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Sample records for affect tumor development

  1. Tumor inoculation site affects the development of cancer cachexia and muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Tatsuzo; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Okayama, Tetsuya; Oka, Kaname; Adachi, Satoko; Mizushima, Katsura; Kimura, Reiko; Okajima, Manabu; Sakai, Hiromi; Sakamoto, Naoyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Handa, Osamu; Takagi, Tomohisa; Kokura, Satoshi; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The phenotype and severity of cancer cachexia differ among tumor types and metastatic site in individual patients. In this study, we evaluated if differences in tumor microenvironment would affect the development of cancer cachexia in a murine model, and demonstrated that body weight, adipose tissue and gastrocnemius muscle decreased in tumor-bearing mice. Interestingly, a reduction in heart weight was observed in the intraperitoneal tumor group but not in the subcutaneous group. We evaluated 23 circulating cytokines and members of the TGF-β family, and found that levels of IL-6, TNF-α and activin A increased in both groups of tumor-bearing mice. Eotaxin and G-CSF levels in the intraperitoneal tumor group were higher than in the subcutaneous group. Atrogin 1 and MuRF1 mRNA expressions in the gastrocnemius muscle increased significantly in both groups of tumor-bearing mice, however, in the myocardium, expression of these mRNAs increased in the intraperitoneal group but not in subcutaneous group. Based on these results, we believe that differences in microenvironment where tumor cells develop can affect the progression and phenotype of cancer cachexia through alterations in various circulating factors derived from the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Cdk4 deficiency inhibits skin tumor development but does not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J

    2002-08-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue.

  3. Inhibition of polyamine oxidase activity affects tumor development during the maize-Ustilago maydis interaction.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Robles, Francisco Ignacio; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Gonzalez, María Elisa; Pieckenstain, Fernando Luis; García de la Cruz, Ramón Fernando; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita

    2016-05-01

    Ustilago maydis is a biotrophic plant pathogenic fungus that leads to tumor development in the aerial tissues of its host, Zea mays. These tumors are the result of cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and are accompanied by the reprograming of primary and secondary metabolism of infected plants. Up to now, little is known regarding key plant actors and their role in tumor development during the interaction with U. maydis. Polyamines are small aliphatic amines that regulate plant growth, development and stress responses. In a previous study, we found substantial increases of polyamine levels in tumors. In the present work, we describe the maize polyamine oxidase (PAO) gene family, its contribution to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and its possible role in tumor development induced by U. maydis. Histochemical analysis revealed that chlorotic lesions and maize tumors induced by U. maydis accumulate H2O2 to significant levels. Maize plants inoculated with U. maydis and treated with the PAO inhibitor 1,8-diaminooctane exhibit a notable reduction of H2O2 accumulation in infected tissues and a significant drop in PAO activity. This treatment also reduced disease symptoms in infected plants. Finally, among six maize PAO genes only the ZmPAO1, which encodes an extracellular enzyme, is up-regulated in tumors. Our data suggest that H2O2 produced through PA catabolism by ZmPAO1 plays an important role in tumor development during the maize-U. maydis interaction.

  4. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis.

  5. Supplementation by vitamin D compounds does not affect colonic tumor development in vitamin D sufficient murine models

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Halberg, Richard B.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Plum, Lori A.; Krentz, Kathleen J.; Clipson, Linda; Drinkwater, Norman; Amos-Landgraf, James M.; Dove, William F.; DeLuca, Hector F.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that sunlight exposure and vitamin D are each associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. The few controlled supplementation trials testing vitamin D in humans reported to date show conflicting results. We have used two genetic models of familial colon cancer, the ApcPirc/+ (Pirc) rat and the ApcMin/+ (Min) mouse, to investigate the effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] and two analogs of vitamin D hormone on colonic tumors. Longitudinal endoscopic monitoring allowed us to test the efficacy of these compounds in preventing newly arising colonic tumors and in affecting established colonic tumors. 25(OH)D3 and two analogs of vitamin D hormone each failed to reduce tumor multiplicities or alter the growth patterns of colonic tumors in the Pirc rat or the Min mouse. PMID:21907701

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha during neonatal brain development affects anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-15

    A nascent literature suggests that neonatal infection is a risk factor for the development of brain, behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which can affect anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in later life. It has been documented that neonatal infection raises the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in neonate rodents and such infections may result in neonatal brain injury, at least in part, through pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, previous studies have shown that TNF-α is involved in cellular differentiation, neurogenesis and programmed cell death during the development of the central nervous system. We investigated for the first time whether neonatal exposure to TNF-α can affect body weight, stress-induced corticosterone (COR), anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult mice. In the present study, neonatal mice were treated to recombinant mouse TNF-α (0.2, 0.4, 0.7 and 1 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal days 3 and 5, then adult male and female mice were exposed to different behavioral tests. The results indicated that neonatal TNF-α treatment reduced body weight in neonatal period in both sexes. In addition, this study presents findings indicating that high doses of TNF- increase stress-induced COR levels, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in adult males, but increase levels of anxiety without significantly influencing depression in adult female mice [corrected]. Our findings suggest that TNF-α exposure during neonatal period can alter brain and behavior development in a dose and sex-dependent manner in mice.

  7. Hypothyroidism Enhances Tumor Invasiveness and Metastasis Development

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Iglesias, Olaia; García-Silva, Susana; Regadera, Javier; Aranda, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background Whereas there is increasing evidence that loss of expression and/or function of the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) could result in a selective advantage for tumor development, the relationship between thyroid hormone levels and human cancer is a controversial issue. It has been reported that hypothyroidism might be a possible risk factor for liver and breast cancer in humans, but a lower incidence of breast carcinoma has been also reported in hypothyroid patients Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we have analyzed the influence of hypothyroidism on tumor progression and metastasis development using xenografts of parental and TRβ1–expressing human hepatocarcinoma (SK-hep1) and breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-468). In agreement with our previous observations tumor invasiveness and metastasis formation was strongly repressed when TRβ–expressing cells were injected into euthyroid nude mice. Whereas tumor growth was retarded when cells were inoculated into hypothyroid hosts, tumors had a more mesenchymal phenotype, were more invasive and metastatic growth was enhanced. Increased aggressiveness and tumor growth retardation was also observed with parental cells that do not express TRs. Conclusions/Significance These results show that changes in the stromal cells secondary to host hypothyroidism can modulate tumor progression and metastatic growth independently of the presence of TRs on the tumor cells. On the other hand, the finding that hypothyroidism can affect differentially tumor growth and invasiveness can contribute to the explanation of the confounding reports on the influence of thyroidal status in human cancer. PMID:19641612

  8. Factors affecting the cerebral network in brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Heimans, Jan J; Reijneveld, Jaap C

    2012-06-01

    Brain functions, including cognitive functions, are frequently disturbed in brain tumor patients. These disturbances may result from the tumor itself, but also from the treatment directed against the tumor. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy all may affect cerebral functioning, both in a positive as well as in a negative way. Apart from the anti-tumor treatment, glioma patients often receive glucocorticoids and anti-epileptic drugs, which both also have influence on brain functioning. The effect of a brain tumor on cerebral functioning is often more global than should be expected on the basis of the local character of the disease, and this is thought to be a consequence of disturbance of the cerebral network as a whole. Any network, whether it be a neural, a social or an electronic network, can be described in parameters assessing the topological characteristics of that particular network. Repeated assessment of neural network characteristics in brain tumor patients during their disease course enables study of the dynamics of neural networks and provides more insight into the plasticity of the diseased brain. Functional MRI, electroencephalography and especially magnetoencephalography are used to measure brain function and the signals that are being registered with these techniques can be analyzed with respect to network characteristics such as "synchronization" and "clustering". Evidence accumulates that loss of optimal neural network architecture negatively impacts complex cerebral functioning and also decreases the threshold to develop epileptic seizures. Future research should be focused on both plasticity of neural networks and the factors that have impact on that plasticity as well as the possible role of assessment of neural network characteristics in the determination of cerebral function during the disease course.

  9. Developing Effective Affective Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, William; Hart, Aaron; Foley, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Physical educators generally understand the importance of the affective domain for student growth and development. However, many teachers struggle with assessing affective behaviors in a way that can be documented and reported. The five-step process outlined in this article can assist teachers in developing an effective way to assess the affective…

  10. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-11-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy.

  11. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  12. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Cuiffo, Benjamin G.; Karnoub, Antoine E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells that participate in the structural and functional maintenance of connective tissues under normal homeostasis. They also act as trophic mediators during tissue repair, generating bioactive molecules that help in tissue regeneration following injury. MSCs serve comparable roles in cases of malignancy and are becoming increasingly appreciated as critical components of the tumor microenvironment. MSCs home to developing tumors with great affinity, where they exacerbate cancer cell proliferation, motility, invasion and metastasis, foster angiogenesis, promote tumor desmoplasia and suppress anti-tumor immune responses. These multifaceted roles emerge as a product of reciprocal interactions occurring between MSCs and cancer cells and serve to alter the tumor milieu, setting into motion a dynamic co-evolution of both tumor and stromal tissues that favors tumor progression. Here, we summarize our current knowledge about the involvement of MSCs in cancer pathogenesis and review accumulating evidence that have placed them at the center of the pro-malignant tumor stroma. PMID:22863739

  14. Benign bone tumors--recent developments.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Roberto A; Inwards, Carrie Y; Unni, Krishnan K

    2011-02-01

    Benign bone tumors frequently pose a diagnostic challenge for general surgical pathologists. Accurate pathologic diagnosis requires careful clinical and radiological correlation. The most significant recent advances in some benign bone tumors have occurred at the molecular and cytogenetic level. The detection of clonal chromosomal aberrations, various specific molecular genetic events, and the description of the bone cell signaling pathways in the field of osteoimmunology have provided a better understanding of the pathophysiology of certain tumors and an important aid in the diagnostic workup and differential diagnosis of some bone lesions demonstrating overlapping clinical and pathologic features. Future directions include prognostic and therapeutic applications of these findings. Newer less invasive therapeutic techniques and medical management have been developed for the treatment of certain benign bone tumors.

  15. Environmental issues affecting CCT development

    SciTech Connect

    Reidy, M.

    1997-12-31

    While no final legislative schedule has been set for the new Congress, two issues with strong environmental ramifications which are likely to affect the coal industry seem to top the list of closely watched debates in Washington -- the Environmental Protection Agency`s proposed new ozone and particulate matter standards and utility restructuring. The paper discusses the background of the proposed standards, public comment, the Congressional review of regulations, other legislative options, and utility restructuring.

  16. Reading Enjoyment and Affective Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reporting on Reading, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The articles in this publication offer ideas for developing enjoyment of reading in children. Among the topics discussed are the following: the need for teachers and parents to build children's self-esteem through increasing their experiences of success, their expectations of success, and the value they place on reading; methods for increasing…

  17. Novel glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic inhibitors affect tumor-associated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Nguyen, Thao Kim Nu; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Koketsu, Mamoru; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are essential players in several steps of tumor-associated angiogenesis. As co-receptors for several pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and FGF, HSPGs regulate receptor-ligand interactions and play a vital role in signal transduction. Previously, we have employed an enzymatic strategy to show the importance of cell surface HSPGs in endothelial tube formation in vitro. We have recently found several fluoro-xylosides that can selectively inhibit proteoglycan synthesis in endothelial cells. The current study demonstrates that these fluoro-xylosides are effective inhibitors of endothelial tube formation in vitro using a matrigel based assay to simulate tumor-associated angiogenesis. These first generation scaffolds offer a promising stepping-stone to the discovery of more potent fluoro-xylosides that can effectively neutralize tumor growth. PMID:21094131

  18. Information superhighway: Issues affecting development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    Technological advances in the transmission of voice, video, and data are fostering fundamental changes in the telecommunications industry. For example, large local telephone companies plan to offer video services in competition with cable and broadcast television, while cable television companies plan to offer local telephone service over their wires in competition with the local telephone companies. The administration believes that these technological changes provide the opportunity to develop an 'Information Superhighway' that could provide every element of society with ready access to data, voice, and video communications. Concurrently, the Congress is considering sweeping changes to telecommunications regulations to keep pace with this dynamic industry. GAO prepared this report to serve as an overview of three key issues that decisionmakers may face as they deliberate telecommunications legislation; it focuses on three pivotal issues they face in formulating new telecommunications legislation: (1) managing the transition to a more competitive local telecommunications marketplace; (2) ensuring that all consumers have access to affordable telecommunications as competition develops; and (3) ensuring that the Information Superhighway provides adequate security, privacy, reliability, and interoperability.

  19. Ascorbate availability affects tumor implantation-take rate and increases tumor rejection in Gulo(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elizabeth J; Vissers, Margreet Cm; Dachs, Gabi U

    2016-01-01

    In solid tumors, HIF1 upregulates the expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell survival, tumor growth, and adaptation to the hypoxic microenvironment. HIF1 stabilization and activity are suppressed by prolyl and asparagine hydroxylases, which require oxygen as a substrate and ascorbate as a cofactor. This has led us to hypothesize that intracellular ascorbate availability could modify the hypoxic HIF1 response and influence tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of variable intracellular ascorbate levels on HIF1 induction in cancer cells in vitro, and on tumor-take rate and growth in the Gulo(-/-) mouse. These mice depend on dietary ascorbate, and were supplemented with 3,300 mg/L, 330 mg/L, or 33 mg/L ascorbate in their drinking water, resulting in saturating, medium, or low plasma and tissue ascorbate levels, respectively. In Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LL/2) in culture, optimal ascorbate supplementation reduced HIF1 accumulation under physiological but not pathological hypoxia. LL/2, B16-F10 melanoma, or CMT-93 colorectal cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into Gulo(-/-) mice at a range of cell inocula. Establishment of B16-F10 tumors in mice supplemented with 3,300 mg/L ascorbate required an increased number of cancer cells to initiate tumor growth compared with the number of cells required in mice on suboptimal ascorbate intake. Elevated ascorbate intake was also associated with decreased tumor ascorbate levels and a reduction in HIF1α expression and transcriptional activity. Following initial growth, all CMT-93 tumors regressed spontaneously, but mice supplemented with 33 mg/L ascorbate had lower plasma ascorbate levels and grew larger tumors than optimally supplemented mice. The data from this study indicate that improved ascorbate intake is consistent with increased intracellular ascorbate levels, reduced HIF1 activity and reduced tumor initiation and growth, and this may be advantageous in the management of cancer.

  20. Tumor development after polyoma infection in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Stutman

    1975-04-01

    Nude (nu/nu) mice in a CBA/H background show an age-dependent ssuceptibility to tumor development after polyoma virus infection (strain LID-1) when compared with nu/ + or CBA/H mice, which is apparent when 15- or 30-day-old mice are used: tumor incidence was 83 to 90% in nudes and 0 to 10% in controls. Latent perids for tumor development were also shortened in nudes. However, with increasing age nude mice become partially resistant and only 25% develop tumors when infected at 120 days of age. This partial resistance could be transferred with spleen cells to newborn mice. The cells in spleen responsible for this transfer can be eliminated by lysis with anti-Ig and complement or by pre-treatment of the donor with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide and were not affected by treatment in vitro with anti-Thy.1.2 or procedures that remove adherent cells and/or macrophages. When the cells in 15-day-old nu/ + spleen were studied, both anti-Ig or anti-Thy.1.2 treatment eliminated tranfer of resistance to newborn. Virus replication in tissues of nude mice was increased 5 days after infection when compared with nu/ + but became comparable by day 15 after infection. Hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies in serum of nude and nu/ + had comparable titers when measured early after infection but higher titers were observed in nu/ + later after infection.

  1. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    toward this goal by developing a whole-body PBPK model with an individualized tumor compartment for topotecan in mice bearing NB5 neuroblastoma tumors...utilized contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) derived individual tumor blood flow and blood volume measurements from NB5 tumor bearing mice. We were... bearing mice for each of the four TPT dosages. The second priority time points have been completed for three of the four dosages in tumor bearing

  2. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  3. STAT1 acts as a tumor promoter for leukemia development.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Boris; Stoiber, Dagmar; Moriggl, Richard; Weisz, Eva; Ott, René G; Kreibich, Rita; Levy, David E; Beug, Hartmut; Freissmuth, Michael; Sexl, Veronika

    2006-07-01

    The tumor suppressor STAT1 is considered a key regulator of the surveillance of developing tumors. Here, we describe an unexpected tumor-promoting role for STAT1 in leukemia. STAT1(-/-) mice are partially protected from leukemia development, and STAT1(-/-) tumor cells induce leukemia in RAG2(-/-) and immunocompetent mice with increased latency. The low MHC class I protein levels of STAT1(-/-) tumor cells enable efficient NK cell lysis and account for the enhanced tumor clearance. Strikingly, STAT1(-/-) tumor cells acquire increased MHC class I expression upon leukemia progression. These findings define STAT1 as a tumor promoter in leukemia development. Furthermore, we describe the upregulation of MHC class I expression as a general mechanism that allows for the escape of hematopoietic malignancies from immune surveillance.

  4. Environmental Factors Affecting Preschoolers' Motor Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venetsanou, Fotini; Kambas, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    The process of development occurs according to the pattern established by the genetic potential and also by the influence of environmental factors. The aim of the present study was to focus on the main environmental factors affecting motor development. The review of the literature revealed that family features, such as socioeconomic status,…

  5. Clinical mutation assay of tumors: new developments.

    PubMed

    Starostik, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Mutation detection in tumors started with classical cytogenetics as the method of choice more than 50 years ago. Karyotyping proved to be sensitive enough to detect deletions or duplications of large chromosome segments, and translocations. Over time, new techniques were developed to detect mutations that are much smaller in scope. The availability of Sanger sequencing and the invention of the PCR improved the discriminatory power of mutation detection to just one base change in the genomic DNA sequence. Techniques derived from PCR (allele-specific PCR, qPCR) and improved or modified sequencing methods (capillary electrophoresis, pyrosequencing) considerably increased the efficiency and sample throughput of mutation detection assays. With the advent of massive parallel sequencing [also called next-generation sequencing (NGS)] in the past decade, a major shift to even higher sample throughput and a significant decrease in cost per sequenced base occurred. The application of the new technology provided a whole slew of novel biomarkers and potential therapy targets to improve diagnosis and treatment. It even led to changes in cancer classification as new information on the mutation profile of tumors became available that characterizes some disease entities better than morphology. NGS, which usually interrogates multiple genes at once and is a prime example of a multianalyte assay, started to replace older single analyte assays focused on analysis of one target, one gene. However, the transition to these extremely complex NGS-based assays is associated with multiple challenges. There are issues with adequate tissue source of nucleic acids, sequencing library preparation, bioinformatics, government regulations and oversight, reimbursement, and electronic medical records that need to be resolved to successfully implement the new technology in a clinical laboratory.

  6. Tumor lymphangiogenesis and new drug development.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Detmar, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, tumor-associated lymphatic vessels have been regarded as passive by-standers, serving simply as a drainage system for interstitial fluid generated within the tumor. However, with growing evidence that tumors actively induce lymphangiogenesis, and that the number of lymphatic vessels closely correlates with metastasis and clinical outcome in various types of cancer, this picture has changed dramatically in recent years. Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels have now emerged as a valid therapeutic target to control metastatic disease, and the first specific anti-lymphangiogenic drugs have recently entered clinical testing. Furthermore, we are just beginning to understand the whole functional spectrum of tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, which not only concerns transport of fluid and metastatic cells, but also includes the regulation of cancer stemness and specific inhibition of immune responses, opening new venues for therapeutic applications. Therefore, we predict that specific targeting of lymphatic vessels and their function will become an important tool for future cancer treatment.

  7. The inhibition of 45A ncRNA expression reduces tumor formation, affecting tumor nodules compactness and metastatic potential in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Penna, Ilaria; Gigoni, Arianna; Costa, Delfina; Vella, Serena; Russo, Debora; Poggi, Alessandro; Villa, Federico; Brizzolara, Antonella; Canale, Claudio; Mescola, Andrea; Daga, Antonio; Russo, Claudio; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio; Menichini, Paola; Pagano, Aldo

    2017-01-31

    We recently reported the in vitro over-expression of 45A, a RNA polymerase III-transcribed non-coding (nc)RNA, that perturbs the intracellular content of FE65L1 affecting cell proliferation rate, short-term response to genotoxic stress, substrate adhesion capacity and, ultimately, increasing the tumorigenic potential of human neuroblastoma cells. In this work, to deeply explore the mechanism by which 45A ncRNA contributes to cancer development, we targeted in vitro and in vivo 45A levels by the stable overexpression of antisense 45A RNA.45A downregulation leads to deep modifications of cytoskeleton organization, adhesion and migration of neuroblastoma cells. These effects are correlated with alterations in the expression of several genes including GTSE1 (G2 and S phase-expressed-1), a crucial regulator of tumor cell migration and metastatic potential. Interestingly, the downregulation of 45A ncRNA strongly affects the in vivo tumorigenic potential of SKNBE2 neuroblastoma cells, increasing tumor nodule compactness and reducing GTSE1 protein expression in a subcutaneous neuroblastoma mouse model. Moreover, intracardiac injection of neuroblastoma cells showed that downregulation of 45A ncRNA also influences tumor metastatic ability. In conclusion, our data highlight a key role of 45A ncRNA in cancer development and suggest that its modulation might represent a possible novel anticancer therapeutic approach.

  8. Recent developments in affective recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katarya, Rahul; Verma, Om Prakash

    2016-11-01

    Recommender systems (RSs) are playing a significant role since 1990s as they provide relevant, personalized information to the users over the internet. Lots of work have been done in information filtering, utilization, and application related to RS. However, an important area recently draws our attention which is affective recommender system. Affective recommender system (ARS) is latest trending area of research, as publication in this domain are few and recently published. ARS is associated with human behaviour, human factors, mood, senses, emotions, facial expressions, body gesture and physiological with human-computer interaction (HCI). Due to this assortment and various interests, more explanation is required, as it is in premature phase and growing as compared to other fields. So we have done literature review (LR) in the affective recommender systems by doing classification, incorporate reputed articles published from the year 2003 to February 2016. We include articles which highlight, analyse, and perform a study on affective recommender systems. This article categorizes, synthesizes, and discusses the research and development in ARS. We have classified and managed ARS papers according to different perspectives: research gaps, nature, algorithm or method adopted, datasets, the platform on executed, types of information and evaluation techniques applied. The researchers and professionals will positively support this survey article for understanding the current position, research in affective recommender systems and will guide future trends, opportunity and research focus in ARS.

  9. New drug development in digestive neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Durán, I; Salazar, R; Casanovas, O; Arrazubi, V; Vilar, E; Siu, L L; Yao, J; Tabernero, J

    2007-08-01

    The traditional cytotoxic agents are of limited efficacy in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (NETs). Recent investigations have brought up a number of biological features in this family of neoplasms that could represent targets for anticancer treatment. NETs seem to have an extraordinary tumor vascularization with high expression of proangiogenic molecules such as the vascular endothelial growth factor along with overexpression of certain tyrosine kinase receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the insulin growth factor receptor (IGFR) and their downstream signaling pathway components (PI3K-AKT-mTOR). The rationale of an antiangiogenic approach in the treatment of NETs and the use of other pharmacological strategies such as EGFR, IGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are discussed. Additionally, the emerging results of recent clinical trials with these targeted drugs are presented.

  10. Developing Hierarchical Structures Integrating Cognition and Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Barbara Martin

    Several categories of the affective domain are important to the schooling process. Schools are delegated the responsibility of helping students to clarify their esthetic, instrumental, and moral values. Three areas of affect are related to student achievement: subject-related affect, school-related affect, and academic self concept. In addition,…

  11. A neurodegenerative disease affecting synaptic connections in Drosophila mutant for the tumor suppressor morphogen Patched

    PubMed Central

    Gazi, Michal; Shyamala, Baragur V.; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2009-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor morphogen, Patched (Ptc), has extensive homology to the Niemann-Pick-C 1 (NPC1) protein. The NPC disease is a paediatric, progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder thought to be due to an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in neurons. Here, we report that patched mutant adults develop a progressive neurodegenerative disease and their brain contains membranous and lamellar inclusions. There is also a significant reduction in the number of synaptic terminals in the brain of the mutant adults. Interestingly, feeding cholesterol to wild type flies generates inclusions in the brain, but does not cause the disease. However, feeding cholesterol to mutant flies increases synaptic connections and suppresses the disease. Our results suggest that sequestration of cholesterol in the mutant brain in the form of membranous material and inclusions affects available pool of cholesterol for cellular functions. This, in turn, negatively affects the synaptic number and contributes to the disease-state. Consistent with this, in ptc mutants there is a reduction in the pool of cholesterol esters, and cholesterol-mediated suppression of the disease accompanies an increase in cholesterol esters. We further show that Ptc does not function directly in this process since gain-of-function for Hedgehog also induces the same disease with a reduction in the level of cholesterol esters. We believe that loss of function for ptc causes neurodegeneration via two distinct ways: de-repression of genes that interfere with lipid trafficking, and de-repression of genes outside of the lipid trafficking; the functions of both classes of genes ultimately converge on synaptic connections. PMID:19635474

  12. Evidence for involvement of phytochrome in tumor development on plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of nonpathogenic tumorous growths on tomato plants by red and far-red radiation was studied using leaf discs floated on water and irradiated from beneath. It was found that red light (600-700 nanometers) was required for the induction of tumors on tomato (Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. & Bonpl. Plant Introduction LA 1625), while both blue (400-500 nanometers) and green (500-600 nanometers) light had little effect on tumor development. Detailed studies with red light demonstrated that tumor development increased with increasing photon flux and duration, though duration was the more significant factor. It was observed that tumor development could be prevented by the addition of far-red irradiance to red irradiance or by providing far-red irradiance immediately following red irradiance. The effectiveness of red and far-red irradiance in the regulation of tumor development indicates phytochrome involvement in this response. These findings should provide additional insight into the multiplicity of physiological factors regulating the development of nonpathogenic tumorous growths in plants.

  13. Evidence for involvement of phytochrome in tumor development on plants.

    PubMed

    Morrow, R C; Tibbitts, T W

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of nonpathogenic tumorous growths on tomato plants by red and far-red radiation was studied using leaf discs floated on water and irradiated from beneath. It was found that red light (600-700 nanometers) was required for the induction of tumors on tomato (Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. & Bonpl. Plant Introduction LA 1625), while both blue (400-500 nanometers) and green (500-600 nanometers) light had little effect on tumor development. Detailed studies with red light demonstrated that tumor development increased with increasing photon flux and duration, though duration was the more significant factor. It was observed that tumor development could be prevented by the addition of far-red irradiance to red irradiance or by providing far-red irradiance immediately following red irradiance. The effectiveness of red and far-red irradiance in the regulation of tumor development indicates phytochrome involvement in this response. These findings should provide additional insight into the multiplicity of physiological factors regulating the development of nonpathogenic tumorous growths in plants.

  14. Leveraging Affective Learning for Developing Future Airmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    sity, the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, or any other US government agency. Cleared for public release: distribution unlimited...clude affective objectives in their lessons. A student’s affective state influences his or her learning pre- disposition, and educators should consider...but may not be possible for a large number of students or for dispersed learning activity. The ability to discern the affective state of students

  15. ADAMTS-1 metalloproteinase promotes tumor development through the induction of a stromal reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rocks, Natacha; Paulissen, Geneviève; Quesada-Calvo, Florence; Munaut, Carine; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Alvarez; Gueders, Maud; Hacha, Jonathan; Gilles, Christine; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noel, Agnès; Cataldo, Didier D

    2008-11-15

    ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs), the first described member of the ADAMTS family, is differentially expressed in various tumors. However, its exact role in tumor development and progression is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ADAMTS-1 transfection in a bronchial epithelial tumor cell line (BZR) and its potential to modulate tumor development. ADAMTS-1 overexpression did not affect in vitro cell properties such as (a) proliferation in two-dimensional culture, (b) proliferation in three-dimensional culture, (c) anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, (d) cell migration and invasion in modified Boyden chamber assay, (e) angiogenesis in the aortic ring assay, and (f) cell apoptosis. In contrast, ADAMTS-1 stable transfection in BZR cells accelerated the in vivo tumor growth after s.c. injection into severe combined immunodeficient mice. It also promoted a stromal reaction characterized by myofibroblast infiltration and excessive matrix deposition. These features are, however, not observed in tumors derived from cells overexpressing a catalytically inactive mutant of ADAMTS-1. Conditioned media from ADAMTS-1-overexpressing cells display a potent chemotactic activity toward fibroblasts. ADAMTS-1 overexpression in tumors was associated with increased production of matrix metalloproteinase-13, fibronectin, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Neutralizing antibodies against TGF-beta and IL-1beta blocked the chemotactic effect of medium conditioned by ADAMTS-1-expressing cells on fibroblasts, showing the contribution of these factors in ADAMTS-1-induced stromal reaction. In conclusion, we propose a new paradigm for catalytically active ADAMTS-1 contribution to tumor development, which consists of the recruitment of fibroblasts involved in tumor growth and tumor-associated stroma remodeling.

