the health professional, family, and treatment regimen. This review highlights the lack of interventional studies addressing treatment adherence in TYA patients with cancer, with only one such intervention being identified: a video game intervention focusing on behavioural issues related to cancer treatment and care. Methodological issues in measuring adherence are addressed and suggestions for improving the design of future adherence studies highlighted, of which there is a great need.

  14. The Exercise-Affect-Adherence Pathway: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, Harold H; Emerson, Jessica A; Williams, David M

    2016-01-01

    The low rates of regular exercise and overall physical activity (PA) in the general population represent a significant public health challenge. Previous research suggests that, for many people, exercise leads to a negative affective response and, in turn, reduced likelihood of future exercise. The purpose of this paper is to examine this exercise-affect-adherence relationship from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically, we argue that low rates of physical exercise in the general population are a function of the evolved human tendency to avoid unnecessary physical exertion. This innate tendency evolved because it allowed our evolutionary ancestors to conserve energy for physical activities that had immediate adaptive utility such as pursuing prey, escaping predators, and engaging in social and reproductive behaviors. The commonly observed negative affective response to exercise is an evolved proximate psychological mechanism through which humans avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. The fact that the human tendencies toward negative affective response to and avoidance of unnecessary physical activities are innate does not mean that they are unchangeable. Indeed, it is only because of human-engineered changes in our environmental conditions (i.e., it is no longer necessary for us to work for our food) that our predisposition to avoid unnecessary physical exertion has become a liability. Thus, it is well within our capabilities to reengineer our environments to once again make PA necessary or, at least, to serve an immediate functional purpose. We propose a two-pronged approach to PA promotion based on this evolutionary functional perspective: first, to promote exercise and other physical activities that are perceived to have an immediate purpose, and second, to instill greater perceived purpose for a wider range of physical activities. We posit that these strategies are more likely to result in more positive (or less negative) affective responses to exercise

  15. Patient adherence to medical treatment: a review of reviews

    PubMed Central

    van Dulmen, Sandra; Sluijs, Emmy; van Dijk, Liset; de Ridder, Denise; Heerdink, Rob; Bensing, Jozien

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients' non-adherence to medical treatment remains a persistent problem. Many interventions to improve patient adherence are unsuccessful and sound theoretical foundations are lacking. Innovations in theory and practice are badly needed. A new and promising way could be to review the existing reviews of adherence to interventions and identify the underlying theories for effective interventions. That is the aim of our study. Methods The study is a review of 38 systematic reviews of the effectiveness of adherence interventions published between 1990 and 2005. Electronic literature searches were conducted in Medline, Psychinfo, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The scope of the study is patient adherence to medical treatment in the cure and care sector. Results Significant differences in the effectiveness of adherence interventions were found in 23 of the 38 systematic reviews. Effective interventions were found in each of four theoretical approaches to adherence interventions: technical, behavioural, educational and multi-faceted or complex interventions. Technical solutions, such as a simplification of the regimen, were often found to be effective, although that does not count for every therapeutic regimen. Overall, our results show that, firstly, there are effective adherence interventions without an explicit theoretical explanation of the operating mechanisms, for example technical solutions. Secondly, there are effective adherence interventions, which clearly stem from the behavioural theories, for example incentives and reminders. Thirdly, there are other theoretical models that seem plausible for explaining non-adherence, but not very effective in improving adherence behaviour. Fourthly, effective components within promising theories could not be identified because of the complexity of many adherence interventions and the lack of studies that explicitly compare theoretical components

  16. Treatment adherence in multiple sclerosis: a survey of Belgian neurologists

    PubMed Central

    Decoo, Danny; Vokaer, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor treatment adherence is common among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This survey evaluated neurologists’ perception of treatment adherence among MS patients. Materials and methods This questionnaire-based survey of Belgian neurologists treating MS patients was conducted between June and July 2014. Face-to-face interviews with the neurologists were based on a semistructured questionnaire containing questions regarding the perception of the treatment-adherence level. Results A total of 41 neurologists participated in the survey. Of these, 88% indicated frequent discussions about treatment adherence as beneficial for treatment efficacy. The mean time spent on the treatment-adherence discussion during the initial consultation was 11 minutes, with 24% of doctors spending 5 minutes and 24% of doctors spending 10 minutes discussing this issue. The majority of neurologists (56%) perceived the adherence level in MS as good, and 12% perceived it as excellent. The majority of neurologists (64%) indicated intolerance as a main cause of poor adherence, and all neurologists reported insufficient efficacy as a consequence of nonadherence. The importance of adherence in the neurologists’ practice was evaluated on a scale of 1–10, with 1= “not very important” and 10= “very important”: 44% of doctors indicated a score of 10, and the mean score was 9.0. Conclusion Belgian neurologists consider treatment adherence in MS as essential for the benefits of therapies. However, although neurologists are aware of the consequences of nonadherence, they generally spend limited time discussing the importance of treatment adherence with their patients. PMID:26640373

  17. Clinical Supervision in Treatment Transport: Effects on Adherence and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    This nonexperimental study used mixed-effects regression models to examine relations among supervisor adherence to a clinical supervision protocol, therapist adherence, and changes in the behavior and functioning of youths with serious antisocial behavior treated with an empirically supported treatment (i.e., multisystemic therapy [MST]) 1 year…

  18. Methodologies for medication adherence evaluation: Focus on psoriasis topical treatment.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana; Teixeira, Maribel; Almeida, Vera; Torres, Tiago; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Almeida, Isabel Filipa

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to topical treatment has been less studied in comparison with systemic therapeutic regimens and is poorly understood. High-quality research on this area is essential to outline a strategy to increase medication adherence and clinical outcomes. For a more comprehensive understanding of this issue, a systematic review of the methodologies for topical treatment adherence evaluation in psoriasis was undertaken. Twenty one studies were selected from the literature which used six different adherence methodologies. Merely three studies used multiple adherence measurement methods. The most used method was questionnaire (44%) which was also associated with higher variability of the adherence results. One possible explanation is the lack of a validated questionnaire designed specifically for the evaluation of adherence to topical treatment. Only one method (medication weight) takes into consideration the applied dose. However, the estimation of the expected weight is complex, which renders this method, as used presently, less effective. The use of a dosing device could improve its accuracy and be helpful to clearly instruct the patients about the correct dose. As there is no single method that allows an accurate and complete assessment of adherence it is recommended to use a combination of methods, including self-report and medicines' weight measurements.

  19. Protocol Development, Treatment Fidelity, Adherence to Treatment, and Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy leaders have emphasized the importance of intervention effectiveness research. The CONSORT and TREND checklists have been suggested as useful tools for reporting the results of randomized and nonrandomized studies, respectively. Despite such recommendations, research protocols and reports continue to underutilize the available tools, a situation reflecting limited resources for and experience with the conduct of effectiveness research. To address this issue, and using the CONSORT statement to structure the analysis, this article discusses strategies for optimization of protocol development, treatment fidelity, adherence to treatment, and quality control. We recommend several approaches to increase the quality of research throughout these various processes. Examples of implementation from our laboratory provide evidence of the utility of these strategies. PMID:23433268

  20. Adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Teklu, T.; Desalegn, F.; Tesfay, M.; Klinkenberg, E.; Mulugeta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Tuberculosis (TB) patients in Mekelle Zone, Tigray Region, in Ethiopia. Objective: To investigate adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Design: A cross-sectional study in health facilities providing anti-tuberculosis treatment was conducted. Adherence was measured in three ways: through self-reported missed doses, by visual analogue scale whereby patients rate their own adherence and by record review. A patient was considered to be adherent if 90% or more of the prescribed medication was taken. Result: Of 278 TB patients included, 101 were in the intensive and 177 in the continuation phase. Respectively 67 (24.1%), 130 (46.8%) and 80 (28.8%) patients had smear-positive, smear-negative and extra-pulmonary TB. Self-report of missed doses and record review indicated adherence of respectively 273 (97.3%) and 271 (97.5%) patients. By visual analogue scale, 250 (91.6%) patients rated themselves as adherent. History of drug side effects (aOR 0.25, 95%CI 0.08–0.77) and knowledge about TB prevention (aOR 0.19, 95%CI 0.05–0.8) were independently associated with being adherent in this setting. Conclusion: Adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment was high in our study. Adherence support should be given to the poor, the elderly, patients co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, alcohol abusers and smokers. Health education on TB prevention should be given to all TB patients regularly. PMID:26478511

  1. Attrition and adherence in the online treatment of chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Elizabeth A; Vincent, Norah; Lewycky, Samantha; Walsh, Kaitlyn

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the ability of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985) and the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (TTM; Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983) to explain adherence and attrition in an online treatment program for chronic insomnia. Responses to questionnaire measures of the TPB and TTM were used to predict adherence and dropout over the subsequent 5 weeks of treatment. Results showed that there was a 17% dropout rate and that perceived behavioral control, social support, and intention to complete the program were significantly associated with adherence to sleep hygiene homework. Attrition was predicted only by symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidity. Implications are that these models should be considered to maximize adherence. PMID:20582757

  2. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet.

    PubMed

    Link, Lilli B; Jacobson, Judith S

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be 80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (beta=0.95), severity of disease (beta=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (beta=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence.

  3. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet

    PubMed Central

    Link, Lilli B.; Jacobson, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be ≥80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (β=0.95), severity of disease (β=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (β=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence. PMID:18243943

  4. Family behavior, adaptation, and treatment adherence of pediatric nephrology patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, M C; Tucker, C M; Fennell, R S

    1996-04-01

    In this exploratory study we investigated the relationships among family behavior variables (e.g., family expressiveness), adaptive functioning skills, maladaptive behavior, and adherence to treatment in pediatric renal failure patients. The study included 22 pediatric outpatients with renal failure who had not yet received dialysis or transplantation (RF) and their parents, and 12 pediatric outpatients with kidney transplants (TX) and their parents. For the RF patients, significant correlations were found between some of their adaptive functioning skills and measures of their medication adherence, diet adherence, and clinic appointment adherence; however, for the TX patients significant correlations were found only between some of their adaptive functioning skills and measures of their medication adherence. For the RF patients only, some measures of their family behavior were significantly correlated with measures of their medication adherence and diet adherence. Additionally, some measures of the RF patients' family behavior were significantly related to their communication skills, socialization skills, overall adaptive functioning skills, and maladaptive behavior. For the TX patients, only their socialization skill level was significantly correlated with one measure of their family behavior. It is concluded that facilitation of adaptive and physical functioning among renal pediatric patients likely requires multidimensional training and/or counselling interventions with the children and their families, and that some of the content and/or emphasis of this training likely needs to differ for RF patients versus TX patients.

  5. Connection between self-stigma, adherence to treatment, and discontinuation of medication

    PubMed Central

    Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Kubinek, Radim; Vrbova, Kristyna; Mainerova, Barbora; Cinculova, Andrea; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Smoldasova, Jarmila; Tichackova, Anezka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Self-stigma plays a role in many areas of the patient’s life. Furthermore, it also discourages therapy. The aim of our study was to examine associations between self-stigma and adherence to treatment and discontinuation of medication in patients from various diagnostic groups. Methods This cross-sectional study involved outpatients attending the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic. The level of self-stigma was measured with the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness and adherence with the Drug Attitude Inventory. The patients also anonymously filled out a demographic questionnaire which included a question asking whether they had discontinued their medication in the past. Results We examined data from 332 patients from six basic diagnostic categories (substance abuse disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders). The study showed a statistically significant negative correlation between self-stigma and adherence to treatment in all diagnostic groups. Self-stigma correlated positively and adherence negatively with the severity of disorders. Another important factor affecting both variables was partnership. Self-stigma positively correlated with doses of antidepressants and adherence with doses of anxiolytics. Self-stigma also negatively correlated with education, and positively with a number of hospitalizations and number of psychiatrists visited. Adherence was further positively correlated with age and age of onset of disorders. Regression analysis showed that self-stigma was an important factor negatively influencing adherence to treatment and significantly contributing to voluntary discontinuation of drugs. The level of self-stigma did not differ between diagnostic categories. Patients suffering from schizophrenia had the lowest adherence to treatment. Conclusion The study showed a significant correlation between self-stigma and adherence to treatment

  6. Psychosocial adjustment and adherence to dialysis treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Brownbridge, G; Fielding, D M

    1994-12-01

    Sixty children and adolescents in end-stage renal failure who were undergoing either haemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis at one of five United Kingdom dialysis centres were assessed on psychosocial adjustment and adherence to their fluid intake, diet and medication regimes. Parental adjustment was also measured and data on sociodemographic and treatment history variables collected. A structured family interview and standardised questionnaire measures of anxiety, depression and behavioural disturbance were used. Multiple measures of treatment adherence were obtained, utilising children's and parents' self-reports, weight gain between dialysis, blood pressure, serum potassium level, blood urea level, dietitians' surveys and consultants' ratings. Correlational analyses showed that low treatment adherence was associated with poor adjustment to diagnosis and dialysis by children and parents (P < 0.01), self-ratings of anxiety and depression in children and parents (P < 0.001), age (adolescents tended to show poorer adherence than younger children, P < 0.001), duration of dialysis (P < 0.05), low family socioeconomic status (P < 0.05) and family structure (P < 0.01). These findings demonstrate the importance of psychosocial care in the treatment of this group of children. Future research should develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions aimed at improving treatment adherence.

  7. Treatment Adherence in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Collective Impact of Barriers to Adherence and Anxiety/Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Wendy N.; Denson, Lee A.; Baldassano, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents’ ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Methods Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Results Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers–adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. Conclusions In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment. PMID:22080456

  8. Adherence to GOLD guideline treatment recommendations among pulmonologists in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Elif; Guclu, Salih Zeki; Kibar, Isil; Ocal, Ulku; Yilmaz, Veysel; Celik, Onur; Cimen, Filiz; Topcu, Fusun; Orhun, Meltem; Tereci, Hikmet; Konya, Aylin; Ar, Idilhan; Saryal, Sevgi

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guideline recommendations has been reported worldwide. There has been no study on the adherence to GOLD guidelines for COPD treatment in Turkey. Objectives To investigate the rates of adherence to GOLD 2010 guidelines for COPD treatment among pulmonologists. Design A multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study was carried out in eleven pulmonary outpatient clinics across Turkey. Adherence to GOLD was evaluated through hospital records. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. Results Study included 719 patients (mean age: 62.9±9.7 years; males 85.4%) of whom 16 was classified as GOLD Stage I, 238 as II, 346 as III, and 119 as IV, and only 59.5% received appropriate treatment. Rates of guideline adherence varied across GOLD stages (I, 6.3%; II, 14.7%; III, 84.4%; and IV, 84%). Causes of inappropriate therapies were overtreatment (Stage I, 100% and Stage II, 91.1%), undertreatment (Stage III, 3.3% and Stage IV, 10.9%) and lack of treatment (Stage II, 3.8%; Stage III, 2.3%; and Stage IV, 5.9%). The most preferred regimen (43.4%) was long-acting β2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid-long-acting muscarinic antagonist. Overall, 614 patients (89%) received treatment containing inhaled corticosteroid. Conclusion Pulmonologists in Turkey have low rates of adherence to GOLD guidelines in COPD treatment. Inappropriateness of therapies was due to overtreatment in early stages and excessive use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in all disease stages. PMID:26715844

  9. [Treatment adherence, access and AIDS assistance quality in Brazil. ].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Maria Inês Batistella; Castanheira, Elen Rose Lodeiro; Helena, Ernani Tiaraju de Santa; Melchior, Regina; Caraciolo, Joselita Magalhães; Basso, Cáritas Relva; Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto E; Alencar, Tatianna Meireles Dantas de; Ferraz, Dulce Aurélia de Souza

    2009-01-01

    The patient adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a crucial matter to AIDS treatment effectiveness and its' impact. This article aims to discuss the association between adherence and quality of health service providing care to people living with AIDS (PLWA), highlighting quality of the services as a central point to adherence and access. It is based on results of our previous studies about the health care to PLWA in Brazil. Our studies point out that the groups of patients who are followed-up in health services providing care for less than 100 patients presented greater estimated risk of non-adherence than services following more than 500 patients. Also, smaller health services showed greater estimated risk to be ranged in the worst quality of services groups. This is related to the low complexity of smaller health care services, such as: lack of minimum human resources and material structures, poor organization on work process, medical-centered care and poor technical management. New studies in adherence and quality of services are needed. Nevertheless, the existent findings have already pointed out the need to review the current distribution of AIDS care services as well as to make the quality of services more homogenous thorough the country. These are high priorities in order to keep acceptable levels of adherence to HAART in Brazil.

  10. Patient Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Salla A; Lewin, Simon A; Smith, Helen J; Engel, Mark E; Fretheim, Atle; Volmink, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    studies produced a line-of-argument synthesis describing how four major factors interact to affect adherence to TB treatment: structural factors, including poverty and gender discrimination; the social context; health service factors; and personal factors. The findings of this study are limited by the quality and foci of the included studies. Conclusions Adherence to the long course of TB treatment is a complex, dynamic phenomenon with a wide range of factors impacting on treatment-taking behaviour. Patients' adherence to their medication regimens was influenced by the interaction of a number of these factors. The findings of our review could help inform the development of patient-centred interventions and of interventions to address structural barriers to treatment adherence. PMID:17676945

  11. [The role of dermatologist in adherence to treatment].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is often partial in the course of chronic cutaneous disease but can be improved by the dermatologist. Patient participation in the therapeutic decision is indispensable. Dialogue between patient and dermatologist should provide an understanding of the patient's expectations of the treatment, his or her preferences, and which treatment can be integrated into the patient's lifestyle, and should also provide the patient with an understanding of what the treatment can provide and what its disadvantages may be. The approach to poor compliance differs depending on whether or not it is intentional, with all points between obviously possible. Repeated consultations can maintain and enhance the relation between physician and patient, each visit stimulating adherence to the treatment.The language used by the dermatologist should be clear and simple, adapted to each patient. The simplest, most effective, and best tolerated treatments are followed best.

  12. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  13. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  14. The economic rationale for adherence in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wild, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, adherence to prescribed medications has been reported to be as low as 60%, meaning that many patients may not be following the treatment plan that has been prescribed for them. The importance of treatment adherence is intuitive: better adherence would promote better outcomes. Data show this to be the case: for every 25% increase in medication adherence, a patient's glycated hemoglobin (A1C) is reduced by 0.34%. Unfortunately, only a little more than half of patients with diabetes achieve an A1C target below 7%. Poor therapeutic adherence affects diabetes-related costs. Patients who are nonadherent are far more likely to require hospitalization and to incur significantly higher healthcare costs. The lesser costs of lower medication utilization in nonadherent patients are more than compensated for by the increased costs arising from poorer glycemic control, as multiple studies employing large managed care databases have demonstrated. Improvements in outcomes and reductions in costs related to the management of diabetes require focused efforts toward facilitating treatment adherence, efforts that should be undertaken by third-party payers in addition to physicians and patients.

  15. Treatment adherence redefined: a critical analysis of technotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marilou; Jacob, Jean Daniel; Guta, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    GAGNON M, JACOB JD and GUTA A. Nursing Inquiry 2013; 20: 60–70 Treatment adherence redefined: a critical analysis of technotherapeutics Treatment adherence issues in the context of chronic illnesses have become an important concern worldwide and a top priority in the field of health-care. The development of devices that will allow healthcare providers to track treatment adherence and monitor physiological parameters with exact precision raises important questions and concerns. The aim of this study is to interrogate the use of these new technological devices which allow for previously unavailable data to be recorded on an ongoing basis and transmitted via a tiny microchip inserted into the body. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault, we analyze how this anatomo-political and bio-political instrument serves to discipline chronically ill individuals and govern the health of entire populations who suffer from chronic conditions. To support our analysis, this article comprises three sections. First, we provide an overview of treatment adherence and technotherapeutics. Then, we explain how technotherapeutics concern the government of bodies and conducts at the individual level and population level more generally. Lastly, we provide an example of how this analysis can be connected to routine nursing practice in the field of HIV. PMID:22381079

  16. Geopolitical and cultural factors affecting ARV adherence on the US-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Shedlin, Michele G; Decena, Carlos Ulises; Beltran, Oscar

    2013-10-01

    The data discussed represent the findings from a study by the NIH-funded Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center, exploring the influence of institutional and psychosocial factors on adherence to antiretroviral medications by Mexican-origin persons living with AIDS on the US-Mexico Border. A qualitative approach was utilized consisting of clinic observations, baseline and follow-up interviews with patients (N = 113), key informant interviews (N = 9) and focus groups (5) with patients and health providers. Findings include the social-normative, institutional and geo-political factors affecting treatment and service delivery as well as individual variation and culturally patterned behaviors. ARV adherence and retention were found to depend on complex interactions and negotiation of co-occurring factors including the experience of medications and side-effects, patient/provider relationships, cultural norms and the changing dynamics of international borders. We note effects of drug-related violence which created border-crossing obstacles influencing mobility, access to services and adherence. PMID:22797951

  17. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence.

  18. Adherence to treatment in patients with open-angle glaucoma and its related factors

    PubMed Central

    Movahedinejad, Tayebeh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lack of adherence to medical treatments typically lead to burdensome consequences such as progressive visual impairment, blindness, and disabilities. This study aimed to determine the adherence to medication in patients with open-angle glaucoma and related factors in patients referred to the Matini Ophthalmology Hospital in Kashan, Iran. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from 23 July 2015 to 20 January 2016 on all patients with open-angle glaucoma referred to the Matini Ophthalmology Hospital in Kashan, Iran. A questionnaire was used to gather data about patients’ demographics and factors affecting adherence to medical treatments. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used to evaluate the adherence to glaucoma medication. Results were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and logistic regression analysis were used. Results In total, 130 patients with a mean age of 55.36 ± 15.54 were studied. Only 34.6% of patients completely adhered to glaucoma medications. The chi-square test showed that age (p=0.007), education (p=0.01), life entourage (p=0.04), place of residence (p=0.06), average monthly income (p=0.005), the interval between medical visits (p=0.007), problem in scheduling the medical visits (p<0.001), number of medications (p<0.001), lifelong using and side-effects of medications (p<0.001), answers of the physician to the patient’s questions (p<0.001), financial and traveling problems (p<0.001), lack of skill in using eye drops (p<0.001), lack of awareness of glaucoma complications and symptoms (p<0.001), forgetting, fatigue, impatience, believing in uselessness of medications, and lack of support from family (p<0.001) were associated with patients’ adherence. Logistic regression showed that 89% of variance of patients’ adherence to glaucoma medications can be predicted by seven factors: problems in traveling and scheduling medical visits, the large number and side effects of medications

  19. Factors that Influence Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in an Urban Population, Jakarta, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Emma Rosamond Nony; Pane, Masdalina; Wandra, Toni; Windiyaningsih, Cicilia; Herlina; Samaan, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indonesia has increased in recent years, little is known about the specific characteristics affecting adherence in this population. Indonesia is different from most of its neighbors given that it is a geographically and culturally diverse country, with a large Muslim population. We aimed to identify the current rate of adherence and explore factors that influence ART adherence. Methods Data were collected from ART-prescribed outpatients on an HIV registry at a North Jakarta hospital in 2012. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics were explored as factors associated with adherence using logistics regression analyses. Chi squared test was used to compare the difference between proportions. Reasons for missing medication were analyzed descriptively. Results Two hundred and sixty-one patients participated, of whom 77% reported ART adherence in the last 3 months. The level of social support experienced was independently associated with adherence where some social support (p = 0.018) and good social support (p = 0.039) improved adherence compared to poor social support. Frequently cited reasons for not taking ART medication included forgetting to take medication (67%), busy with something else (63%) and asleep at medication time (60%). Discussion This study identified that an increase in the level of social support experienced by ART-prescribed patients was positively associated with adherence. Social support may minimize the impact of stigma among ART prescribed patients. Based on these findings, if social support is not available, alternative support through community-based organizations is recommended to maximize treatment success. PMID:25229671

  20. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  1. Treatment adherence, clinical outcomes, and economics of triple-drug therapy in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Panjabi, Sumeet; Lacey, Michael; Bancroft, Timothy; Cao, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Poor antihypertensive treatment adherence adversely affects blood pressure control. We analyzed US health plan data to assess the impact of fixed- versus loose-dose triple-combination therapy on adherence, clinical, and economic outcomes. Patients initiating triple therapy with an angiotensin receptor blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, or beta blocker plus amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide comprised three cohorts. Within-cohort comparisons were made between fixed-dose combinations of two antihypertensives plus a second pill (two pills) or three separate pills. Outcomes included adherence, cardiovascular events, health care resource use, and costs for patients with ≥ 12 months follow-up. A total of 16,290 patients were matched. Patients receiving two pills were more likely to be adherent (P < .001) and less likely to discontinue treatment (P < .001) across all cohorts. Therapy with two versus three pills resulted in significantly lower adjusted risk of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio = 0.76, P = .005) in the beta blocker cohort only. Total adjusted health care costs were significantly lower for two- versus three-pill therapy in the beta blocker cohort only (cost ratio = 0.74 overall, P < .01; 0.71 hypertension-attributable, P < .01). In patients with hypertension requiring triple therapy, fixed-dose combinations that lower pill burden may improve adherence (seen across all cohorts) and clinical outcomes (seen in the beta blocker cohort) without increasing health care costs.

  2. The role of social support and negative affect in medication adherence for HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Eva N; Pantalone, David W

    2012-01-01

    Combinations of medications that control HIV viral replication are called antiretroviral therapy (ART). Regimens can be complex, so medication adherence is often suboptimal, although high rates of adherence are necessary for ART to be effective. Social support, which has been directly and indirectly associated with better treatment adherence in HIV-infected individuals, influences negative affect, including depression and anxiety. Our study assessed whether current anxious and depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between general social support and recent self-reported medication adherence in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (N= 136; 65% White, 15% Black/African American). Results revealed no direct effect, but an indirect effect of depressive (95% CI [-.011, -.0011]) and anxious symptoms (95% CI [-.0097, -.0009]), between social support and medication adherence. Greater levels of social support were associated with lower levels of depression and anxiety, which in turn were associated with lower ART adherence.

  3. Factors Influencing Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in Nepal: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V.; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. Results A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p =  0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = <0.001), being female (OR = 6.91, p = 0.001), being illiterate (OR = 4.58, p = 0.015), side-effects (OR = 6.04, p = 0.025), ART started ≤24 months (OR = 3.18, p = 0.009), travel time to hospital >1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Conclusion Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear

  4. Patients' adherence to hard acrylic interocclusal appliance treatment in general dental practice in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Erik; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate patient adherence to treatment with hard acrylic interocclusal appliance in general dentistry in Sweden and to see if some general factors could predict patient adherence or non-adherence. During the period January - May 2009 a postal questionnaire was sent to all adult patients (> or = 20 years of age) that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance from the public dental health service in the County of Uppsala during 2007 (n=388). The same questionnaire was also sent to all adult patients that had received a hard acrylic interocclusal appliance at a specialist clinic during the same year (n=69). The response rate in general dental practice was 71% and at the specialist clinic the response rate was 91%. In general dental practice, 97% of the hard acrylic interocclusal appliances were stabilisation appliances. At the specialist clinic other types of interocclusal appliances was used to a greater extent. A vast majority of patients in both general dental practice and at the specialist clinic experienced that the interocclusal appliance had a positive treatment effect. In general dental practice, 73% of the patients still used their interocclusal appliances 1 1/2-2 years after they had received them. The corresponding figure at the specialist clinic was 54%. The main reasons for not using the interocclusal appliance, besides disappearance/reduction of TMD symptoms, were different kinds of comfort problems. From the results of this study it is concluded that the patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances made in general dental practice in Sweden is good. It can also be concluded that a perceived good treatment effect, as well as treatment of more long-term conditions, predicted a better patient adherence to hard acrylic stabilisation appliances. More studies concerning factors affecting patient adherence in TMD therapy are warranted.

  5. Nurses' Roles and Experiences with Enhancing Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment among Patients in Burundi: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Marie; Johansson, Stina; Eale, Remy-Paul Bosela

    2014-01-01

    Background. In TB control, poor treatment adherence is a major cause of relapse and drug resistance. Nurses have a critical role in supporting patients in TB treatment process. Yet, very little research has been done to inform policymakers and practitioners on nurses' experiences of treatment adherence among patients with TB. Aim. To describe nurses' experiences of supporting treatment adherence among patients with tuberculosis in Burundi. Method. The study adopted qualitative approach with a descriptive design. A purposive sampling was performed. Eight nurses were selected from two TB treatment centers in Burundi. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Result. According to the nurses, most patients complete their treatment. Educating patients, providing the medication, observing and following up treatment, and communicating with the patients were the key tasks by nurses to support adherence. Causes for interruption were medication-related difficulties, poverty, and patients' indiscipline. Treatment adherence could also be affected by patients' and nurses' feelings. Providing transportation and meals could enhance treatment compliance. Conclusion. Nurses are critical resources to TB treatment success. In a poverty stricken setting, nurses' work could be facilitated and adherence further could be enhanced if socioeconomic problems (transportation and nutritional support) were alleviated. PMID:25215232

  6. Medication adherence in patients in treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus in a university hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Prudente, Luciana Resende; Diniz, Juliana de Souza; Ferreira, Tatyana Xavier Almeida Matteucci; Lima, Dione Marçal; Silva, Nílzio Antônio; Saraiva, Guylherme; Silveira, Erika Aparecida; Dewulf, Nathalie de Lourdes Souza; Amaral, Rita Goreti

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is essential for the control of symptoms and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the study was to investigate medication adherence in outpatients in treatment for RA and SLE in a university hospital in Brazil. This was a quantitative, cross-sectional analytical study. A total of 92 patients (55 RA patients and 37 SLE patients) were included in the study. A structured questionnaire for patients’ interview and a form for collecting data from medical records were used for data collection. Adherence to drug treatment was assessed by the Morisky scale questionnaire. Data storage and analysis were performed using Epi Info 3.5.4 and statistical analysis by Stata/SE 12.0. The Pearson’s chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test were applied for statistical and bivariate analyses. For multivariate data analysis the Poisson regression and the Wald test were used. The prevalence of adherence to drug treatment was 16.4% in RA patients and 45.9% in SLE patients. The final model of the multivariate analysis demonstrated associations between medication adherence and the following covariates for both RA and SLE groups: duration of therapy for rheumatic disease at the institution greater than 15 years and presence of more than six chronic comorbidities. The parameter “acquisition of medication at the high-cost pharmacy” was differently associated with medication adherence by group, and for the SLE group, living outside the city of Goiânia was a protective factor associated with adherence. This study demonstrated a low prevalence of medication adherence in patients in treatment for RA and SLE treated at this institution. These findings will serve as a base for future studies to elucidate what factors may positively or negatively affect medication adherence in this population. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches are needed to enhance adherence to drug treatment in patients in treatment for

  7. Religious Beliefs in Schizophrenia: Their Relevance for Adherence to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Borras, L; Mohr, S; Brandt, P-Y; Gilliéron, C; Eytan, A; Huguelet, P

    2007-01-01

    The study examined how religious beliefs and practices impact upon medication and illness representations in chronic schizophrenia. One hundred three stabilized patients were included in Geneva's outpatient public psychiatric facility in Switzerland. Interviews were conducted to investigate spiritual and religious beliefs and religious practices and religious coping. Medication adherence was assessed through questions to patients and to their psychiatrists and by a systematic blood drug monitoring. Thirty-two percent of patients were partially or totally nonadherent to oral medication. Fifty-eight percent of patients were Christians, 2% Jewish, 3% Muslim, 4% Buddhist, 14% belonged to various minority or syncretic religious movements, and 19% had no religious affiliation. Two thirds of the total sample considered spirituality as very important or even essential in everyday life. Fifty-seven percent of patients had a representation of their illness directly influenced by their spiritual beliefs (positively in 31% and negatively in 26%). Religious representations of illness were prominent in nonadherent patients. Thirty-one percent of nonadherent patients and 27% of partially adherent patients underlined an incompatibility or contradiction between their religion and taking medication, versus 8% of adherent patients. Religion and spirituality contribute to shaping representations of disease and attitudes toward medical treatment in patients with schizophrenia. This dimension should be on the agenda of psychiatrists working with patients with schizophrenia. PMID:17213479

  8. Building adherence-competent communities: Factors promoting children's adherence to anti-retroviral HIV/AIDS treatment in rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine; Skovdal, Morten; Mupambireyi, Zivai; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Given relatively high levels of adherence to HIV treatment in Africa, we explore factors facilitating children's adherence, despite poverty, social disruption and limited health infrastructure. Using interviews with 25 nurses and 40 guardians in Zimbabwe, we develop our conceptualisation of an ‘adherence competent community’, showing how members of five networks (children, guardians, community members, health workers and NGOs) have taken advantage of the gradual public normalisation of HIV/AIDS and improved drug and service availability to construct new norms of solidarity with HIV and AIDS sufferers, recognition of HIV-infected children's social worth, an ethic of care/assistance and a supporting atmosphere of enablement/empowerment. PMID:21975285

  9. GADL1 variant and medication adherence in predicting response to lithium maintenance treatment in bipolar I disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Ken; Lee, Chau-Shoun; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jung-Chen; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic variants and medication adherence have been identified to be the main factors contributing to lithium treatment response in bipolar disorders. Aims To simultaneously examine effects of variant glutamate decarboxylase-like protein 1 (GADL1) and medication adherence on response to lithium maintenance treatment in Han Chinese patients with bipolar I (BPI) disorder. Method Frequencies of manic and depressive episodes between carriers and non-carriers of the effective GADL1 rs17026688 T allele during the cumulative periods of off-lithium, poor adherence to lithium treatment and good adherence to lithium treatment were compared in Han Chinese patients with BPI disorder (n=215). Results GADL1 rs17026688 T carriers had significantly lower frequencies of recurrent affective episodes than non-T carriers during the cumulative period of good adherence, but not during those of poor adherence. Conclusions GADL1 rs17026688 and medication adherence jointly predict response to lithium maintenance treatment in Han Chinese BPI patients. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703793

  10. Impact of Treatment Adherence Intervention on a Social Skills Program Targeting Criticism Behaviours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinin, Serge; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated effect of cognitive-behavioral treatment adherence intervention in course of criticism skill group training program. Assigned 86 participants to treatment condition with or without adherence intervention or to control. Results suggest that adherence activities facilitated arousal optimal to greater program attendance and outcome gains…

  11. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV-infected women attending an urban care facility.

    PubMed

    Aspeling, Heila E; van Wyk, Neltjie C

    2008-02-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is often jeopardized by factors misapprehended by health-care providers. As South Africa is severely affected by HIV and AIDS, identifying factors that influence adherence in this specific context becomes essential. An exploratory and descriptive case study design was used to further explore this subject and to identify factors that could influence adherence to ART. A significant correlation with international data was found. Most participants indicated that their traditional beliefs and customs did not interfere with their adherence to ART, although the lack of HIV education might facilitate reversion to traditional customs. Adequate treatment preparation, comprehensive HIV education and a supportive patient-provider relationship seemed to impact adherence significantly.

  12. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kassahun, Ashebir; Gashe, Fanta; Mulisa, Eshetu; Rike, Wote Amelo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. Objective: To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH), Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Of all respondents, 149 (52.3%) and 136 (47.7%) were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3%) were in the age group of 30–60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8%) of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2%) of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer). A total of 196 (68.8%) respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The participants in the area of study were moderately adherent to their anti-diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income. PMID:27134464

  13. Factors affecting medication adherence in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karakurt, Papatya; Kaşikçi, Mağfiret

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study descriptive study was to evaluate concordance with medication and those factors that affect the use of medicine in patients with hypertension. Data were collected using a questionnaire completed by 750 patients with hypertension between December 25, 2003, and April 30, 2004, in an outpatient hypertension clinic in Erzincan, Turkey. It was found that 57.9% of the patients did not use their medicines as prescribed. Forgetfulness, aloneness, and negligence were ranked as the top three reasons for this non-concordance, accounting for almost half (49.3%) of all patients with hypertension studied; price (expensive medicines) accounted for another quarter (26.5%). A statistically significant relationship with non-concordance was found for age, education level and profession. Patients' lack of knowledge related to the complications of hypertension was also found to have a statistically significant relationship with not taking medicines as prescribed. Gender, location of residence and salary were not found to be statistically related to concordance. These results indicate the need to educate patients with hypertension on how to use their medicine regularly and indicate also the target populations for this. PMID:23127428

  14. Mode of administration of dulaglutide: implications for treatment adherence

    PubMed Central

    Amblee, Ambika

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication complexity/burden can be associated with nonadherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients’ satisfaction with their treatment is an important consideration for physicians. Strategies like using longer acting efficacious agents with less frequent dosing may help adherence. Objective To explore the mode of administration of dulaglutide and its implications for treatment adherence in T2DM. Methods PubMed search using the term “Dulaglutide” through October 31, 2015 was conducted. Published articles, press releases, and abstracts presented at national/international meetings were considered. Results/conclusion Dulaglutide is a once-weekly glucagon like peptide-1 analog with a low intraindividual variability. Phase III trials demonstrated significant improvements in glycemia and weight, with a low hypoglycemia risk similar to liraglutide/exenatide, but with substantially fewer injections. A significant improvement was observed in the total Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire score, Impact of Weight on Self-Perception, and perceived frequency of hyperglycemia with dulaglutide when compared with placebo, exenatide, liraglutide, or metformin. Treatment satisfaction scores showed an improvement with dulaglutide (34%–39%) when compared with exenatide (31%). A positive experience with a high initial (97.2%) and final (99.1%) injection success rate along with a significant reduction in patients’ fear of self-injecting, as measured by the modified self-injecting subscale of the Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-Testing Questionnaire and Medication Delivery Device Assessment Battery, was found. Its acceptance was high (>96%) among a variety of patients including patients who fear injections and injection-naïve users. Dulaglutide is available as a single-dose automatic self-injecting device, which has a low volume, does not need reconstitution, and avoids patient handling of the needle. Dose adjustment based on

  15. Measuring adherence to treatment of paediatric HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Naar-King, S; Frey, M; Harris, M; Arfken, C

    2005-04-01

    Parent, child, physician report and pill counts were used to measure adherence in paediatric HIV. Relationships to viral load were assessed. Pill counts were considered invalid. Adherence measures did not correlate with one another. Physicians reported lower adherence than parents, but parent and physician report correlated with viral load. The clinical and research utility of the various measures are discussed.

  16. Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions.

  17. The patient's duty to adhere to prescribed treatment: an ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2005-04-01

    This article examines the ethical basis for the patient's duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions. The article argues that patients have a moral duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions, once they have accepted treatment. Since patients still retain the right to refuse medical treatment, their duty to adhere to treatment prescriptions is a prima facie duty, which can be overridden by their other ethical duties. However, patients do not have the right to refuse to adhere to treatment prescriptions if their non-adherence poses a significant threat to other people. This paper also discusses the use of written agreements between physicians and patients as a strategy for promoting patient adherence.

  18. Measuring Parental Treatment Adherence in a Multimodal Treatment Program for Children with ADHD: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Craig; Reddy, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical significance of measuring between session parental adherence on child and parent outcomes for 51 children (age 4 to 8.5 years) with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a multimodal group training program. Three group treatment conditions: (a) child-only treatment (C1), (c) child and parent training…

  19. Adherence to Behavioral and Medical Treatment Recommendations by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy R.; Symons, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which parents of children with intellectual or developmental disabilities are adherent to prescribed treatments has not been investigated. In this treatment adherence study, parents (n = 220) of children with autism spectrum disorders were surveyed regarding implementation of recommended treatments to manage problem behavior of their…

  20. How Patients Take Malaria Treatment: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Adherence to Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S. Patrick; Schellenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Background High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. Objective We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. Results The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90–100%) and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. Conclusion Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report. PMID:24465418

  1. Treatment adherence in heart failure patients followed up by nurses in two specialized clinics

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andressa Freitas; Cavalcanti, Ana Carla Dantas; Malta, Mauricio; Arruda, Cristina Silva; Gandin, Thamires; da Fé, Adriana; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze treatment adherence in heart failure (HF) patients followed up by the nursing staff at specialized clinics and its association with patients' characteristics such as number of previous appointments, family structure, and comorbidities. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted at two reference clinics for the treatment of HF patients (center 1 and center 2). Data were obtained using a 10-item questionnaire with scores ranging from 0 to 26 points; adherence was considered adequate if the score was ≥ 18 points, or 70% of adherence. Results: a total of 340 patients were included. Mean adherence score was 16 (±4) points. Additionally, 124 (36.5%) patients showed an adherence rate ≥ 70%. It was demonstrated that patients who lived with their family had higher adherence scores, that three or more previous nursing appointments was significantly associated with higher adherence (p<0.001), and that hypertension was associated with low adherence (p=0.023). Conclusions: treatment adherence was considered satisfactory in less than a half of the patients followed up at the two clinics specialized in HF. Living with the family and attending to a great number of nursing appointments improved adherence, while the presence of hypertension led to worse adherence. PMID:26487139

  2. Statin adherence and risk of acute cardiovascular events among women: a cohort study accounting for time-dependent confounding affected by previous adherence

    PubMed Central

    Lavikainen, Piia; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Eerola, Mervi; Fang, Gang; Hartikainen, Juha; Huupponen, Risto; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies on the effect of statin adherence on cardiovascular events in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease have adjusted for time-dependent confounding, but potentially introduced bias into their estimates as adherence and confounders were measured simultaneously. We aimed to evaluate the effect when accounting for time-dependent confounding affected by previous adherence as well as time sequence between factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Finnish healthcare registers. Participants Women aged 45–64 years initiating statin use for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in 2001–2004 (n=42 807). Outcomes Acute cardiovascular event defined as a composite of acute coronary syndrome and acute ischaemic stroke was our primary outcome. Low-energy fractures were used as a negative control outcome to evaluate the healthy-adherer effect. Results During the 3-year follow-up, 474 women experienced the primary outcome event and 557 suffered a low-energy fracture. The causal HR estimated with marginal structural model for acute cardiovascular events for all the women who remained adherent (proportion of days covered ≥80%) to statin therapy during the previous adherence assessment year was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.94) when compared with everybody remaining non-adherent (proportion of days covered <80%). The result was robust against alternative model specifications. Statin adherers had a potentially reduced risk of experiencing low-energy fractures compared with non-adherers (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.07). Conclusions Our study, which took into account the time dependence of adherence and confounders, as well as temporal order between these factors, is support for the concept that adherence to statins in women in primary prevention decreases the risk of acute cardiovascular events by about one-fifth in comparison to non-adherence. However, part of the observed effect of statin adherence on acute cardiovascular events

  3. HIV Treatment Adherence, Drug Resistance, Virologic Failure: Evolving Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Marconi, Vincent C.; van Zyl, Gert U.; Gardner, Edward M.; Preiser, Wolfgang; Hong, Steven Y.; Mills, Edward J.; Gross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been shown to be a major determinant of virologic failure, emergence of drug resistant virus, disease progression, hospitalizations, mortality, and health care costs. While high adherence levels can be achieved in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings following initiation of cART, long-term adherence remains a challenge regardless of available resources. Barriers to optimal adherence may originate from individual (biological, socio-cultural, behavioral), pharmacological, and societal factors. Although patients and providers should continuously strive for maximum adherence to cART, there is accumulating evidence that each class of antiretroviral therapy has specific adherence-drug resistance relationship characteristics allowing certain regimens more flexibility than others. There is not a universally accepted measure for cART adherence, since each method has distinct advantages and disadvantages including cost, complexity, accuracy, precision, intrusiveness and bias. Development of a real-time cART adherence monitoring tool will enable the development of novel, pre-emptive adherence-improving strategies. The application of these strategies may ultimately prove to be the most cost-effective method to reduce morbidity and mortality for the individual and decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission and emergence of resistance in the community. PMID:21406048

  4. Heart failure patient adherence: epidemiology, cause, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Corotto, Paul S; McCarey, Melissa M; Adams, Suzanne; Khazanie, Prateeti; Whellan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to therapeutic regimens is a significant impediment to improving clinical outcomes in the HF population. Typical rates of adherence to prescribed medications, low-sodium diets, and aerobic exercise programs remain lower than that needed to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with HF. Factors contributing to poor adherence include multiple comorbidities, clinical depression, and decreased cognitive functioning. HF education and programs to enhance self-management skills have improved patient quality of life but have yet to decrease mortality or rehospitalization rates significantly. Telemonitoring to improve adherence behaviors and self-management interventions within broader HF management programs have demonstrated significant clinical improvements in this population.

  5. Adherence to Technology-Mediated Insomnia Treatment: A Meta-Analysis, Interviews, and Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Lancee, Jaap; Beun, Robbert Jan; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment as a solid base for improving those adherence rates by applying adherence-enhancing strategies. Methods Adherence to technology-mediated sleep products was studied in three ways. First, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate adherence rates in technology-mediated insomnia therapy. Several databases were queried for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. After inclusion and exclusion steps, data from 18 studies were retrieved and aggregated to find an average adherence rate. Next, 15 semistructured interviews about sleep-support technologies were conducted to investigate perceived adherence. Lastly, several scenarios were written about the usage of a virtual sleep coach that could support adherence rates. The scenarios were discussed in six different focus groups consisting of potential users (n=15), sleep experts (n=7), and coaches (n=9). Results From the meta-analysis, average treatment adherence appeared to be approximately 52% (95% CI 43%-61%) for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. This means that, on average, half of the treatment exercises were not executed, suggesting there is a substantial need for adherence and room for improvement in this area. However, the users in the interviews believed they adhered quite well to their sleep products. Users mentioned relying on personal commitment (ie, willpower) for therapy adherence. Participants of the focus groups reconfirmed their belief in the effectiveness of personal commitment, which they regarded as more effective than adherence-enhancing strategies. Conclusions Although adherence rates for insomnia interventions indicate extensive room for improvement, users might not consider adherence to

  6. Factors influencing non-adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Jepara, central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rondags, Angelique; Himawan, Ari Budi; Metsemakers, Job Fm; Kristina, Tri Nur

    2014-07-01

    One of the most serious problems for tuberculosis (TB) control is non-adherence to TB treatment. We studied the factors influencing non-adherence to TB treatment in Indonesia to inform TB treatment adherence strategies. We con- ducted semi-structured interviews with non-adherent patients and key informants in Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Three major themes were found in reasons for non-adherence to TB treatment: 1) knowledge about TB, 2) knowledge about TB treatment and 3) choosing and changing a health care treatment facility. Respondents had an inadequate knowledge about TB and its treatment. Feeling healthy and having financial problems were the most common reasons for TB treatment non-adherence. Respondents sought treatment from many different health care providers, and often changed the treatment facility location. TB treatment adherence might improve by providing better education about the disease and its treatment to those undergoing treatment. Providing information about where to receive treatment and that treatment is free could also improve compliance.

  7. Adherence to HIV treatment among IDUs and the role of opioid substitution treatment (OST).

    PubMed

    Spire, Bruno; Lucas, Gregory M; Carrieri, M Patrizia

    2007-08-01

    In the era of highly effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART), data show a significant difference in treatment outcomes between injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs. Factors that may contribute to suboptimal treatment outcomes in IDUs include delayed access to ART, competing comorbid diseases, psychosocial barriers and poor long-term adherence to ART. This review describes and compares several studies on adherence to ART and its correlates in HIV-infected individuals in general, then IDUs and finally those IDUs on opioid substitution treatment (OST). It highlights how ongoing drug use or OST can modify the pattern of these correlates. The aim is to extend all the experience acquired from these studies in order to optimise both access to care and adherence in those countries where HIV infection is mainly driven by IDUs and where ART and OST are only starting to be scaled up. The role of OST in fostering access to care and adherence to ART together with the promising results achieved to date using modified directly observed therapy (DOT) programs for patients taking methadone, allow us to emphasize the efficacy of a comprehensive care model which integrates substance dependence treatment, psychiatric treatment, social services, and medical treatment. The review concludes by suggesting areas of future research targeted at improving the understanding of both the role of perceived toxicity and patient-provider relationship for patients on ART and OST.

  8. How Medicare Part D Benefit Phases Affect Adherence with Evidence-Based Medications Following Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Bruce; Davidoff, Amy; Erten, Mujde; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Dai, Mingliang; Shaffer, Thomas; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Bryant-Comstock, Lynda; Shenolikar, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Assess impact of Medicare Part D benefit phases on adherence with evidence-based medications after hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction. Data Source. Random 5 percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Study Design. Difference-in-difference analysis of drug adherence by AMI patients stratified by low-income subsidy (LIS) status and benefit phase. Data Collection/Extraction Methods. Subjects were identified with an AMI diagnosis in Medicare Part A files between April 2006 and December 2007 and followed until December 2008 or death (N = 8,900). Adherence was measured as percent of days covered (PDC) per month with four drug classes used in AMI treatment: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), beta-blockers, statins, and clopidogrel. Monthly exposure to Part D benefit phases was calculated from flags on each Part D claim. Principal Findings. For non-LIS enrollees, transitioning from the initial coverage phase into the Part D coverage gap was associated with statistically significant reductions in mean PDC for all four drug classes: statins (−7.8 percent), clopidogrel (−7.0 percent), beta-blockers (−5.9 percent), and ACE inhibitor/ARBs (−5.1 percent). There were no significant changes in adherence associated with transitioning from the gap to the catastrophic coverage phase. Conclusions. As the Part D doughnut hole is gradually filled in by 2020, Medicare Part D enrollees with critical diseases such as AMI who rely heavily on brand name drugs are likely to exhibit modest increases in adherence. Those reliant on generic drugs are less likely to be affected. PMID:23742013

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Positive-Affect Intervention and Medication Adherence in Hypertensive African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga O.; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Wells, Martin T.; Allegrante, John P.; Isen, Alice M.; Jobe, Jared B.; Charlson, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor adherence explains poor blood pressure (BP) control; however African Americans suffer worse hypertension-related outcomes. Methods This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether a patient education intervention enhanced with positive-affect induction and self-affirmation (PA) was more effective than patient education (PE) alone in improving medication adherence and BP reduction among 256 hypertensive African Americans followed up in 2 primary care practices. Patients in both groups received a culturally tailored hypertension self-management workbook, a behavioral contract, and bimonthly telephone calls designed to help them overcome barriers to medication adherence. Also, patients in the PA group received small gifts and bimonthly telephone calls to help them incorporate positive thoughts into their daily routine and foster self-affirmation. The main outcome measures were medication adherence (assessed with electronic pill monitors) and within-patient change in BP from baseline to 12 months. Results The baseline characteristics were similar in both groups: the mean BP was 137/82 mm Hg; 36% of the patients had diabetes; 11% had stroke; and 3% had chronic kidney disease. Based on the intention-to-treat principle, medication adherence at 12 months was higher in the PA group than in the PE group (42% vs 36%, respectively; P =.049). The within-group reduction in systolic BP (2.14 mm Hg vs 2.18 mm Hg; P =.98) and diastolic BP (−1.59 mm Hg vs −0.78 mm Hg; P=.45) for the PA group and PE group, respectively, was not significant. Conclusions A PE intervention enhanced with PA led to significantly higher medication adherence compared with PE alone in hypertensive African Americans. Future studies should assess the cost-effectiveness of integrating such interventions into primary care. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00227175 PMID:22269592

  10. The Differential Outcomes Procedure Enhances Adherence to Treatment: A Simulated Study with Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Michael; Plaza, Victoria; Fuentes, Luis J.; Estévez, Angeles F.

    2015-01-01

    Memory for medical recommendations is a prerequisite for good adherence to treatment, and therefore to ameliorate the negative effects of the disease, a problem that mainly affects people with memory deficits. We conducted a simulated study to test the utility of a procedure (the differential outcomes procedure, DOP) that may improve adherence to treatment by increasing the patient’s learning and retention of medical recommendations regarding medication. The DOP requires the structure of a conditional discriminative learning task in which correct choice responses to specific stimulus–stimulus associations are reinforced with a particular reinforcer or outcome. In two experiments, participants had to learn and retain in their memory the pills that were associated with particular disorders. To assess whether the DOP improved long-term retention of the learned disorder/pill associations, participants were asked to perform two recognition memory tests, 1 h and 1 week after completing the learning phase. The results showed that compared with the standard non-differential outcomes procedure, the DOP produced better learning and long-term retention of the previously learned associations. These findings suggest that the DOP can be used as a useful complementary technique in intervention programs targeted at increasing adherence to clinical recommendations. PMID:26913010

  11. Prescribing for children - taste and palatability affect adherence to antibiotics: a review.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Dave; Lim, Emma; Bevan, Amanda; Pallet, Ann; Faust, Saul N

    2012-03-01

    The taste of an antibiotic is often not taken into account by practitioners, although there is significant evidence to show palatability correlates strongly with adherence. Many parents will be familiar with the difficulties of convincing young children to take bitter, unfamiliar medicine. Certain drugs, for example flucloxacillin, are so unpalatable that they should not be prescribed as syrups without prior 'taste testing' in an individual child, while others, such as oral cephalosporins, are accepted very well although they are more expensive with a broader antimicrobial spectrum than may be strictly necessary. Palatability is important in the broader context of global child health as regards the successful treatment of malaria, HIV and dehydration. The hidden cost of poor adherence resulting treatment failure, complications and the development of drug resistance cannot be over emphasised. Prescribing should involve parents, children and practitioners in an open discussion around the most suitable, palatable formulations for successful treatment outcomes. PMID:22088684

  12. The Influence of Cognition, Anxiety and Psychiatric Disorders over Treatment Adherence in Uncontrolled Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Úrsula; De Castro, Mauro S.; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Poor adherence is estimated to cause 125 thousand deaths per year and is linked to 10% of all hospital stays in the U.S. Up to one third of elderly hypertensive patients don't have adherence, which is responsible for high proportion of hospitalizations. Hypertension is also related to poor performance in tests that assess cognitive functions. On the other hand, poor cognitive performance is associated with low adherence to treatment. Objective To assess the association between cognitive function, anxiety and psychiatric disorders with adherence to drug treatment in patients with hypertension. Methodology and Principal Findings This a cohort studies with 56 adult patients with uncontrolled hypertension who participated of all meetings of a pharmaceutical intervention in a randomized clinical trial of pharmaceutical care. Cognitive function was measured by the Mini Mental State Examination (Mini-mental). The memory was measured by digit and word spans, tower and church shadow test, short story test and metamemory. Anxiety and psychiatric disorders were evaluated by the State Trace Anxiety Inventory and the Self-Report Questionnaire, respectively. The participants were classified as adherent or non-adherent to the drug treatment, according to the identification of plasma levels of hydrochlorothiazide. All non-adherent patients (n = 12) and 35 out 44 (79.5%) patients with adherence to treatment had at least one memory test with an altered score (P = 0.180). Participants with an unsatisfactory score in the Mini-mental had six-fold higher risk of non-adherence to treatment when compared to those with a normal score (RR = 5.8; CI 95%: 1.6–20.8; P = 0.007). The scores of anxiety and psychiatric disorders were not associated with adherence to the pharmacological treatment. Conclusion Cognitive deficit impairs adherence to drug therapy and should be screened as part of a program of pharmaceutical care to improve adherence to treatment. PMID

  13. Adherence to antidepressant treatment: what the doctor thinks and what the patient says.

    PubMed

    Loayza, N; Crettol, S; Riquier, F; Eap, C B

    2012-07-01

    Adherence to antidepressant treatment has been shown to range from 30 to 70%. The aim of this study was to compare the patient's self-report of adherence with the doctors' estimation of adherence and therapeutic alliance in 104 outpatients with mood and/or anxiety disorder treated with antidepressants. The adherence scores estimated by the patients and the doctors were significantly different, the doctors underestimating adherence in 29% of cases and overestimating it in 31% of cases compared to the patients' evaluation. Adherence measured by drug plasma concentration, despite being higher than expected from previously published reports, was in line with the patients' self-reported score but not the doctors' estimation. Finally, the patients' and the doctors' Helping Alliance scores were not related to adherence self-report.