  16. Cadmium affects retinogenesis during zebrafish embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Hen Chow, Elly Suk; Yu Hui, Michelle Nga; Cheng, Chi Wa; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2009-02-15

    Ocular malformations are commonly observed in embryos of aquatic species after exposure to toxicants. Using zebrafish embryos as the model organism, we showed that cadmium exposure from sphere stage (4 hpf) to end of segmentation stage (24 hpf) induced microphthalmia in cadmium-treated embryos. Embryos with eye defects were then assessed for visual abilities. Cadmium-exposed embryos were behaviorally blind, showing hyperpigmentation and loss of camouflage response to light. We investigated the cellular basis of the formation of the small eyes phenotype and the induction of blindness by studying retina development and retinotectal projections. Retinal progenitors were found in cadmium-treated embryos albeit in smaller numbers. The number of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), the first class of retinal cells to differentiate during retinogenesis, was reduced, while photoreceptor cells, the last batch of retinal neurons to differentiate, were absent. Cadmium also affected the propagation of neurons in neurogenic waves. The neurons remained in the ventronasal area and failed to spread across the retina. Drastically reduced RGC axons and disrupted optic stalk showed that the optic nerves did not extend from the retina beyond the chiasm into the tectum. Our data suggested that impairment in neuronal differentiation of the retina, disruption in RGC axon formation and absence of cone photoreceptors were the causes of microphthalmia and visual impairment in cadmium-treated embryos.

  17. Gender-Specific Transfusion Affects Tumor-Associated Neutrophil: Macrophage Ratios in Murine Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Douglas D.; Kelher, Marguerite R.; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.; Lee, Joon H.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative blood transfusion has been linked to decreased survival for pancreas cancer. Noting clinical data associating female blood products with increased morbidity, our lab has demonstrated that transfusion of female blood augments metastatic events compared to male blood in an immunocompetent murine pancreatic cancer model. It has been suggested that tumor-associated macrophages correlate with tumor progression by promoting angiogenesis. More recently, tumor-associated neutrophils have been implicated in aggressive tumor behavior. We hypothesize that differences in gender-specific transfusion-mediated pancreatic cancer progression are due to microenvironmental changes within the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we examined tumor-associated neutrophils and macrophage ratios in male and female mice with pancreatic cancer receiving blood transfusion from male or female donors. Methods C57/BL6 mice, age 7–9 weeks, underwent splenic inoculation with 2.5×105 PanO2 murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Mice were transfused on post-op day 7 with 1 ml/kg supernatant from day 42 male or female packed red cells. Necropsy was performed at 5 weeks or earlier for clinical deterioration, and tumors harvested. Frozen sections (5 μm) were stained for neutrophils and macrophages by immunofluorescence. Data were analyzed using ANOVA; p≤0.05 was used to determine significance; N≥3 per group. Results Clinically, male mice had greater morbidity and mortality than female mice when receiving female blood products, with roughened hair coat, development of ascites and death due to bowel obstruction. In evaluating the tumor microenvironment from mice receiving female blood products, male mice were noted to have a greater neutrophil to macrophage ratio than female mice, 0.176±0.028 vs. 0.073±0.012, p=0.03. When examining neutrophil to macrophage ratio in mice receiving male blood products, no difference was noted (p=0.48). Conclusions Male mice with pancreas

  18. Overview of mimotopes and related strategies in tumor vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Liu, Zhiguo; Fan, Daiming

    2008-12-01

    Tumor vaccine has been studied extensively as an alternative or adjuvant therapy in the treatment of malignant tumors in the hope of prolonging the overall survival rates of cancer patients. The efficacy largely relies on the specificity of the target. In the last decade, many antibody epitopes, called mimotopes, have been revealed as candidates through phage-display technology. These mimotopes do not necessarily consist of amino acid sequences that are identical to the native antigen but they do mimic their structure. Tumor vaccines based on these mimotopes have been proposed as an important developing strategy. Some peptide mimotopes have produced encouraging clinical outcomes. Although most studies are still in the preclinical phase, these findings will possibly pave the way for the development of novel mimotope-based tumor vaccines.

  19. Correlates of Tumor Development in Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maya; Moxley, Richard T.; Hilbert, James E.; Martens, William B.; Letren, Lisa; Greene, Mark H.; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM) have recently been reported to be at increased risk of tumor development, but clinical associations related to this observation are unknown. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of self-reported tumor development by patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics to evaluate factors associated with tumor development in DM patients, using data from the National Registry of Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients and Family Members. Of the 911 participants, 47.5% were male and 85.7% had DM type 1 (DM1). Compared with DM1, patients with DM type 2 (DM2) were older at Registry enrollment (median age =55 vs. 44 years, p<0.0001) and at DM diagnosis (median age= 48 vs. 30 years, p<0.0001); and more likely to be females (p=0.001). At enrollment, 95 (10.4%) DM patients reported a history of benign or malignant tumor. Tumors were associated with female gender (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.2–3.1, p=0.007) and DM1 (OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.1–4.1, p=0.03). In a subgroup analysis of patients with blood-based DNA testing results (397 DM1, 54 DM2), repeat expansion size was not associated with tumor risk in DM1 (p=0.26) or DM2 (p=0.34). In conclusion, female gender and DM1 subtype, but not DNA repeat expansion size, were associated with increased risk of tumors in DM. Follow-up studies are warranted to determine if oncogenes associated with dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase (DMPK) are altered in DM, and to determine if repeat expansion size, as in our study, is not associated with tumor development. PMID:22619053

  20. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  1. Chemo-Predictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem-Like Cells in Patients Affected by Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nande, Rounak; Neto, Walter; Lawrence, Logan; McCallister, Danielle R.; Denvir, James; Kimmey, Gerrit A.; Mogul, Mark; Oakley, Gerard; Denning, Krista L.; Dougherty, Thomas; Valluri, Jagan V.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Administration of ineffective anticancer therapy is associated with unnecessary toxicity and development of resistant clones. Cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) resist chemotherapy, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, development of a test that identifies the most effective chemotherapy management offers great promise for individualized anticancer treatments. We have developed an ex vivo chemotherapy sensitivity assay (ChemoID), which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as well as the bulk of tumor cells to a variety of chemotherapy agents. Two patients, a 21-year old male (patient 1) and a 5-month female (patient 2), affected by anaplastic WHO grade-III ependymoma were screened using the ChemoID assay. Patient 1 was found sensitive to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab, which resulted in a prolonged disease progression free period of 18 months. Following recurrence, the combination of various chemotherapy drugs was tested again with the ChemoID assay. We found that benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) greatly increased the chemosensitivity of the ependymoma cells to the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. After patient 1 was treated for two months with irinotecan, bevacizumab and supplements of cruciferous vegetable extracts containing BITC, we observed over 50% tumoral regression in comparison with pre-ChemoID scan as evidenced by MRI. Patient 2 was found resistant to all treatments tested and following 6 cycles of vincristine, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin in various combinations, the tumor of this patient rapidly progressed and proton beam therapy was recommended. As expected animal studies conducted with patient derived xenografts treated with ChemoID screened drugs recapitulated the clinical observation. This assay demonstrates that patients with the same histological stage and grade of cancer may vary considerably in their clinical response, suggesting that ChemoID testing which measures the sensitivity of CSLCs as

  2. Role of parathymic lymph nodes in metastatic tumor development.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2012-06-01

    Parathymic lymph nodes as potential sites of tumor progression have been neglected in humans. We have established a rat renal capsule-parathymic lymph node model to study in vivo metastasis. Epithelial liver carcinoma (HeDe) and mesenchymal mesoblastic nephroma (NeDe) cell lines have been established after inducing chemical carcinogenesis in newborn Fisher 344 inbred rats by N-nitrosodimethylamine. Implanting the exact number of tumor cells (HeDe, NeDe) under the renal capsule allowed the standardization and timing of metastatic development. Tumor cells released from the primary tumor in the peritoneal cavity were drained to the parathymic lymph nodes (PTNs) as sentinel lymph nodes. Similarly, tumor cells injected i.p. were engulfed by macrophages, drained through the transdiaphragmatic channels, and transported to the thoracal lymphatics, primarily to PTNs. Tumor cells after transdiaphragmic drainage can enter both anterior mammary and parathymic sentinel lymph nodes. The potential common origin can shed new light on the metastatic cell progression of PTNs and mammary tumors.

  3. Development of Hypoxia in a Preclinical Model of Tumor Micrometastases

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, Trude G.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Hypoxic regions have been shown to be a characteristic feature of a wide variety of human primary tumors, whereas the oxygenation status of subclinical micrometastases is in general unknown. The development of hypoxia in a xenograft model of microscopic metastases was investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: U-25-GFP human melanomas growing in dorsal window chamber preparations in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as a preclinical model of micrometastases. Tumor blood supply time and morphologic parameters of the vascular network were determined from first-pass imaging movies and vascular maps recorded by use of 155-kDa tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled dextran as a vascular tracer. Tumor hypoxia was assessed from immunohistochemical preparations of the imaged tissue by use of pimonidazole as a hypoxia marker. Results: Nearly half of the tumors had developed hypoxic regions when they reached a diameter of 2 to 3 mm. Tumors with multiple hypoxic foci showed a low growth rate, low blood flow velocity, high vessel tortuosity, high vessel segment length, and high vascular density, whereas tumors with a single hypoxic region showed a high growth rate, high blood flow velocity, low vessel tortuosity, low vessel segment length, and low vascular density. The tumors with hypoxic regions did not differ from those without hypoxia in any single parameter. Conclusions: U-25-GFP xenograft models of vascularized human tumor micrometastases may develop hypoxic regions as a consequence of two distinctly different morphologic abnormalities in the vascular network: high resistance against blood flow (i.e., high vessel tortuosity and high vessel segment length) or low vascular density.

  4. Autophagy-deficient mice develop multiple liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Akito; Komatsu, Masaaki; Hara, Taichi; Sakamoto, Ayako; Kishi, Chieko; Waguri, Satoshi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Hino, Okio; Tanaka, Keiji; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-04-15

    Autophagy is a major pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles, and has been implicated in tumor suppression. Here, we report that mice with systemic mosaic deletion of Atg5 and liver-specific Atg7⁻/⁻ mice develop benign liver adenomas. These tumor cells originate autophagy-deficient hepatocytes and show mitochondrial swelling, p62 accumulation, and oxidative stress and genomic damage responses. The size of the Atg7⁻/⁻ liver tumors is reduced by simultaneous deletion of p62. These results suggest that autophagy is important for the suppression of spontaneous tumorigenesis through a cell-intrinsic mechanism, particularly in the liver, and that p62 accumulation contributes to tumor progression.

  5. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1–3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia. PMID:27512387

  6. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1-3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia.

  7. Gene therapy for brain tumors: basic developments and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-10-11

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest of adult primary brain tumors. Due to its invasive nature and sensitive location, complete resection remains virtually impossible. The resistance of GBM against chemotherapy and radiotherapy necessitate the development of novel therapies. Gene therapy is proposed for the treatment of brain tumors and has demonstrated pre-clinical efficacy in animal models. Here we review the various experimental therapies that have been developed for GBM including both cytotoxic and immune stimulatory approaches. We also review the combined conditional cytotoxic immune stimulatory therapy that our lab has developed which is dependent on the adenovirus mediated expression of the conditional cytotoxic gene, Herpes Simplex Type 1 Thymidine Kinase (TK) and the powerful DC growth factor Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Combined delivery of these vectors elicits tumor cell death and an anti-tumor adaptive immune response that requires TLR2 activation. The implications of our studies indicate that the combined cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic strategies are effective strategies to combat deadly brain tumors and warrant their implementation in human Phase I clinical trials for GBM.

  8. Gene Therapy for Brain Tumors: Basic Developments and Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest of adult primary brain tumors. Due to its invasive nature and sensitive location, complete resection remains virtually impossible. The resistance of GBM against chemotherapy and radiotherapy necessitate the development of novel therapies. Gene therapy is proposed for the treatment of brain tumors and has demonstrated pre-clinical efficacy in animal models. Here we review the various experimental therapies that have been developed for GBM including both cytotoxic and immune stimulatory approaches. We also review the combined conditional cytotoxic immune stimulatory therapy that our lab has developed which is dependent on the adenovirus mediated expression of the conditional cytotoxic gene, Herpes Simplex Type 1 Thymidine Kinase (TK) and the powerful DC growth factor Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Combined delivery of these vectors elicits tumor cell death and an anti-tumor adaptive immune response that requires TLR2 activation. The implications of our studies indicate that the combined cytotoxic and immunotherapeutic strategies are effective strategies to combat deadly brain tumors and warrant their implementation in human Phase I clinical trials for GBM. PMID:22906921

  9. Ascorbate availability affects tumor implantation-take rate and increases tumor rejection in Gulo−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Elizabeth J; Vissers, Margreet CM; Dachs, Gabi U

    2016-01-01

    In solid tumors, HIF1 upregulates the expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell survival, tumor growth, and adaptation to the hypoxic microenvironment. HIF1 stabilization and activity are suppressed by prolyl and asparagine hydroxylases, which require oxygen as a substrate and ascorbate as a cofactor. This has led us to hypothesize that intracellular ascorbate availability could modify the hypoxic HIF1 response and influence tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of variable intracellular ascorbate levels on HIF1 induction in cancer cells in vitro, and on tumor-take rate and growth in the Gulo−/− mouse. These mice depend on dietary ascorbate, and were supplemented with 3,300 mg/L, 330 mg/L, or 33 mg/L ascorbate in their drinking water, resulting in saturating, medium, or low plasma and tissue ascorbate levels, respectively. In Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LL/2) in culture, optimal ascorbate supplementation reduced HIF1 accumulation under physiological but not pathological hypoxia. LL/2, B16-F10 melanoma, or CMT-93 colorectal cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into Gulo−/− mice at a range of cell inocula. Establishment of B16-F10 tumors in mice supplemented with 3,300 mg/L ascorbate required an increased number of cancer cells to initiate tumor growth compared with the number of cells required in mice on suboptimal ascorbate intake. Elevated ascorbate intake was also associated with decreased tumor ascorbate levels and a reduction in HIF1α expression and transcriptional activity. Following initial growth, all CMT-93 tumors regressed spontaneously, but mice supplemented with 33 mg/L ascorbate had lower plasma ascorbate levels and grew larger tumors than optimally supplemented mice. The data from this study indicate that improved ascorbate intake is consistent with increased intracellular ascorbate levels, reduced HIF1 activity and reduced tumor initiation and growth, and this may be advantageous in the management of cancer

  10. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  11. Cognition and Affect in Early Literacy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Gillian D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Using Vygotsky's theory of development, explores the significance of storytelling and dramatization activities on the intellectual and emotional development of preschool children. Results indicate that dramatizing of children's stories enhances the storytelling of preschool children and, thus, influences their literacy development. (DST)

  12. Developing vascular and hypoxia based theranostics in solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koonce, Nathan A.

    Tissue hypoxia was recognized for its biological attenuating effects on ionizing radiation over a century ago and is a characteristic feature of many solid tumors. Clinical and experimental evidence indicates tumor hypoxia plays diverse and key roles in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Hypoxia has known effects on progression and resistance to several standard treatment approaches and the significant history of study might suggest diagnostic imaging and therapeutic interventions would be routine in oncological practice. Curiously, this is not the case and the research results involved in this report will attempt to better understand and contribute to why this gap in knowledge exists and a rationale for harnessing the potential of detecting and targeting hypoxia. Despite the addition of oxygen and reversal of hypoxia being known as the best radiosensitizer, hypoxia remains unexploited in clinical cancer therapy. The studies reported herein detail development of a novel imaging technique to detect a subtype of tumor hypoxia, vascular hypoxia or hypoxemia, with a 17-fold increase (p<0.05) in uptake of pimonidazole targeted microbubbles observed compared to controls. This technique creates the potential to study the role of hypoxemia in progression and therapeutic response. Additionally, description of a nanoparticle-based therapy that targets tumor areas associated with tumor hypoxia and the tumor microenvironment in general is reported. TNF-loaded nanoparticles combined with radiotherapy resulted in a 5.25-fold growth delay that was found to be synergistic (p<0.05) and suggests clinical evaluation is warranted. An additional study to evaluate an approach to use thermal ablation of intratumoral hypoxia by an image-guided technique developed in our group is described along with a sequence dependence of radiation preceding ablation. A final study on the use of galectin-1 antagonist to significantly decrease (p<0.05) hypoxia

  13. Development, Selection, and Validation of Tumor Growth Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Lima, Ernesto; Oden, J. Tinsley

    In recent years, a multitude of different mathematical approaches have been taken to develop multiscale models of solid tumor growth. Prime successful examples include the lattice-based, agent-based (off-lattice), and phase-field approaches, or a hybrid of these models applied to multiple scales of tumor, from subcellular to tissue level. Of overriding importance is the predictive power of these models, particularly in the presence of uncertainties. This presentation describes our attempt at developing lattice-based, agent-based and phase-field models of tumor growth and assessing their predictive power through new adaptive algorithms for model selection and model validation embodied in the Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL), that brings together model calibration, determination of sensitivities of outputs to parameter variances, and calculation of model plausibilities for model selection. Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences.

  14. Development of multifunctional nanoparticles for brain tumor diagnosis and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiseh, Omid

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a class of non-invasive imaging agents developed for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and drug delivery. MNPs have traditionally been developed for disease imaging via passive targeting, but recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled cellular-specific targeting, drug delivery and multi-modal imaging using these nanoparticles. Opportunities now exist to engineer MNP with designated features (e.g., size, coatings, and molecular functionalizations) for specific biomedical applications. The goal of this interdisciplinary research project is to develop targeting multifunctional nanoparticles, serving as both contrast agents and drug carriers that can effectively pass biological barriers, for diagnosis, staging and treatment of brain tumors. The developed nanoparticle system consists of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core (NP) and a shell comprised of biodegradable polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and chitosan. Additionally, near-infrared fluorescing (NIRF) molecules were integrated onto the NP shell to enable optical detection. Tumor targeting was achieved by the addition of chlorotoxin, a peptide with that has high affinity to 74 out of the 79 classifications of primary brain tumors and ability to illicit a therapeutic effect. This novel NP system was tested both in vitro and in vivo and was shown to specifically target gliomas in tissue culture and medulloblastomas in transgenic mice with an intact blood brain barriers (BBB), and delineate tumor boundaries in both MR and optical imaging. Additionally, the therapeutic potential of this NP system was explored in vitro, which revealed a unique nanoparticle-enabled pathway that enhances the therapeutic potential of bound peptides by promoting the internalization of membrane bound cell surface receptors. This NP system was further modified with siRNA and evaluated as a carrier for brain tumor targeted gene therapy. Most significantly, the evaluation of

  15. Mammary Tumor Development: Stromal-Epithelial Interactions in Oncogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    address experimentally the strong association of p53 mutations with human breast cancers, and to test whether this association holds for experimental...may develop secretory tumors (32,45,46). MG tumors are reported in transgenic mice expressing c-myc, c- erbB2 /neu, int-1, int-3 and Ha-ras, and in F1...Yasui, W, Takekura, N, Kameda, T, Oda, N, Ito, M, Ito, H, Tahara, E: Effect of epider- mal growth factor on rat stomach carcinogenesis induced by N

  16. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  17. A liver microphysiological system of tumor cell dormancy and inflammatory responsiveness is affected by scaffold properties.

    PubMed

    Clark, A M; Wheeler, S E; Young, C L; Stockdale, L; Shepard Neiman, J; Zhao, W; Stolz, D B; Venkataramanan, R; Lauffenburger, D; Griffith, L; Wells, A

    2016-12-20

    Distant metastasis is the major cause of breast cancer-related mortality, commonly emerging clinically after 5 or more years of seeming 'cure' of the primary tumor, indicating a quiescent dormancy. The lack of relevant accessible model systems for metastasis that recreate this latent stage has hindered our understanding of the molecular basis and the development of therapies against these lethal outgrowths. We previously reported on the development of an all-human 3D ex vivo hepatic microphysiological system that reproduces several features of liver physiology and enables spontaneous dormancy in a subpopulation of breast cancer cells. However, we observed that the dormant cells were localized primarily within the 3D tissue, while the proliferative cells were in contact with the polystyrene scaffold. As matrix stiffness is known to drive inflammatory and malignant behaviors, we explored the occurrence of spontaneous tumor dormancy and inflammatory phenotype. The microphysiological system was retrofitted with PEGDa-SynKRGD hydrogel scaffolding, which is softer and differs in the interface with the tissue. The microphysiological system incorporated donor-matched primary human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs), with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Hepatic tissue in hydrogel scaffolds secreted lower levels of pro-inflammatory analytes, and was more responsive to inflammatory stimuli. The proportion of tumor cells entering dormancy was markedly increased in the hydrogel-supported tissue compared to polystyrene. Interestingly, an unexpected differential response of dormant cells to varying chemotherapeutic doses was identified, which if reflective of patient pathophysiology, has important implications for patient dosing regimens. These findings highlight the metastatic microphysiological system fitted with hydrogel scaffolds as a critical tool in the assessment and development of therapeutic strategies to target dormant metastatic breast cancer.

  18. Input and output constraints affecting irrigation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, G.

    1981-05-01

    In many of the developing countries the expansion of irrigated agriculture is used as a major development tool for bringing about increases in agricultural output, rural economic growth and income distribution. Apart from constraints imposed by water availability, the major limitations considered to any acceleration of such programs are usually thought to be those of costs and financial resources. However, as is shown on the basis of empirical data drawn from Mexico, in reality the feasibility and effectiveness of such development programs is even more constrained by the lack of specialized physical and human factors on the input and market limitations on the output side. On the input side, the limited availability of complementary factors such as, for example, truly functioning credit systems for small-scale farmers or effective agricultural extension services impose long-term constraints on development. On the output side the limited availability, high risk, and relatively slow growth of markets for high-value crops sharply reduce the usually hoped-for and projected profitable crop mix that would warrant the frequently high costs of irrigation investments. Three conclusions are drawn: (1) Factors in limited supply have to be shadow-priced to reflect their high opportunity costs in alternative uses. (2) Re-allocation of financial resources from immediate construction of projects to longer-term increase in the supply of scarce, highly-trained manpower resources are necessary in order to optimize development over time. (3) Inclusion of high-value, high-income producing crops in the benefit-cost analysis of new projects is inappropriate if these crops could potentially be grown in already existing projects.

  19. The circumplex model of affect: An integrative approach to affective neuroscience, cognitive development, and psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Posner, Jonathan; Russell, James A.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The circumplex model of affect proposes that all affective states arise from cognitive interpretations of core neural sensations that are the product of two independent neurophysiological systems. This model stands in contrast to theories of basic emotions, which posit that a discrete and independent neural system subserves every emotion. We propose that basic emotion theories no longer explain adequately the vast number of empirical observations from studies in affective neuroscience, and we suggest that a conceptual shift is needed in the empirical approaches taken to the study of emotion and affective psychopathologies. The circumplex model of affect is more consistent with many recent findings from behavioral, cognitive neuroscience, neuroimaging, and developmental studies of affect. Moreover, the model offers new theoretical and empirical approaches to studying the development of affective disorders as well as the genetic and cognitive underpinnings of affective processing within the central nervous system. PMID:16262989

  20. Fetal jaw movement affects condylar cartilage development.

    PubMed

    Habib, H; Hatta, T; Udagawa, J; Zhang, L; Yoshimura, Y; Otani, H

    2005-05-01

    Using a mouse exo utero system to examine the effects of fetal jaw movement on the development of condylar cartilage, we assessed the effects of restraint of the animals' mouths from opening, by suture, at embryonic day (E)15.5. We hypothesized that pre-natal jaw movement is an important mechanical factor in endochondral bone formation of the mandibular condyle. Condylar cartilage was reduced in size, and the bone-cartilage margin was ill-defined in the sutured group at E18.5. Volume, total number of cells, and number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the mesenchymal zone were lower in the sutured group than in the non-sutured group at E16.5 and E18.5. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were larger, whereas fewer apoptotic chondrocytes and osteoclasts were observed in the hypertrophic zone in the sutured group at E18.5. Analysis of our data revealed that restricted fetal TMJ movement influences the process of endochondral bone formation of condylar cartilage.

  1. Oral ingestion of Streptococcus thermophilus does not affect mucositis severity or tumor progression in the tumor-bearing rat.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Lymn, Kerry A; Lawrence, Andrew; Butler, Ross N

    2011-07-15

    Preventative or adjunctive agents for the amelioration of small intestinal chemotherapy-induced mucositis are not currently available for clinical use. We have previously demonstrated that oral ingestion of Streptococcus thermophilus (TH-4) partially attenuated chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the rat. Here we assess the effects of TH-4 on small intestinal damage and tumor progression in tumor-bearing rats with experimentally-induced mucositis. Female Dark Agouti tumor-bearing (mammary adenocarcinoma) rats (n = 36; 139 ± 1 g) had small intestinal damage induced via the administration of methotrexate (MTX). Rats were administered MTX; (1.5 mg/kg intramuscular) or saline at 0 and 24 h; with daily gavage administration of TH-4 (109 cfu/mL) or skim milk from -48 to +96 h post-MTX. Rats were allocated to groups (n=9): saline control, TH-4 control, MTX control or TH-4+MTX. The non-invasive ( 13) C-sucrose breath test (SBT) was conducted prior to tumor inoculation, pre-MTX (-24 h) and prior to sacrifice (96 h) to monitor gut function. At sacrifice small intestinal segments were excised and assessed for sucrase and myeloperoxidase activity as well as histological damage. Irrespective of TH-4 treatment, MTX-treated rats had a significant decrease in bodyweight, SBT levels, sucrase and myeloperoxidase activity, and histological damage score (p < 0.05) compared to saline and TH-4 control rats. TH-4 treatment did not result in tumor progression (p > 0.05) but failed to alleviate mucositis indices. Although TH-4, at a dose of 109 cfu/mL, yielded neither protection nor amelioration of chemotherapy-induced mucositis, progression of mammary adenocarcinoma was unaffected.

  2. Polystyrene nanoparticles affect Xenopus laevis development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tussellino, Margherita; Ronca, Raffaele; Formiggini, Fabio; Marco, Nadia De; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Carotenuto, Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Exposing living organisms to nanoparticulates is potentially hazardous, in particular when it takes place during embryogenesis. In this investigation, we have studied the effects of 50-nm-uncoated polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) as a model to investigate the suitability of their possible future employments. We have used the standardized Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay- Xenopus test during the early stages of larval development of Xenopus laevis, and we have employed either contact exposure or microinjections. We found that the embryos mortality rate is dose dependent and that the survived embryos showed high percentage of malformations. They display disorders in pigmentation distribution, malformations of the head, gut and tail, edema in the anterior ventral region, and a shorter body length compared with sibling untreated embryos. Moreover, these embryos grow more slowly than the untreated embryos. Expressions of the mesoderm markers, bra (T-box Brachyury gene), myod1 (myogenic differentiation1), and of neural crest marker sox9 (sex SRY (determining region Y-box 9) transcription factor sox9), are modified. Confocal microscopy showed that the nanoparticles are localized in the cytoplasm, in the nucleus, and in the periphery of the digestive gut cells. Our data suggest that PSNPs are toxic and show a potential teratogenic effect for Xenopus larvae. We hypothesize that these effects may be due either to the amount of NPs that penetrate into the cells and/or to the "corona" effect caused by the interaction of PSNPs with cytoplasm components. The three endpoints of our study, i.e., mortality, malformations, and growth inhibition, suggest that the tests we used may be a powerful and flexible bioassay in evaluating pollutants in aquatic embryos.

  3. Are preoperative sex-related differences of affective symptoms in primary brain tumor patients associated with postoperative histopathological grading?

    PubMed

    Richter, Andre; Jenewein, J; Krayenbühl, N; Woernle, C; Bellut, D

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the impact of the histopathological tumor type on affective symptoms before surgery among male and female patients with supratentorial primary brain tumors. A total of 44 adult patients were included in the study. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Additionally, clinical interviews, including the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), were conducted. The general function of patients was measured with the Karnofsky Performance Status scale (KPS). All measures were obtained before surgery and therefore before the final histopathological diagnosis. All self-rating questionnaires but not the HDRS, showed significantly higher scores in female patients. The functional status assessed with the KPS was lower in female patients and correlated to the somatic part of the BDI. We further found a tendency for higher HDRS scores in male patients with a WHO grade 4 tumor stage compared to female patients. This finding was supported by positive correlations between HDRS scores and WHO grade in male and negative correlations between HDRS scores and WHO grade in female patients. In conclusion the preoperative evaluation of affective symptoms with self-rating questionnaires in patients with brain tumors may be invalidated by the patient’s functional status. Depression should be explored with clinical interviews in these patients. Sex differences of affective symptoms in this patient group may also be related to the malignancy of the tumor, but further studies are needed to disentangle this relationship.

  4. Affective Development in Advanced Old Age: Analyses of Terminal Change in Positive and Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Wiegering, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Late-life development of affect may unfold terminal changes that are driven more by end-of-life processes and not so much by time since birth. This study aimed to explore time-to-death-related effects in measures of affect in a sample of the very old. We used longitudinal data (2 measurement occasions: 2002 and 2003) from 140 deceased…

  5. Role for the Wilms tumor gene in genital development?

    PubMed Central

    van Heyningen, V; Bickmore, W A; Seawright, A; Fletcher, J M; Maule, J; Fekete, G; Gessler, M; Bruns, G A; Huerre-Jeanpierre, C; Junien, C

    1990-01-01

    Detailed molecular definition of the WAGR region at chromosome 11p13 has been achieved by chromosome breakpoint analysis and long-range restriction mapping. Here we describe the molecular detection of a cytogenetically invisible 1-megabase deletion in an individual with aniridia, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias but no Wilms tumor (WT). The region of overlap between this deletion and one associated with WT and similar genital anomalies but no aniridia covers a region of 350-400 kilobases, which is coincident with the extent of homozygous deletion detected in tumor tissue from a sporadic WT. A candidate WT gene located within this region has recently been isolated, suggesting nonpenetrance for tumor expression in the first individual. The inclusion within the overlap region of a gene for WT predisposition and a gene for the best-documented WT-associated genitourinary malformations leads us to suggest that both of these anomalies result from a loss-of-function mutation at the same locus. This in turn implies that the WT gene exerts pleiotropic effect on both kidney and genitourinary development, a possibility supported by the observed expression pattern of the WT candidate gene in developing kidney and gonads. Images PMID:1973540

  6. Role for the Wilms tumor gene in genital development

    SciTech Connect

    van Heyningen, V.; Bickmore, W.A.; Seawright, A.; Fletcher, J.M.; Maule, J.; Hastie, N.D. ); Fekete, G. ); Gessler, M.; Bruns, G.A.P. ); Huerre-Jeanpierre, C.; Junien, C. ); Williams, B.R.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Detailed molecular definition of the WAGR region at chromosome 11p13 has been achieved by chromosome breakpoint analysis and long-range restriction mapping. Here the authors describe the molecular detection of a cytogenetically invisible 1-megabase deletion in an individual with aniridia, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias but no Wilms tumor (WT). The region of overlap between this deletion and one associated with WT and similar genital anomalies but no aniridia covers a region of 350-400 kilobases, which is coincident with the extent of homozygous deletion detected in tumor tissue from a sporadic WT. A candidate WT gene located within this region has recently been isolated, suggesting nonpenetrance for tumor expression in the first individual. The inclusion within the overlap region of a gene for WT predisposition and a gene for the best-documented WT-associated genitourinary malformations leads to suggest that both of these anomalies result from a loss-of-function mutation at the same locus. This in turn implies that the WT gene exerts pleiotropic effect on both kidney and genitourinary development, a possibility supported by the observed expression pattern of the WT candidate gene in developing kidney and gonads.

  7. Telomere profiles and tumor-associated macrophages with different immune signatures affect prognosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Noelyn A; Eiholzer, Ramona A; Kirs, Stenar; Zhou, Jean; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten; Wiles, Anna K; Frampton, Chris M; Taha, Ahmad; Royds, Janice A; Slatter, Tania L

    2016-03-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer and likely to be targeted in future treatments. In glioblastoma established methods of identifying telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomeres leave a significant proportion of tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism. This study investigated the composition of these tumors using RNA-Seq. Glioblastomas with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had an increased immune signature compared with alternative lengthening of telomeres and telomerase-positive tumors. Immunohistochemistry for CD163 confirmed that the majority (80%) of tumors with an indeterminate telomere maintenance mechanism had a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The RNA-Seq and immunostaining data separated tumors with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism into three subgroups: alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages and telomerase like tumors with a high presence of tumor-associated macrophages. The third subgroup had no increase in tumor-associated macrophages and may represent a distinct category. The presence of tumor-associated macrophages conferred a worse prognosis with reduced patient survival times (alternative lengthening of telomeres with and without macrophages P=0.0004, and telomerase with and without macrophages P=0.013). The immune signatures obtained from RNA-Seq were significantly different between telomere maintenance mechanisms. Alternative lengthening of telomeres like tumors with macrophages had increased expression of interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1-3). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages had increased expression of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), CXCL12 and sushi-repeat containing protein x-linked 2 (SRPX2). Telomerase-positive tumors with macrophages were also associated with a reduced frequency of total/near total resections (44% vs >76% for all other subtypes

  8. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid‐derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. Methods In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. Results The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. Conclusions These data indicate that alterations in tumor‐reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci. PMID:28250928

  9. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  11. Ongoing neural development of affective theory of mind in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Weigelt, Sarah; Döhnel, Katrin; Smolka, Michael N; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Affective Theory of Mind (ToM), an important aspect of ToM, involves the understanding of affective mental states. This ability is critical in the developmental phase of adolescence, which is often related with socio-emotional problems. Using a developmentally sensitive behavioral task in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging, the present study investigated the neural development of affective ToM throughout adolescence. Eighteen adolescent (ages 12-14 years) and 18 young adult women (aged 19-25 years) were scanned while evaluating complex affective mental states depicted by actors in video clips. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) showed significantly stronger activation in adolescents in comparison to adults in the affective ToM condition. Current results indicate that the vmPFC might be involved in the development of affective ToM processing in adolescence.

  12. Factors affecting tumor recurrence after curative surgery for NSCLC: impacts of lymphovascular invasion on early tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanyeong; Jang, Seung Hun; Lee, Jae Woong

    2014-01-01

    Background Although surgery is potentially curative treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the risk of postoperative disease recurrence is still high. This study was conducted to assess the factors associated with postoperative tumor recurrence in patients who underwent curative surgery for NSCLC. Methods One hundred seventy-one patients who underwent curative surgery for NSCLC were included in this study. Clinicopathological factors of histologic type, pathologic TNM stage, T stage, N stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), perineural invasion (PNI), surgical procedure, adjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy were investigated. Gender, age, and clinicopathologic factors were included in univariate and multivariate analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model, respectively. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to investigate the significance of differences in recurrence-free interval (RFI) according to clinicopathological factors. Results Median RFI was 20 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses for overall recurrence identified T stage, N stage, and LVI as significant factors (P=0.045, 0.044, and <0.001, respectively). Pathologic stage (P=0.005) was the only factor that was significantly associated with locoregional recurrence. T stage (P=0.040) and LVI (P<0.001) were significantly associated with distant recurrence. The difference in 2-year freedom from recurrence between LVI positive and negative groups was significant (14.9% vs. 44.6%, P<0.001). LVI was the only factor that was significantly associated with a shortened mean RFI (P<0.001). Conclusions LVI had a significant effect on both overall and distant recurrence rates as well as on early tumor recurrence after curative surgery for NSCLC. PMID:25364519

  13. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  14. Strategies for Developing Effective Teaching Skills in the Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other academic discipline, physical education holds the highest potential for teaching affective skills. By its very nature, the typical physical education setting offers countless teachable moments and opportunities to capitalize on the development of affective skills. The seeming lack of attention given to affective…

  15. The Development of the Meta-Affective Trait Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen; Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Meta-Affective Trait Scale (MATS) to measure the meta-affective inclinations related to emotions that students have while they are studying for their classes. First, a pilot study was performed with 380 10th-grade students. Results of the exploratory factor analysis supported a two-factor structure of the…

  16. One cell, multiple roles: contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to tumor development in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Hou, Jing; Han, Zhipeng; Wang, Ying; Hao, Chong; Wei, Lixin; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-21

    The discovery of tissue reparative and immunosuppressive abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has drawn more attention to tumor microenvironment and its role in providing the soil for the tumor cell growth. MSCs are recruited to tumor which is referred as the never healing wound and altered by the inflammation environment, thereby helping to construct the tumor microenvironment. The environment orchestrated by MSCs and other factors can be associated with angiogenesis, immunosuppression, inhibition of apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), survival of cancer stem cells, which all contribute to tumor growth and progression. In this review, we will discuss how MSCs are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and what effects they have on tumor progression.

  17. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GOUDARZI, KAVEH M.; LINDSTRÖM, MIKAEL S.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research. PMID:26892688

  18. Assessing the effects of metabolism of environmental agents on cancer tumor development by a two-stage model of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W Y; Singh, K P

    1987-01-01

    By combining the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of metabolism with the two-stage model of Moolgavkar and Knudson (1981) and the extended two-stage model of carcinogenesis proposed by Tan and Gastardo (1985), this paper proceeds to investigate the effects of metabolism of carcinogens on cancer tumor development. It is shown that the nonlinear kinetics of metabolism of carcinogens affect the dose-response relationship mainly through the mutation rates. If the initiator is affected by metabolism, then the metabolism of promoters has very little or negligible effects of the expected incidences and the number of tumors. PMID:3691427

  19. The CCN Family Proteins: Modulators of Bone Development and Novel Targets in Bone-Associated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Chun; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the CCN family proteins in regulating resident cells of the bone microenvironment. In vertebrate development, the CCN family plays a critical role in osteo/chondrogenesis and vasculo/angiogenesis. These effects are regulated through signaling via integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, Wnt, and Notch via direct binding to CCN family proteins. Due to the important roles of CCN family proteins in skeletal development, abnormal expression of CCN proteins is related to the tumorigenesis of primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Additionally, emerging studies have suggested that CCN proteins may affect progression of secondary metastatic bone tumors by moderating the bone microenvironment. CCN proteins could therefore serve as potential therapeutic targets for drug development against primary and metastatic bone tumors. PMID:24551846

  20. The CCN family proteins: modulators of bone development and novel targets in bone-associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Chun; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the CCN family proteins in regulating resident cells of the bone microenvironment. In vertebrate development, the CCN family plays a critical role in osteo/chondrogenesis and vasculo/angiogenesis. These effects are regulated through signaling via integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, Wnt, and Notch via direct binding to CCN family proteins. Due to the important roles of CCN family proteins in skeletal development, abnormal expression of CCN proteins is related to the tumorigenesis of primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Additionally, emerging studies have suggested that CCN proteins may affect progression of secondary metastatic bone tumors by moderating the bone microenvironment. CCN proteins could therefore serve as potential therapeutic targets for drug development against primary and metastatic bone tumors.

  1. Case report: long-term survival of an infant syndromic patient affected by atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) patients display a dismal median overall survival of less than 1 year. A consistent fraction of cases carries de-novo SMARCB1/INI1 constitutional mutations in the setting of the “rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome” and the outcome is worst in infant syndromic ATRT patients. Case presentation We here describe a patient affected by mosaic Klinefelter syndrome and by rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome caused by constitutional SMARCB1/INI1 heterozygous mutation c.118C>T (Arg40X). Patient’s ATRT primary tumor occurred at 2 years of age concurrent with metastatic lesions. The patient was rendered without evidence of disease by combined surgery, high-dose poli-chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At the onset of a spinal lesion 5.5 years later, both tumors were pathologically and molecularly evaluated at the national central pathology review board and defined as ATRT in a syndromic patient, with strong evidence of a clonal origin of the two lesions. The patient was then treated according to SIOP guidelines and is now alive without evidence of disease 24 months after the detection of metastatic disease and 90 months after the original diagnosis. Conclusion The report underscores the current utility of multiple comprehensive approaches for the correct diagnosis and clinical management of patients affected by rare and atypical brain neoplasms. Successful local control of disease and achievement of long-term survival is possible in ATRT patients even in the setting of rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome, infant age at diagnosis and metastatic spread of disease, thus justifying the efforts for the management of this severe condition. PMID:23510391

  2. SU-E-J-175: Comparison of the Treatment Reproducibility of Tumors Affected by Breathing Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, M; Piotrowski, T; Adamczyk, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the dose distribution simulations was to form a global idea of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) realization, by its comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) delivery for tumors affected by respiratory motion. Methods: In the group of 10patients both 3DCRT and IMRT plans were prepared.For each field the motion kernel was generated with the largest movement amplitude of 4;6 and 8mm.Additionally,the sets of reference measurements were made in no motion conditions(0 mm).The evaluation of plan delivery,using a diode array placed on moving platform,was based on the Gamma Index analysis with distance to agreement of 3mm and dose difference of 3%. Results: IMRT plans tended to spare doses delivered to lungs compared to 3DCRT.Nonetheless,analyzed volumes showed no significant difference between the static and dynamic techniques,except for the volumes of both lungs receiving 10 and 15Gy.After adding the components associated with the respiratory movement,all IMRT lung parameters evaluated for the ipsilateral,contralateral and both lungs together,revealed considerable differences between the 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes.Similar results were obtained for the 3DCRT lung measurements,but without significance between the 0vs.6-mm amplitude.Taking into account the CTV score parameter in 3DCRT and IMRT plans,there was no statistically significant difference between the motion patterns with the smallest amplitudes.The differences were found for the 8-mm amplitude when it was compared both with static conditions and 4-mm amplitude (for 3DCRT) and between 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes (for IMRT).All accepted and measured 3DCRT and IMRT doses to spinal cord,esophagus and heart were always below the QUANTEC limits. Conclusion: The application of IMRT technique in lung radiotherapy affords possibilities for reducing the lung doses.For maximal amplitudes of breathing trajectory below 4mm,the disagreement between CTV

  3. Xeroderma pigmentosum skin: an immune privilege site for tumor development.

    PubMed

    Abid, Kalthoum; El Mezni, Faouzi; Kamoun, Mohamed Ridha; Fazaa, Becima; Zermani, Rachida; Hadouchi, Chokri; Hamzaoui, Kamel

    2010-04-01

    A unique feature of the skin immune system is its proximity to cells continuously exposed to sun rays, as it is located in the interface between the body and the environment. In this study, we aimed to determine the impact of DNA damaged keratinocytes on the expression of apoptotic-related molecules, in T-cells of the inflammatory component of the tumor environment. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue sections derived from skin biopsies of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients, non-XP patients and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) patients, using antibodies against B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax), CD95, CD3, CD8 and CD56. Our results showed significantly lower levels of expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 molecule, in XP, in comparison with non-XP and NBCCS T-lymphocytes, leading to the highest Bax/Bcl-2 ratio for XP T-cells. For the CD95 receptor expression levels, there were significant differences among T-cells of the three patient subgroups as well. The higher propensity of XP T-cells to undergo apoptosis may have evolved in individual XP patients, apparently during the course of their disease, to maintain a special skin as an immune privilege site for tumors' development.

  4. The Emerging Role of TRAF7 in Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Tiziana; Scudiero, Ivan; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2017-06-01

    The seven members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R)-associated factor (TRAF) family of intracellular proteins were originally discovered and characterized as signaling adaptor molecules coupled to the cytoplasmic regions of receptors of the TNF-R superfamily. Functionally, TRAFs act both as a scaffold and/or enzymatic proteins to regulate activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and transcription factors of nuclear factor-κB family (NF-κB). Given the wide variety of stimuli intracellularly conveyed by TRAF proteins, they are physiologically involved in multiple biological processes, including embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the last few years, it has become increasingly evident the involvement of TRAF7, the last member of the TRAF family to be discovered, in the genesis and progression of several human cancers, placing TRAF7 in the spotlight as a novel tumor suppressor protein. In this paper, we review and discuss the literature recently produced on this subject. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1233-1238, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Emerging Role of TRAF7 in Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Zotti, Tiziana; Scudiero, Ivan; Stilo, Romania

    2017-01-01

    The seven members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF‐R)‐associated factor (TRAF) family of intracellular proteins were originally discovered and characterized as signaling adaptor molecules coupled to the cytoplasmic regions of receptors of the TNF‐R superfamily. Functionally, TRAFs act both as a scaffold and/or enzymatic proteins to regulate activation of mitogen‐activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and transcription factors of nuclear factor‐κB family (NF‐κB). Given the wide variety of stimuli intracellularly conveyed by TRAF proteins, they are physiologically involved in multiple biological processes, including embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the last few years, it has become increasingly evident the involvement of TRAF7, the last member of the TRAF family to be discovered, in the genesis and progression of several human cancers, placing TRAF7 in the spotlight as a novel tumor suppressor protein. In this paper, we review and discuss the literature recently produced on this subject. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1233–1238, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27808423

  6. Cancer promotion in a mouse-skin model by a 60-Hz magnetic field: II. Tumor development and immune response.

    PubMed

    McLean, J R; Stuchly, M A; Mitchel, R E; Wilkinson, D; Yang, H; Goddard, M; Lecuyer, D W; Schunk, M; Callary, E; Morrison, D

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary findings on the influence of 60-Hz (2-mT) magnetic fields on tumor promotion and co-promotion in the skins of mice. The effect of magnetic fields on natural killer (NK) cell activity in spleen and blood was also examined. Groups of 32 juvenile female mice were exposed to the magnetic field as described in part I. The dorsal skin of all animals was treated with a subthreshold dose of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA). One week after the treatment, two groups were sham exposed (group A) or field exposed at 2 mT (group B) 6 h/day for 21 weeks, to test whether the field would act as a tumor promoter. No tumors developed in these two groups of mice. To test whether the magnetic field would modify tumor development by directly affecting tumor growth or by suppressing immune surveillance, two additional groups of mice were treated weekly with the tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and then either sham exposed (group C) or field exposed (group D). The time to appearance of tumors was shorter (but not statistically so) in the group exposed to magnetic fields and TPA. Some differences in NK cell activity and spleen size were observed between the sham- and field-exposed groups.

  7. Influence of Immune Privilege on Ocular Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Kyle C.; Chen, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms that maintain ocular immune privilege may contribute to ocular tumor progression by inhibiting tumoricidal immune responses. Consistent with that notion are observations from transplantable tumor models in mice demonstrating that the tumoricidal activity of CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) may be inhibited directly by interfering with CTL effector function in the eye or indirectly by abrogating the effector function of CD8+ T cell-activated intratumoral macrophages that are critical for ocular tumor rejection. In addition, epigenetic gene regulation by factors within the ocular tumor environment favors the generation of tumor variants that are resistant to CD8+ CTL. Intratumoral macrophages may be essential for eliminating these variants because, unlike CTL, their tumoricidal activity is nonspecific. Hence, the inhibition of macrophage effector function within the eye, presumably to preserve immune privilege by minimizing ocular immunopathology, may hasten the outgrowth of tumor escape variants which contributes to ocular tumor progression. PMID:20370332

  8. Revisiting influences on tumor development focusing on laboratory housing.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Helaine M; Schweitzer, Natalie B; Snedden, Angela M; Callahan, Phyllis; Hagerman, Ann E

    2009-05-01

    Spontaneous tumors are reported to occur in 45% to 71% of Sprague-Dawley rats, yet few studies have considered the effect of the sedentary condition of standard laboratory cages on tumorigenesis. Tumor profiles and tumor promoting hormone prolactin were compared in female Sprague-Dawley rats (108) that were allocated into 3 groups: those housed without outside activity (SED group), with twice-weekly 1-h sessions of physical activity in large box (PA group), and with regular voluntary running-wheel exercise (EX). Compared with the EX group, SED rats had more and larger tumors throughout most of their lifespan; tumor profiles of PA rats were similar to those of the SED group. A larger percentage of animals in the SED group had tumors (54%), compared with EX rats (38%). At 64 wk, tumors in SED animals included thyroid carcinoma, malignancy, mammary fibroadenoma, cystadenoma, and granuloma, whereas benign mammary gland cysts were most common in EX. Prolactin levels were highest in SED animals at 24 and 52 wk. In conclusion, increased tumor number, increased tumor size, type of spontaneous tumor, and increased prolactin in rats were associated with standard laboratory housing, which limited physical activity, and were not primarily due to aging.

  9. Oral pathogens change proliferation properties of oral tumor cells by affecting gene expression of human defensins.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, T; Kraus, D; Novak, N; Probstmeier, R; Frentzen, M; Wenghoefer, M; Jepsen, S; Winter, J

    2016-10-01

    The impact of oral pathogens onto the generation and variability of oral tumors has only recently been investigated. To get further insights, oral cancer cells were treated with pathogens and additionally, as a result of this bacterial cellular infection, with human defensins, which are as anti-microbial peptide members of the innate immune system. After cell stimulation, proliferation behavior, expression analysis of oncogenic relevant defensin genes, and effects on EGFR signaling were investigated. The expression of oncogenic relevant anti-microbial peptides was analyzed with real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were performed to examine cellular impacts caused by stimulation, i.e., altered gene expression, proliferation rate, and EGF receptor-dependent signaling. Incubation of oral tumor cells with an oral pathogen (Porphyromonas gingivalis) and human α-defensins led to an increase in cell proliferation. In contrast, another oral bacterium used, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, enhanced cell death. The bacteria and anti-microbial peptides exhibited diverse effects on the transcript levels of oncogenic relevant defensin genes and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These two oral pathogens exhibited opposite primary effects on the proliferation behavior of oral tumor cells. Nevertheless, both microbe species led to similar secondary impacts on the proliferation rate by modifying expression levels of oncogenic relevant α-defensin genes. In this respect, oral pathogens exerted multiplying effects on tumor cell proliferation. Additionally, human defensins were shown to differently influence epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, supporting the hypothesis that these anti-microbial peptides serve as ligands of EGFR, thus modifying the proliferation behavior of oral tumor cells.

  10. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-10-15

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR{sup −/−} and SHP{sup −/−} mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR{sup −/−} mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR{sup −/−} mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR{sup −/−} mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR{sup −/−}/SHP{sup Tg}) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR{sup −/−} mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR{sup −/−} mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR{sup −/−} mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency.

  11. Affect development as a need to preserve homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Aslıhan; Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Ünsalver, Barış Önen

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we aim to present our hypothesis about the neural development of affect. According to this view, affect develops at a multi-layered process, and as a mediator between drives, emotion and cognition. This development is parallel to the evolution of the brain from reptiles to mammals. There are five steps in this process: (1) Because of the various environmental challenges, changes in the autonomic nervous system occur and homeostasis becomes destabilized; (2) Drives arise from the destabilized homeostasis; (3) Drives trigger the neural basis of the basic emotional systems; (4) These basic emotions evolve into affect to find the particular object to invest the emotional energy; and (5) In the final stage, cognition is added to increase the possibility of identifying a particular object. In this paper, we will summarize the rationale behind this view, which is based on neuroscientific proofs, such as evolution of autonomic nervous system, neural basis the raw affective states, the interaction between affect and cognition, related brain areas, related neurotransmitters, as well as some clinical examples.

  12. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  13. Developing Worksheet Based on Science Process Skills: Factors Affecting Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsli, Fethiye; Sahin, Cigdem

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a worksheet about the factors affecting solubility, which could be useful for the prospective science teachers (PST) to remind and regain their science process skills (SPS). The pilot study of the WS was carried out with 32 first grade PST during the 2007-2008 academic year in the education department at…

  14. Ischemia in Tumors Induces Early and Sustained Phosphorylation Changes in Stress Kinase Pathways but Does Not Affect Global Protein Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Mertins, Philipp; Yang, Feng; Liu, Tao; Mani, D. R.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gillette, Michael A.; Clauser, Karl R.; Qiao, Jana W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Levine, Douglas A.; Townsend, Reid; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Davies, Sherri R.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; Fenyo, David; Kitchens, R. Thomas; Li, Shunqiang; Olvera, Narciso; Dao, Fanny; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel W.; Liebler, Daniel; White, Forest; Rodland, Karin D.; Mills, Gordon B.; Smith, Richard D.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein abundance and phosphorylation convey important information about pathway activity and molecular pathophysiology in diseases including cancer, providing biological insight, informing drug and diagnostic development, and guiding therapeutic intervention. Analyzed tissues are usually collected without tight regulation or documentation of ischemic time. To evaluate the impact of ischemia, we collected human ovarian tumor and breast cancer xenograft tissue without vascular interruption and performed quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics after defined ischemic intervals. Although the global expressed proteome and most of the >25,000 quantified phosphosites were unchanged after 60 min, rapid phosphorylation changes were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome, representing activation of critical cancer pathways related to stress response, transcriptional regulation, and cell death. Both pan-tumor and tissue-specific changes were observed. The demonstrated impact of pre-analytical tissue ischemia on tumor biology mandates caution in interpreting stress-pathway activation in such samples and motivates reexamination of collection protocols for phosphoprotein analysis. PMID:24719451

  15. Development of cognitive and affective control networks and decision making.

    PubMed

    Kar, Bhoomika R; Vijay, Nivita; Mishra, Shreyasi

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control and decision making are two important research areas in the realm of higher-order cognition. Control processes such as interference control and monitoring in cognitive and affective contexts have been found to influence the process of decision making. Development of control processes follows a gradual growth pattern associated with the prolonged maturation of underlying neural circuits including the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and the medial prefrontal cortex. These circuits are also involved in the control of processes that influences decision making, particularly with respect to choice behavior. Developmental studies on affective control have shown distinct patterns of brain activity with adolescents showing greater activation of amygdala whereas adults showing greater activity in ventral prefrontal cortex. Conflict detection, monitoring, and adaptation involve anticipation and subsequent performance adjustments which are also critical to complex decision making. We discuss the gradual developmental patterns observed in two of our studies on conflict monitoring and adaptation in affective and nonaffective contexts. Findings of these studies indicate the need to look at the differences in the effects of the development of cognitive and affective control on decision making in children and particularly adolescents. Neuroimaging studies have shown the involvement of separable neural networks for cognitive (medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate) and affective control (amygdala, ventral medial prefrontal cortex) shows that one system can affect the other also at the neural level. Hence, an understanding of the interaction and balance between the cognitive and affective brain networks may be crucial for self-regulation and decision making during the developmental period, particularly late childhood and adolescence. The chapter highlights the need for empirical investigation on the interaction between the different aspects

  16. 24-Hydroxycholesterol participates in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Matias; Corna, Gianfranca; Moresco, Marta; Coltella, Nadia; Restuccia, Umberto; Maggioni, Daniela; Raccosta, Laura; Lin, Chin-Yo; Invernizzi, Francesca; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Doglioni, Claudio; Traversari, Catia; Bachi, Angela; Bernardi, Rosa; Bordignon, Claudio; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the tumor microenvironment may be reprogrammed by tumor-derived metabolites. Cholesterol-oxidized products, namely oxysterols, have been shown to favor tumor growth directly by promoting tumor cell growth and indirectly by dampening antitumor immune responses. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing oxysterol generation within tumor microenvironments remain elusive. We recently showed that tumor-derived oxysterols recruit neutrophils endowed with protumoral activities, such as neoangiogenesis. Here, we show that hypoxia inducible factor-1a (HIF-1α) controls the overexpression of the enzyme Cyp46a1, which generates the oxysterol 24-hydroxycholesterol (24S-HC) in a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) model commonly used to study neoangiogenesis. The activation of the HIF-1α–24S-HC axis ultimately leads to the induction of the angiogenic switch through the positioning of proangiogenic neutrophils in proximity to Cyp46a1+ islets. Pharmacologic blockade or genetic inactivation of oxysterols controls pNET tumorigenesis by dampening the 24S-HC–neutrophil axis. Finally, we show that in some human pNET samples Cyp46a1 transcripts are overexpressed, which correlate with the HIF-1α target VEGF and with tumor diameter. This study reveals a layer in the angiogenic switch of pNETs and identifies a therapeutic target for pNET patients. PMID:27671648

  17. [Mentalisation and affect regulation--how the infantile self develops].

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The text comprises the different elements of the psychoanalytic mentalization theory of Peter Fonagy et al. and tries to explain them. Part of this theory are above all the affect mirroring as well as the affect reciprocity theory and the two modes of the "as if" character and the psychic equivalence (playing with reality). You can find clear examples for each of these theoretical components. Moreover there are many correlations to other authors and their respective development theories: that is to Wilfred Bion, Donald Winnicott and John Bowlby. The text is based above all on Martin Dornes' approaches on this topic (2004, 2006).

  18. Does inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha affect chlamydial genital tract infection in mice and guinea pigs?

    PubMed

    Darville, T; Andrews, C W; Rank, R G

    2000-09-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in host defense against chlamydial infection remains unclear. In order to further evaluate the relevance of TNF-alpha to host resistance in chlamydial genital tract infection, we examined the effect of local inhibition of the TNF-alpha response in normal C57 mice and in interferon gamma gene-deficient C57 mice infected intravaginally with the mouse pneumonitis agent of Chlamydia trachomatis. Since the guinea pig model of female genital tract infection more closely approximates the human in terms of ascending infection and development of pathology, we also examined the effect of local inhibition of the TNF-alpha response in guinea pigs infected intravaginally with the guinea pig strain of Chlamydia psittaci. We successfully blocked the early TNF-alpha response in the respective animal models. This blockade had no effect on the numbers of organisms isolated from the genital tract during the time of TNF-alpha inhibition in mice or guinea pigs. Analysis of interleukin-1beta, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in the mouse model revealed that blockade of the TNF-alpha response did not alter the release of these proinflammatory proteins. Yet, in TNF-alpha-depleted mice, increased numbers of neutrophils were detected in the genital tract, and, in TNF-alpha-depleted guinea pigs, increased numbers of neutrophils as well as infiltrating lymphocytes were seen in the endocervix. Blockade of TNF-alpha does not affect the level of infection in mice or guinea pigs, but it may decrease TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis of infiltrating inflammatory cells.