  14. Treatment Adherence in a Lay Health Adviser Intervention to Treat Tobacco Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, N. E.; Ferketich, A. K.; Paskett, E. D.; Wewers, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Lay health advisers (LHAs) are increasingly used to deliver tobacco dependence treatment, especially with low-socioeconomic status (SES) populations. More information is needed about treatment adherence to help interpret mixed evidence of LHA intervention effectiveness. This study examined adherence to behavioral counseling and nicotine patches in…

  15. Is inconsistent pre-treatment bedtime related to CPAP non-adherence?

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Amy M; King, Tonya S; Sawyer, Douglas A; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-12-01

    Lack of adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) limits the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that an irregular bedtime would be negatively related to regular use of CPAP treatment. If so, modifying bedtime schedule may address the persistent problem of inconsistent CPAP use in adults with OSA. In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether inconsistent self-reported bedtime before initiation of CPAP treatment, operationalized as bedtime variability, was (1) different among those adherent (≥4 hours per night) and non-adherent to CPAP treatment at 1 week and 1 month; and/or (2) was related to 1-week and 1-month CPAP use when other variables were accounted for. Consecutively recruited newly diagnosed OSA adults (n = 79) completed sleep diaries prior to CPAP treatment. One-week and 1-month objective CPAP use data were collected. Pre-treatment bedtime variability was different among CPAP non-adherers and adherers at 1 month and was a significant predictor of non-adherence at 1 month in multi-variable analyses. The odds of 1-month CPAP non-adherence were 3.5 times greater in those whose pre-treatment bedtimes varied by >75 minutes. Addressing sleep schedule prior to CPAP initiation may be an opportunity to improve CPAP adherence.

  16. Barriers to treatment adherence in physiotherapy outpatient clinics: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Kirsten; McLean, Sionnadh Mairi; Moffett, Jennifer Klaber; Gardiner, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment can have negative effects on outcomes and healthcare cost. However, little is known about the barriers to treatment adherence within physiotherapy. The aim of this systematic review was to identify barriers to treatment adherence in patients typically managed in musculoskeletal physiotherapy outpatient settings and suggest strategies for reducing their impact. The review included twenty high quality studies investigating barriers to treatment adherence in musculoskeletal populations. There was strong evidence that poor treatment adherence was associated with low levels of physical activity at baseline or in previous weeks, low in-treatment adherence with exercise, low self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, helplessness, poor social support/activity, greater perceived number of barriers to exercise and increased pain levels during exercise. Strategies to overcome these barriers and improve adherence are considered. We found limited evidence for many factors and further high quality research is required to investigate the predictive validity of these potential barriers. Much of the available research has focussed on patient factors and additional research is required to investigate the barriers introduced by health professionals or health organisations, since these factors are also likely to influence patient adherence with treatment. PMID:20163979

  17. An Approach to Maximizing Treatment Adherence of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Disorders and Major Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, Robin Edward; Mian, Irfan A.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Mental health research has consistently focused on high rates of treatment non-adherence, and how inpatient programs and health professionals can effectively confront this reality. The literature has centred almost exclusively on adult populations. Unfortunately, psychotic and major mood disorders are serious and persistent mental health problems that are increasingly recognized as having an early onset, affecting children and adolescents. Method This article draws on a review of the literature and Habermas’s three domains of knowledge: technical, practical, and emancipatory. This article has incorporated current research, adherence theories, and the facilitation of the unique local expertise of health professionals to generate a framework. This framework is designed to teach health professionals working in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient units how they and the larger unit can practice to enhance patient treatment adherence during and after admission. Results A five-step approach to teach health professionals to enhance treatment adherence has been developed based on current research and educational theories and principles. Conclusion Health professionals working in child and adolescent psychiatry can practice to enhance patient treatment adherence, and improve patient and family outcomes. PMID:19030524

  18. Adherence to Interferon β-1b Treatment in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Oscar; Agüera, Javier; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Millán-Pascual, Javier; Ramió i Torrentà, Lluis; Oliva, Pedro; Argente, Javier; Berdei, Yasmina; Soler, Jose Maria; Carmona, Olga; Errea, Jose Maria; Farrés, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to interferon β-1b (INFβ-1b) therapy is essential to maximize the beneficial effects of treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS). For that reason, the main objectives of this study are to assess adherence to INFβ-1b in patients suffering from MS in Spain, and to identify the factors responsible for adherence in routine clinical practice. Methodology/Principal Findings This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study including 120 Spanish patients with MS under INFβ-1b treatment. Therapeutic adherence was assessed with Morisky-Green test and with the percentage of doses received. The proportion of adherent patients assessed by Morisky-Green test was 68.3%, being indicative of poor adherence. Nevertheless, the percentage of doses received, which was based on the number of injected medication, was 94.3%. The main reason for missing INFβ-1b injections was forgetting some of the administrations (64%). Therefore, interventions that diminish forgetfulness might have a positive effect in the proportion of adherent patients and in the percentage of doses received. In addition, age and comorbidities had a significant effect in the number of doses injected per month, and should be considered in the management of adherence in MS patients. Conclusion/Significance Among all the available methods for assessing adherence, the overall consumption of the intended dose has to be considered when addressing adherence. PMID:22615737

  19. Adherence as therapeutic citizenship: impact of the history of access to antiretroviral drugs on adherence to treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh-Kim; Ako, Cyriaque Yapo; Niamba, Pascal; Sylla, Aliou; Tiendrébéogo, Issoufou

    2007-10-01

    A dramatic increase in the use of antiretroviral drugs in Africa has increased focus on adherence to treatment, which has so far been equivalent if not superior to that in northern contexts. The reasons for this exceptional adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we examine adherence in the historical and ethnographic context of access to treatment in Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire and Mali. Living where there is no social security and minimal, if any, medical care, individuals diagnosed with HIV are faced with the threat of illness, death, ostracism and destitution, and were obliged to negotiate conflicting networks of obligation, reciprocity, and value. HIV and AIDS programmes value efforts to address social, and indeed biological, vulnerability. In contrast, kinship-based social relationships may value individuals in other ways. These conflicting moral economies often intersect in the worlds of people living with HIV. HIV status can be used to claim resources from the public or non-governmental organization programmes. This may interfere with social networks that are the most stable source of material and emotional support. Self-help and empowerment techniques provided effective tools for people living with HIV to fashion themselves into effective advocates. In the early years of the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), access to treatment was thus mediated by confessional practices and forms of social triage. We introduce the term 'therapeutic citizenship' to describe the way in which people living with HIV appropriate ART as a set of rights and responsibilities to negotiate these at times conflicting moral economies. Exemplary adherence should be viewed through the lens of therapeutic citizenship. PMID:18090265

  20. The Scale of Self-Efficacy Expectations of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment: A Tool for Identifying Risk for Non-Adherence to Treatment for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Drachler, Carlos Wietzke; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; de Carvalho Leite, José Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of risk for non-adherence to treatment is a challenge for personalized care for people living with HIV. Standardized questionnaires of patients’ expectations of their capability to overcome obstacles for treatment adherence may be used as a pre-screening for risk identification. A scale of self-efficacy expectations of adherence to antiretroviral treatment (SEA-ART scale) was previously developed. This study assesses the scale validity in predicting non-adherence to ART in adults living with HIV. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort study applied a 21-item SEA-ART scale to 275 adults in ART treatment at an outpatient public service for HIV in Southern Brazil. ART medications taken were assessed at one-month follow-up; ART adherence was devised as an intake of 95% and more of the prescribed medication. A SEA-ART score was calculated by adding up the scores of all items. Multivariable logistic regression and the Area Under the Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Curve (AUROC) were applied to examine the ability of the SEA-ART score to predict non-adherence at follow-up. The SEA-ART score varied from 21 to 105; mean 93.9; median 103.0. Non-adherence was 30.3% (n = 81/267). The odds of non-adherence was 8% lower for each unit increase of the SEA-ART score; after adjustment for age, sex, formal education and time in treatment (OR = 0.92; 95%CI 0.90–0.95; LRT for linear trend, p = 0.002). The AUROC was 0.80 (95%CI 0.73–0.87; p<0.001). The SEA-ART optimal cut-off value was 101, providing a sensitivity of 76.5%, a specificity of 73.1%, a positive predictive value of 55.4% and a negative predictive value of 87.7%. There was no evidence of difference in sensitivity, and specificity among groups organized by age, gender, formal education and time in treatment. Conclusions The SEA-ART scale appears to have a good capacity to discriminate between adherents and non-adherents at one-month follow-up. Further studies should confirm these results

  1. Adherence to treatment of chronic hepatitis C: from interferon containing regimens to interferon and ribavirin free regimens

    PubMed Central

    Younossi, Zobair M.; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Younossi, Youssef; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients’ experience during treatment may affect treatment adherence. Our aim was to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) on adherence to different anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) regimens. Clinical, demographic, and PRO data (short form-36 [SF-36], chronic liver disease questionnaire-hepatitis C version [CLDQ-HCV], functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue [FACIT-F], work productivity and activity impairment: specific health problem [WPAI:SHP]) from 13 multinational clinical trials of anti-HCV treatment were available. Treatment adherence was defined as >80% of prescribed doses taken. Included were 4825 HCV patients. Regimens were grouped into: interferon- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing (±sofosbuvir [SOF]), interferon-free RBV-containing (RBV + SOF ± ledipasvir [LDV]), and interferon-free RBV-free (LDV/SOF). The adherence to these regimens were 77.6%, 84.3%, and 96.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Nonadherent patients were more likely to be unemployed and to have a greater PRO impairment at baseline (up to −5.3% lower PRO scores, P < 0.0001). During treatment with interferon- or RBV-based regimens, nonadherent patients experienced lower PROs and had larger decrements from their baseline PRO scores. In contrast, there were no significant declines in PRO scores (all P > 0.05) for the small number of patients who were nonadherent to LDV/SOF. In multivariate analysis, being treatment-naive, longer treatment duration, and receiving an interferon- or RBV-containing regimen were associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (all P < 0.003). Better baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were associated with a higher likelihood of adherence to interferon and RBV. The use of interferon and/or RBV, longer duration of treatment, and lower baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were linked to a decreased likelihood of being adherent to interferon + RBV-containing or interferon-free RBV-containing antiviral

  2. Adherence to treatment of chronic hepatitis C: from interferon containing regimens to interferon and ribavirin free regimens.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Stepanova, Maria; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Younossi, Youssef; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Patients' experience during treatment may affect treatment adherence. Our aim was to assess the impact of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) on adherence to different anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) regimens.Clinical, demographic, and PRO data (short form-36 [SF-36], chronic liver disease questionnaire-hepatitis C version [CLDQ-HCV], functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue [FACIT-F], work productivity and activity impairment: specific health problem [WPAI:SHP]) from 13 multinational clinical trials of anti-HCV treatment were available. Treatment adherence was defined as >80% of prescribed doses taken.Included were 4825 HCV patients. Regimens were grouped into: interferon- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing (±sofosbuvir [SOF]), interferon-free RBV-containing (RBV + SOF ± ledipasvir [LDV]), and interferon-free RBV-free (LDV/SOF). The adherence to these regimens were 77.6%, 84.3%, and 96.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Nonadherent patients were more likely to be unemployed and to have a greater PRO impairment at baseline (up to -5.3% lower PRO scores, P < 0.0001). During treatment with interferon- or RBV-based regimens, nonadherent patients experienced lower PROs and had larger decrements from their baseline PRO scores. In contrast, there were no significant declines in PRO scores (all P > 0.05) for the small number of patients who were nonadherent to LDV/SOF. In multivariate analysis, being treatment-naive, longer treatment duration, and receiving an interferon- or RBV-containing regimen were associated with a lower likelihood of adherence (all P < 0.003). Better baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were associated with a higher likelihood of adherence to interferon and RBV.The use of interferon and/or RBV, longer duration of treatment, and lower baseline and on-treatment PRO scores were linked to a decreased likelihood of being adherent to interferon + RBV-containing or interferon-free RBV-containing antiviral regimens

  3. Strategies to optimize treatment adherence in adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Lara C; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    While development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a significant improvement in survival age, routine daily treatment for CF is complex, burdensome, and time intensive. Adolescence is a period of decline in pulmonary function in CF, and is also a time when adherence to prescribed treatment plans for CF tends to decrease. Challenges to adherence in adolescents with CF include decreased parental involvement, time management and significant treatment burden, and adolescent perceptions of the necessity and value of the treatments prescribed. Studies of interventions to improve adherence are limited and focus on education, without significant evidence of success. Smaller studies on behavioral techniques do not focus on adolescents. Other challenges for improving adherence in adolescents with CF include infection control practices limiting in-person interactions. This review focuses on the existing evidence base on adherence intervention in adolescents with CF. Future directions for efforts to optimize treatment adherence in adolescents with CF include reducing treatment burden, developing patient-driven technology to improve tracking, communication, and online support, and rethinking the CF health services model to include assessment of individualized adherence barriers. PMID:27799838

  4. Quality of life, clinical characteristics and treatment adherence of people living with HIV/AIDS1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Cristina de Oliveira e; Reis, Renata Karina; Nogueira, Jordana Almeida; Gir, Elucir

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS and verify its association with clinical characteristics and treatment adherence. METHOD: cross-sectional study conducted in a hospital in the state of Paraíba, Brazil. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical data. The quality of life scale proposed by the World Health Organization and a questionnaire to measure treatment adherence were used. RESULTS: of the 314 interviewees, 190 (60.5%) were male, aged 43 years on average, 121 (38.5%) had attended up to five years of schooling, 108 (34.4%) received up to two times the minimum wage, and 112 (35.7%) were on sick leave. In regard to clinical variables, individuals with an undetectable viral load scored higher in all the domains concerning quality of life, with statistically significant differences in three domains. Regarding treatment adherence, 235 (73.8%) presented poor adherence and those who strictly adhered to treatment obtained better scores in quality of life. The results show that quality of life is better among individuals adherent to ART. Supporting people to adhere to the antiretroviral treatment should be a persistent task of healthcare workers and other people participating in the treatment, such as family members and friends. PMID:25591095

  5. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  6. [Modifying habits and treatment adherence, essential for controlling the chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Pisano González, Marta M; González Pisano, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic adherence is defined as the extent to which a person's behavior (taking medications, following a diet and changes in lifestyle) coincides with health recommendations (WHO, 2004). We can deduce that is a multiple, complex and changing phenomenon, that there can be total or partial adherence to a treatment, and depending on timing and circumstances. Lack of adherence is a worrying problem; due to its great magnitude and complexity (over two hundred factors) it is responsible for the increased morbid-mortality, complications, hospital admissions, health costs, and dissatisfaction of the user and health professionals. In this paper we develop effective interventions in changing habits and improving adherence: cognitive (education and improved communication), behavior and motivation. Interventions areas include pharmacological treatments, habits and life style, as well as social and family support. The most effective model emphasizes self-care and self-responsibility of the user to manage their disease and increase adherence. PMID:24369770

  7. Association between Medication Adherence and Duration of Outpatient Treatment in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kikuyama, Hiroki; Ohta, Munehiro; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Okamura, Takehiko; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence is important in the treatment of schizophrenia, and critical periods during treatment may be associated with relapse. However, the relationship between adherence and duration of outpatient treatment (DOT) remains unclear. The authors aimed to clarify the relationship between adherence and DOT at a psychiatric hospital in Japan. Methods For outpatients with schizophrenia who regularly visit Shin-Abuyama hospital, the authors conducted a single questionnaire survey (five questions covering gender, age, DOT, medication shortages, and residual medication) over one month period. Participants were divided into two groups whether DOT were from more than one year to within five years or not. Mantel-Haenszel analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed on the data regarding the medication adherence. Results Effective answers were received for 328 patients. The residual medication rate was significantly higher among those receiving outpatient treatment from more than one year to within five years than five years than those receiving outpatient treatment for more than five years or less than one year (p=0.016). Conclusion This survey suggests that there are critical periods during which patients are most prone to poor adherence. Because poor adherence increases the risk of relapse, specific measures must be taken to improve adherence during these periods. PMID:27482242

  8. Improving Treatment Adherence in Bipolar Disorder: A Review of Current Psychosocial Treatment Efficacy and Recommendations for Future Treatment Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment adherence is a frequent problem in bipolar disorder, with research showing that more than 60% of bipolar patients are at least partially nonadherent to medications. Treatment nonadherence is consistently predictive of a number of negative outcomes in bipolar samples, and the discontinuation of mood stabilizers places these patients at…

  9. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L; Martin, Rosemarie A; Barton Laws, M; Wilson, Ira B

    2013-09-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection.

  10. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  11. Pharmacological interventions for ADHD: how do adolescent and adult patient beliefs and attitudes impact treatment adherence?

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to medication can be problematic for patients, especially so for patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Effective medications are available for the treatment of ADHD; however, nonadherence rates for ADHD medication range from 13.2%–64%. The reasons for nonadherence can be complex. This review aims to look at how the beliefs and attitudes of adolescents and adults impact ADHD treatment adherence. PMID:25284990

  12. Evaluation of adherence to oral antiviral hepatitis B treatment using structured questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Leesa; Selinger, Christian P; Lee, Alice Unah

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess adherence rates to nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUCs) therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection and determine factors associated with adherence. METHODS: The questionnaire study was conducted in the liver clinics at Concord Repatriation General Hospital. All patients who were currently taking one or more NUCs were asked to complete a structured, self-administered 32-item questionnaire. Adherence was measured using visual analogue scales. The patient’s treating clinician was also asked to assess their patient’s adherence via a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients completed the questionnaire. Sixty six percent of the patients (n = 49) reported optimal adherence whilst 25 (33.8%) graded their adherence to NUCs as suboptimal. Thirty four (43%) patients reported to have omitted taking their NUCs sometime in the past. Recent non-adherence was uncommon. Amongst the patients who reported skipping medications, the most common reason cited was ”forgetfulness“ (n = 27, 56.25%). Other common reasons included: ran out of medications (n = 5, 10.42%), being too busy (n = 4, 8.33%) and due to a change in daily routine (n = 5, 10.42%). Patients who reported low adherence to other prescription pills were also more likely to miss taking NUCs (P = 0.04). Patients who were under the care of a language-discordant clinician were also more likely to report suboptimal adherence to NUCs (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Adherence rates were much less than that expected by the physician and has potential adverse affect on long term outcome. Communication and education appear central and strategies need to be implemented to improve ongoing adherence. PMID:22400085

  13. Adherence to Concurrent Tuberculosis Treatment and Antiretroviral Treatment among Co-Infected Persons in South Africa, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Webb Mazinyo, Ernesha; Kim, Lindsay; Masuku, Sikhethiwe; Lancaster, Joey L.; Odendaal, Ronel; Uys, Margot; Podewils, Laura Jean; Van der Walt, Martie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces morbidity and mortality among persons co-infected with TB/HIV. We measured adherence and determined factors associated with non-adherence to concurrent TB treatment and ART among co-infected persons in two provinces in South Africa. Methods A convenience sample of 35 clinics providing integrated TB/HIV care was included due to financial and logistic considerations. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted among persons who received concurrent TB treatment and ART and who had a TB treatment outcome recorded during 1 January 2008–31 December 2010. Adherence to concurrent TB and HIV treatment was defined as: (1) taking ≥80% of TB prescribed doses by directly observed therapy (DOT) as noted in the patient card; and (2) taking >90% ART doses as documented in the ART medical record during the concurrent treatment period (period of time when the patient was prescribed both TB treatment and ART). Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify factors associated with non-adherence. Results Of the 1,252 persons receiving concurrent treatment, 138 (11.0%) were not adherent. Non-adherent persons were more likely to have extrapulmonary TB (RR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.60) and had not disclosed their HIV status (RR: 1.96, 95% CI: 1.96 to 3.76). Conclusions The majority of persons with TB/HIV were adherent to concurrent treatment. Close monitoring and support of persons with extrapulmonary TB and for persons who have not disclosed their HIV status may further improve adherence to concurrent TB and antiretroviral treatment. PMID:27442440

  14. Being as an iceberg: hypertensive treatment adherence experiences in southeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Dehghan, Mahlagha; Iranmanesh, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is often an important issue in the management of hypertension. Deep understanding of adherence behavior as well as its influential factors can expand knowledge about treatment adherence among hypertensives. Objective The aim of this study was to explore patients, their families, and healthcare providers’ experiences about hypertension treatment adherence in southeast of Iran. Design A qualitative study was conducted to explore the experience of patients, family members, and healthcare providers (n=18) by using a conventional content analysis. The purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected through semi-structured and deep interviews. Results Data analysis showed that hypertensive treatment adherence in an Iranian context is like an iceberg with two subthemes. The first subtheme relates to the upper and clear part of this iceberg and it consists of two categories, including 1) healthy and 2) unhealthy regimens. The second subtheme associates with under-water and unanticipated part and it consists of four categories, including 1) the nature of disease and treatment, 2) the individual resources, 3) the healthcare organization, and 4) the socio-cultural environment. Conclusions The treatment adherence features emerged in this study can be useful in designing and developing context-based hypertension interventions. Further qualitative and quantitative studies with a closer collaboration between the social, natural, and medical sciences in other Iranian populations are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:26395925

  15. Treatment Adherence in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Perceptions from Adolescent Patients and Their Families

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Kevin A.; Odell, Shannon; Sander, Emily; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barg, Frances K.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine patient- and parent-perceived factors that impact adherence to inflammatory bowel disease treatment using a qualitative descriptive individual interview approach. Sixteen adolescents and their parents were recruited from May through August 2007 and interviewed about medication adherence using an open-ended semi-structured interview format. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes. Parent-child dyads identified forgetting, interfering activities, parent-child conflict and oppositional behaviour, and inadequate planning for treatment as challenges to adherence. Participants reported that family support and good parent-child relationships, routines, monitoring and reminding, and organizational tools such as pill boxes facilitated treatment adherence. Other issues that emerged included immediacy of treatment effects and parent-adolescent responsibility for treatment. Patients and parents experience a number of challenges related to adherence within behavioural, educational, organizational, and health belief domains. Behavioural interventions should focus on these issues, reduction of perceived barriers, and effective transition of responsibility for treatment adherence. Future research considerations are discussed. PMID:21143544

  16. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    PubMed

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology.

  17. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  18. [HIV-AIDS medicine, antiretroviral treatment, adherence: a discussion about self-care].

    PubMed

    Margulies, Susana

    2012-01-01

    We propose a reflection on the role of biomedical and clinical action in the organization, promotion and legitimating of discourses and practices of self-care and control in the experience of HIV-AIDS disease. We analyze the conditions and requirements of the so-called "adherence" to antiretroviral treatment, which is of central importance in medical and health actions. Since medical intervention tends to associate viral progression to patient adherence, the "meeting of requirements" implies not only the certainty about medical indication but the very possibility of salvation. Through corporeal monitoring and the control of the interactions and practices of those affected, this medicalizing process directs their behavior, sets forms of discipline and imposes a responsible way to care for themselves. Thus, the power of biomedical institution is not only its ability to define a physical condition through diagnosis but also helps to establish the parameters of illness experience, reconfiguring the ways in which subjects understand and relate to themselves and others, producing new forms of identity, belongings and social relations.

  19. Internet-based adherence interventions for treatment of chronic disorders in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Alexandria M; Farhangian, Michael E; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is a ubiquitous challenge in medicine, particularly in the adolescent population with chronic disorders. Web-based adherence interventions may be particularly useful in adolescents, due to their familiarity with and frequent use of the Internet. Objective To review web-based interventions used to improve adherence to medication in adolescent patients with chronic disorders. Methods A PubMed search was performed for full-text, English, clinical trials in adolescents using keywords “adherence” or “compliance”, “Internet” or “web”, and “treatment” from inception until November 2014. Articles were selected if they involved using the Internet to provide support to adolescents to help improve their adherence to treatment, excluding those focused on solely providing medical services through the Internet and articles focusing on preventative care, rather than treatment of an illness. Results Fourteen studies were found concentrating on chronic adolescent disorders. Interventions included online surveys, physician chat lines, monitoring programs, and interactive programs. All interventions experienced either greater improvement in adherence or another disease control measure or no statistically significant difference compared with the control group (in-clinic visits). Limitations Few clinical trials studying web-based interventions to improve adherence in adolescents were found. Due to not having one standard outcome measured in all of the studies, it was also difficult comparing the effectiveness of the interventions. Conclusion Web-based interventions play a role in improving adherence in adolescents with chronic disorders by being more time saving and cost effective compared with in-clinic visits. Further research focusing on adherence interventions using the Internet is necessary to determine the ideal ways of utilizing the Internet to improve adherence in adolescents with chronic disorders. PMID:26113787

  20. Practical Strategies for Enhancing Adherence to Treatment Regimen in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenley, Rachel N.; Kunz, Jennifer H.; Walter, Jennifer; Hommel, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Promoting adherence to treatment among pediatric and adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a critical yet challenging task for health care providers. Several existing interventions to enhance adherence among individuals with IBD offer useful information about practical strategies to enhance adherence. The current review article has 3 goals. First, the review provides a context for understanding treatment regimen adherence in IBD by reviewing key definitional, measurement, and conceptual challenges in this area. Next, published studies focused on interventions to enhance adherence in IBD are briefly summarized, followed by a synthesis of practical adherence promotion strategies for use in IBD by health care providers. Strategies are distinguished by the level of evidence supporting their utility as well as by age group. Finally, recommendations for future research to facilitate the development and implementation of practical, evidence-based strategies for adherence promotion in IBD are provided. Findings from the literature review suggest that strategies including education, regimen simplification, and use of reminder systems and organizational strategies (e.g., pill boxes) are likely to be best suited for addressing accidental nonadherence. In contrast, addressing motivational issues, teaching problem-solving skills, and addressing problematic patterns of family functioning are more likely to benefit individuals displaying intentional nonadherence. PMID:23635715

  1. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country. PMID:27622461

  2. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fagundez, Gabriela; Perez-Freixo, Hugo; Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country. PMID:27622461

  3. Treatment Adherence of Tuberculosis Patients Attending Two Reference Units in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fagundez, Gabriela; Perez-Freixo, Hugo; Eyene, Juan; Momo, Juan Carlos; Biyé, Lucia; Esono, Teodoro; Ondó Mba Ayecab, Marcial; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar; Herrador, Zaida

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial Guinea has one of the highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Incomplete adherence to TB treatment has been identified as one of the most serious remaining problem in tuberculosis control. The following study is aimed at determining the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Equatorial Guinea and its determinants, as well as at assessing the knowledge of the people about the disease. In this cross-sectional study, participants were recruited by non-probabilistic consecutive sampling amongst patients who attended the reference units for TB in Bata and Malabo between March and July 2015. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Adherence to treatment and knowledge about TB were assessed by Morisky-Green-Levine and Batalla tests and a questionnaire on adherence related factors specifically prepared for this research. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize the data and bivariate analyses by adherence profile were performed with χ2 test for categorical data. A total of 98 patients with TB were interviewed. 63.27% of interviewees had good knowledge about TB (Batalla test) while 78.57% of respondents were adherent according to the Morisky-Green-Levine test. A low educational level, lack of family support and lack of medical advice about the disease were significantly associated to lower adherence level. Patients with re-infection (due to relapse or treatment failure) and those who have suffered from drug shortages were also less adherents. The National Programme for TB Control should consider improving the early diagnosis and follow-up of TB cases, as well as the implementation of all components of DOTS (Directly observed Treatment, short-course) strategy all over the country.

  4. Impact of socio-psychological factors on treatment adherence of TB patients in Russia.

    PubMed

    Jakubowiak, W M; Bogorodskaya, E M; Borisov, S E; Danilova, I D; Lomakina, O B; Kourbatova, E V

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of social and psychological factors on treatment adherence of patients with tuberculosis (TB). To this end a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among TB patients in four Russian regions (Orel, Vladimir, Belgorod oblasts, and Republic of Mari-El) from 01/04/2004 to 31/03/2005. A total of 87 non-adherent and 1302 adherent patients were interviewed. Compared to adherents, non-adherents were significantly more likely to be male, unemployed, have a technical college education, have a history of imprisonment, have a negative emotional status, consider themselves "not sick", not know the treatment period, have negative feelings and distrust for medical staff, not believe they will fully recover, and not want to continue treatment. Patients at highest risk for non-adherence should be identified at the start of treatment, and offered the services of a psychologist. A case management and patient-centered approach should be applied.

  5. The effect of different intervention programs on treatment adherence of HIV-infected children, a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Atie; Scherpbier, Henriette; Kuijpers, Taco; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2013-01-01

    In HIV-infected children, long-term adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) is difficult. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the effect of two different treatment adherence programs on treatment adherence (as indicated by cART failures) and the need for additional supportive care measures in a cohort of 31 HIV-infected children between 3 and 18 years of age. In a follow-up period of 6 years, we evaluated the treatment adherence at baseline (before introduction of any treatment adherence program in 2004) and compared this to cART failures during two treatment adherence programs (in respectively 2006 and 2009). The need for additional supportive care measures (the frequency of hospitalizations, daily observed treatment, use of child protection service, attendance of special schools, and placement in foster homes) was also evaluated at these three time points. The first treatment adherence program focused on increasing patient's obedience by imposing negative measures in case of treatment failure, whereas the second program aimed to increase treatment adherence by rewarding optimal medication intake. Prior to start of any treatment adherence intervention program, cART failures were observed in 29% of the pediatric patients. After introduction of the first treatment adherence program, cART failures decreased to 6%. During the second treatment adherence program, the cART failures remained equally low (10%), but the need for some specific additional supportive care measures (the frequency of hospitalizations and placement in foster homes) was importantly reduced. Treatment adherence programs are effective in increasing treatment adherence to cART in HIV-infected children. A novel reward treatment interventional program as an addition to social supportive care programs is a promising new positive enforcement program and can reduce the need for additional supportive care programs. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long

  6. Factors that influence treatment adherence of tuberculosis patients living in Java, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Widjanarko, Bagoes; Gompelman, Michelle; Dijkers, Maartje; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective: Due to nonadherence of tuberculosis (TB) patients to treatment, complications may arise and if remaining infectious, these patients may infect other people with TB. To obtain information about factors associated with nonadherence, we performed a study comparing adherent and nonadherent TB patients. Methods: Adherent and nonadherent patients randomly selected from hospital records in one urban and two rural districts were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires. Key informant interviews were done with TB nurses and doctors. Results: The most frequently mentioned reason for nonadherence to treatment was feeling better. Although the drugs were given free of charge, many patients were nonadherent because of lack of money. Social support was considered very important for adherence. The study indicated that some patients had a negative image about the health care staff, treatment, and quality of medication. Conclusion: Treatment adherence of TB patients receiving treatment in hospitals in Central Java might be improved by providing health education about treatment duration and side effects, facilitating procedures for receiving treatment free of charge and reducing costs of transportation and consultation. Qualified friendly health care staff able to motivate patients might further improve adherence. PMID:19936166

  7. Treatment modality preferences and adherence to group treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Michel; Julien, Dominic; White, Noé Djawn; Bélanger, Claude; Marchand, André; Katerelos, Theodora; Milton, Diana

    2014-06-01

    To examine the relationship between preference for group psychotherapy and adherence to group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for clients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA), 109 participants experiencing PDA completed a questionnaire measuring preference for group treatment (PGTQ) before beginning CBT groups. A t test was used to compare preference scores for group treatment to investigate whether participants who completed treatment differed from those who abandoned treatment. Participants who completed group therapy expressed higher preference for group treatment than participants who dropped out of treatment (t[107] = 1.99; p < 0.05). The PGTQ-4 presented adequate psychometric properties. Reliability analyses of the items retained after factorization demonstrated an acceptable level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of 0.76). Preference for individual or group therapy appears to impact treatment retention for patients with PDA. Matching patients' preferences to the type of treatment modality used appears to be pertinent, especially for the treatment of anxiety disorders. In terms of practical implications, the rationale and benefits of group therapy should be explained to participants reluctant to engage in group therapy. Individual intervention or a combination of group and individual treatment could be considered for clients who are likely to drop out of group therapy.

  8. Guideline adherence for the treatment of advanced schistosomiasis japonica in Hubei, China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fangying; Liu, Chenxi; Zhang, Xinping

    2014-12-01

    This study compared physicians' practices on three treatment procedures and hospitalization days with guideline recommendations to assess guideline adherence in the treatment of advanced schistosomiasis japonica. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate patients' characteristics and rate of guideline adherence. And chi-square tests were used to assess influences of severity of the disease on guideline adherence. The study found no one (0/173) adhered to adequate diagnosis, treatment regimens, and discharge criteria of guidelines completely. And 2.23% of patients in group 1 and 4.23% in group 2 were totally conforming to adequate diagnosis. 91.91% of patients were conforming to adequate treatment regimens among which group 1 and group 2 were 90.32 and 92.25%, respectively. And one (2.23%) patient in group 1 and zero (0%) in group 2 were conforming to discharge criteria of guidelines, and most of the patients left hospital without symptom checks (151/173), liver function and biochemical tests (169/173), and complication checks (91/173). Among 173 inpatients, rate of adequate hospitalization days was 36.42% (63/173). And chi-square test suggested no significant difference (P > 0.05) on guideline adherence in two groups, which implied both of critical and general patients' treatments should be stressed to comply with guidelines. There existed a large gap between guidelines and practices of the treatment of advanced schistosomiasis japonica.

  9. Patient adherence and treatment outcome with exposure and response prevention for OCD: Which components of adherence matter and who becomes well?

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Michael G; Galfalvy, Hanga; Steinman, Shari A; Wall, Melanie M; Foa, Edna B; Simpson, H Blair

    2016-10-01

    Exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) is an evidence-based treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet not all patients achieve wellness with EX/RP. The degree to which patients adhere to EX/RP procedures outside of sessions has been found to predict therapy outcomes, including who achieves post-treatment wellness. We sought to investigate which components of treatment adherence most relate to outcome and to develop adherence benchmarks to identify who does and does not become well to provide clinicians with prognostic tools. Adherence data came from 37 adult patients with DSM-IV OCD who received 17 sessions of EX/RP as part of a randomized controlled trial of augmentation strategies for incomplete response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). Therapists rated between-session patient adherence at each exposure session by quantifying: 1) the quantity of homework exposures attempted; 2) the quality of attempted exposures; and 3) the degree of success with response prevention. Each adherence item significantly correlated with post-treatment OCD severity. Success with response prevention proved particularly strongly linked to therapy outcome. Time course analysis of this item accurately identified, relatively early in treatment, who would achieve post-treatment wellness. These data provide an efficient method for differentiating between those patients who will and will not achieve wellness after EX/RP augmentation of SRIs. Limitations and clinical implications of the current findings are discussed. PMID:27497840

  10. Antiretroviral treatment adherence in childhood and adolescence: multidisciplinary team as an associated factor in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Crozatti, Marcia Terezinha Lonardoni; França-Junior, Ivan; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Carneiro Ferrão, Maria do Socorro; Brigido, Luis Fernando M; Della Negra, Marinella; Campéas, Alexandre Ely; Castilho Raymundo, Miriam Elia; Marques, Silvia Regina; Waldman, Eliseu Alves

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze factors associated with non-adherence to antiretroviral (ARV) treatment among children and adolescents. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving non-institutionalized children and adolescents between 2 and 20 years of age, addressing non-adherence to ARV treatment, which was defined as taking ≤89% of the medications on the day of the interview and the three previous days. The investigation into the association between non-compliance and the variables of interest was performed using unconditional logistic regression. The independent factors associated with non-adherence were forgetfulness (OR = 3.22; 95%CI = 1.75-5.92), difficulties coping with treatment (OR = 2.65; 95%CI = 1.03-6.79), and living with grandparents (OR = 2.28; 95%CI = 1.08-4.83), whereas a protective effect was found with participation in multidisciplinary activities (OR = 0.49; 95%CI = 0.25-0.96), i.e., this factor indicates that the exposure to the variable is beneficial, promoting adherence. We concluded that forgetting to take the medications and reporting having difficulty coping with ARV treatment are potentially modifiable factors through educational and programmatic actions. Residing with one's grandparents may strongly impact adherence to ARV treatment, indicating the need for the systematic support of these family members. Participation in multidisciplinary activities should be stimulated at health-care services.

  11. The relationship between beliefs about sleep and adherence to behavioral treatment combined with meditation for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Cvengros, Jamie A; Crawford, Megan R; Manber, Rachel; Ong, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    This study examined beliefs about sleep, as measured by the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (DBAS) scale, as predictors of adherence to 3 specific insomnia treatment recommendations: restriction of time spent in bed, maintenance of a consistent rise time, and completion of daily meditation practice. Higher DBAS scores predicted poorer adherence to restriction of time spent in bed and to maintenance of a prescribed rise time. DBAS scores were not associated with completion of daily meditation. These preliminary findings suggest that pre-treatment beliefs about sleep may impact patient engagement with behavioral recommendations regarding time in bed and consistent rise time during treatment for insomnia.

  12. The Introduction of Generic Aromatase Inhibitors and Treatment Adherence Among Medicare D Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Sailaja; Charlson, John A.; Wozniak, Erica M.; Smith, Elizabeth C.; Biggers, Alana; Smallwood, Alicia J.; Laud, Purushottam W.; Pezzin, Liliana E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) substantially reduce breast cancer mortality in clinical trials, but high rates of nonadherence to these long-term oral therapies have reduced their impact outside of trials. We examined the association of generic AI availability with AI adherence among a large national breast cancer cohort. Methods: Using a quasi-experimental prepost design, we examined the effect of generic AI introductions (7/2010 and 4/2011) on adherence among a national cohort of women with incident breast cancer in 2006 and 2007 who were enrolled in the Medicare D pharmaceutical coverage program. Medicare D claims were used to calculate AI adherence, defined as a medication possession ratio of 80% or more of eligible days, over 36 months. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated with generalized estimating equations were applied to longitudinal adherence data to control for possible confounders, including receipt of a Medicare D low-income subsidy, and to account for repeated measures. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Sixteen thousand four hundred sixty-two Medicare D enrollees were eligible. Adherence declined throughout the study. However, among women without a subsidy, the median quarterly out-of-pocket cost of anastrozole fell from $183 in the fourth quarter of 2009 to $15 in 2011, and declines in adherence were attenuated with generic AI introductions. Regression-adjusted adherence probabilities were estimated to be 5.4% higher after generic anastrozole was introduced in 2010 and 11% higher after generic letrozole/exemestane was introduced in 2011. Subsidy recipients had higher adherence rates throughout the study. Conclusions: The introduction of generic medications attenuated the decline in adherence to AIs over three years of treatment among breast cancer survivors not receiving low-income subsidies for Medicare D coverage. PMID:25971298

  13. Adherence to Plasmodium vivax malaria treatment in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients' adherence to malaria treatment is an important factor in determining the therapeutic response to anti-malarial drugs. It contributes to the patient's complete recovery and prevents the emergence of parasite resistance to anti-malarial drugs. In Brazil, the low compliance with malaria treatment probably explains the large number of Plasmodium vivax malaria relapses observed in the past years. The goal of this study was to estimate the proportion of patients adhering to the P. vivax malaria treatment with chloroquine + primaquine in the dosages recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Methods Patients who were being treated for P. vivax malaria with chloroquine plus primaquine were eligible for the study. On the seventh day of taking primaquine, they were visited at their home and were interviewed. The patients were classified as probably adherent, if they reported having taken all the medication as prescribed, in the correct period of time and dosage, and had no medication tablets remaining; probably non-adherent, if they reported not having taken the medication, in the correct period of time and dosage, and did not show any remaining tablets; and certainly non-adherent, if they showed any remaining medication tablets. Results 242 of the 280 patients reported having correctly followed the prescribed instructions and represented a treatment adherence frequency (CI95%) of 86.4% (81.7%-90.1%). Of the 38 patients who did not follow the recommendations, 27 (9.6%) were still taking the medication on the day of the interview and, therefore, still had primaquine tablets left in the blister pack. These patients were then classified as certainly non-adherent to treatment. Although 11 patients did not show any tablets left, they reported incorrect use of the prescribed therapy regimen and were considered as probably non-adherent to treatment. Conclusions Compliance with the P. vivax malaria treatment is a characteristic of 242/280 patients in the

  14. Understanding Factors Associated with Early Therapeutic Alliance in PTSD Treatment: Adherence, Childhood Sexual Abuse History, and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Stephanie M.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Therapeutic alliance has been associated with better treatment engagement, better adherence, and less dropout across various treatments and disorders. In treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it may be particularly important to establish a strong early alliance to facilitate treatment adherence. However, factors such as…

  15. Distress and Diabetes Treatment Adherence: A Mediating Role for Perceived Control

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Shreck, Erica; Psaros, Christina; Safren, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand independent pathways linking emotional distress, medication adherence and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes, as well as the potential mediating effects of perceived control over illness and self-efficacy. Methods Adults with type 2 diabetes (N = 142) were recruited for an intervention study evaluating cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression. Depressive symptom severity was assessed via semi-structured interview. Validated self-reports assessed diabetes-related distress, perceived control over diabetes (perceived control), self-efficacy for diabetes self-management and medication adherence. Glycemic control was evaluated by hemoglobin A1c (A1C). Only baseline data were included in correlational and linear regression analyses. Results Perceived control was an important mediator for both medication adherence and A1C outcomes. Specifically, regression analyses demonstrated that diabetes distress, but not depression severity, was significantly related to medication adherence and A1C. Self-efficacy and perceived control were also independently associated with medication adherence and A1C. Mediation analyses demonstrated a significant indirect effect for diabetes distress and medication adherence, through perceived control and self-efficacy. The relationship between distress and A1C was accounted for by an indirect effect through perceived control. Conclusion Results demonstrate that diabetes-related emotional distress is associated with poorer treatment adherence and glycemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes; these relationships were partially mediated through perceived control over diabetes. Perceptions of one’s personal ability to influence diabetes may be important in understanding the pathway between emotional distress and poor diabetes treatment outcomes. PMID:25110840

  16. Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E.; Dauber, Sarah; Barajas, Priscilla C.; Fried, Adam; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake,…

  17. Treatment Integrity Assessment: How Estimates of Adherence, Quality, and Exposure Influence Interpretation of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagermoser Sanetti, Lisa M.; Fallon, Lindsay M.

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of treatment integrity is important for determining the effectiveness of an intervention. Treatment integrity, a multidimensional construct, can be evaluated in two ways: by session or component. In this study, adherence, quality, and exposure data are estimated using permanent product data from implementation of the PAX Good…

  18. Contingency Management Treatments: Reinforcing Abstinence Versus Adherence with Goal-Related Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Hanson, Tressa; MacKinnon, Stephen; Rounsaville, Bruce; Sierra, Sean

    2006-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) interventions usually reinforce submission of drug-negative specimens, but they can also reinforce adherence with goal-related activities. This study compared the efficacy of the 2 approaches. Substance-abusing outpatients (N = 131) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 12-week treatments: standard treatment (ST), ST with CM…

  19. STIGMA, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND TREATMENT ADHERENCE AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS IN CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2016-01-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes) were negatively correlated with adherence to anti-retroviral regimens. Multiple linear regression indicated that total HIV-related stigma was more predictive of treatment adherence than any individual stigma type, after adjusting for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Tests of interaction showed that social support did not appear to moderate the association between HIV stigma and treatment adherence. Our findings suggest that community and government efforts to improve public perceptions about people living with HIV might promote treatment adherence behaviors among HIV-positive patients. PMID:25299810

  20. Pain Treatment and Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among Vulnerable HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Cicero, Theodore J.; Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; O'Grady, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain represents a significant source of morbidity, function loss, and decreased quality of life among people living with HIV. The present study examined the associations among pain, pain treatment, and ARV adherence among indigent, HIV-positive substance abusers. Participants were recruited via targeted sampling strategies, and completed a one-time computer-assisted personal interview. ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to analyze differences in demographics, health and psychological status, health behaviors, by pain and pain treatment status; a multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to examine the contribution of pain/treatment status to recent ARV adherence. Results indicated that those with untreated pain had lower odds of achieving gold-standard 95% ARV adherence as compared to the pain-free and treated pain groups; higher substance dependence symptoms were also associated with significantly lower odds of 95% ARV adherence. Findings suggest that pain management is critical to the health of people living with HIV, specifically those with high levels of co-morbid health and psychological problems. The prevalence of untreated pain was elevated among this group, and contributed to reduced ARV adherence. Providers of clinical care to disadvantaged HIV-positive patients should emphasize routine assessment and appropriate treatment of pain in order to provide comprehensive HIV care. PMID:24984142

  1. Stigma, social support, and treatment adherence among HIV-positive patients in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-10-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes) were negatively correlated with adherence to anti-retroviral regimens. Multiple linear regression indicated that total HIV-related stigma was more predictive of treatment adherence than any individual stigma type, after adjusting for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Tests of interaction showed that social support did not appear to moderate the association between HIV stigma and treatment adherence. Our findings suggest that community and government efforts to improve public perceptions about people living with HIV might promote treatment adherence behaviors among HIV-positive patients. PMID:25299810

  2. Motivation and Treatment Credibility Predicts Dropout, Treatment Adherence, and Clinical Outcomes in an Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Erik; Hursti, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Background In previous research, variables such as age, education, treatment credibility, and therapeutic alliance have shown to affect patients’ treatment adherence and outcome in Internet-based psychotherapy. A more detailed understanding of how such variables are associated with different measures of adherence and clinical outcomes may help in designing more effective online therapy. Objective The aims of this study were to investigate demographical, psychological, and treatment-specific variables that could predict dropout, treatment adherence, and treatment outcomes in a study of online relaxation for mild to moderate stress symptoms. Methods Participant dropout and attrition as well as data from self-report instruments completed before, during, and after the online relaxation program were analyzed. Multiple linear and logistical regression analyses were conducted to predict early dropout, overall attrition, online treatment progress, number of registered relaxation exercises, posttreatment symptom levels, and reliable improvement. Results Dropout was significantly predicted by treatment credibility, whereas overall attrition was associated with reporting a focus on immediate consequences and experiencing a low level of intrinsic motivation for the treatment. Treatment progress was predicted by education level and treatment credibility, whereas number of registered relaxation exercises was associated with experiencing intrinsic motivation for the treatment. Posttreatment stress symptoms were positively predicted by feeling external pressure to participate in the treatment and negatively predicted by treatment credibility. Reporting reliable symptom improvement after treatment was predicted by treatment credibility and therapeutic bond. Conclusions This study confirmed that treatment credibility and a good working alliance are factors associated with successful Internet-based psychotherapy. Further, the study showed that measuring adherence in different ways

  3. The association between medication adherence and treatment intensification with blood pressure control in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Stacie L; Powers, J David; Magid, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A; Margolis, Karen L; O'Connor, Patrick J; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Ho, P Michael

    2012-08-01

    Patients with resistant hypertension are at risk for poor outcomes. Medication adherence and intensification improve blood pressure (BP) control; however, little is known about these processes or their association with outcomes in resistant hypertension. This retrospective study included patients from 2002 to 2006 with incident hypertension from 2 health systems who developed resistant hypertension or uncontrolled BP despite adherence to ≥3 antihypertensive medications. Patterns of hypertension treatment, medication adherence (percentage of days covered), and treatment intensification (increase in medication class or dose) were described in the year after resistant hypertension identification. Then, the association between medication adherence and intensification with 1-year BP control was assessed controlling for patient characteristics. Of the 3550 patients with resistant hypertension, 49% were male, and mean age was 60 years. One year after resistance hypertension determination, fewer patients were taking diuretics (77.7% versus 92.2%; P<0.01), β-blockers (71.2% versus 79.4%; P<0.01), and angiotensinogen-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (64.8% versus 70.1%; P<0.01) compared with baseline. Rates of BP control improved over 1 year (22% versus 55%; P<0.01). During this year, adherence was not associated with 1-year BP control (adjusted odds ratio, 1.18 [95% CI: 0.94-1.47]). Treatment was intensified in 21.6% of visits with elevated BP. Increasing treatment intensity was associated with 1-year BP control (adjusted odds ratio, 1.64 [95% CI, 1.58-1.71]). In this cohort of patients with resistant hypertension, treatment intensification but not medication adherence was significantly associated with 1-year BP control. These findings highlight the need to investigate why patients with uncontrolled BP do not receive treatment intensification.

  4. HIV/AIDS Adherence: Teaching about Treatment and Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Jena Nicols

    2008-01-01

    Advances in HIV/AIDS treatment have dramatically changed the nature of HIV/AIDS education and prevention, creating new opportunities and challenges. This activity is designed to help participants reflect on the impact that HIV treatment can have on a person's life. It also enables trainers to engage participants in a dialogue about the impact of…

  5. How payment scheme affects patients’ adherence to medications? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Hamiza; Hatah, Ernieda; Makmor Bakry, Mohd; Islahudin, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Background A previous systematic review reported that increase in patients’ medication cost-sharing reduced patients’ adherence to medication. However, a study among patients with medication subsidies who received medication at no cost found that medication nonadherence was also high. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the influence of different medication payment schemes on patients’ medication adherence. Objective This study aims to review research reporting the influence of payment schemes and their association with patients’ medication adherence behavior. Methods This study was conducted using systematic review of published articles. Relevant published articles were located through three electronic databases Medline, ProQuest Medical Library, and ScienceDirect since inception to February 2015. Included articles were then reviewed and summarized narratively. Results Of the total of 2,683 articles located, 21 were included in the final analysis. There were four types of medication payment schemes reported in the included studies: 1) out-of-pocket expenditure or copayments; 2) drug coverage or insurance benefit; 3) prescription cap; and 4) medication subsidies. Our review found that patients with “lower self-paying constraint” were more likely to adhere to their medication (adherence rate ranged between 28.5% and 94.3%). Surprisingly, the adherence rate among patients who received medication as fully subsidized was similar (rate between 34% and 84.6%) as that of other payment schemes. The studies that evaluated patients with fully subsidized payment scheme found that the medication adherence was poor among patients with nonsevere illness. Conclusion Although medication adherence was improved with the reduction of cost-sharing such as lower copayment, higher drug coverage, and prescription cap, patients with full-medication subsidies payment scheme (received medication at no cost) were also found to have poor adherence to their medication. Future

  6. Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Claros, Joan M; de Pee, Saskia; Bloem, Martin W

    2014-10-01

    Food security and nutrition play an important role in HIV and TB care and treatment, including for improving treatment outcomes, adherence and uptake of HIV and TB care. This AIDS and behaviour supplement on "Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition" provides an overview of the current evidence and knowledge about the barriers to uptake and retention in HIV and TB treatment and care and on whether and how food and nutrition assistance can help overcome these barriers. It contains nine papers on three topic areas discussing: (a) adherence and food and nutrition security in context of HIV and TB, their definitions, measurement tools and the current situation; (b) food and nutrition insecurity as barriers to uptake and retention; and (c) food and nutrition assistance to increase uptake and retention in care and treatment. Future interventions in the areas of food security, nutrition and social protection for increasing access and adherence should be from an HIV sensitive lens, linking the continuum of care with health systems, food systems and the community, complementing existing platforms through partnerships and integrated services. PMID:25092515

  7. Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Claros, Joan M; de Pee, Saskia; Bloem, Martin W

    2014-10-01

    Food security and nutrition play an important role in HIV and TB care and treatment, including for improving treatment outcomes, adherence and uptake of HIV and TB care. This AIDS and behaviour supplement on "Adherence to HIV and TB care and treatment, the role of food security and nutrition" provides an overview of the current evidence and knowledge about the barriers to uptake and retention in HIV and TB treatment and care and on whether and how food and nutrition assistance can help overcome these barriers. It contains nine papers on three topic areas discussing: (a) adherence and food and nutrition security in context of HIV and TB, their definitions, measurement tools and the current situation; (b) food and nutrition insecurity as barriers to uptake and retention; and (c) food and nutrition assistance to increase uptake and retention in care and treatment. Future interventions in the areas of food security, nutrition and social protection for increasing access and adherence should be from an HIV sensitive lens, linking the continuum of care with health systems, food systems and the community, complementing existing platforms through partnerships and integrated services.

  8. Development of an adherence-enhancing intervention in topical treatment termed the topical treatment optimization program (TTOP).

    PubMed

    Reich, Kristian; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Karakasili, Eleni; Zschocke, Ina

    2014-09-01

    Psoriasis is a common, disabling, chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorder of the skin with a worldwide prevalence of 2-3 % in which adherence to treatment is often poor. The majority of individuals have limited disease that is being treated with topical medication according to existing guidelines. Adherence rates are lower for topical compared with systemic treatment. Low medication adherence is a major problem for patients with chronic disorders as it results in suboptimal treatment outcomes, increased risk for development of concomitant diseases, inefficient use of health resources and considerable losses to society. However, to date no adherence-enhancing intervention has been developed for psoriasis patients under topical treatment. In this article, we report the development of the topical treatment optimization program (TTOP). The TTOP intervention aims to improve the information given to the patients and to result in an engaged patient-physician relationship. Application of the TTOP intervention in daily clinical practice may lead to a significant increase of adherence and the successful management of psoriasis and other chronic skin disorders.

  9. Shared Treatment Decision Making Improves Adherence and Outcomes in Poorly Controlled Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Strub, Peg; Buist, A. Sonia; Knowles, Sarah B.; Lavori, Philip W.; Lapidus, Jodi; Vollmer, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Poor adherence to asthma controller medications results in poor treatment outcomes. Objectives: To compare controller medication adherence and clinical outcomes in 612 adults with poorly controlled asthma randomized to one of two different treatment decision-making models or to usual care. Methods: In shared decision making (SDM), nonphysician clinicians and patients negotiated a treatment regimen that accommodated patient goals and preferences. In clinician decision making, treatment was prescribed without specifically eliciting patient goals/preferences. The otherwise identical intervention protocols both provided asthma education and involved two in-person and three brief phone encounters. Measurements and Main Results: Refill adherence was measured using continuous medication acquisition (CMA) indices—the total days' supply acquired per year divided by 365 days. Cumulative controller medication dose was measured in beclomethasone canister equivalents. In follow-up Year 1, compared with usual care, SDM resulted in: significantly better controller adherence (CMA, 0.67 vs. 0.46; P < 0.0001) and long-acting β-agonist adherence (CMA, 0.51 vs. 0.40; P = 0.0225); higher cumulative controller medication dose (canister equivalent, 10.9 vs. 5.2; P < 0.0001); significantly better clinical outcomes (asthma-related quality of life, health care use, rescue medication use, asthma control, and lung function). In Year 2, compared with usual care, SDM resulted in significantly lower rescue medication use, the sole clinical outcome available for that year. Compared with clinician decision making, SDM resulted in: significantly better controller adherence (CMA, 0.67 vs. 0.59; P = 0.03) and long-acting β-agonist adherence (CMA, 0.51 vs. 0.41; P = 0.0143); higher cumulative controller dose (CMA, 10.9 vs. 9.1; P = 0.005); and quantitatively, but not significantly, better outcomes on all clinical measures. Conclusions: Negotiating patients' treatment decisions

  10. Health Behavior Theories and Research: Implications for Suicidal Individuals' Treatment Linkage and Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipson, Polly; King, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Treatment linkage and adherence to psychotherapeutic interventions can be challenging with suicidal individuals. Health behavior theories, specifically the Health Belief Model, Stages of Change, and Theory of Planned Behavior, focus on individuals' beliefs, their readiness to change, their perceptions of illness severity and "threat," their…

  11. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L.; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Laws, M. Barton; Wilson, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection. PMID:23370833

  12. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L; Martin, Rosemarie A; Barton Laws, M; Wilson, Ira B

    2013-09-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection. PMID:23370833

  13. Client Factors Affect Provider Adherence to Clinical Guidelines during First Antenatal Care

    PubMed Central

    Agyepong, Irene Akua; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P. A.; Kayode, Gbenga A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Ansah, Evelyn K

    2016-01-01

    Background The first antenatal clinic (ANC) visit helps to distinguish pregnant women who require standard care, from those with specific problems and so require special attention. There are protocols to guide care providers to provide optimal care to women during ANC. Our objectives were to determine the level of provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines in the Safe Motherhood Protocol (SMP), and assess patient factors that determine complete provider adherence. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of a cohort study that recruited women who delivered in eleven health facilities and who had utilized antenatal care services during their pregnancy in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. A record review of the first antenatal visit of participants was carried out to assess the level of adherence to the SMP, using a thirteen-point checklist. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and previous pregnancy history was collected using a questionnaire. Percentages of adherence levels and baseline characteristics were estimated and cluster-adjusted odds ratios (OR) calculated to identify determinants. Results A total of 948 women who had delivered in eleven public facilities were recruited with a mean age (SD) of 28.2 (5.4) years. Overall, complete adherence to guidelines pertained to only 48.1% of pregnant women. Providers were significantly more likely to completely adhere to guidelines when caring for multiparous women [OR = 5.43 (1.69–17.44), p<0.01] but less likely to do so when attending to women with history of previous pregnancy complications [OR = 0.50 (0.33–0.75), p<0.01]. Conclusion Complete provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines is low across different facility types in the Greater Accra region of Ghana and is determined by parity and history of previous pregnancy complication. Providers should be trained and supported to adhere to the guidelines during provision of care to all pregnant women. PMID:27322643

  14. Patients’ Depression Treatment Preferences and Initiation, Adherence, and Outcome: A Randomized Primary Care Study

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Patrick J.; Schulberg, Herbert C.; Heo, Moonseong; Klimstra, Sibel; Bruce, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We examined the association of treatment preferences with treatment initiation, adherence, and clinical outcome among depressed mid-life and elderly primary care patients. Methods 60 primary care participants meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depression were randomized to receive treatment congruent or incongruent with their primary stated preference. Participants received either 20 weeks of escitalopram as monitored by a care manager, or 12 weekly sessions of interpersonal psychotherapy followed by 2 monthly booster sessions. Adherence to treatment and depression severity were reassessed at weeks 4, 8, 12, and 24. Results Participants expressed stronger preferences for psychotherapy than antidepressant medication. Preference strength was a more sensitive measure of outcomes than congruence versus incongruence of preference with the assigned treatment. Across age groups, preference strength was significantly associated with treatment initiation and 12-week adherence rate, but not with depression severity or remission. Conclusions A continuous measure of preference strength may be a more useful measure in clinical practice than preferences per se. Future research should focus on whether and how greater facilitation of the patient-clinician treatment decision-making process influences clinical outcome. PMID:19252046

  15. Adherence to 7-Day Primaquine Treatment for the Radical Cure of P. vivax in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Grietens, Koen Peeters; Soto, Veronica; Erhart, Annette; Ribera, Joan Muela; Toomer, Elizabeth; Tenorio, Alex; Montalvo, Tanilu Grande; Rodriguez, Hugo; Cuentas, Alejandro Llanos; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Gamboa, Dionicia

    2010-01-01

    Despite being free of charge, treatment adherence to 7-day primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax was estimated at 62.2% among patients along the Iquitos-Nauta road in the Peruvian Amazon. The principal reason for non-adherence was the perceived adverse effects related to local humoral illness conceptions that hold that malaria produces a hot state of body, which is further aggravated by the characteristically hot medical treatment. Notably, patients were willing to adhere to the first 3 days of treatment during which symptoms are most apparent and include the characteristic chills. Nevertheless, as symptoms abate, the perceived aggravating characteristics of the medication outweigh the perceived advantages of treatment adherence. Improving community awareness about the role of primaquine to prevent further malaria transmission and fostering a realistic system of direct observed treatment intake, organized at community level, can be expected to improve adherence to the radical cure of P. vivax in this area. PMID:20519594

  16. Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment in a cessation trial among smokers in Aleppo, Syria

    PubMed Central

    Ben Taleb, Ziyad; Ward, Kenneth D; Asfar, Taghrid; Bahelah, Raed; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of evidence-based smoking cessation programs is in its infancy in developing countries, which continue to bear the main brunt of the tobacco epidemic. Adherence to treatment recommendations is an important determinant of the success of smoking cessation programs, but little is known about factors influencing adherence to either pharmacological or behavioral treatment in developing countries settings. Our study represents the first attempt to examine the predictors of adherence to cessation treatment in a low-income developing country. Methods Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment were identified by analyzing data from a multi-site, two-group, parallel-arm, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled smoking cessation trial in primary care clinics in Aleppo, Syria. Participants received 3 in-person behavioral counseling sessions plus 5 brief follow-up phone counseling sessions, and were randomized to either 6 weeks of nicotine or placebo patch. Results Of the 269 participants, 68% adhered to pharmacological treatment, while 70% adhered to behavioral counseling. In logistic regression modeling, lower adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment was associated with higher daily smoking at baseline, greater withdrawal symptoms, and perception of receiving placebo instead of active nicotine patch. Women showed lower adherence than men to behavioral treatment, while being assigned to placebo condition and baseline waterpipe use were associated with lower adherence to pharmacological treatment. Conclusion Adherence to cessation treatment for cigarette smokers in low-income countries such as Syria may benefit from integrated cessation components that provide intensive treatment for subjects with higher nicotine dependence, and address concurrent waterpipe use at all stages. PMID:26077603

  17. Surviving the aftershock: postearthquake access and adherence to HIV treatment among Haiti's tent residents.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Toorjo; Boucicaut, Edner; King, Charles; Doyle, Andrea; Shubert, Virginia

    2013-04-01

    In this research we examined how the conditions of Haiti's tent communities, inhabited by those displaced by the January 10, 2010, earthquake, shaped access and adherence to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for Haitians with HIV. Conditions in the encampments were marked by unhygienic and cramped living spaces, exposure to the elements, a lack of privacy, unavailability of food and clean water, and a dependence on poorly functioning aid agencies. These conditions shaped access and adherence to HAART by (a) exacerbating the stigma of being HIV positive and undermining mental health; (b) presenting logistical challenges to accessing medical care, storing pills, and ingesting them safely and privately; and (c) sustaining a political economy of aid characterized by unequal treatment in major HAART-dispensing centers, unequal circulation of international funds, and the emergence of alternative medical institutions within encampments that could improve future treatment. Policy and intervention implications are discussed.

  18. Adherence to Hospital Antibiotic Policy for Treatment of Escherichia coli ESBL in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, K. Gnana; Deshpande, Shreeram A.; Aravazhi, Anbu N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Escherichia coli are the most common uropathogen worldwide accounting for 80% of the Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs). Nosocomial infections caused by Multi-drug resistant Gram negative bacteria expressing Extended Spectrum β Lactamase enzyme, pose a serious therapeutic challenge to clinicians due to limited therapeutic options. Stringent adherence to Hospital Antibiotic Policy in treating Urinary Escherichia coli ESBLs is a borne necessity. Aim A clinical audit was undertaken in the form of a cross-sectional study to evaluate the compliance on appropriate antibiotic prescription and strict adherence to Hospital Antibiotic Policy for therapeutic management of the patients infected with urinary Escherichia coli ESBL producers. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional medical audit on adherence to treatment of Escherichia coli ESBL producers from in-patients diagnosed to have urinary tract infections for a duration of 7 months was conducted as a prospective study. Clinical data, culture and sensitivity reports of the patient diagnosed with urinary Escherichia coli ESBLs were compared with the treatment chart to ensure strict adherence to hospital antibiotic policy for appropriate therapy by physicians. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS version 20 software. Results The incidence of uncomplicated cystitis, pyelonephritis and complicated pyelonephritis cases were 65.24% (107 out of 164), 20.7% (34 out of 164) and 14.02% (23 out of 164) respectively. Resistance to individual fluoroquinolones like norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were found to be 60%, 59% and 47.5% respectively. As per hospital antibiotic policy, fluoroquinolones were prescribed in only 23% of the patients for the treatment of urinary Escherichia coli ESBLs. Conclusion Irrational utilization of antibiotics and non-adherence to antibiotic policy could have been the significant risk factors for drug resistance. Optimized antibiotic use, Microbiology laboratory support and periodic

  19. Predictors of Adherence to a 26-Week Viniyoga Intervention Among Post-Treatment Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cadmus-Bertram, Lisa; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Stovall, Rachael; Ceballos, Rachel M.; McGregor, Bonnie A.; Wang, Ching-Yun; Ramaprasad, Jaya; McTiernan, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study aimed to identify demographic, psychological, health-related, and geographic predictors of adherence to home-based and supervised components of a yoga intervention in breast cancer survivors. Methods Participants were the 32 post-treatment breast cancer survivors who were randomized to the Viniyoga intervention arm of a controlled trial. Participants were asked to practice yoga 5 times per week for 6 months, including at least one weekly facility-based session. Adherence was monitored using sign-in sheets and logs. Height and weight were measured; other potential predictors of adherence were obtained from baseline questionnaires. Results Participants attended 19.6±13.0 yoga classes and performed 55.8±32.8 home-based yoga sessions. Participants adhered to 58% of the overall yoga practice goal (75% of the goal for yoga classes and 54% of the goal for home based-sessions). Higher class attendance and home practice were predicted by greater self-efficacy for yoga (p=0.004 and 0.06, respectively). Additionally, employment outside the home was associated with greater class attendance (p=0.004), while higher waist circumference was marginally associated with lower adherence to home-based yoga (p=0.05). Conclusions High levels of facility- and home-based yoga practice were achieved. Breast cancer survivors who have lower self-efficacy for yoga or who have a higher waist circumference may benefit from additional support or intervention tailoring. Adherence may also be improved by ensuring that class times are convenient to both working and nonworking women. PMID:23663078

  20. Identification of validated questionnaires to measure adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Beatriz; Franco-Trigo, Lucía; Moullin, Joanna C; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; García-Corpas, José P

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to pharmacological treatments is one of the factors associated with poor blood pressure control. Questionnaires are an indirect measurement method that is both economic and easy to use. However, questionnaires should meet specific criteria, to minimize error and ensure reproducibility of results. Numerous studies have been conducted to design questionnaires that quantify adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether questionnaires fulfil the minimum requirements of validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to compile validated questionnaires measuring adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments that had at least one measure of validity and one measure of reliability. Methods A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [LILACS]). References from included articles were hand-searched. The included papers were all that were published in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish from the beginning of the database’s indexing until July 8, 2013, where a validation of a questionnaire (at least one demonstration of the validity and at least one of reliability) was performed to measure adherence to antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. Results A total of 234 potential papers were identified in the electronic database search; of these, 12 met the eligibility criteria. Within these 12 papers, six questionnaires were validated: the Morisky–Green–Levine; Brief Medication Questionnaire; Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale; Morisky Medication Adherence Scale; Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for Patients with Hypertension (TAQPH); and Martín–Bayarre–Grau. Questionnaire length ranged from four to 28 items. Internal consistency, assessed by Cronbach’s α, varied from 0

  1. Improving antibiotic adherence in treatment of acute upper respiratory infections: a quality improvement process

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Rittu; Mahmood, Maryam; Alweis, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 25 million people in the United States visit their primary care physician each year for acute respiratory infections (ARI). They are a common cause of unnecessary prescription of antibiotics; despite well-validated national treatment guidelines, around 73% of adults with ARI are prescribed antibiotics in the United States. Inappropriate use of antibiotics has profound implications. Methods Our aim was to increase adherence to antibiotic guidelines for treatment of ARI in an internal medicine outpatient practice. We used a package of active and passive interventions to improve physician awareness of treatment guidelines; these included short sessions of didactic teaching, antibiotic guidelines posters in patient examination rooms and staff areas, clinical decision support (CDS) tools integrated into the electronic medical record system, guideline adherence report cards for providers, and reiteration of CDS tool use and guideline adherence at monthly group meetings. Process measures were the rate of use of CDS tools for the management of ARI and patient callbacks within 72 h for the same issue. Outcome measures were compliance with antibiotic prescribing guidelines. Results Our low-cost interventions led to a significant improvement in ARI treatment guideline adherence. There was improvement in compliance with treatment guidelines for sinusitis (90.90% vs. 57.58%, p<0.001), pharyngitis (64.28% vs. 25.00%, p=0.003), upper respiratory infection (96.18% vs. 73.68%, p=0.008), and the aggregated measure of ARI (91.25% vs. 78.6%, p<0.001). Rate of CDS tool usage was 40.5% with a 72-h callback rate of 0.05%. Conclusion Simple, low-cost interventions can improve appropriate antibiotic use for ARI and change the prescribing habits of providers in an outpatient setting. Provider and patient education is a vital component of antibiotic stewardship. Simple interventions for common outpatient conditions can have a positive impact on patient outcomes and

  2. Spiritual and mind-body beliefs as barriers and motivators to HIV-treatment decision-making and medication adherence? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Ironson, Gail; Porr, Martina

    2009-02-01

    We examined spiritual/mind-body beliefs related to treatment decision-making and adherence in 79 HIV-positive people (35% female, 41% African American, 22% Latino, 24% White) who had been offered antiretroviral treatment by their physicians. Interviews (performed in 2003) identified spiritual/mind-body beliefs; the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) questionnaire assessed adherence and symptoms/side effects. Decision-making was influenced by health-related spiritual beliefs (e.g., calling on God/Higher Power for help/protection, God/Higher Power controls health) and mind-body beliefs (e.g., mind controls body, body tells when medication is needed). Participants believing God/Higher Power controls health were 4.75 times more likely to refuse, and participants with mind-body beliefs related to decision-making were 5.31 times more likely to defer antiretrovirals than those without those beliefs. Participants believing spirituality helps coping with side effects reported significantly better adherence and fewer symptoms/side effects. Fewer symptoms/side effects were significantly associated with the beliefs mind controls body, calling on God/Higher Power for help/protection, and spirituality helps adherence. Spiritual/mind-body beliefs as barriers or motivators to taking or adhering to treatment are important, since they may affect survival and quality of life of HIV-positive people.

  3. Spiritual and Mind–Body Beliefs as Barriers and Motivators to HIV-Treatment Decision-Making and Medication Adherence? A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ironson, Gail; Porr, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We examined spiritual/mind–body beliefs related to treatment decision-making and adherence in 79 HIV-positive people (35% female, 41% African American, 22% Latino, 24% White) who had been offered antiretroviral treatment by their physicians. Interviews (performed in 2003) identified spiritual/mind–body beliefs; the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) questionnaire assessed adherence and symptoms/side effects. Decision-making was influenced by health-related spiritual beliefs (e.g., calling on God/Higher Power for help/protection, God/Higher Power controls health) and mind–body beliefs (e.g., mind controls body, body tells when medication is needed). Participants believing God/Higher Power controls health were 4.75 times more likely to refuse, and participants with mind–body beliefs related to decision-making were 5.31 times more likely to defer antiretrovirals than those without those beliefs. Participants believing spirituality helps coping with side effects reported significantly better adherence and fewer symptoms/side effects. Fewer symptoms/side effects were significantly associated with the beliefs mind controls body, calling on God/Higher Power for help/protection, and spirituality helps adherence. Spiritual/mind–body beliefs as barriers or motivators to taking or adhering to treatment are important, since they may affect survival and quality of life of HIV-positive people. PMID:19133751

  4. Building capacity for rigorous controlled trials in autism: the importance of measuring treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    McConachie, H; Fletcher-Watson, S

    2015-03-01

    Research groups across Europe have been networking to share information and ideas about research on preschool children with autism. The paper describes preliminary work to develop capacity for future multi-site randomized controlled trials of early intervention, with a specific focus on the need to measure treatment adherence where parents deliver therapy. The paper includes a review of randomized and controlled studies of parent-mediated early intervention from two sources, a recent Cochrane Collaboration review and a mapping of European early intervention studies in autism published since 2002. The data extracted focused on methods for describing parent adherence, that is, how and to what extent parents carry out the strategies taught them by therapists. Less than half of the 32 studies reviewed included any measure of parent adherence. Only seven included a direct assessment method. The challenges of developing pan-European early intervention evaluation studies are discussed, including choice of intervention model and of important outcomes, the need for translation of measurement tools and achievement of joint training to reliability of assessors. Measurement of parent-child interaction style and of adherence to strategies taught need further study.

  5. Costs of pulmonary rehabilitation and predictors of adherence in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial.

    PubMed

    Fan, Vincent S; Giardino, Nicholas D; Blough, David K; Kaplan, Robert M; Ramsey, Scott D

    2008-04-01

    This study reports the costs associated with rehabilitation among participants in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), and evaluates factors associated with adherence to rehabilitation. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended for moderate-to-severe COPD and required by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) prior to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Between January 1998 and July 2002, 1,218 subjects with emphysema and severe airflow limitation (FEV(1) < or = 45% predicted) were randomized. Primary outcome measures were designated as mortality and maximal exercise capacity 2 years after randomization. Pre-randomization, estimated mean total cost per patient of rehabilitation was $2,218 (SD $314; 2006 dollars) for the medical group and $2,187 (SD $304) for the surgical group. Post-randomization, mean cost per patient in the medical and surgical groups was $766 and $962 respectively. Among patients who attended > or = 1 post-randomization rehabilitation session, LVRS patients, patients with an FEV(1) > or = 20% predicted, and higher education were significantly more likely to complete rehabilitation. Patients with depressive and anxiety symptoms, and those who live > 36 miles compared to < 6 miles away were less likely to be adherent. Patients who underwent LVRS completed more exercise sessions than those in the medical group and were more likely to be adherent with post-randomization rehabilitation. A better understanding of patient factors such as socioeconomic status, depression, anxiety and transportation issues may improve adherence to pulmonary rehabilitation.

  6. Concordance of Direct and Indirect Measures of Medication Adherence in A Treatment Trial for Cannabis Dependence.

    PubMed

    McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Baker, Nathaniel L; Sonne, Susan C; DeVane, C Lindsay; Wagner, Amanda; Norton, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    The current study compared adherence rates as measured by two indirect measurement methods (pill count and daily medication diary) to two direct measurement methods (urine riboflavin and serum 6-OH-buspirone level measurement) among participants (n = 109) in a medication treatment trial for cannabis dependence. Pill count and diary data showed high levels of percent agreement and strong kappa coefficients throughout the study. Riboflavin levels indicated lower level of percent in adherence during the study as compared to both pill count and self-report. In the subset of participants with 6-OH-buspirone levels (n = 58), the kappa coefficient also showed low to moderate agreement between the pill count and medication diaries with 6-OH-buspirone levels. In contrast to pill count and medication diaries, adherence as measured by riboflavin and 6-OH-buspirone significantly decreased over time. The findings from this study support previous work demonstrating that pill count and patient self-report of medication taking likely overestimate rates of medication adherence, and may become less reliable as the duration of a clinical trial increases. PMID:26028133

  7. An Analysis of Patient Adherence to Treatment during a 1-Year, Open-Label Study of OROS[R] Methylphenidate in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Zimmerman, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Treatment adherence is an important aspect of ADHD symptom management, but there are many factors that may influence adherence. Method: This analysis assessed adherence to OROS methylphenidate during a 1-year, open-label study in children. Adherence was defined as the number of days medication was taken divided by the number of days in…

  8. Sex Differences in Severity, Social Functioning, Adherence to Treatment, and Cognition of Adolescents with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have reported sex differences in the clinical presentation and outcome of adult patients with schizophrenia; the aim of present study was to compare the clinical characteristics, social functioning, adherence to treatment, and cognition of adolescents with this diagnosis in a six-month followup. Methods. A total of 87 adolescents with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), the Matrics Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP), and the Rating of Medication Influences (ROMI). Results. Both groups showed a similar improvement in all PANSS factors and in the PSP scores during the followup. Males better adhered to treatment. Females displayed better results in the area of social cognition (F = 6.3, df = 2,52, and p = 0.003) and attention/vigilance (F = 8.3, df = 2,51, and p = 0.001). Conclusions. Male and female adolescents showed similar clinical presentation and functioning but a different pattern of cognitive improvement and adherence to treatment. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov II3/02/0811.‏ PMID:27703813

  9. Factors associated with non-adherence to the treatment of vivax malaria in a rural community from the Brazilian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Eduardo Dias; Vieira, José Luiz Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION We investigated the association between demographic and behavioral factors and non-adherence to antimalarial therapy. METHODS A demographic questionnaire and 5-item self-reported questionnaire regarding non-adherence were completed by 135 patients after treatment for Plasmodium vivax. RESULTS Treatment interruption, but not demographic factors, was significantly associated with non-adherence to therapy. The likelihood of non-adherence was 5.16 times higher when the patients felt better than when they felt worse. The relative risk of parasitic resurgence was 3.04 times higher in non-adherent patients. CONCLUSIONS Treatment interruption is significantly associated with treatment adherence.

  10. Quality of life associated with treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Yolanda V; Prado-Aguilar, Carlos A; Rascón-Pacheco, Ramón A; Valdivia-Martínez, José J

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite certain contradictions, an association has been identified between adherence to drug treatment and the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. The contradictions observed emphasize the importance of using different methods to measure treatment adherence, or the association of psychological precursors of adherence with quality of life. For this reason, we have used an indirect method to measure adherence (pill count), as well as two adherence behaviour precursors (attitude and knowledge), to assess the association between adherence and the quality of life in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods A cross-sectional comparative study on a random sample of 238 type 2 diabetic patients was carried out over one year in four family medicine units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Treatment adherence was measured using the indirect method of pill count to assess adherence behaviour, obtaining information at two home visits. In the first we recorded the medicine prescribed and in the second, we counted the medicine remaining to determine the proportion of the medicine taken. We also assessed two adherence behaviour precursors: the patients' knowledge regarding their medical prescription measured through a structured questionnaire; and attitudes to treatment adherence using a Likert scale. Quality of life was measured through the WHOQOL-100 (the WHO Quality of Life questionnaire). Information concerning both knowledge and attitude was obtained through interviews with the patients. A multiple linear regression model was constructed to establish the relationship between each quality of life domain and the variables related to adherence, controlling for covariates. Results There was no association between quality of life and treatment adherence behaviour. However, the combination of strong knowledge and a positive attitude was associated with five of the six quality of life domains. Conclusion The results

  11. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  12. Concordance between two methods in measuring treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Simarro, Flora; Brotons, Carlos; Moral, Irene; Aguado-Jodar, Alba; Cols-Sagarra, Cèlia; Miravet-Jiménez, Sònia

    2016-01-01

    Objective We analyzed the concordance between two methods for measuring treatment adherence (TA) and studied the determinants of TA in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study in a primary care center, involving 320 diabetic patients. TA was measured using the Haynes–Sackett (H–S) adherence test during the patient interview and based on pharmacy refill data. TA was calculated globally and by drug groups (antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic drugs). Results Poor TA as measured by the H–S test was observed in 11.2% of the patients. Based on pharmacy refill data, there was a poor global TA rate of 30.3%, which was 33.3%, 26.6%, and 34.2% for oral antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and lipid-lowering drugs, respectively. Concordance between the two methods was poor. There was no relationship between the degree of disease control and TA as measured by the H–S test. Good TA measured based on pharmacy refill data for antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs was associated with lower glycosylated hemoglobin and diastolic blood pressure values, respectively. Patients with good global TA showed lower glycosylated hemoglobin, diastolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values. The multivariate analysis found good oral antidiabetic adherence to be associated to free pharmacy service; good antihypertensive drug adherence to the existence of comorbidities; and good lipid-lowering drug adherence to a history of ischemic heart disease, and a more experienced physician and/or female physician. Conclusion Concordance between the two methods in assessing TA was low. Approximately one-third of the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented poor TA in relation to antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidiabetic medication. An improved TA was associated with a better control of the studied parameters. Comorbidities, such as ischemic heart disease and access to free pharmacy service

  13. Challenging factors for enuresis treatment: Psychological problems and non-adherence.

    PubMed

    Van Herzeele, Charlotte; De Bruyne, Pauline; De Bruyne, Elke; Walle, Johan Vande

    2015-12-01

    The evidence for organic pathogenetic factors in enuresis and the discovery of effective therapies targeting the bladder and/or nocturnal diuresis have overwhelmed every potential role of psychological factors in pathogenesis and treatment. However, psychopathology is still important in enuresis because according to the document of the International Children's Continence Society (ICCS) 20-30% of the children with enuresis have at least one psychological/psychiatric disorder at rates two times higher than non-wetting children. The most common comorbid disorder with enuresis is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The aim of this review is to translate the existing evidence on the importance of a psychological screening into daily clinical practice of the medical practitioner. The use of the minimal psychological screening tool should be considered mandatory in each primary setting. If psychological problems are indicated, referral of the patient to a multidisciplinary setting should be considered, not only to allow psychological assessment to screen for a possible psychopathology, but also since therapy resistance might be expected. This review concentrates on two items from psychopathology/psychotherapy that might predict insufficient treatment response: the psychological comorbidities as described according to the DSM-5 criteria and the underestimated importance of therapy adherence. Adherence is a cornerstone of effective therapy in enuresis. It is a problem involving the doctor, the patient, and the parents. Increasing adherence takes effort and is time-consuming. But it is worthwhile knowing that several studies have demonstrated that high adherence is associated with high therapy success of enuresis. Eventually, this is the ultimate goal of treatment.

  14. Increasing Daily Water Intake and Fluid Adherence in Children Receiving Treatment for Retentive Encopresis

    PubMed Central

    Hoodin, Flora; Rice, Jennifer; Felt, Barbara T.; Rausch, Joseph R.; Patton, Susana R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy of an enhanced intervention (EI) compared to standard care (SC) in increasing daily water intake and fluid goal adherence in children seeking treatment for retentive encopresis. Methods Changes in beverage intake patterns and fluid adherence were examined by comparing 7-week diet diary data collected during participation in the EI to achieved data for families who had previously completed the SC. Results Compared to children in SC (n = 19), children in the EI (n = 18) demonstrated a significantly greater increase in daily water intake from baseline to the conclusion of treatment ( p ≤ .001), and were four and six times more likely to meet fluid targets in Phases 1 (Weeks 3–4) and 2 (Weeks 5–6) of fluid intervention, respectively (both p ≤ .001). Conclusions Enhanced education and behavioral strategies were efficacious in increasing children’s intake of water and improving fluid adherence. Future research should replicate the findings in a prospective randomized clinical trial to discern their effectiveness. PMID:20439348

  15. Crack cocaine use and adherence to antiretroviral treatment among HIV-infected black women.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Tanya Telfair; Lee, Lisa M; Nakashima, Allyn K; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Fleming, Patricia L

    2004-04-01

    Since the appearance of crack cocaine in the 1980s, unprecedented numbers of women have become addicted. A disproportionate number of female crack users are Black and poor. We analyzed interview data of HIV-infected women > or = 18 years of age reported to 12 health departments between July 1997 and December 2000 to ascertain if Black women reported crack use more than other HIV-infected women and to examine the relationship between crack use and antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among Black women. Of 1655 HIV-infected women, 585 (35%) were nonusers of drugs, 694 (42%) were users of other drugs and 376 (23%) were crack users. Of the 1196 (72%) Black women, 306 (26%) were crack users. We used logistic regression to examine the effect of crack use on adherence to ART, controlling for age and education among Black women. In multivariate analysis, crack users and users of other drugs were less likely than non-users to take their ART medicines exactly as prescribed (odds ratio [OR] = 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.24-0.56), OR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.36-0.68), respectively. HIV-infected Black women substance users, especially crack cocaine users, may require sustained treatment and counseling to help them reduce substance use and adhere to ART.

  16. Translation and validation of the Persian version of the treatment adherence questionnaire for patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Mahlagha; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Iranmanesh, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is a global public health crisis. Poorly controlled high blood pressure is one of the major factors contributed to this crisis. As lack of treatment adherence is often considered the main reason for this failure, the Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for Patient with Hypertension (TAQPH) was developed. Since this questionnaire should be reliable and strongly valid to be used in clinics and research, this study was performed to test the reliability and validity of the TAQPH. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted to validate the Persian version of TAQPH after using a modified forward/backward translation procedure. A total of 330 hypertensive patients were participated in this study. Construct and criterion validity, Cronbach¢s alpha, and test-retest reliability were used to validate the Persian scale. RESULTS Data analysis showed that the scale had excellent stability (intraclass correlation = 0.95) and good acceptability of internal consistency (α = 0.80). The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was meaningful but was not confirmed with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The scale score was correlated with Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) score (Ρ = 0.27). CONCLUSION In total, most of the psychometric properties of the 25-item P-TAQHP achieved the standard level and were sufficient to recommend for general use. PMID:27429627

  17. Barriers and facilitators to patients' adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Zambia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sanjobo, Nawa; Frich, Jan C; Fretheim, Atle

    2008-09-01

    Patients' adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important for effective medical treatment of HIV/AIDS. We conducted a qualitative interview study in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia in 2006. The aim of the study was to explore patients' and health care professionals' perceived barriers and facilitators to patients' adherence to ART. Based on data from individual interviews and focus group interviews with a total of 60 patients and 12 health care professionals, we identified barriers and facilitators related to patients' beliefs and behaviours, the health service, and socio-economic and cultural factors. Among the barriers we identified were lack of communication and information about ART, inadequate time during consultations, lack of follow-up and counselling, forgetfulness, stigma, discrimination and disclosure of HIV status, lack of confidentiality in the treatment centres, and lack of nutritional support. Feeling better, prospects of living longer, family support, information about ART, support for income-generating activities, disclosure of HIV status, prayers and transport support were among the facilitators. Our study suggests that several issues need to be considered when providing ART. Further research is needed to study interactions between patients and their health care providers. Our findings can inform interventions to improve adherence to ART.

  18. [Prevalence of anti-hypertensive treatment adherence in patients with resistant hypertension and validation of three indirect methods for assessing treatment adherence].

    PubMed

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Melo, André Nascimento de; Nogueira, Armando R

    2008-12-01

    This study estimated adherence to anti-hypertensive medication using three indirect methods and their combinations in a cohort of patients with resistant hypertension in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2005. The methods used were: self-reported adherence; physicians' adherence evaluation; and the Morisky-Green test (MGT) translated into Portuguese. The predictive validation was performed comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, measured on two different occasions, from patients classified as adherent or not. The means were compared using non-parametric tests. Two hundred patients were interviewed. Mean age was 63 years (SD = 10.3), and 73.5% were female. Adherence prevalence was 51% using MGT, 52% according to the physician, and 80.5% according to the patient. Adherent patients showed a reduction in both office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure, while non-adherent patients did not. The use of more than one method to evaluate adherence showed that non-adherent individuals according to the three methods (11.9%) had the worst evolution in blood pressure levels. This finding suggests that resistant hypertension cannot be attributed exclusively to low adherence. PMID:19082292

  19. Improved in vitro assay for determining the mucin adherence of bacteria sensitive to Triton X-100 treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsilia, Varvara; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2015-09-01

    Mucin-associated microbiota are in relatively close contact with the intestinal epithelium and may thus have a more pronounced effect on host health. We have previously developed a simple mucin agar assay to simulate initial mucus colonization by intestinal microbial communities. Adherence of microbiota was estimated using flow cytometry after detachment with Triton X-100. In this study, the effect of this detergent on the cultivability of both virulent and commensal strains was investigated. Mucin attachment of selected strains was evaluated using the mucin adhesion assay. Bacteria were dislodged from the mucin surface by incubation with Triton or from the whole mucin agar layer using a stomacher. Mechanical extraction resulted in 1.24 ± 0.42, 2.69 ± 0.44, and 1.56 ± 0.85 log CFU/mL higher plate counts of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli strains, respectively, than the chemical method. The sensitivity of bacteria to Triton varied among microbial species and strains. Among others, Triton inhibited the growth of Salmonella enterica LMG 10396 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa LMG 8029 on laboratory media, although these bacteria maintained their viability during this treatment. Only Gram-positive strains, Enterococcus hirae LMG 6399 and L. rhamnosus GG, were not affected by this detergent. Therefore, the mechanical method is recommended for the extraction of mucin-adhered bacteria that are sensitive to Triton, especially when followed by traditional cultivation techniques. However, this approach can also be recommended for strains that are not affected by this detergent, because it resulted in higher recovery of adhered L. rhamnosus GG compared to the chemical extraction.

  20. Teriflunomide for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: patient preference and adherence.

    PubMed

    Bayas, Antonios; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is the most common neurological disorder leading to disability in young adulthood. In the last 2 decades, numerous treatments for relapsing-remitting MS have been approved with eleven treatment options available worldwide. One of the determinants in treatment selection is disease activity in the individual patient. However, patient preferences play an increasingly major role in treatment decision making. With teriflunomide, a reversible inhibitor of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a new oral therapeutic option, given once daily, has been approved within the last 2 years by the regulatory agencies. The current review focuses on characteristics of the drug relevant for patients' preferences in the treatment decision process in the light of the available medications. Perceiving and considering patients' preferences will have an effect on treatment adherence, which is known to be often low in MS patients. Teriflunomide-related adherence issues will also be discussed regarding mode of application, dosing, and potential side effects. PMID:25709412

  1. Process and treatment adherence factors in group cognitive-behavioral therapy for partner violent men.

    PubMed

    Taft, Casey T; Murphy, Christopher M; King, Daniel W; Musser, Peter H; DeDeyn, Judith M

    2003-08-01

    This study used multilevel modeling to examine process and treatment adherence factors as predictors of collateral partner reports of abuse following participation in a cognitive-behavioral grouptreatment program for partner violent men (N = 107). Therapist working alliance ratings predicted lower levels of physical and psychological abuse at the 6-month follow-up and were the strongest predictors of outcome. Homework compliance partially mediated associations between early alliance ratings and psychological abuse at follow-up. Greater group cohesion during treatment, assessed byclient report, also predicted lower physical and psychological abuse at follow-up. The findings support the promotion of a collaborative therapeutic environment to induce change among partner violent men.

  2. The causal effect of opioid substitution treatment on HAART medication refill adherence

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Min, Jeong E.; Colley, Guillaume; Lima, Viviane D.; Yip, Benita; Milloy, M.-J.S.; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background People who inject drugs (PWID) account for roughly 13% of the prevalent HIV/AIDS population outside of sub-Saharan Africa, and access to opioid substitution treatment (OST) is limited in many settings globally. OST likely facilitates access to HAART, yet sparse evidence is available to support this hypothesis. Our objective was to determine the causal impact of OST exposure on HAART adherence among HIV-positive PWID in a Canadian setting. Methods We executed a retrospective cohort study using linked population-level data for British Columbia, Canada (January 1996–March 2010). We considered HIV-positive PWID after meeting HAART initiation criteria. A marginal structural model was estimated on a monthly timescale using inverse probability of treatment weights. The primary outcome was 95% HAART adherence, according to pharmacy refill compliance. Exposure to OST was defined as 95% of OST receipt, and we controlled for a range of fixed and time-varying covariates. Results Our study included 1852 (63.3%) HIV-positive PWID with a median follow-up of 5.5 years; 34% were female and 39% had previously accessed OST. The baseline covariate-adjusted odds of HAART adherence following OST exposure was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.72–2.24), although the adjusted odds estimated within the marginal structural model was 1.68 (1.48–1.92). Findings were robust to sensitivity analyses on model specification. Conclusion In a setting characterized by universal healthcare and widespread access to both office-based OST and HAART, OST substantially increased the odds of HAART adherence. This underlines the need to address barriers to OST globally to reduce the disease burden of both opioid dependence and HIV/AIDS. PMID:25915170

  3. Patterns of geographic mobility predict barriers to engagement in HIV care and antiretroviral treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara S; Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A; Khan, Shah Z; Garduño, L Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  4. Patterns of Geographic Mobility Predict Barriers to Engagement in HIV Care and Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A.; Khan, Shah Z.; Garduño, L. Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  5. Correlates of Adherence and Treatment Failure Among Kenyan Patients on Long-term Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Washingtone; Kitawi, Rose C.; Nzomo, Timothy J.; Mwatelah, Ruth S.; Kimulwo, Maureen J.; Ochieng, Dorothy J.; Kinyua, Joyceline; Lagat, Nancy; Onyango, Kevin O.; Lwembe, Raphael M.; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Ogutu, Bernhards R.; Oloo, Florence A.; Aman, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Background Universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is still elusive in most developing nations. We asked whether peer support influenced adherence and treatment outcome and if a single viral load (VL) could define treatment failure in a resource-limited setting. Methods A multi-center longitudinal and cross-sectional survey of VL, CD4 T-cells and adherence in 546 patients receiving HAART for up to 228 months. VL and CD4 counts were determined using m2000 Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay and FACS respectively. Adherence was assessed based on pill-count and on self-report. Results Respectively, 55.8%, 22.2% and 22% of the patients had good, fair and poor adherence. Adherence, peer support and regimen but not HIV disclosure, age or gender, independently correlated with VL and durability of treatment in a multivariate analysis (p<0.001). Treatment failure was 35.9% using sequential VL but ranged between 27% and 35% using alternate single VL cross-sectional definitions. More patients failed stavudine (41.2%) than zidovudine (37.4%) or tenofovir (28.8%, P=0.043) treatment arms. Peer support correlated positively with adherence (χ2, p<0.001), with non-adherence highest in the stavudine arm. VL before the time of regimen switch was comparable between patients switching and those not switching treatment. Moreover, 36% of those switching still failed second-line regimen. Conclusion Weak adherence support and inaccessible VL testing threaten to compromise the success of HAART scale-up in Kenya. To hasten ART monitoring and decision-making, we suggest strengthening patient-focused adherence programs, optimizing and aligning regimen to WHO standards, and a single point-of-care VL testing when multiple tests are unavailable. PMID:26009836

  6. Peer mentors, mobile phone and pills: collective monitoring and adherence in Kenyatta National Hospital's HIV treatment programme

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Kenyan state joined the international commitment to make antiretroviral treatment free in public health institutions to people infected with HIV. Less than a decade later, treatment has reached over 60% of those who need it in Kenya. This paper, which is based on an in-depth ethnographic case study of the HIV treatment programme at Kenyatta National Hospital, conducted intermittently between 2008 and 2014, examines how HIV-positive peer mentors encourage and track adherence to treatment regimens within and beyond the clinic walls using mobile phones and computer technology. This research into the everyday practices of patient monitoring demonstrates that both surveillance and adherence are collective activities. Peer mentors provide counselling services, follow up people who stray from treatment regimens, and perform a range of other tasks related to patient management and treatment adherence. Despite peer mentors’ involvement in many tasks key to encouraging optimal adherence, their role is rarely acknowledged by co-workers, hospital administrators, or public health officials. Following a biomedical paradigm, adherence at Kenyatta and in Kenya is framed by programme administrators as something individual clients must do and for which they must be held accountable. This framing simultaneously conceals the sociality of adherence and undervalues the work of peer mentors in treatment programmes. PMID:25175291

  7. Adherence to treatment in a Western European paediatric population with haemophilia: reliability and validity of the VERITAS-Pro scale.

    PubMed

    Lock, J; Raat, H; Duncan, N; Shapiro, A; Beijlevelt, M; Peters, M; Tamminga, R Y J; Leebeek, F W G; Moll, H A; Cnossen, M H

    2014-09-01

    Treatment adherence in haemophilia is strongly associated with quality of life and the cost-benefit of treatment. Therefore, it is important to quantify and monitor it. This study aimed to validate a translation of the VERITAS-Pro cross-culturally and analyse treatment adherence in a Dutch population of paediatric haemophilia patients. Children aged 1-18 years with haemophilia were included from three Haemophilia Treatment Centres, on prophylactic clotting factor replacement therapy for more than 1 year. Parents and adolescents were analysed separately. The adherence scale for prophylactic therapy (VERITAS-Pro) was translated according to international guidelines. This instrument contains a total of six subscales ('Time', 'Dose', 'Plan', 'Remember', 'Skip' and 'Communicate') each with four items. Lower scores reflect higher adherence. Overall response rate was 85%, leading to a study population of 60 children. Mean age was 10 years (SD 4.1). Internal consistency reliability: Mean Cronbach's alphas were adequate (>0.70) for total score and the subscales 'Skip' and 'Communicate'. Item-own subscale correlations were stronger than most item-other subscale correlations. Convergent validity: Total scores were higher for non-adherent participants compared with adherent participants according to patient infusion logs (n = 48; P < 0.05). Test-retest correlations: Significant for all scales except 'Dose' (n = 58; P < 0.01). This study demonstrates applicability of VERITAS-Pro outside the United States, as total score and most subscales effectively quantified treatment adherence in a Dutch paediatric population on prophylactic therapy. Non-adherent respondents' total scores were significantly higher, demonstrating the ability of VERITAS-Pro to identify non-adherent individuals.

  8. Mobile phone text messaging for promoting adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile phone text messaging (SMS) has the potential to promote adherence to tuberculosis treatment. This systematic review aims to synthesize current evidence on the effectiveness of SMS interventions in improving patients’ adherence to tuberculosis treatment. Methods We searched electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index), reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings, and selected websites for eligible studies available by 15 February 2013; regardless of language or publication status. Two authors independently screened selected eligible studies, and assessed risk of bias in included studies; resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus. Results We identified four studies that compared the outcomes of the SMS intervention group with controls. Only one of the four studies was a randomized controlled trial. This was conducted in Argentina and the SMS intervention did not significantly improve adherence to tuberculosis treatment compared to self-administration of tuberculosis treatment (risk ratio [RR] 1.49, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.90 to 2.42). One of the non-randomized studies, conducted in South Africa, which compared SMS reminders to directly observed therapy short course (DOTS) reported similar rates of tuberculosis cure (62.35% vs. 66.4%) and treatment success (72.94% vs. 69.4%). A second study from South Africa, utilized SMS reminders when patients delayed in opening their pill bottles and reported increased tuberculosis cure (RR 2.32, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.36) and smear conversion (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.42) rates compared to DOTS. In the third non-randomized study, conducted in Kenya, use of SMS reminders increased rates of clinic attendance on scheduled days compared to standard care (RR 1.56, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.29). Using the GRADE approach, we rate the quality of the evidence as low, mainly because of the high risk of bias and heterogeneity of effects across studies. Conclusions This systematic

  9. Low concentration of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) affects biofilm formation of Listeria monocytogenes by inhibiting its initial adherence.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuhua; Gu, Weimin; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2012-02-01

    The distribution and survival of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is associated with its biofilm formation ability, which is affected by various environmental factors. Here we present the first evidence that EDTA at low concentration levels inhibits the biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes. This effect of EDTA is not caused by a general growth inhibition, as 0.1 mM EDTA efficiently reduced the biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes without affecting the planktonic growth. Adding 0.1 mM of EDTA at the starting time of biofilm formation had the strongest biofilm inhibitory effect, while the addition of EDTA after 8 h had no biofilm inhibitory effects. EDTA was shown to inhibit cell-to-surface interactions and cell-to-cell interactions, which at least partially contributed to the repressed initial adherence. The addition of sufficient amounts of cations to saturate EDTA did not restore the biofilm formation, indicating the biofilm inhibition was not due to the chelating properties of EDTA. The study suggests that EDTA functions in the early stage of biofilm process by affecting the initial adherence of L. monocytogenes cells onto abiotic surfaces.

  10. Health literacy in HIV treatment: accurate understanding of key biological treatment principles is not required for good ART adherence.

    PubMed

    Laws, M Barton; Danielewicz, Michael; Rana, Aadia; Kogelman, Laura; Wilson, Ira B

    2015-04-01

    Findings on the relationship between health literacy and outcomes in HIV have been inconsistent. Health literacy has previously been operationalized as general functional literacy, but has not included content knowledge about HIV disease and treatment. Semi-structured interviews with people living with HIV in 2 U.S. cities, including questions about the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of HIV. We compared responses to biomedical conceptions. The 32 respondents were demographically diverse. Although most understood that HIV degrades the immune system, none could explain the nature of a virus, or the mechanism of antiretroviral (ARV) drug action. Fewer than half accurately reported that it is desirable to have a high CD4+ cell count and low viral load. A minority understood the concept of drug resistance. While most believed that strict adherence to ARV regimens was important to maintain health, three believed that periodic treatment interruption was beneficial, and three believed they should not take ARVs when they used alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents generally had very limited, and often inaccurate biomedical understanding of HIV disease. Most reported good regimen adherence but did not have any mechanistic rationale for it. The failure to find a consistent relationship between health literacy and ARV adherence may be largely because most people simply follow their doctors' instructions, without the need for deep understanding.

  11. Health Literacy in HIV Treatment: Accurate Understanding of Key Biological Treatment Principles is Not Required for Good ART Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Laws, M. Barton; Danielewicz, Michael; Rana, Aadia; Kogelman, Laura; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    Findings on the relationship between health literacy and outcomes in HIV have been inconsistent. Health literacy has previously been operationalized as general functional literacy, but has not included content knowledge about HIV disease and treatment. Semi-structured interviews with people living with HIV in 2 U.S. cities, including questions about the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of HIV. We compared responses to biomedical conceptions. The 32 respondents were demographically diverse. Although most understood that HIV degrades the immune system, none could explain the nature of a virus, or the mechanism of antiretroviral (ARV) drug action. Fewer than half accurately reported that it is desirable to have a high CD4+ cell count and low viral load. A minority understood the concept of drug resistance. While most believed that strict adherence to ARV regimens was important to maintain health, three believed that periodic treatment interruption was beneficial, and three believed they should not take ARVs when they used alcohol or illicit drugs. Respondents generally had very limited, and often inaccurate biomedical understanding of HIV disease. Most reported good regimen adherence but did not have any mechanistic rationale for it. The failure to find a consistent relationship between health literacy and ARV adherence may be largely because most people simply follow their doctors’ instructions, without the need for deep understanding. PMID:25354736

  12. Screening for non-adherence to antihypertensive treatment as a part of the diagnostic pathway to renal denervation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, P; Gupta, P K C; White, C M J; Stanley, A G; Williams, B; Tomaszewski, M

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is a potential therapeutic option for resistant hypertension. A thorough clinical assessment to exclude reversible/spurious causes of resistance to antihypertensive therapy is required prior to this procedure. The extent to which non-adherence to antihypertensive treatment contributes to apparent resistance to antihypertensive therapy in patients considered for renal denervation is not known. Patients (n=34) referred for renal denervation entered the evaluation pathway that included screening for adherence to antihypertensive treatment by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based urine analysis. Biochemical non-adherence to antihypertensive treatment was the most common cause of non-eligibility for renal denervation—23.5% of patients were either partially or completely non-adherent to prescribed antihypertensive treatment. About 5.9% of those referred for renal denervation had admitted non-adherence prior to performing the screening test. Suboptimal pharmacological treatment of hypertension and ‘white-coat effect' accounted for apparently resistant hypertension in a further 17.7 and 5.9% of patients, respectively. Taken together, these three causes of pseudo-resistant hypertension accounted for 52.9% of patients referred for renal denervation. Only 14.7% of referred patients were ultimately deemed eligible for renal denervation. Without biochemical screening for therapeutic non-adherence, the eligibility rate for renal denervation would have been 38.2%. Non-adherence to antihypertensive treatment and other forms of therapeutic pseudo-resistance are by far the most common reason of ‘resistant hypertension' in patients referred for renal denervation. We suggest that inclusion of biochemical screening for non-adherence to antihypertensive treatment may be helpful in evaluation of patients with ‘resistant hypertension' prior to consideration of renal denervation. PMID:26446393

  13. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Cardoso, Claudete A. Araújo; Darmont, Mariana Q.; Dickstein, Paulo; Bastos, Francisco I.; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D.; Fabbro, Marcia D’All; Fonseca, Rosana; Monteiro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers’ role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV). Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors. PMID:27338431

  14. Trends in Antihypertensive Medication Discontinuation and Low Adherence Among Medicare Beneficiaries Initiating Treatment From 2007 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Tajeu, Gabriel S; Kent, Shia T; Kronish, Ian M; Huang, Lei; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Bress, Adam P; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Low antihypertensive medication adherence is common. During recent years, the impact of low medication adherence on increased morbidity and healthcare costs has become more recognized, leading to interventions aimed at improving adherence. We analyzed a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries initiating antihypertensive medication between 2007 and 2012 to assess whether reductions occurred in discontinuation and low adherence. Discontinuation was defined as having no days of antihypertensive medication supply for the final 90 days of the 365 days after initiation. Low adherence was defined as having a proportion of days covered <80% during the 365 days after initiation among beneficiaries who did not discontinue treatment. Between 2007 and 2012, 41 135 Medicare beneficiaries in the 5% sample initiated antihypertensive medication. Discontinuation was stable during the study period (21.0% in 2007 and 21.3% in 2012; P-trend=0.451). Low adherence decreased from 37.4% in 2007 to 31.7% in 2012 (P-trend<0.001). After multivariable adjustment, the relative risk of low adherence for beneficiaries initiating treatment in 2012 versus in 2007 was 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.92). Low adherence was more common among racial/ethnic minorities, beneficiaries with Medicaid buy-in (an indicator of low income), and those with polypharmacy, and was less common among females, beneficiaries initiating antihypertensive medication with multiple classes or a 90-day prescription fill, with dementia, a history of stroke, and those who reached the Medicare Part D coverage gap in the previous year. In conclusion, low adherence to antihypertensive medication has decreased among Medicare beneficiaries; however, rates of discontinuation and low adherence remain high. PMID:27432867

  15. Improvement of health-related quality of life and adherence to treatment with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel in patients with psoriasis vulgaris*

    PubMed Central

    Kontochristopoulos, George; Kouris, Anargyros; Chantzaras, Athanasios; Petridis, Athanasios; Yfantopoulos, John

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a common, chronic, recurrent, immune-mediated disorder of the skin and joints. It can have a significant negative impact on the physical, emotional and psychosocial wellbeing of affected patients. OBJECTIVES To measure improvement in health-related QoL (HRQoL) in Greek patients with psoriasis vulgaris after a month of treatment with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel; and evaluate adherence to treatment parameters. METHODS The study included 394 psoriasis vulgaris patients from 16 private dermatological practices in Greece, all treated with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel. They were evaluated at the first visit and after 4 weeks. Moreover, they completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), while other data such as disease severity, subjective symptoms and adherence, were collected. RESULTS At week 4, the DLQI median was reduced by 3.5 points from the baseline (p<0.001; baseline and week 4 median: 4.5 and 1.0 respectively). Pruritus and sleep disorders also improved (p<0.001). Furthermore, 90.1% of the subjects fully adhered to treatment, with a 97.1% mean level of compliance. CONCLUSIONS The convincing clinical results, with a distinct improvement in HRQoL, plus the high level of adherence due to its advantageous physical properties, make the calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate gel formulation an important, effective and well-tolerated topical therapy to treat psoriasis. PMID:27192514

  16. Treatment adherence and other patient-reported outcomes as cost determinants in multiple sclerosis: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lizán, Luis; Comellas, Marta; Paz, Silvia; Poveda, José Luis; Meletiche, Dennis M; Polanco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is one of the key factors for achieving optimal clinical outcomes. In order to assess costs related to adherence to, and persistence and compliance with, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a narrative review of the literature was performed. Satisfaction with and preference for DMTs and their delivery devices were also assessed, as both can have an influence on patients’ adherence and persistence. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, congress proceedings) were searched to identify publications analyzing MS costs related to adherence, persistence, satisfaction, and preferences for MS treatments. Bibliographic references were hand searched. English or Spanish studies published between January 2007 and January 2013 were selected. Results A total of 398 titles were identified, of which 12 met the inclusion criteria. Six studies evaluated the impact of adherence, persistence, and compliance on treatment costs; four publications analyzed satisfaction with DMTs; and two assessed treatment preferences based on attributes of the delivery device. Increased adherence and persistence were associated with better clinical outcomes, leading to lower relapse risk (odds ratio [OR]: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59–0.85) and a decrease in health care resource use, such as MS-related hospitalizations (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47–0.83) and emergency department visits (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.60–1.07). This reduction in resource use led to a patient/year total cost reduction (excluding DMT costs) of up to 22%. Conclusion This review highlights the importance of ensuring adequate adherence in MS patients through treatments and devices better tailored to patients’ needs that could enhance clinical outcomes and reduce MS costs. Understanding the factors underlying satisfaction and compliance with treatment and patients’ preference for certain therapies could help in the development

  17. Improved long-term antiretroviral treatment outcomes amongst patients receiving community-based adherence support in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Mothibi, Eula; Shaikh, Najma; Grimwood, Ashraf