  19. Insulin-like growth factors and insulin: at the crossroad between tumor development and longevity.

    PubMed

    Novosyadlyy, Ruslan; Leroith, Derek

    2012-06-01

    Numerous lines of evidence indicate that insulin-like growth factor signaling plays an important role in the regulation of life span and tumor development. In the present paper, the role of individual components of insulin-like growth factor signaling in aging and tumor development has been extensively analyzed. The molecular mechanisms underlying aging and tumor development are frequently overlapping. Although the link between reduced insulin-like growth factor signaling and suppressed tumor growth and development is well established, it remains unclear whether extended life span results from direct suppression of insulin-like growth factor signaling or this effect is caused by indirect mechanisms such as improved insulin sensitivity.

  20. Antisense therapeutics for tumor treatment: the TGF-beta2 inhibitor AP 12009 in clinical development against malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Schlingensiepen, K H; Fischer-Blass, B; Schmaus, S; Ludwig, S

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-beta2) is a hallmark of various malignant tumors including pancreatic carcinoma, malignant glioma, metastasizing melanoma, and metastatic colorectal carcinoma. This is due to the pivotal role of TGF-beta2 as it regulates key mechanisms of tumor development, namely immunosuppression, metastasis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. The antisense technology is an innovative technique offering a targeted approach for the treatment of different highly aggressive tumors and other diseases. Antisense oligonucleotides are being developed to inhibit the production of disease-causing proteins at the molecular level. The immunotherapeutic approach with the phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide AP 12009 for the treatment of malignant tumors is based on the specific inhibition of TGF-beta2. After providing preclinical proof of concept, the safety and efficacy of AP 12009 were assessed in clinical phase I/II open-label dose-escalation studies in recurrent or refractory high-grade glioma patients. Median survival time after recurrence exceeded the current literature data for chemotherapy. Currently, phase I/II study in advanced pancreatic carcinoma, metastatic melanoma, and metastatic colorectal carcinoma and a phase IIb study in recurrent or refractory high-grade glioma are ongoing. The preclinical as well as the clinical results implicate targeted TGF-beta2 suppression as a promising therapeutic approach for malignant tumor therapy.

  1. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    SciTech Connect

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  2. How a Decade of Conflict Affected Junior Logistics Officer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-22

    OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 22-03-2011 2. REPORT TYPE Strategy Research...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT HOW A DECADE OF CONFLICT AFFECTED JUNIOR...FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 March 2011 WORD COUNT: 5,662 PAGES: 28 KEY TERMS: Modularity, ARFORGEN, Leader Development

  3. The Immunogenicity of Colorectal Cancer in Relation to Tumor Development and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Natasja L.; Swets, Marloes; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Hokland, Marianne; Kuppen, Peter J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Although most cancer types have been viewed as immunologically silent until recently, it has become increasingly clear that the immune system plays key roles in the course of tumor development. Remarkable progress towards understanding cancer immunogenicity and tumor-immune system interactions has revealed important implications for the design of novel immune-based therapies. Natural immune responses, but also therapeutic interventions, can modulate the tumor phenotype due to selective outgrowth of resistant subtypes. This is the result of heterogeneity of tumors, with genetic instability as a driving force, and obviously changes the immunogenicity of tumors. In this review, we discuss the immunogenicity of colorectal cancer (CRC) in relation to tumor development and treatment. As most tumors, CRC activates the immune system in various ways, and is also capable of escaping recognition and elimination by the immune system. Tumor-immune system interactions underlie the balance between immune control and immune escape, and may differ in primary tumors, in the circulation, and in liver metastases of CRC. Since CRC immunogenicity varies between tumors and individuals, novel immune-based therapeutic strategies should not only anticipate the molecular profile, but also the immunological profile of a specific tumor. PMID:27367680

  4. The Factors that Affect Science Teachers' Participation in Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Judi Ann

    Scientific literacy for our students and the possibilities for careers available in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) areas are important topics for economic growth as well as global competitiveness. The achievement of students in science learning is dependent upon the science teachers' effectiveness and experienced science teachers depend upon relevant professional development experiences to support their learning. In order to understand how to improve student learning in science, the learning of science teachers must also be understood. Previous research studies on teacher professional development have been conducted in other states, but Minnesota science teachers comprised a new and different population from those previously studied. The purpose of this two-phase mixed methods study was to identify the current types of professional development in which experienced, Minnesota secondary science teachers participated and the factors that affect their participation in professional development activities. The mixed-methods approach s utilized an initial online survey followed by qualitative interviews with five survey respondents. The results of the quantitative survey and the qualitative interviews indicated the quality of professional development experiences and the factors which affected the science teachers' participation in professional development activities. The supporting and inhibiting factors involved the availability of resources such as time and money, external relationships with school administrators, teacher colleagues, and family members, and personal intrinsic attributes such as desires to learn and help students. This study also describes implications for science teachers, school administrators, policymakers, and professional development providers. Recommendations for future research include the following areas: relationships between and among intrinsic and extrinsic factors, science-related professional development activities

  5. Nicotine alters bovine oocyte meiosis and affects subsequent embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Guang-Peng; White, Kenneth L; Rickords, Lee F; Sessions, Benjamin R; Aston, Kenneth I; Bunch, Thomas D

    2007-11-01

    The effects of nicotine on nuclear maturation and meiotic spindle dynamics of bovine oocytes and subsequent embryonic development were investigated. Maturation rates (85%-94%) derived from nicotine treatments at 0.01 to 1.0 mM were similar to the control (86%), but significantly decreased at 2.0 to 6.0 mM. Haploid complements of metaphase II oocytes in 0.01 to 1.0 mM nicotine (approximately 90%) were similar to the control, while lower (ranged from 63% to 76%, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) haploid oocytes were observed in the 2.0 to 6.0 mM nicotine groups. The majority of the PB1-free oocytes derived from 3.0 to 6.0 mM nicotine treatments were diploidy (2n = 60). Spindle microtubules changed from characteristically being asymmetrical in the controls to being equally distributed into two separate chromosome groups in the nicotine treatments. Nicotine disorganized the microfilament organization and inhibited the movement of anaphase or telophase chromosomes to the cortical area. The inhibited two chromosome groups became two spindles that either moved close in proximity or merged entirely together resulting in diploidy within the affected oocyte. Nicotine treatment significantly reduced the rate of cleavage and blastocyst development after parthenogenetic activation. Diploidy and cell number were drastically reduced in the resultant blastocysts. In conclusion, nicotine can alter the normal process of bovine oocyte meiosis and affects subsequent embryonic development.

  6. Training affects the development of postural adjustments in sitting infants.

    PubMed Central

    Hadders-Algra, M; Brogren, E; Forssberg, H

    1996-01-01

    1. The present study addressed the question of whether daily balance training can affect the development of postural adjustments in sitting infants. 2. Postural responses during sitting on a moveable platform were assessed in twenty healthy infants at 5-6, 7-8 and 9-10 months of age. Multiple surface EMGs and kinematics were recorded while the infants were exposed to slow and fast horizontal forward (Fw) and backward (Bw) displacements of the platform. After the first session the parents of nine infants trained their child's sitting balance daily. 3. At the youngest age, when none of the infants could sit independently, the muscle activation patterns were direction specific and showed a large variation. This variation decreased with increasing age, resulting in selection of the most complete responses. Training facilitated response selection both during Fw and Bw translations. This suggests a training effect on the first level of the central pattern generator (CPG) model of postural control. 4. Training also affected the development of response modulation during Fw translations. It accelerated the development of: (1) the ability to modulate EMG amplitude with respect to platform velocity and initial sitting position, (2) antagonist activity and (3) a distal onset of the response. These findings point to a training effect on the second level of the CPG model of postural adjustments. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:8735713

  7. Stress sensitivity and the development of affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Bale, Tracy L

    2006-11-01

    Depressive disorders are the most common form of mental illness in America, affecting females twice as often as males. The great variability of symptoms and responses to therapeutic treatment emphasize the complex underlying neurobiology of disease onset and progression. Evidence from human and animal studies reveals a vital link between individual stress sensitivity and the predisposition toward mood disorders. While the stress response is essential for maintenance of homeostasis and survival, chronic stress and maladaptive responses to stress insults can lead to depression or other affective disorders. A key factor in the mediation of stress responsivity is the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Studies in animal models of heightened stress sensitivity have illustrated the involvement of CRF downstream neurotransmitter targets, including serotonin and norepinephrine, in the profound neurocircuitry failure that may underlie maladaptive coping strategies. Stress sensitivity may also be a risk factor in affective disorder development susceptibility. As females show an increased stress response and recovery time compared to males, they may be at an increased vulnerability for disease. Therefore, examination of sex differences in CRF and downstream targets may aid in the elucidation of the underlying causes of the increased disease presentation in females. While we continue to make progress in our understanding of mood disorder etiology, we still have miles to go before we sleep. As an encouraging number of new animal models of altered stress sensitivity and negative stress coping strategies have been developed, the future looks extremely promising for the possibility of a new generation of drug targets to be developed.

  8. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described.

  9. Beneficial microbes affect endogenous mechanisms controlling root development

    PubMed Central

    Verbon, Eline H.; Liberman, Louisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have incredible developmental plasticity, enabling them to respond to a wide range of environmental conditions. Among these conditions is the presence of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the soil. Recent studies show that PGPR affect root growth and development within Arabidopsis thaliana root. These effects lead to dramatic changes in root system architecture, that significantly impact aboveground plant growth. Thus, PGPR may promote shoot growth via their effect on root developmental programs. This review focuses on contextualizing root developmental changes elicited by PGPR in light of our understanding of plant-microbe interactions and root developmental biology. PMID:26875056

  10. The development of Wilms tumor: from WT1 and microRNA to animal models.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; Yourek, Gregory; Shi, Xiaolei; Yang, Yili

    2014-08-01

    Wilms tumor recapitulates the development of the kidney and represents a unique opportunity to understand the relationship between normal and tumor development. This has been illustrated by the findings that mutations of Wnt/β-catenin pathway-related WT1, β-catenin, and WTX together account for about one-third of Wilms tumor cases. While intense efforts are being made to explore the genetic basis of the other two-thirds of tumor cases, it is worth noting that, epigenetic changes, particularly the loss of imprinting of the DNA region encoding the major fetal growth factor IGF2, which results in its biallelic over-expression, are closely associated with the development of many Wilms tumors. Recent investigations also revealed that mutations of Drosha and Dicer, the RNases required for miRNA generation, and Dis3L2, the 3'-5' exonuclease that normally degrades miRNAs and mRNAs, could cause predisposition to Wilms tumors, demonstrating that miRNA can play a pivotal role in Wilms tumor development. Interestingly, Lin28, a direct target of miRNA let-7 and potent regulator of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, is significantly elevated in some Wilms tumors, and enforced expression of Lin28 during kidney development could induce Wilms tumor. With the success in establishing mice nephroblastoma models through over-expressing IGF2 and deleting WT1, and advances in understanding the ENU-induced rat model, we are now able to explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms induced by these genetic, epigenetic, and miRNA alterations in animal models to understand the development of Wilms tumor. These animal models may also serve as valuable systems to assess new treatment targets and strategies for Wilms tumor.

  11. Rearing environment affects development of the immune system in neonates.

    PubMed

    Inman, C F; Haverson, K; Konstantinov, S R; Jones, P H; Harris, C; Smidt, H; Miller, B; Bailey, M; Stokes, C

    2010-06-01

    Early-life exposure to appropriate microbial flora drives expansion and development of an efficient immune system. Aberrant development results in increased likelihood of allergic disease or increased susceptibility to infection. Thus, factors affecting microbial colonization may also affect the direction of immune responses in later life. There is a need for a manipulable animal model of environmental influences on the development of microbiota and the immune system during early life. We assessed the effects of rearing under low- (farm, sow) and high-hygiene (isolator, milk formula) conditions on intestinal microbiota and immune development in neonatal piglets, because they can be removed from the mother in the first 24 h for rearing under controlled conditions and, due to placental structure, neither antibody nor antigen is transferred in utero. Microbiota in both groups was similar between 2 and 5 days. However, by 12-28 days, piglets reared on the mother had more diverse flora than siblings reared in isolators. Dendritic cells accumulated in the intestinal mucosa in both groups, but more rapidly in isolator piglets. Importantly, the minority of 2-5-day-old farm piglets whose microbiota resembled that of an older (12-28-day-old) pig also accumulated dendritic cells earlier than the other farm-reared piglets. Consistent with dendritic cell control of T cell function, the effects on T cells occurred at later time-points, and mucosal T cells from high-hygiene, isolator pigs made less interleukin (IL)-4 while systemic T cells made more IL-2. Neonatal piglets may be a valuable model for studies of the effects of interaction between microbiota and immune development on allergy.

  12. Bone development in black ducks as affected by dietary toxaphene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehrle, P.M.; Finley, M.T.; Ludke, J.L.; Mayer, F.L.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Black ducks, Anas rubripes, were exposed to dietary toxaphene concentrations of 0, 10, or 50 μg/g of food for 90 days prior to laying and through the reproductive season. Toxaphene did not affect reproduction or survival, but reduced growth and impaired backbone development in ducklings. Collagen, the organic matrix of bone, was decreased significantly in cervical vertebrae of ducklings fed 50 μg/g, and calcium conentrations increased in vertebrae of ducklings fed 10 or 50 μg/g. The effects of toxaphene were observed only in female ducklings. In contrast to effects on vertebrae, toxaphene exposure did not alter tibia development. Toxaphene residues in carcasses of these ducklings averaged slightly less than the dietary levels.

  13. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  14. CD34 EXPRESSION BY HAIR FOLLICLE STEM CELLS IS REQUIRED FOR SKIN TUMOR DEVELOPMENT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used knockout mice to show that a cell surface protein called CD34 is required for skin tumor formation in mice. Wild type mice treated with 7-12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and a tumor promoter developed papillomas. When we treated CD34 knockout (KO) mice the same way, n...

  15. The Development and Evaluation of a Correspondence Training Program for Tumor Registrars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, C. Dennis; Ryan, Robert F.

    A program designed to teach the medical vocabulary required of tumor registrars was developed and administered to 33 persons, 31 of whom were employed at 25 Louisiana hospitals. The training program was administered as a correspondence course covering such topics as the purposes of a tumor registry and how the registry is established; how to code…

  16. Development, differentiation, and vascular components of subcutaneous and intrahepatic Hepa129 tumors in a mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Gutierrez, Paula M; Baratta, Janie L; Thordarson, Kristoffer; Braslow, Joshua; Haynes, Sherry M; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Tumor models in mice offer opportunities for understanding tumor formation and development of therapeutic treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, subcutaneous or intra-hepatic Hepa129 tumors were established in C3H mice. Tumor growth was determined by daily measurements of subcutaneous tumors and post-mortem studies of subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors. Administration of Edu was used to determine cell generation dates of tumor cells. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies directed at CD31 or CD34, and intravenous injection of labeled tomato lectin revealed tumor vasculature. Tissue sections also were processed for immunohistochemistry using a panel of antibodies to proteoglycans. Comparison of Edu labeled cells with immunoreactivity allowed determination of development and differentiation of tumor cells after cell generation. Subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors displayed similar growth over 3 weeks. Immunohistochemistry showed strong labeling for glypican-3, 9BA12, and chondroitin sulfate of tumors in both loci, while normal liver was negative. Tumor regions containing Edu labeled cells did not show significant immunohistochemical labeling for the tumor markers until 2-3 days after Edu treatment; overlap of Edu labeled cells and immunohistochemically labeled tumor regions appeared to reach a maximum at 5 days after Edu treatment. Ectopic subcutaneous tumors displayed vascular ingrowth as the tumor cells expressed immunocytochemical markers; subcutaneous tumors displayed significantly more vascular elements than did intrahepatic tumors.

  17. Measurement of changes in blood oxygenation using Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) allows assessment of tumor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with the spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We aim to demonstrate that MSOT can be used to monitor the development of tumor vasculature. To establish the relationship between MSOT derived imaging biomarkers and biological changes during tumor development, we performed MSOT on nude mice (n=10) bearing subcutaneous xenograft U87 glioblastoma tumors using a small animal optoacoustic tomography system. The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified between 21% and 100%. The measurements from early (week 4) and late (week 7) stages of tumor development were compared. To further explore the functionality of the blood vessels, we examined the evolution of changes in the abundance of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin in the tumors in response to a gas challenge. We found that the kinetics of the change in oxygen saturation (SO2) were significantly different between small tumors and the healthy blood vessels in nearby normal tissue (p=0.0054). Furthermore, we showed that there was a significant difference in the kinetics of the gas challenge between small and large tumors (p=0.0015). We also found that the tumor SO2 was significantly correlated (p=0.0057) with the tumor necrotic fraction as assessed by H&E staining in histology. In the future, this approach may be of use in the clinic as a method for tumor staging and assessment of treatment response.

  18. Common germline variants within the CDKN2A/2B region affect risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Pastore, Manuela; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Milanetto, Anna Caterina; Landoni, Luca; Maiello, Evaristo; Lawlor, Rita T.; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Funel, Niccola; Gazouli, Maria; De Bonis, Antonio; Klüter, Harald; Rinzivillo, Maria; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Hackert, Thilo; Landi, Stefano; Bugert, Peter; Bambi, Franco; Archibugi, Livia; Scarpa, Aldo; Katzke, Verena; Dervenis, Christos; Liço, Valbona; Furlanello, Sara; Strobel, Oliver; Tavano, Francesca; Basso, Daniela; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pasquali, Claudio; Gentiluomo, Manuel; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are heterogeneous neoplasms which represent only 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms by incidence, but 10% by prevalence. Genetic risk factors could have an important role in the disease aetiology, however only a small number of case control studies have been performed yet. To further our knowledge, we genotyped 13 SNPs belonging to the pleiotropic CDKN2A/B gene region in 320 PNET cases and 4436 controls, the largest study on the disease so far. We observed a statistically significant association between the homozygotes for the minor allele of the rs2518719 SNP and an increased risk of developing PNET (ORhom = 2.08, 95% CI 1.05–4.11, p = 0.035). This SNP is in linkage disequilibrium with another polymorphic variant associated with increased risk of several cancer types. In silico analysis suggested that the SNP could alter the sequence recognized by the Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor (NRSF), whose deregulation has been associated with the development of several tumors. The mechanistic link between the allele and the disease has not been completely clarified yet but the epidemiologic evidences that link the DNA region to increased cancer risk are convincing. In conclusion, our results suggest rs2518719 as a pleiotropic CDKN2A variant associated with the risk of developing PNETs. PMID:28008994

  19. Akt signaling leads to stem cell activation and promotes tumor development in epidermis.

    PubMed

    Segrelles, Carmen; García-Escudero, Ramón; Garín, Maria I; Aranda, Juan F; Hernández, Pilar; Ariza, José M; Santos, Mirentxu; Paramio, Jesús M; Lorz, Corina

    2014-07-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HF-SCs) alternate between periods of quiescence and proliferation, to finally differentiate into all the cell types that constitute the hair follicle. Also, they have been recently identified as cells of origin in skin cancer. HF-SCs localize in a precise region of the hair follicle, the bulge, and molecular markers for this population have been established. Thus, HF-SCs are good model to study the potential role of oncogenic activations on SC physiology. Expression of a permanently active form of Akt (myrAkt) in basal cells leads to Akt hyperactivation specifically in the CD34(+)Itga6(H) population. This activation causes bulge stem cells to exit from quiescence increasing their response to proliferative stimuli and affecting some functions such as cell migration. HF-SC identity upon Akt activation is preserved; in this sense, increased proliferation does not result in stem cell exhaustion with age suggesting that Akt activation does not affect self-renewal an important aspect for normal tissue maintenance and cancer development. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of HF-SC isolated from myrAkt and wild-type epidermis underscores changes in metabolic pathways characteristic of cancer cells. These differences manifest during a two-step carcinogenesis protocol in which Akt activation in HF-SCs results in increased tumor development and malignant transformation.

  20. Loss of prolyl hydroxylase-2 in myeloid cells and T-lymphocytes impairs tumor development.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Kalucka, Joanna; Singh, Rashim Pal; Franke, Kristin; Muschter, Antje; Langer, Anika; Jakob, Christiane; Gassmann, Max; Baretton, Gustavo B; Wielockx, Ben

    2014-02-15

    The tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role during cancer development and progression. The balance between suppressive and cytotoxic responses of the tumor immune microenvironment has been shown to have a direct effect on the final outcome in various human and experimental tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that the oxygen sensor HIF-prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) plays a detrimental role in tumor cells, stimulating systemic growth and metastasis in mice. In our current study, we show that the conditional ablation of PHD2 in the hematopoietic system also leads to reduced tumor volume, intriguingly generated by an imbalance between enhanced cell death and improved proliferation of tumor cells. This effect seems to rely on the overall downregulation of protumoral as well as antitumoral cytokines. Using different genetic approaches, we were able to confine this complex phenotype to the crosstalk of PHD2-deficient myeloid cells and T-lymphocytes. Taken together, our findings reveal a multifaceted role for PHD2 in several hematopoietic lineages during tumor development and might have important implications for the development of tumor therapies in the future.

  1. Ionizing radiation from Chernobyl affects development of wild carrot plants

    PubMed Central

    Boratyński, Zbyszek; Arias, Javi Miranda; Garcia, Cristina; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Pajares, Antonio Jesús Muñoz; Piwczyński, Marcin; Tukalenko, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Radioactivity released from disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima is a global hazard and a threat to exposed biota. To minimize the deleterious effects of stressors organisms adopt various strategies. Plants, for example, may delay germination or stay dormant during stressful periods. However, an intense stress may halt germination or heavily affect various developmental stages and select for life history changes. Here, we test for the consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation on plant development. We conducted a common garden experiment in an uncontaminated greenhouse using 660 seeds originating from 33 wild carrots (Daucus carota) collected near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These maternal plants had been exposed to radiation levels that varied by three orders of magnitude. We found strong negative effects of elevated radiation on the timing and rates of seed germination. In addition, later stages of development and the timing of emergence of consecutive leaves were delayed by exposure to radiation. We hypothesize that low quality of resources stored in seeds, damaged DNA, or both, delayed development and halted germination of seeds from plants exposed to elevated levels of ionizing radiation. We propose that high levels of spatial heterogeneity in background radiation may hamper adaptive life history responses. PMID:27982121

  2. Ionizing radiation from Chernobyl affects development of wild carrot plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boratyński, Zbyszek; Arias, Javi Miranda; Garcia, Cristina; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Pajares, Antonio Jesús Muñoz; Piwczyński, Marcin; Tukalenko, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Radioactivity released from disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima is a global hazard and a threat to exposed biota. To minimize the deleterious effects of stressors organisms adopt various strategies. Plants, for example, may delay germination or stay dormant during stressful periods. However, an intense stress may halt germination or heavily affect various developmental stages and select for life history changes. Here, we test for the consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation on plant development. We conducted a common garden experiment in an uncontaminated greenhouse using 660 seeds originating from 33 wild carrots (Daucus carota) collected near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These maternal plants had been exposed to radiation levels that varied by three orders of magnitude. We found strong negative effects of elevated radiation on the timing and rates of seed germination. In addition, later stages of development and the timing of emergence of consecutive leaves were delayed by exposure to radiation. We hypothesize that low quality of resources stored in seeds, damaged DNA, or both, delayed development and halted germination of seeds from plants exposed to elevated levels of ionizing radiation. We propose that high levels of spatial heterogeneity in background radiation may hamper adaptive life history responses.

  3. Tumor development following internal exposures to radionuclides during the perinatal period

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.

    1988-07-01

    Exposure to radiation from internally deposited radionuclides during the prenatal and/or neonatal periods involves a distinct oncogenic potential. The fundamental mechanisms for perinatal radionuclide carcinogenesis seem to be generally similar to those that pertain to external radiation exposures and other carcinogenic agents, but unique interactions may be superimposed. Specific dose-effect relationships differ among radionuclides; many studies find dose-related increases in the incidence of tumors or decreases in age at tumor appearance following prenatal or neonatal radiation exposures. Tumor incidences may be decreased, especially at high dose levels; these are usually attributable to cell death, inhibited development of target tissues, or to endocrine malfunction. Age-related differences in predominant tumor types and/or sites of tumor development are often detected, and are explainable by the existence of nuclide-specific target organs or tissues, dosimetric factors, and developmental considerations. 34 refs.

  4. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Vikis, Haris G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting. PMID:24821130

  5. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M. )

    1993-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the two common oxidant air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm)* of ozone or 15 ppm of nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. Ozone delayed the appearance of tracheal tumors and reduced the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. A suspected neuroendocrine differentiation of those lung tumors could not be established by immunocytochemistry due to overfixation of tissues. On the other hand, ozone seemed to mitigate development of hepatotoxic lesions mediated by diethylnitrosamine. In animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and exposed to nitrogen dioxide, fewer tracheal tumors and no lung tumors were found. Only a few lung tumors were produced in animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in an atmosphere of 65% oxygen. The previously observed neuroendocrine nature of tumors induced by simultaneous exposure to diethylnitrosamine and hyperoxia could not be established because the long fixation of tissues precluded immunocytochemical stains. Animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in filtered air while being housed in wire-mesh cages developed fewer lung tumors than animals given the same treatment and kept on conventional bedding in shoebox cages. Although all inhalants tested are known to produce substantial cell proliferation in the respiratory tract, it was not possible to document whether this would enhance lung tumor development. The role of the two common air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  6. Development of Lymantria dispar affected by manganese in food.

    PubMed

    Kula, Emanuel; Martinek, Petr; Chromcová, Lucie; Hedbávný, Josef

    2014-10-01

    We studied the response of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)) to the content of manganese in food in the laboratory breeding of caterpillars. The food of the caterpillars {Betula pendula Roth (Fagales: Betulaceae) leaves} was contaminated by dipping in the solution of MnCl2 · 4H2O with manganese concentrations of 0, 0.5, 5 and 10 mg ml(-1), by which differentiated manganese contents (307; 632; 4,087 and 8,124 mg kg(-1)) were reached. Parameters recorded during the rearing were as follows: effect of manganese on food consumption, mortality and length of the development of caterpillars, pupation and hatching of imagoes. At the same time, manganese concentrations were determined in the offered and unconsumed food, excrements, and exuviae of the caterpillars, pupal cases and imagoes by using the AAS method. As compared with the control, high manganese contents in the food of gypsy moth caterpillars affected the process of development particularly by increased mortality of the first instar caterpillars (8 % mortality for caterpillars with no Mn contamination (T0) and 62 % mortality for subjects with the highest contamination by manganese (T3)), by prolonged development of the first-third instar (18.7 days (T0) and 27.8 days (T3)) and by increased food consumption of the first-third instar {0.185 g of leaf dry matter (T0) and 0.483 g of leaf dry matter (T3)}. The main defence strategy of the caterpillars to prevent contamination by the increased manganese content in food is the translocation of manganese into frass and exuviae castoff in the process of ecdysis. In the process of development, the content of manganese was reduced by excretion in imagoes to 0.5 % of the intake level even at its maximum inputs in food.

  7. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of the development of individual colon cancer tumors in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mook, Olaf R F; Jonker, Ard; Strang, Aart C; Veltien, Andor; Gambarota, Giulio; Frederiks, Wilma M; Heerschap, Arend; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2008-04-01

    Monitoring tumor development is essential for the understanding of mechanisms involved in tumor progression and to determine efficacy of therapy. One of the evolving approaches is longitudinal noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumors in experimental models. We applied high-resolution MRI at 7 Tesla to study the development of colon cancer tumors in rat liver. MRI acquisition was triggered to the respiratory cycle to minimize motion artifacts. A special radio frequency (RF) coil was designed to acquire detailed T1-weighted and T2-weighted images of the liver. T2-weighted images identified hyperintense lesions representing tumors with a minimum diameter of 2 mm, enabling the determination of growth rates and morphological aspects of individual tumors. It is concluded that high-resolution MRI using a dedicated RF coil and triggering to the respiratory cycle is an excellent tool for quantitative and morphological analysis of individual diffusely distributed tumors throughout the liver. However, at present, MRI requires expensive equipment and expertise and is a time-consuming methodology. Therefore, it should preferably be used for dedicated applications rather than for high-throughput assessment of total tumor load in animals.

  8. Development of a Biomimetic Chondroitin Sulfate-modified Hydrogel to Enhance the Metastasis of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Shujun; Sun, Dongsheng; Liu, Yongdong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hao; Lv, Yan; Ren, Ying; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guangwei; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis with resistance to anticancer therapies is the main cause of death in cancer patients. It is necessary to develop reliable tumor metastasis models that can closely recapitulate the pathophysiological features of the native tumor tissue. In this study, chondroitin sulfate (CS)-modified alginate hydrogel beads (ALG-CS) are developed to mimic the in vivo tumor microenvironment with an abnormally increased expression of CS for the promotion of tumor cell metastasis. The modification mechanism of CS on alginate hydrogel is due to the cross-linking between CS and alginate molecules via coordination of calcium ions, which enables ALG-CS to possess significantly different physical characteristics than the traditional alginate beads (ALG). And quantum chemistry calculations show that in addition to the traditional egg-box structure, novel asymmetric egg-box-like structures based on the interaction between these two kinds of polymers are also formed within ALG-CS. Moreover, tumor cell metastasis is significantly enhanced in ALG-CS compared with that in ALG, as confirmed by the increased expression of MMP genes and proteins and greater in vitro invasion ability. Therefore, ALG-CS could be a convenient and effective 3D biomimetic scaffold that would be used to construct standardized tumor metastasis models for tumor research and anticancer drug screening. PMID:27432752

  9. Embryonic genotype and inbreeding affect preimplantation development in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, G; Colleoni, S; Duchi, R; Galli, A; Houghton, F D; Galli, C

    2011-05-01

    Infertility in cattle herds is a growing problem with multifactorial causes. Embryonic genotype and level of inbreeding are among the many factors that can play a role on reproductive efficiency. To investigate this issue, we produced purebred and crossbred bovine embryos by in vitro techniques from Holstein oocytes and Holstein or Brown Swiss semen and analyzed several cellular and molecular features. In the first experiment, purebred and crossbred embryos, obtained from abattoir oocytes, were analyzed for cleavage, development to morula/blastocyst stages, amino acid metabolism and gene expression of developmentally important genes. The results indicated significant differences in the percentage of compacted morulae, in the expression of three genes at the blastocyst stage (MNSOD, GP130 and FGF4) and in the utilization of serine, asparagine, methionine and tryptophan in day 6 embryos. In the second experiment, bovine oocytes were collected by ovum pick up from ten Holstein donors and fertilized with the semen of the respective Holstein sires or with Brown Swiss semen. The derived embryos were grown in vitro up to day 7, and were then transferred to synchronized recipients and recovered on day 12. We found that purebred/inbred embryos had lower blastocyst rate on days 7-8, were smaller on day 12 and had lower expression of the trophoblast gene PLAC8. Overall, these results indicate reduced and delayed development of purebred embryos compared with crossbred embryos. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that embryo genotype and high inbreeding can affect amino acid metabolism, gene expression, preimplantation development and therefore fertility in cattle.

  10. Development of array piezoelectric fingers towards in vivo breast tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Chung, Youngsoo; Brooks, Ari D.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the development of a handheld 4 × 1 piezoelectric finger (PEF) array breast tumor detector system towards in vivo patient testing, particularly, on how the duration of the DC applied voltage, the depression depth of the handheld unit, and breast density affect the PEF detection sensitivity on 40 patients. The tests were blinded and carried out in four phases: with DC voltage durations 5, 3, 2, to 0.8 s corresponding to scanning a quadrant, a half, a whole breast, and both breasts within 30 min, respectively. The results showed that PEF detection sensitivity was unaffected by shortening the applied voltage duration from 5 to 0.8 s nor was it affected by increasing the depression depth from 2 to 6 mm. Over the 40 patients, PEF detected 46 of the 48 lesions (46/48)—with the smallest lesion detected being 5 mm in size. Of 28 patients (some have more than one lesion) with mammography records, PEF detected 31/33 of all lesions (94%) and 14/15 of malignant lesions (93%), while mammography detected 30/33 of all lesions (91%) and 12/15 of malignant lesions (80%), indicating that PEF could detect malignant lesions not detectable by mammography without significantly increasing false positives. PEF's detection sensitivity is also shown to be independent of breast density, suggesting that PEF could be a potential tool for detecting breast cancer in young women and women with dense breasts.

  11. Microwave ablation of renal tumors: state of the art and development trends.

    PubMed

    Floridi, Chiara; De Bernardi, Irene; Fontana, Federico; Muollo, Alessandra; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Agostini, Andrea; Fonio, Paolo; Squillaci, Ettore; Brunese, Luca; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    In the last decades an increased incidence of new renal tumor cases has been for clinically localized, small tumors <2.0 cm. This trend for small, low-stage tumors is the reflection of earlier diagnosis primarily as a result of the widespread and increasing use of non-invasive abdominal imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Renal tumors are often diagnosed in elderly patients, with medical comorbidities whom the risk of surgical complications may pose a greater risk of death than that due to the tumor itself. In these patients, unsuitable for surgical approach, thermal ablation represents a valid alternative to traditional surgery. Thermal ablation is a less invasive, less morbid treatment option thanks to reduced blood loss, lower incidence of complications during the procedure and a less long convalescence. At present, the most widely used thermal ablative techniques are cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation (MWA). MWA offers many benefits of other ablation techniques and offers several other advantages: higher intratumoral temperatures, larger tumor ablation volumes, faster ablation times, the ability to use multiple applicators simultaneously, optimal heating of cystic masses and tumors close to the vessels and less procedural pain. This review aims to provide the reader with an overview about the state of the art of microwave ablation for renal tumors and to cast a glance on the new development trends of this technique.

  12. Carnitines slow down tumor development of colon cancer in the DMH-chemical carcinogenesis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Mori, Federica; Di Napoli, Arianna; Mancini, Rita; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Virmani, Ashraf; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-07-01

    Dietary agents are receiving much attention for the chemoprevention of cancer. While curcumin is known to influence several pathways and affect tumor growth in vivo, carnitin and its congeners play a variety of important metabolic functions: are involved in the oxydation of long-chain fatty acids, regulate acyl-CoA levels and influence protein activity and stability by modifying the extent of protein acetylation. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of carnitines in the prevention of cancer development using the 1,2,-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis model. We also assessed whether their combination was able to give rise to increased protection from cancer development. Mice treated with DMH were dosed orally with curcumin and/or carnitine and acylcarnitines for 20 weeks. At the end of the treatment colon samples were collected, and scored for multiple ACF and adenomas. We observed that carnitine and acyl-carnitines had same, if not higher, efficacy than curcumin alone in inhibiting the formation of neoplastic lesions induced by DMH treatment. Interestingly, the combination of curcumin and acetyl-L-carnitine was able to fully inhibit the development of advanced adenoma lesions. Our data unveil the antitumor effects of carnitines and warrant additional studies to further support the adoption of carnitines as cancer chemopreventative agents.

  13. Novel roles of the unfolded protein response in the control of tumor development and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Barroso, Kim; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Samali, Afshin; Chevet, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The hallmarks of cancer currently define the molecular mechanisms responsible for conferring specific tumor phenotypes. Recently, these characteristics were also connected to the status of the secretory pathway, thereby linking the functionality of this cellular machinery to the acquisition of cancer cell features. The secretory pathway ensures the biogenesis of proteins that are membrane-bound or secreted into the extracellular milieu and can control its own homeostasis through an adaptive signaling pathway named the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the present review, we discuss the specific features of the UPR in various tumor types and the impact of the selective activation of this pathway on cell transformation, tumor development and aggressiveness.

  14. Development of a novel cyclic RGD peptide for multiple targeting approaches of liposomes to tumor region.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mohamadreza; Mansourian, Mercedeh; Koning, Gerben A; Badiee, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-12-28

    Liposomes containing cytotoxic agents and targeted with Arg-Gly-Asp based peptides have frequently been used against αvβ3 integrin on tumor neovasculature. However, like many other ligand modified liposomes these preparations suffered from enhanced uptake by the reticulo endothelial system (RES) and off-targeted interaction with integrin receptors vastly expressed in normal organs causing poor biodistribution and toxic effects. Here we mainly focus on development of a RGD-modified liposomal delivery system to enhance both targeting selectivity and tumor uptake. First, sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSLD) prepared and decorated with cRGDfK and RGDyC peptides differ in their physical properties. Stability assessments as well as in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that increasing the peptide hydrophobicity promotes the therapeutic efficacy of RGD-SSLD in a C-26 tumor model due to decreased recognition by RES and opsonization and limited off-targeted interactions. Then a novel N-methylated RGD peptide was designed and its capability in targeting integrin presenting cells was comprehensively assessed both in vitro and in vivo. RGDf[N-methyl]C promotes the liposome internalization by HUVEC via integrin mediated endocytosis. Intravital microscopy in window chamber bearing mice illustrated the capability of RGDf[N-methyl]C-liposomes in targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells in murine B16F0 and human BLM tumor models. Quantitative biodistribution in mice bearing B16F0 tumor revealed its high affinity to tumor with no considerable affinity to normal organs. Treatment by high dose of RGDf[N-methyl]C-SSLD was found more effective than non-targeted SSLD and no toxic side effect was observed. In conclusion, the RGDf[N-methyl]C-liposome was found promising in targeting tumor vasculature as well as other cells inside the tumor.

  15. Building characteristics affect the risk of allergy development.

    PubMed

    Hesselmar, Bill; Aberg, Birgitta; Eriksson, Bo; Björkstén, Bengt; Aberg, Nils

    2005-03-01

    Damp dwellings increase the risk for house dust mite (HDM) infestation in temperate climate zones and may be associated with an increased risk for allergic disease. The aim of the study was to assess possible relationships between allergen levels in house dust, characteristics of residence buildings and allergic diseases in children. A subsample of 12-yr-old children, having the same address in 1991 and 1996, was selected from a population-based sample of children from the Göteborg area. Health inspectors examined the residences of all the 109 children and several different building characteristics including humidity and indoor temperature were collected. Dust samples for analysis of HDM allergens were collected from the children's beds, and for analysis of cat and dog allergens from the living room. Current health status was assessed by questionnaires, interviews and skin prick tests (SPT). Dog or cat allergens were found in all houses, even in houses without such animals. HDM allergens were found in 60% of the houses, but only six of them had levels exceeding 2 microg/g dust. There was a strong association between HDM-infestation and wheeze, but not with specific sensitization to HDM. The type of building (houses when compared with flats), the ventilation system and the presence of a basement had all major implications on respiratory symptoms, atopy and HDM infestation. We can conclude that dog or cat allergens were found in all houses, and a strong association between HDM infestation and indoor environment. Building construction affected both respiratory morbidity and sensitisation independently, suggesting not only worsening of symptoms but also a causative relationship with disease development.

  16. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J.; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  17. Decreasing CNPY2 Expression Diminishes Colorectal Tumor Growth and Development through Activation of p53 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Gong, Hui; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jun; He, Sheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guo, Rui; Xie, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization drives tumor development, and angiogenic factors are important neovascularization initiators. We recently identified the secreted angiogenic factor CNPY2, but its involvement in cancer has not been explored. Herein, we investigate CNPY2's role in human colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Tumor samples were obtained from CRC patients undergoing surgery. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) expression was analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Stable lines of human HCT116 cells expressing CNPY2 shRNA or control shRNA were established. To determine CNPY2's effects on tumor xenografts in vivo, human CNPY2 shRNA HCT116 cells and controls were injected into nude mice, separately. Cellular apoptosis, growth, and angiogenesis in the xenografts were evaluated. CNPY2 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. CNPY2 knockdown in HCT116 cells inhibited growth and migration and promoted apoptosis. In xenografts, CNPY2 knockdown prevented tumor growth and angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of CNPY2 in the HCT116 CRC cell line reversibly increased p53 activity. The p53 activation increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 2, thereby inhibiting tumor cell growth, inducing cell apoptosis, and reducing angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. CNPY2 may play a critical role in CRC development by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis through negative regulation of the p53 pathway. Therefore, CNPY2 may represent a novel CRC therapeutic target and prognostic indicator.

  18. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  19. Student Cognitive and Affective Development in the Context of Classroom-Level Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad Fathy; Gilmore, Deanna; Banks-Joseph, Susan Rae

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the impact of teacher curriculum approaches (curriculum-transmitter/curriculum-developer/curriculum-maker) on student cognitive change (reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities) and their affective change (motivation and interests). This study's conceptual framework was grounded in teacher curriculum…

  20. Akkermansia muciniphila and Helicobacter typhlonius modulate intestinal tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, Celia; Belzer, Clara; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Günthel, Marie; Salvatori, Daniela; den Dunnen, Johan T; Kuijper, Ed J; Devilee, Peter; de Vos, Willem M; van Ommen, GertJan B; Robanus-Maandag, Els C

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal tumor growth is thought to be promoted by gastrointestinal bacteria and their inflammatory products. We observed that intestine-specific conditional Apc mutant mice (FabplCre;Apc (15lox/+)) developed many more colorectal tumors under conventional than under pathogen-low housing conditions. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing plus quantitative PCR analysis of feces DNA revealed the presence of two bacterial species in conventional mice, absent from pathogen-low mice. One, Helicobacter typhlonius, has not been associated with cancer in man, nor in immune-competent mice. The other species, mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, is abundantly present in healthy humans, but reduced in patients with inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases and in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. Eradication of H.typhlonius in young conventional mice by antibiotics decreased the number of intestinal tumors. Additional presence of A.muciniphila prior to the antibiotic treatment reduced the tumor number even further. Colonization of pathogen-low FabplCre;Apc (15lox/+) mice with H.typhlonius or A.muciniphila increased the number of intestinal tumors, the thickness of the intestinal mucus layer and A.muciniphila colonization without H.typhlonius increased the density of mucin-producing goblet cells. However, dual colonization with H.typhlonius and A.muciniphila significantly reduced the number of intestinal tumors, the mucus layer thickness and goblet cell density to that of control mice. By global microbiota composition analysis, we found a positive association of A.muciniphila, and of H.typhlonius, and a negative association of unclassified Clostridiales with increased tumor burden. We conclude that A.muciniphila and H.typhlonius can modulate gut microbiota composition and intestinal tumor development in mice.

  1. Affect Regulation Training (ART) for Alcohol Use Disorders: Development of a Novel Intervention for Negative Affect Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Stasiewicz, Paul R.; Bradizza, Clara M.; Schlauch, Robert C.; Coffey, Scott F.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Gudleski, Gregory; Bole, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Although negative affect is a common precipitant of alcohol relapse, there are few interventions for alcohol dependence that specifically target negative affect. In this Stage 1a/1b treatment development study, several affect regulation strategies (e.g., mindfulness, prolonged exposure, distress tolerance) were combined to create a new treatment supplement called Affect Regulation Training (ART), which could be added to enhance Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for alcohol dependence. A draft therapy manual was given to therapists and treatment experts before being administered to several patients who also provided input. After two rounds of manual development (Stage 1a), a pilot randomized clinical trial (N = 77) of alcohol-dependent outpatients who reported drinking often in negative affect situations was conducted (Stage 1b). Participants received 12-weekly, 90-minute sessions of either CBT for alcohol dependence plus ART (CBT + ART) or CBT plus a healthy lifestyles control condition (CBT + HLS). Baseline, end-of-treatment, and 3- and 6-month posttreatment interviews were conducted. For both treatment conditions, participant ratings of treatment satisfaction were high, with CBT + ART rated significantly higher. Drinking outcome results indicated greater reductions in alcohol use for CBT + ART when compared to CBT + HLS, with moderate effect sizes for percent days abstinent, drinks per day, drinks per drinking day, and percent heavy drinking days. Overall, findings support further research on affect regulation interventions for negative affect drinkers. PMID:23876455

  2. Toward the development of intrafraction tumor deformation tracking using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Yuanyuan; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy. Studies show tumor deformation of over 10 mm for both single tumor deformation and system deformation (due to differential motion between primary tumors and involved lymph nodes). Such deformation cannot be adapted to with current radiotherapy methods. The objective of this study was to develop and experimentally investigate the ability of a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to account for tumor deformation. Methods: To compensate for tumor deformation, the DMLC tracking strategy is to warp the planned beam aperture directly to conform to the new tumor shape based on real time tumor deformation input. Two deformable phantoms that correspond to a single tumor and a tumor system were developed. The planar deformations derived from the phantom images in beam's eye view were used to guide the aperture warping. An in-house deformable image registration software was developed to automatically trigger the registration once new target image was acquired and send the computed deformation to the DMLC tracking software. Because the registration speed is not fast enough to implement the experiment in real-time manner, the phantom deformation only proceeded to the next position until registration of the current deformation position was completed. The deformation tracking accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the ideal aperture. The individual contributions from the deformable registration algorithm and the finite leaf width to the tracking uncertainty were analyzed. Clinical proof-of-principle experiment of deformation tracking using previously acquired MR images of a lung cancer patient was implemented to represent the MRI-Linac environment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered with enabled deformation tracking was simulated and demonstrated. Results: The first

  3. Maternal Stress and Affect Influence Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Hawkins, Melissa; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Pressman, Eva K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated associations between maternal psychological and fetal neurobehavioral functioning with data provided at 24, 30, and 36 weeks gestation. Found that fetuses of women who were more affectively intense, appraised their lives as more stressful, and reported more pregnancy-specific hassles were more active across gestation. Fetuses of women…

  4. Child Studies through Fantasy: Cognitive-Affective Patterns in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Rosalind

    This book presents a study of cognitive-affective interdependence as shown in children's fantasy behavior. The systems of Piaget and Freud are the foundation of analysis. The study data consist of approximately one hundred verbatim recordings of the dramatic play of 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds (in groups or alone) collected by trained teachers in a…

  5. Factors affecting mammary tumor incidence in chlorotriazine-treated female rats: hormonal properties, dosage, and animal strain.

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, J C; Tennant, M K; Wetzel, L T; Breckenridge, C B; Stevens, J T

    1994-01-01

    Chlorotriazines are widely used in agriculture as broadleaf herbicides. The compounds specifically inhibit photosynthesis, and, as such, display little interaction with animal systems. However, a 24-month feeding study with atrazine (ATR) revealed a significant dose-related increase of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Because numerous studies indicated that ATR had a low mutagenic and oncogenic potential, it was decided to test a hypothesis that the herbicide possessed endocrine activity. Among tests for estrogenic action, oral dosing of ATR up to 300 mg/kg did not stimulate uterine weight of ovariectomized rats. However, ATR administration did reduce estrogen-stimulated uterine weight gain. Further evidence of inhibition came from measures of [3H]-thymidine incorporation into uterine DNA of ATR-treated immature rats. Again, no intrinsic estrogenic activity was observed up to a 300-mg/kg dose. In vitro, ATR competed poorly against estradiol binding to cytosolic receptors, with an approximate IC50 of 10(-5) M. Atrazine administration to SD and Fischer-344 (F-344) rats for 12 months, up to 400 ppm in food, was correlated with significant alterations of estrous cycling activity; but there was a divergent strain response. SD rats showed an increased number of days in vaginal estrus, increased plasma estradiol, and decreased plasma progesterone by 9 to 12 months of treatment. F-344 rats did not demonstrate treatment-related affects. A study of ultrastructure in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of female SD rats that were fed diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), an ATR metabolite, suggested that age-associated glial pathology was enhanced by treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 8. PMID:7737039

  6. Effect of Dietary Intervention on Prostate Tumor Development in TRAMP Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    restricted mice had significant delay in the age of tumor detection and age at death compared to ad libitum and chronic restricted mice. Serum leptin ...assessing aspects of the IGF-I, adiponectin and leptin axes. The results of this study provide further evidence that the manner in which calories are...and the fact that serum levels of these, in particular leptin and adiponectin, are affected by calorie intake and body weight we have expanded our

  7. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  8. CAPS1 Negatively Regulates Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development through Alteration of Exocytosis-Associated Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruyi; Tang, Wenqing; Dong, Pingping; Weng, Shuqiang; Ma, Lijie; Chen, She; Liu, Taotao; Shen, Xizhong; Huang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Si; Dong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles (DCVs) in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The role of CAPS1 in cancer biology remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CAPS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We determined the levels of CAPS1 in eight hepatoma cell lines and 141 HCC specimens. We evaluated the prognostic value of CAPS1 expression and its association with clinical parameters. We investigated the biological consequences of CAPS1 overexpression in two hepatoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that loss of CAPS1 expression in HCC tissues was markedly correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes, such as high-grade tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage (p = 0.003) and absence of tumor encapsulation (p = 0.016), and was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.008) and high recurrence (p = 0.015). CAPS1 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation and migration by changing the exocytosis-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatoma cells in vitro. The in vivo study showed that CAPS1 overexpression inhibited xenograft tumor growth. Together, these results identified a previously unrecognized tumor suppressor role for CAPS1 in HCC development. PMID:27689999

  9. Flor-Essence? Herbal Tonic Promotes Mammary Tumor Development in Sprague Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L; Montgomery, J; Steinberg, S; Kulp, K

    2004-01-28

    Background: Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer often self-administer complementary and alternative medicines to augment their conventional treatments, improve health, or prevent recurrence. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} Tonic is a complex mixture of herbal extracts used by cancer patients because of anecdotal evidence that it can treat or prevent disease. Methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats were given water or exposed to 3% or 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign} beginning at one day of age. Mammary tumors were induced with a single oral 40 mg/kg/bw dose of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene at 50 days of age and sacrificed at 23 weeks. Rats were maintained on AIN-76A diet. Results: Control rats had palpable mammary tumor incidence of 51.0% at 19 weeks of age compared to 65.0% and 59.4% for the 3% and 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign} groups respectively. Overall, no significant difference in time until first palpable tumor was detected among any of the groups. At necropsy, mammary tumor incidence was 82.5% for controls compared to 90.0% and 97.3% for rats consuming 3% and 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign}, respectively. Mean mammary tumor multiplicity ({+-}SES) for the controls was 2.8 ({+-} 0.5) and statistically different from the 3% or 6% Flor- Essence{reg_sign} groups with 5.2 ({+-} 0.7), and 4.8 ({+-} 0.6), respectively (p{<=}0.01). As expected, the majority of isolated tumors were diagnosed as adenocarcinomas. Conclusions: Flor-Essence{reg_sign} can promote mammary tumor development in the Sprague Dawley rat model. This observation is contrary to widely available anecdotal evidence as well as the desire of the consumer that this commercially available herbal tonic will suppress and/or inhibit tumor growth.

  10. Utility of tumor-avid photosensitizers in developing bifunctional agents for tumor imaging and/or phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Chen, Yihui; Zawada, Robert H.; Oseroff, Allan; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2006-02-01

    HPPH (a chlorophyll-a analog) was linked with a cyanine dye and the resulting conjugate was found to be an efficient tumor imaging (fluorescence imaging) and photosensitizing agent (PDT). Our preliminary results suggest that tumor-avid porphyrin-based compounds can be used as vehicles for delivering the desired fluorophores to tumor for fluorescence imaging. In an early diagnosis of microscopic lesions in pre-clinical studies (C3H mice implanted with RIF tumors) the HPPH-cyanine dye conjugate showed tumor-imaging capability (λ ex: 780 nm, λ em: 860 nm) at the non- therapeutic doses that are 100 fold lower than those used therapeutically. Compared to the cyanine dye, the corresponding HPPH-conjugate showed enhanced long-term tumor imaging ability.

  11. Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in cancer immunity: from antigen identification to tumor prognosis and development of therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Protti, M P; De Monte, L; Monte, L D; Di Lullo, G; Lullo, G D

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells comprise a large fraction of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and it is now established that they may exert an important role in tumor immune-surveillance. Several CD4(+) T cell subsets [i.e. T helper (Th)1, Th2, T regulatory (Treg), Th17, Th22 and follicular T helper (Tfh)] have been described and differentiation of each subset depends on both the antigen presenting cells responsible for its activation and the cytokine environment present at the site of priming. Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells with different functional activity have been found in the blood of cancer patients and different CD4(+) T cell subsets have been identified at the tumor site by the expression of specific transcription factors and the profile of secreted cytokines. Importantly, depending on the subset, CD4(+) T cells may exert antitumor versus pro-tumor functions. Here we review the studies that first identified the presence of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells in cancer patients, the techniques used to identify the tumor antigens recognized, the role of the different CD4(+) T cell subsets in tumor immunity and in cancer prognosis and the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at activating efficient antitumor CD4(+) T cell effectors.

  12. Butylated hydroxyanisole and lung tumor development in A/J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.R.; Doherty, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    A diet containing 0.75% butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) did not enhance the development of lung tumors in A/J mice if fed for 8 weeks after administration of urethane, benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), or dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). Prefeeding animals with BHA partially protected animals against the tumorigenic effect of urethane and B(a)P. Partial protection was also seen in animals given B(a)P and then exposed to BHA in the diet. The two isomers of BHA 3-tert.-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and 2-tert.-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole) were synthesized and injected ip. They failed to enhance lung tumor development. It is concluded that BHA is not a promoting agent as is butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) for lung tumors in mice. One possible explanation is that BHA in the diet does not produce the extensive cell proliferation seen in the lungs of mice fed BHT. 19 references, 5 tables.

  13. p38delta Mitogen-activated protein kinase is essential for skin tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Eva M; Hindes, Anna; Gribben, Erin L; Burns, Carole J; Yin, Yan; Lin, Meei-Hua; Owen, Robert J; Longmore, Gregory D; Kissling, Grace E; Arthur, J Simon C; Efimova, Tatiana

    2009-06-01

    Activating Ras mutations occur in a large portion of human tumors. Yet, the signaling pathways involved in Ras-induced tumor formation remain incompletely understood. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are among the best studied Ras effector pathways. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase isoforms are important regulators of key biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, inflammation, senescence, and tumorigenesis. However, the specific in vivo contribution of individual p38 isoforms to skin tumor development has not been elucidated. Recent studies have shown that p38delta, a p38 family member, functions as an important regulator of epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and survival. In the present study, we have assessed the effect of p38delta deficiency on skin tumor development in vivo by subjecting p38delta knockout mice to a two-stage 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate chemical skin carcinogenesis protocol. We report that mice lacking p38delta gene exhibited a marked resistance to development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced skin papillomas, with increased latency and greatly reduced incidence, multiplicity, and size of tumors compared with wild-type mice. Our data suggest that the underlying mechanism for reduced susceptibility to skin carcinogenesis in p38delta-null mice involves a defect in proliferative response associated with aberrant signaling through the two major transformation-promoting pathways: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-activator protein 1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. These findings strongly suggest an in vivo role for p38delta in promoting cell proliferation and tumor development in epidermis and may have therapeutic implication for skin cancer.

  14. Development of a Behavioral Affective Relationship Scale for Encounter Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R., Jr.; Zarle, Thomas

    The paper outlines several studies over a two-year period to develop a self-report and observer-rating measure of sensitivity/encounter group outcome. The initial form of the scale was taken from McMillan (1971) who developed a measure of 16 categories of group outcome; McMillan's work indicated the scale had high reliability. Subsequent study…

  15. Collaborative Development: A New Culture Affects an Old Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Jim; Ruzicka, Terry

    2008-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison, the Registrar's Office and the Division of Information Technology (DoIT) apply a collaborative development process to joint projects. This model differs from a "waterfall" model in that technical and functional staff work closely to develop requirements, prototypes, and the product throughout…

  16. How does Low Impact Development affect Urban Base Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, A.; Hogan, D. M.; Archfield, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    A novel form of urban development, Low Impact Development (LID), aims to engineer systems that replicate natural hydrologic functioning. LID includes the preservation of near-natural groundwater recharge via infiltration close to impervious surfaces where stormwater is generated. Our study watershed in Clarksburg, Maryland is an instrumented 1.11 km2 watershed developed between 2004 and 2010 with 73 infiltration-focused stormwater facilities, including bioretention facilities, dry wells, and dry swales. We examined changes to annual and monthly streamflow during and after urban development (2004—2014) and compared alterations to nearby forested and urban control watersheds. We show that total flow and base flow increased in the study watershed during development as compared to control watersheds. We also found that the study watershed had slower storm recessions after development and less seasonality in base flow. These changes may be due to a combination of urban processes occurring during development, including reduction in evapotranspiration and the increase in point sources of recharge. Precipitation that may have infiltrated a forested landscape pre-development, been stored in soil moisture, and eventually been transpired by plants may now be recharged to groundwater and become base flow. A transfer of evapotranspiration to base flow is an unintended alteration to the urban water budget, here observed in a watershed using LID.

  17. Early Tumor Development Captured Through Nondestructive, High Resolution Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, A.; Pinzer, B. R.; McDonald, J. T.; Stampanoni, M.; Hlatky, L.

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable amount is known about molecular dysregulations in later stages of tumor progression, much less is known about the regulated processes supporting initial tumor growth. Insight into such processes can provide a fuller understanding of carcinogenesis, with implications for cancer treatment and risk assessment. Work from our laboratory suggests that organized substructure emerges during tumor formation. The goal here was to examine the feasibility of using state-of-the-art differential phase contrast X-ray imaging to investigate density differentials that evolve during early tumor development. To this end the beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source was used to examine the time-dependent assembly of substructure in developing tumors. Differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging based on grating interferometry as implemented with TOMCAT, offers sensitivity to density differentials within soft tissues and a unique combination of high resolution coupled with a large field of view that permits the accommodation of larger tissue sizes (1 cm in diameter), difficult with other imaging modalities. PMID:24125488

  18. Paradoxical role of autophagy in the dysplastic and tumor-forming stages of hepatocarcinoma development in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, K; Guo, X-L; Zhao, Q-d; Jing, Y-y; Kou, X-r; Xie, X-q; Zhou, Y; Cai, N; Gao, L; Zhao, X; Zhang, S-s; Song, J-r; Li, D; Deng, W-j; Li, R; Wu, M-c; Wei, L-x

    2013-02-21

    Many reports have shown that autophagy has a role as both a promoter and inhibitor in tumor development. However, the mechanism of this paradox is unknown. Tumor development is a multistep process. Therefore, we investigated whether the role of autophagy in hepatocarcinoma formation depended on the stage of tumor development. Based on our results, autophagy inhibition by chloroquine had a tumor-promotive effect in the rat model with N-diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in its dysplastic stage (Ds) and a tumor-suppressive effect in its tumor-forming stage (Ts). In the Ds, autophagy inhibition enhanced cell proliferation, DNA damage and inflammatory cytokines expression in liver. These changes were dependent on the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was resulted from autophagy inhibition, and ultimately accelerated the process of hepatocarcinogenesis. However, in the Ts, autophagy inhibition restrained tumor formation by decreasing tumor cell survival and proliferation. In this stage, autophagy inhibition led to excessive ROS accumulation in the tumor, which promoted cell apoptosis, and prominently suppressed tumor cell metabolism. Taken together, our data suggested that autophagy suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ds by protecting normal cell stability and promoted hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ts by supporting tumor cells growth. Autophagy always had a role as a protector throughout the process of hepatocarcinoma development.