    2016-11-01

    Retaining high levels of patients in care who are virally suppressed over long treatment periods has been an important challenge for antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, the region having the highest HIV burden globally. Clinic-linked community-based adherence support (CBAS) programmes provide home-based adherence and psychosocial support for ART patients. However, there is little evidence of their longer-term impact. This study assessed the effectiveness of CBAS after eight years of ART. CBAS workers are lay healthcare personnel providing regular adherence and psychosocial support for ART patients and their households through home visits addressing household challenges affecting adherence. A multicentre cohort study using routinely collected data was undertaken at six public ART sites in a high HIV-prevalence South African district. Patient retention, loss to follow-up (LTFU), viral suppression and CD4 cell restoration were compared between patients with and without CBAS, using competing-risks regression, linear mixed models and log-binomial regression. 3861 patients were included, of whom 1616 (41.9%) received CBAS. Over 14,792 patient-years of observation, the cumulative incidence of LTFU was 37.3% and 46.2% amongst patients with and without CBAS, respectively, following 8 years of ART; adjusted subhazard ratio (CBAS vs. no CBAS) = 0.74 (95% CI: 0.66-0.84; P < .0001). Amongst patients on ART for 6.5-8 years, proportions not achieving viral suppression were 11.4% and 19.4% in patients with and without CBAS, respectively; adjusted risk ratio = 0.47 (95% CI: 0.26-0.86; P = .015). Annual CD4 cell increases from baseline were 62.8 cells/µL/year and 51.5 cells/µL/year amongst patients with and without CBAS, respectively, after 6.5 years or more (P = .034). After adjustment, annual CD4 cell recovery was 15.1 cells/µL/year (95% CI: 2.7-27.6) greater in CBAS patients (P = .017). ART patients who received CBAS had

  18. Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment, Sputum Smear Conversion and Mortality: A Retrospective Cohort Study in 48 Rwandan Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Mugisha, Veronicah; De Naeyer, Ludwig; Gasana, Michel; Cobelens, Frank; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to treatment and sputum smear conversion after 2 months of treatment are thought to be important for successful outcome of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Methods Retrospective cohort study of new adult TB patients diagnosed in the first quarter of 2007 at 48 clinics in Rwanda. Data were abstracted from TB registers and individual treatment charts. Logistic regression analysis was done to examine associations between baseline demographic and clinical factors and three outcomes adherence, sputum smear conversion at two months, and death. Results Out of 725 eligible patients the treatment chart was retrieved for 581 (80%). Fifty-six (10%) of these patients took <90% of doses (defined as poor adherence). Baseline demographic characteristics were not associated with adherence to TB treatment, but adherence was lower among HIV patients not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART); p = 0.03). Sputum smear results around 2 months after start of treatment were available for 220 of 311 initially sputum-smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB+) patients (71%); 175 (80%) had achieved sputum smear conversion. In multivariable analysis, baseline sputum smear grade (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7, 95% Confidence interval [CI] 1.1–6.6 comparing smear 3+ against 1+) and HIV infection (OR 3.0, 95%CI 1.3–6.7) were independent predictors for non-conversion at 2 months. Sixty-nine of 574 patients (12%) with known TB treatment outcomes had died. Besides other known determinants, poor adherence had an independent, strong effect on mortality (OR 3.4, 95%CI 1.4–7.8). Conclusion HIV infection is an important independent predictor of failure of sputum smear conversion at 2 months among PTB+ patients. Poor adherence to TB treatment is an important independent determinant of mortality. PMID:24066053

  19. Understanding treatment non-adherence in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a survey of what service users do and why

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately half of service users with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder do not fully follow treatment recommendations. Studies of adherence have not adequately explored the frequency, consequences and meanings of non-adherence behaviours from service users’ perspectives. This study contributes to a more fine-grained understanding of treatment choices and the support service users require in order to maximise benefit from their medications. Methods This was a mixed-methods questionnaire study, employing quantitative and thematic qualitative analyses. Thirty-five individuals with a diagnosis of, and receiving psycho-pharmaceutical treatment for, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder answered online or telephone questions about whether, how, and why they deviated from their treatment recommendations, and what support they currently and would like to receive. Results Over half of participants identified themselves as being non-adherent, however when asked in detail about intentional and unintentional adherence, 77% reported deviating from treatment recommendations. Critically, 29% were non-adherent and satisfied with being so. Service users’ satisfaction with their support was positively correlated with satisfaction with their medication. Participants’ made treatment choices in order to live well. Both side-effects and symptoms could be obstacles to adherence, but feeling well also impacted on participants’ treatment choices. Treatment choices were often made in the context of living well day-to-day, and did not necessarily take into account longer-term effects of non-adherence. Participants wanted more information about their medications, better emotional support (including better access to psychological therapies) and stability in their relationships with health professionals. Conclusions This study suggests that non-adherence, both intentional and unintentional, is common amongst individuals with diagnoses of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and

  20. Persistence and adherence in multiple sclerosis patients starting glatiramer acetate treatment: assessment of relationship with care received from multiple disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Lemmens, Wim A; Hupperts, Raymond; Hoogervorst, Erwin LJ; Schrijver, Hans M; Slettenaar, Astrid; de Schryver, Els L; Boringa, Jan; van Noort, Esther; Donders, Rogier

    2016-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis patients, the persistence of, and adherence to, disease-modifying treatment are often insufficient. The degree of persistence and adherence may relate to the care received from various disciplines. Methods In an observational study of 203 patients treated with glatiramer acetate 20 mg subcutaneous daily, we assess the persistence and adherence in relation to the amount of care received in various disciplines. The frequencies and durations of care per discipline were reported by patients online, as were missed doses and eventual treatment discontinuation. The associations between the care provided by neurologists, nurses, psychologists, pharmacists, and rehabilitative doctors and persistence and adherence were the primary outcomes; the associations between care received from general practitioners, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, social workers, dieticians, home caregivers, informal caregivers, other medical specialists, and other caregivers and persistence and adherence were secondary outcomes. Results It was found that the 12-month persistence rate was 62% and that 85% of the persistent patients were 95% adherent (missed <5% of doses). Patients who discontinued treatment in the fourth quarter (Q) had received less-frequent and shorter psychological care in Q3 than persistent patients (P=0.0018 and P=0.0022). Adherent patients had received more frequent home care and informal care than nonadherent patients (P=0.0074 and P=0.0198), as well as longer home care and informal care (P=0.0074 and P=0.0318). Associations between care in other disciplines and persistence or adherence were not observed. As to the relationship between adherence and persistence, nonadherence in Q2 was related to discontinuation after Q2 (P=0.0001). Conclusion We obtained no evidence that, in multiple sclerosis patients, persistence of and adherence to disease-modifying treatment are associated with the amount of neurological, nursing, pharmaceutical

  1. Patient Outcomes According to Adherence to Treatment Guidelines for Rhythm Control of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dingxin; Leef, George; Alam, Mian Bilal; Rattan, Rohit; Munir, Mohamad Bilal; Patel, Divyang; Khattak, Furqan; Vaghasia, Nishit; Adelstein, Evan; Jain, Sandeep K.; Saba, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background Although guidelines for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in atrial fibrillation (AF) were published in 2006, it remains uncertain whether adherence to these guidelines affects patient outcomes. Methods and Results We retrospectively evaluated the records of 5976 consecutive AF patients who were prescribed at least 1 antiarrhythmic drug between 2006 and 2013. Patients with 1 or more prescribed antiarrhythmic drugs that did not comply with guideline recommendations comprised the non–guideline‐directed group (=2920); the remainder constituted the guideline‐directed group (=3056). Time to events was assessed using the survival analysis method and adjusted for covariates using Cox regression. Rates of adherence to the guidelines increased significantly with a higher degree of prescriber specialization in arrhythmias (49%, 55%, and 60% for primary care physicians, general cardiologists, and cardiac electrophysiologists, respectively, P=0.001) for the first prescribed antiarrhythmic drug. Compared to the non–guideline‐directed group, the guideline‐directed group had higher rates of heart failure, but lower baseline CHADS2‐VASc scores (P<0.001) and lower rates of coronary artery disease, valvular disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, pulmonary disease, and renal insufficiency (P<0.05 for all). During 45±26 months follow‐up, the guideline‐directed group had a lower risk of AF recurrence (hazard ratio=0.86, 95% CI=0.80 to 0.93), fewer hospital admissions for AF (hazard ratio=0.87, 95% CI=0.79 to 0.97), and fewer procedures for recurrent AF, including electrical cardioversion, pacemaker implantation, and atrioventricular nodal ablation (P<0.01 for all). The mortality and stroke risks were similar between the groups. Conclusions Adherence to published guidelines in the antiarrhythmic management of AF is associated with improved patient outcomes. PMID:25845930

  2. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  3. A Systematic Review of Individual and Contextual Factors Affecting ART Initiation, Adherence, and Retention for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Ian; Plummer, Mary L.; Konopka, Sarah N.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories. Results Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman’s awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child’s health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes. Conclusions To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in

  4. Factors affecting treatment outcomes in drug-resistant tuberculosis cases in the Northern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E; Draper, H R; Baitsiwe, P; Claassens, M M

    2014-09-21

    The Northern Cape Province has low cure rates (21%) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We audited the programme to identify factors affecting treatment outcomes. Cases admitted to two drug-resistant TB units from 2007 to 2009 had data extracted from clinical folders. Unfavourable treatment outcomes were found in 58% of the 272 cases. A multivariable regression analysis found that male sex was associated with unfavourable outcome (P = 0.009). Weight at diagnosis (P < 0.001) and oral drug adherence (P < 0.001) were also associated with an unfavourable outcome; however, injectable drug adherence was not (P = 0.395). Positive baseline smear and human immunodeficiency virus positive status were not associated with unfavourable outcome. Shorter, more patient-friendly regimens may go a long way to improving adherence and outcomes.

  5. Random effects logistic models for analysing efficacy of a longitudinal randomized treatment with non-adherence.

    PubMed

    Small, Dylan S; Ten Have, Thomas R; Joffe, Marshall M; Cheng, Jing

    2006-06-30

    We present a random effects logistic approach for estimating the efficacy of treatment for compliers in a randomized trial with treatment non-adherence and longitudinal binary outcomes. We use our approach to analyse a primary care depression intervention trial. The use of a random effects model to estimate efficacy supplements intent-to-treat longitudinal analyses based on random effects logistic models that are commonly used in primary care depression research. Our estimation approach is an extension of Nagelkerke et al.'s instrumental variables approximation for cross-sectional binary outcomes. Our approach is easily implementable with standard random effects logistic regression software. We show through a simulation study that our approach provides reasonably accurate inferences for the setting of the depression trial under model assumptions. We also evaluate the sensitivity of our approach to model assumptions for the depression trial.

  6. Development and validation of an instrument to assess treatment adherence for each individual drug taken by a patient

    PubMed Central

    Sidorkiewicz, Stéphanie; Tran, Viet-Thi; Cousyn, Cécile; Perrodeau, Elodie; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate an instrument to assess adherence to each individual drug taken by patients undergoing long-term treatment. Design Multicentre prospective observational validation study. Setting Six general practitioners' clinics and 6 university hospitals in Paris, France. Participants Patients 18 years and older receiving at least one long-term treatment. Methods The instrument was developed from a literature search and interviews with experts. Clarity and wording were assessed during pilot testing with 51 patients. The tool was validated in a sample of consecutive patients. We assessed agreement between adherence measured with our tool and drug diaries and compared measurements from our instrument with (1) the Lu instrument; (2) the Adherence Estimator (AE); (3) patient's adherence assessed by physicians; (4) the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items (MMAS-4); and (5) the Treatment Burden Questionnaire (TBQ). Reliability was assessed by a test–retest method. Results A total of 243 patients taking 961 drugs were recruited in 2014. We found good agreement between adherence measured by our tool and drug diaries (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.69, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.91) and a linear relationship between measurement with our tool and (1) the Lu instrument (p<0.01); (2) 2 items of the AE (perceived need for medication (p<0.01) and concerns about medication (p<0.01)); (3) patients' adherence assessed by their physicians (p<0.01); (4) the MMAS-4 (p<0.01) and (5) the TBQ (p<0.01). Reliability of the retest was good (ICC 0.67, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.85). Conclusions We developed an instrument with acceptable validity and reliability to assess adherence for each drug taken by patients, usable in hospital and primary care settings. PMID:27165645

  7. Adherence to zinc supplementation guidelines for the treatment of diarrhea among children under–five in Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Laura M; Walker, Christa L Fischer; Taneja, Sunita; Mazumder, Sarmila; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on adherence to the recommended dose and duration of zinc supplementation for diarrheal episodes in children under five years of age. In selected districts of Uttar Pradesh, India, we sought to assess adherence to the nationally advised zinc treatment regimen (ie, 10 mg/day for ages 2–6 months and 20 mg/day for ages 7–59 months for 14 days) among caregivers of zinc–prescribed children. Methods We identified and conducted follow–up visits to children advised zinc for the treatment of diarrhea. At the initial visit, we collected data on the treatment instructions received from providers. Caregivers were asked to record treatments administered on a pictorial tracking form and were asked to retain all packaging for collection at follow–up. We quantified the average dose and duration of zinc therapy and built logistic regression models to assess the factors associated with caregiver adherence to national guidelines. Results Caregivers administered zinc for an average of 10.7 days (standard deviation (SD) = 3.9 days; median = 13 days), and 47.8% continued treatment for the complete 14 days. Among children receiving zinc syrups and tablets respectively, the age appropriate dose was received by 30.8% and 67.3%. Adherence to age appropriate dose and continuation of zinc for 14 days were highly associated with having received appropriate provider instructions. Conclusions Our results indicate moderate–to–good adherence to national zinc treatment guidelines for diarrhea among caregivers in rural India. Our findings also highlight the importance of provider guidance in ensuring adherence to zinc dose and duration. Programs aiming to scale–up zinc treatment for childhood diarrhea should train providers to successfully communicate dosing instructions to caregivers, while also addressing the tendency of caregivers to terminate treatment once a child appears to have recovered from an acute diarrheal episode. PMID

  8. "Why won't my patients do what's good for them?" Motivational interviewing and treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Zuckoff, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Limited adherence to healthy habits in adults at risk of lifestyle diseases, some of whom become candidates for bariatric surgery, has been paralleled by high rates of nonadherence to postbariatric surgery behavioral recommendations. This is a specific case of the more general problem of nonadherence to medical treatment of chronic conditions. An adequate understanding of the problem of nonadherence requires an understanding of the motivational factors that influence whether persons implement healthy behavior. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported counseling style for strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. It offers a model for understanding and intervening with nonadherence to behavioral recommendations that emphasizes the role of clinician communication in both increasing and inadvertently decreasing patient motivation. A conceptual account of patient motivation for healthy change, highlighting the centrality of resolution of patient ambivalence through targeted conversation, is illustrated by thought exercises for the reader and supplemented by references to empirical data. Recommendations for changes in clinical practice to improve patient adherence to behavioral recommendations are also offered.

  9. Comparative analysis of non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension in urban and rural populations 1

    PubMed Central

    Magnabosco, Patricia; Teraoka, Eliana Cavalari; de Oliveira, Edward Meirelles; Felipe, Elisangela Aparecida; Freitas, Dayana; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the indexes and the main factors associated with non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension between urban and rural areas. METHOD: analytical study based on an epidemiological survey with a sample of 247 hypertensive residents of rural and urban areas, with application of a socio-demographic and economic questionnaire, and treatment adherence assessment. The Pearson's Chi-square test was used and the odds ratio (OD) was calculated to analyze the factors related to non-adherence. RESULTS: the prevalence of non-adherence was 61.9% and it was higher in urban areas (63.4%). Factors significantly associated with non-adherence were: male gender (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.08-3.50), age 20-59 years old (OR=2.51; 95% CI 1.44-4.39), low economic status (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.09-3.47), alcohol consumption (OR=5.92, 95% CI 1.73-20.21), short time of hypertension diagnosis (OR=3.07; 95% CI 1.35-6.96) and not attending the health service for routine consultations (OR=2.45; 1.35-4.42). CONCLUSION: the socio-demographic/economic characteristics, lifestyle habits and how to relate to health services were the factors that presented association with non-adherence regardless of the place of residence. PMID:25806627

  10. Reasons for non-adherence to obesity treatment in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Thaïs Florence D.; Zambon, Mariana Porto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the reasons for non-adherence to follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic for obese children and adolescents. METHODS Descriptive study of 41 patients, including information from medical records and phone recorded questionnaires which included two open questions and eight closed ones: reason for abandonment, financial and structural difficulties (distance and transport costs), relationship with professionals, obesity evolution, treatment continuity, knowledge of difficulties and obesity complications. RESULTS Among the interviewees, 29.3% reported that adherence to the program spent too much time and it was difficult to adjust consultations to patientsâ€(tm) and parentsâ€(tm) schedules. Other reasons were: childrenâ€(tm)s refusal to follow treatment (29.3%), dissatisfaction with the result (17.0%), treatment in another health service (12.2%), difficulty in schedule return (7.3%) and delay in attendance (4.9%). All denied any relationship problems with professionals. Among the respondents, 85.4% said they are still overweight. They reported hurdles to appropriate nutrition and physical activity (financial difficulty, lack of parentsâ€(tm) time, physical limitation and insecure neighborhood). Among the 33 respondents that reported difficulties with obesity, 78.8% had emotional disorders such as bullying, anxiety and irritability; 24.2% presented fatigue, 15.1% had difficulty in dressing up and 15.1% referred pain. The knowledge of the following complications prevailed: cardicac (97.6%), aesthetic (90.2%), psychological (90.2%), presence of obesity in adulthood (90.2%), diabetes (85.4%) and cancer (31.4%). CONCLUSIONS According to the results, it is possible to create weight control public programs that are easier to access, encouraging appropriate nutrition and physical activities in order to achieve obesity prevention. PMID:24142316

  11. Reasons for non-adherence to obesity treatment in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Thaïs Florence D; Zambon, Mariana Porto

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the reasons for non-adherence to follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic for obese children and adolescents. METHODS Descriptive study of 41 patients, including information from medical records and phone recorded questionnaires which included two open questions and eight closed ones: reason for abandonment, financial and structural difficulties (distance and transport costs), relationship with professionals, obesity evolution, treatment continuity, knowledge of difficulties and obesity complications. RESULTS Among the interviewees, 29.3% reported that adherence to the program spent too much time and it was difficult to adjust consultations to patients' and parents' schedules. Other reasons were: children's(tm)s refusal to follow treatment (29.3%), dissatisfaction with the result (17.0%), treatment in another health service (12.2%), difficulty in schedule return (7.3%) and delay in attendance (4.9%). All denied any relationship problems with professionals. Among the respondents, 85.4% said they are still overweight. They reported hurdles to appropriate nutrition and physical activity (financial difficulty, lack of parents' time, physical limitation and insecure neighborhood). Among the 33 respondents that reported difficulties with obesity, 78.8% had emotional disorders such as bullying, anxiety and irritability; 24.2% presented fatigue, 15.1% had difficulty in dressing up and 15.1% referred pain. The knowledge of the following complications prevailed: cardicac (97.6%), aesthetic (90.2%), psychological (90.2%), presence of obesity in adulthood (90.2%), diabetes (85.4%) and cancer (31.4%). CONCLUSIONS According to the results, it is possible to create weight control public programs that are easier to access, encouraging appropriate nutrition and physical activities in order to achieve obesity prevention. PMID:24142316

  12. Reasons for non-adherence to obesity treatment in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Thaïs Florence D; Zambon, Mariana Porto

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the reasons for non-adherence to follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic for obese children and adolescents. METHODS Descriptive study of 41 patients, including information from medical records and phone recorded questionnaires which included two open questions and eight closed ones: reason for abandonment, financial and structural difficulties (distance and transport costs), relationship with professionals, obesity evolution, treatment continuity, knowledge of difficulties and obesity complications. RESULTS Among the interviewees, 29.3% reported that adherence to the program spent too much time and it was difficult to adjust consultations to patients' and parents' schedules. Other reasons were: children's(tm)s refusal to follow treatment (29.3%), dissatisfaction with the result (17.0%), treatment in another health service (12.2%), difficulty in schedule return (7.3%) and delay in attendance (4.9%). All denied any relationship problems with professionals. Among the respondents, 85.4% said they are still overweight. They reported hurdles to appropriate nutrition and physical activity (financial difficulty, lack of parents' time, physical limitation and insecure neighborhood). Among the 33 respondents that reported difficulties with obesity, 78.8% had emotional disorders such as bullying, anxiety and irritability; 24.2% presented fatigue, 15.1% had difficulty in dressing up and 15.1% referred pain. The knowledge of the following complications prevailed: cardicac (97.6%), aesthetic (90.2%), psychological (90.2%), presence of obesity in adulthood (90.2%), diabetes (85.4%) and cancer (31.4%). CONCLUSIONS According to the results, it is possible to create weight control public programs that are easier to access, encouraging appropriate nutrition and physical activities in order to achieve obesity prevention.

  13. The IMEA project: an intervention based on microfinance, entrepreneurship, and adherence to treatment for women with HIV/AIDS living in poverty.

    PubMed

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Salcedo, Juan Pablo; Pérez, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    A number of issues affect adherence to treatment and quality of life among women living with HIV/AIDS. In particular, women living in poverty have a higher risk of mortality due to their vulnerable conditions and socioeconomic exclusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that combines microfinance, entrepreneurship and adherence to treatment (IMEA) for women with HIV/AIDS and living in poverty in Cali, Colombia. A pre-post research design without a control was utilized, and 48 women were included in the study. The evaluation showed effectiveness of the program in the majority of the results (knowledge of HIV and treatment, adherence to treatment, self-efficacy, and the formation of a microenterprise) (p < 0.001); the global indicator increased from 28.3% to 85.5% (p < 0.001). The findings of this study demonstrate that the intervention was partially effective; the health outcomes showed beneficial effects. However, at the end of the study and throughout the follow-up phase, only one third of the participants were able to develop and maintain a legal operating business. It is concluded that the IMEA project should be tested in other contexts and that its consequent results should be analyzed; so it could be converted into a large scale public health program.

  14. The IMEA project: an intervention based on microfinance, entrepreneurship, and adherence to treatment for women with HIV/AIDS living in poverty.

    PubMed

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Salcedo, Juan Pablo; Pérez, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    A number of issues affect adherence to treatment and quality of life among women living with HIV/AIDS. In particular, women living in poverty have a higher risk of mortality due to their vulnerable conditions and socioeconomic exclusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that combines microfinance, entrepreneurship and adherence to treatment (IMEA) for women with HIV/AIDS and living in poverty in Cali, Colombia. A pre-post research design without a control was utilized, and 48 women were included in the study. The evaluation showed effectiveness of the program in the majority of the results (knowledge of HIV and treatment, adherence to treatment, self-efficacy, and the formation of a microenterprise) (p < 0.001); the global indicator increased from 28.3% to 85.5% (p < 0.001). The findings of this study demonstrate that the intervention was partially effective; the health outcomes showed beneficial effects. However, at the end of the study and throughout the follow-up phase, only one third of the participants were able to develop and maintain a legal operating business. It is concluded that the IMEA project should be tested in other contexts and that its consequent results should be analyzed; so it could be converted into a large scale public health program. PMID:25299805

  15. Mexican American women's adherence to hemodialysis treatment: a social constructivist perspective.

    PubMed

    Tijerina, Mary S

    2009-07-01

    Mexican Americans have as much as a six-times greater risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than non-Hispanic white Americans, and women show a faster rate of decline in diabetic renal functioning. The leading treatment for ESRD is hemodialysis, an intensive, complex treatment regimen associated with high levels of patient nonadherence. Previous studies of patient adherence have adopted a biomedical, practitioner-oriented approach focused on performance of fixed behaviors and ignoring contextual and motivational factors. The author describes a social constructivist approach to understanding how female Mexican American dialysis patients experience their disease, the treatment regimen, and the consequences of that experience. Mexican American women's perceptions and psychosocial factors were examined to understand what these women viewed as important to their realities as dialysis patients. Poverty, longer treatment history, and immigrant status emerged as factors that appeared to influence treatment nonadherence. Perceived identity losses, heightened awareness of mortality and family dysfunction emerged as themes that participants viewed as preeminent in their day-to-day lives. A social constructivist perspective is highly compatible with social work principles of person-in-environment and starting where the client is. This perspective provides a valuable framework for informing social work practice with this special population of Mexican American dialysis patients.

  16. [Therapy and Rehabilitation of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Different Treatment Adherence].

    PubMed

    Rubleva, N V; Kolomiets, V M; Kochetkova, E Ya

    2016-01-01

    The pulmonary tuberculosis process as dependent on the disease form and the therapy efficacy with the use of Cycloferon in the treatment scheme were investigated. The study had two stages. At the first stage the data concerning 358 patients with primary pulmonary tuberculosis and infiltration (93 patients) or degradation (89 patients) and 176 patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis were analysed. At the second stage the efficacy of the treatment schemes applied to the patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis was compared. The etiotropic therapy intensive phase was applied to all the patients. Moreover, 56 patients (group 1) under the therapy and rehabilitatinon were treated with Cycloferon in a dose of 0.25 administered intramuscularly twice a week (not less than 16 injections for the course), 60 patients (group 2) were treated with Omega 3, 30 patients (group 3) were given the standard complex (vitamins and tonics), 30 patients (group 4) were under the etiotropic therapy alone. The following additional factors promoting progression and aggravation of the tuberculosis process were confirmed: degradation at the time of the disease diagnosis, high resistance of the pathogen to antituberculosis drugs, low adherence to the treatment, social desadaptation and especially psychofunctional state of the patients. The use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the intensive phase treatment of the primary fibrocavernous tuberculosis resulted in reduction of the intoxication signs, bacteria isolation, positive dynamics of the cavity healing, lower lung infiltration and consequently high frequency of the treatment positive outcomes (94.1 ± 3.33%). PMID:27337863

  17. Risk Factors for Poor Adherence to Betaferon® Treatment in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis or Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jernas, Łukasz; Wencel, Jacek; Wiak, Andrzej; Bieniek, Marek; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to treatment, including early treatment discontinuation, in patients with multiple sclerosis or clinically isolated syndrome can be affected by: treatment tolerability, route of drug administration, patient age, disease duration, comorbidities, medical care, and support from their caregivers. Aim This study aimed to identify the risk factors for poor adherence to Betaferon® treatment, including early discontinuation and omitting doses. Materials and Methods 852 adult patients treated with Betaferon participated in this 24-month study. All patients were interviewed using the Risk of Drop-out Questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale. Results Patients who stopped therapy were younger (p = 0.003) had a higher mean EDSS score (p = 0.022), higher mean number of relapses (p = 0.017), and reported more often fear of injection (p = 0.027) and adverse events (p = 0.007) than those who did not stop treatment. Comparing patients who stopped therapy in the first and the second year, patients who stopped therapy in the first year of treatment more frequently reported flu-like symptoms and fever, and those who stopped therapy in the second year reported—ineffectiveness of treatment and disease progression. Multivariable logistic regression models confirmed that young age, short disease duration, advanced and progressing disease, and poor Betaferon tolerability were related to premature treatment discontinuation. The risk of omitting a dose during therapy was increased in patients who were working or studying, who had more advanced disease or more adverse events, and in patients who received less support from their caregivers. Conclusions Several reasons may lead to problems with adherence to Betaferon treatment. Patients at higher risk of discontinuing treatment need to be identified early to make caregivers’ support available to them. PMID:27695075

  18. Paradoxes in antiretroviral treatment for injecting drug users: access, adherence and structural barriers in Asia and the former Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Offered proper support, injection drug users (IDUs) can achieve the same levels of adherence to and clinical benefit from antiretroviral treatment (ARV) as other patients with HIV. Nonetheless, in countries of Asia and the former Soviet Union where IDUs represent the largest share of HIV cases, IDUs have been disproportionately less likely to receive ARV. While analysis of adherence amongst IDUs has focused on individual patient ability to adhere to medical regimens, HIV treatment systems themselves are in need of examination. Structural impediments to provision of ARV for IDUs include competing, vertical systems of care; compulsory drug treatment and rehabilitation services that often offer neither ARV nor effective treatment for chemical dependence; lack of opiate substitution treatments demonstrated to increase adherence to ARV; and policies that explicitly or implicitly discourage ARV delivery to active IDUs. Labeling active drug users as socially untrustworthy or unproductive, health systems can create a series of paradoxes that ensure confirmation of these stereotypes. Needed reforms include professional education and public campaigns that emphasize IDU capacity for health protection and responsible choice; recognition that the chronic nature of injecting drug use and its links to HIV infection require development of ARV treatment delivery that includes active drug users; and integrated treatment that strengthens links between health providers and builds on, rather than seeks to bypass, IDU social networks and organizations.

  19. [Development of an electronic device to organize medications and promote treatment adherence].

    PubMed

    Vieira, Liliana Batista; Ramos, Celso de Ávila; Castello, Matheus de Barros; Nascimento, Lorenzo Couto do

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the development of an electronic prototype to organize medications - the Electronic System for Personal and Controlled Use of Medications (Sistema Eletrônico de Uso Personalizado e Controlado de Medicamentos, SUPERMED). The prototype includes a drawer containing 1 month's supply of medicines, sound and visual medication timers, and a memory card for recording the times when the box was opened/closed (scheduled and unscheduled). This information is later transferred to a computer. Evolutionary prototyping was used to develop SUPERMED with the Arduino platform and C programming. To read alarm and box opening/closing data, software was developed in Java. Once the alarms are programmed (ideally by a health care professional), no additional adjustments are required by the patient. The prototype was tested during 31 days by the developers, with satisfactory functioning. The system seems adequate to organize medications and facilitate adherence to treatment. New studies will be carried out to validate and improve the prototype.

  20. [Development of an electronic device to organize medications and promote treatment adherence].

    PubMed

    Vieira, Liliana Batista; Ramos, Celso de Ávila; Castello, Matheus de Barros; Nascimento, Lorenzo Couto do

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the development of an electronic prototype to organize medications - the Electronic System for Personal and Controlled Use of Medications (Sistema Eletrônico de Uso Personalizado e Controlado de Medicamentos, SUPERMED). The prototype includes a drawer containing 1 month's supply of medicines, sound and visual medication timers, and a memory card for recording the times when the box was opened/closed (scheduled and unscheduled). This information is later transferred to a computer. Evolutionary prototyping was used to develop SUPERMED with the Arduino platform and C programming. To read alarm and box opening/closing data, software was developed in Java. Once the alarms are programmed (ideally by a health care professional), no additional adjustments are required by the patient. The prototype was tested during 31 days by the developers, with satisfactory functioning. The system seems adequate to organize medications and facilitate adherence to treatment. New studies will be carried out to validate and improve the prototype. PMID:27657186

  1. Tuberculosis Treatment Non-Adherence and Lost to Follow Up among TB Patients with or without HIV in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tola, Habteyes Hailu; Tol, Azar; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Garmaroudi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review intended to combine factors associated with tuberculosis treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up among TB patients with/without HIV in developing countries. Comprehensive remote electronic databases (MEDLINE, (PMC, Pub Med Central), Google scholar and Web of science) search was conducted using the following keywords: Tuberculosis, treatment, compliance, adherence, default, behavioural factors and socioeconomic factors. All types of studies intended to assess TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up in developing countries among adult TB patient from 2008 to data extraction date were included. Twenty-six original and one-reviewed articles, which meet inclusion criteria, were reviewed. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries. The main factors associated with TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were socioeconomic factors: lack of transportation cost, lack of social support, and patients-health care worker poor communication. Behavioural factors were Feeling better after few weeks of treatments, tobacco and alcohol use, knowledge deficit about duration of treatment and consequences of non-adherence and lost to follow up. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries throughout the publication years of reviewed articles. Numerous, socioeconomic and behavioural factors were influencing TB treatment adherence and lost to follow up. Therefore, well understanding and minimizing of the effect of these associated factors is very important to enhance treatment adherence and follow up completion in developing countries.

  2. Fullerene fine particles adhere to pollen grains and affect their autofluorescence and germination

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Hideki; Ugwu, Charles U

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion of commercially produced fullerene fine particles to Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Camellia japonica pollen grains was investigated. The autofluorescence of pollen grains was affected by the adhesion of fullerene fine particles to the pollen grains. The degree of adhesion of fullerene fine particles to the pollen grains varied depending on the type of fullerene. Furthermore, germination of Camellia japonica pollen grains was inhibited by the adhesion of fullerene fine particles. PMID:24198486

  3. The effect of clinician-patient alliance and communication on treatment adherence in mental health care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to mental health treatment incurs clinical and economic burdens. The clinician-patient alliance, negotiated through clinical interaction, presents a critical intervention point. Recent medical reviews of communication and adherence behaviour exclude studies with psychiatric samples. The following examines the impact of clinician-patient alliance and communication on adherence in mental health, identifying the specific mechanisms that mobilise patient engagement. Methods In December 2010, a systematic search was conducted in Pubmed, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase and Cinahl and yielded 6672 titles. A secondary hand search was performed in relevant journals, grey literature and reference. Results 23 studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The methodological quality overall was moderate. 17 studies reported positive associations with adherence, only four of which employed intervention designs. 10 studies examined the association between clinician-patient alliance and adherence. Subjective ratings of clinical communication styles and messages were assessed in 12 studies. 1 study examined the association between objectively rated communication and adherence. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity of methods. Findings were presented as a narrative synthesis. Conclusions Clinician-patient alliance and communication are associated with more favourable patient adherence. Further research of observer rated communication would better facilitate the application of findings in clinical practice. Establishing agreement on the tasks of treatment, utilising collaborative styles of communication and discussion of treatment specifics may be important for clinicians in promoting cooperation with regimens. These findings align with those in health communication. However, the benefits of shared decision making for adherence in mental health are less conclusive than in general medicine. PMID:22828119

  4. Lack of Adherence to Evidence-based Treatment Guidelines for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prevots, D. Rebecca; Gallagher, Jack; Heap, Kylee; Gupta, Renu; Griffith, David

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recommend that patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or M. abscessus be treated with a macrolide-based multidrug antibiotic regimen until sputum culture negative for 1 year. After 6 years, the degree of adherence to recommended guidelines among physicians remains unknown. Objective: To describe antibiotic treatment practices among physicians treating patients with PNTM in the United States. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 1,286 U.S. physicians was contacted in December 2011 through January 2012; 582 of the responding physicians were treating patients with PNTM and were eligible to participate. Physicians were asked to extract medical record data on the last four patients they treated in the past year with PNTM disease from either MAC or M. abscessus. Treatment patterns were assessed for all patients by NTM species and physician specialty, and compared with the 2007 recommended ATS/IDSA guidelines. Main Results: Questionnaires were completed by 349 physicians on 915 patients with PNTM, including 744 (81%) with MAC and 174 (19%) with M. abscessus; 3 patients were positive for both. Physicians treated 76 (44%) patients with M. abscessus and 411 (55%) patients with MAC. Only 13% of antibiotic regimens prescribed to patients with MAC met ATS/IDSA guidelines, 56% did not include a macrolide, and 16% were for macrolide monotherapy. Among patients with M. abscessus, 64% of regimens prescribed did not include a macrolide. Conclusions: Adherence to the 2007 ATS/IDSA guidelines for treating PNTM disease is poor. Across all physician specialties evaluated, suboptimal or potentially harmful antibiotic regimens were commonly prescribed. PMID:24236749

  5. Treatment adherence in schizophrenia: a patient-level meta-analysis of combined CATIE and EUFEST studies.

    PubMed

    Czobor, Pál; Van Dorn, Richard A; Citrome, Leslie; Kahn, Rene S; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Volavka, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) obtained a sample of 1493 chronic schizophrenia patients. The European First Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST) studied a sample of 498 patients. We have combined these two samples to study the predictors and correlates of adherence to treatment. Here we report on adherence to pharmacological treatment at the six and twelve month assessments of these trials with a combined subsample of 1154 schizophrenia patients. Individual patients׳ data were used for analyses. We used logistic regression to examine the effects of substance use, akathisia, parkinsonism, dyskinesia, hostility, and insight on pharmacological adherence. The results showed that reduced adherence to pharmacological treatment was associated with substance use (p=0.0003), higher levels of hostility (p=0.0002), and impaired insight (p<0.0001). Furthermore, poor adherence to study medication was associated with earlier discontinuation in the combined data. The clinical implications of the results point to the importance of routine assessments and interventions to address patients׳ insight and comorbid substance use and the establishment of therapeutic alliance.

  6. Is Adherence to Imatinib Mesylate Treatment Among Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Associated with Better Clinical Outcomes in Qatar?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dewik, Nader I.; Morsi, Hisham M.; Samara, Muthanna M.; Ghasoub, Rola S.; Gnanam, Cinquea C.; Bhaskaran, Subi K.; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J.; Al-Jurf, Rana M.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; AlSharshani, Mohammed M.; AlSayab, Ali A.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg I.; Khatib, Rani B.; Yassin, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the revolutionary success of introducing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib mesylate (IM), for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a substantial proportion of patients’ treatments fail. AIM This study investigates the correlation between patient adherence and failure of TKIs’ treatment in a follow-up study. METHODS This is a follow-up study of a new cohort of CML patients. Adherence to IM is assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS 6 TrackCap, AARDEX Ltd). The 9-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, medication possession ratio (MPR) calculation, and the electronic medical records are used for identifying potential factors that influence adherence. Clinical outcomes are assessed according to the European Leukemia Net 2013 guidelines via reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurement of the level of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in peripheral blood. Response is classified at the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular levels into optimal, suboptimal, or failure. RESULTS A total of 36 CML patients (5 citizens and 31 noncitizen residents) consented to participate in the study. The overall mean MEMS score was 89. Of the 36 patients, 22 (61%) were classified as adherent (mean: 95) and 14 (39%) were classified as nonadherent (mean: 80.2). Adherent patients were significantly more likely to obtain optimal response (95%) compared to the nonadherent group (14.3%; P < 0.0001). The rate of poor adherence was as high as 39% using MEMS, which correlates with 37% treatment failure rate. The survey results show that 97% of patients increased the IM dose by themselves when they felt unwell and 31% of them took the missing IM dose when they remembered. Other factors known to influence adherence show that half of patients developed one or more side effects, 65% of patients experienced lack of funds, 13% of patients declared unavailability of the drug in the NCCCR pharmacy, and 72% of patients

  7. Influence of patients' representations and beliefs about diabetes and its treatment on their adherence to therapy.

    PubMed

    Gentili, P; Maldonato, A; Grieco, R; Santini, A

    2001-06-01

    Research in the last 25 years has shown that diabetic patients' adhesion to medical advice is a multi-factor phenomenon. Most recent research has focused on a patient-centred approach, on the representations that the patient has with respect to medicine, health and disease (with particular regard to the perceived self-efficiency in managing the disease, trust in conventional medicine, treatment, drugs, etc) and on the level of agreement between the patient's representations and those of the health care provider. These representations can potentially act as barriers/facilitators on patients' adhesion to treatment; the best adherence can only be obtained if the real needs of the patient are met, matching therapy with his/her representations and expectations, and acknowledging the constraints that everyday life puts on the individual. The indication is therefore to avoid exclusively considering the physical burdens of the disease, while ignoring the personal and social significance of the experience that the patient is having. It will take time for this to become routine in health care, since it requires a complex change from a traditional, bio-medical approach to an integrated bio-psycho-social approach. The aim of this review is to show how those disease representations of diabetes, and the treatment having considerable impact on patients' adhesion, are being considered in recent literature, and how this nonetheless still constitutes a little explored aspect in medical consultation and research. PMID:11476361

  8. An initiative to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines in the treatment of URIs, sinusitis, and pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Alweis, Richard; Greco, Michael; Wasser, Thomas; Wenderoth, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Upper respiratory infections, acute sinus infections, and sore throats are common symptoms that cause patients to seek medical care. Despite well-established treatment guidelines, studies indicate that antibiotics are prescribed far more frequently than appropriate, raising a multitude of clinical issues. Methods The primary goal of this study was to increase guideline adherence rates for acute sinusitis, pharyngitis, and upper respiratory tract infections (URIs). This study was the first Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle in a quality improvement program at an internal medicine resident faculty practice at a university-affiliated community hospital internal medicine residency program. To improve guideline adherence for respiratory infections, a package of small-scale interventions was implemented aimed at improving patient and provider education regarding viral and bacterial infections and the necessity for antibiotics. The data from this study was compared with a previously published study in this practice, which evaluated the adherence rates for the treatment guidelines before the changes, to determine effectiveness of the modifications. After the first PDSA cycle, providers were surveyed to determine barriers to adherence to antibiotic prescribing guidelines. Results After the interventions, antibiotic guideline adherence for URI improved from a rate of 79.28 to 88.58% with a p-value of 0.004. The increase of adherence rates for sinusitis and pharyngitis were 41.7–57.58% (p=0.086) and 24.0–25.0% (p=0.918), respectively. The overall change in guideline adherence for the three conditions increased from 57.2 to 78.6% with the implementations (p<0.001). In planning for future PDSA cycles, a fishbone diagram was constructed in order to identify all perceived facets of the problem of non-adherence to the treatment guidelines for URIs, sinusitis, and pharyngitis. From the fishbone diagram and the provider survey, several potential directions for future work

  9. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  10. Examining the Relation between the Therapeutic Alliance, Treatment Adherence, and Outcome of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liber, Juliette M.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Goedhart, Arnold W.; van der Leeden, Adelinde J. M.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the contribution of technical and relational factors to child outcomes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety disorders. This study investigated the association between treatment adherence, the child-therapist alliance, and child clinical outcomes in manual-guided individual- and group-based CBT for…

  11. Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Adherence in Two Interventions for Bulimia Nervosa: A Study of Process and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Wilson, G. Terence; Labouvie, Erich; Pratt, Elizabeth M.; Hayaki, Jumi; Walsh, B. Timothy; Agras, W. Stewart; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between therapeutic alliance, therapist adherence to treatment protocol, and outcome was analyzed in a randomized trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. Independent observers rated audiotapes of full-length therapy sessions. Purging frequency was the primary outcome…

  12. Does adherence to treatment mediate the relationship between patients' treatment outcome expectancies and the outcomes of pain intensity and recovery from acute low back pain?

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Spriensma, Alette S; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that patients' expectancies about the effectiveness of treatment influence their treatment outcomes, but the working mechanism is rarely studied in patients with low back pain. Theoretical models suggest that adherence to treatment may be an important pathway. The aim of this study was to assess the mediating role of adherence to treatment in the relationship between expectancies and the outcomes of recovery and pain intensity in patients with acute low back pain. This study used data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain. Expectancies were measured with the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with a medication diary. Pain intensity was recorded daily in a diary on a 0 to 10 pain scale, and recovery was defined as the first of 7 consecutive days scoring 0 or 1 on a 6-point pain scale. Cox regression (dependent variable: recovery) and linear mixed-model analyses (dependent variable: daily pain intensity scores) were performed. The "difference in coefficients" approach was used to establish mediation. A total of 1573 participants were included in current analyses. There was a small but highly significant relationship between expectancies and outcomes; 3.3% of the relationship between expectancies and recovery and 14.2% of the relationship between expectancies and pain intensity were mediated by adherence to treatment. This study does not convincingly support the theory that adherence is a key pathway in the relationship between treatment outcome expectancies and recovery and pain intensity in this acute low back pain population.

  13. Coping with Treatment-Related Stress: Effects on Patient Adherence in Hemodialysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the relation of coping to adherence among 57 hemodialysis patients. As predicted, coping efforts involving planful problem solving were associated with more favorable adherence when used in response to stressors involving a relatively controllable aspect of the hemodialysis context. For less controllable stressors, coping efforts…

  14. Postpartum affective disorders: incidence and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ugarriza, D N

    1992-05-01

    1. Postpartum depression is a culture-bound syndrome found in Western societies. The lack of supportive rites and rituals for postpartum women shape depressive symptoms. 2. Postpartum depression is a term used for three distinct syndromes: postpartum "blues," postpartum psychosis, and postpartum depression. 3. Treatment issues surrounding each postpartum affective disorder are different and require education and support of family members as well as postpartum women.

  15. Patient and Provider Perspectives on Cellular Phone Based Technology to Improve HIV Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Baranoski, Amy S.; Meuser, Elizabeth; Hardy, Helene; Closson, Elizabeth F.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Safren, Steven A.; Virk, Pushwaz; Luk, Rowena; Skolnik, Paul R.; Kumar, Vikram S.

    2013-01-01

    Innovative techniques, potentially using technology, to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), may help patients with HIV who struggle with self-care. This qualitative study compared patient and provider participants’ perspectives on ART adherence and text messaging as a tool to promote adherence. Thirteen providers and 14 HIV-infected patients identified four main themes: 1). facilitators and 2). barriers to using text message reminders as a medium for ART medication reminders; 3). framing of text message reminders; and 4). patient responsibility and autonomy in management of their health and wellness. Ease of use, access, convenience, and confidentiality were cited as benefits of a text message based adherence intervention; while access, cost, difficulty manipulating cellular phones, lack of knowledge/education, and confidentiality were cited as potential barriers. Providers, but not patients, also identified patient apathy and time burden as potential barriers to a text message based adherence reminder system. Patients and providers felt that personalization of messages, attention to timing, and confidentiality of messages were key factors for a successful text message based adherence reminder system. Both providers and patients felt that patient responsibility and autonomy over an individual’s own health care is an important issue in adherence to medical care. The majority of patients and providers felt that a text message based adherence reminder system would be beneficial. While patients and providers had many similar views on factors influencing adherence with ART and the use of text messaging to improve adherence, there were some divergent views between the two groups. PMID:23742640

  16. Patient and provider perspectives on cellular phone-based technology to improve HIV treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, Amy S; Meuser, Elizabeth; Hardy, Helene; Closson, Elizabeth F; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A; Virk, Pushwaz; Luk, Rowena; Skolnik, Paul R; Kumar, Vikram S

    2014-01-01

    Innovative techniques, potentially using technology, to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help patients with HIV who struggle with self-care. This qualitative study compared patient and provider participants' perspectives on ART adherence and text messaging as a tool to promote adherence. Thirteen providers and 14 HIV-infected patients identified four main themes: (1) facilitators, (2) barriers to using text message reminders as a medium for ART medication reminders, (3) framing of text message reminders, and (4) patient responsibility and autonomy in the management of their health and wellness. Ease of use, access, convenience, and confidentiality were cited as benefits of a text message-based adherence intervention; while access, cost, difficulty manipulating cellular phones, lack of knowledge/education, and confidentiality were cited as potential barriers. Providers, but not patients, also identified patient apathy and time burden as potential barriers to a text message-based adherence reminder system. Patients and providers felt that personalization of messages, attention to timing, and confidentiality of messages were key factors for a successful text message-based adherence reminder system. Both providers and patients felt that patient responsibility and autonomy over an individual's own health care is an important issue in adherence to medical care. The majority of patients and providers felt that a text message-based adherence reminder system would be beneficial. While patients and providers had many similar views on factors influencing adherence with ART and the use of text messaging to improve adherence, there were some divergent views between the two groups.

  17. Associations between substance use, sexual risk taking and HIV treatment adherence among homeless people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mark S; Marshal, Michael P; Stall, Ron; Kidder, Daniel P; Henny, Kirk D; Courtenay-Quirk, Cari; Wolitski, Richard J; Aidala, Angela; Royal, Scott; Holtgrave, David R

    2009-06-01

    Prior research suggests that the interconnections between substance use, HIV risk and lack of adherence to HIV medications are especially strong among homeless individuals. Thus, study of these interconnections warrants public health attention. The objectives of this paper are to describe patterns of alcohol and drug use, associations between substance use and participation in high-risk sex, and associations between substance use and adherence to HIV treatment regimens among a sample of 602 homeless or unstably housed HIV-seropositive individuals who are part of a housing-based intervention--the Housing and Health Study. Participants experienced high levels of substance use. Significant associations were found between substance use and adherence to HIV treatment medications, and between substance use and high-risk sexual practices within the entire group. Group analyses by sexual orientation/gender show that the association between substance use and treatment adherence is found primarily among heterosexual males whereas the relationship between several drugs and high-risk sexual practices is strongest among gay and bisexual men. Health professionals working with HIV-seropositive individuals should routinely ascertain housing status and screen for substance use and risky sex.

  18. [Pharmaceutical formulations and adherence to pharmacological treatment in psychiatry: the example of oral disintegrating tablet of olanzapine].

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Cristiana; Canonico, Pier Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to treatment in psychiatric as in other chronic or recurrent conditions, is often suboptimal. A high proportion of relapses is due to non-adherence to prescribed treatment. Adherence to treatment is a potent predictor of effectiveness, both in clinical trials and cohort studies, therefore is a very relevant area where any improving tool is looked forward. Orally Disintegrating Tablets (ODT) were developed with the aim to improve patient's compliance due to their fast oral absorption. They are particularly useful in psychiatric patients who often simulate drug assumption or experience difficulties in taking pills. ODT formulations have been developed for many antypsychotics including olanzapine. The ODT formulations of olanzapine show to be significantly different one from the other in the dissolution time, thus having a potential impact on compliance. In this review, the results of different studies consistently highlight the positive risk/benefit profile, the contribution to patient's compliance and their preference while using ODT formulation of olanzapine produced throughout the ZYDIS technology (Velotab). Moreover, the differences between olanzapine ODT (Velotab) and the standard formulation of olanzapine and other antipsychotics are described focusing on in efficacy, safety, patient acceptance and health economic impact. The ODT formulation of olanzapine (Velotab) seems to ameliorate patient's adherence thus improving psychiatrist/caregiver/patient alliance.

  19. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  20. Beliefs related to adherence to oral antidiabetic treatment according to the Theory of Planned Behavior1

    PubMed Central

    Jannuzzi, Fernanda Freire; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; Cornélio, Marilia Estevam; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Gallani, Maria Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify salient behavioral, normative, control and self-efficacy beliefs related to the behavior of adherence to oral antidiabetic agents, using the Theory of Planned Behavior. METHOD: cross-sectional, exploratory study with 17 diabetic patients in chronic use of oral antidiabetic medication and in outpatient follow-up. Individual interviews were recorded, transcribed and content-analyzed using pre-established categories. RESULTS: behavioral beliefs concerning advantages and disadvantages of adhering to medication emerged, such as the possibility of avoiding complications from diabetes, preventing or delaying the use of insulin, and a perception of side effects. The children of patients and physicians are seen as important social references who influence medication adherence. The factors that facilitate adherence include access to free-of-cost medication and taking medications associated with temporal markers. On the other hand, a complex therapeutic regimen was considered a factor that hinders adherence. Understanding how to use medication and forgetfulness impact the perception of patients regarding their ability to adhere to oral antidiabetic agents. CONCLUSION: medication adherence is a complex behavior permeated by behavioral, normative, control and self-efficacy beliefs that should be taken into account when assessing determinants of behavior. PMID:25296135

  1. Web-Based Cognitive Training: Patient Adherence and Intensity of Treatment in an Outpatient Memory Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Joana; Alves, Ivânia; Ruano, Luís; Mateus, Cátia; Barreto, Rui; Bento, Virgílio; Colunas, Márcio; Rocha, Nelson; Coutinho, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive training has been playing an increasing role in the treatment of patients with cognitive deficits. This type of intervention, namely its intensity, can be optimized by incorporating information technology-based systems. Objective The intent of the study was to determine the treatment intensity and patient adherence to home-based cognitive training strategies (Web-based cognitive training). Methods A cohort of 45 patients with neurologic and psychiatric diseases attending an outpatient memory clinic (average age 50.7 years, SD 17.0; average education 7.8 years, SD 4.9) was followed over 18 months. Participants were challenged to use a Web-based cognitive training system, “COGWEB”, on a daily basis, and fulfilled at least four weeks of training supervised remotely. Additionally, 11 patients attended face-to-face sessions. Results The average duration of continuous cognitive training was 18.8 weeks (SD 18.9). Each patient performed on average 363.5 minutes/week (SD 136.6). At 6-month follow-up, 82.8% complied with their treatment plan. The average proportion of complete weeks was 0.75 (SD 0.22). Patients with dementia trained more intensively (444.6 minutes/week), followed by patients with static brain lesion (414.5 minutes/week; P=.01). The group that held face-to-face sessions performed more training overall (481.4 vs 366.9 minutes/week), achieving a stronger expression and statistical significance in the last week of training (652.6 versus 354.9 minutes/week, P=.027). Conclusions Overall, the weekly training intensity was high. Patients with dementia and static lesions performed more cognitive training. Face-to-face sessions were associated with higher intensities. The combination of classical methods with information technology systems seems to ensure greater training intensity. PMID:24808451

  2. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    plus care", may improve adolescent adherence. Through this they have potential to improve survival and wellbeing, to prevent HIV transmission, and to advance treatment equity for HIV-positive adolescents. PMID:27392002

  3. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    plus care", may improve adolescent adherence. Through this they have potential to improve survival and wellbeing, to prevent HIV transmission, and to advance treatment equity for HIV-positive adolescents.

  4. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, L. D.; Toska, E.; Orkin, F. M.; Meinck, F.; Hodes, R.; Yakubovich, A. R.; Sherr, L.