  19. Paradoxical role of autophagy in the dysplastic and tumor-forming stages of hepatocarcinoma development in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, K; Guo, X-l; Zhao, Q-d; jing, Y-y; Kou, X-r; Xie, X-q; Zhou, Y; Cai, N; Gao, L; Zhao, X; Zhang, S-s; Song, J-r; Li, D; Deng, W-j; Li, R; Wu, M-c; Wei, L-x

    2013-01-01

    Many reports have shown that autophagy has a role as both a promoter and inhibitor in tumor development. However, the mechanism of this paradox is unknown. Tumor development is a multistep process. Therefore, we investigated whether the role of autophagy in hepatocarcinoma formation depended on the stage of tumor development. Based on our results, autophagy inhibition by chloroquine had a tumor-promotive effect in the rat model with N-diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in its dysplastic stage (Ds) and a tumor-suppressive effect in its tumor-forming stage (Ts). In the Ds, autophagy inhibition enhanced cell proliferation, DNA damage and inflammatory cytokines expression in liver. These changes were dependent on the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was resulted from autophagy inhibition, and ultimately accelerated the process of hepatocarcinogenesis. However, in the Ts, autophagy inhibition restrained tumor formation by decreasing tumor cell survival and proliferation. In this stage, autophagy inhibition led to excessive ROS accumulation in the tumor, which promoted cell apoptosis, and prominently suppressed tumor cell metabolism. Taken together, our data suggested that autophagy suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ds by protecting normal cell stability and promoted hepatocarcinogenesis in the Ts by supporting tumor cells growth. Autophagy always had a role as a protector throughout the process of hepatocarcinoma development. PMID:23429287

  20. Larval diet affects mosquito development and permissiveness to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Linenberg, Inbar; Christophides, George K.; Gendrin, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The larval stages of malaria vector mosquitoes develop in water pools, feeding mostly on microorganisms and environmental detritus. Richness in the nutrient supply to larvae influences the development and metabolism of larvae and adults. Here, we investigated the effects of larval diet on the development, microbiota content and permissiveness to Plasmodium of Anopheles coluzzii. We tested three fish diets often used to rear mosquitoes in the laboratory, including two pelleted diets, Dr. Clarke’s Pool Pellets and Nishikoi Fish Pellets, and one flaked diet, Tetramin Fish-Flakes. Larvae grow and develop faster and produce bigger adults when feeding on both types of pellets compared with flakes. This correlates with a higher microbiota load in pellet-fed larvae, in agreement with the known positive effect of the microbiota on mosquito development. Larval diet also significantly influences the prevalence and intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection in adults, whereby Nishikoi Fish Pellets-fed larvae develop into adults that are highly permissive to parasites and survive longer after infection. This correlates with a lower amount of Enterobacteriaceae in the midgut microbiota. Together, our results shed light on the influence of larval feeding on mosquito development, microbiota and vector competence; they also provide useful data for mosquito rearing. PMID:27910908

  1. Development and characterization of non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) for brain tumor margining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir

    During tumor removal surgery, due to the problems associated with obtaining high-resolution, real-time chemical images of where exactly the tumor ends and healthy tissue begins (tumor margining), it is often necessary to remove a much larger volume of tissue than the tumor itself. In the case of brain tumor surgery, however, it is extremely unsafe to remove excess tissue. Therefore, without an accurate image of the tumor margins, some of the tumor's finger-like projections are inevitably left behind in the surrounding parenchyma to grow again. For this reason, the development of techniques capable of providing high-resolution real-time images of tumor margins up to centimeters below the surface of a tissue is ideal for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors, as well as surgical guidance during brain tumor excision. A novel spectroscopic technique, non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), is being developed with the capabilities of obtaining high-resolution subsurface chemical-based images of underlying tumors. This novel technique combines the strengths of multiphoton tissue spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy into a diagnostic methodology that will, ultimately, provide unparalleled chemical information and images to provide the state of sub-surface tissues. The NMPPAS technique employs near-infrared light (in the diagnostic window) to excite ultraviolet and/or visible light absorbing species deep below the tissue's surface. Once a multiphoton absorption event occurs, non-radiative relaxation processes generates a localized thermal expansion and subsequent acoustic wave that can be detected using a piezoelectric transducer. Since NMPPAS employs an acoustic detection modality, much deeper diagnoses can be performed than that is possible using current state of the art high-resolution chemical imaging techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy. NMPPAS was employed to differentiate between excised brain tumors (astrocytoma III

  2. Ischemia in tumors induces early and sustained phosphorylation changes in stress kinase pathways but does not affect global protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mertins, Philipp; Yang, Feng; Liu, Tao; Mani, DR; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gillette, Michael; Clauser, Karl; Qiao, Jana; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Davies, Sherri; Ruggles, Kelly; Fenyo, David; Kitchens, R. T.; Li, Shunqiang; Olvera, Narcisco; Dao, Fanny; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel W.; Liebler, Daniel; White, Forest; Rodland, Karin D.; Mills, Gordon; Smith, Richard D.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.

    2014-07-01

    Advances in quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have sparked efforts to characterize the proteomes of tumor samples to provide complementary and unique information inaccessible by genomics. Tumor samples are usually not accrued with proteomic characterization in mind, raising concerns regarding effects of undocumented sample ischemia on protein abundance and phosphosite stoichiometry. Here we report the effects of cold ischemia time on clinical ovarian cancer samples and patient-derived basal and luminal breast cancer xenografts. Tumor tissues were excised and collected prior to vascular ligation, subjected to accurately defined ischemia times up to 60 min, and analyzed by quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics using isobaric tags and high-performance, multidimensional LC-MS/MS. No significant changes were detected at the protein level in each tumor type after 60 minutes of ischemia, and the majority of the >25,000 phosphosites detected were also stable. However, large, reproducible increases and decreases in protein phosphorylation at specific sites were observed in up to 24% of the phosphoproteome starting as early as 5 minutes post-excision. Early and sustained activation of stress response, transcriptional regulation and cell death pathways were observed in common across tumor types. Tissue-specific changes in phosphosite stability were also observed suggesting idiosyncratic effects of ischemia in particular lineages. Our study provides insights into the information that may be obtained by proteomic characterization of tumor samples after undocumented periods of ischemia, and suggests caution especially in interpreting activation of stress pathways in such samples as they may reflect sample handling rather than tumor physiology.

  3. Rhizosphere microbiome assemblage is affected by plant development

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Jacqueline M; Badri, Dayakar V; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2014-01-01

    There is a concerted understanding of the ability of root exudates to influence the structure of rhizosphere microbial communities. However, our knowledge of the connection between plant development, root exudation and microbiome assemblage is limited. Here, we analyzed the structure of the rhizospheric bacterial community associated with Arabidopsis at four time points corresponding to distinct stages of plant development: seedling, vegetative, bolting and flowering. Overall, there were no significant differences in bacterial community structure, but we observed that the microbial community at the seedling stage was distinct from the other developmental time points. At a closer level, phylum such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria and specific genera within those phyla followed distinct patterns associated with plant development and root exudation. These results suggested that the plant can select a subset of microbes at different stages of development, presumably for specific functions. Accordingly, metatranscriptomics analysis of the rhizosphere microbiome revealed that 81 unique transcripts were significantly (P<0.05) expressed at different stages of plant development. For instance, genes involved in streptomycin synthesis were significantly induced at bolting and flowering stages, presumably for disease suppression. We surmise that plants secrete blends of compounds and specific phytochemicals in the root exudates that are differentially produced at distinct stages of development to help orchestrate rhizosphere microbiome assemblage. PMID:24196324

  4. Disrupting Circadian Homeostasis of Sympathetic Signaling Promotes Tumor Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susie; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Herron, Alan J.; Moore, David D.; Fu, Loning

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per) or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry) are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice. Conclusions/Significance Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor. PMID:20539819

  5. 75 FR 16490 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of PANVAC and Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...; Facsimile: (301) 435-4013; E-mail: chatterjeesa@od.nih.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Cancer immunotherapy... PANVAC and Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public... Rights for development of therapeutics for human cancers. The field of use will specifically...

  6. Disrupting circadian homeostatis of sympathetic signaling promotes tumor development in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Perio...

  7. INFLUENCE OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS (EDCS) ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AND TUMOR SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) on Mammary Gland Development and Tumor Susceptibility.

    Suzanne E. Fenton1, and Jennifer Rayner1,2

    1 Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, and 2 Department of Environmen...

  8. Hypothesized role of pregnancy hormones on HER2+ breast tumor development.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Giovanna I; Martínez, María Elena; Natarajan, Loki; Wertheim, Betsy C; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Bondy, Melissa; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Meza-Montenegro, María Mercedes; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique; Brewster, Abenaa; Schedin, Pepper; Komenaka, Ian K; Castelao, J Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Redondo, Carmen M; Thompson, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence rates have declined among older but not younger women; the latter are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancers carrying a poor prognosis. Epidemiological evidence supports an increase in breast cancer incidence following pregnancy with risk elevated as much as 10 years post-partum. We investigated the association between years since last full-term pregnancy at the time of diagnosis (≤10 or >10 years) and breast tumor subtype in a case series of premenopausal Hispanic women (n = 627). Participants were recruited in the United States, Mexico, and Spain. Cases with known estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 status, with one or more full-term pregnancies ≥1 year prior to diagnosis were eligible for this analysis. Cases were classified into three tumor subtypes according to hormone receptor (HR+ = ER+ and/or PR+; HR- = ER- and PR-) expression and HER2 status: HR+/HER2-, HER2+ (regardless of HR), and triple negative breast cancer. Case-only odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for HER2+ tumors in reference to HR+/HER2- tumors. Participants were pooled in a mixed-effects logistic regression model with years since pregnancy as a fixed effect and study site as a random effect. When compared to HR+/HER2- cases, women with HER2+ tumors were more likely be diagnosed in the post-partum period of ≤10 years (OR = 1.68; 95 % CI, 1.12-2.52). The effect was present across all source populations and independent of the HR status of the HER2+ tumor. Adjusting for age at diagnosis (≤45 or >45 years) did not materially alter our results (OR = 1.78; 95 % CI, 1.08-2.93). These findings support the novel hypothesis that factors associated with the post-partum breast, possibly hormonal, are involved in the development of HER2+ tumors.

  9. Hhip regulates tumor-stroma-mediated upregulation of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is governed by the coordinated action of various types of cells that are present in the tumor environment. Fibroblasts, which constitute a major fraction of the stroma, participate actively in various signaling events and regulate tumor development and metastasis. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role in promoting tumor malignancy via fibroblasts; however, the role of hedgehog interacting protein (hhip; inhibitor of Hh pathway) in tumor growth is poorly understood. Here we implanted B16F10 tumors in hhip+/− mice to study the tumor growth characteristics and the vascular phenotype. Furthermore, the mechanism involved in the observed phenomena was explored to reveal the role of hhip in tumor growth. The tumors that were implanted in hhip+/− mice exhibited accelerated growth and increased tumor angiogenesis. Although we observed a decrease in hypoxia, blood vessels still had abnormal phenotype. We found that increased Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts induced a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which subsequently resulted in an increased proliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the heterozygous knockdown of hhip in mice could affect Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts, which could cause the increased production of the growth factor VEGF. This signaling, via a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, increased tumor vascular density. PMID:28127049

  10. Mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported.

  11. Sexual dimorphism of liver metastasis by murine pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is affected by expression of complement C5.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Kobayashi, Shinta; da Silva, Edaise; Clausen, Richard; Chan, Chang; Vosburgh, Evan; Tang, Laura H; Levine, Arnold J; Harris, Chris R

    2016-05-24

    In a mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PanNETs), liver metastasis occurred at a higher frequency in males. Male mice also had higher serum and intratumoral levels of the innate immunity protein complement C5. In mice that lost the ability to express complement C5, there was a lower frequency of metastasis, and males no longer had a higher frequency of metastasis than females. Treatment with PMX53, a small molecule antagonist of C5aR1/CD88, the receptor for complement C5a, also reduced metastasis. Mice lacking a functional gene for complement C5 had smaller primary tumors, which were less invasive and lacked the CD68+ macrophages that have previously been associated with metastasis in this type of tumor. This is the first report of a gene that causes sexual dimorphism of metastasis in a mouse model. In the human disease, which also shows sexual dimorphism for metastasis, clinically advanced tumors expressed more complement C5 than less advanced tumors.

  12. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  13. Factors Affecting the Professional Development of Elementary English Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zein, Subhan

    2016-01-01

    The poor classroom practices of English teachers at elementary level in Indonesia have been attributed to the inadequacy of pre-service education. Yet, whether in-service professional development (PD) also plays a role is unknown. This study investigated the perspectives of 23 teachers, 14 teacher educators and 3 school principals regarding the…

  14. Factors affecting early seedling development in whole pine tree substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wood-based materials derived from pine trees, such as processed whole pine tree (WPT), can be a viable option for producers looking to offset pine bark or peatmoss usage in container substrates. Reduced root development of stem cuttings rooted in WPT compared with pine bark (PB) has been observed, b...

  15. Early Social Experience Affects the Development of Eye Gaze Processing

    PubMed Central

    Senju, Atsushi; Vernetti, Angélina; Ganea, Natasa; Hudry, Kristelle; Tucker, Leslie; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Eye gaze is a key channel of non-verbal communication in humans [1, 2, 3]. Eye contact with others is present from birth [4], and eye gaze processing is crucial for social learning and adult-infant communication [5, 6, 7]. However, little is known about the effect of selectively different experience of eye contact and gaze communication on early social and communicative development. To directly address this question, we assessed 14 sighted infants of blind parents (SIBPs) longitudinally at 6–10 and 12–16 months. Face scanning [8] and gaze following [7, 9] were assessed using eye tracking. In addition, naturalistic observations were made when the infants were interacting with their blind parent and with an unfamiliar sighted adult. Established measures of emergent autistic-like behaviors [10] and standardized tests of cognitive, motor, and linguistic development [11] were also collected. These data were then compared with those obtained from a group of infants of sighted parents. Despite showing typical social skills development overall, infants of blind parents allocated less attention to adult eye movements and gaze direction, an effect that increased between 6–10 and 12–16 months of age. The results suggest that infants adjust their use of adults’ eye gaze depending on gaze communication experience from early in life. The results highlight that human functional brain development shows selective experience-dependent plasticity adaptive to the individual’s specific social environment. PMID:26752077

  16. Professional Development: Designing for the Cognitive and Affective Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Iain

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically reflects on the pedagogical approach underlying a professional development course in eLearning. The aim of the course was to teach faculty based eLearning officers the necessary practical and theoretical skills to fulfil their roles in supporting Faculties with eLearning initiatives. Whilst the course was successful--judged…

  17. Beyond Brain Growth: Other Factors Affecting Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanich, Greg; Aldridge, Mary Nan

    The intellectual model of Jean Piaget asserts that individuals pass through a series of various intellectual stages as they mature. Human development is categorized into four basic stages: (1) sensory motor stage, which lasts from birth to about eighteen months; (2) preoperational stage, lasting from eighteen months to about seven years; (3)…

  18. Traumatic Experience in Infancy: How Responses to Stress Affect Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witten, Molly Romer

    2010-01-01

    Responses to traumatic stress during the earliest years of life can change quickly and can be difficult to identify because of the young child's rapid rate of development. The symptoms of traumatic stress will depend on the child's developmental level and individual coping styles, as well as the quality and nature of the child's most important…

  19. Starting Smart: How Early Experiences Affect Brain Development. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Theresa

    Based on recent research, it is now believed that brain growth is highly dependent upon children's early experiences. Neurons allow communication and coordinated functioning among various brain areas. Brain development after birth consists of an ongoing process of wiring and rewiring the connections among neurons. The forming and breaking of…

  20. Factors Affecting Teachers' Participation in Professional Development Activities in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayar, Adem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between factors (internal [personal] and external [environmental]) and teachers' participation in professional development (PD) programs in Turkey. The researcher employed a survey design, using a multiple-stage sampling method, selecting 30 out of 66 elementary schools in the Center…

  1. Developing Culturally Competent Faculty: A Cognitive, Affective, and Spiritual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Deborah L.; Van Zandt, Cassandra; Menjares, Pete C.

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has evidenced significant dialogue on faith-based campuses about the persistent gap between the increasing ethnic diversity of the student population and that of the faculty. While campus administrators and leaders acknowledge the need to address this concern through faculty development, there is a disturbing lack of successful…

  2. Development of novel nanocarrier-based near-infrared optical probes for in vivo tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoichi; Temma, Takashi; Hara, Isao; Yamahara, Ryo; Ozeki, Ei-ichi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes is a useful diagnostic technology for in vivo tumor detection. Our plan was to develop novel NIR fluorophore-micelle complex probes. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were synthesized as novel lipophilic NIR fluorophores, which were encapsulated in an amphiphilic polydepsipeptide micelle "lactosome". The fluorophore-micelle complexes IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were evaluated as NIR fluorescent probes for in vivo tumor imaging. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were synthesized and then encapsulated in lactosomes. The optical properties of IC7-1, IC7-2, IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were measured. IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were administered to tumor-bearing mice, and fluorescence images were acquired for 48 h. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were successfully synthesized in 12% and 6.3% overall yield, and maximum emission wavelengths in chloroform were observed at 858 nm and 897 nm, respectively. Aqueous buffered solutions of IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome showed similar fluorescence spectra in chloroform and higher or comparable quantum yields and higher photostability compared with ICG. Both lactosome probes specifically visualized tumor tissue 6 h post-administration. IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome could be promising NIR probes for in vivo tumor imaging.

  3. Albumin-bound paclitaxel in solid tumors: clinical development and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kundranda, Madappa N; Niu, Jiaxin

    2015-01-01

    Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) is a solvent-free formulation of paclitaxel that was initially developed more than a decade ago to overcome toxicities associated with the solvents used in the formulation of standard paclitaxel and to potentially improve efficacy. Nab-paclitaxel has demonstrated an advantage over solvent-based paclitaxel by being able to deliver a higher dose of paclitaxel to tumors and decrease the incidence of serious toxicities, including severe allergic reactions. To date, nab-paclitaxel has been indicated for the treatment of three solid tumors in the USA. It was first approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in 2005, followed by locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer in 2012, and most recently for metastatic pancreatic cancer in 2013. Nab-paclitaxel is also under investigation for the treatment of a number of other solid tumors. This review highlights key clinical efficacy and safety outcomes of nab-paclitaxel in the solid tumors for which it is currently indicated, discusses ongoing trials that may provide new data for the expansion of nab-paclitaxel's indications into other solid tumors, and provides a clinical perspective on the use of nab-paclitaxel in practice.

  4. Development of a surgical safety checklist for the performance of radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The surgical management of renal cell carcinoma with invasion of the renal vein or inferior vena cava is associated with significant rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this report we propose a surgical checklist aimed at reducing adverse events associated with the resection of these tumors. Methods This review describes the development of an evidence- and experience-based surgical checklist aimed at improving the perioperative safety of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy. Results Reducing the risk of complications during the surgical management of renal tumors with venous invasion begins with appropriate pre-operative imaging aimed at defining the cranial extent of the tumor thrombus, thus facilitating accurate preoperative planning. Other key elements of the checklist are aimed at ensuring clear and precise pre-, intra- and postoperative communication between members of the multidisciplinary-care team. Conclusion A standardized surgical checklist may help to increase the perioperative safety of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy. Future validation studies are required to determine the clinical feasibility and post-implementation safety profile of this new checklist. PMID:23241448

  5. Albumin-bound paclitaxel in solid tumors: clinical development and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kundranda, Madappa N; Niu, Jiaxin

    2015-01-01

    Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) is a solvent-free formulation of paclitaxel that was initially developed more than a decade ago to overcome toxicities associated with the solvents used in the formulation of standard paclitaxel and to potentially improve efficacy. Nab-paclitaxel has demonstrated an advantage over solvent-based paclitaxel by being able to deliver a higher dose of paclitaxel to tumors and decrease the incidence of serious toxicities, including severe allergic reactions. To date, nab-paclitaxel has been indicated for the treatment of three solid tumors in the USA. It was first approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in 2005, followed by locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer in 2012, and most recently for metastatic pancreatic cancer in 2013. Nab-paclitaxel is also under investigation for the treatment of a number of other solid tumors. This review highlights key clinical efficacy and safety outcomes of nab-paclitaxel in the solid tumors for which it is currently indicated, discusses ongoing trials that may provide new data for the expansion of nab-paclitaxel’s indications into other solid tumors, and provides a clinical perspective on the use of nab-paclitaxel in practice. PMID:26244011

  6. Development of Six Tumors in a Sebaceus Nevus of Jadassohn: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Gozel, Serap; Donmez, Melahat; Akdur, Noyan Can

    2013-01-01

    Nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn is a congenital cutaneous hamartoma comprised of multiple skin structures. It has the potential to develop into variety of neoplasms of various epidermal adnexal origins. While multiple tumors may occasionally arise, it is unusual for more than four tumors to arise simultaneously within a single sebaceus nevus. Here in, we report a case of a 70-year-old woman with six neoplastic proliferations including a syringocystadenoma papilliferum, pigmented trichoblastoma, tubular apocrine adenoma, sebaceoma, tumors of follicular infundibulum and superficial epithelioma with sebaceus differentiation arising in a long standing nevus sebaceus on the scalp. Our case is extraordinary because a single nevus sebaceus contained six neoplastic proliferations with differentiation toward the folliculosebaceous-apocrine unit. PMID:24421851

  7. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Jochen; Scholz, Claus-Juergen; Kneitz, Susanne; Weber, Dana; Fuchs, Joerg; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes regulate gene

  8. Identification of genes associated with tumor development in CaSki cells in the cosmic space.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengjie; Li, Yalin; Liu, Yan; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Zhijie; Wang, Jiajia; Li, Yuehui; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2012-06-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms of tumor development for curing cervical cancer. However, the molecular basis determining the different characteristics of tumor remains unclear. Space environment as a special study model can expand the study field of tumor development. To approach this, after human cervical carcinoma CaSki cells were flown on “Shen Zhou IV” space shuttle mission, the cell morphology and proliferation was investigated after flying to ground. We found that the growth of 48A9 CaSki cell (flight group) became slow compared with ground groups. Observation of cells by light microscopy revealed differences in cell morphology between ground controls and flight groups, and the flight group exhibited morphologic differences, characterized by rounder, smoother, decreased, smaller and low-adhension cells. Transmission electron microscope images showed the structure of the ultrastructural characteristics of 48A9 CaSki cells were clearly distinct from those of the ground CaSki cells in aspects of mitochondrion, cytoplasm, nucleus and ribosomes. MTT and soft agar assay showed that 48A9 CaSki cells grew slowly compared to ground control. Furthermore, suppression subtractive hybridization combining with reverse Northern blot was used to identify differently expression genes between flight and ground groups. These differentially expressed genes included cytoskeleton, cell differentiation, cell apoptosis, signal transduction, DNA repair, protein synthesis, substance metabolism, and antigen presentation. The identification of differently expressed genes which is likely to increase our understanding of the molecular processes underlying tumor development will provide new insight into tumor development mechanisms, and may facilitate the development of new anticancer strategies.

  9. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  10. Critical role for the Ets transcription factor ELF-1 in the development of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuling; Brown, Courtney; Ni, Weihua; Maynard, Elizabeth; Rigby, Alan C; Oettgen, Peter

    2006-04-15

    The Ets transcription factors regulate a wide variety of biologic processes. Several members have been shown to play a role in regulating angiogenesis and vascular development. For example, the Ets factor ELF-1 is enriched in the developing vasculature of the embryo, where it regulates the expression of the Tie2 gene. We have determined that ELF-1 and Tie2 expression is also enriched in tumor blood vessels, and have identified a short peptide, 34 amino acids in length, corresponding to the terminal portion of the highly conserved ETS domain that potently blocks the function of ELF-1. A tailored ELF-1 blocking peptide, containing a 12-amino acid HIV-1 TAT protein, readily crosses the cell membrane and enters into the nucleus of endothelial cells, leading to a marked reduction in the expression of ELF-1 gene targets including Tie2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, the ELF-1 blocking peptide potently inhibits angiopoietin-1-mediated endothelial cell migration. Systemic administration of this peptide markedly attenuates B16 melanoma tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis in nude mice. These results support the function of ELF-1 in the regulation of Tie2 gene expression during the development of tumor angiogenesis.

  11. Gld-1, a Tumor Suppressor Gene Required for Oocyte Development in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Francis, R.; Barton, M. K.; Kimble, J.; Schedl, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1(null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1(null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. PMID:7713419

  12. Development and validation of a prototypal neural networks-based tumor tracking method.

    PubMed

    Seregni, M; Pella, A; Riboldi, M; Baroni, G

    2011-01-01

    In radiotherapy, intra-fractional organ motion introduces uncertainties in target localization, leading to unacceptable inaccuracy in dose delivery. Especially in highly selective treatments, such as those delivered with particles beams instead of photons, organ motion may results in severe side effects and/or limited tumor control. Tumor tracking is a motion mitigation strategy that allows an almost continuous dose delivery while the beam is dynamically steered to match the position of the moving target in real-time. Currently, tumor tracking is applied clinically only in the CyberKnife system for photon radiotherapy, whereas neither clinical solutions nor dedicated methodologies are available for particle therapy. Consequently, the aim of the proposed study is to develop a neural networks-based prototypal tracking algorithm intended for particle therapy. We developed a method that exploits three independent neural networks to estimate the internal target position as a function of external surrogate signals. This method was tested on data relative to 20 patients treated with CyberKnife, whose performance was used as benchmark. Results show that the developed algorithm allows targeting error reduction with respect to the CyberKnife system, thus proving the potential value of artificial neural networks for the implementation of tumor tracking methodologies.

  13. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T.; Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J.

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Early development of Xenopus embryos is affected by simulated gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Hiroki; Neff, Anton W.; Malacinski, George M.

    1994-01-01

    Early amphibian (Xenopus laevis) development under clinostat-simulated weightlessness and centrifuge-simulated hypergravity was studied. The results revealed significant effects on (i) 'morphological patterning' such as the cleavage furrow pattern in the vegetal hemisphere at the eight-cell stage and the shape of the dorsal lip in early gastrulae and (ii) 'the timing of embryonic events' such as the third cleavage furrow completion and the dorsal lip appearance. Substantial variations in sensitivity to simulated force fields were observed, which should be considered in interpreting spaceflight data.

  15. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 2: Enhancement of tumor penetration through receptor mediated transcytosis in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor models, presumably through tandem cycles of CD44 mediated endocytosis and exocytosis. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the NPs, better penetration of multilayered tumor cells was observed with much improved cytotoxicities against both drug sensitive and drug resistant cancer spheroids compared to the free drug. Thus, targeting receptors such as CD44 that can readily undergo recycling between the cell surface and interior of the cells can become a useful strategy to enhance the tumor penetration potential of NPs and the efficiency of drug delivery through receptor mediated transcytosis.We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor

  16. Conditional loss of ErbB3 delays mammary gland hyperplasia induced by mutant PIK3CA without affecting mammary tumor latency, gene expression, or signaling.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Pfefferle, Adam D; Owens, Philip; Kuba, María G; Rexer, Brent N; Balko, Justin M; Sánchez, Violeta; Cheng, Hailing; Perou, Charles M; Zhao, Jean J; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), have been shown to transform mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Studies suggest this transforming activity requires binding of mutant p110α via p85 to phosphorylated YXXM motifs in activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) or adaptors. Using transgenic mice, we examined if ErbB3, a potent activator of PI3K, is required for mutant PIK3CA-mediated transformation of MECs. Conditional loss of ErbB3 in mammary epithelium resulted in a delay of PIK3CA(H1047R)-dependent mammary gland hyperplasia, but tumor latency, gene expression, and PI3K signaling were unaffected. In ErbB3-deficient tumors, mutant PI3K remained associated with several tyrosyl phosphoproteins, potentially explaining the dispensability of ErbB3 for tumorigenicity and PI3K activity. Similarly, inhibition of ErbB RTKs with lapatinib did not affect PI3K signaling in PIK3CA(H1047R)-expressing tumors. However, the p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 in combination with lapatinib impaired mammary tumor growth and PI3K signaling more potently than BYL719 alone. Furthermore, coinhibition of p110α and ErbB3 potently suppressed proliferation and PI3K signaling in human breast cancer cells harboring PIK3CA(H1047R). These data suggest that PIK3CA(H1047R)-driven tumor growth and PI3K signaling can occur independently of ErbB RTKs. However, simultaneous blockade of p110α and ErbB RTKs results in superior inhibition of PI3K and mammary tumor growth, suggesting a rational therapeutic combination against breast cancers harboring PIK3CA activating mutations.