    2016-01-01

    , particularly combinations of “cash plus care”, may improve adolescent adherence. Through this they have potential to improve survival and wellbeing, to prevent HIV transmission, and to advance treatment equity for HIV-positive adolescents. PMID:27392002

  5. Impact of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence: systematic review and meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ingrid T; Ryu, Annemarie E; Onuegbu, Afiachukwu G; Psaros, Christina; Weiser, Sheri D; Bangsberg, David R; Tsai, Alexander C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a critical determinant of HIV-1 RNA viral suppression and health outcomes. It is generally accepted that HIV-related stigma is correlated with factors that may undermine ART adherence, but its relationship with ART adherence itself is not well established. We therefore undertook this review to systematically assess the relationship between HIV-related stigma and ART adherence. Methods We searched nine electronic databases for published and unpublished literature, with no language restrictions. First we screened the titles and abstracts for studies that potentially contained data on ART adherence. Then we reviewed the full text of these studies to identify articles that reported data on the relationship between ART adherence and either HIV-related stigma or serostatus disclosure. We used the method of meta-synthesis to summarize the findings from the qualitative studies. Results Our search protocol yielded 14,854 initial records. After eliminating duplicates and screening the titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 960 journal articles, dissertations and unpublished conference abstracts for review. We included 75 studies conducted among 26,715 HIV-positive persons living in 32 countries worldwide, with less representation of work from Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Among the 34 qualitative studies, our meta-synthesis identified five distinct third-order labels through an inductive process that we categorized as themes and organized in a conceptual model spanning intrapersonal, interpersonal and structural levels. HIV-related stigma undermined ART adherence by compromising general psychological processes, such as adaptive coping and social support. We also identified psychological processes specific to HIV-positive persons driven by predominant stigmatizing attitudes and which undermined adherence, such as internalized stigma and concealment. Adaptive coping and social support were critical

  6. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura Q.; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  7. Therapist Adherence/Competence and Treatment Outcome: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christian A.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Barber, Jacques P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors conducted a meta-analytic review of adherence–outcome and competence– outcome findings, and examined plausible moderators of these relations. Method A computerized search of the PsycINFO database was conducted. In addition, the reference sections of all obtained studies were examined for any additional relevant articles or review chapters. The literature search identified 36 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Results R-type effect size estimates were derived from 32 adherence–outcome and 17 competence–outcome findings. Neither the mean weighted adherence– outcome (r = .02) nor competence–outcome (r = .07) effect size estimates were found to be significantly different from zero. Significant heterogeneity was observed across both the adherence–outcome and competence–outcome effect size estimates, suggesting that the individual studies were not all drawn from the same population. Moderator analyses revealed that larger competence–outcome effect size estimates were associated with studies that either targeted depression or did not control for the influence of the therapeutic alliance. Conclusions One explanation for these results is that, among the treatment modalities represented in this review, therapist adherence and competence play little role in determining symptom change. However, given the significant heterogeneity observed across findings, mean effect sizes must be interpreted with caution. Factors that may account for the nonsignificant adherence– outcome and competence–outcome findings reported within many of the studies reviewed are addressed. Finally, the implication of these results and directions for future process research are discussed. PMID:20350031

  8. The impact of psychiatric diagnosis on treatment adherence and duration among victimized children and adolescents in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Scivoletto, Sandra; Silva, Thiago F.; Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the high prevalence of substance abuse and mood disorders among victimized children and adolescents, few studies have investigated the association of these disorders with treatment adherence, represented by numbers of visits per month and treatment duration. We aimed to investigate the effects of substance abuse and mood disorders on treatment adherence and duration in a special program for victimized children in São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: A total of 351 participants were evaluated for psychiatric disorders and classified into one of five groups: mood disorders alone; substance abuse disorders alone; mood and substance abuse disorders; other psychiatric disorders; no psychiatric disorders. The associations between diagnostic classification and adherence to treatment and the duration of program participation were tested with logistic regression and survival analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Children with mood disorders alone had the highest rate of adherence (79.5%); those with substance abuse disorders alone had the lowest (40%); and those with both disorders had an intermediate rate of adherence (50%). Those with other psychiatric disorders and no psychiatric disorders also had high rates of adherence (75.6% and 72.9%, respectively). Living with family significantly increased adherence for children with substance abuse disorders but decreased adherence for those with no psychiatric disorders. The diagnostic correlates of duration of participation were similar to those for adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Mood and substance abuse disorders were strong predictive factors for treatment adherence and duration, albeit in opposite directions. Living with family seems to have a positive effect on treatment adherence for patients with substance abuse disorders. More effective treatment is needed for victimized substance-abusing youth. PMID:22249474

  9. European Society of Cardiology Guideline-Adherent Antithrombotic Treatment and Risk of Mortality in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chou, Annie Y.; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Su-Jung; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the risk of mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients treated adherent to the 2012 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for stroke prevention and those who were not treated according to guideline recommendations. This study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From 1996 to 2011, 354,649 newly diagnosed AF patients were identified as the study population. Among the study cohort, 45,595 and 309,054 patients were defined as Guideline-Adherent and Non-Adherent groups, respectively. During the follow up of 1,480,280 person-years, 133,552 (37.7%) patients experienced mortality. The risk of mortality was lower among AF patients whose treatment was adherent to the guideline recommendation for stroke prevention than those whose treatment was not (annual risk of mortality = 4.3% versus 10.0%) with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.62 (95% confidence interval = 0.61–0.64, p value < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, CHA2DS2-VASc score and antiplatelet therapy. The findings were consistently observed after propensity matching analysis. In conclusion, the risk of mortality was lower for AF patients who were treated according to the antithrombotic recommendations of the 2012 ESC guidelines, guided by the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Better efforts to implement guidelines would lead to improved outcomes for patients with AF. PMID:27498702

  10. European Society of Cardiology Guideline-Adherent Antithrombotic Treatment and Risk of Mortality in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chou, Annie Y; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Su-Jung; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the risk of mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients treated adherent to the 2012 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for stroke prevention and those who were not treated according to guideline recommendations. This study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From 1996 to 2011, 354,649 newly diagnosed AF patients were identified as the study population. Among the study cohort, 45,595 and 309,054 patients were defined as Guideline-Adherent and Non-Adherent groups, respectively. During the follow up of 1,480,280 person-years, 133,552 (37.7%) patients experienced mortality. The risk of mortality was lower among AF patients whose treatment was adherent to the guideline recommendation for stroke prevention than those whose treatment was not (annual risk of mortality = 4.3% versus 10.0%) with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.62 (95% confidence interval = 0.61-0.64, p value < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, CHA2DS2-VASc score and antiplatelet therapy. The findings were consistently observed after propensity matching analysis. In conclusion, the risk of mortality was lower for AF patients who were treated according to the antithrombotic recommendations of the 2012 ESC guidelines, guided by the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Better efforts to implement guidelines would lead to improved outcomes for patients with AF. PMID:27498702

  11. The Association Between Treatment Adherence to Nicotine Patches and Smoking Cessation in Pregnancy: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, Paul; Cooper, Sue; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Coleman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In nonpregnant “quitters,” adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) increases smoking cessation. We investigated relationships between adherence to placebo or NRT patches and cessation in pregnancy, including an assessment of reverse causation and whether any adherence: cessation relationship is moderated when using nicotine or placebo patches. Methods: Using data from 1050 pregnant trial participants, regression models investigated associations between maternal characteristics, adherence and smoking cessation. Results: Adherence during the first month was associated with lower baseline cotinine concentrations (β −0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.15 to −0.01) and randomization to NRT (β 2.59, 95% CI 1.50 to 3.68). Adherence during both treatment months was associated with being randomized to NRT (β 0.51, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.72) and inversely associated with higher nicotine dependence. Adherence with either NRT or placebo was associated with cessation at 1 month (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.13) and delivery (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.09), but no such association was observed in the subgroup where reverse causation was not possible. Amongst all women, greater adherence to nicotine patches was associated with increased cessation (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.32 to 4.63) but greater adherence to placebo was not (OR 0.98, 95% CI: 0.44 to 2.18). Conclusion: Women who were more adherent to NRT were more likely to achieve abstinence; more nicotine dependent women probably showed lower adherence to NRT because they relapsed to smoking more quickly. The interaction between nicotine-containing patches and adherence for cessation suggests that the association between adherence with nicotine patches and cessation may be partly causal. Implications: This study used placebo randomized controlled trial data to investigate both associations between women’s characteristics and adherence to NRT patch treatment, and the relationship between

  12. Measuring Patient Adherence to Malaria Treatment: A Comparison of Results from Self-Report and a Customised Electronic Monitoring Device

    PubMed Central

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Festo, Charles; Cairns, Matthew; Kalolella, Admirabilis; Mayaya, Frank; Kachur, S. Patrick; Schellenberg, David; Goodman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-report is the most common and feasible method for assessing patient adherence to medication, but can be prone to recall bias and social desirability bias. Most studies assessing adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) have relied on self-report. In this study, we use a novel customised electronic monitoring device—termed smart blister packs—to examine the validity of self-reported adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in southern Tanzania. Methods Smart blister packs were designed to look identical to locally available AL blister packs and to record the date and time each tablet was removed from packaging. Patients obtaining AL at randomly selected health facilities and drug stores were followed up at home three days later and interviewed about each dose of AL taken. Blister packs were requested for pill count and extraction of smart blister pack data. Results Data on adherence from both self-report verified by pill count and smart blister packs were available for 696 of 1,204 patients. There was no difference between methods in the proportion of patients assessed to have completed treatment (64% and 67%, respectively). However, the percentage taking the correct number of pills for each dose at the correct times (timely completion) was higher by self-report than smart blister packs (37% vs. 24%; p<0.0001). By smart blister packs, 64% of patients completing treatment did not take the correct number of pills per dose or did not take each dose at the correct time interval. Conclusion Smart blister packs resulted in lower estimates of timely completion of AL and may be less prone to recall and social desirability bias. They may be useful when data on patterns of adherence are desirable to evaluate treatment outcomes. Improved methods of collecting self-reported data are needed to minimise bias and maximise comparability between studies. PMID:26214848

  13. Adherence to an overweight and obesity treatment: how to motivate a patient?

    PubMed Central

    Rizo, Mercedes; Cortés-Castell, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To explore anthropometric changes in normal-weight, overweight and obese subjects who did not dropout or fail a weight loss program over the 16 treatment weeks to improve patient motivation and treatment adherence. Methods. A clinical intervention study was conducted among 271 (including 100 dropouts and/or failures) obese and overweight patients who consulted a nutrition clinic in Barranquilla (Colombia) for the purpose of nutritional assessment. They were subject to a personalized weekly follow-up consultation over the course of 16 weeks in which initial and the final Body Mass Index (BMI, kg/m2), photographs, food consumption patterns, percentage weight loss, waist and hip circumference were registered and grouped according to BMI, measuring treatment response. Data’s nonparametric statistical comparison was made. Results. In 62 patients from the BMI < 25 group, there is weight loss of 2.6% (3.1 SD), 5.5% (3.3 SD) in waist circumference and 3.0% (2.5 SD) in hip circumference. In 67 patients from the 25 ≥ BMI < 30 group, there is weight loss of 3.8% (4.1 SD), 5.7% (4.5 SD) in waist circumference loss and 3.7% (3.0 SD) in hip circumference loss. In 42 patients from the BMI > 30 group, there is weight loss of 4.8% (3.7 SD), 7.0% (3.6 SD) in waist circumference loss and 3.9% (2.4 SD) in hip circumference loss. Monitoring is done every 4 weeks by the Friedman test, with significant differences between the three groups (p < 0.001). Patients do not drop out of treatment because they start to see physical results in waist decrease. When comparing final values of initial waist/hip circumference ratios and waist/height ratios, a clear decrease in the three BMI groups was observed (p < 0.001). Conclusion. After three weeks of continuous treatment patients improved in all overweight and obesity parameter indicators; there were not statistically significant differences in hip circumference (HC) and waist loss (WC) (%) among the three BMI groups (normal

  14. The initial feasibility of a computer-based motivational intervention for adherence for youth newly recommended to start antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, Angulique Y; Naar-King, Sylvie; Tanney, Mary; Belzer, Marvin E; Aagenes, Anna; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Merlo, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Young people represent the largest number of new HIV infections, thus youth living with HIV (YLH) are likely to be the largest group to initiate antiretroviral treatment (ART). Adherence patterns for behaviorally infected YLH are not adequate to effectively manage the disease; therefore, novel interventions are needed to improve medication adherence. The purpose of the current study, which will precede a randomized controlled trial, was to assess the initial feasibility of an individually tailored computer-based two-session interactive motivational interviewing (MI) intervention for YLH newly recommended to start ART. Intervention development occurred in collaboration with three youth advisory groups. Ten youth (ages 18-24) were recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed the intervention online. Intervention components focused on medication adherence (rating perceived importance and confidence, and goal setting). Retention was 100% for both intervention sessions. All participants (n=10) felt medication adherence was important, but 80% felt confident they could manage their adherence to HIV medications. Ninety percent of participants set the goal of taking their HIV medications exactly as prescribed and reported success achieving this goal at follow-up. Additionally, participants were satisfied with the quality of the sessions and the amount of assistance they received for managing their adherence to HIV medications (90% participants for Session 1; 89% for Session 2). Per exit interview responses, participants felt that the intervention made them think more about their health and was a motivator for them to take better care of their health. In conclusion, the intervention was feasible for YLH enrolled in the study.

  15. Psychometrics of A New Questionnaire to Assess Glaucoma Adherence: The Glaucoma Treatment Compliance Assessment Tool (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Mansberger, Steven L.; Sheppler, Christina R.; McClure, Tina M.; VanAlstine, Cory L.; Swanson, Ingrid L.; Stoumbos, Zoey; Lambert, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the psychometrics of the Glaucoma Treatment Compliance Assessment Tool (GTCAT), a new questionnaire designed to assess adherence with glaucoma therapy. Methods: We developed the questionnaire according to the constructs of the Health Belief Model. We evaluated the questionnaire using data from a cross-sectional study with focus groups (n = 20) and a prospective observational case series (n=58). Principal components analysis provided assessment of construct validity. We repeated the questionnaire after 3 months for test-retest reliability. We evaluated predictive validity using an electronic dosing monitor as an objective measure of adherence. Results: Focus group participants provided 931 statements related to adherence, of which 88.7% (826/931) could be categorized into the constructs of the Health Belief Model. Perceived barriers accounted for 31% (288/931) of statements, cues-to-action 14% (131/931), susceptibility 12% (116/931), benefits 12% (115/931), severity 10% (91/931), and self-efficacy 9% (85/931). The principal components analysis explained 77% of the variance with five components representing Health Belief Model constructs. Reliability analyses showed acceptable Cronbach’s alphas (>.70) for four of the seven components (severity, susceptibility, barriers [eye drop administration], and barriers [discomfort]). Predictive validity was high, with several Health Belief Model questions significantly associated (P <.05) with adherence and a correlation coefficient (R2) of .40. Test-retest reliability was 90%. Conclusion: The GTCAT shows excellent repeatability, content, construct, and predictive validity for glaucoma adherence. A multisite trial is needed to determine whether the results can be generalized and whether the questionnaire accurately measures the effect of interventions to increase adherence. PMID:24072942

  16. The initial feasibility of a computer-based motivational intervention for adherence for youth newly recommended to start antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Outlaw, Angulique Y; Naar-King, Sylvie; Tanney, Mary; Belzer, Marvin E; Aagenes, Anna; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Merlo, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Young people represent the largest number of new HIV infections, thus youth living with HIV (YLH) are likely to be the largest group to initiate antiretroviral treatment (ART). Adherence patterns for behaviorally infected YLH are not adequate to effectively manage the disease; therefore, novel interventions are needed to improve medication adherence. The purpose of the current study, which will precede a randomized controlled trial, was to assess the initial feasibility of an individually tailored computer-based two-session interactive motivational interviewing (MI) intervention for YLH newly recommended to start ART. Intervention development occurred in collaboration with three youth advisory groups. Ten youth (ages 18-24) were recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed the intervention online. Intervention components focused on medication adherence (rating perceived importance and confidence, and goal setting). Retention was 100% for both intervention sessions. All participants (n=10) felt medication adherence was important, but 80% felt confident they could manage their adherence to HIV medications. Ninety percent of participants set the goal of taking their HIV medications exactly as prescribed and reported success achieving this goal at follow-up. Additionally, participants were satisfied with the quality of the sessions and the amount of assistance they received for managing their adherence to HIV medications (90% participants for Session 1; 89% for Session 2). Per exit interview responses, participants felt that the intervention made them think more about their health and was a motivator for them to take better care of their health. In conclusion, the intervention was feasible for YLH enrolled in the study. PMID:23869650

  17. Optimising text messaging to improve adherence to web-based smoking cessation treatment: a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amanda L; Jacobs, Megan A; Cohn, Amy M; Cha, Sarah; Abroms, Lorien C; Papandonatos, George D; Whittaker, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Millions of smokers use the Internet for smoking cessation assistance each year; however, most smokers engage minimally with even the best designed websites. The ubiquity of mobile devices and their effectiveness in promoting adherence in other areas of health behaviour change make them a promising tool to address adherence in Internet smoking cessation interventions. Text messaging is used by most adults, and messages can proactively encourage use of a web-based intervention. Text messaging can also be integrated with an Internet intervention to facilitate the use of core Internet intervention components. Methods and analysis We identified four aspects of a text message intervention that may enhance its effectiveness in promoting adherence to a web-based smoking cessation programme: personalisation, integration, dynamic tailoring and message intensity. Phase I will use a two-level full factorial design to test the impact of these four experimental features on adherence to a web-based intervention. The primary outcome is a composite metric of adherence that incorporates general utilisation metrics (eg, logins, page views) and specific feature utilisation shown to predict abstinence. Participants will be N=860 adult smokers who register on an established Internet cessation programme and enrol in its text message programme. Phase II will be a two-arm randomised trial to compare the efficacy of the web-based cessation programme alone and in conjunction with the optimised text messaging intervention on 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 9 months. Phase II participants will be N=600 adult smokers who register to use an established Internet cessation programme and enrol in text messaging. Secondary analyses will explore whether adherence mediates the effect of treatment condition on outcome. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by Chesapeake IRB. We will disseminate study results through peer-reviewed manuscripts and conference

  18. Treatment adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunfei; Yin, Rulan; Fu, Ting; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Guo, Genkai; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) may lead to joint damage and function loss. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore Chinese RA patients’ adherence rates and investigate potential risk factors for nonadherence. Methods A total of 122 RA patients were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University from January 2014 to April 2015. Patients were asked to complete a set of standardized self-report questionnaires (Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Short Form-36 questionnaire, 28-joint Disease Activity Score, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Visual Analog Scale). Independent samples t-tests, chi-square analyses, and logistic regression modeling were used to analyze these data. Results Based on Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology, 38% of the patients adhered to DMARDs. Adherence was associated with education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs. Other demographic and clinical characteristics were not associated with adherence. Logistic regression models identified income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs as predictors of medication nonadherence. Conclusion In this study, 62% of patients with RA were not adherent to their DMARD prescription. Education, income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were associated with medication adherence, and income, depression, and the total number of DMARDs were independent predictors of medication adherence in patients with RA. These findings could help medical personnel develop helpful interventions to improve adherence in RA patients by paying more attention to the patients with these accompanying risk factors and, finally, improve RA patients’ quality of life. PMID:27217726

  19. Does treatment adherence correlates with health related quality of life? findings from a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although medication adherence and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are two different outcome measures, it is believed that adherence to medication leads to an improvement in overall HRQoL. The study aimed to evaluate the association between medication adherence and HRQoL. Methods A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study design was undertaken with hypertension patients attending public hospitals in Quetta city, Pakistan. HRQoL was measured by Euroqol EQ-5D. Medication adherence was assessed by the Drug Attitude Inventory. Descriptive statistics was used to tabulate demographic and disease-related information. Spearmans correlation was used to assess the association between the study variables. All analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0. Results Among 385 study patients, the mean age (SD) was 39.02 (6.59), with 68.8% of males dominating the entire cohort. The mean (SD) duration of hypertension was 3.010.939years. Forty percent (n=154) had a bachelors degree level of education with 34.8% (n=134) working in the private sector. A negative and weak correlation (0.77) between medication adherence and EQ-5D was reported. In addition, a negative weak correlation (0.120) was observed among medication adherence and EQ-VAS. Conclusions Correlations among the study variables were negligible and negative. Hence, there is no apparent relationship between the variables. PMID:22545950

  20. Utilization of medical treatments and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults with histories of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Meade, Christina S; Hansen, Nathan B; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2009-04-01

    HIV is a chronic, life-threatening illness that necessitates regular and consistent medical care. Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a common experience among HIV-positive adults and may interfere with treatment utilization. This study examined rates and correlates of treatment utilization among HIV-positive adults with CSA enrolled in a coping intervention trial in New York City. The baseline assessment included measures of treatment utilization, mental health, substance abuse, and other psychosocial factors. In 2002-2004, participants (50% female, 69% African-American, M = 42.3 +/- 6.8 years old) were recruited. Nearly all (99%) received HIV medical care. However, 20% had no outpatient visits and 24% sought emergency services in the past 4 months. Among 184 participants receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), 22% were less than 90% adherent in the past week. In a multivariable logistic regression model, no outpatient treatment was associated with African American race (AOR = 3.46 [1.42-8.40]), poor social support (AOR = 1.59 [1.03-2.45]), and abstinence from illicit drug use (AOR = 0.37 [0.16-0.85]). Emergency service utilization was associated with HIV symptoms (AOR = 2.30 [1.22-4.35]), binge drinking (AOR=2.92 (1.18-7.24)), and illicit drug use (AOR = 1.98 [1.02-3.85]). Poor medication adherence was associated with trauma symptoms (AOR = 2.64 [1.07-6.75]) and poor social support (AOR = 1.82 [1.09-2.97]). In sum, while participants had access to HIV medical care, a sizable minority did not adhere to recommended guidelines and thus may not be benefiting optimally from treatment. Interventions targeting HIV-positive adults with CSA histories may need to address trauma symptoms, substance abuse, and poor social support that interfere with medical treatment utilization and adherence.

  1. Perceptions and Acceptability of Short Message Services Technology to Improve Treatment Adherence amongst Tuberculosis Patients in Peru: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Albino, Sandra; Tabb, Karen M.; Requena, David; Egoavil, Miguel; Pineros-Leano, Maria F.; Zunt, Joseph R.; García, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is global health concern and a leading infectious cause of mortality. Reversing TB incidence and disease-related mortality is a major global health priority. Infectious disease mortality is directly linked to failure to adhere to treatments. Using technology to send reminders by short message services have been shown to improve treatment adherence. However, few studies have examined tuberculosis patient perceptions and attitudes towards using SMS technology to increase treatment adherence. In this study, we sought to investigate perceptions related to feasibility and acceptability of using text messaging to improve treatment adherence among adults who were receiving treatment for TB in Callao, Peru. Methods We conducted focus group qualitative interviews with current TB positive and non-contagious participants to understand the attitudes, perceptions, and feasibility of using short message service (SMS) reminders to improve TB treatment adherence. Subjects receiving care through the National TB Program were recruited through public health centers in Ventanilla, Callao, Peru. In four focus groups, we interviewed 16 patients. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic network analysis and codebook techniques were used to analyze data. Results Three major themes emerged from the data: limits on health literacy and information posed challenges to successful TB treatment adherence, treatment motivation at times facilitated adherence to TB treatment, and acceptability of SMS including positive perceptions of SMS to improve TB treatment adherence. The majority of patients shared considerations about how to effectively and confidentially administer an SMS intervention with TB positive participants. Conclusion The overall perceptions of the use of SMS were positive and indicated that SMS technology may be an efficient way to transmit motivational texts on treatment, health education information, and simple reminders to

  2. A Social-Ecological View of Barriers and Facilitators for HIV Treatment Adherence: Interviews with Puerto Rican HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify perceived barriers and facilitators for HAART adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in Southern Puerto Rico using a Social Ecological framework. Patients and Methods Individual in-depths interviews were conducted with 12 HIV patients with a history of HAART non-adherence. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Content analysis was performed for each transcribed interview by three independent coders using a codebook. Using Atlas TI, super-codes and families were generated to facilitate the categorization tree as well as grounded analyses and density estimates Results Most participants reported a monthly income of $500 or less (n = 7), a high school education level (n = 7), being unemployed (n = 9) and being recipients of government health insurance (n = 11). Three out of six women reported living alone with their children and most men informed living with their parents or other relatives (n = 4). For the grounded analyses, the top four sub-categories linked to high number of quotations were mental health barriers (G = 32) followed by treatment regimen (G = 28), health system (G = 24) and interpersonal relations (G = 16). The top four sub-categories linked to high number of codes are treatment regimen (D = 4), health status perception (D = 3), interpersonal relations (D = 3) and health system (D = 3). Conclusion The results of this study suggest the interconnection of HIV treatment adherence barriers at various system levels. Future studies on HIV treatment barriers should explore these interactions and investigate the possible synergistic effect on non-adherent behavior PMID:26422049

  3. Evaluation of SMS reminder messages for altering treatment adherence and health seeking perceptions among malaria care-seekers in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jenny X.; Modrek, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, access to malaria diagnostics may be expanded if drug retailers were allowed to administer malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). A 2012 pilot intervention showed that short message service (SMS) reminder messages could boost treatment adherence to RDT results by 10–14% points. This study aimed to replicate the SMS intervention in a different population, and additionally test the effect of an expanded message about anticipated RDT access policy change on customers’ acceptability for drug retailers’ administration of RDTs. One day after being tested with an RDT, participants who purchased malaria treatment from drug shops were randomized to receive (1) a basic SMS reminder repeating the RDT result and appropriate treatment actions, (2) an expanded SMS reminder additionally saying that the ‘government might allow pharmacists/chemists to do RDTs’ or (3) no SMS reminders (i.e. control). Using regression analysis, we estimate intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment effects on the treated for 686 study participants. Results corroborate previous findings that a basic SMS reminder increased treatment adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 1.53, 95% CI 0.96–2.44] and decreased use of unnecessary anti-malarials for RDT-negative adults [OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.39–1.00]. The expanded SMS also increased adherence for adults [OR = 1.42, 95% CI 0.97–2.07], but the effects for sick children differed—the basic SMS did not have any measurable impact on treatment adherence [OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.24–3.09] or use of unnecessary anti-malarials [OR = 1.27, 95% CI 0.32–1.93], and the expanded SMS actually led to poorer treatment adherence [OR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.10–0.66] and increased use of unnecessary anti-malarials [OR = 4.67, 95% CI 1.76–12.43]. Further, the targeted but neutral message in the expanded SMS lowered acceptance for drug retailers' administration of RDTs [OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.10–2.93], counter to what we hypothesized. Future

  4. Improving treatment adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: what are the options?

    PubMed Central

    Marengo, María F; Suarez-Almazor, María E

    2015-01-01

    Low adherence to therapeutic regimens is a prevalent and persistent healthcare problem, particularly for patients with chronic disorders. Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) show inadequate therapeutic adherence resulting in poor health outcomes. Reasons for nonadherence can be unintentional or intentional. The characteristics of patient–doctor interactions are also likely to play a role although they have not been well studied for patients with RA. While many educational and cognitive behavioral interventions have been proposed to improve adherence, the few studies that have examined the efficacy of these programs in RA have had disappointing results. Future studies involving the use of mobile technologies have shown promise in other chronic diseases and could prove useful for patients with RA. PMID:27087857

  5. Does adherence to treatment mediate the relationship between patients' treatment outcome expectancies and the outcomes of pain intensity and recovery from acute low back pain?

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Spriensma, Alette S; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that patients' expectancies about the effectiveness of treatment influence their treatment outcomes, but the working mechanism is rarely studied in patients with low back pain. Theoretical models suggest that adherence to treatment may be an important pathway. The aim of this study was to assess the mediating role of adherence to treatment in the relationship between expectancies and the outcomes of recovery and pain intensity in patients with acute low back pain. This study used data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain. Expectancies were measured with the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with a medication diary. Pain intensity was recorded daily in a diary on a 0 to 10 pain scale, and recovery was defined as the first of 7 consecutive days scoring 0 or 1 on a 6-point pain scale. Cox regression (dependent variable: recovery) and linear mixed-model analyses (dependent variable: daily pain intensity scores) were performed. The "difference in coefficients" approach was used to establish mediation. A total of 1573 participants were included in current analyses. There was a small but highly significant relationship between expectancies and outcomes; 3.3% of the relationship between expectancies and recovery and 14.2% of the relationship between expectancies and pain intensity were mediated by adherence to treatment. This study does not convincingly support the theory that adherence is a key pathway in the relationship between treatment outcome expectancies and recovery and pain intensity in this acute low back pain population. PMID:25906348

  6. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-06-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD--both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: impact of medication persistence and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Gu, Jieruo; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Aims Raloxifene treatment of osteoporotic fractures is clinically effective, but economic evidence in support of raloxifene reimbursement is lacking in the People’s Republic of China. We aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures using an osteoporosis health economic model. We also assessed the impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of raloxifene. Methods We used a previously developed and validated osteoporosis state-transition microsimulation model to compare treatment with raloxifene with current practices of osteoporotic fracture treatment (conventional treatment) from the health care payer’s perspective. A Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis with microsimulations was conducted. The impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene was addressed in sensitivity analyses. The simulated patients used in the model’s initial state were 65-year-old postmenopausal Chinese women with osteoporosis (but without previous fractures), simulated using a 1-year cycle length until all patients had died. Costs were presented in 2015 US dollars (USD), and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at USD 20,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results Treatment with raloxifene improved clinical effectiveness by 0.006 QALY, with additional costs of USD 221 compared with conventional treatment. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 36,891 per QALY gained. The cost-effectiveness decision did not change in most of the one-way sensitivity analyses. With full raloxifene persistence and adherence, average effectiveness improved compared with the real-world scenario, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 40,948 per QALY gained compared with conventional treatment. Conclusion Given the willingness-to-pay threshold

  8. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, O.; Arroyo, R.; Martínez-Yélamos, S.; Marco, M.; Merino, J. A. García; Muñoz, D.; Merino, E.; Roque, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6–1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6–94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28–7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  9. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Arroyo, R; Martínez-Yélamos, S; Marco, M; Merino, J A García; Muñoz, D; Merino, E; Roque, A

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6-1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6-94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28-7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months.

  10. Improved adherence with PTH(1–84) in an extension trial for 24 months results in enhanced BMD gains in the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Bilezikian, J. P.; Greenspan, S. L.; Wüster, C.; Muñoz-Torres, M.; Bone, H. G.; Rosen, C. J.; Andersen, H. S.; Hanley, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of PTH(1–84) treatment over 24 months followed by 12 months discontinuation on BMD, bone turnover markers, fractures and the impact of adherence on efficacy. Introduction There is limited information about the effect of PTH(1-84) after 18 months and limited data about the impact of compliance on response to anabolic therapy. Methods Seven hundred and eighty-one subjects who received active PTH(1–84) in the Treatment of Osteoporosis with Parathyroid hormone trial for approximately 18 months were entered into a 6-month open-label extension. Thereafter, they were followed for 12 additional months after discontinuation of treatment. Endpoints examined included changes in BMD and biochemical markers. Results PTH(1–84) treatment over 24 months increased BMD at the lumbar spine by 6.8 % above baseline (p < 0.05). The total corresponding BMD increases at the hip and femoral neck were 1.1 and 2.2% above baseline. Larger increases in spine BMD were observed in participants with ≥80 % adherence to daily injections of PTH(1–84) (8.3% in adherent vs 4.9 % in poorly adherent patients). Total hip BMD gains were 1.7 % in adherent vs 0.6 % in poorly adherent participants. Markers of bone turnover (BSAP and NTx) peaked 6 months after starting PTH(1–84) treatment and declined slowly but remained above baseline at 24 months. After discontinuation of PTH(1–84) treatment (at 24 months), bone turnover markers returned to near baseline levels by 30 months. The adherent group sustained significantly fewer fractures than the poorly adherent group. Conclusions PTH(1–84) treatment over 24 months results in continued increases in lumbar spine BMD. Adherence to treatment with PTH(1–84) for up to 24 months is also associated with greater efficacy. PMID:22930240

  11. Long-Term Adherence to IFN Beta-1a Treatment when Using RebiSmart® Device in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Arroyo, R; Martínez-Yélamos, S; Marco, M; Merino, J A García; Muñoz, D; Merino, E; Roque, A

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of multiple sclerosis is associated with adherence. RebiSmart® electronic device provides useful information about adherence to the treatment with subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a (Rebif®). The aim of the study was to determine long-term adherence to this treatment in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This retrospective multicentre observational study analysed 258 patients with RRMS who were receiving sc IFN β-1a (Rebif®) treatment by using RebiSmart® until replacement (36 months maximum lifetime) or treatment discontinuation. Adherence was calculated with data (injection dosage, time, and date) automatically recorded by RebiSmart®. Patients in the study had a mean age of 41 years with a female proportion of 68%. Mean EDSS score at start of treatment was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.6-1.9). Overall adherence was 92.6% (95% CI, 90.6-94.5%). A total of 30.2% of patients achieved an adherence rate of 100%, 80.6% at least 90%, and only 13.2% of patients showed a suboptimal adherence (<80%). A total of 59.9% of subjects were relapse-free after treatment initiation. Among 106 subjects (41.1%) who experienced, on average, 1.4 relapses, the majority were mild (40.6%) or moderate (47.2%). Having experienced relapses from the beginning of the treatment was the only variable significantly related to achieving an adherence of at least 80% (OR = 3.06, 1.28-7.31). Results of this study indicate that sc IFN β-1a administration facilitated by RebiSmart® could lead to high rates of adherence to a prescribed dose regimen over 36 months. PMID:27526201

  12. Predicting Therapist Adherence to a Transported Family-Based Treatment for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen

    2005-01-01

    This study examined relations between therapist, caregiver, and youth characteristics and therapist adherence to multisystemic therapy (MST). Participants were 405 therapists in 45 organizations and the 1,711 families they treated with MST. Therapist perceptions that the flexible hours required to implement MST are problematic predicted lower…

  13. "I honestly believe god keeps me healthy so i can take care of my child": parental use of faith related to treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Cotton, Sian; Ragsdale, Judy; Quittner, Alexandra L; McPhail, Gary; Seid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of studies address parental faith and its relationship to their children's health. Using cystic fibrosis as a disease exemplar in which religion/spirituality have been shown to play a role and parental health behaviors (adherence to their child's daily recommended home treatments) are important, this study explored whether parents with different levels of adherence would describe use of faith differently. Twenty-five interviews were completed and analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Some parents described no relationship between faith and treatment adherence. However, of those who did, higher-adherence parents believed God empowered them to care for their child and they used prayer to change themselves, while lower-adherence parents described trusting God to care for their child and used prayer to change God. Clinical implications for chaplains' differential engagement with parents are presented.

  14. The effect of providing patient-specific electronically monitored antipsychotic medication adherence results on the treatment planning of prescribers of outpatients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nakonezny, Paul A; Byerly, Matthew J; Pradhan, Amit

    2013-06-30

    Adherence to antipsychotic medication was assessed monthly over a 6-month study period using patient-specific electronic monitoring (EM) of medication bottle opening in 23 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Patient-specific EM adherence results were then shared with the seven participating prescribers, who were surveyed concerning the treatment changes, if any, that they would recommend based on the EM adherence results. Prescribers indicated that they would recommend adherence-related treatment plan changes in 61% of patients, all of whom were ≤80% adherent. The strength of this effect was significantly stronger for psychosocial intervention treatment plan change recommendations than for medication treatment plan change recommendations. Of the psychosocial intervention recommendations, an increase in case management intensity was most often recommended. Of the medication treatment plan recommendations, initiation of a long-acting injectable medication and an increase in dosage of current oral antipsychotic medication were each recommended in only one case. Prescriber recommendations of adherence interventions in this study were not necessarily consistent with major guideline recommendations. Findings suggest the need for further study and dissemination of findings regarding evidence-based adherence assessment and interventions.

  15. The association of smoking with medical treatment adherence in the workforce of a large employer

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Bruce W; Lynch, Wendy D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prior descriptive epidemiology studies have shown that smokers have lower compliance rates with preventive care services and lower chronic medication adherence rates for preventive care services in separate studies. The goal of this study was to perform a more detailed analysis to validate both of these findings for current smokers versus nonsmokers within the benefit-covered population of a large US employer. Patients and methods This study involved the analysis of incurred medical and pharmacy claims for employee and spouse health plan enrollees of a single US-based employer during 2010. Multivariate regression models were used to compare data by active or never-smoker status for preventive care services and medication adherence for chronic conditions. Analysis controlled for demographic variables, chronic condition prevalence, and depression. Results Controlling for demographic variables and comorbid conditions, smokers had significantly lower cancer screening rates, with absolute reductions of 6%–13%. Adherence to chronic medication use for hypertension was also significantly lower among smokers, with nearly 7% fewer smokers having a medication possession ratio of ≥80%. Smokers were less adherent to depression medications (relative risk =0.79) than nonsmokers (P=0.10). While not statistically significant, smokers were consistently less adherent to all other medications than nonsmokers. Conclusion Current smokers are less compliant with recommended preventive care and medication use than nonsmokers, likely contributing to smoking-related employer costs. Awareness of these care gaps among smokers and direct management should be considered as part of a comprehensive population health-management strategy. PMID:24790415

  16. Using a Mobile Health Intervention to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Retention Among Patients at Risk for Disengaging with Care.

    PubMed

    Rana, Aadia I; van den Berg, Jacob J; Lamy, Eric; Beckwith, Curt G

    2016-04-01

    Less than half of the 1.2 million HIV-infected individuals in the United States are in consistent medical care, with only a third receiving treatment resulting in viral suppression. Novel interventions to improve engagement are necessary to ensure medical adherence, improve long-term outcomes, and reduce HIV transmission. Mobile health (mHealth) strategies including cell phone and text messaging have shown success in the developing world for medical adherence, yet mHealth interventions have not been developed and evaluated to improve retention in HIV care in the United States. We conducted a 6-month pilot study investigating the use of a clinic-based bi-directional texting intervention to enhance engagement in HIV care among those with higher risk of loss to follow up, including those with a recent HIV diagnosis or those re-engaging in HIV care at a large urban clinic in New England. PMID:27028183

  17. Enhanced care by community health workers in improving treatment adherence to antidepressant medication in rural women with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Johnson; Isaacs, Anton; Shanbag, Deepthi; Selvan, Sumithra; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Depression remains largely undiagnosed in women residing in rural India and consequently many do not seek help. Moreover, among those who are diagnosed, many do not complete treatment due to high rates of attrition. This study was aimed to compare the effectiveness of enhanced care with usual care in improving treatment seeking and adherence to antidepressant medication in women with depression living in rural India. Methods: Six villages from rural Bangalore were randomized to either community health worker supported enhanced care or usual care. A total of 260 adult depressed women formed the final participants for the analysis. The outcome measures were number of women who sought and completed treatment, number of clinic visits, duration of treatment with antidepressant, changes in severity of depression (HDRS) and changes in quality of life [WHO-QOL (Brev) scale]. Results: A significantly greater number of women from the treatment intervention (TI) group completed the treatment and were on treatment for a longer duration compared to the treatment as usual (TAU) group. However, there were no significant differences in the severity of depression or quality of life between the TI and the TAU groups or between treatment completers and treatment dropouts at six months. Interpretation & conclusions: Enhanced care provided by the trained community health workers to rural women with major depression living in the community resulted in greater number of women seeking help and adhering to treatment with antidepressants. However, despite enhanced care a significant number of rural women diagnosed with depression either did not seek help or discontinued treatment prematurely. These findings have significant public health implications, as untreated depression is associated with considerable disability. PMID:24718398

  18. Perceptions of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) and barriers to adherence in Nasarawa and Cross River States in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria during pregnancy is dangerous to both mother and foetus. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) is a strategy where pregnant women in malaria-endemic countries receive full doses of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), whether or not they have malaria. The Nigerian government adopted IPTp as a national strategy in 2005; however, major gaps affecting perception, uptake, adherence, and scale-up remain. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in peri-urban and rural communities in Nasarawa and Cross River States in Nigeria. Study instruments were based on the socio-ecological model and its multiple levels of influences, taking into account individual, community, societal, and environmental contexts of behaviour and social change. Women of reproductive age, their front-line care providers, and (in Nasarawa only) their spouses participated in focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews. Facility sampling was purposive to include tertiary, secondary and primary health facilities. Results The study found that systems-based challenges (stockouts; lack of provider knowledge of IPTp protocols) coupled with individual women’s beliefs and lack of understanding of IPT contribute to low uptake and adherence. Many pregnant women are reluctant to seek care for an illness they do not have. Those with malaria often prefer to self-medicate through drug shops or herbs, though those who seek clinic-based treatment trust their providers and willingly accept medicine prescribed. Conclusions Failing to deliver complete IPTp to women attending antenatal care is a missed opportunity. While many obstacles are structural, programmes can target women, their communities and the health environment with specific interventions to increase IPTp uptake and adherence. PMID:24059757

  19. A review of the role of food insecurity in adherence to care and treatment among adult and pediatric populations living with HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sera; Wheeler, Amanda; McCoy, Sandi; Weiser, Sheri D.

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for reducing HIV/AIDS morbidity and mortality. Food insecurity (FI) is emerging as an important barrier to adherence to care and treatment recommendations for people living with HIV (PLHIV), but this relationship has not been comprehensively examined. Therefore, we reviewed the literature to explore how FI may impact ART adherence, retention in medical care, and adherence to health care recommendations among PLHIV. We found data to support FI as a critical barrier to adherence to ART and to other health care recommendations among HIV-infected adults, HIV-infected pregnant women and their HIV-exposed infants, and child and adolescent populations of PLHIV. Associations between FI and ART non-adherence were seen in qualitative and quantitative studies. We identified a number of mechanisms to explain how food insecurity and ART non-adherence may be causally linked, including the exacerbation of hunger or ART side effects in the absence of adequate food and competing resource demands. Interventions that address FI may improve adherence to care and treatment recommendations for PLHIV. PMID:23842717

  20. Psychological and Educational Intervention to Improve Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence in Ethiopia Based on Health Belief Model: A Cluster Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Tol, Azar; Garmaroudi, Gholamreza; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Kebede, Abebaw; Ejeta, Luche Tadesse; Kassa, Desta; Klinkenberg, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment non-adherence results in treatment failure, prolonged transmission of disease and emergence of drug resistance. Although the problem widely investigated, there remains an information gap on the effectiveness of different methods to improve treatment adherence and the predictors of non-adherence in resource limited countries based on theoretical models. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of psychological counseling and educational intervention on tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence based on Health Belief Model (HBM). Methodology A cluster randomized control trial was conducted in Addis Ababa from May to December, 2014. Patients were enrolled into study consecutively from 30 randomly selected Health Centers (HCs) (14 HCs intervention and 16 HCs control groups). A total of 698 TB patients, who were on treatment for one month to two months were enrolled. A structured questionnaire was administered to both groups of patients at baseline and endpoint of study. Control participants received routine directly-observed anti-TB therapy and the intervention group additionally received combined psychological counseling and adherence education. Treatment non-adherence level was the main outcome of the study, and multilevel logistic regression was employed to assess the impact of intervention on treatment adherence. Results At enrollment, the level of non-adherence among intervention (19.4%) and control (19.6%) groups was almost the same. However, after intervention, non-adherence level decreased among intervention group from 19.4 (at baseline) to 9.5% (at endpoint), while it increased among control group from 19.4% (baseline) to 25.4% (endpoint). Psychological counseling and educational interventions resulted in significant difference with regard to non-adherence level between intervention and control groups (Adjusted OR = 0.31, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) (0.18–0.53), p < 0.001)). Conclusion Psychological counseling and educational interventions

  1. Results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a mobile SMS-based intervention on treatment adherence in HIV/AIDS-infected Brazilian women and impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Martini; Barbosa, Bárbara Jaqueline Peres; e Costa, Durval Alex Gomes; Sigulem, Daniel; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Filho, Adauto Castelo; Pisa, Ivan Torres

    2013-01-01

    adherence, and 10 (90.90%) responded that they would like to continue receiving SMS messages. SMS messaging can help Brazilian women living with HIV/AIDS to adhere to antiretroviral therapy for a period of at least 4 months. In general, the results are encouraging because the SMS messages stimulated more participants in the intervention group to be adherent to their treatment, and the patients were satisfied with the messages received, which were seen as reminders, incentives and signs of affection by the health clinic for a marginalized population. PMID:22296762

  2. Antihypertensive drug prescription patterns, rationality, and adherence to Joint National Committee-7 hypertension treatment guidelines among Indian postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vishal R.; Sharma, Sudhaa; Mahajan, Shagun; Mahajan, Annil; Khajuria, Vijay; Mahajan, Vivek; Prakash, Chander

    2014-01-01

    Aim of Study: The aim of this study is to evaluate antihypertensive drug prescription patterns, rationality and adherence to Joint National Committee (JNC-7) hypertension (HT) treatment recommendations among Indian postmenopausal women (PMW). Materials and Methods: An observational and cross-sectional prospective prescription audit study was carried over a period of 1 year. A total of 500 prescriptions prescribed to PMW for diagnosed HT, were identified for one point analysis. Drug prescription patterns/trends, and their adherence to JNC-7 report as well as rationality using WHO guide to good prescribing was assessed. Results: In the monotherapy, category angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) accounted (24.8%), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) (19.4%), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) (11%), beta blockers (BBs) (2.8%), and diuretics (2%) of the total prescription. Individually, amlodipine was maximally prescribed in 16.4%. 31.6% had double combination, whereas 2.2% and 1% had triple and four drug combinations, respectively. About 3.6% of the prescription contained antihypertensive combination along with other class of drug. ARBs + diuretic were observed in 11%, CCBs + BB 10% and ACEI + diuretic in 2.6% of the total prescriptions. Among the combination therapy amlodipine + atenolol (8.4%), telmisartan + hydrochlorothiazide (6%) and losartan + hydrochlorothiazide (4.4%) were maximally prescribed. 84.21% (P < 0.001) of the prescription showed nonadherence as per recommendations for pre-HT. 100% and 43.25% adherence rates were noticed for Stage 1 HT (P < 0.001) and Stage 2 HT (P > 0.05) patients. Conclusion: Antihypertensive prescription trends largely adhere to existing guidelines and are rational except polypharmacy, generic and fixed dose combinations prescribing, were some of the common pharmacologically considered irrationality noticed. PMID:24970986

  3. Adherence to Artemisinin Combination Therapy for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Willis, Andrew; Bil, Karla; Singh, Jatinder; Mukomena Sompwe, Eric; Ariti, Cono

    2015-01-01

    Between 2011 and 2013 the number of recorded malaria cases had more than doubled, and between 2009 and 2013 had increased almost 4-fold in MSF-OCA (Médecins sans Frontières – Operational Centre Amsterdam) programmes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The reasons for this rise are unclear. Incorrect intake of Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) could result in failure to treat the infection and potential recurrence. An adherence study was carried out to assess whether patients were completing the full course of ACT. One hundred and eight malaria patients in Shamwana, Katanga province, DRC were visited in their households the day after ACT was supposed to be completed. They were asked a series of questions about ACT administration and the blister pack was observed (if available). Sixty seven (62.0%) patients were considered probably adherent. This did not take into account the patients that vomited or spat their pills or took them at the incorrect time of day, in which case adherence dropped to 46 (42.6%). The most common reason that patients gave for incomplete/incorrect intake was that they were vomiting or felt unwell (10 patients (24.4%), although the reasons were not recorded for 22 (53.7%) patients). This indicates that there may be poor understanding of the importance of completing the treatment or that the side effects of ACT were significant enough to over-ride the pharmacy instructions. Adherence to ACT was poor in this setting. Health education messages emphasising the need to complete ACT even if patients vomit doses, feel unwell or their health conditions improve should be promoted. PMID:25949803

  4. The relationship between treatment attendance, adherence, and outcome in a caregiver-mediated intervention for low-resourced families of young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Carr, Themba; Shih, Wendy; Lawton, Kathy; Lord, Catherine; King, Bryan; Kasari, Connie

    2016-08-01

    Rates of participation in intervention research have not been extensively studied within autism spectrum disorder. Such research is important given the benefit of early intervention on long-term prognosis for children with autism spectrum disorder. The goals of this study were to examine how family demographic factors predicted treatment attendance and adherence in a caregiver-mediated randomized controlled trial targeting core deficits of autism spectrum disorder, and whether treatment attendance and adherence predicted outcome. In all, 147 caregiver-child dyads from a low-resourced population were randomized to in-home caregiver-mediated module or group-based caregiver education module treatment. Treatment attendance, adherence, and outcome (time spent in joint engagement) were the primary outcome variables. The majority of families who entered treatment (N = 87) maintained good attendance. Attendance was significantly predicted by socioeconomic status, site, and treatment condition. Families in caregiver-mediated module reported lower levels of treatment adherence, which was significantly predicted by site, condition, caregiver stress, and child nonverbal intelligence quotient. Dyads in caregiver-mediated module had significantly longer interactions of joint engagement, which was significantly predicted by an interaction between treatment attendance and condition. Overall, the results from this study stress the importance of considering demographic variables in research design when considering barriers to treatment attendance and adherence.

  5. Design of a randomized trial to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment in South India - the HIVIND study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment has been a public health challenge associated with the treatment of HIV. Although different adherence-supporting interventions have been reported, their long term feasibility in low income settings remains uncertain. Thus, there is a need to explore sustainable contextual adherence aids in such settings, and to test these using rigorous scientific designs. The current ubiquity of mobile phones in many resource-constrained settings, make it a contextually appropriate and relatively low cost means of supporting adherence. In India, mobile phones have wide usage and acceptability and are potentially feasible tools for enhancing adherence to medications. This paper presents the study protocol for a trial, to evaluate the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to first-line antiretroviral treatment in South India. Methods/Design 600 treatment naïve patients eligible for first-line treatment as per the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines will be recruited into the trial at two clinics in South India. Patients will be randomized into control and intervention arms. The control arm will receive the standard of care; the intervention arm will receive the standard of care plus mobile phone reminders. Each reminder will take the form of an automated call and a picture message. Reminders will be delivered once a week, at a time chosen by the patient. Patients will be followed up for 24 months or till the primary outcome i.e. virological failure, is reached, whichever is earlier. Self-reported adherence is a secondary outcome. Analysis is by intention-to-treat. A cost-effectiveness study of the intervention will also be carried out. Discussion Stepping up telecommunications technology in resource-limited healthcare settings is a priority of the World Health Organization. The trial will evaluate if the use of mobile phone reminders can influence adherence to first-line antiretrovirals in an Indian context

  6. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p < .01); however, no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p < .001) and when not protected by naltrexone (p < .02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence.

  7. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p < .01); however, no effect of experimental group was observed on percent opiate-negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p < .001) and when not protected by naltrexone (p < .02), independent of experimental group. Overall, these results show that contingent access to a therapeutic workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence. PMID:23205722

  8. Comprehensive CYP2D6 genotype and adherence affect outcome in breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alastair M; Johnson, Andrea; Quinlan, Philip; Hillman, Grantland; Fontecha, Marcel; Bray, Susan E; Purdie, Colin A; Jordan, Lee B; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Latif, Ayshe; Hadfield, Kirsten D; Clarke, Robert B; Ashcroft, Linda; Evans, D Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Nikoloff, Michele; Lawrence, Jeffrey; Newman, William G

    2011-01-01

    The association between CYP2D6 genotype and outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen remains controversial. We assessed the influence of comprehensive versus limited CYP2D6 genotype in the context of tamoxifen adherence and co-medication in a large cohort of 618 patients. Genotyping of 33 CYP2D6 alleles used two archival cohorts from tamoxifen-treated women with invasive breast cancer (Dundee, n = 391; Manchester, n = 227). Estimates for recurrence-free survival (RFS) were calculated based on inferred CYP2D6 phenotypes using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for nodal status and tumour size. Patients with at least one reduced function CYP2D6 allele (60%) or no functional alleles (6%) had a non-significant trend for worse RFS: hazard ratio (HR) 1.52 (CI 0.98-2.36, P = 0.06). For post-menopausal women on tamoxifen monotherapy, the HR for recurrence in patients with reduced functional alleles was 1.96 (CI 1.05-3.66, P = 0.036). However, RFS analysis limited to four common CYP2D6 allelic variants was no longer significant (P = 0.39). The effect of CYP2D6 genotype was increased by adjusting for adherence to tamoxifen therapy, but not significantly changed when adjusted for co-administration of potent inhibitors of CYP2D6. Comprehensive genotyping of CYP2D6 and adherence to tamoxifen therapy may be useful to identify breast cancer patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen.

  9. The Effects of Psycho-Emotional and Socio-Economic Support for Tuberculosis Patients on Treatment Adherence and Treatment Outcomes – A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Hoorn, Rosa; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Collins, David; Gebhard, Agnes; van den Hof, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is uncertainty about the contribution that social support interventions (SSI) can have in mitigating the personal, social and economic costs of tuberculosis (TB) treatment on patients, and improving treatment outcomes. Objective To identify psycho-emotional (PE) and socio-economic (SE) interventions provided to TB patients and to assess the effects of these interventions on treatment adherence and treatment outcomes. Search strategy We searched PubMed and Embase from 1 January 1990–15 March 2015 and abstracts of the Union World Conference on Lung Health from 2010–2014 for studies reporting TB treatment adherence and treatment outcomes following SSI. Selection criteria Studies measuring the effects of PE or SE interventions on TB treatment adherence, treatment outcomes, and/or financial burden. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently assessed titles and abstracts for inclusion of articles. One reviewer reviewed full text articles and the reference list of selected studies. A second reviewer double checked all extracted information against the articles. Main results Twenty-five studies were included in the qualitative analysis; of which eighteen were included in the meta-analysis. Effects were pooled from 11 Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), including 9,655 participants with active TB. Meta-analysis showed that PE support (RR 1.37; CI 1.08–1.73), SE support (RR 1.08; CI 1.03–1.13) and combined PE and SE support (RR 1.17; CI 1.12–1.22) were associated with a significant improvement of successful treatment outcomes. Also PE support, SE support and a combination of these types of support were associated with reductions in unsuccessful treatment outcomes (PE: RR 0.46; CI 0.22–0.96, SE: RR 0.78; CI 0.69–0.88 and Combined PE and SE: RR 0.42; CI 0.23–0.75). Evidence on the effect of PE and SE interventions on treatment adherence were not meta-analysed because the interventions were too heterogeneous to pool. No evidence

  10. Treatment Patterns and Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Among Commercially Insured Patients With Schizoaffective Disorder in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kruti; Lin, Jay; Lingohr-Smith, Melissa; Fu, Dong-Jing; Muser, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed real-world treatment patterns and antipsychotic (AP) medication adherence among commercially insured US patients with schizoaffective disorder (SCA). Continuously insured adults aged 18 years or older with a diagnosis of SCA from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012, were identified from the Clinformatics Data Mart database. Patients were categorized into 2 cohorts: incident or prevalent SCA. Demographics and clinical characteristics were evaluated during the baseline period. Use of psychiatric medications and adherence to AP medications were evaluated during a 12-month follow-up period after index diagnosis of SCA. Of the overall study population (N = 2713; mean age, 40.2 y; 52.7% female), 1961 patients (72.3%) (mean age, 38.7 y; 51.3% female) had incident SCA, and 752 patients (27.7%) (mean age, 43.9 y; 56.5% female) had prevalent SCA. Antipsychotics were used by 74.8% of patients in the overall study population during the follow-up period. The most commonly prescribed oral AP was risperidone (23.9%), followed by quetiapine (21.4%) and aripiprazole (20.4%). Use of any long-acting injectable APs in the overall study population during the follow-up period was less than 3%. A total of 49.0% and 38.0% of the overall study population had medication possession ratios and proportion of days covered for APs of 80% or greater, respectively. Overall use of long-acting injectable APs for the treatment of SCA is low, and adherence to AP medications, measured by both medication possession ratio and proportion of days covered, is suboptimal among patients with SCA in the real-world setting. PMID:27525965

  11. Health and Nutrition Literacy and Adherence to Treatment in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Maria; Rak, Eniko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to treatment and dietary restrictions is important for health outcomes of patients with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. The relationship of adherence with nutritional and health literacy in children, adolescents, and young adults is not well understood. The current study examined the relationship of health literacy, nutrition knowledge, nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance, and medication adherence in a sample of children and young people with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. Methods We enrolled 74 patients (aged 7–29 y) with a diagnosis of chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension from the University of North Carolina Kidney Center. Participants completed instruments of nutrition literacy (Disease-Specific Nutrition Knowledge Test), health literacy (Newest Vital Sign), nutrition behavior (Nutrition Knowledge–Behavior Concordance Scale), and medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale). Linear and binary logistic regressions were used to test the associations. Results In univariate comparisons, nutrition knowledge was significantly higher in people with adequate health literacy. Medication adherence was related to nutrition knowledge and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance. Multivariate regression models demonstrated that knowledge of disease-specific nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance scores. In logistic regression, knowledge of nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict medication adherence. Lastly, health literacy and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance were significant predictors of medication adherence. Conclusion Nutrition knowledge and health literacy skills are positively associated. Nutrition knowledge, health literacy, and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance are positively related to medication adherence. Future research should focus on additional factors that may predict

  12. Patients’ beliefs about adherence to oral antidiabetic treatment: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Guénette, Line; Lauzier, Sophie; Guillaumie, Laurence; Giguère, Gabriel; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Moisan, Jocelyne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to elicit patients’ beliefs about taking their oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) as prescribed to inform the development of sound adherence-enhancing interventions. Methods A qualitative study was performed. Adults with type 2 diabetes who had been taking an OAD for >3 months were solicited to participate in one of six focus groups. Discussions were facilitated using a structured guide designed to gather beliefs related to important constructs of the theory of planned behavior. Four coders using this theory as the theoretical framework analyzed the videotaped discussions. Results Forty-five adults participated. The most frequently mentioned advantages for OAD-taking as prescribed were to avoid long-term complications and to control glycemia. Family members were perceived as positively influential. Carrying the OAD at all times, having the OAD in sight, and having a routine were important facilitating factors. Being away from home, not accepting the disease, and not having confidence in the physician’s prescription were major barriers to OAD-taking. Conclusion This study elicited several beliefs regarding OAD-taking behavior. Awareness of these beliefs may help clinicians adjust their interventions in view of their patients’ beliefs. Moreover, this knowledge is crucial to the planning, development, and evaluation of interventions that aim to improve medication adherence. PMID:25792814

  13. HAART adherence strategies for methadone clients who are HIV-positive: a treatment manual for implementing contingency management and medication coaching.