  17. Community history affects the predictability of microbial ecosystem development.

    PubMed

    Pagaling, Eulyn; Strathdee, Fiona; Spears, Bryan M; Cates, Michael E; Allen, Rosalind J; Free, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate crucial biogeochemical, biomedical and biotechnological processes, yet our understanding of their assembly, and our ability to control its outcome, remain poor. Existing evidence presents conflicting views on whether microbial ecosystem assembly is predictable, or inherently unpredictable. We address this issue using a well-controlled laboratory model system, in which source microbial communities colonize a pristine environment to form complex, nutrient-cycling ecosystems. When the source communities colonize a novel environment, final community composition and function (as measured by redox potential) are unpredictable, although a signature of the community's previous history is maintained. However, when the source communities are pre-conditioned to their new habitat, community development is more reproducible. This situation contrasts with some studies of communities of macro-organisms, where strong selection under novel environmental conditions leads to reproducible community structure, whereas communities under weaker selection show more variability. Our results suggest that the microbial rare biosphere may have an important role in the predictability of microbial community development, and that pre-conditioning may help to reduce unpredictability in the design of microbial communities for biotechnological applications.

  18. Community history affects the predictability of microbial ecosystem development

    PubMed Central

    Pagaling, Eulyn; Strathdee, Fiona; Spears, Bryan M; Cates, Michael E; Allen, Rosalind J; Free, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate crucial biogeochemical, biomedical and biotechnological processes, yet our understanding of their assembly, and our ability to control its outcome, remain poor. Existing evidence presents conflicting views on whether microbial ecosystem assembly is predictable, or inherently unpredictable. We address this issue using a well-controlled laboratory model system, in which source microbial communities colonize a pristine environment to form complex, nutrient-cycling ecosystems. When the source communities colonize a novel environment, final community composition and function (as measured by redox potential) are unpredictable, although a signature of the community's previous history is maintained. However, when the source communities are pre-conditioned to their new habitat, community development is more reproducible. This situation contrasts with some studies of communities of macro-organisms, where strong selection under novel environmental conditions leads to reproducible community structure, whereas communities under weaker selection show more variability. Our results suggest that the microbial rare biosphere may have an important role in the predictability of microbial community development, and that pre-conditioning may help to reduce unpredictability in the design of microbial communities for biotechnological applications. PMID:23985743

  19. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  20. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-09-19

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies.

  1. Community violence as it affects child development: issues of definition.

    PubMed

    Trickett, Penelope K; Durán, Lorena; Horn, John L

    2003-12-01

    The state of the art of definition of community violence as it relates to child development was examined in terms of the definitions used in 23 empirical studies. In all cases community violence was defined in terms of what were assumed to be measurements obtained as linear combinations of a priori numerical weighting of responses to questions--asked either of a child or of the parent of a child--about experiencing and/or witnessing and/or hearing about instances of violence. Thus, the definitions can be seen to represent the perspectives of 2 kinds of observers--the child or the child's parent--and 3 levels of closeness to violence--experiencing, witnessing, or hearing about violence. Combining these perspectives and levels, the following 8 different definitions could be seen to be used in the practice of 1 or more of the 23 empirical studies: Child Self-Report (perception) of either (1) experiencing, or (2) witnessing, or (3) experiencing and witnessing, and hearing about violence; or Parent Report (perception) of the Child (4) experiencing, or (5) witnessing, or (6) experiencing and witnessing and hearing about violence, or (7) = (1) + (4), or (8) = (3) + (6). In almost all the examples of research definitions it was assumed implicitly and without test of the assumption that different violent events were interchangeable, and usually it was assumed (again without test) that the magnitudes of different violence events were equal. Usually, an unstated theory of stress appeared to guide the measurement definition, but in one study definitions were developed and tested in terms of a clearly-stated theory of learning. It was concluded that definition of community violence is a measurement problem; that very likely it is multidimensional; that it could be more nearly solved if better attention were given to specifying it in terms of theory that can be put to test and by attending to basic assumptions and principles of measurement.

  2. Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumors: What They Can Tell Us on Adrenal Development and Comparison with Adult Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, Enzo; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors (ACT) in children are very rare and are most frequently diagnosed in the context of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a multiple cancer syndrome linked to germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 with loss of heterozygosity in the tumors. A peak of children ACT incidence is present in the states of southern Brazil, where they are linked to the high prevalence in the population of a specific TP53 mutation (R337H). Children ACT have specific features distinguishing them from adult tumors in their pathogenetic mechanisms, genomic profiles, and prognosis. Epidemiological and molecular evidence suggests that in most cases they are derived from the fetal adrenal. PMID:25741319

  3. Definition of genetic events directing the development of distinct types of brain tumors from postnatal neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Falk; Meyer, Katharina; Braun, Sebastian; Ek, Sara; Spang, Rainer; Pfenninger, Cosima V; Artner, Isabella; Prost, Gaëlle; Chen, Xinbin; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Judkins, Alexander R; Englund, Elisabet; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2012-07-01

    Although brain tumors are classified and treated based upon their histology, the molecular factors involved in the development of various tumor types remain unknown. In this study, we show that the type and order of genetic events directs the development of gliomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid-like tumors from postnatal mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC). We found that the overexpression of specific genes led to the development of these three different brain tumors from NSC/NPCs, and manipulation of the order of genetic events was able to convert one established tumor type into another. In addition, loss of the nuclear chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCB1 in rhabdoid tumors led to increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, a central cytoplasmic unfolded protein response (UPR) component, suggesting a role for the UPR in these tumors. Consistent with this, application of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib led to an increase in apoptosis of human cells with reduced SMARCB1 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that the order of genetic events determines the phenotypes of brain tumors derived from a common precursor cell pool, and suggest that the UPR may represent a therapeutic target in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors.

  4. Development of an autologous canine cancer vaccine system for resectable malignant tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yannelli, J R; Wouda, R; Masterson, T J; Avdiushko, M G; Cohen, D A

    2016-12-01

    While conventional therapies exist for canine cancer, immunotherapies need to be further explored and applied to the canine setting. We have developed an autologous cancer vaccine (K9-ACV), which is available for all dogs with resectable disease. K9-ACV was evaluated for safety and immunogenicity for a variety of cancer types in a cohort of companion dogs under veterinary care. The autologous vaccine was prepared by enzymatic digestion of solid tumor biopsies. The resultant single cell suspensions were then UV-irradiated resulting in immunogenic cell death of the tumor cells. Following sterility and endotoxin testing, the tumor cells were admixed with CpG ODN adjuvant and shipped to the participating veterinary clinics. The treating veterinarians then vaccinated each patient with three intradermal injections (10 million cells per dose) at 30-day intervals (one prime and two boost injections). In a cohort of 20 dogs completing the study, 17 dogs (85%) developed an augmented IgG response to autologous tumor antigens as demonstrated using western blot analysis of pre- and post-peripheral blood samples. We also report several dogs have lived beyond expected survival time based on previously published data. In summary, K9-ACV is an additional option to be considered for the treatment of dogs with resectable cancer.

  5. Involvement of Notch1 in the development of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Diévart, A; Beaulieu, N; Jolicoeur, P

    1999-10-28

    The MMTV/neu transgenic (Tg) mice spontaneously develop mammary tumors stochastically after a long latent period, suggesting that the c-neu/erbB2 oncogene is not sufficient for tumor formation. To identify putative collaborator(s) of the c-neu/erbB2, we used the provirus insertional mutagenesis approach with mammary tumors arising in MMTV/neu Tg mice infected with the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The Notch1 gene was identified as a novel target for MMTV provirus insertional activation. In Notch1-rearranged tumors, the Notch1 gene was interrupted by the MMTV provirus insertion upstream of the exons coding for the TM domain. These insertions led to overexpression of novel 5' truncated approximately 7 kb RNA coding for 280 kDa mutant protein harboring only the Notch1 ectodomain, N(EC)mut. These may be involved in tumor formation. Another consequence of these insertions was the expression of truncated 3' Notch1 transcripts (3.5 - 4.5 kb) and proteins (86 - 110 kDa) deleted of most of the extracellular sequences (Notch1intra). We found that 3' truncated Notch1intra can transform HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Deletion analysis revealed that the ankyrin-repeats and the domain 1 (aa 1751 - 1821) are required, while a signal peptide, the two conserved cysteines (C1652 and C1685) and the OPA and PEST sequences are dispensable for transformation. These results indicate that the N-terminally truncated Notch1intra protein behaves as an oncogene in this system.

  6. Clinical development of BLZ-100 for real-time optical imaging of tumors during resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Heather L.; Miller, Dennis M.; Hedges, Teresa; Perry, Jeff; Parrish-Novak, Julia

    2016-03-01

    Complete initial resection can give cancer patients the best opportunity for long-term survival. There is unmet need in surgical oncology for optical imaging that enables simple and precise visualization of tumors and consistent contrast with surrounding normal tissues. Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents and camera systems that can detect them represent an area of active research and development. The investigational Tumor Paint agent BLZ-100 is a conjugate of a chlorotoxin peptide and the NIR dye indocyanine green (ICG) that has been shown to specifically bind to a broad range of solid tumors. Clinical efficacy studies with BLZ-100 are in progress, a necessary step in bringing the product into clinical practice. To ensure a product that will be useful for and accepted by surgeons, the early clinical development of BLZ- 100 incorporates multiple tumor types and imaging devices so that surgeon feedback covers the range of anticipated clinical uses. Key contrast agent characteristics include safety, specificity, flexibility in timing between dose and surgery, and breadth of tumor types recognized. Imaging devices should use wavelengths that are optimal for the contrast agent, be sensitive enough that contrast agent dosing can be adjusted for optimal contrast, include real-time video display of fluorescence and white light image, and be simple for surgeons to use with minimal disruption of surgical flow. Rapid entry into clinical studies provides the best opportunity for early surgeon feedback, enabling development of agents and devices that will gain broad acceptance and provide information that helps surgeons achieve more complete and precise resections.

  7. Factors affecting the development of lung function in Tunisian children.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Y; Pariès, J; Harrabi, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z; Richalet, J P; Buvry, A

    2008-01-01

    We undertook to evaluate the impacts of morphology at birth, physical activity, anthropometric, socioeconomic and environmental factors on lung function in healthy Tunisian children. Pulmonary function parameters were measured with a Minato portable spirometer in a randomized population of 756 healthy children (388 males and 368 females) aged between 6 and 16. The morphology at birth, the gestational age, the physical activity, the socioeconomic status, the type of habitation, and the environmental factors were all assessed by a standard questionnaire. Using univariate analysis, we found that: (1) morphometric parameters (height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory perimeter), as well as sex were highly associated with pulmonary function parameters; (2) Height at birth showed strong significant relations with FVC, FEV(1), and FEV(1)/FVC; (3) lung function parameters were influenced by physical training of our children, socioeconomic status, indoor pollution, and passive smoking; and (4) we did not observe any association between the gestational age and the weight at their birth and lung function parameters. Using a general linear model analysis, morphometric parameters, age, sex, type of heating, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory perimeters had significant relation with respiratory parameters. In our population of healthy Tunisian children, the main predictive factors of the pulmonary development were the morphological factors such as height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory thoracic perimeter, sex and age, and the environmental conditions such as type of heating but not morphology at birth, physical activity, or socioeconomic status.

  8. Roles of tumor heterogeneity in the development of drug resistance: A call for precision therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duojiao; Wang, Diane C; Cheng, Yunfeng; Qian, Mengjia; Zhang, Miaomiao; Shen, Qi; Wang, Xiangdong

    2017-02-01

    The drug resistance limits the optimal efficacy of drugs during target therapies for lung cancer and requires the development of precision medicine to identify and develop new highly selective drugs and more precise tailoring of medicine to the target population. Lung cancer heterogeneity as a potential cause of drug resistance to targeted therapy may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and fade personalized-medicine strategies. The present review elucidates the influence of tumor heterogeneity on drug efficacy and resistance, and discusses potential strategies to combat heterogeneity for cancer treatment. There is an urgent need to discover and develop disease- and biology-specific biomarkers for monitoring the existence and occurrence of lung cancer heterogeneity, testing targeted drugs in clinical trials, and implementing precision medicine for patients. Better understanding of lung cancer heterogeneity will strengthen therapeutic strategies and apply precision medicine to cure the disease.

  9. The Role of Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Liver Injury and Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatics and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) possess multiple immunological functions besides affecting immune cell migration, such as inhibiting T cell proliferation and antigen presentation by dendritic cells. Moreover, they control the trans-endothelial transport of multiple molecules and antigens. Emerging evidence suggest their active involvements in immunregulation, tumor, and metastases formation. In the liver, increased lymphangiogenesis, specifically at the portal area has been associated with multiple liver diseases in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, and liver malignancies. Nevertheless, the exact role and contribution of LECs to liver diseases are poorly understood. The review summarizes the current understanding of LECs in liver diseases. PMID:27965673

  10. Major Vault Protein May Affect Nonhomologous End-Joining Repair and Apoptosis Through Ku70/80 and BAX Downregulation in Cervical Carcinoma Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloret, Marta Lara, Pedro Carlos; Bordon, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustin; Pinar, Beatriz; Falcon, Orlando

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: We investigated the relationship between major vault protein (MVP) expression, the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair gene Ku70/80, and related genes involved in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation to shed light on the possible causes of genetic instability, tumor progression, and resistance to oncologic treatment in patients with clinical cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen consecutive patients with localized cervix carcinoma were prospectively included in this study from July 1997 to Dec 2003. Patients were staged according to the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification. Forty patients had Stage I disease, 45 had Stage II, and 31 had Stage III/IVA. Most patients had squamous tumors (98 cases) and Grades II (52 cases) and III (45 cases) carcinomas. Expression of MVP, Ku70/80, Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), p53, and Ki67 was studied by using immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Results: Tumors overexpressing MVP (65 of 116 cases) showed low levels of Ku70/80 (p = 0.013) and BAX expression (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, low Ku70/80 expression was strongly related to suppressed BAX (p < 0.001) and, to a lesser extent, upregulated BCL-2 (p = 0.042), altered p53 (p = 0.038), and increased proliferation (p = 0.002). Conclusion: We hypothesize that an early regulatory mechanism favors homologous or NHEJ repair at first, mediated by vaults along with other factors yet to be elucidated. If vaults are overexpressed, NHEJ repair may be suppressed by means of several mechanisms, with resultant genomic instability. These mechanisms may be associated with the decision of damaged cells to survive and proliferate, favoring tumor progression and reducing tumor response to oncologic treatment through the development of resistant cell phenotypes. Additional clinical studies are necessary to test this hypothesis.

  11. Strategies for Developing the Affective Work Competencies of Marketing Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Earl C.

    Effective strategies for developing the affective work competencies of marketing education students include teaching procedures, acquisition of skills and materials for teaching in the affective domain, and implementation considerations. Affective concerns in marketing can be grouped into three broad types of performance categories--self-concept,…

  12. Evidence of cellular senescence during the development of estrogen-induced pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Maria Eugenia; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Sosa, Liliana Del Valle; Pérez, Pablo Anibal; Gutiérrez, Silvina; Leimgruber, Carolina; Latini, Alexandra; Torres, Alicia Inés; De Paul, Ana Lucía

    2015-06-01

    Although pituitary adenomas represent 25% of intracranial tumors, they are usually benign, with the mechanisms by which these tumors usually avoid an invasive profile and metastatic growth development still remaining unclear. In this context, cellular senescence might constitute a plausible explanation for the benign nature of pituitary adenomas. In this study, we investigated the emergence of cellular senescence as a growth control mechanism during the progression of estrogen-induced pituitary tumors. The quantification of Ki67-immunopositive cells in the pituitaries of estrogenized male rats after 10, 20, 40, and 60 days revealed that the mitogenic potential rate was not sustained for the whole period analyzed and successively decreased after 10 days of estrogen exposure. In addition, the expression of cellular senescence features, such as the progressive rise in the enzymatic senescence-associated b-galactosidase (SA-b-gal) activity, IL6, IL1b, and TGFb expression, was observed throughout pituitary tumor development. Furthermore, tumoral pituitary cells also displayed nuclear pATM expression, indicating activated DNA damage signaling, with a significant increase in p21 expression also being detected. The associations among DNA damage signaling activation, SA-b-gal expression, and p21 may provide a reliable combination of senescence-associated markers for in vivo pituitary senescence detection. These results suggest a role for this cellular process in the regulation of pituitary cell growth. Thus, cellular senescence should be conceived as a contributing component to the benign nature of pituitary adenomas, thereby influencing the capability of the pituitary gland to avoid unregulated cell proliferation.

  13. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  14. Mutations in the hormone regulatory element of mouse mammary tumor virus differentially affect the response to progestins, androgens, and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Gowland, P L; Buetti, E

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is known to be induced by several steroid hormones. Using chimeric MMTV plasmids containing mutations within the hormone regulatory element, we have previously studied the regions required for the glucocorticoid response in mouse fibroblasts. Here we report the characterization of elements essential for the stimulation by progestins and androgens as compared with glucocorticoids. The same set of mutant plasmids was transfected into the human mammary tumor cell line T47D, and the specific transcripts were analyzed by an S1 nuclease protection assay. Androgen-mediated stimulation, although weak, showed an extended sensitivity to mutations, with a slight preference for the proximal region. The results with progestin suggest that sequences within all the described sites protected by the receptor in vitro are required and that the promoter-proximal region (-128 to -78 from the RNA start site) is more important than the distal one (-190 to -160). Moreover, a binding site for nuclear factor I was not required for the progestin response, whereas it was required for glucocorticoids. Thus, the various steroid receptors play a role in the differential regulation of mouse mammary tumor virus transcription by recognizing distinct sequence differences in the hormone regulatory element and interacting with different factors bound to the promoter. Images PMID:2550809

  15. SIRT3-dependent GOT2 acetylation status affects the malate–aspartate NADH shuttle activity and pancreatic tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Lisha; Shi, Qian; Zhao, Yuzheng; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhang, Mengli; Zhao, Shimin; Yang, Yi; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The malate–aspartate shuttle is indispensable for the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria to maintain a high rate of glycolysis and to support rapid tumor cell growth. The malate–aspartate shuttle is operated by two pairs of enzymes that localize to the mitochondria and cytoplasm, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases (GOT), and malate dehydrogenases (MDH). Here, we show that mitochondrial GOT2 is acetylated and that deacetylation depends on mitochondrial SIRT3. We have identified that acetylation occurs at three lysine residues, K159, K185, and K404 (3K), and enhances the association between GOT2 and MDH2. The GOT2 acetylation at these three residues promotes the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria and changes the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ redox state to support ATP production. Additionally, GOT2 3K acetylation stimulates NADPH production to suppress ROS and to protect cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, GOT2 3K acetylation promotes pancreatic cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, we show that GOT2 K159 acetylation is increased in human pancreatic tumors, which correlates with reduced SIRT3 expression. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which GOT2 acetylation stimulates the malate–aspartate NADH shuttle activity and oxidative protection. PMID:25755250

  16. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, David A.; Enfield, Katey S. S.; Martinez, Victor D.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Stewart, Greg L.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Lam, Wan L.

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation. PMID:25298778

  17. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor Avasimibe affect survival and proliferation of glioma tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bemlih, Sana; Poirier, Marie-Denise; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar

    2010-06-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and one of its hallmarks is resistance to apoptosis. Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an intracellular membrane-bound enzyme that uses cholesterol and long chain fatty acyl-CoA as substrates to produce cholesteryl esters. The presence of cholesteryl esters in glioblastoma may be related to vascular and/or cell neoplastic proliferation in the tumor mass, two prerequisites for tumor cell growth. ACAT activity has been detected in glioblastoma cell homogenates. The present study is the first report on the effect of Avasimibe, a specific inhibitor of ACAT, on glioma cell lines (U87, A172 and GL261). Our results showed that Avasimibe inhibited ACAT-1 expression and cholesterol ester synthesis in glioma cell lines. Moreover, Avasimibe inhibited the growth of the cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis as a result of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation. Also, Our findings provide proof of principle that targeting ACAT-1 with the inhibitor Avasimibe could be an efficient therapy in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  18. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, David A; Enfield, Katey S S; Martinez, Victor D; Thu, Kelsie L; Vucic, Emily A; Stewart, Greg L; Bennewith, Kevin L; Lam, Wan L

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  19. How does a protein with dual mitotic spindle and extracellular matrix receptor functions affect tumor susceptibility and progression?

    PubMed Central

    Tolg, Cornelia; McCarthy, James B

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the oncogenic effects of the hyaluronan (HA) receptor and mitotic spindle binding protein, RHAMM, are poorly understood. On one hand, extracellular RHAMM interacts with HA and cellsurface receptors such as CD44 to coordinately activate the MAPK/ERK1,2 pathway, thus contributing to the spread and proliferation of tumor cells. On the other hand, intracellular RHAMM decorates mitotic spindles and is necessary for spindle formation and progression through G2/M and overexpression or loss of RHAMM can result in multipole spindles and chromosome missegregation. The deregulation of these intracellular functions could lead to genomic instability and fuel tumor progression. This suggests that both extracellular and intracellular RHAMM can promote tumor progression. Intracellular RHAMM can bind directly to ERK1 to form complexes with ERK2, MEK1 and ERK1,2 substrates, and we present a model whereby RHAMM's function is as a scaffold protein, controlling activation and targeting of ERK1,2 to specific substrates. PMID:21655434

  20. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Mense, Sarah M; Bhat, Nimee K; Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhat, Hari K

    2010-09-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E(2)). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E(2)-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E(2) pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E(2)-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin+E(2)-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin+E(2) group relative to those in the E(2) group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F(2alpha) (8-iso-PGF(2alpha)) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E(2)-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E(2)-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E(2)-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E(2) and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E(2) and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E(2

  1. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bhupendra; Mense, Sarah M.; Bhat, Nimee K.; Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A.; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhat, Hari K.

    2010-09-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E{sub 2}-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E{sub 2} pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E{sub 2}-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E{sub 2}-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E{sub 2} group relative to those in the E{sub 2} group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F{sub 2{alpha}} (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E{sub 2}-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E{sub 2} and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E{sub 2} and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox

  2. A rationally designed combined treatment with an alphavirus-based cancer vaccine, sunitinib and low-dose tumor irradiation completely blocks tumor development.

    PubMed

    Draghiciu, Oana; Boerma, Annemarie; Hoogeboom, Baukje Nynke; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-10-01

    The clinical efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines remains limited. For effective immunotherapeutic responses in cancer patients, multimodal approaches capable of both inducing antitumor immune responses and bypassing tumor-mediated immune escape seem essential. Here, we report on a combination therapy comprising sunitinib (40 mg/kg), single low-dose (14 Gy) tumor irradiation and immunization with a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus vector encoding the oncoproteins E6 and E7 of human papillomavirus (SFVeE6,7). We previously demonstrated that either low-dose irradiation or sunitinib in single combination with SFVeE6,7 immunizations enhanced the intratumoral ratio of antitumor effector cells to myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). On the basis of these results we designed a triple treatment combinatorial regimen. The trimodal sunitinib, low-dose irradiation and SFVeE6,7 immunization therapy resulted in stronger intratumoral MDSC depletion than sunitinib alone. Concomitantly, the highest levels of intratumoral E7-specific CD8(+) T cells were attained after triple treatment. Approximately 75% of these cells were positive for the early activation marker CD69. The combination of sunitinib, low-dose tumor irradiation and SFVeE6,7 immunization dramatically changed the intratumoral immune compartment. Whereas control tumors contained 0.02 E7-specific CD8(+) T cells per MDSC, triple treatment tumors contained more than 200 E7-specific CD8(+) T cells per MDSC, a 10,000-fold increased ratio. As a result, the triple treatment strongly enhanced the immunotherapeutic antitumor effect, blocking tumor development altogether and leading to 100% tumor-free survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study demonstrates that this multimodal approach elicits superior antitumor effects and should be considered for clinical applications.

  3. Dietary phytochemical PEITC restricts tumor development via modulation of epigenetic writers and erasers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Sun, Yang; Lim, Sai Kiang; Tam, James P.; Dekker, Matthijs; Chen, Hong; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Dietary intake of bioactive phytochemicals including the cruciferous vegetable derivative phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) can reduce risk of human cancers, but possible epigenetic mechanisms of these effects are yet unknown. We therefore sought to identify the molecular basis of PEITC-mediated epigenetic tumor restriction. Colon cancer cells treated with low-dose PEITC for >1 month exhibited stable alterations in expression profile of epigenetic writers/erasers and chromatin-binding of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins. Sustained PEITC exposure not only blocked HDAC binding to euchromatin but was also associated with hypomethylation of PcG target genes that are typically hypermethylated in cancer. Furthermore, PEITC treatment induced expression of pro-apoptotic genes in tumor cells, which was partially reversed by overexpression of PcG member BMI-1, suggesting opposing roles for PEITC and PcG proteins in control of tumor progression. These data demonstrate that PEITC regulates chromatin binding of key epigenetic writers/erasers and PcG complexes to restrict tumor development. PMID:28079155

  4. [RAC3 overexpression is a transforming and proliferative signal that contributes to tumoral development].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Cecilia V; Micenmacher, Sabrina; Ruiz Grecco, Marina; Rubio, Maria F; Fernandez Larrosa, Nicolas; Costas, Monica A

    2011-01-01

    RAC3 has been firstly characterized as a nuclear receptor coactivator that is found in limited amounts in normal cells, but is over-expressed in tumors and is also an NF-kB coactivator. Although the mechanisms involved in its over-expression are not clear, it is well known that it enhances resistance to apoptosis. In this work, we investigated if there are any additional mechanisms by which RAC3 may contribute to tumor development and if TNF-a, an inflammatory cytokine that is found at high levels in cancer could increase RAC3 levels. We found that enhancement of RAC3 levels by transfection of HEK293 cells with a RAC3 expression vector induces a significant increase of cell proliferation not only in the presence, but also in the absence of serum growth factors. Moreover, the cells were transformed showing an anchorage independent growth, similar to that observed in tumoral cells. The treatment of HEK293 cells with TNF-a induced an increase in the protein levels of RAC3 and this was blocked by an NF-kB specific inhibitor, suggesting that this transcription factor is involved in the cytokine effect. We conclude that RAC3, in addition to is anti-apoptotic action, is a transforming factor that promotes the proliferation and growth independent of anchorage, and that its levels could be elevated by the action of inflammatory cytokines that are involved in the anti-tumoral response.

  5. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  6. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.

  7. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Löser, Reik; Pietzsch, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging. After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge toward their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes. PMID:26157794

  8. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  9. Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle East

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-20

    Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle East Elham Ghashghai and Rosalind Lewis RAND issue papers explore...COVERED (FROM - TO) xx-xx-2002 to xx-xx-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle

  10. Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle East

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-10

    Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle East Elham Ghashghai and Rosalind Lewis Afghanistan and its...Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Issues Affecting Internet Use in Afghanistan and Developing Countries in the Middle

  11. Development and Validation of Children's Environmental Affect (Attitude, Sensitivity and Willingness to Take Action) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Marcinkowski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design, development, validation, and psychometric properties of the Children's Environmental Affect Scale (CEAS). The following steps were taken in developing the CEAS. A substantial review of literature on environmental affect and EL helped the researchers identify several scales and questionnaires that, in turn, help…

  12. Maternal regulation of child affect in externalizing and typically-developing children.

    PubMed

    Lougheed, Jessica P; Hollenstein, Tom; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Granic, Isabela

    2015-02-01

    Temporal contingencies between children's affect and maternal behavior play a role in the development of children's externalizing problems. The goal of the current study was to use a microsocial approach to compare dyads with externalizing dysregulation (N =191) to healthy controls (N = 54) on maternal supportive regulation of children's negative and positive affect. Children were between the ages of 8 and 12 years. Mother-child dyads participated in conflict and positive discussions, and child affect and maternal supportive affect regulation were coded in real time. First, no group differences on overall levels of mother supportive regulation or child affect were found. Second, three event history analyses in a 2-level Cox hazard regression framework were used to predict the hazard rate of (a) maternal supportiveness, and of children's transitions (b) out of negative affect and (c) into positive affect. The hazard rate of maternal supportiveness, regardless of child affect, was not different between groups. However, as expected, the likelihood of mothers' supportive responses to children's negative affect was lower in externalizing than comparison dyads. In addition, children with externalizing problems were significantly less likely than typically developing children to transition out of negative affect in response to maternal supportiveness. The likelihood of both typically developing children and children with externalizing problems transitioning into positive affect were not related to specific occurrences of maternal supportiveness. Results of the current study show the importance of temporal dynamics in mother-child interactions in the emergence of children's externalizing problems.

  13. Development of affective theory of mind across adolescence: disentangling the role of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Altgassen, Mareike; Phillips, Louise; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind, the ability to understand mental states, involves inferences about others' cognitive (cognitive theory of mind) and emotional (affective theory of mind) mental states. The current study explored the role of executive functions in developing affective theory of mind across adolescence. Affective theory of mind and three subcomponents of executive functions (inhibition, updating, and shifting) were measured. Affective theory of mind was positively related to age, and all three executive functions. Specifically, inhibition explained the largest amount of variance in age-related differences in affective theory of mind.