    PubMed

    Haug, Nancy A; Sorensen, James L; Gruber, Valerie A; Lollo, Nicole; Roth, Gregory

    2006-11-01

    Research demonstrates that injection drug users with HIV and/or AIDS have difficulty adhering to complex regimens of HIV medications. Because of the risk of increased viral resistance associated with irregular medication adherence, there is considerable clinical need to assist clients who abuse substances in taking their antiretroviral medications on time and as directed. This article outlines intervention strategies to improve medication adherence among clients who are in methadone maintenance. In this treatment manual, the authors delineate contingency management procedures, including voucher incentives and a fishbowl lottery prize system. They also describe intervention elements and adherence tools for medication coaching. The purpose of this manual is to describe the intervention procedures for clinicians and to serve as a resource for drug abuse treatment programs that serve clients who are HIV-positive.

  14. Factors associated with antiretroviral treatment uptake and adherence: a review. Perspectives from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Bolsewicz, K; Debattista, J; Vallely, A; Whittaker, A; Fitzgerald, L

    2015-01-01

    International focus on reducing onward HIV transmission emphasizes the need for routine HIV testing and early uptake of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Strategic targets have been set for 2020 to achieve the goal of 90% of people infected with HIV diagnosed, 90% of identified cases on treatment, and 90% of persons on treatment virally suppressed (90-90-90). It is vital to understand the complexity of factors influencing a person's treatment decisions over time and the context which may enable better adherence. In this paper we present findings from the review of published and gray literature (2003-2013) on the documented factors associated with treatment initiation and adherence in the general adult population of Australia, Canada, and the UK. A framework developed by Begley, McLaws, Ross, and Gold [2008. Cognitive and behavioural correlates of non-adherence to HIV anti-retroviral therapy: Theoretical and practical insight for clinical psychology and health psychology. Clinical Psychologist, 12(1), 9-17] in Australia was adapted to summarize the findings. A systematic database search using keywords and a set of inclusion criteria yielded 17 studies (Australia = 6; Canada = 8; UK = 3). In addition 11 reports were included in the review. We found that a person's abilities and motivations (intrapersonal factors, reported in 7 studies) to start and continue ART are influenced by a host of interconnected factors spanning relationship (interpersonal, 3 studies) and broader structural (extrapersonal, 15 studies) factors that are situated within social determinants of health. People therefore evaluate various costs and benefits of starting and staying on treatment, in which biomedical concerns play an important yet often subsidiary role. In this review the economic barriers to care were found to be significant and under-reported, highlighting the persistent health inequities in terms of access to services. Our understanding of the context around people's use of

  15. Factors associated with antiretroviral treatment uptake and adherence: a review. Perspectives from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Bolsewicz, K; Debattista, J; Vallely, A; Whittaker, A; Fitzgerald, L

    2015-01-01

    International focus on reducing onward HIV transmission emphasizes the need for routine HIV testing and early uptake of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Strategic targets have been set for 2020 to achieve the goal of 90% of people infected with HIV diagnosed, 90% of identified cases on treatment, and 90% of persons on treatment virally suppressed (90-90-90). It is vital to understand the complexity of factors influencing a person's treatment decisions over time and the context which may enable better adherence. In this paper we present findings from the review of published and gray literature (2003-2013) on the documented factors associated with treatment initiation and adherence in the general adult population of Australia, Canada, and the UK. A framework developed by Begley, McLaws, Ross, and Gold [2008. Cognitive and behavioural correlates of non-adherence to HIV anti-retroviral therapy: Theoretical and practical insight for clinical psychology and health psychology. Clinical Psychologist, 12(1), 9-17] in Australia was adapted to summarize the findings. A systematic database search using keywords and a set of inclusion criteria yielded 17 studies (Australia = 6; Canada = 8; UK = 3). In addition 11 reports were included in the review. We found that a person's abilities and motivations (intrapersonal factors, reported in 7 studies) to start and continue ART are influenced by a host of interconnected factors spanning relationship (interpersonal, 3 studies) and broader structural (extrapersonal, 15 studies) factors that are situated within social determinants of health. People therefore evaluate various costs and benefits of starting and staying on treatment, in which biomedical concerns play an important yet often subsidiary role. In this review the economic barriers to care were found to be significant and under-reported, highlighting the persistent health inequities in terms of access to services. Our understanding of the context around people's use of

  16. Predictors of adherence to a brief behavioral insomnia intervention: daily process analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiter Petrov, Megan E; Lichstein, Kenneth L; Huisingh, Carrie E; Bradley, Laurence A

    2014-05-01

    Behavioral interventions for insomnia are effective in improving sleep, yet adherence is variable, and predictors of adherence have not been consistently replicated. The relationships between daily variations in state factors at the initiation of treatment and adherence have not been investigated. Using 2-week, self-report online logs, this study determined, among 53 college students with probable insomnia, the associations of pretreatment factors and daily factors during treatment on daily variations in adherence to one session of behavioral treatments for insomnia. These treatments included stimulus control therapy (SCT), sleep restriction therapy (SRT), and sleep hygiene (SH). Low self-efficacy was associated with poorer SCT and SH adherence. Participants with a "bed partner or pet" at least some of the time had better SCT adherence. Greater total sleep time and poorer sleep quality were associated with poor SCT and SRT adherence the following night. Greater sleep efficiency was related to greater next night SCT and SRT adherence. Alcohol consumption was related to poorer SRT and SH adherence the following night. Future studies should test the replicability of these findings. Adherence trials may want to test whether discouraging alcohol intake, enhancing treatment-related self-efficacy, and monitoring and providing feedback on sleep, early in treatment, affects adherence. PMID:24680236

  17. Adherence to HIV treatment and care among previously homeless jail detainees

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nadine E.; Meyer, Jaimie P.; Avery, Ann K.; Draine, Jeffrey; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Lincoln, Thomas; Spaulding, Anne C.; Springer, Sandra A.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-infected persons entering the criminal justice system (CJS) often experience suboptimal healthcare system engagement and social instability, including homelessness. We evaluated surveys from a multisite study of 743 HIV-infected jail detainees prescribed or eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) to understand correlates of healthcare engagement prior to incarceration, focusing on differences by housing status. Dependent variables of healthcare engagement were: 1) having an HIV provider, 2) taking ART, and 3) being adherent (>95% of prescribed doses) to ART during the week before incarceration. Homeless subjects, compared to their housed counterparts, were significantly less likely to be engaged in healthcare using any measure. Despite Ryan White funding availability, insurance coverage remains insufficient among those entering jails, and having health insurance was the most significant factor correlated with having an HIV provider and taking ART. Individuals interfacing with the CJS, especially those unstably housed, need innovative interventions to facilitate healthcare access and retention. PMID:22065234

  18. Sticking to it: the effect of maximally assisted therapy on antiretroviral treatment adherence among individuals living with HIV who are unstably housed.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Surita; Palmer, Alexis K; O'Brien, Nadia; Chan, Keith; Shen, Anya; Coulter, Suzy; Montaner, Julio S G; Hogg, Robert S

    2011-11-01

    Housing is a known determinant of health behaviors, which includes adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Within the Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary Health Services (LISA) study, unstable housing is inversely associated with adherence. Several comprehensive adherence support services have emerged to improve adherence for unstably housed or otherwise vulnerable populations. The Maximally Assisted Therapy (MAT) program in Vancouver, British Columbia uses a multidisciplinary approach to support HIV-positive clients with a history of addictions or mental illness, many of whom also experience episodic homelessness. This study investigated the association between antiretroviral adherence and use of support services, including the MAT program, amongst people living with HIV and AIDS who are unstably housed in the LISA sample. Of the 212 unstably housed participants, those who attended the MAT program were 4.76 times more likely to be ≥95% adherent (95% CI 1.72-13.13; P = 0.003) than those who did not. The findings suggest that in the absence of sustainable housing solutions, programs such as MAT play an important role in supporting treatment adherence in this population.

  19. The Rational Patient and Beyond: Implications for Treatment Adherence in People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Rüsch, Nicolas; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Sher, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Many people with psychiatric disabilities do not benefit from evidence-based practices because they often do not seek out or fully adhere to them. One way psychologists have made sense of this rehabilitation and health decision process and subsequent behaviors (of which adherence might be viewed as one) is by proposing a “rational patient;” namely, that decisions are made deliberatively by weighing perceived costs and benefits of intervention options. Social psychological research, however, suggests limitations to a rational patient theory that impact models of health decision making. Design The research literature was reviewed for studies of rational patient models and alternative theories with empirical support. Special focus was on models specifically related to decisions about rehabilitation strategies for psychiatric disability. Results Notions of the rational patient evolved out of several psychological models including the health belief model, protection motivation theory, and theory of planned behavior. A variety of practice strategies evolved to promote rational decision making. However, research also suggests limitations to rational deliberations of health. (1) Rather than carefully and consciously considered, many health decisions are implicit, potentially occurring outside awareness. (2) Decisions are not always planful; often it is the immediate exigencies of a context rather than an earlier balance of costs and benefits that has the greatest effects. (3) Cool cognitions often do not dictate the process; emotional factors have an important role in health decisions. Each of these limitations suggests additional practice strategies that facilitate a person’s health decisions. Conclusions/Implications Old models of rational decision making need to be supplanted by multi-process models that explain supra-deliberative factors in health decisions and behaviors. PMID:24446671

  20. Treatment adherence among new triptan users: a 2-year cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The persistence of triptan use among newly prescribed users is low in the United States and European countries. However, triptan refill patterns in Asian primary care practices have not been well described. Methods Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan were used to conduct a retrospective cohort analysis from 2005 to 2008. All participants were followed for 2 years after receiving a new triptan prescription. Refill and 2-year retention rates of newly prescribed triptans were calculated, and predictors of the first triptan refill and 2-year retention were analyzed. Results Of the 13,951 participants with a new triptan prescription (99.9% sumatriptan), 67.4% were prescribed by a neurologist, 67.4% were prescribed at least one prophylactic agent for migraine. Of them, 34.3% adhered to the newly prescribed triptan at the first refill, 0.01% switched to another triptan, and 40.9% switched to a non-triptan acute migraine medication. The 2-year retention rate was 4.0%. The frequency of headache-related neurologic visits for 1 year before the index date, first prescription of triptan or other acute medications, first triptan prescription by a neurologist, and prophylactic use were associated with higher first refill rates. The frequency of headache-related neurologic visits 1 year before the index date and first triptan prescription by a neurologist were related to higher 2-year retention rates. Diabetes mellitus and first triptan prescription at a local medical clinic were associated with reduced probability of continued triptan use at the first refill and 2 years. Conclusions Similar to Western societies, the refill and 2-year retention rates were low in new users of triptans. Frequency of neurologic visits and triptan prescription by a neurologist were significant predictors of adherence. PMID:25117594

  1. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea*

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos; Piccin, Vivien Schmeling; Nascimento, Juliana Araújo; Viana, Fernanda Madeiro Leite; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6) or adherence (n = 6). Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect. PMID:25610507

  2. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  3. A non-interventional study of extended-release methylphenidate in the routine treatment of adolescents with ADHD: effectiveness, safety and adherence to treatment.

    PubMed

    Sobanski, Esther; Döpfner, Manfred; Ose, Claudia; Fischer, Roland

    2013-12-01

    This multi-centre, open-label, non-interventional study evaluates effectiveness, safety and adherence to treatment of a specific extended-release methylphenidate with a 50 % immediate and a 50 % extended-release component (Medikinet(®) retard) in the clinical routine treatment of 381 adolescents with ADHD and a mean age of 14.0 ± 1.9 years. ADHD and associated psychiatric symptoms, medication status and dosage frequency, treatment adherence and adverse events were assessed at baseline and after a median treatment length with Medikinet(®) retard of 70 days. Primary outcome criterion was the change of ADHD symptom severity from baseline to endpoint according to the ADHD-KGE (German: ADHS-Klinische Gesamteinschätzung) change score. At baseline, 4.2 % of the patients were treatment naïve, 92.7 % had previously received different methylphenidate formulations and 3.1 % had received atomoxetine or amphetamine. During the study, patients received a mean daily dose of 35.7 ± 15.1 mg Medikinet(®) retard. At endpoint, in 78 % of patients, the total ADHD symptom severity was reduced, in 20.4 %, it remained unchanged and in 1.6 %, it was worsened. The mean ADHD-KGE total ADHD symptom score was reduced from 1.8 ± 0.7 (moderate) at baseline to 0.8 ± 0.5 (mild; p < 0.001) at endpoint; the mean ADHD-KGE total-associated symptom score was reduced from 1.9 ± 0.7 (moderate) at baseline to 1.0 ± 0.6 (mild; p < 0.0001) at endpoint. After the medication switch from previous methylphenidate formulation to Medikinet(®) retard, multiple dosing with ≥3 daily medication intakes was reduced from 12.9 % at baseline to 3.1 % at endpoint (p < 0.001). Adherence to treatment was improved in 37 % of patients. Most frequent adverse events were loss of appetite and gastrointestinal problems. The findings suggest that pharmacologically treated adolescents with ADHD and insufficient symptom reduction and/or treatment adherence benefit from switching to Medikinet(®) retard and that it is

  4. The large social value resulting from use of statins warrants steps to improve adherence and broaden treatment.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, David C; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Goldman, Dana P; Eber, Michael; Liu, Larry Z; Abdelgawad, Tamer; Kuznik, Andreas; Chernew, Michael E; Philipson, Tomas

    2012-10-01

    Statins are considered a clinically important breakthrough for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, their social value at the US population level has not previously been studied. From an economic perspective, social value measures the quantity of resources--in monetary terms--that society would be willing to give up in order to retain the survival gains resulting from statin therapy. Using combined population and clinical data, this article calculates statins' social value to consumers, or the value of survival benefits above actual payments for the drug, and to producers, or drug revenues, for the period 1987-2008. National survey data suggest that statin therapy reduced low-density lipoprotein levels by 18.8 percent, which translated into roughly 40,000 fewer deaths, 60,000 fewer hospitalizations for heart attacks, and 22,000 fewer hospitalizations for strokes in 2008. For people starting statin therapy in 1987-2008, consumers captured $947.4 billion (76 percent) of the total social value of the survival gains. Even greater consumer benefits could be achieved in the future if statins were prescribed in full compliance with cholesterol guidelines and patients adhered to prescribed regimens. In addition, statin costs are declining because of patent expirations. Policy makers should consider interventions at the patient and provider levels to encourage both therapy for untreated patients with high cholesterol and greater adherence after therapy is initiated. PMID:23048109

  5. Medication adherence: WHO cares?

    PubMed

    Brown, Marie T; Bussell, Jennifer K

    2011-04-01

    The treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes the long-term use of pharmacotherapy. Although these medications are effective in combating disease, their full benefits are often not realized because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Factors contributing to poor medication adherence are myriad and include those that are related to patients (eg, suboptimal health literacy and lack of involvement in the treatment decision-making process), those that are related to physicians (eg, prescription of complex drug regimens, communication barriers, ineffective communication of information about adverse effects, and provision of care by multiple physicians), and those that are related to health care systems (eg, office visit time limitations, limited access to care, and lack of health information technology). Because barriers to medication adherence are complex and varied, solutions to improve adherence must be multifactorial. To assess general aspects of medication adherence using cardiovascular disease as an example, a MEDLINE-based literature search (January 1, 1990, through March 31, 2010) was conducted using the following search terms: cardiovascular disease, health literacy, medication adherence, and pharmacotherapy. Manual sorting of the 405 retrieved articles to exclude those that did not address cardiovascular disease, medication adherence, or health literacy in the abstract yielded 127 articles for review. Additional references were obtained from citations within the retrieved articles. This review surveys the findings of the identified articles and presents various strategies and resources for improving medication adherence.

  6. High rates of non-adherence to antihypertensive treatment revealed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HP LC-MS/MS) urine analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Maciej; White, Christobelle; Patel, Prashanth; Masca, Nicholas; Damani, Ravi; Hepworth, Joanne; Samani, Nilesh J; Gupta, Pankaj; Madira, Webster; Stanley, Adrian; Williams, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Non-adherence to therapy is an important cause of suboptimal blood pressure control but few practical tools exist to accurately and routinely detect it. We used a simple urine-based assay to evaluate the prevalence of antihypertensive treatment non-adherence and its impact on blood pressure in a specialist hypertension centre. Methods 208 hypertensive patients (125 new referrals, 66 follow-up patients with inadequate blood pressure control and 17 renal denervation referrals) underwent assessment of antihypertensive drug intake using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HP LC-MS/MS) urine analysis at the time of clinical appointment. A total of 40 most commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications (or their metabolites) were screened for in spot urine samples. Results Overall, 25% of patients were totally or partially non-adherent to antihypertensive treatment (total non-adherence 10.1%, partial non-adherence 14.9%). The highest prevalence of partial and total non-adherence was among follow-up patients with inadequate blood pressure control (28.8%) and those referred for consideration of renal denervation (23.5%), respectively. There was a linear relationship between blood pressure and the numerical difference in detected/prescribed antihypertensive medications—every unit increase in this difference was associated with 3.0 (1.1) mm Hg, 3.1 (0.7) mm Hg and 1.9 (0.7) mm Hg increase in adjusted clinic systolic blood pressure, clinic diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and 24 h mean daytime DBP (p=0.0051, p=8.62×10−6, p=0.0057), respectively. Conclusions Non-adherence to blood pressure lowering therapy is common, particularly in patients with suboptimal blood pressure control and those referred for renal denervation. HP LC-MS/MS urine analysis could be used to exclude non-adherence and better stratify further investigations and intervention. PMID:24694797

  7. Impact of tuberculosis treatment length and adherence under different transmission intensities.

    PubMed

    Pinho, S T R; Rodrigues, P; Andrade, R F S; Serra, H; Lopes, J S; Gomes, M G M

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of human mortality due to infectious disease. Treatment default is a relevant factor which reduces therapeutic success and increases the risk of resistant TB. In this work we analyze the relation between treatment default and treatment length along with its consequence on the disease spreading. We use a stylized model structure to explore, systematically, the effects of varying treatment duration and compliance. We find that shortening treatment alone may not reduce TB prevalence, especially in regions where transmission intensity is high, indicating the necessity of complementing this action with increased compliance. A family of default functions relating the proportion of defaulters to the treatment length is considered and adjusted to a particular dataset. We find that the epidemiological benefits of shorter treatment regimens are tightly associated with increases in treatment compliance and depend on the epidemiological background.

  8. RATE OF ADHERENCE TO AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH METHADONE MAINTENANCE TREATMENT PROGRAM (MMTP) COMPLIANCE AMONG INJECTING DRUG USE PATIENTS IN NEPAL.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Chamroonswasdi, Kanittha; Srisorrachatr, Suwat

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a survey to determine the rate of adherence to and factors associated with compliance with a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) among injecting drug users in Nepal. We conducted face-to-face structured interviews with 165 methadone treatment patients aged 20-54 years during 5-20 April 2015. Data analysis included percentages, means, standard deviations, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analysis. Seventy-two point one percent of respondents had good adherence to a MMTP. Multiple logistic regression with 81.8% prediction showed respondents without a previous history of relapse were 2.7 times more likely to adhere to the MMTP than those with a history of relapse [Adjusted OR = 2.772; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.163-6.605]. Respondents with a good knowledge of the MMTP 9.4 times more likely to be adherent to the MMTP than those with a poor to fair knowledge of the MMTP (Adjusted OR = 9.464; 95% CI: 3.873-23.126). The likelihood of MMTP adherence was 4.5 times more likely when methadone treatment services were available than those where the availability of methadone treatment services were low to moderate (Adjusted OR = 4.553; 95% CI: 1.883-11.008). Knowledge and availability of MMTP need to be improved in the study area in Nepal.

  9. A Multifaceted Nurse- and Web-Based Intervention for Improving Adherence to Treatment in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: Rationale and Design of the MIRROR Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to medication is one of the limitations in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, thereby increasing the risk of premature death, hospital admissions, and related costs. There is a need for simple and easy-to-implement interventions that are based on patients’ perspectives, beliefs, and perceptions of their illness and medication. Objective The objective is to test the effectivity of this intervention to improve medication adherence in patients with established cardiovascular disease, that is, in secondary prevention. Methods In this study the effect of a personalized visualization of cardiovascular risk levels through a website aiming at supporting self management in combination with a group consultation and communication intervention by a nurse on adherence to treatment in 600 patients with manifest cardiovascular diseases will be assessed. The health belief model was chosen as main theoretical model for the intervention. Results Primary outcome is adherence to treatment calculated by refill data. Secondary outcomes include the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire and the Modified Morisky Scale. Patients are followed for one year. Results are expected by 2015. Conclusions This study assesses adherence to treatment in a high-risk cardiovascular population by applying an intervention that addresses patients’ capacity and practical barriers as well as patients’ beliefs and perceptions of their illness and medication. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01449695; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01449695 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6kCzkIKH3) PMID:27624877

  10. RATE OF ADHERENCE TO AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH METHADONE MAINTENANCE TREATMENT PROGRAM (MMTP) COMPLIANCE AMONG INJECTING DRUG USE PATIENTS IN NEPAL.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Chamroonswasdi, Kanittha; Srisorrachatr, Suwat

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a survey to determine the rate of adherence to and factors associated with compliance with a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) among injecting drug users in Nepal. We conducted face-to-face structured interviews with 165 methadone treatment patients aged 20-54 years during 5-20 April 2015. Data analysis included percentages, means, standard deviations, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analysis. Seventy-two point one percent of respondents had good adherence to a MMTP. Multiple logistic regression with 81.8% prediction showed respondents without a previous history of relapse were 2.7 times more likely to adhere to the MMTP than those with a history of relapse [Adjusted OR = 2.772; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.163-6.605]. Respondents with a good knowledge of the MMTP 9.4 times more likely to be adherent to the MMTP than those with a poor to fair knowledge of the MMTP (Adjusted OR = 9.464; 95% CI: 3.873-23.126). The likelihood of MMTP adherence was 4.5 times more likely when methadone treatment services were available than those where the availability of methadone treatment services were low to moderate (Adjusted OR = 4.553; 95% CI: 1.883-11.008). Knowledge and availability of MMTP need to be improved in the study area in Nepal. PMID:27244967

  11. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life. PMID:27698597

  12. ADHERENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS IN NORTHERN GREECE

    PubMed Central

    Zioga, Efrosini; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Dimopoulos, Evagelos; Koutras, Christos; Marmara, Kalliopi; Marmara, Eleni-Efrosini; Marmaras, Athanasios; Lavdaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence as a concept includes various types of health-related behavior. Better medical adherence leads to improved disease control and fewer diabetes–related complications. Quality of life and medication adherence are interrelated. Patients with diabetes who adhere to their treatment can experience an improvement in quality of life and vice versa. Aim: To assess treatment adherence in patients with type II diabetes, as well as the connection between adherence and quality of life. Methodology: A descriptive non-experimental study was conducted in a provincial hospital in Northern Greece. The sample examined was a convenience sample consisting of 108 patients with type II diabetes mellitus. They completed the “Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire” and SF-36 “Quality of Life Questionnaire”. Results: Participants demonstrated good adherence to diet and blood test / blood glucose test routines, but did not experience high levels of quality of life. The type of treatment affected the adherence to blood tests with a statistically significant difference (p=0,000). Also, marital status affected mental health with a statistically significant difference (p=0,032). The adherence sub scales are correlated with the all domains of quality of life. Conclusions: According to our findings, it is important to plan interventions to enhance adherence to other types of treatment and to help patients to further improve their quality of life.

  13. The Effects of Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Factors Influencing Drug Adherence in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of knee osteoarthritis patients according to drug adherence; and to find out the factors the affecting those outcomes. We analyzed the drug adherence and clinical outcomes in 1,334 primary knee osteoarthritis patients who took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 3 weeks. Clinical outcomes of Pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EQ-5D were compared at baseline and 3 weeks’ follow-up between the two groups of adherent group and non-adherent group (1,167 vs. 167 patients). Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors affecting the adherence, and the reasons for the non-adherence were asked. The follow-up clinical outcomes of NRS and KOOS symptom, pain and activity of daily life were significantly higher in the adherence group (P = 0.003, P = 0.048, P = 0.005, and P = 0.003, respectively). The adherence was better in the elderly and in the male group (P = 0.042 and P = 0.034, respectively) and the top reason for no strict adherence was “symptom improved” (21.5%) followed by side effects. In this study, the patients with better adherence to NSAIDs showed better outcomes compared to those with poor adherence. This study can contribute to the patient education for the pharmacological treatment in knee OA patients. PMID:27134504

  14. Genomic characterization of non-mucus-adherent derivatives of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG reveals genes affecting pilus biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Reunanen, Justus; Douillard, François P; Ritari, Jarmo; Uotinen, Virva; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-11-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized lactic acid bacteria and can be considered a probiotic paradigm. Comparative and functional genome analysis showed that L. rhamnosus GG harbors a genomic island including the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster, encoding the cell surface-decorating host-interacting pili. Here, induced mutagenesis was used to study pilus biogenesis in L. rhamnosus GG. A combination of two powerful approaches, mutation selection and next-generation sequencing, was applied to L. rhamnosus GG for the selection of pilus-deficient mutants from an enriched population. The isolated mutants were first screened by immuno-dot blot analysis using antiserum against pilin proteins. Relevant mutants were selected, and the lack of pili was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. The pilosotype of 10 mutant strains was further characterized by analyzing pilin expression using Western blot, dot blot, and immunofluorescence methods. A mucus binding assay showed that the mutants did not adhere to porcine intestinal mucus. Comparative genome sequence analysis using the Illumina MiSeq platform allowed us to determine the nature of the mutations in the obtained pilus-deficient derivatives. Three major classes of mutants with unique genotypes were observed: class I, with mutations in the srtC1 gene; class II, with a deletion containing the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster; and class III, with mutations in the spaA gene. Only a limited number of collateral mutations were observed, and one of the pilus-deficient derivatives with a deficient srtC1 gene contained 24 other mutations. This strain, PB12, can be considered a candidate for human trials addressing the impact of the absence of pili.

  15. Genomic Characterization of Non-Mucus-Adherent Derivatives of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Reveals Genes Affecting Pilus Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Reunanen, Justus; Douillard, François P.; Ritari, Jarmo; Uotinen, Virva; Palva, Airi

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized lactic acid bacteria and can be considered a probiotic paradigm. Comparative and functional genome analysis showed that L. rhamnosus GG harbors a genomic island including the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster, encoding the cell surface-decorating host-interacting pili. Here, induced mutagenesis was used to study pilus biogenesis in L. rhamnosus GG. A combination of two powerful approaches, mutation selection and next-generation sequencing, was applied to L. rhamnosus GG for the selection of pilus-deficient mutants from an enriched population. The isolated mutants were first screened by immuno-dot blot analysis using antiserum against pilin proteins. Relevant mutants were selected, and the lack of pili was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. The pilosotype of 10 mutant strains was further characterized by analyzing pilin expression using Western blot, dot blot, and immunofluorescence methods. A mucus binding assay showed that the mutants did not adhere to porcine intestinal mucus. Comparative genome sequence analysis using the Illumina MiSeq platform allowed us to determine the nature of the mutations in the obtained pilus-deficient derivatives. Three major classes of mutants with unique genotypes were observed: class I, with mutations in the srtC1 gene; class II, with a deletion containing the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster; and class III, with mutations in the spaA gene. Only a limited number of collateral mutations were observed, and one of the pilus-deficient derivatives with a deficient srtC1 gene contained 24 other mutations. This strain, PB12, can be considered a candidate for human trials addressing the impact of the absence of pili. PMID:25192985

  16. Mexican American Women's Adherence to Hemodialysis Treatment: A Social Constructivist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    Mexican Americans have as much as a six-times greater risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than non-Hispanic white Americans, and women show a faster rate of decline in diabetic renal functioning. The leading treatment for ESRD is hemodialysis, an intensive, complex treatment regimen associated with high levels of patient nonadherence. Previous…

  17. Effects of Verbal and Written Performance Feedback on Treatment Adherence: Practical Application of Two Delivery Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Dahlia; Codding, Robin S.; Markus, Keith A.; Tryon, Georgiana Shick; Kyse, Eden Nagler

    2013-01-01

    Verbal and written performance feedback for improving preschool and kindergarten teachers' treatment integrity of behavior plans was compared using a combined multiple-baseline and multiple-treatment design across teacher-student dyads with order counterbalanced as within-series conditions. Supplemental generalized least square regression…

  18. Maximizing patient adherence for optimal outcomes in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bewley, A; Page, B

    2011-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, disabling disease in which adherence to treatment is often poor. The aim of this article is to highlight the problem of adherence to long-term treatment in psoriasis and the factors that contribute to it, and to discuss how adherence, and thus outcomes, can be improved. This article is based on a presentation given by the authors at a satellite symposium held during the 19th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 6-10 October, 2010, in Gothenburg, Sweden. Adherence to topical medication is a major problem in psoriasis. Not only are prescriptions not being filled by patients (primary adherence) but topical medications are not being used as recommended (secondary adherence). The issue is complex due to the many factors which affect adherence, including efficacy, ease of use and convenience of application, and the healthcare professional-patient relationship. Due to the nature of the disease, patients suffer poor self-image and feel stigmatized, particularly when psoriasis is present on a visible part of the body. Consequently, the negative impact of psoriasis on patient quality of life underlies many adherence issues. It is therefore important for treatment to address the psychological aspects as well as the physical symptoms of psoriasis. Improvements in several areas of disease management may lead to benefits in medication adherence and hence clinical benefit. Prescribing therapy in line with patient preference for treatment vehicle and improving the healthcare professional-patient relationship may be key factors. Nurses have an important role in educating patients and delivering long-term care. This individualized, personal, approach may help improve treatment adherence, outcomes, and the quality of life for patients with psoriasis. PMID:21507078

  19. Affective psychosis following Accutane (isotretinoin) treatment.

    PubMed

    Barak, Yoram; Wohl, Yonit; Greenberg, Yifa; Bar Dayan, Yosefa; Friedman, Tali; Shoval, Gideon; Knobler, Haim Y

    2005-01-01

    Isotretinoin (Accutane) ranks in the top 10 of the US Food and Drug Administration's database of drugs associated with reports of depression and suicide attempts. However, this association is still controversial because up to 5.6% of patients with moderate acne may have pre-existing suicidal ideations, improvement of acne often reduces associated depression, and isotretinoin users are reportedly no more likely than those taking antibiotics for acne to have depression or commit suicide. We describe a series of cases of manic psychosis that developed in a 1-year period (2003) in association with isotretinoin treatment and resulted in suicidality and progression to long-standing psychosis. Cases were drawn from 500 soldiers who had been evaluated in a military specialists dermatology clinic for severe acne. Data were summarized from medical records of five severe acne patients treated by isotretinion during their compulsory military service. Data from their draft board examinations and service records, as well as repeated clinical assessments by certified psychiatrists at the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Mental Health Department clinic, were evaluated. Five young adults developed manic psychosis within a mean of 7.6 months of exposure to isotretinoin. In three cases, this was accompanied by a suicide attempt, and in three cases, psychosis lasted for longer than 6 months. Either a personal history of obsessive-compulsive disorder, neurological insult or family history of a major psychiatric illness were present in all cases. The present case-series is suggestive of an increase in the likelihood of an association between exposure to isotretinion and manic psychosis. Associated risk factors were both family and personal history of psychiatric morbidity. Further studies are needed to establish our findings.

  20. Adherence to Occlusion Therapy in the First Six Months of Follow-Up and Visual Acuity among Participants in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS)

    PubMed Central

    Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D.; Celano, Marianne; Kruger, Stacey; Hartmann, E. Eugenie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Achieving good vision in infants born with a unilateral cataract is believed to require early surgery and consistent occlusion of the fellow eye. This article examines the relationship between adherence to patching and grating acuity. Methods. Data came from the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study, a randomized clinical trial of treatment for unilateral congenital cataract. Infants were either left aphakic (n = 53) or had an intraocular lens implanted (n = 55). Patching was prescribed 1 hour per day per month of age until 8 months of age and 50% of waking hours thereafter. Adherence was measured as the mean percentage of prescribed patching reported in a 7-day diary completed 2 months after surgery, and 48-hour recall interviews conducted 3 and 6 months after surgery. Grating visual acuity was measured within 1 month of the infant's first birthday (n = 108) using Teller Acuity Cards by a tester masked to treatment. Nonparametric correlations were used to examine the relationship with grating acuity. Results. On average, caregivers reported patching 84.3% (SD = 31.2%) of prescribed time and adherence did not differ by treatment (t = −1.40, df = 106, p = 0.16). Adherence was associated with grating acuity (rSpearman = −0.27, p < 0.01), but more so among pseudophakic (rSpearman = −0.41, p < 0.01) than aphakic infants (rSpearman = −0.10, p = 0.49). Conclusions. This study empirically has shown that adherence to patching during the first 6 months after surgery is associated with better grating visual acuity at 12 months of age after treatment for unilateral cataract and that implanting an intraocular lens is not associated with adherence. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00212134.) PMID:22491410

  1. Adherence to alendronic or risedronic acid treatment, combined or not to calcium and vitamin D, and related determinants in Italian patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Calabria, S; Cinconze, E; Rossini, M; Rossi, E; Maggioni, AP; Pedrini, A; De Rosa, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis is a chronic disease and an important health and social burden due to its worldwide prevalence. Literature and clinical experience report incomplete adherence to the therapy. This retrospective observational study aimed at assessing the adherence to first-line antiosteoporosis drugs (AODs; reimbursed by the National Health System, according to the Italian Medicine Agency recommendation number 79), alendronate or risedronate, with or without calcium and/or vitamin D supplements, in a real, Italian clinical setting. Patients and methods Analyses were carried out on data present in the ARNO Observatory, a population-based patient-centric Italian database. From a population of 5,808,832 inhabitants with available data, a cohort of 3.3 million of patients aged ≥40 years was selected. New users of first-line AODs as monotherapy (accrual period, 2007–2009) were followed up over 3 years to assess adherence at 6, 12, and 36 months to AODs and to supplements and related determinants. Results Approximately 40,000 new users were identified: mostly women, aged on average (standard deviation) 71±10 years. Alendronate was the most prescribed (38.2% of patients), followed by risedronate (34.9%) and alendronate with colecalciferol as a fixed-dose combination (25.8%). Adherence at the 6-month follow-up was 54%, and this constantly and significantly decreased after 1 year to 46%, and after 3 years to 33% (P<0.01). Adherence to the fixed-dose combination was higher than to plain alendronate throughout the follow-up period. Similarly, adherence to supplements constantly decreased with the duration of treatment. Women and patients aged >50 years were more likely to adhere to treatment regimen (P<0.001). The use of drugs for peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease and of corticosteroids for systemic use were significantly associated with high adherence at different times. Polytherapy (>5 drugs), cardiovascular, and neurological therapies were

  2. Better adherence to prescribed treatment regimen is related to less chronic pain among adolescents and young adults with moderate or severe haemophilia.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J M; Witkop, M L; Lambing, A; Anderson, T L; Munn, J; Tortella, B

    2014-07-01

    Little data exist, especially for adolescent and young adult (AYA) persons with haemophilia (PWH), about the relationship between adherence to prescribed treatment regimen and chronic pain. We examined this relationship among PWH (moderate or severe) aged 13-25 via cross-sectional survey. Adherence was assessed using the Validated Hemophilia Regimen Treatment Adherence Scale (VERITAS)-Pro and VERITAS-PRN for prophylactic and on-demand participants respectively. VERITAS scores range from 24 (most adherent) to 120 (least adherent). Chronic pain was measured using the FPS-R and was dichotomized as high for FPS-R scores ≥4 and low for <4. Logistic regression models were constructed to assess factors associated with having high (vs. low) chronic pain. Of 80 AYA respondents (79 men), most had severe disease (91%), infused prophylactically (86%) and had haemophilia A (91%). Fifty-one per cent were aged 13-17 and most were white (76%), non-Hispanic (88%) and never married (93%). Chronic pain was reported as high for 35% of respondents. Mean VERITAS-Pro scores for those with high and low chronic pain were 53.6 ± 12.3 vs. 47.4 ± 12.9, P = 0.05. VERITAS-PRN scores were similar across chronic pain status. Logistic regression revealed that for each 10-point reduction (i.e. increase in adherence) in the combined VERITAS (Pro and PRN) and VERITAS-Pro scores there was a 35% (OR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.44, 0.96; P = 0.03) and 39% (OR = 0.61; 95%CI = 0.39, 0.96; P = 0.03) reduction in odds of having high chronic pain respectively. Among AYA PWHs, better adherence was associated with significantly lower odds of having high chronic pain. Moreover, non-whites were >4 times as likely as whites to report high chronic pain.

  3. High levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor are associated with treatment adherence among crack-cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Juliana N; Schuch, Silvia; Ornell, Felipe; Sordi, Anne O; Bristot, Giovana; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kessler, Felix H P; Fumagalli, Fabio; Pechansky, Flavio; von Diemen, Lisia

    2016-09-01

    Due to the complexity of crack -cocaine addiction treatment, the identification of biological markers that could help determining the impact or outcome of drug use has become a major subject of study. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the association of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) levels in crack -cocaine users with treatment adherence and with drug addiction severity. A sample of 47 male inpatient crack- cocaine users were recruited in a treatment unit, and blood samples were collected at admission and discharge in order to measure BDNF and TBARS serum levels. Subjects were split into 2 groups: treatment non-completers (n=23) and treatment completers (n=24). The completer group had a tendency of higher levels of BDNF than non-completers at admission (16.85±3.24 vs. 14.65±5.45, p=0.10), and significant higher levels at discharge (18.10±4.88 vs. 13.91±4.77, p=0.001). A negative correlation between BDNF levels at admission and years of crack use was observed. We did not find significant changes in TBARS levels during inpatient treatment, although the completer group tended to decrease these levels while non-completers tend to increase it. These findings suggest an association between higher levels of BDNF and better clinical outcomes in crack- cocaine users after detoxification. We believe that the variation in BDNF and TBARS found here add evidence to literature data that propose that such biomarkers could be used to better understand the physiopathology of crack- cocaine addiction. PMID:27473943

  4. Longitudinal relationships between antiretroviral treatment adherence and discrimination due to HIV-serostatus, race, and sexual orientation among African-American men with HIV.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Laura M; Wagner, Glenn J; Galvan, Frank H; Klein, David J

    2010-10-01

    African-Americans show worse HIV disease outcomes compared to Whites. Health disparities may be aggravated by discrimination, which is associated with worse health and maladaptive health behaviors. We examined longitudinal effects of discrimination on antiretroviral treatment adherence among 152 HIV-positive Black men who have sex with men. We measured adherence and discrimination due to HIV-serostatus, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation at baseline and monthly for 6 months. Hierarchical repeated-measures models tested longitudinal effects of each discrimination type on adherence. Over 6 months, participants took 60% of prescribed medications on average; substantial percentages experienced discrimination (HIV-serostatus, 38%; race/ethnicity, 40%; and sexual orientation, 33%). Greater discrimination due to all three characteristics was significantly bivariately associated with lower adherence (all p's < 0.05). In the multivariate model, only racial discrimination was significant (p < 0.05). Efforts to improve HIV treatment adherence should consider the context of multiple stigmas, especially racism.

  5. A pilot study to improve adherence among MS patients who discontinue treatment against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Lynch, Sharon; Strober, Lauren; O'Bryan, Sean; Sobotka, Deborah; Thelen, Joan; Ness, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Goggin, Kathy; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Catley, Delwyn

    2016-04-01

    Between 30 and 50% of MS patients may prematurely discontinue disease modifying therapies. Little research has examined how to best talk with patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether telephone counseling increases disease modifying therapy (DMT) re-initiation among nonadherent patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants were eligible if they had relapsing-remitting disease, had stopped taking a DMT, and had no plan to re-initiate treatment despite a provider recommendation. Following a baseline assessment, 81 patients were randomly assigned to either five 20 min, weekly sessions of Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MI-CBT) or Treatment as Usual (TAU) with brief education. At 10 weeks, patients initially assigned to TAU switched over to MI-CBT. Compared to patients in the TAU group, patients undergoing MI-CBT were significantly more likely to indicate they were re-initiating DMT (41.7 vs. 14.3%). These significant results were replicated among patients crossing over from TAU to MI-CBT. Treatment satisfaction was high, with 97% of participants reporting that they would recommend MI-CBT to other patients with MS. Results of this pilot study provide initial support for the use of MI-CBT among MS patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01925690. PMID:26563147

  6. A pilot study to improve adherence among MS patients who discontinue treatment against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Lynch, Sharon; Strober, Lauren; O'Bryan, Sean; Sobotka, Deborah; Thelen, Joan; Ness, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Goggin, Kathy; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Catley, Delwyn

    2016-04-01

    Between 30 and 50% of MS patients may prematurely discontinue disease modifying therapies. Little research has examined how to best talk with patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether telephone counseling increases disease modifying therapy (DMT) re-initiation among nonadherent patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants were eligible if they had relapsing-remitting disease, had stopped taking a DMT, and had no plan to re-initiate treatment despite a provider recommendation. Following a baseline assessment, 81 patients were randomly assigned to either five 20 min, weekly sessions of Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MI-CBT) or Treatment as Usual (TAU) with brief education. At 10 weeks, patients initially assigned to TAU switched over to MI-CBT. Compared to patients in the TAU group, patients undergoing MI-CBT were significantly more likely to indicate they were re-initiating DMT (41.7 vs. 14.3%). These significant results were replicated among patients crossing over from TAU to MI-CBT. Treatment satisfaction was high, with 97% of participants reporting that they would recommend MI-CBT to other patients with MS. Results of this pilot study provide initial support for the use of MI-CBT among MS patients who have discontinued treatment against medical advice.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01925690.

  7. An Observational Cohort Comparison of Facilitators of Retention in Care and Adherence to Anti-Eetroviral Therapy at an HIV Treatment Center in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Achieng, Loice; Musangi, Helen; Ong'uti, Sharon; Ombegoh, Edwin; Bryant, LeeAnn; Mwiindi, Jonathan; Smith, Nathaniel; Keiser, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background Most HIV treatment programs in resource-limited settings utilize multiple facilitators of adherence and retention in care but there is little data on the efficacy of these methods. We performed an observational cohort analysis of a treatment program in Kenya to assess which program components promote adherence and retention in HIV care in East Africa. Methods Patients initiating ART at A.I.C. Kijabe Hospital were prospectively enrolled in an observational study. Kijabe has an intensive program to promote adherence and retention in care during the first 6 months of ART that incorporates the following facilitators: home visits by community health workers, community based support groups, pharmacy counseling, and unannounced pill counts by clinicians. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure, defined as a detectable HIV-1 viral load; discontinuation of ART; death; or loss to follow-up. Time to treatment failure for each facilitator was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The relative effects of the facilitators were determined by the Cox Proportional Hazards Model. Results 301 patients were enrolled. Time to treatment failure was longer in patients participating in support groups (448 days vs. 337 days, P<0.001), pharmacy counseling (480 days vs. 386 days, P = 0.002), pill counts (482 days vs. 189 days, P<0.001) and home visits (485 days vs. 426 days, P = 0.024). Better adherence was seen with support groups (89% vs. 82%, P = 0.05) and pill counts (89% vs. 75%, P = 0.02). Multivariate analysis using the Cox Model found significant reductions in risk of treatment failure associated with pill counts (HR = 0.19, P<0.001) and support groups (HR = 0.43, P = 0.003). Conclusion Unannounced pill counts by the clinician and community based support groups were associated with better long term treatment success and with better adherence. PMID:22427869

  8. High Concordance between Self-Reported Adherence, Treatment Outcome and Satisfaction with Care Using a Nine-Item Health Questionnaire in InfCareHIV

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Gaetano; Mellgren, Åsa; Eriksson, Lars E.; Svedhem, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Background In this cross-sectional study we present an integrated analysis of a self-reported Health Questionnaire and socio-demographic and treatment outcome data from the national Swedish HIV cohort, InfCareHIV. Objectives To evaluate the Health Questionnaire and identify the main determinants of adherence. Methods A total of 2,846 patients answered a nine-item disease-specific Health Questionnaire between 2012 and 2014, corresponding to 44% of all active patients in the national InfCareHIV cohort. The questionnaire assessed patient related outcome measures (PROMs) regarding health and antiretroviral treatment (ART) and patient related experience measures (PREMs) regarding involvement in care and satisfaction with the care provider. Result We found the Health Questionnaire to be valid and reliable when used in ordinary clinical practice. There was a high concordance between self-reported adherence to ART in the past seven days and treatment outcome, with 94% of patients who reported optimal adherence having a viral load <50 copies/ml. The main determinants of optimal adherence were heterosexual transmission path, being born in Sweden, being male, not reporting experience of ART side effects and being fully satisfied with care. Conclusion The nine-item Health Questionnaire can identify patients at risk of treatment failure, those in need of clinical assessment of adverse events and those with impaired physical health. PMID:27310201

  9. TextTB: A Mixed Method Pilot Study Evaluating Acceptance, Feasibility, and Exploring Initial Efficacy of a Text Messaging Intervention to Support TB Treatment Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Patricia F.; Chirico, Cristina; Etchevarria, Mirta; Cardinale, Daniel; Rubinstein, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess a text messaging intervention to promote tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence. Methods. A mixed-methods pilot study was conducted within a public pulmonary-specialized hospital in Argentina. Patients newly diagnosed with TB who were 18 or older, and had mobile phone access were recruited and randomized to usual care plus either medication calendar (n = 19) or text messaging intervention (n = 18) for the first two months of treatment. Primary outcomes were feasibility and acceptability; secondary outcomes explored initial efficacy. Results. Feasibility was evidenced by high access to mobile phones, familiarity with texting, most phones limited to basic features, a low rate of participant refusal, and many describing suboptimal TB understanding. Acceptability was evidenced by participants indicating feeling cared for, supported, responsible for their treatment, and many self-reporting adherence without a reminder. Participants in the texting group self-reported adherence on average 77% of the days whereas only 53% in calendar group returned diaries. Exploring initial efficacy, microscopy testing was low and treatment outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusion. The texting intervention was well accepted and feasible with greater reporting of adherence using text messaging than the diary. Further evaluation of the texting intervention is warranted. PMID:24455238

  10. Compensatory Beliefs about Glucose Testing are Associated with Low Adherence to Treatment and Poor Metabolic Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiau, Marjorie A.; Knauper, Barbel; Nguyen, Thien-Kim; Sufrategui, Maria; Polychronakos, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate whether compensatory beliefs (CBs) regarding glucose testing predict blood glucose levels and adherence to treatment in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. CBs are convictions that the negative effects of one behavior (e.g. not testing one's glucose level) can be compensated for by engaging in another…

  11. Food supplementation among HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa: impact on treatment adherence and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Audain, Keiron A; Zotor, Francis B; Amuna, Paul; Ellahi, Basma

    2015-11-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest proportion of undernourished people in the world, along with the highest number of people living with HIV and AIDS. Thus, as a result of high levels of food insecurity many HIV patients are also undernourished. The synergism between HIV and undernutrition leads to poor treatment adherence and high mortality rates. Undernutrition has a debilitating effect on the immune system due to key nutrient deficiencies and the overproduction of reactive species (oxidative stress), which causes rapid HIV progression and the onset of AIDS. Therapeutic food supplementation used in the treatment of severe acute malnutrition is being applied to HIV palliative care; however, little biochemical data exist to highlight its impact on oxidative stress and immune recovery. In addition, as most food supplements are imported by donor agencies, efforts are being put into local therapeutic food production such as the Food Multi-Mix concept to ensure sustainability. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies that examine the effectiveness of food supplementation in undernourished HIV patients in Sub-Saharan Africa; noting the parameters used to measure efficacy, as well as the long-term feasibility of supplementation.

  12. Realist evaluation of the antiretroviral treatment adherence club programme in selected primary healthcare facilities in the metropolitan area of Western Cape Province, South Africa: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; Van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Suboptimal retention in care and poor treatment adherence are key challenges to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Community-based approaches to HIV service delivery are recommended to improve patient retention in care and ART adherence. The implementation of the adherence clubs in the Western Cape province of South Africa was with variable success in terms of implementation and outcomes. The need for operational guidelines for its implementation has been identified. Therefore, understanding the contexts and mechanisms for successful implementation of the adherence clubs is crucial to inform the roll-out to the rest of South Africa. The protocol outlines an evaluation of adherence club intervention in selected primary healthcare facilities in the metropolitan area of the Western Cape Province, using the realist approach. Methods and analysis In the first phase, an exploratory study design will be used. Document review and key informant interviews will be used to elicit the programme theory. In phase two, a multiple case study design will be used to describe the adherence clubs in five contrastive sites. Semistructured interviews will be conducted with purposively selected programme implementers and members of the clubs to assess the context and mechanisms of the adherence clubs. For the programme's primary outcomes, a longitudinal retrospective cohort analysis will be conducted using routine patient data. Data analysis will involve classifying emerging themes using the context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) configuration, and refining the primary CMO configurations to conjectured CMO configurations. Finally, we will compare the conjectured CMO configurations from the cases with the initial programme theory. The final CMOs obtained will be translated into middle range theories. Ethics and dissemination The study will be conducted according to the principles of the declaration of Helsinki (1964). Ethics clearance was obtained from the

  13. Characterization of the Adherence of Clostridium difficile Spores: The Integrity of the Outermost Layer Affects Adherence Properties of Spores of the Epidemic Strain R20291 to Components of the Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Uribe, Paola; Miranda-Cárdenas, Camila; Castro-Córdova, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Calderón, Iván; Fuentes, Juan A.; Rodas, Paula I.; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the causative agent of the most frequently reported nosocomial diarrhea worldwide. The high incidence of recurrent infection is the main clinical challenge of C. difficile infections (CDI). Formation of C. difficile spores of the epidemic strain R20291 has been shown to be essential for recurrent infection and transmission of the disease in a mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms of how these spores persist in the colonic environment remains unclear. In this work, we characterized the adherence properties of epidemic R20291 spores to components of the intestinal mucosa, and we assessed the role of the exosporium integrity in the adherence properties by using cdeC mutant spores with a defective exosporium layer. Our results showed that spores and vegetative cells of the epidemic R20291 strain adhered at high levels to monolayers of Caco-2 cells and mucin. Transmission electron micrographs of Caco-2 cells demonstrated that the hair-like projections on the surface of R20291 spores are in close proximity with the plasma membrane and microvilli of undifferentiated and differentiated monolayers of Caco-2 cells. Competitive-binding assay in differentiated Caco-2 cells suggests that spore-adherence is mediated by specific binding sites. By using spores of a cdeC mutant we demonstrated that the integrity of the exosporium layer determines the affinity of adherence of C. difficile spores to Caco-2 cells and mucin. Binding of fibronectin and vitronectin to the spore surface was concentration-dependent, and depending on the concentration, spore-adherence to Caco-2 cells was enhanced. In the presence of an aberrantly-assembled exosporium (cdeC spores), binding of fibronectin, but not vitronectin, was increased. Notably, independent of the exosporium integrity, only a fraction of the spores had fibronectin and vitronectin molecules binding to their surface. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the integrity of the exosporium layer of

  14. Reminder systems to improve patient adherence to tuberculosis clinic appointments for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Abba, Katharine; Alejandria, Marissa M; Sinclair, David; Balanag, Vincent M; Lansang, Mary Ann D

    2014-01-01

    Background People with active tuberculosis (TB) require six months of treatment. Some people find it difficult to complete treatment, and there are several approaches to help ensure completion. One such system relies on reminders, where the health system prompts patients to attend for appointments on time, or re-engages people who have missed or defaulted on a scheduled appointment. Objectives To assess the effects of reminder systems on improving attendance at TB diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment clinic appointments, and their effects on TB treatment outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Effective Practice andOrganization of Care Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL,MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, m RCT, and the Indian Journal of Tuberculosis without language restriction up to 29 August 2014. We also checked reference lists and contacted researchers working in the field. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster RCTs and quasi-RCTs, and controlled before-and-after studies comparing reminder systems with no reminders or an alternative reminder system for people with scheduled appointments for TB diagnosis, prophylaxis, or treatment. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. We compared the effects of interventions by using risk ratios (RR) and presented RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Also we assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results Nine trials, including 4654 participants, met our inclusion criteria. Five trials evaluated appointment reminders for people on treatment for active TB, two for people on prophylaxis for latent TB, and four for people undergoing TB screening using skin tests.We classified the interventions into 'pre-appointment' reminders (telephone calls or letters prior to a scheduled appointment) or

  15. Impact of mHealth Chronic Disease Management on Treatment Adherence and Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hamine, Saee; Faulx, Dunia; Green, Beverly B; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to chronic disease management is critical to achieving improved health outcomes, quality of life, and cost-effective health care. As the burden of chronic diseases continues to grow globally, so does the impact of non-adherence. Mobile technologies are increasingly being used in health care and public health practice (mHealth) for patient communication, monitoring, and education, and to facilitate adherence to chronic diseases management. Objective We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth in supporting the adherence of patients to chronic diseases management (“mAdherence”), and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among patients and health care providers. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, and EBSCO databases for studies that assessed the role of mAdherence in chronic disease management of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases from 1980 through May 2014. Outcomes of interest included effect of mHealth on patient adherence to chronic diseases management, disease-specific clinical outcomes after intervention, and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among target end-users. Results In all, 107 articles met all inclusion criteria. Short message service was the most commonly used mAdherence tool in 40.2% (43/107) of studies. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability or patient preferences for mAdherence interventions were assessed in 57.9% (62/107) of studies and found to be generally high. A total of 27 studies employed randomized controlled trial (RCT) methods to assess impact on adherence behaviors, and significant improvements were observed in 15 of those studies (56%). Of the 41 RCTs that measured effects on disease-specific clinical outcomes, significant improvements between groups were reported in 16 studies (39

  16. Adherence to HIV Care after Pregnancy among Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: Falling Off the Cliff of the Treatment Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Psaros, Christina; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Safren, Steven A.; Smit, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased access to testing and treatment means HIV can be managed as a chronic illness, though successful management requires continued engagement with the healthcare system. Most of the global HIV burden is in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of new infections are consistently higher in women versus men. Pregnancy is often the point at which an HIV diagnosis is made. While PMTCT interventions significantly reduce the rate of vertical transmission of HIV, women must administer ARVs to their infants, adhere to breastfeeding recommendations, and test their infants for HIV after childbirth. Some women will be expected to remain on the ARVs initiated during the pregnancy period, while others are expected to engage in routine testing so treatment can be reinitiated when appropriate. The postpartum period presents many barriers to sustained treatment adherence and engagement in care. While some studies have examined adherence to postpartum PMTCT guidelines, few have focused on continued engagement in care by the mother, and very few examine adherence beyond the six week postpartum visit. Here, we attempt to identify gaps in the research literature and make recommendations on how to address barriers to ongoing postpartum HIV care. PMID:25620530

  17. [Self-care, adherence and uncertainty: biomedical treatments and patients' experiences regarding chronic migraine pain].

    PubMed

    Del Monaco, Romina

    2013-04-01

    Based in the social sciences, this text explores and analyzes the particularities of migraine treatments using a relational approach, articulating the statements of professionals with the experiences and practices of patients in health services and their everyday care trajectories to manage pain. This qualitative research study utilized semi-structured interviews with neurologists and patients in a public hospital in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires. A number of processes were observed by which biomedicine assigns part of the responsibility for the course of the disease to the patient through the logic of self-care. Patients must make changes in their ways of life in order to prevent headaches from appearing. Nevertheless, as the efficacy of these modifications is unclear, daily life is filled with uncertainty and charged with the mandate to follow care guidelines, which are valued not only professionally but also socially.

  18. HIV treatment adherence measurement and reporting concordance in youth with perinatally acquired HIV infection and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Shenell D; Mellins, Claude Ann; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Warne, Patricia; Elkington, Katherine S; Dolezal, Curtis; Santamaria, E Karina; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Jurgrau-Voulgari, Andrea S; Abrams, Elaine J

    2015-01-01

    We examined youth-caregiver adherence report concordance and association of different adherence self-report items with HIV RNA viral load (VL) in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents assessed in 2003-2008. Youth (n=194; 9-19 years) and their caregivers completed a multi-step 2-day recall, one item on last time medications were missed, and one item on responsibility for managing youths' medications. Across early (9-12 years), middle (13-15 years), and late (16+years) adolescence, both youth and caregivers reported having primary responsibility for youths' medication regimens and demonstrated poor to moderate youth-caregiver concordance on adherence items. Responses to the last-time-missed item had greater association with VL than did the 2-day recall, particularly for longer times (e.g., past month). By age group, significant associations with VL were found for caregiver reports in early adolescence, caregiver and youth reports in middle adolescence, and youth reports in late adolescence, suggesting that caregivers offer better reports of youth adherence during early adolescence, but by later adolescence, youth are better informants. Although design limitations preclude definitive conclusions about the reliability and validity of specific adherence items, this study suggests important issues related to age group, caregiver vs. youth informants of adherence, and recall periods for child adherence assessment that warrant further research.

  19. Micronutrient Deficiency and Treatment Adherence in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Micronutrient Supplementation in ART-Naïve Persons with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Balfour, Louise; Spaans, Johanna N.; Fergusson, Dean; Huff, Harold; Mills, Edward J.; la Porte, Charles J.; Walmsley, Sharon; Singhal, Neera; Rosenes, Ron; Tremblay, Nancy; Gill, M. John; Loemba, Hugues; Conway, Brian; Rachlis, Anita; Ralph, Edward; Loutfy, Mona; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Moorhouse, Rika; William Cameron, D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The MAINTAIN study is an on-going RCT comparing high-dose micronutrient and anti-oxidant supplementation versus recommended daily allowance (RDA) vitamins in slowing HIV immune deficiency progression in ART-naïve people with HIV infection. Objective We planned analysis of the first 127 participants to determine the baseline prevalence of serum micronutrient deficiencies and correlates, as well as tolerance and adherence to study interventions. Methods Participants receive eight capsules twice daily of 1) high-dose or 2) RDA supplements for two years and are followed-up quarterly for measures of immune deficiency progression, safety and tolerability. Regression analysis was used to identify correlates of micronutrient levels at baseline. Adherence was measured by residual pill count, self-report using the General Treatment Scale (GTS) and short-term recall HIV Adherence Treatment Scale (HATS). Results Prior micronutrient supplementation (within 30 days) was 27% at screening and 10% of study population, and was not correlated with baseline micronutrient levels. Low levels were frequent for carotene (24%<1 nmol/L), vitamin D (24%<40 nmol/L) and serum folate (20%<15 nmol/L). The proportion with B12 deficiency (<133 pmol/L) was 2.4%. Lower baseline levels of B12 correlated lower baseline CD4 count (r = 0.21, p = 0.02) with a 21 pmol/L reduction in B12 per 100 cells/µL CD4. Vitamin D levels were higher in men (p<0.001). After a median follow-up of 1.63 years, there were 19 (15%) early withdrawals from the study treatment. Mean treatment adherence using pill count was 88%. Subjective adherence by the GTS was 81% and was moderately but significantly correlated with pill count (r = 0.29, p<0.001). Adherence based on short-term recall (HATS) was >80% in 75% of participants. Conclusion Micronutrient levels in asymptomatic HIV+ persons are in keeping with population norms, but micronutrient deficiencies are frequent. Adherence levels are high, and

  20. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones. PMID:26256647

  1. Comparative study of the radiobiological effects induced on adherent vs suspended cells by BNCT, neutrons and gamma rays treatments.

    PubMed

    Cansolino, L; Clerici, A M; Zonta, C; Dionigi, P; Mazzini, G; Di Liberto, R; Altieri, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Carante, M P; Ferrari, M; González, S J; Postuma, I; Protti, N; Santa Cruz, G A; Ferrari, C

    2015-12-01

    The present work is part of a preclinical in vitro study to assess the efficacy of BNCT applied to liver or lung coloncarcinoma metastases and to limb osteosarcoma. Adherent growing cell lines can be irradiated as adherent to the culture flasks or as cell suspensions, differences in radio-sensitivity of the two modalities of radiation exposure have been investigated. Dose related cell survival and cell cycle perturbation results evidenced that the radiosensitivity of adherent cells is higher than that of the suspended ones.

  2. Adherence to and appropriateness of anti-osteoporotic treatments in patients aged 50 and over in the Valencia Region (Spain). The ESOSVAL-AD Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background A study to evaluate the adherence to and appropriateness of anti-osteoporotic treatments in a cohort of men and women aged 50 and over participating in the ESOSVAL-R study. Methods/Design Design: An observational, longitudinal, prospective cohort study; Study subjects: Men and women aged 50 and over living in the Valencia Region (Spain) who initiated treatment between June 15, 2009, and June 15, 2011, in primary healthcare centers with electronic medical records; Data sources: The main data source will be electronic medical records. Measurement of results: Degree of compliance with and persistence of anti-osteoporotic treatments, and the proportion of patients with appropriate anti-osteoporotic treatment in accordance with the most relevant and high impact recommendations with clearly defined treatment algorithms in Spain (the Spanish National Health System guide (2010), the General Practitioners' Society (2007) and the General Directorate for Pharmacy and Medical Products of Madrid (2007)), and with the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF, 2010), and the International Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines (IOF, 2008); Analysis: 1.) Descriptive analysis of patients undergoing treatment and the treatments prescribed; 2.) Descriptive analysis of compliance with and persistence of anti-osteoporotic treatments; 3.) Analysis of factors associated with compliance with and persistence of treatments by Cox proportional hazard regression models, 4.) Descriptive analysis of appropriateness of treatment; 5.) Analysis of factors associated with the appropriateness of treatment by multilevel models (4 levels: patient, doctor, Basic Healthcare Zone/Primary Healthcare Center, and Health Area variables). Discussion ESOSVAL-AD will provide information regarding adherence to osteoporosis treatments and the factors associated with a higher or lower adherence (including the appropriateness of the treatment) in the Spanish context. A better understanding of this

  3. Mobile phone technologies improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting: a randomized controlled trial of text message reminders

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Eleches, Cristian; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Habyarimana, James P.; Zivin, Joshua G.; Goldstein, Markus P.; de Walque, Damien; MacKeen, Leslie; Haberer, Jessica; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Sidle, John; Ngare, Duncan; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence on whether growing mobile phone availability in sub-Saharan Africa can be used to promote high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study tested the efficacy of short message service (SMS) reminders on adherence to ART among patients attending a rural clinic in Kenya. Design A randomized controlled trial of four SMS reminder interventions with 48 weeks of follow-up. Methods Four hundred and thirty-one adult patients who had initiated ART within 3 months were enrolled and randomly assigned to a control group or one of the four intervention groups. Participants in the intervention groups received SMS reminders that were either short or long and sent at a daily or weekly frequency. Adherence was measured using the medication event monitoring system. The primary outcome was whether adherence exceeded 90% during each 12-week period of analysis and the 48-week study period. The secondary outcome was whether there were treatment interruptions lasting at least 48 h. Results In intention-to-treat analysis, 53% of participants receiving weekly SMS reminders achieved adherence of at least 90% during the 48 weeks of the study, compared with 40% of participants in the control group (P=0.03). Participants in groups receiving weekly reminders were also significantly less likely to experience treatment interruptions exceeding 48 h during the 48-week follow-up period than participants in the control group (81 vs. 90%, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results suggest that SMS reminders may be an important tool to achieve optimal treatment response in resource-limited settings. PMID:21252632

  4. The role of therapists' treatment adherence, professional experience, therapeutic alliance, and clients' severity of psychological problems: Prediction of treatment outcome in eight different psychotherapy approaches. Preliminary results of a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Tschuschke, Volker; Crameri, Aureliano; Koehler, Miriam; Berglar, Jessica; Muth, Katharina; Staczan, Pia; Von Wyl, Agnes; Schulthess, Peter; Koemeda-Lutz, Margit

    2015-01-01

    In this naturalistic study, 262 audiotaped psychotherapy sessions--randomly drawn from 81 individual therapies from eight different psychotherapy approaches--were rated completely on treatment adherence using a newly developed rating manual. In the therapy sessions, a relatively low percentage of treatment specific interventions (ranging from 4.2% to 27.8%) was found for all eight approaches, 50% to 73% of the interventions were nonspecific or common, and approximately 18% to 27% were intervention techniques from other approaches. Different types of psychotherapy differed highly significantly in levels of treatment adherence. There was no statistically significant association between the type of psychotherapy and its outcome, or between the degree of therapists' treatment fidelity and the treatment outcome. However, there were significant associations between therapists' degree of professional experience, clients' initial psychological burden, and treatment response. Clients' severity of psychological problems prior to treatment predicted quality of therapeutic alliance while therapists' treatment adherence was predicted by therapists' professional experience and by the quality of the therapeutic alliance. We discuss the seemingly indirect importance of treatment adherence for psychotherapy outcome that we found in this study in relation to findings from other studies and in the context of the role of schools within psychotherapy. PMID:24689912

  5. The role of therapists' treatment adherence, professional experience, therapeutic alliance, and clients' severity of psychological problems: Prediction of treatment outcome in eight different psychotherapy approaches. Preliminary results of a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Tschuschke, Volker; Crameri, Aureliano; Koehler, Miriam; Berglar, Jessica; Muth, Katharina; Staczan, Pia; Von Wyl, Agnes; Schulthess, Peter; Koemeda-Lutz, Margit

    2015-01-01

    In this naturalistic study, 262 audiotaped psychotherapy sessions--randomly drawn from 81 individual therapies from eight different psychotherapy approaches--were rated completely on treatment adherence using a newly developed rating manual. In the therapy sessions, a relatively low percentage of treatment specific interventions (ranging from 4.2% to 27.8%) was found for all eight approaches, 50% to 73% of the interventions were nonspecific or common, and approximately 18% to 27% were intervention techniques from other approaches. Different types of psychotherapy differed highly significantly in levels of treatment adherence. There was no statistically significant association between the type of psychotherapy and its outcome, or between the degree of therapists' treatment fidelity and the treatment outcome. However, there were significant associations between therapists' degree of professional experience, clients' initial psychological burden, and treatment response. Clients' severity of psychological problems prior to treatment predicted quality of therapeutic alliance while therapists' treatment adherence was predicted by therapists' professional experience and by the quality of the therapeutic alliance. We discuss the seemingly indirect importance of treatment adherence for psychotherapy outcome that we found in this study in relation to findings from other studies and in the context of the role of schools within psychotherapy.

  6. Factors affecting response to biologic treatment in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Karczewski, Jacek; Poniedziałek, Barbara; Rzymski, Piotr; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease, affecting approximately 2-4% of the population in western countries. Patients with a more severe form of the disease are typically considered for systemic therapy, including biologics. In spite of the overall superiority of biologic agents, the treatment response may differ substantially among individual patients. As with other medical conditions, a range of factors contribute to response heterogeneity observed in psoriasis. Proper identification of these factors can significantly improve the therapeutic decisions. This review focuses on potential genetic and nongenetic factors that may affect the treatment response and outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

  7. Relations between cognitive status and medication adherence in patients treated for memory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Raymond L.; Hertzog, Christopher; Czaja, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in elderly persons' health. Various studies have shown that medication non-adherence is associated with poor health status in this population. As part of a study of the effects of two interventions to promote medication adherence in patients treated for memory problems, information on medication adherence and cognitive status was collected at 3-month intervals. Twenty-seven participants (16 men, 11 women, age 71–92 years) were assigned to control or treatment conditions and adherence was evaluated with an electronic monitoring device. Cognitive status was evaluated at 3-month intervals beginning in April of 2003 and continuing through September of 2006. We have previously reported on the effectiveness of these interventions to promote adherence. In this paper, we examine the relations of cognitive status and adherence over time using a partial least squares path model in order to evaluate the extent to which adherence to cholinesterase medications was related to cognitive status. Adherence predicted cognitive status at later time points while cognition did not, in general, predict adherence. Results thus suggest that interventions to ensure high levels of medication adherence may be important for maintaining cognitive function in affected elderly people. PMID:24575293

  8. HIV Treatment Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours Registration News & Events Awareness Days National ... you, which includes your medical appointments, dental appointments, lab tests, and many other services. When you participate ...

  9. Blood pressure control and treatment adherence in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome: protocol of a randomized controlled study based on home blood pressure telemonitoring vs. conventional management and assessment of psychological determinants of adherence (TELEBPMET Study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inadequate blood pressure control and poor adherence to treatment remain among the major limitations in the management of hypertensive patients, particularly of those at high risk of cardiovascular events. Preliminary evidence suggests that home blood pressure telemonitoring (HBPT) might help increasing the chance of achieving blood pressure targets and improve patient’s therapeutic adherence. However, all these potential advantages of HBPT have not yet been fully investigated. Methods/design The purpose of this open label, parallel group, randomized, controlled study is to assess whether, in patients with high cardiovascular risk (treated or untreated essential arterial hypertension - both in the office and in ambulatory conditions over 24 h - and metabolic syndrome), long-term (48 weeks) blood pressure control is more effective when based on HBPT and on the feedback to patients by their doctor between visits, or when based exclusively on blood pressure determination during quarterly office visits (conventional management (CM)). A total of 252 patients will be enrolled and randomized to usual care (n=84) or HBPT (n=168). The primary study endpoint will be the rate of subjects achieving normal daytime ambulatory blood pressure targets (<135/85 mmHg) 24 weeks and 48 weeks after randomization. In addition, the study will assess the psychological determinants of adherence and persistence to drug therapy, through specific psychological tests administered during the course of the study. Other secondary study endpoints will be related to the impact of HBPT on additional clinical and economic outcomes (number of additional medical visits, direct costs of patient management, number of antihypertensive drugs prescribed, level of cardiovascular risk, degree of target organ damage and rate of cardiovascular events, regression of the metabolic syndrome). Discussion The TELEBPMET Study will show whether HBPT is effective in improving blood pressure control and

  10. Associations among correlates of schedule adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART): a path analysis of a sample of crack cocaine using sexually active African-Americans with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J S; Schönnesson, L Nilsson; Williams, M L; Timpson, S C

    2008-02-01

    Adherence to HIV medication regimens is a function of multiple dimensions including psychological functioning, social support, adherence self-efficacy and optimism regarding treatment. Active substance use can also negatively affect adherence. An understanding of the nature of the associations among the correlates of adherence can better inform the design of interventions to improve adherence. This study developed an exploratory path model of schedule adherence using data from a sample 130 African-American HIV-positive crack cocaine users on highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART). This model was based on the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman. Following the theory, the effects of psychological distress on schedule adherence were mediated by patients' relationship with their doctor and optimism towards antiretroviral treatment. Adherence was also associated with patients' self-efficacy regarding their medical regimen which, in turn, was associated with their social support.

  11. Determinants of patient adherence: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Przemyslaw; Lewek, Pawel; Matyjaszczyk, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A number of potential determinants of medication non-adherence have been described so far. However, the heterogenic quality of existing publications poses the need for the use of a rigorous methodology in building a list of such determinants. The purpose of this study was a systematic review of current research on determinants of patient adherence on the basis of a recently agreed European consensus taxonomy and terminology. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, IPA, and PsycINFO were systematically searched for systematic reviews published between 2000/01/01 and 2009/12/31 that provided determinants on non-adherence to medication. The searches were limited to reviews having adherence to medication prescribed by health professionals for outpatient as a major topic. Results: Fifty-one reviews were included in this review, covering 19 different disease categories. In these reviews, exclusively assessing non-adherence to chronic therapies, 771 individual factor items were identified, of which most were determinants of implementation, and only 47—determinants of persistence with medication. Factors with an unambiguous effect on adherence were further grouped into 8 clusters of socio-economic-related factors, 6 of healthcare team- and system-related factors, 6 of condition-related factors, 6 of therapy-related factors, and 14 of patient-related factors. The lack of standardized definitions and use of poor measurement methods resulted in many inconsistencies. Conclusions: This study provides clear evidence that medication non-adherence is affected by multiple determinants. Therefore, the prediction of non-adherence of individual patients is difficult, and suitable measurement and multifaceted interventions may be the most effective answer toward unsatisfactory adherence. The limited number of publications assessing determinants of persistence with medication, and lack of those providing determinants of adherence to short-term treatment identify

  12. The impact of African Americans' beliefs about HIV medical care on treatment adherence: a systematic review and recommendations for interventions.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Gina B; Alleyne-Green, Binta

    2013-01-01

    Disparities in access to and retention of regular HIV medical treatment persist among African Americans living with HIV. Many scholars believe that the mistrust of health care held by many African Americans stems from a legacy of abuse, from medical experimentation on slaves to the unethical practices with patients in the Tuskegee Syphilis study. We performed a systematic appraisal of the literature, using several key terms, in order to understand how attitudes about HIV-related health care influence African Americans' engagement in care. We examined peer-reviewed studies published during the period January 2001 through May 2012. An initial search generated 326 studies. Sixteen descriptive studies met our inclusion criteria. Experiences of racism, conspiracy beliefs and the quality of provider relationships appeared to impact engagement. Providers should openly investigate personal beliefs that adversely affect their treatment decisions, listen to patient narratives, and share treatment decisions in order to create a transparent environment.

  13. Interventions to improve adherence to treatment for paediatric tuberculosis in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Meaghann S; Lönnroth, Knut; Howard, Scott C; Roter, Debra L

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the design, delivery and outcomes of interventions to improve adherence to treatment for paediatric tuberculosis in low- and middle-income countries and develop a contextual framework for such interventions. Methods We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases for reports published between 1 January 2003 and 1 December 2013 on interventions to improve adherence to treatment for tuberculosis that included patients younger than 20 years who lived in a low- or middle-income country. For potentially relevant articles that lacked paediatric outcomes, we contacted the authors of the studies. We assessed heterogeneity and risk of bias. To evaluate treatment success – i.e. the combination of treatment completion and cure – we performed random-effects meta-analysis. We identified areas of need for improved intervention practices. Findings We included 15 studies in 11 countries for the qualitative analysis and of these studies, 11 qualified for the meta-analysis – representing 1279 children. Of the interventions described in the 15 studies, two focused on education, one on psychosocial support, seven on care delivery, four on health systems and one on financial provisions. The children in intervention arms had higher rates of treatment success, compared with those in control groups (odds ratio: 3.02; 95% confidence interval: 2.19–4.15). Using the results of our analyses, we developed a framework around factors that promoted or threatened treatment completion. Conclusion Various interventions to improve adherence to treatment for paediatric tuberculosis appear both feasible and effective in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:26600612

  14. Vocal Hygiene Education, Voice Production Therapy, and the Role of Patient Adherence: A Treatment Effectiveness Study in Women with Phonotrauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Alison; Rutledge, John; Hembree, Amanda; Sheridan, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of vocal hygiene education (VHE) and voice production therapy (VP) in altering patient perception of vocal handicap in adult women with benign, bilateral phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions and the role of adherence in that perception. Method: Sixty-two women were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of VP (n = 31) or…

  15. Treatment acceptance and adherence in HIV disease: patient identity and the perceived impact of physician–patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Laws, M Barton; Rose, Gary S; Bezreh, Tanya; Beach, Mary Catherine; Taubin, Tatiana; Kogelman, Laura; Gethers, Marcia; Wilson, Ira B

    2012-01-01

    Studies have found that physician–patient relationships and communication quality are related to medication adherence and outcomes in HIV care. Few qualitative studies exist of how people living with HIV experience clinical communication about their self-care behavior. Eight focus groups with people living with HIV in two US cities were conducted. Participants responded to a detailed discussion guide and to reenactments of actual physician–patient dialogue about antiretroviral adherence. The 82 participants were diverse in age, sex, and ethnicity. Most had been living with HIV for many years and had stable relationships with providers. They appreciated providers who knew and cared about their personal lives, who were clear and direct about instructions, and who were accessible. Most had struggled to overcome addiction, emotional turmoil, and/or denial before gaining control over their lives and becoming adherent to medications. They made little or no causal attribution for their transformation to any outside agency, including their providers. They generally saw medication adherence as a function of autonomous motivation. Successful coping with HIV with its prevalent behavioral comorbidities, stigma, and other challenges requires a transformation of identity and internalization of motivation to maintain health. Effective methods for clinicians to support such development are needed. PMID:23271898

  16. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  17. Beliefs about antidepressant medication and associated adherence among older Chinese patients with major depression: A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Arthur, David; Hu, Lili; Cheng, Gen; An, Fengrong; Li, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Antidepressant non-adherence among people with depressive disorder is a major, ongoing public health issue, yet few studies have focused on older adults and their medication adherence. Although treatment adherence is determined by multiple factors, one of the important and modifiable predictors are patients' attitudes and beliefs about medication. We explored a sample of 135 older Chinese people with major depression, and the relationship between beliefs about antidepressants and medication adherence. Sociodemographic and illness variables were also examined. In all, high antidepressant adherence was reported in 37.8%, moderate adherence in 39.2%, and low adherence in 23%. Ordinal regression analysis showed perceived necessity (P < 0.01) and concern (P < 0.01) about antidepressants were significant influencing factors. Other variables with a positive association with higher adherence were lower average income (P < 0.05), fewer number of prior episodes of depression (P < 0.01), and comorbid anxiety (P < 0.05). The present study highlights low adherence in a sample of older depressed Chinese people, and highlights how beliefs about medication affect adherence. Therefore, more attention should be focused on non-adherence in older patients, and there is a need to establish accessible and systematic education programmes to correct misconceptions to improve their adherence.

  18. Patterns of Substance Use among HIV-Positive Adults Over 50: Implications for Treatment and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Starks, Tyrel J.; Millar, Brett M.; Boonrai, Kailip; Marcotte, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The population of older adults living with HIV is increasing in the United States. Despite an increased focus on the health of HIV-positive older adults, knowledge about their substance use, a primary risk factor for HIV medication non-adherence, and the association between use, problems associated with use, and adherence behavior, is limited. Methods Data were collected from 557 HIV-positive adults aged 50 and older in the New York City area via telephone interview. Participants reported the number of days in the past month on which they missed any doses of HIV medication as well as the number of days they used alcohol, marijuana, cocaine/crack, opiates, amyl nitrite (poppers), and other drugs. The severity of substance use associated problems was assessed using the DAST-10 and AUDIT-C. Results The sample included gay/bisexual (40.4%) and heterosexual (28.1%) men as well as lesbian/bisexual (4.9%) and heterosexual (26.7%) women. Latent class analyses identified four distinct patterns of substance use: Exclusive Alcohol Use; Alcohol and Marijuana; Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack; and Multiple-Substance Use. Variability in the number of missed HIV medication days and perceptions of substance use associated problems were observed across classes, with poorest adherence reported in the Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack class, followed by the Multiple-Substance Use class. These two classes also reported the greatest perceived impairment from substance use. Conclusions Patterns of recent substance use were associated with varying levels of HIV medication adherence and perceived substance use impairment, indicating that substance type matters when considering the health of older adults living with HIV, and that multiple-substance use needs to be addressed by interventions aimed at improving medication adherence. PMID:24745475

  19. Long-term and preventative treatment for seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Westrin, Asa; Lam, Raymond W

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent major depressive disorder with regular seasonal patterns, commonly known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), has evoked substantial research in the last two decades. It is now recognised that SAD is a common condition with prevalence rates between 0.4% and 2.9% of the general population, and that patients with SAD experience significant morbidity and impairment in psychosocial function. There is good evidence that bright light therapy and antidepressant medications are effective for the short-term treatment of SAD; however, given that SAD is characterised by recurrent major depressive episodes, long-term and maintenance treatment must be considered. Unfortunately, there are few studies of longer term (>8 weeks) and maintenance (preventative) treatments for SAD. The weight of evidence suggests that light therapy usually needs to be continued daily throughout the winter season because of rapid relapse when light is stopped too early in the treatment period. However, some studies support the use of antidepressants to continue the response from a brief (1-2 weeks) course of light therapy early in the depressive episode, as soon as the first symptoms emerge in autumn. Only small studies have examined preventative treatment (before onset of symptoms) with light therapy, all of which have methodological limitations. The best evidence for preventative treatment in SAD comes from antidepressant studies. Three large, randomised, placebo-controlled studies have shown that preventative treatment with bupropion XL reduces the recurrence rate of depressive episodes in patients with SAD. Given the limitations in the evidence base and the inconsistent recurrence rate of winter depressive episodes, clinical recommendations for long-term and preventative treatment must individualise treatment choices and weigh potential benefits against possible adverse effects. PMID:17927295

  20. Qualitative exploration of the relationship between HIV/AIDS patients' experiences of clinical services and treatment adherence at Maitama District Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Audu, Bridget; Morgan, Rae; Rutter, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Nigeria has the third largest number of patients worldwide living with HIV/AIDs, and the Nigerian government has set ambitious targets to slow, halt and potentially reverse this number over the coming years. Clinical service provision has increased to meet this challenge, and yet it is unknown how services may affect patient anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. The aim of this study was to learn from patients what factors influence their adherence, and how services could be changed to facilitate adherence. In-depth interviews were conducted with 35 HIV patients attending Maitama District Hospital in Abuja and supplemented with shadowing observations of additional 10 patients during their clinic day appointment. Faith, stigma and discrimination and the hospital care patients received all influenced their thinking in relation to ART. Faith was expressed not only through their religious beliefs but also in the effectiveness of ART. They feared disclosure, even to close family, due to the stigma associated with HIV, and the threat of discrimination. They felt that the hospital service was under-resourced to cope with the volume of patients which led to delays on clinic day, including limited ART availability. This necessitated repeated hospital visits, thus increasing the chance of their status being revealed to third parties. Shadowing confirmed lengthy procedural delays in the hospital systems. PMID:23875980

  1. Factors affecting the duration of orthodontic treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mavreas, Dimitrios; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the literature for articles referring exclusively to the duration of orthodontic therapy and to explore the various factors that could affect this. A Medline search from 1990 to the first week of March 2005 was conducted, the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews was utilized, five orthodontic journals were hand searched, the abstracts of related articles were reviewed to search for any relevant studies that might have been missed, and the reference lists of the retrieved articles were hand assessed. Eligibility was determined by reading the reports identified by the search. The end result of this search provided 41 articles. Although there is a need for more conclusive research, the present review revealed several conclusions concerning the duration of orthodontic treatment: (1) there are indications that extraction treatment lasts longer than the non-extraction therapy; (2) age does not seem to play a role provided the patients are in the permanent dentition; (3) when Class II division 1 malocclusions are considered, there is evidence that the earlier the orthodontic treatment begins the longer its duration; (4) there is conflicting information regarding treatment duration within public health systems; (5) combined orthodontic-surgical treatment duration is variable and appears to be operator sensitive; (6) various factors, such as the technique employed, the skill and number of operators involved, the compliance of the patients, and the severity of the initial malocclusion, all seem to play a role; and (7) impacted maxillary canines appear to prolong treatment.

  2. Adherence to Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction in Long-Term Users: How Do Men Use the Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Carvalheira, Ana; Forjaz, Vera; Pereira, Nuno Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The high effectiveness of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-i) in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) has been demonstrated. However, previous research shows that PDE5-i treatments have high discontinuation rates. Aim The main goals of this study were to (i) characterize the way men use PDE5-i and (ii) analyze the adherence to treatment, identifying the factors that influence PDE5-i use. Methods A total of 148 men with clinical diagnosis for ED who maintained the treatment with PDE5-i for over 3 years were interviewed. Interviews concerning their ongoing treatment were carried out using a standardized questionnaire with quantitative and qualitative items. Main Outcome Measures Physiological measures included the intracavernous alprostadil injection test, associated with penile rigidometry and penile Doppler ultrasound. The qualitative measure included two questions: “Do you use the drug in every sexual intercourse?” and “How do you use the inhibitor?” Results ED causes were classified as venogenic (31%), arteriogenic (23%), psychogenic (18%), iatrogenic (13%), neurogenic (8%), and diabetic (7%). Participation rate was 71.8%. Of the 148 patients studied, 75% claimed not to use PDE5-i in every intercourse. Most used tadalafil (66%), followed by sildenafil (20%), vardenafil (10%), and 4% alternated the type of medicine. Four main categories emerged concerning the factors that determine the intake of PDE5-i in some intercourse situations and not in others: (i) psychological factors; (ii) medication-related factors; (iii) circumstantial factors; and (iv) relational factors. Conclusion The analysis of men's narratives revealed a combination of factors that influence the adherence to PDE5-i. The psychological and medication-related factors were the most prevalent. This study highlighted the importance of taking these factors into account, both at the time of prescription and during the follow-up in order to improve adherence

  3. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per; Vindbjerg, Erik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Elklit, Ask

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of treatment in trials with trauma-affected refugees vary considerably not only between studies but also between patients within a single study. However, we know little about why some patients benefit more from treatment, as few studies have analysed predictors of treatment outcome. Objective The objective of the study was to examine possible psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees. Method The participants were 195 adult refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who were enrolled in a 6- to 7-month treatment programme at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP), Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients’ past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms Checklist-90, Global Assessment of Functioning scales, and pain rated on visual analogue scales. The relations between treatment outcomes and the total score as well as subscores of the CTP Predictor Index were analysed. Results Overall, the total score of the CTP Predictor Index was significantly correlated to pre- to post treatment score changes on the majority of the ratings mentioned above. While employment status was the only single item significantly correlated to HTQ-score changes, a number of single items from the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with changes in depression and anxiety symptoms, but the size of the correlation coefficients were modest. Conclusions The total score of the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with outcomes on most

  4. Management and adherence to VTE treatment guidelines in a national prospective cohort study in the Canadian outpatient setting. The Recovery Study.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Susan R; Springmann, Vicky; Schulman, Sam; Martineau, Josée; Stewart, John A; Komari, Nelly; McLeod, Anne; Strulovitch, Carla; Blostein, Mark; Faucher, Jacques-Philippe; Gamble, Greg; Gordon, Wendy; Kagoma, Peter K; Miron, Marie-José; Laverdière, David; Game, Melaku; Mills, Allan

    2012-09-01

    Documenting patterns and outcomes of venous thromboembolism (VTE) management and degree of adherence by clinicians to treatment guidelines could help identify remediable gaps in patient care. Prospective, clinical practice-based data from Canadian outpatient settings on management of VTE, degree of adherence with treatment guidelines and frequency of recurrent VTE and bleeding during follow-up was obtained in a multicentre, prospective observational study. From 12 Canadian centres, we assessed 868 outpatients with acute symptomatic VTE who received the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) enoxaparin alone or with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), at baseline and at six months (or at the end of treatment, whichever came first). Index VTE was limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 583 (67.2%) patients, pulmonary embolism (PE) with or without DVT in 262 (30.2%) patients, and unusual site DVT in 23 (2.6%) patients. VTE was unprovoked in 399 (46.0%) patients, associated with cancer in 74 (8.5%) patients, transient risk factors in 327 (37.7%) patients and hormonal factors in 68 (7.8%) patients.With regard to guideline adherence, 58 (7.3%) patients received <5 days LMWH and 114 (14.5%) had overlap <1 day. Among patients with cancer-related VTE, 59.5% were prescribed LMWH monotherapy and 43.2% received such treatment for >3 months. Only 38.1% of patients with transient VTE risk factors had received thromboprophylaxis. Our study provides useful information on clinical presentation, management and related outcomes in Canadian outpatients with VTE. Our results suggest there may be important gaps in use of thromboprophylaxis to prevent VTE and use of LMWH monotherapy to treat cancer-related VTE.

  5. Psychosocial Predictors of Non-Adherence and Treatment Failure in a Large Scale Multi-National Trial of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV: Data from the ACTG A5175/PEARLS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Biello, Katie B.; Smeaton, Laura; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Walawander, Ann; Lama, Javier R.; Rana, Aadia; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Kayoyo, Virginia M.; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Joglekar, Anjali; Celentano, David; Martinez, Ana; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Nair, Aspara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James; Campbell, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Background PEARLS, a large scale trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV (n = 1,571, 9 countries, 4 continents), found that a once-daily protease inhibitor (PI) based regimen (ATV+DDI+FTC), but not a once-daily non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI/NRTI) regimen (EFV+FTC/TDF), had inferior efficacy compared to a standard of care twice-daily NNRTI/NRTI regimen (EFV+3TC/ZDV). The present study examined non-adherence in PEARLS. Methods Outcomes: non-adherence assessed by pill count and by self-report, and time to treatment failure. Longitudinal predictors: regimen, quality of life (general health perceptions  =  QOL-health, mental health  =  QOL-mental health), social support, substance use, binge drinking, and sexual behaviors. “Life-Steps” adherence counseling was provided. Results In both pill-count and self-report multivariable models, both once-a-day regimens had lower levels of non-adherence than the twice-a-day standard of care regimen; although these associations attenuated with time in the self-report model. In both multivariable models, hard-drug use was associated with non-adherence, living in Africa and better QOL-health were associated with less non-adherence. According to pill-count, unprotected sex was associated with non-adherence. According to self-report, soft-drug use was associated with non-adherence and living in Asia was associated with less non-adherence. Both pill-count (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.09, p<.01) and self-report (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.13, p<.01) non-adherence were significant predictors of treatment failure over 72 weeks. In multivariable models (including pill-count or self-report nonadherence), worse QOL-health, age group (younger), and region were also significant predictors of treatment failure. Conclusion In the context of a large, multi-national, multi-continent, clinical trial there were variations in adherence over time, with more

  6. Behavioral family treatment for patients with bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, D J; Goldstein, M J

    1990-10-01

    Techniques of behavioral family management (BFM), which have been found to be highly effective in delaying relapse for schizophrenic patients when used as adjuncts to medication maintenance, are also applicable in the outpatient treatment of recently hospitalized bipolar, manic patients. The authors describe their adaptation of the educational, communication skills training, and problem-solving skills training modules of BFM to families containing a bipolar member. The observations that families of bipolar patients are often high functioning, and that these families seem to enjoy interchanges that are highly affective and spontaneous, led to certain modifications in the original BFM approach. The authors found it necessary to be (a) more flexible and less didactic, (b) more oriented toward dealing with affect and resistance to change, and (c) more focused on the patient's and family members' feelings about labeling, stigmatization, and medication usage. Research issues relevant to testing the efficacy of this approach are also discussed. PMID:2252468

  7. Seasonal Affective Disorder: An Overview of Assessment and Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Melrose, Sherri

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder or SAD is a recurrent major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern usually beginning in fall and continuing into winter months. A subsyndromal type of SAD, or S-SAD, is commonly known as "winter blues." Less often, SAD causes depression in the spring or early summer. Symptoms center on sad mood and low energy. Those most at risk are female, are younger, live far from the equator, and have family histories of depression, bipolar disorder, or SAD. Screening instruments include the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Typical treatment includes antidepressant medications, light therapy, Vitamin D, and counselling. This paper provides an overview of SAD.

  8. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  9. Patient-reported side effects, concerns and adherence to corticosteroid treatment for asthma, and comparison with physician estimates of side-effect prevalence: a UK-wide, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Vanessa; Metcalf, Leanne; Versnel, Jenny; Upton, Jane; Walker, Samantha; Horne, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-adherence to corticosteroid treatment has been shown to reduce treatment efficacy, thus compromising asthma control. Aims: To examine the experiences of treatment side effects, treatment concerns and adherence to inhaled (ICS) and oral corticosteroids (OCS) among people with asthma and to identify the degree of concordance between clinician estimates of side effects and the prevalence reported by patients. Methods: Asthma UK members were sent validated questionnaires assessing treatment concerns, experiences of side effects and adherence. Questionnaires measuring clinicians’ estimates of the prevalence of corticosteroid side effects were completed online. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 1,524 people taking ICS, 233 taking OCS and 244 clinicians (67% of clinicians were primary care nurses). Among people with asthma, 64% of those taking ICS and 88% of those taking OCS reported ⩾1 side effect. People reporting high adherence to ICS (t=−3.09, P<0.005) and those reporting low adherence to OCS (t=1.86, P<0.05; one-tailed test) reported more side effects. There was a disparity between clinicians’ estimates of the frequency of side effects and the frequency reported by people with asthma: e.g., although 46% of people taking ICS reported sore throat, clinicians estimated that this figure would be 10%. Patients who reported side effects had stronger concerns about both ICS (r=0.46, P<0.0001) and OCS (r=0.50, P<0.0001). Concerns about corticosteroids were associated with low adherence to ICS (t=6.90, P<0.0001) and OCS (t=1.71; P<0.05; one-tailed test). Conclusions: An unexpectedly large proportion of people with asthma experienced side effects and had strong concerns about their treatment, which compromised adherence. These findings have implications for the design of interventions to optimise asthma control through improved adherence. PMID:26158805

  10. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that-in all social interventions-the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient's hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA's household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his/her household

  11. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that-in all social interventions-the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient's hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA's household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his/her household

  12. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that–in all social interventions–the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient’s hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA’s household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his

  13. Reinforcement sensitivity underlying treatment-seeking smokers' affect, smoking reinforcement motives, and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Robinson, Jason D; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Lam, Cho Y; Minnix, Jennifer A; Karam-Hage, Maher; Wetter, David W; Dani, John A; Kosten, Thomas R; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Nicotine dependence has been suggested to be related to reinforcement sensitivity, which encompasses behavioral predispositions either to avoid aversive (behavioral inhibition) or to approach appetitive (behavioral activation) stimuli. Reinforcement sensitivity may shape motives for nicotine use and offer potential targets for personalized smoking cessation therapy. However, little is known regarding how reinforcement sensitivity is related to motivational processes implicated in the maintenance of smoking. Additionally, women and men differ in reinforcement sensitivity, and such difference may cause distinct relationships between reinforcement sensitivity and motivational processes for female and male smokers. In this study, the authors characterized reinforcement sensitivity in relation to affect, smoking-related reinforcement motives, and affective responses, using self-report and psychophysiological measures, in over 200 smokers before treating them. The Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; Carver & White, 1994) was used to measure reinforcement sensitivity. In female and male smokers, BIS was similarly associated with negative affect and negative reinforcement of smoking. However, positive affect was positively associated with BAS Drive scores in male smokers, and this association was reversed in female smokers. BIS was positively associated with corrugator electromyographic reactivity toward negative stimuli and left frontal electroencephalogram alpha asymmetry. Female and male smokers showed similar relationships for these physiological measures. These findings suggest that reinforcement sensitivity underpins important motivational processes (e.g., affect), and gender is a moderating factor for these relationships. Future personalized smoking intervention, particularly among more dependent treatment-seeking smokers, may experiment to target individual differences in reinforcement sensitivity. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25621416

  14. Reinforcement sensitivity underlying treatment-seeking smokers' affect, smoking reinforcement motives, and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Robinson, Jason D; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Lam, Cho Y; Minnix, Jennifer A; Karam-Hage, Maher; Wetter, David W; Dani, John A; Kosten, Thomas R; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Nicotine dependence has been suggested to be related to reinforcement sensitivity, which encompasses behavioral predispositions either to avoid aversive (behavioral inhibition) or to approach appetitive (behavioral activation) stimuli. Reinforcement sensitivity may shape motives for nicotine use and offer potential targets for personalized smoking cessation therapy. However, little is known regarding how reinforcement sensitivity is related to motivational processes implicated in the maintenance of smoking. Additionally, women and men differ in reinforcement sensitivity, and such difference may cause distinct relationships between reinforcement sensitivity and motivational processes for female and male smokers. In this study, the authors characterized reinforcement sensitivity in relation to affect, smoking-related reinforcement motives, and affective responses, using self-report and psychophysiological measures, in over 200 smokers before treating them. The Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; Carver & White, 1994) was used to measure reinforcement sensitivity. In female and male smokers, BIS was similarly associated with negative affect and negative reinforcement of smoking. However, positive affect was positively associated with BAS Drive scores in male smokers, and this association was reversed in female smokers. BIS was positively associated with corrugator electromyographic reactivity toward negative stimuli and left frontal electroencephalogram alpha asymmetry. Female and male smokers showed similar relationships for these physiological measures. These findings suggest that reinforcement sensitivity underpins important motivational processes (e.g., affect), and gender is a moderating factor for these relationships. Future personalized smoking intervention, particularly among more dependent treatment-seeking smokers, may experiment to target individual differences in reinforcement sensitivity. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Predictors of non-adherence to follow-up visits and deferasirox chelation therapy among jordanian adolescents with Thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Al-Kloub, Manal Ibrahim; A Bed, Mona A; Al Khawaldeh, Omar A; Al Tawarah, Yasin M; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2014-10-01

    Poor adherence to treatment can have negative effects on outcomes and heath care cost. However, little is known about the factors that impact adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy. The aims of this study were to identify rates and predictors of non-adherence to medical regimen among thalassemia major adolescents on deferasirox oral chelation therapy by using subjective (self-reporting) and objective (serum ferritin and follow-up visits) measures. Convenient samples of 164 adolescents, aged 12-19 years were recruited from three National Thalassemia Centers in Jordan. Patients were interviewed using a four-section questionnaire and the medical records were checked. Results indicated that rate of adherence according to self-report was (73%); while to follow-up medical appointments and serum ferritin level rates was 57% and 47%, respectively. One-third of participant adolescents (n = 52) were psychologically impaired. Multivariate analysis showed that factors affecting adolescent non-adherence to deferasirox chelation therapy is different from that affecting adherence to follow-up visits. In general, adolescents more than 16 years old, presence of sibling with thalassemia, lack of parental monitoring, lower family income, decrease frequency of blood transfusion, and psychological impairment were found significant predictors of non-adherence among adolescents. Disease knowledge was not associated with adherence status of the adolescents. Clinician should be aware of high prevalence of low adherence to chelation therapy during adolescent years. Nurses need to regularly assess, monitor, and promote adherence behavior that might impact patients' outcomes.

  16. The Role of Positive Affect in Pain and its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Patrick H.; Garland, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    This narrative review summarizes and integrates the available literature on PA and pain to: 1) Provide a brief overview of PA and summarize the key findings that have emerged in the study of PA and chronic pain; 2) Provide a theoretical foundation from which to understand how PA operates in the context of chronic pain; and 3) Highlight how the prevailing psychosocial treatments for chronic pain address PA in the therapeutic context, and offer suggestions for how future treatment development research can maximize the benefit of PA for patients with chronic pain. To that end, we review experimental studies that have assessed the association of evoked PA and pain sensitivity, as well as clinical studies that have assessed the association of naturally occurring PA and clinical pain in the context of chronic pain. The evidence suggests PA influences pain, over and above the influence of NA. We offer an “upward spiral” model of positive affect, resilience and pain self-management, which makes specific predictions that PA will buffer maladaptive cognitive and affective responses to pain, and promote active engagement in valued goals that enhance chronic pain self-management. PMID:24751543

  17. Effect of washing, antibiotics and trypsin treatment of bovine embryos on the removal of adhering K99+ Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Otoi, T; Tachikawa, S; Kondo, S; Suzuki, T

    1993-12-01

    Bovine embryos with the intact zona pellucida were exposed in vitro to K99+ Escherichia coli (K99 E. coli). The recommended procedures for washing and treating embryos were then evaluated for their effectiveness in removing or killing the adherent bacteria. After 10-step washing, bacteria were recovered not only from the embryos exposed to E. coli suspensions but also from those treated with trypsin during washing. On the other hand, no bacteria were recovered from any embryos treated with antibiotics (gentamicin; 50 micrograms/ml) in culture medium before washing, indicating that the recommended washing procedures with appropriate antibiotics assure that zona pellucida-intact bovine embryos are free from E. coli.

  18. SP 03-1 POLYPILL STRATEGY TO IMPROVED ADHERENCE.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2016-09-01

    Among individuals with established CVD, multiple medications (aspirin, blood pressure lowering drugs and statins) are required to manage CVD and it is well established that non adherence to prescribed treatments is substantial in the long term. Such discontinuation of CV-preventive medications and low adherence rates has been shown to affect the success of CVD prevention efforts. In low- and middle income countries only less than 20% patients receive recommended therapy for CVD prevention, but even in high-income countries treatment coverage in the community is only about 50% in those with heart disease and 35% in those with stroke. Patients adherence to CV drugs is likely to be adversely affected by a number of factors including patients' beliefs, complexity of medication regime, lack of understanding of their condition or medication, and medication cost and associated clinic visits cost. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) polypill therapy may reduce these treatment gaps by reducing cost, complexity, therapeutic inertia, and low adherence. There are several mechanisms whereby an FDC strategy may enhance adherence. These encompass ease of prescription, overcoming physician inertia, patient acceptability, packaged delivery, and ease of taking. Recent evidence from well-designed randomized controlled trials (UMPIRE, Kanyini-GAP, IMPACT) and meta-analysis (SPACE collaboration) of RCTs have shown that access to FDC polypill in patients with CVD or similarly high risk improved adherence, BP, and cholesterol levels. These trials have shown that physicians are willing to prescribe polypill to this group of patients by involving them in the trial, and at the end of the study more patients were taking the FDC treatment. In order to achieve substantial reduction of CVD burden, immediate use of FDC/polypill in secondary prevention is indicated; however, the evidence in primary prevention needs to be adjudicated. PMID:27642921

  19. Similarities and differences between asthma health care professional and patient views regarding medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Sandra; Bacon, Simon L; Aulls, Mark W; Lacoste, Guillaume; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature has reported disparate views between patients and health care professionals regarding the roles of various factors affecting medication adherence. OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of asthma patients, physicians and allied health professionals regarding adherence to asthma medication. METHODOLOGY: A qualitative, multiple, collective case study design with six focus-group interviews including 38 participants (13 asthma patients, 13 pulmonologist physicians and 12 allied health professionals involved in treating asthma patients) was conducted. RESULTS: Patients, physicians and allied health professionals understood adherence to be an active process. In addition, all participants believed they had a role in treatment adherence, and agreed that the cost of medication was high and that access to the health care system was restricted. Major disagreements regarding patient-related barriers to medication adherence were identified among the groups. For example, all groups referred to side effects; however, while patients expressed their legitimate concerns, health care professionals believed that patients’ opinions of medication side effects were based on inadequate perceptions. CONCLUSION: Differences regarding medication adherence and barriers to adherence among the groups examined in the present study will provide insight into how disagreements may be translated to overcome barriers to optimal asthma adherence. Furthermore, when designing an intervention to enhance medication adherence, it is important to acknowledge that perceptual gaps exist and must be addressed. PMID:24712015

  20. Intent-to-adhere and adherence to malaria prevention recommendations in two travel clinics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Irit; Grefat, Rami; Ephros, Moshe; Rishpon, Shmuel

    2015-01-01

    Malaria infects 30,000 travelers annually worldwide. At greatest risk are those who travel for long duration. Prevention of malaria includes chemoprophylaxis. This prospective study on 121 travelers who visited two travel clinics shows that adherence to prophylactic treatment was low, especially in long duration trips, and that adherence rate could be predicted by the much more available intent-to-adhere rate.

  1. Does adherence therapy improve medication adherence among patients with schizophrenia? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Non-adherence to medication is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Adherence therapy aims to improve medication adherence of these patients by applying techniques of cognitive behavioural therapy, psycho-education, and motivational interviewing. Even though adherence therapy is frequently discussed and researched, its effectiveness is still uncertain. This paper aims to review the effectiveness of adherence therapy on the medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia. To this end, six electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized, controlled trials on adherence therapy from January 2002 to March 2013. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into the review. The findings suggest that adherence therapy does not improve patients' medication adherence in comparison to treatment as usual or a control intervention. However, all the studies reviewed showed high-adherence ratings at baseline. Thus, further well-designed studies that target adherence therapy to patients who are non-adherent to their medication are needed for a more profound understanding of its effectiveness. In addition, if adherence therapy is aimed not only at improving medication adherence, but also to reach an agreement whereby the patient's decision not to take his medication is accepted, the shared decision-making process needs to be assessed as well.

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal noninvasive testing for post-treatment confirmation of Helicobacter pylori eradication and the impact of patient adherence

    PubMed Central

    Boklage, Susan H; Mangel, Allen W; Ramamohan, Varun; Mladsi, Deirdre; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment failure rate for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is ~20% due to poor patient compliance and increased antibiotic resistance. This analysis assessed the cost-effectiveness of universal post-treatment testing to confirm eradication of H. pylori infection in adults. Methods Decision-analytic models evaluated the cost-effectiveness of universal post-treatment testing (urea breath test [UBT] or monoclonal fecal antigen test [mFAT]) vs no testing (Model 1), and UBT vs mFAT after adjusting for patient adherence to testing (Model 2) in adults who previously received first-line antimicrobial therapy. Patients testing positive received second-line quadruple therapy; no further action was taken for those testing negative or with no testing (Model 1) or for those nonadherent to testing (Model 2). In addition to testing costs, excess lifetime costs and reduced quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) due to continuing H. pylori infection were considered in the model. Results Expected total costs per patient were higher for post-treatment testing (UBT: US$325.76; mFAT: US$242.12) vs no testing (US$182.41) in Model 1 and for UBT (US$336.75) vs mFAT (US$326.24) in Model 2. Expected QALYs gained per patient were 0.71 and 0.72 for UBT and mFAT, respectively, vs no testing (Model 1), and the same was 0.37 for UBT vs mFAT (Model 2). The estimated incremental costs per QALY gained for post-treatment testing vs no testing were US$82.90–US$202.45 and, after adjusting for adherence, US$28.13 for UBT vs mFAT. Conclusion Universal post-treatment testing was found to be cost-effective for confirming eradication of H. pylori infection following first-line therapy. Better adherence to UBT relative to mFAT was the key to its cost-effectiveness. PMID:27354772

  3. Improving Health Worker Adherence to Malaria Treatment Guidelines in Papua New Guinea: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Text Message Reminder Service

    PubMed Central

    Kurumop, Serah F.; Bullen, Chris; Whittaker, Robyn; Betuela, Inoni; Hetzel, Manuel W.; Pulford, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether a text message reminder service designed to support health worker adherence to a revised malaria treatment protocol is feasible and acceptable in Papua New Guinea (PNG). The study took place in six purposively selected health facilities located in the Eastern Highlands Province (EHP) of PNG. Ten text messages designed to remind participants of key elements of the new NMTP were transmitted to 42 health workers twice over a two week period (two text messages per day, Monday to Friday) via the country’s largest mobile network provider. The feasibility and acceptability of the text message reminder service was assessed by transmission reports, participant diaries and group discussions. Findings indicate that the vast majority of text messages were successfully transmitted, participants’ had regular mobile phone access and that most text messages were read most of the time and were considered both acceptable and clinically useful. Nevertheless, the study found that PNG health workers may tire of the service if the same messages are repeated too many times and that health workers may be reluctant to utilize more comprehensive, yet complementary, resources. In conclusion, a text message reminder service to support health worker adherence to the new malaria treatment protocol is feasible and acceptable in PNG. A rigorous pragmatic, effectiveness trial would be justified on the basis of these findings. PMID:24116122

  4. Social Impact of Stigma Regarding Tuberculosis Hindering Adherence to Treatment: A Cross Sectional Study Involving Tuberculosis Patients in Rajshahi City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Md Rocky Khan; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam; Sayem, Abu; Billah, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Stigma, considered a social disease, is more apparent in developing societies which are driven by various social affairs, and influences adherence to treatment. The aim of the present study was to examine levels of social stigma related to tuberculosis (TB) in sociodemographic context and identify the effects of sociodemographic factors on stigma. The study sample consisted of 372 TB patients. Data were collected using stratified sampling with simple random sampling techniques. T tests, chi-square tests, and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to examine correlations between stigma and sociodemographic variables. Approximately 85.9% of patients had experienced stigma. The most frequent indicator of the stigma experienced by patients involved problems taking part in social programs (79.5%). Mean levels of stigma were significantly higher in women (55.5%), illiterate individuals (60.8%), and villagers (60.8%) relative to those of other groups. Chi-square tests revealed that education, monthly family income, and type of patient (pulmonary and extrapulmonary) were significantly associated with stigma. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that stigma was influenced by sex, education, and type of patient. Stigma is one of the most important barriers to treatment adherence. Therefore, in interventions that aim to reduce stigma, strong collaboration between various institutions is essential.

  5. Factors Affecting Response to Infertility Treatment: Case of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Peyromusavi, Fatemeh; Barouni, Mohsen; Naderi, Tayebeh; Shahravan, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility affects both women and men in all the countries. Infertility often has profound long-term or short-term impacts on the people involved and puts them at risk of familial and social pressures. According to WHO estimates, between 8% and 12% of all the couples worldwide experience some form of infertility during their reproductive life, i.e. 50–80 million people are affected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to infertility treatment by taking into account factors such as age, hirsutism, menstruation and galactose among women in Kerman. Methodology: Of a total of 300 patient files evaluated 220 cases were flawless, of which the study factors were recorded. These data were estimated by Logit model. The dependent variable was the response to treatment (0 and 1) and the independent variables included age of men and women, hirsutism, menstruation, galactose, duration of the period no preventive measures were used and body mass index. After entering the data, model output was analyzed by using the STATA software. Results: The results showed that of all the model variables, female age (prob=0.0065), menstruation (prob=0.04), hirsutism (prob=0.02), marriage age (in months) (prob=0.02) and BMI were significant and other variables were not significant. McFadden analysis for goodness of fit was 0.92. Conclusion: The study results showed that women should pay more attention to variables such as BMI, menstruation quality (regular and irregular) and aging because clinical disregard of any of the above can have a significant impact on the individual’s fertility. PMID:26234994

  6. Factors associated with antipsychotic medication adherence in community-based patients with schizophrenia in Hong Kong: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bressington, Dan; Mui, Jolene; Gray, Richard

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the factors affecting adherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with schizophrenia registered with a community psychiatric nursing service in Hong Kong. The study was a cross-sectional observational survey; symptoms, drug attitudes, insight, side-effects, and sociodemographic characteristics were measured and explored in terms of their relationship with medication adherence. A total of 584 patients who were visited by community psychiatric nurses (CPN) participated, and 30% of these patients were non-adherent with their antipsychotic medication. Positive treatment attitudes, awareness of the need for treatment, being prescribed clozapine, receiving state benefits, lower levels of symptoms, and fewer side-effects were associated with adherence. The findings from this study suggest that the clinical efforts of CPN to improve adherence should aim to help patients amplify the personal relevance of treatment and modify patients' attitudes towards medication.

  7. Assessing treatment benefit with competing risks not affected by the randomized treatment.

    PubMed

    Korn, Edward L; Dignam, James J; Freidlin, Boris

    2015-01-30

    The comparison of overall survival curves between treatment arms will always be of interest in a randomized clinical trial involving a life-shortening disease. In some settings, the experimental treatment is only expected to affect the deaths caused by the disease, and the proportion of deaths caused by the disease is relatively low. In these settings, the ability to assess treatment-effect differences between Kaplan-Meier survival curves can be hampered by the large proportion of deaths in both arms that are unrelated to the disease. To address this problem, frequently displayed are cause-specific survival curves or cumulative incidence curves, which respectively censor and immortalize events (deaths) not caused by the disease. However, the differences between the experimental and control treatment arms for these curves overestimate the difference between the overall survival curves for the treatment arms and thus could result in overestimation of the benefit of the experimental treatment for the patients. To address this issue, we propose new estimators of overall survival for the treatment arms that are appropriate when the treatment does not affect the non-disease-related deaths. These new estimators give a more precise estimate of the treatment benefit, potentially enabling future patients to make a more informed decision concerning treatment choice. We also consider the case where an exponential assumption allows the simple presentation of mortality rates as the outcome measures. Applications are given for estimating overall survival in a prostate-cancer treatment randomized clinical trial, and for estimating the overall mortality rates in a prostate-cancer screening trial. PMID:25363739

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life, Treatment Satisfaction, Adherence and Persistence in β-Thalassemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients with Iron Overload Receiving Deferasirox: Results from the EPIC Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porter, John; Bowden, Donald K.; Economou, Marina; Troncy, Jacques; Ganser, Arnold; Habr, Dany; Martin, Nicolas; Gater, Adam; Rofail, Diana; Abetz-Webb, Linda; Lau, Helen; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of iron overload using deferoxamine (DFO) is associated with significant deficits in patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and low treatment satisfaction. The current article presents patient-reported HRQOL, satisfaction, adherence, and persistence data from β-thalassemia (n = 274) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients (n = 168) patients participating in the Evaluation of Patients' Iron Chelation with Exjade (EPIC) study (NCT00171821); a large-scale 1-year, phase IIIb study investigating the efficacy and safety of the once-daily oral iron chelator, deferasirox. HRQOL and satisfaction, adherence, and persistence to iron chelation therapy (ICT) data were collected at baseline and end of study using the Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36v2) and the Satisfaction with ICT Questionnaire (SICT). Compared to age-matched norms, β-thalassemia and MDS patients reported lower SF-36 domain scores at baseline. Low levels of treatment satisfaction, adherence, and persistence were also observed. HRQOL improved following treatment with deferasirox, particularly among β-thalassemia patients. Furthermore, patients reported high levels of satisfaction with deferasirox at end of study and greater ICT adherence, and persistence. Findings suggest deferasirox improves HRQOL, treatment satisfaction, adherence, and persistence with ICT in β-thalassemia and MDS patients. Improving such outcomes is an important long-term goal for patients with iron overload. PMID:22924125

  9. Engagement with Health Care Providers Affects Self- Efficacy, Self-Esteem, Medication Adherence and Quality of Life in People Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ti; Wantland, Dean; Reid, Paula; Corless, Inge B; Eller, Lucille S.; Iipinge, Scholastika; Holzemer, William L; Nokes, Kathleen; Sefcik, Elizbeth; Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Voss, Joachim; Nicholas, Patrice; Phillips, J. Craig; Brion, John M.; Rose, Caro Dawson; Portillo, Carmen J; Kirksey, Kenn; Sullivan, Kathleen M; Johnson, Mallory O; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Webel, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    The engagement of patients with their health care providers (HCP) improves patients’ quality of life (QOL), adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and life satisfaction. Engagement with HCP includes access to HCP as needed, information sharing, involvement of client in decision making and self-care activities, respect and support of the HCP for the client’s choices, and management of client concerns. This study compares country-level differences in patients’ engagement with HCP and assesses statistical associations relative to adherence rates, self-efficacy, self-esteem, QOL, and symptom self-reporting by people living with HIV (PLHIV). A convenience sample of 2,182 PLHIV was enrolled in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, Namibia, and China. Cross-sectional data were collected between September 2009 and January 2011. Inclusion criteria were being at least 18 years of age, diagnosed with HIV, able to provide informed consent, and able to communicate in the local language with site researchers. In the HCP scale, a low score indicated greater provider engagement. Country comparisons showed that PLHIV in Namibia had the most HCP engagement (OR 2.80, p < 0.001) and that PLHIV in China had the least engagement (OR −7.03, p < 0.0001) compared to the PLHIV in the Western countries. Individuals having better HCP engagement showed better self-efficacy for adherence (t = −5.22, p < 0.0001), missed fewer medication doses (t = 1.92, p ≤ 0.05), had lower self-esteem ratings (t = 2.67, p < 0.01), fewer self-reported symptoms (t = 3.25, p < 0.0001), and better overall QOL physical condition (t = −3.39, p < 0.001). This study suggests that promoting engagement with the HCP is necessary to facilitate skills that help PLHIV manage their HIV. To improve ART adherence, HCPs should work on strategies to enhance self-efficacy and self-esteem, therefore, exhibiting fewer HIV-related symptoms and missing less medication doses to achieve better QOL. PMID:24575329

  10. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C.; van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory—the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not). Methods We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective. Results We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase. Conclusion The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing

  11. Mobile Assessment and Treatment for Schizophrenia (MATS): A Pilot Trial of An Interactive Text-Messaging Intervention for Medication Adherence, Socialization, and Auditory Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Granholm, Eric; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Bradshaw, Kristen R.; Holden, Jason L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile Assessment and Treatment for Schizophrenia (MATS) employs ambulatory monitoring methods and cognitive behavioral therapy interventions to assess and improve outcomes in consumers with schizophrenia through mobile phone text messaging. Three MATS interventions were developed to target medication adherence, socialization, and auditory hallucinations. Participants received up to 840 text messages over a 12-week intervention period. Fifty-five consumers with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were enrolled, but 13 consumers with more severe negative symptoms, lower functioning, and lower premorbid IQ did not complete the intervention, despite repeated prompting and training. For completers, the average valid response rate for 216 outcome assessment questions over the 12-week period was 86%, and 86% of phones were returned undamaged. Medication adherence improved significantly, but only for individuals who were living independently. Number of social interactions increased significantly and a significant reduction in severity of hallucinations was found. In addition, the probability of endorsing attitudes that could interfere with improvement in these outcomes was also significantly reduced in MATS. Lab-based assessments of more general symptoms and functioning did not change significantly. This pilot study demonstrated that low-intensity text-messaging interventions like MATS are feasible and effective interventions to improve several important outcomes, especially for higher functioning consumers with schizophrenia. PMID:22080492

  12. Hearing Aid Use and Adherence to Treatment in a Publicly-Funded Health Service from the City of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Juliana Harumi; Jardim, Isabela de Souza; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Yuasa, Motoyuki; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    Introduction Periodic follow-up appointments are important to ensure long-term effectiveness of rehabilitation with hearing aids. However, not all users are able to maintain adherence to recommendations prescribed during the fitting process and some do not attend those appointments, which compromises the effectiveness of treatment. Objective Compare hearing aid use after 1 year between subjects who did not attend a follow-up evaluation appointment at a publicly-funded health service (nonattenders) and those who attended the appointment (attenders). Reasons for nonuse of hearing aids and unscheduled appointments were also analyzed. Methods Prospective observational cross-sectional study. Nonattenders and attenders in a follow-up evaluation appointment were interviewed by telephone about hearing aid use, reasons for nonuse, and unscheduled appointments. Results The nonattenders group consisted of 108 subjects and the attenders group had 200 subjects; in both groups, most users kept bilateral use but the nonuse rate was higher in nonattenders. The main reason for nonuse of hearing aids among nonattenders was health problems; fitting problems was the main reason for nonuse in the attenders group. Health problems and issues like unavailable companion and transportation difficulties were the reasons for unscheduled follow-up appointments. Conclusion Nonattenders had a greater nonuse rate and were more likely to abandon hearing aid use. Measures to increase hearing aid use and adherence to prescribed recommendations are also necessary to ensure long-term effectiveness of rehabilitation with hearing aids.

  13. Mobile Assessment and Treatment for Schizophrenia (MATS): a pilot trial of an interactive text-messaging intervention for medication adherence, socialization, and auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Eric; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Link, Peter C; Bradshaw, Kristen R; Holden, Jason L

    2012-05-01

    Mobile Assessment and Treatment for Schizophrenia (MATS) employs ambulatory monitoring methods and cognitive behavioral therapy interventions to assess and improve outcomes in consumers with schizophrenia through mobile phone text messaging. Three MATS interventions were developed to target medication adherence, socialization, and auditory hallucinations. Participants received up to 840 text messages over a 12-week intervention period. Fifty-five consumers with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were enrolled, but 13 consumers with more severe negative symptoms, lower functioning, and lower premorbid IQ did not complete the intervention, despite repeated prompting and training. For completers, the average valid response rate for 216 outcome assessment questions over the 12-week period was 86%, and 86% of phones were returned undamaged. Medication adherence improved significantly, but only for individuals who were living independently. Number of social interactions increased significantly and a significant reduction in severity of hallucinations was found. In addition, the probability of endorsing attitudes that could interfere with improvement in these outcomes was also significantly reduced in MATS. Lab-based assessments of more general symptoms and functioning did not change significantly. This pilot study demonstrated that low-intensity text-messaging interventions like MATS are feasible and effective interventions to improve several important outcomes, especially for higher functioning consumers with schizophrenia.

  14. Bacterial infection of wounds: fibronectin-mediated adherence group A and C streptococci to fibrin thrombi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chhatwal, G S; Valentin-Weigand, P; Timmis, K N

    1990-09-01

    Adherence of group A, B, and C streptococci to fibrin thrombi was studied by using a novel fluorochrome microassay carried out in microdilution plates in which fibrin thrombi had been prepared by clotting citrated human, cattle, or horse plasma. Substantial adherence was observed with various strains of group A and C streptococci, whereas little was observed with group B streptococci. Adherence of all group A and C streptococcal strains decreased by up to 40% when fibronectin was depleted from the plasmas used for preparing fibrin thrombi, and fibronectin repletion increased adherence of streptococci in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of the 210-kilodalton C-terminal fragment of fibronectin to fibronectin-depleted plasma restored the adherence of group C but not group A streptococci, whereas addition of the 29-kilodalton N-terminal fragment was without any effect for all tested streptococcal strains. Prior incubation of group A and C streptococcal strains with fibronectin markedly increased their adherence, but treatment with proteases abolished their ability to adhere to fibrin thrombi. Adherence of group B streptococci was not affected by either fibronectin depletion or proteolytic digestion. These results indicate that both fibronectin incorporated into the fibrin matrix of thrombi and soluble fibronectin can mediate adherence of group A and C streptococci to fibrin thrombi and that binding sites for fibronectin located on the bacterial surface mediate this adherence.

  15. Improving hand hygiene adherence among nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Fowler, Kimberly A

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored initial and sustained effects of educational and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and the relationships between hand hygiene adherence and health care-associated infections. Education paired with positive reinforcement behavioral interventions significantly improved hand hygiene adherence after the first month (χ² = 4.27; P = .039); however, the improvement was not sustained over 6 months. There were no significant differences in infection rates between the treatment and control groups. PMID:20407392

  16. 'Triply cursed': racism, homophobia and HIV-related stigma are barriers to regular HIV testing, treatment adherence and disclosure among young Black gay men.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Emily A; Rebchook, Gregory M; Kegeles, Susan M

    2014-06-01

    In the USA, young Black gay men are disproportionately impacted upon by HIV. In this qualitative study consisting of in-depth interviews with 31 young Black gay men and nine service providers, where we used thematic analysis to guide our interpretations, we found that HIV-related stigma and homophobia, within the larger societal context of racism, were related to sexual risk behaviour, reluctance to obtain HIV testing or care, lower adherence to treatment medication, and non-disclosure of a positive HIV status to sexual partners. Participants experienced homophobia and HIV-related stigma from churches and families within the Black community and from friends within the Black gay community, which otherwise provide support in the face of racism. Vulnerability to HIV was related to strategies that young Black gay men enacted to avoid being stigmatised or as a way of coping with alienation and rejection.

  17. “Triply cursed”: Racism, homophobia, and HIV-related stigma are barriers to regular HIV testing, treatment adherence, and disclosure among young Black gay men

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Emily A.; Rebchook, Gregory M.; Kegeles, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    In the USA, young Black gay men are disproportionately impacted by HIV. In this qualitative study consisting of in-depth interviews with 31 young Black gay men and 9 service providers, where we used thematic analysis to guide our interpretations, we found that HIV-related stigma and homophobia, within the larger societal context of racism, were related to sexual risk behaviour, reluctance to obtain HIV testing or care, lower adherence to treatment medication, and disclosure of a positive HIV status to sexual partners. Participants experienced homophobia and HIV-related stigma from churches and families within the Black community, and from friends within the Black gay community, that otherwise provide support in the face of racism. Vulnerability to HIV was related to strategies that young Black gay men enacted to avoid being stigmatised or as a way of coping with their alienation and rejection. PMID:24784224

  18. Prescribing Pattern of Oral Antihyperglycaemic Drugs, Rationality and Adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) Treatment Guidelines among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudhaa; Tandon, Vishal R.; Roshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral antihyperglycaemic prescription trends keep on changing and thus the drug prescription trend study may prove to be powerful exploratory tool for health care providers. Aim To investigate trends in prescriptions of oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) among postmenopausal women suffering from T2DM in India and evaluate the rationality and adherence to ADA treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods An observational, cross-sectional descriptive prescription audit (n=500) was carried. Postmenopausal women were interviewed in their local language using pre-tested pre validated questionnaire after verbal informed consent at a teaching tertiary care hospital of north India. Oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OHDs) drugs were categorized as per the pharmacological classification. Adherence to available clinical practice guidelines/recommendations issued under American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2015 Guidelines as well as rationality of these prescriptions were assessed using WHO Guide to Good Prescribing. Results Mean age of the study population was 58.14±12.86. Mean duration since menopause was 5.3 years and of T2DM was 9.5 years. A 93.4% of the prescriptions had only OHDs whereas 6.6% of the prescriptions had various insulin preprations + OHDs (p<0.0001). Biguanides followed by sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, DPP-inhibitors and alpha-glucosidases inhibitor were prescribed in 85.6%, 59.8%, 26.6%, 26% and 12.2% respectively as monotherapy or in combination. Among biguanides, metformin was the most frequently prescribed OHDs. In spite of black box warning on pioglitazone, it was prescribed in 26.6% as FDC. However, clear increase use of vidagliptine was noticed upto 26%. Among combinations most frequent was metformin plus glimipride followed by voglibose plus metformin, whereas, among FDC, metformin plus glimipride followed by metformin plus vidagliptine were most frequently prescribed. Conclusion Metformin was the most common OHDs to be prescribed

  19. [Normative definition of staff requirement for a guideline-adherent inpatient qualified detoxification treatment in alcohol dependence].

    PubMed

    Kiefer, F; Koopmann, A; Godemann, F; Wolff, J; Batra, A; Mann, K

    2016-03-01

    The central element of the "qualified withdrawal treatment" of alcohol dependence is - in addition to physical withdrawal treatment - psychotherapy. The treatment of the underlying addictive disorder that is displayed by intoxication, harmful behaviour and withdrawal symptoms is only possible with a combination of somatic and psychotherapeutic treatment elements. The successfully established multimodal therapy of the "qualified alcohol withdrawal treatment", postulated in the current S3-Treatment Guidelines, requires a multi-disciplinary treatment team with psychotherapeutic competence. The aim of the present work is to calculate the normative staff requirement of a guideline-based 21-day qualified withdrawal treatment and to compare the result with the staffing regulations of the German Institute for Hospital Reimbursement. The present data support the hypothesis that even in the case of a hundred per cent implementation of these data, adequate therapy of alcohol-related disorders, according to the guidelines, is not feasible. This has to be considered when further developing the finance compensation system based on the described superseded elements of the German Institute for Hospital Reimbursement. PMID:26842899

  20. Medication Adherence in the MTA: Saliva Methylphenidate Sample versus Parent Report and Mediating Effect of Concomitant Behavior Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopulos, Elizabeth; Jensen, Peter S.; Chait, Alanna R.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Swanson, James M.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Chuang, Shirley; Wells, Karen C.; Pelham, William; Cooper, Thomas; Elliott, Glenn; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Saliva methylphenidate samples from participants in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder reveal that nearly half of them had some degree of nonadherence to treatment. This suggests that nearly half of the parent reports of medication use are inaccurate.

  1. Linguistic and Cultural Adaptation of a Computer-Based Counseling Program (CARE+ Spanish) to Support HIV Treatment Adherence and Risk Reduction for People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chhun, Nok; Cleland, Charles M; Crespo-Fierro, Michele; Parés-Avila, José A; Lizcano, John A; Shedlin, Michele G; Johnston, Barbara E; Sharp, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in the United States disproportionately affects minorities, including Latinos. Barriers including language are associated with lower antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence seen among Latinos, yet ART and interventions for clinic visit adherence are rarely developed or delivered in Spanish. Objective The aim was to adapt a computer-based counseling tool, demonstrated to reduce HIV-1 viral load and sexual risk transmission in a population of English-speaking adults, for use during routine clinical visits for an HIV-positive Spanish-speaking population (CARE+ Spanish); the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was the theoretical framework guiding program development. Methods A longitudinal randomized controlled trial was conducted from June 4, 2010 to March 29, 2012. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive HIV treatment center comprising three clinics in New York City. Eligibility criteria were (1) adults (age ≥18 years), (2) Latino birth or ancestry, (3) speaks Spanish (mono- or multilingual), and (4) on antiretrovirals. Linear and generalized mixed linear effects models were used to analyze primary outcomes, which included ART adherence, sexual transmission risk behaviors, and HIV-1 viral loads. Exit interviews were offered to purposively selected intervention participants to explore cultural acceptability of the tool among participants, and focus groups explored the acceptability and system efficiency issues among clinic providers, using the TAM framework. Results A total of 494 Spanish-speaking HIV clinic attendees were enrolled and randomly assigned to the intervention (arm A: n=253) or risk assessment-only control (arm B, n=241) group and followed up at 3-month intervals for one year. Gender distribution was 296 (68.4%) male, 110 (25.4%) female, and 10 (2.3%) transgender. By study end, 433 of 494 (87.7%) participants were retained. Although intervention participants had reduced viral loads, increased

  2. Complexities of Adherence and Post-Cancer Lymphedema Management

    PubMed Central

    Ostby, Pamela L.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at increased risk for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), a chronic, debilitating, condition that is progressive and requires lifelong self-management. Up to 40% of 3 million breast cancer survivors in the US will develop BCRL, which has no cure, is irreversible, and requires self-management with regimens that may include multiple components. The complexities of treatment can negatively affect adherence to BCRL self-management which is critical to preventing progressive swelling and infection. The aim of this review of contemporary literature published from 2005–2015 is to examine the complexities of BCRL self-management, to identify adherence-focused studies relevant to BCRL, and to summarize barriers to self-management of BCRL. Six electronic indices were searched from which 120 articles were retrieved; 17 were BCRL-focused; and eight met inclusion criteria. Seventeen of 120 articles identified barriers to self-management of BCRL such as complexities of treatment regimens, symptom burden, balance of time for treatment and life demands, and lack of education and support; however, only eight studies included outcome measures of adherence to BCRL treatment regimens with a subsequent improvement in reduced limb volumes and/or perceptions of self-efficacy and self-regulation. A major limitation is the few number of rigorously developed outcome measures of BCRL adherence. In addition, randomized studies are needed with larger sample sizes to establish adequate levels of evidence for establishing best practice standards for improving adherence to BCRL self-management treatment regimens. PMID:26580657

  3. Exploring the patterns of use and the feasibility of using cellular phones for clinic appointment reminders and adherence messages in an antiretroviral treatment clinic, Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Corless, Inge B; Giddy, Janet; Nicholas, Patrice K; Eichbaum, Quentin; Butler, Lisa M

    2010-11-01

    In preparation for a proposed intervention at an antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic in Durban, South Africa, we explored the dynamics and patterns of cellular phone use among this population, in order to ascertain whether clinic contact via patients' cellular phones was a feasible and acceptable modality for appointment reminders and adherence messages. Adults, who were more than 18 years old, ambulatory, and who presented for treatment at the clinic between October-December 2007, were consecutively recruited until the sample size was reached (n = 300). A structured questionnaire was administered, including questions surrounding sociodemographics, cellular phone availability, patterns of use, and acceptability of clinic contact for the purpose of clinic appointment reminders and adherence support. Most respondents (n = 242; 81%) reported current ownership of a cellular phone with 95% utilizing a prepaid airtime service. Those participants who currently owned a cellular phone reported high cellular phone turnover due to theft or loss (n = 94, 39%) and/or damage (n = 68, 28%). More females than men switched their cell phones off during the day (p = 0.002) and were more likely to not take calls in certain social milieus (p ≤ 0.0001). Females were more likely to share their cell phone with others (p = 0.002) or leave it in a place where someone could access it (p = 0.005). Most respondents were willing to have clinic contact via their cellular phones, either verbally (99%) or via text messages (96%). The use of cellular phones for intervention purposes is feasible and should be further investigated. The findings highlight the value of gender-based analyses in informing interventions.

  4. Self-reported adherence to a home-based exercise program among patients affected by psoriatic arthritis with minimal disease activity.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Conigliaro, Paola; Santoro, Matteo; Lucchetti, Ramona; Perricone, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    More than half of all patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) exhibit progressive erosive arthritis, associated with severe functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Biologics have been suggested to be more effective in inducing minimal disease activity" (MDA) than disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Behavioral patient education appears to be more effective in encouraging patients to increase their physical activity (PA) levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of home-based exercises program on disease activity and quality of life in MDA-PsA patients treated with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and DMARD therapy. We observed a self-reported adherence rate to home-based exercise of 76.6% and data showed the impact of the exercise program on self-reported health and mental assessment. A positive relationship between patient and therapist is crucial, influencing the quality of the performance, the emotional support, and increasing motivation in PsA patients.

  5. Selective adherence of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) to mucus or epithelial cells in the chinchilla eustachian tube and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Bakaletz, L O

    1996-11-01

    Frozen sections of chinchilla Eustachian tube (ET) and middle ear mucosa were incubated with either FITC-labeled non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) or Bordetella pertussis. The number of bacteria adherent to "roof" vs "floor" regions was compared for each of three anatomic portions of the ET and for middle ear epithelium noting whether bacteria adhered to mucus or to epithelial cells. NTHi strains adhered significantly greater to mucus in the ET lumen whereas B. pertussis preferentially adhered to epithelial cells lining the ET (P < or = 0.05). A non-fimbriated isogenic mutant of NTHi adhered significantly less to mucus than the parental isolate at all sites of the ET floor (P < or = 0.05). Isolated fimbrin protein adhered to ET mucus and blocked adherence of whole organisms. Treatment with the mucolytic agent N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in significantly reduced adherence of NTHi to mucus (P < or = 0.001) and eliminated the ability to detect binding of isolated fimbrin protein. N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment did not affect adherence of either B. pertussis or NTHi to epithelial cells. These data indicated that NTHi may mediate ascension of the ET from the nasopharynx primarily via adherence to and growth in mucus overlying the floor region of the tubal lumen. The OMP P5-homologous fimbriae were shown to contribute to this binding.

  6. [Factors affecting the treatment results with pulmonary tuberculosis patients].

    PubMed

    Berezovskiĭ, B A; Salobaĭ, R Iu; Marchak, V V; Popova, I I; Zakopaĭlo, G G; Kucher, V A; Vasylyk, V U; Mikheĭ, L V

    1991-12-01

    A study is presented of the effect of social factors on the outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with freshly detected disease mainly in rural localities in 1985-1989. The outcomes of treatment depended mainly on the form and extension of the pathological process and terms of treatment. It was also established that the outcomes of tuberculosis are also influenced by unfavourable social factors which are more pronounced in persons with an extensive process. Treatment results were better in women with higher education than in similarly educator men. Among agricultural workers treatment efficacy was worse than among office workers and housewives. Life in the family effects more favourably treatment results than single life. Treatment results were worse in those living in unsatisfactory conditions, engaged in hard physical work, suffering of concomitant diseases and bad habits.

  7. Eikenella corrodens adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Y; Ebisu, S; Okada, H

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of Eikenella corrodens adherence to human buccal epithelial cells in vitro was studied. Initial experiments to determine the optimal conditions for adherence of E. corrodens to buccal epithelial cells showed that adherence was dependent on time, temperature, bacterial concentration, and pH. Different strains of E. corrodens varied in their ability to adhere, and strain 1073 showed the greatest ability in adherence. Strain 1073 was selected for studies of adherence mechanisms. Trypsin treatment or heating (100 degrees C, 10 min) of the bacterial cells abolished their capacity to adhere to buccal epithelial cells. Treatment of buccal epithelial cells with trypsin also abolished adherence of E. corrodens 1073, whereas neuraminidase treatment of buccal epithelial cells enhanced the adherence. The adherence was inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and restored by adding Ca2+. The adherence was remarkably inhibited by sugars containing D-galactose and n-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Treatment of neuraminidase-treated epithelial cells with sodium metaperiodate or alpha- and beta-galactosidase did not decrease the adherence. These data suggest that adherence of E. corrodens 1073 to human buccal epithelial cells may require the interaction of lectin-like proteins on the bacterial surface with galactose-like receptors on the surface of epithelial cells. PMID:6260661

  8. ACT HEALTHY: A Combined Cognitive-Behavioral Depression and Medication Adherence Treatment for HIV-Infected Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daughters, Stacey B.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Schuster, Randi M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The two most common comorbid conditions with HIV are substance use disorders and depression, and individuals with comorbid HIV, depression, and substance dependence face a more chronic and treatment-resistant course. As an example of how to adapt evidence-based approaches to a complex comorbid population, the current case study examined the…

  9. HAART Adherence Strategies for Methadone Clients Who Are HIV-Positive: A Treatment Manual for Implementing Contingency Management and Medication Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Nancy A.; Sorensen, James L.; Gruber, Valerie A.; Lollo, Nicole; Roth, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Research demonstrates that injection drug users with HIV and/or AIDS have difficulty adhering to complex regimens of HIV medications. Because of the risk of increased viral resistance associated with irregular medication adherence, there is considerable clinical need to assist clients who abuse substances in taking their antiretroviral medications…

  10. Histamine increases sickle erythrocyte adherence to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Matthew C; Eckman, James R; Wick, Timothy M

    2006-02-01

    Complications of sickle cell anaemia include vascular occlusion triggered by the adherence of sickle erythrocytes to endothelium in the postcapillary venules. Adherence can be promoted by inflammatory mediators that induce endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and arrest flowing erythrocytes. The present study characterised the effect of histamine stimulation on the kinetics of sickle cell adherence to large vessel and microvascular endothelium under physiological flow. Increased sickle cell adherence was observed within minutes of endothelial activation by histamine and reached a maximum value within 30 min. At steady state, sickle cell adherence to histamine-stimulated endothelium was 47 +/- 4 adherent cells/mm(2), 2.6-fold higher than sickle cell adherence to unstimulated endothelial cells. Histamine-induced sickle cell adherence occurred rapidly and transiently. Studies using histamine receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that histamine-induced sickle cell adhesion depends on simultaneous stimulation of the H(2) and H(4) histamine receptors and endothelial P-selectin expression. These data show that histamine release may promote sickle cell adherence and vaso-occlusion. In vivo histamine release should be studied to determine its role in sickle complications and whether blocking of specific histamine receptors may prevent clinical complications or adverse effects from histamine release stimulated by opiate analgesic treatment.

  11. Determinants of Adherence to Delayed-Release Doxylamine and Pyridoxine in Patients with Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Costantine, Maged M.; Matok, Ilan; Chiossi, Guisseppe; Clark, Shannon; Miodovnik, Menachem; Umans, Jason G.; Caritis, Steve; Hankins, Gary D.V.; Koren, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    Objective Women often hesitate to take medications in pregnancy due to fears of perceived potential fetal damage. The authors’ objective is to identify the determinants of adherence to delayed release doxylamine-pyridoxine (Diclectin®) in patients with nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP). Methods The authors performed a pre-specified secondary analysis of a multicenter double blind randomized controlled trial of Diclectin® vs. placebo for the treatment of NVP. Data on adherence to study medication were collected in all patients. The primary outcome of this analysis was adherence with study medication, which was determined by pill counting and patient diaries. The treatment regimen in the original trial was not fixed and depended on patient’s symptoms. There was no difference in the adherence rates between subjects in the Diclectin® or placebo arms of the study, so the 2 arms were analyzed as one cohort. The degree of adherence was analyzed in the various subgroups. Subsequently, a multiple linear regression model was constructed to identify predictors to adherence. Results 258 women were included in this analysis. There was no difference in adherence rates according to ethnicity, race or the presence of adverse events. Gravidity, average number of prescribed tablets per day, site of enrollment, and change in NVP severity measured by the pregnancy unique-quantification of emesis (PUQE) score were associated with adherence. In multivariable analysis, average number of tablets per day, change in PUQE, number of treatment days, site of enrollment were significantly predictive of adherence, with the former being negatively correlated. Conclusion adherence to antinauseants for NVP is affected by number of tablets prescribed per day, and treatment duration and effectiveness. PMID:22972538

  12. Mobile Phone Text Messages to Support Treatment Adherence in Adults With High Blood Pressure (StAR): A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew J; Springer, David; Shanyinde, Milensu; Yu, Ly-Mee; Brennan, Thomas; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Steyn, Krisela; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed the effect of automated treatment adherence support delivered via mobile-phone short message system (SMS) text-messages on blood pressure. Methods and Results In this pragmatic single-blind, three-arm randomized trial (StAR), undertaken in South Africa, patients treated for high blood pressure were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to information-only or interactive SMS text-messaging, or usual care. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 12-months from baseline measured with a validated oscillometric device. All trial staff were masked to treatment allocation. Analyses were intention to treat. Between June 26, 2012 and November 23, 2012, 1372 participants were randomized to receive information-only SMS text-messages (n=457), interactive SMS text-messages (n=458), or usual care (n=457). Primary outcome data were available for 1256 (92%) participants. At 12-months, the mean adjusted change (95% CI) in systolic blood pressure compared to usual care was −2.2 mm Hg (−4.4 to −0.04) with information-only SMS and −1.6 mm Hg (−3.7 to 0.6) with interactive SMS. Odds ratios (95% CI) for the proportion of participants with a blood pressure <140/90mm Hg were for information-only messaging 1.42 (1.03 to 1.95) and for interactive messaging 1.41 (1.02 to 1.95) compared to usual care. Conclusions In this randomized trial of an automated adherence support program delivered by SMS text-message in a general outpatient population of adults with high blood pressure, we found a small, reduction in systolic blood pressure control compared to usual care at 12-months. There was no evidence that an interactive intervention increased this effect. Clinical Trial Registration Information ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: South African National Clinical Trials Register number (SANCTR DOH-27-1212-386); Pan Africa Trial Register (PACTR201411000724141). PMID:26769742

  13. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  14. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  15. Adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G C; Young, T; Ross, R F; Rosenbusch, R F

    1990-03-01

    This work was an attempt to develop an in vitro adherence model for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, using monolayers of human and porcine lung fibroblasts and porcine kidney cells. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae grown in Friis mycoplasma broth was radiolabeled with 35[S]-methionine, washed, concentrated, and inoculated on the monolayers. After 15 minutes of centrifugation to facilitate adherence, monolayers were washed 3 times, dissolved with 0.1N NaOH, and suspended in scintillation liquid, and the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation counter. Adherence, measured as a percentage of counts added, varied according to the mycoplasma strain and the cell line used. Comparison of strains J, 144L, and 232 of M hyopneumoniae revealed 7.5 +/- 5.9, 31.9 +/- 13, and 9.6 +/- 5% adherence to porcine kidney cells, respectively. Slightly different, but proportionally the same relationships were obtained with swine or human fibroblasts. Adherence was decreased slightly by repeated washings of the mycoplasma-treated cell monolayers; however, a plateau was reached, indicating irreversibility of the adherence process. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with nonlabeled organisms substantially blocked adherence by labeled organisms. Dilution of labeled organisms resulted in an increased proportion adhering. Therefore, it appears that the adherence was a receptor-dependent event. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with trypsin prior to the inoculation of monolayers resulted in a marked reduction in adherence. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with hyperimmune swine serum against M hyopneumoniae or normal swine serum resulted in 80 to 90% reduction of adherence; however, no inhibition occurred when mycoplasmas were treated with purified IgG from the hyperimmune serum.

  16. Parameters affecting the formation of perfluoroalkyl acids during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Kim, M; Kinsman, L; Ng, T; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2014-05-15

    This study examined the fate and behaviour of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in liquid and solid samples from five different wastewater treatment types: facultative and aerated lagoons, chemically assisted primary treatment, secondary aerobic biological treatment, and advanced biological nutrient removal treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest data set from a single study available in the literature to date for PFAAs monitoring study in wastewater treatment. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the predominant PFAA in wastewater with levels from 2.2 to 150ng/L (influent) and 1.9 to 140ng/L (effluent). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the predominant compound in primary sludge, waste biological sludge, and treated biosolids with concentrations from 6.4 to 2900ng/g dry weight (dw), 9.7 to 8200ng/gdw, and 2.1 to 17,000ng/gdw, respectively. PFAAs were formed during wastewater treatment and it was dependant on both process temperature and treatment type; with higher rates of formation in biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operating at longer hydraulic retention times and higher temperatures. PFAA removal by sorption was influenced by different sorption tendencies; median log values of the solid-liquid distribution coefficient estimated from wastewater biological sludge and final effluent were: PFOS (3.73)>PFDA (3.68)>PFNA (3.25)>PFOA (2.49)>PFHxA (1.93). Mass balances confirmed the formation of PFAAs, low PFAA removal by sorption, and high PFAA levels in effluents. PMID:24691135

  17. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment affects hippocampal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Noorlander, Cornelle W; Tijsseling, Deodata; Hessel, Ellen V S; de Vries, Willem B; Derks, Jan B; Visser, Gerard H A; de Graan, Pierre N E

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are administered to pregnant women at risk for preterm delivery, to enhance fetal lung maturation. The benefit of this treatment is well established, however caution is necessary because of possible unwanted side effects on development of different organ systems, including the brain. Actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by corticosteroid receptors, which are highly expressed in the hippocampus, a brain structure involved in cognitive functions. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of a single antenatal dexamethasone treatment on the development of the mouse hippocampus. A clinically relevant dose of dexamethasone (0.4 mg/kg) was administered to pregnant mice at embryonic day 15.5 and the hippocampus was analyzed from embryonic day 16 until adulthood. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone treatment on anatomical changes, apoptosis and proliferation in the hippocampus, hippocampal volume and on total body weight. Our results show that dexamethasone treatment reduced body weight and hippocampal volume transiently during development, but these effects were no longer detected at adulthood. Dexamethasone treatment increased the number of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus until birth, but postnatally no effects of dexamethasone treatment on apoptosis were found. During the phase with increased apoptosis, dexamethasone treatment reduced the number of proliferating cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. The number of proliferative cells was increased at postnatal day 5 and 10, but was decreased again at the adult stage. This latter long-term and negative effect of antenatal dexamethasone treatment on the number of proliferative cells in the hippocampus may have important implications for hippocampal network function.

  18. Depressive symptoms, lifestyle structure, and ART adherence among HIV-infected individuals: a longitudinal mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A; Wagner, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented relationship between depression and antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence, few studies have identified explanatory pathways through which depression affects adherence. The current study tested lifestyle structure-the degree of organization and routinization of daily activities-as a mediator of this relationship, given previous evidence of lifestyle structure being associated with both depression and ART nonadherence. HIV-infected individuals starting or re-starting ART in the California Collaborative Treatment Group 578 study (n = 199) were assessed over 48 weeks. Adherence was measured using electronic monitoring caps to determine dose timing and doses taken, and viral load was assessed. The mediating role of lifestyle structure was tested using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling and bootstrapping. Lifestyle significantly mediated the relationship between depression and both measures of ART adherence behavior. Interventions that minimize disruptions to lifestyle structure and link adherence to daily activities may be useful for individuals with depression and ART nonadherence.

  19. Biological treatments affect the chemical composition of coffee pulp.

    PubMed

    Ulloa Rojas, J B; Verreth, J A J; Amato, S; Huisman, E A

    2003-09-01

    Biological treatments were applied to fresh coffee pulp (CoP) to improve its nutritive value for monogastric animals by reducing its content of cellulose and antinutritional factors (ANFs) such as total phenols, tannins and caffeine. Treatments were: (1) ensiling with 0, 50 and 100 gkg(-1) molasses for 2 and 3 months, (2) aerobic decomposition for 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days, (3) aerobic bacterial inoculation (Bacillus sp.) for 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Ensiled CoP (E-CoP) showed higher fat and ash contents than oven-dried-CoP (OD-CoP; P<0.05). Similarly, true protein values tended to increase. The cellulose and total phenols levels of E-CoP were lower than OD-CoP (P<0.05). The E-CoP tannins levels tended to be lower than OD-CoP whereas caffeine levels remained unaffected. Improvement in the nutritional quality of E-CoP was associated with higher fat and protein contents and reduction of cellulose, total phenols and tannins. The aerobic decomposition treatment improved the nutritional quality of CoP by increasing true protein and fat contents. In addition, total phenols, tannins, caffeine and cellulose contents were reduced by an increase in treatment time (P<0.05). Bacterial treatment increased the protein content of CoP after 21 days (from 137 to 392 gkg(-1)) and decreased it after 28 days. Cellulose, total phenols, tannins and caffeine contents reduced with an increase in time of bacterial degradation. Bacterial treatment improved the CoP quality by increasing protein content and reducing cellulose and ANFs, especially after 21 days of treatment. Both the aerobic decomposition (after 21-28 days) and the aerobic bacterial degradation of CoP (after 21 days) appeared more suitable to improve the nutritional quality of CoP than the ensiling.

  20. Treatment Protocols for Eating Disorders: Clinicians' Attitudes, Concerns, Adherence and Difficulties Delivering Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions.

    PubMed

    Waller, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    There are several protocols in existence that guide clinicians in the implementation of effective, evidence-based psychological interventions for eating disorders. These have been made accessible in the form of treatment manuals. However, relatively few clinicians use those protocols, preferring to offer more eclectic or integrative approaches. Following a summary of the research that shows that these evidence-based approaches can be used successfully in routine clinical settings, this review considers why there is such poor uptake of these therapies in such settings. This review focuses on the role of service culture and on clinicians' own attitudes, beliefs and emotions. Possible means of enhancing uptake are considered, but these cannot be considered to be ideal solutions at present. PMID:26893234

  1. Utilization study of antidiabetic agents in a teaching hospital of Sikkim and adherence to current standard treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Sushrut Varun; Datta, Supratim; Upreti, Binu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes has gradually emerged as one of the most serious public health problems in our country. This underlines the need for timely disease detection and decisive therapeutic intervention. This prospective cross-sectional observational study aims at analyzing the utilization pattern of antidiabetic agents in a remote North-East Indian tertiary care teaching hospital in the perspective of current standard treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods: Diabetic patients receiving antidiabetic medication, both as outpatients and inpatients in our hospital over a period of 12 months (May 2013–May 2014), were included in this study. The data obtained were sorted and analyzed on the basis of gender, type of therapy, and hospital setting. Results: A total of 310 patients were included in the study. Metformin was the single most frequently prescribed antidiabetic agent (66.8%) followed by the sulfonylureas group (37.4%). Insulin was prescribed in 23.2% of the patients. Combination antidiabetic drug therapy (65.1%) was used more frequently than monotherapy (34.8%). The use of biguanides (P < 0.0001) and sulfonylureas (P = 0.02) in combination was significant as compared to their use as monotherapy. A total of 48% of all antidiabetic combinations used, comprised metformin and sulfonylureas (n = 96). Insulin use was significantly higher as monotherapy and in inpatients (P < 0.0001). The utilization of drugs from the National List of Essential Medicines was 51.2%, while 11% of antidiabetics were prescribed by generic name. Conclusion: The pattern of utilization largely conforms to the current standard treatment guidelines. Increased use of generic drugs is an area with scope for improvement. PMID:27413351

  2. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  3. Group Education and Nurse-Telephone Follow-Up Effects on Blood Glucose Control and Adherence to Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aliha, Jaleh M.; Asgari, Mina; Khayeri, Feridone; Ramazani, Majid; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Javaheri, Javad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Training and continuous dynamic communication between patients and health professionals in chronic diseases like diabetes, is important. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of diabetes self-care group education and nurse- telephone follow-up on glycemic control and compliance with treatment orders in patients with type 2 diabetes attending to diabetes clinic in khomein. Methods: In this clinical trial, 62 patients with type 2 diabetes who attending to the diabetes clinic selected and were randomly assigned to experiment and control groups. Self-care group education was applied for case group (n = 31) and they were followed up using telephone calls for 12 weeks by a nurse. The control group (n = 31) received the conventional management. Demographic characteristics, compliance with treatment recommendations (diet, drug use, exercise) and blood glucose control indices were recorded before and after interventions. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16 using independent t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square test, non-parametric tests, mixed model (ANOVA + repeated measure) and ANCOVA. Results: The mean age of intervention and control groups was 50.9 ± 7.3 and 55.1 ± 10.1 years, respectively. Blood glucose indices (FBS, 2 hpp BS, Hb A1C) were improved in both case and control group after intervention but it was only statistically significant in case group P > 0.0001. During study, percentage of patients with very good compliance in control group decrease from 12.5% to zero (0%), whereas in experiment group these amounts increase from 6.5% to 90.3% P > 0.0001. Conclusions: According to the results of the current study self-care group education and 12 weeks follow-up by a nurse using telephone causes significant improvement in metabolic parameters and adherence to treatment recommendations in diabetic patients. PMID:24049598

  4. Medication Adherence in Psychopharmacologically Treated Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Duran, Petra; Yovel, Iftah; Perlman, Carol A.; Sprich, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: One of the potential causes of residual symptoms of ADHD in adults can be difficulties with consistent adherence to medications. Method: This formative study examined self-reported medication adherence in adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms despite medication treatment. Results: Mean adherence for the two-week period…

  5. Adherence to HIV/AIDS antiretroviral therapy among drug users: A qualitative study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Zahra; Eftkhar, Hasan; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Ebadi, Abbas; Abbasian, Ladan; Zamani, Fereshte; Aghamollaei, Teamur; Shojaeizade, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: The introduction of antiretroviral therapy has caused a remarkable decrease in the occurrence of diseases and mortality among HIV-positive patients, while this success has not been achieved among injection addicts due to a low adherence to antiretroviral medicine. This study aims at clarifying the important factors affecting adherence to treatment in addicts suffering from HIV. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative research, data were gathered through in-depth interviews and field notes, and were interpreted through content analysis in the form of constant comparison. The participants were 16 drug addicts living with HIV/AIDS. Most of them had records of imprisonment and were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) drug treatments in the AIDS center of Imam Khomeini Hospital complex, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Sampling was started in a purposive method and was continued until data were saturated. Results: Four main categories including psychological reactions, contradictory beliefs, perceived support, and individual and environmental barriers were extracted from the data, each having some sub-categories. Conclusions: The obtained results indicated that adherence to the treatment of HIV is not constant and mono-dimensional, but is a function of different factors. Hence, an individual having feeble adherence in a specific time and under specific circumstances may show desirable adherence under a different circumstance. Thus, treatment of addicts living with HIV/AIDS requires physical, psychological, and social attention along with drug treatments. PMID:26985220

  6. Treatments affecting maturation and germination of American chestnut somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Rodney L; Lessard, Veronica C; Merkle, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    The effects of amino acids, abscisic acid (ABA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and elevated sucrose were tested on the maturation and germination of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) somatic embryos. Somatic embryos from three lines were matured over an eight week period through a two-stage process. After maturation, somatic embryos were randomly divided into three groups to measure dry weight/ fresh weight ratios, starch levels, and germination rates. Prior to transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos received a four week cold treatment. While some treatments with amino acids, elevated sucrose, PEG or ABA increased either dry weight/fresh weight ratios, starch content or both, only addition of 25mM L-asparagine significantly increased germination rate and taproot length, and this response was only obtained with one of the three lines tested. Six plants survived the transfer to potting mix, acclimatization to greenhouse conditions and field planting. PMID:15384407

  7. Treatments affecting maturation and germination of American chestnut somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Rodney L; Lessard, Veronica C; Merkle, Scott A

    2004-08-01

    The effects of amino acids, abscisic acid (ABA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and elevated sucrose were tested on the maturation and germination of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) somatic embryos. Somatic embryos from three lines were matured over an eight week period through a two-stage process. After maturation, somatic embryos were randomly divided into three groups to measure dry weight/ fresh weight ratios, starch levels, and germination rates. Prior to transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos received a four week cold treatment. While some treatments with amino acids, elevated sucrose, PEG or ABA increased either dry weight/fresh weight ratios, starch content or both, only addition of 25mM L-asparagine significantly increased germination rate and taproot length, and this response was only obtained with one of the three lines tested. Six plants survived the transfer to potting mix, acclimatization to greenhouse conditions and field planting.

  8. Factors affecting the performance of stormwater treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Carleton, J N; Grizzard, T J; Godrej, A N; Post, H E

    2001-04-01

    Data from 35 studies on 49 wetland systems used to treat stormwater runoff or runoff-impacted surface waters were examined and compared in order to identify any obvious trends that may aid future stormwater treatment wetland design efforts. Despite the intermittent nature of hydrologic and pollutant inputs from stormwater runoff, our analysis demonstrates that steady-state first-order plug-flow models commonly used to analyze wastewater treatment wetlands can be adapted for use with stormwater wetlands. Long-term pollutant removals are analyzed as functions of long-term mean hydraulic loading rate and nominal detention time. First-order removal rate constants for total phosphorus, ammonia, and nitrate generated in this fashion are demonstrated to be similar to values reported in the literature for wastewater treatment wetlands. Constituent removals are also demonstrated via regression analyses to be functions of the ratio of wetland area to watershed area. Resulting equations between these variables can be used as preliminary design tools in the absence of more site-specific details, with the understanding that they should be employed cautiously. PMID:11317903

  9. In vitro fertilisation treatment and factors affecting success.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jack Yu Jen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2012-12-01

    The efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies has improved significantly over the past decades. The main indications for in vitro fertilisation include tubal obstruction, severe male-factor infertility, severe endometriosis, ovulatory dysfunction, diminished ovarian reserve, and infertility of unexplained cause. In vitro fertilisation has also become an effective treatment option for couples wishing to undergo pre-implantation genetic diagnosis or screening, and for those wishing to cryopreserve their oocytes or embryos for preservation of fertility. The management of women in late reproductive age poses a major challenge; the optimum in vitro fertilisation treatment for poor responders remains elusive. The success of in vitro fertilisation treatment can be optimised by taking an individualised, patient-centered approach to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. Key components involve selection of an appropriate controlled ovarian protocol, close-cycle monitoring, adjustment of gonadotropin dosage to avoid hyper-response, and individualised timing of human chorionic gonadotropin injection. Future directions of assisted reproductive technologies include development of non-invasive embryo selection methods, use of transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and time-lapse imaging technologies.

  10. Impact of telephonic interviews on persistence and daily adherence to insulin treatment in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients: dropout study

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Dilek Gogas; Bilen, Habip; Sancak, Seda; Garip, Tayfun; Hekimsoy, Zeliha; Sahin, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Murat; Aydin, Hasan; Atmaca, Aysegul; Sert, Murat; Karakaya, Pinar; Arpaci, Dilek; Oguz, Aytekin; Guvener, Nilgun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of sequential telephonic interviews on treatment persistence and daily adherence to insulin injections among insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients initiated on different insulin regimens in a 3-month period. Methods A total of 1,456 insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes (mean [standard deviation, SD] age: 56.0 [12.0] years, 49.1% were females) initiated on insulin therapy and consecutively randomized to sequential (n=733) and single (n=723) telephonic interview groups were included. Data on insulin treatment and self-reported blood glucose values were obtained via telephone interview. Logistic regression analysis was performed for factors predicting increased likelihood of persistence and skipping an injection. Results Overall, 76.8% patients (83.2% in sequential vs 70.3% in single interview group, (P<0.001) remained on insulin treatment at the third month. Significantly higher rate for skipping doses was noted in basal bolus than in other regimens (27.0% vs 15.0% for premixed and 15.8% basal insulin, respectively, P<0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed sequential telephonic interview (odds ratio [OR], 1.531; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.093–2.143; P=0.013), higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 0.999–1.189; P=0.049), and less negative appraisal of insulin therapy as significant predictors of higher persistence. Basal bolus regimen (OR, 1.583; 95% CI, 1.011–2.479; P=0.045) and higher hemoglobin A1c levels (OR, 1.114; 95% CI, 1.028–1.207; P=0.008) were the significant predictors of increased likelihood of skipping an injection. Conclusion Our findings revealed positive influence of sequential telephonic interview, although including no intervention in treatment, on achieving better treatment persistence in type 2 diabetes patients initiating insulin. PMID:27274207

  11. Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence in Older Persons: Consensus Statement from the Senior Italia Federanziani Advisory Board.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Monaco, Alessandro; Costa, Elisio; Cherubini, Antonio; Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Muth, Christiane; Melis, Renè J F; Pasina, Luca; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Palmer, Katie; Pecorelli, Sergio; Onder, Graziano

    2016-09-01

    Poor adherence to treatment regimens has long been recognized as a substantial roadblock to achieving better outcomes for patients. Non-adherence to medications affects the quality and length of life and has been associated with negative health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. The problem of non-adherence is particularly troublesome in older patients who are affected by multiple chronic diseases and for this reason receive multiple treatments. To date, no single intervention strategy has been shown to be effective in improving adherence across all patients, conditions, and settings. Between September and October 2014, a group of experts in geriatrics, pharmacology, epidemiology, and public health applied a modified RAND appropriateness method to reach a consensus on the possible best interventions to improve adherence in older individuals. Seven interventions were identified, classified based on their target (patient, therapy, and public health/society): (1) Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, (2) patient (and caregiver) education to improve patient empowerment, (3) optimization of treatment, (4) use of adherence aids, (5) physician and other healthcare professionals' education, (6) adherence assessment, (7) facilitating access to medicine by service integration. For each intervention, experts assessed (a) target population, (b) health professionals potentially involved in the intervention, (c) strategies/instruments needed for implementation, and (d) time of the intervention. Interventions that target adherence must combine different approaches targeting the complex aspects of older adults in a holistic approach. Tackling non-adherence, with its complexity, requires a multi-stakeholder patient-centred approach acting in a defined framework of interactions in which the different players may provide different services but are integrated with one another. PMID:27444182

  12. Strategies to Improve Medication Adherence in Older Persons: Consensus Statement from the Senior Italia Federanziani Advisory Board.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Monaco, Alessandro; Costa, Elisio; Cherubini, Antonio; Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Muth, Christiane; Melis, Renè J F; Pasina, Luca; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Palmer, Katie; Pecorelli, Sergio; Onder, Graziano

    2016-09-01

    Poor adherence to treatment regimens has long been recognized as a substantial roadblock to achieving better outcomes for patients. Non-adherence to medications affects the quality and length of life and has been associated with negative health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. The problem of non-adherence is particularly troublesome in older patients who are affected by multiple chronic diseases and for this reason receive multiple treatments. To date, no single intervention strategy has been shown to be effective in improving adherence across all patients, conditions, and settings. Between September and October 2014, a group of experts in geriatrics, pharmacology, epidemiology, and public health applied a modified RAND appropriateness method to reach a consensus on the possible best interventions to imp