  14. Early ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences after breast conservation affect survival: An analysis of the National Cancer Institute randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Joseph P.; Danforth, David N.; Albert, Paul; Sciuto, Linda C. B.S.N.; Smith, Sharon L.; Camphausen, Kevin A.; Poggi, Matthew M. . E-mail: MMPoggi@Bethesda.med.navy.mil

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conservation therapy (BCT) on survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one women were randomized to BCT. Patients with an IBTR were analyzed to determine survival. Analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates, log-rank tests, and time-dependent covariate Cox models. Results: At a median follow-up of 18.4 years, 27 patients had an IBTR. The median survival time after IBTR was 13.1 years. The 5-year survival rate was 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.5-100%). The 10-year survival rate was 54.3% (95% CI, 35.8-82.6%). According to a Cox model with time-dependent covariates, the hazard ratio or relative risk of dying for those with an IBTR at <5.3 years after BCT relative to patients without an IBTR after BCT is 1.47 (95% CI, 1.02-2.12%; p = 0.04). The hazard ratio for those who relapse after 5.3 years is 0.59 (95% CI, 0.22-1.61%; p = 0.31). Age at randomization, original tumor size, and the presence of positive regional nodes at initial presentation were not found to be associated with decreased survival. Conclusions: There seems to be a significant association of early IBTR after BCT with decreased survival. Local control should be maximized.

  15. A crucial role of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in liver tumor development by imazalil in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Matsuo, Saori; Kodama, Yukio; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the major pathway of liver tumor development induced by imazalil (IMA), an imidazole fungicide, male constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)-knockout (CARKO) and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with IMA at 500 ppm in the diet up to 27 weeks after initiation by diethylnitrosamine. After 27 weeks of treatment, neither altered foci nor adenomas were significantly increased in CARKO mice, whereas both eosinophilic altered foci and adenomas were increased in WT mice. After 4 or 13 weeks of IMA treatment, liver hypertrophy was observed at the tumor-inducible dose without differences among genotypes or durations. Analysis of hepatic drug metabolite enzymes, performed after administration of multiple doses during a 1-week period, indicated that pregnane X receptor might be involved in liver hypertrophy because IMA markedly elevated Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 expression levels in a dose-dependent manner in both genotypes. Our results demonstrated that the CAR pathway was the main mechanism of liver tumor development induced by IMA. The carcinogenic pathway was different from that of liver hypertrophy.

  16. Determination of a constitutional neuroendocrine factor probably influencing tumor development in man: prophylactic and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Audier, A G

    1988-01-01

    Slow recovery from stress may be one of the factors associated with the development of certain forms of cancer. In rabbits with slow recovery from stress, the growth rate of inoculated tumor cells was greater than those with rapid recovery. In cancer patients, the rate of recovery from stress was determined by the cortisol level in the blood after a stressful situation. Patients operated for breast and stomach carcinoma had a poorer prognosis if, after stress, the morning cortisol level of greater than 31 micrograms % did not decrease to less than or equal to 31 micrograms % during the next 2 weeks. It is suggested that slow recovery from stress is a genetically determined risk factor for certain diseases, including some malignant tumors. In healthy subjects a Rorschach test with form/color perception only was associated with a higher incidence of malignant neoplasms among their relatives than individuals with more movement than form/color perception.

  17. Recent Developments in Active Tumor Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Combination Chemotherapy in Cancer Treatment and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Micah D. K.; Chougule, Mahavir B.

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology and combination therapy are two major fields that show great promise in the treatment of cancer. The delivery of drugs via nanoparticles helps to improve drug’s therapeutic effectiveness while reducing adverse side effects associated with high dosage by improving their pharmacokinetics. Taking advantage of molecular markers over-expressing on tumor tissues compared to normal cells, an “active” molecular marker targeted approach would be beneficial for cancer therapy. These actively targeted nanoparticles would increase drug concentration at the tumor site, improving efficacy while further reducing chemo-resistance. The multidisciplinary approach may help to improve the overall efficacy in cancer therapy. This review article summarizes recent developments of targeted multifunctional nanoparticles in the delivery of various drugs for a combinational chemotherapy approach to cancer treatment and imaging. PMID:26554150

  18. Listeriolysin O as a strong immunogenic molecule for the development of new anti-tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Liu, Yuqin

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO), which is produced by Listeria monocytogenes, mediates bacterial phagosomal escape and facilitates bacterial multiplication during infection. This toxin has recently gained attention because of its confirmed role in the controlled and specific modulation of the immune response. Currently, cancer immunotherapies are focused on conquering the immune tolerance induced by poorly immunogenic tumor antigens and eliciting strong, lasting immunological memory. An effective way to achieve these goals is the co-administration of potent immunomodulatory adjuvant components with vaccine vectors. LLO, a toxin that belongs to the family of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), exhibits potent cell type-non-specific toxicity and is a source of dominant CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. According to recent research, in addition to its effective cytotoxicity as a cancer immunotherapeutic drug, the non-specific adjuvant property of LLO makes it promising for the development of efficacious anti-tumor vaccines. PMID:23399758

  19. Involvement of Mouse Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Acifluorfen-Induced Liver Injury and Subsequent Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Kazunori; Inoue, Kaoru; Ichimura, Ryohei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Shibutani, Makoto; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-06-01

    Acifluorfen (ACI), a protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PROTOX) inhibitor herbicide, promotes the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), and induces tumors in the rodent liver. Porphyria is a risk factor for liver tumors in humans; however, the specific mechanisms through which ACI induces hepatocarcinogenesis in rodents are unclear. Here, we investigated the mode of action of ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, focusing on constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which is essential for the development of rodent liver tumors in response to certain cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B inducers. Dietary treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for up to 13 weeks increased Cyp2b10 expression in the livers of wild-type (WT) mice, but not in CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice. Microscopically, ACI treatment-induced cytotoxic changes, including hepatocellular necrosis and inflammation, and caused regenerative changes accompanied by prolonged increases in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatocytes in WT mice. In contrast, these cytotoxic and regenerative changes in hepatocytes were significantly attenuated, but still observed, in CARKO mice. ACI treatment also increased liver PPIX levels similarly in both genotypes; however, no morphological evidence of porphyrin deposition was found in hepatocytes from either genotype. Treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for 26 weeks after initiation with diethylnitrosamine increased the incidence and multiplicities of altered foci and adenomas in hepatocytes from WT mice; these effects were significantly reduced in CARKO mice. These results indicated that prolonged cytotoxicity in the liver was a key factor for ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and that CAR played an important role in ACI-induced liver injury and tumor development in mice.

  20. Development of anticancer drugs based on the hallmarks of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bailón-Moscoso, Natalia; Romero-Benavides, Juan Carlos; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Cancer remains a public health problem with a high unmet medical demand. However, in recent decades, the knowledge of several functional molecular and biological traits that distinguish tumor cells from normal cells, known as the hallmarks of cancer as described by Hannahan and Weinberg, has led to new and modern therapeutic approaches against this disease. Most cancer drugs are deliberately developed for specific molecular targets that involve these hallmarks. In this review, we address the currently available cancer drugs and development of new drugs from the perspective of their interaction with these hallmarks as well as the pathways and mechanisms involved.

  1. Chlorinated Water Modulates the Development of Colorectal Tumors with Chromosomal Instability and Gut Microbiota in Apc-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Sasada, Tatsunari; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Takakura, Yuji; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to a variety of chemicals and commensal bacteria. Recent studies have shown that changes in gut microbial populations caused by chlorine or other chemicals in the drinking water influence the development of human colorectal cancer, although the mechanism of tumorigenesis in the gut epithelium is obfuscated by the diversity of microflora and complexity of the tumor microenvironment. In this regard, mouse models that recapitulate human colorectal cancer are an invaluable tool. In this study, we used two conditional adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) knockout mouse models to investigate the effect of chlorinated water on tumorigenesis in the digestive tract. Mice with colon-specific carcinoma--caused by either chromosomal (CDX2P 9.5-NLS Cre;Apc(+/flox), abbreviated to CPC;Apc) or microsatellite (CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox)) instability, respectively--were administered chlorinated (10.0 mg/L chlorine) or tap (0.7 mg/L chlorine) water and evaluated for colon polyp formation. In CPC;Apc mice given chlorinated drinking water, tumors tended to develop in the colon, whereas in those that drank tap water, tumors were mostly observed in the small intestine. There was no difference in the rate of tumor formation of CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox) mice consuming chlorinated as compared to tap water, suggesting that microsatellite instability in the Apc gene does not significantly affect tumorigenesis. Chlorinated water altered the enteric environment by reducing the fecal populations of the obligatory anaerobes Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile, as well as species belonging to the Atopobium cluster, including Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus sp., which was associated with colon tumorigenesis in CPC;Apc mice. These results suggest that differences in tumorigenesis among CPC;Apc mice consuming chlorinated versus tap water may be due to differences

  2. Production Conditions Affect the In Vitro Anti-Tumoral Effects of a High Concentration Multi-Strain Probiotic Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Cinque, Benedetta; La Torre, Cristina; Lombardi, Francesca; Palumbo, Paola; Van der Rest, Michel

    2016-01-01

    A careful selection of the probiotic agent, standardization of the dose and detailed characterization of the beneficial effects are essential when considering use of a probiotic for the dietary management of serious diseases. However, changes in the manufacturing processes, equipment or facilities can result in differences in the product itself due to the live nature of probiotics. The need to reconfirm safety and/or efficacy for any probiotic product made at a different factory is therefore mandatory. Recently, under the brand VSL#3®, a formulation produced by a manufacturer different from the previous one, has been commercialized in some European countries (the UK and Holland). VSL#3 is a high concentration multi-strain preparation which has been recognized by the main Gastroenterology Associations for the dietary management of pouchitis as well as ulcerative colitis. We have compared the “original” VSL#3 produced in USA with the “newfound” VSL#3 produced in Italy. According to our results, the “newfound” VSL#3 has 130–150% more “dead bacteria” compared to the “original” product, raising concerns for the well-known association between dead microbes with adverse effects. The abilities of bacterial lysates from the two formulations to influence in vitro viability and proliferation of different tumor cell lines also resulted different. The repair of previously scratched monolayers of various adherent tumor cell lines (i.e. HT1080, and Caco-2 cells) was inhibited more significantly by the “original” VSL#3 when compared to the “newfound” VSL#3. Tumor cell cycle profile, in particular cell cycle arrest and apoptotic death of the cancer cells, further confirms that the “original” VSL#3 has a better functional profile than the “newfound” VSL#3, at least in in vitro. Our data stress the importance of the production conditions for the “newfound” VSL#3 considering that this product is intended to be used for the dietary management

  3. Nuclear receptor CAR-regulated expression of the FAM84A gene during the development of mouse liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Saito, Kosuke; Takizawa, Daichi; Kakizaki, Satoru; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2011-06-01

    The nuclear xenobiotic receptor CAR is a phenobarbital (PB)-activated transcription factor. Using a mouse model of two-step liver tumorigenesis, in which tumor growth was initiated by diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) and promoted by chronic treatment with PB, we previously demonstrated that tumors developed only in the presence of CAR. Here, we have identified the FAM84A (family with sequence similarity 84, member A) gene as a CAR-regulated gene that is over-expressed during development of phenobarbital-promoted mouse liver tumors. FAM84A mRNA was induced in the liver of DEN/PB-treated mice prior to the development of liver tumors and this induction continued in the non-tumor as well as tumor tissues of a tumor-bearing liver. Western blotting demonstated that FAM84A protein expression increased in mouse liver after PB treatment; however, the FAM84A protein in liver and liver tumors was not phosphorylated at the serine 38 residue, which has been reported to correlate with morphological changes in cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed the cytoplasmic localization of FAM84A protein and its expression during tumor development in normal tissues (especially in hepatocytes around the central vein), eosinophilic foci, adenomas and carcinomas. HepG2 cell-based reporter assays indicated that CAR activated the FAM84A promoter. Exogenous over-expression of FAM84A in HepG2 cells resulted in increased cell migration. The physiological function of FAM84A remains unknown, but our results suggest that FAM84A is up-regulated by CAR during the development of liver tumors, and may play an important role in the progression of liver cancer by increasing cell migration.

  4. E2f8 mediates tumor suppression in postnatal liver development

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rakijas, Jessica B.; Pandit, Shusil K.; Westendorp, Bart; Chen, Hui-Zi; Huntington, Justin T.; Tang, Xing; Bae, Sooin; Srivastava, Arunima; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Martin, Chelsea K.; Cuitino, Maria C.; Perez, Miguel; Clouse, Julian M.; Chokshi, Veda; Shinde, Neelam; Kladney, Raleigh; Sun, Daokun; Perez-Castro, Antonio; Matondo, Ramadhan B.; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Mokry, Michal; Machiraju, Raghu; Fernandez, Soledad; Rosol, Thomas J.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Pipas, James M.; Schmidt, Carl R.; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    E2F-mediated transcriptional repression of cell cycle–dependent gene expression is critical for the control of cellular proliferation, survival, and development. E2F signaling also interacts with transcriptional programs that are downstream of genetic predictors for cancer development, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we evaluated the function of the atypical repressor genes E2f7 and E2f8 in adult liver physiology. Using several loss-of-function alleles in mice, we determined that combined deletion of E2f7 and E2f8 in hepatocytes leads to HCC. Temporal-specific ablation strategies revealed that E2f8’s tumor suppressor role is critical during the first 2 weeks of life, which correspond to a highly proliferative stage of postnatal liver development. Disruption of E2F8’s DNA binding activity phenocopied the effects of an E2f8 null allele and led to HCC. Finally, a profile of chromatin occupancy and gene expression in young and tumor-bearing mice identified a set of shared targets for E2F7 and E2F8 whose increased expression during early postnatal liver development is associated with HCC progression in mice. Increased expression of E2F8-specific target genes was also observed in human liver biopsies from HCC patients compared to healthy patients. In summary, these studies suggest that E2F8-mediated transcriptional repression is a critical tumor suppressor mechanism during postnatal liver development. PMID:27454291

  5. A rare case of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor developing in maxillary sinus of an old patient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Maithili Mandar; Khandeparkar, Siddhi Gaurish Sinai; Joshi, Avinash R; Barpande, Chitrangi

    2016-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET) family of tumors is an uncommon group of malignant neoplasms that may present in both skeletal and extraskeletal sites. PNET outside the central nervous system is called peripheral PNET (pPNET) developing from migrating embryonal cells of the neural crest. Very few cases of pPNET of the maxilla are reported in English literature. These tumors may be difficult to diagnose due to their primitive morphology. These tumors occur predominantly in infancy or early childhood. The occurrence of extraskeletal ES/PNET in the maxillary sinus in an old age is very rare. We report a case of extraskeletal ES/PNET developing in maxillary sinus in a 60-year-old woman. The ES/PNET should be included in the differential diagnosis of a small round cell tumor and immunohistochemical analysis with a panel of immunomarkers should be done for correct diagnosis and proper treatment.

  6. Development of a mouse model for sporadic and metastatic colon tumors and its use in assessing drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth E; Maricevich, Marco A; Richard, Larissa Georgeon; Chen, Wei Y; Richardson, Michael P; Kunin, Alexandra; Bronson, Roderick T; Mahmood, Umar; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2010-01-26

    Most genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models for colon cancer are based on tissuewide or germline gene modification, resulting in tumors predominantly of the small intestine. Several of these models involve modification of the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and are excellent models for familial cancer predisposition syndromes. We have developed a stochastic somatic mutation model for sporadic colon cancer that presents with isolated primary tumors in the distal colon and recapitulates the entire adenoma-carcinoma-metastasis axis seen in human colon cancer. Using this model, we have analyzed tumors that are either solely mutant in the Apc gene or in combination with another colon cancer-associated mutant gene, the Kras G12D allele. Because of the restricted location in the distal colon, the natural history of the tumors can be analyzed by serial colonoscopy. As the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical component of the complex signaling network in colon cancer, we used this model to assess the efficacy of mTOR blockade through rapamycin treatment of mice with established tumors. After treatment, Apc mutant tumors were more than 80% smaller than control tumors. However, tumors that possessed both Apc and Kras mutations did not respond to rapamycin treatment. These studies suggest that mTOR inhibitors should be further explored as potential colorectal cancer therapies in patients whose tumors do not have activating mutations in KRAS.

  7. Aurora B Overexpression Causes Aneuploidy and p21Cip1 Repression during Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    González-Loyola, Alejandra; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Trakala, Marianna; Partida, David; Samejima, Kumiko; Ogawa, Hiromi; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Martínez-Ramírez, Ángel; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; Earnshaw, William C; Malumbres, Marcos

    2015-10-01

    Aurora kinase B, one of the three members of the mammalian Aurora kinase family, is the catalytic component of the chromosomal passenger complex, an essential regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Aurora B is overexpressed in human tumors although whether this kinase may function as an oncogene in vivo is not established. Here, we report a new mouse model in which expression of the endogenous Aurkb locus can be induced in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Aurora B in cultured cells induces defective chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. Long-term overexpression of Aurora B in vivo results in aneuploidy and the development of multiple spontaneous tumors in adult mice, including a high incidence of lymphomas. Overexpression of Aurora B also results in a reduced DNA damage response and decreased levels of the p53 target p21(Cip1) in vitro and in vivo, in line with an inverse correlation between Aurora B and p21(Cip1) expression in human leukemias. Thus, overexpression of Aurora B may contribute to tumor formation not only by inducing chromosomal instability but also by suppressing the function of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1).

  8. Aurora B Overexpression Causes Aneuploidy and p21Cip1 Repression during Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    González-Loyola, Alejandra; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Trakala, Marianna; Partida, David; Samejima, Kumiko; Ogawa, Hiromi; Cañamero, Marta; de Martino, Alba; Martínez-Ramírez, Ángel; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; Earnshaw, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase B, one of the three members of the mammalian Aurora kinase family, is the catalytic component of the chromosomal passenger complex, an essential regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Aurora B is overexpressed in human tumors although whether this kinase may function as an oncogene in vivo is not established. Here, we report a new mouse model in which expression of the endogenous Aurkb locus can be induced in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Aurora B in cultured cells induces defective chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. Long-term overexpression of Aurora B in vivo results in aneuploidy and the development of multiple spontaneous tumors in adult mice, including a high incidence of lymphomas. Overexpression of Aurora B also results in a reduced DNA damage response and decreased levels of the p53 target p21Cip1 in vitro and in vivo, in line with an inverse correlation between Aurora B and p21Cip1 expression in human leukemias. Thus, overexpression of Aurora B may contribute to tumor formation not only by inducing chromosomal instability but also by suppressing the function of the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. PMID:26240282

  9. Genetic and environmental contributions to the development of positive affect in infancy.

    PubMed

    Planalp, Elizabeth M; Van Hulle, Carol; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2017-04-01

    We studied developmental changes in infant positive affect from 6 to 12 months of age, a time marked by increasing use of positive vocalizations, laughter, and social smiles. We estimated the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on observed and parent reported infant positive affect across development. Participants were drawn from a longitudinal twin study of infancy and toddlerhood (N = 536 twin pairs). Mothers and fathers reported on infant temperament and infants were videotaped during 2 observational tasks assessing positive affect. Parents also reported on their own affect and emotional expression within the family. Biometric models examined genetic and environmental influences that contribute to the developmental continuity of positive affect. Infant positive affect was associated with increased parent positive affect and family expressions of positive affect although not with family expressions of negative affect. In addition, the shared environment accounted for a large portion of variation in infant positive affect and continuity over time. These findings highlight the importance of the family environment in relation to infant positive emotional development. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Is rumen development in newborn calves affected by different liquid feeds and small intestine development?

    PubMed

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P; Kotunia, A; Jagusiak, W; Zabielski, R

    2011-06-01

    fed MR. Significant positive Pearson correlations were found between small intestine and reticulorumen weights as well as between activity of brush border lactase, maltase, aminopeptidase A, and aminopeptidase N and reticulorumen weight. Different liquid feeds affect small intestine development, animal growth, solid feed intake and metabolic status of calves and this effect can indirectly influence the development of forestomachs.

  11. The Development and Application of Affective Assessment in an Upper-Level Cell Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Elizabeth; Reeve, Suzanne; Bell, John D.; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2007-01-01

    This study exemplifies how faculty members can develop instruments to assess affective responses of students to the specific features of the courses they teach. Means for assessing three types of affective responses are demonstrated: (a) student attitudes towards courses with differing instructional objectives and methodologies, (b) student…

  12. Affections in Learning Situations: A Study of an Entrepreneurship Skills Development Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gondim, Sonia Maria Guedes; Mutti, Clara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the results of a study whose general objective is to characterize the affective states experienced in response to different teaching activities used in a workshop for developing entrepreneurial skills. It seeks to answer the following question: how affections and experiential learning strategies interrelate in…

  13. Androgen dependent mechanisms of pro-angiogenic networks in placental and tumor development.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Veronika M; de Brot, Simone; Robinson, Robert S; Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Rakha, Emad; Walton, Thomas; Gardner, David S; Lund, Emma F; Whitchurch, Jonathan; Haigh, Daisy; Lochray, Jack M; Robinson, Brian D; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Fray, Rupert G; Persson, Jenny L; Ødum, Niels; Miftakhova, Regina R; Rizvanov, Albert A; Hughes, Ieuan A; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Heery, David M; Rutland, Catrin S; Mongan, Nigel P

    2017-02-20

    The placenta and tumors share important characteristics, including a requirement to establish effective angiogenesis. In the case of the placenta, optimal angiogenesis is required to sustain the blood flow required to maintain a successful pregnancy, whereas in tumors establishing new blood supplies is considered a key step in supporting metastases. Therefore the development of novel angiogenesis inhibitors has been an area of active research in oncology. A subset of the molecular processes regulating angiogenesis are well understood in the context of both early placentation and tumorigenesis. In this review we focus on the well-established role of androgen regulation of angiogenesis in cancer and relate these mechanisms to placental angiogenesis. The physiological actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand dependent transcription factor. Androgens and the AR are essential for normal male embryonic development, puberty and lifelong health. Defects in androgen signalling are associated with a diverse range of clinical disorders in men and women including disorders of sex development (DSD), polycystic ovary syndrome in women and many cancers. We summarize the diverse molecular mechanisms of androgen regulation of angiogenesis and infer the potential significance of these pathways to normal and pathogenic placental function. Finally, we offer potential research applications of androgen-targeting molecules developed to treat cancer as investigative tools to help further delineate the role of androgen signalling in placental function and maternal and offspring health in animal models.

  14. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Jason P; Cuff, Simone M; Yong, Audrey A; Wang, Eddie C Y

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members' roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined.

  15. Antitumor immunization of mothers delays tumor development in cancer-prone offspring

    PubMed Central

    Barutello, Giuseppina; Curcio, Claudia; Spadaro, Michela; Arigoni, Maddalena; Trovato, Rosalinda; Bolli, Elisabetta; Zheng, Yujuan; Ria, Francesco; Quaglino, Elena; Iezzi, Manuela; Riccardo, Federica; Holmgren, Lars; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Maternal immunization is successfully applied against some life-threatening infectious diseases as it can protect the mother and her offspring through the passive transfer of maternal antibodies. Here, we sought to evaluate whether the concept of maternal immunization could also be applied to cancer immune-prevention. We have previously shown that antibodies induced by DNA vaccination against rat Her2 (neu) protect heterozygous neu-transgenic female (BALB-neuT) mice from autochthonous mammary tumor development. We, herein, seek to evaluate whether a similar maternal immunization can confer antitumor protection to BALB-neuT offspring. Significantly extended tumor-free survival was observed in BALB-neuT offspring born and fed by mothers vaccinated against neu, as compared to controls. Maternally derived anti-neu immunoglobulin G (IgG) was successfully transferred from mothers to newborns and was responsible for the protective effect. Vaccinated mothers and offspring also developed active immunity against neu as revealed by the presence of T–cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the neu immunodominant peptide. This active response was due to the milk transfer of immune complexes that were formed between the neu extracellular domain, shed from vaccine-transfected muscle cells, and the anti-neu IgG induced by the vaccine. These findings show that maternal immunization has the potential to hamper mammary cancer in genetically predestinated offspring and to develop into applications against lethal neonatal cancer diseases for which therapeutic options are currently unavailable. PMID:26155401

  16. Myeloid Leukemias and Virally Induced Lymphomas in Miniature Inbred Swine: Development of a Large Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Matar, Abraham J; Huang, Christene A

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in major histocompatibility characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  17. Advances in preclinical therapeutics development using small animal imaging and molecular analyses: the gastrointestinal stromal tumors model.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, M A; Landuzzi, L; Nicoletti, G; Nanni, C; Boschi, S; Piazzi, G; Santini, D; Di Battista, M; Castellucci, P; Lodi, F; Fanti, S; Lollini, P-L; Biasco, G

    2009-09-01

    The large use of target therapies in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) highlighted the urgency to integrate new molecular imaging technologies, to develop new criteria for tumor response evaluation and to reach a more comprehensive definition of the molecular target. These aspects, which come from clinical experiences, are not considered enough in preclinical research studies which aim to evaluate the efficacy of new drugs or new combination of drugs with molecular target. We developed a xenograft animal model GIST882 using nude mice. We evaluated both the molecular and functional characterization of the tumor mass. The mutational analysis of KIT receptor of the GIST882 cell lines and tumor mass showed a mutation on exon 13 that was still present after in vivo cell growth. The glucose metabolism and cell proliferation was evaluated with a small animal PET using both FDG and FLT. The experimental development of new therapies for GIST treatment requires sophisticated animal models in order to represent the tumor molecular heterogeneity already demonstrated in the clinical setting and in order to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment also considering the inhibition of tumor metabolism, and not only considering the change in size of tumors. This approach of cancer research on GISTs is crucial and essential for innovative perspectives that could cross over to other types of cancer.

  18. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC) technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI). PMID:22747748

  19. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Burns, Janine A; Cheney, Carol A; Zhang, Ningyan; Vitelli, Salvatore; Wang, Fubao; Bett, Andrew; Chastain, Michael; Audoly, Laurent P; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1) whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2) the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers. We found that the expression of Notch-1 protein was overexpressed in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), but not in primary ductal breast carcinoma or prostate adenocarcinoma. Further analysis revealed that higher levels of Notch-1 protein expression were significantly associated with poorer differentiation of breast and prostate tumors. Strikingly, for NSCLC, the expression levels of Notch-1 protein were found to be inversely correlated with tumor differentiation and progression. For colorectal tumors, however, no correlation of Notch-1 protein expression was found with any tumor clinicopathological parameters, in spite of its overexpression in tumor cells. Our data demonstrated the complexity of Notch-1 protein expression in human solid tumors and further supported the notion that the roles of Notch-1 expression in tumorigenesis are highly context-dependent. The findings could provide the basis for development of distinct therapeutic strategies of Notch-1 mAbs for its applications in the treatment of suitable types of human cancers. PMID:20631820

  20. Dysregulated Expression of Glycolipids in Tumor Cells: From Negative Modulator of Anti-tumor Immunity to Promising Targets for Developing Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Daniotti, Jose Luis; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycolipids are complex molecules consisting of a ceramide lipid moiety linked to a glycan chain of variable length and structure. Among these are found the gangliosides, which are sialylated glycolipids ubiquitously distributed on the outer layer of vertebrate plasma membranes. Changes in the expression of certain species of gangliosides have been described to occur during cell proliferation, differentiation, and ontogenesis. However, the aberrant and elevated expression of gangliosides has been also observed in different types of cancer cells, thereby promoting tumor survival. Moreover, gangliosides are actively released from the membrane of tumor cells, having a strong impact on impairing anti-tumor immunity. Beyond the undesirable effects of gangliosides in cancer cells, a substantial number of cancer immunotherapies have been developed in recent years that have used gangliosides as the main target. This has resulted in successful immune cell- or antibody-responses against glycolipids, with promising results having been obtained in clinical trials. In this review, we provide a general overview on the metabolism of glycolipids, both in normal and tumor cells, as well as examining glycolipid-mediated immune modulation and the main successes achieved in immunotherapies using gangliosides as molecular targets. PMID:26779443

  1. The development of techniques for resection of spinal cord tumors by Harvey W. Cushing.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spencer, Dennis D; Krauss, William E

    2005-01-01

    Harvey Cushing's refinement of Halsted's meticulous surgical techniques facilitated safe resection of intradural spinal tumors. Although Cushing focused his attention on brain tumors at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, his numerous contributions to the treatment of intradural spinal tumors include the description of these tumors' natural histories and their histological classifications. The application of his experienced intracranial techniques to the resection of spinal tumors improved outcomes. The authors review selected operative notes and sketches to demonstrate his technique in the excision of the spinal cord tumors.

  2. Clinical development of VEGF signaling pathway inhibitors in childhood solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Glade Bender, Julia; Yamashiro, Darrell J; Fox, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a target shared by both adult epithelial cancers and the mesenchymal or embryonal tumors of childhood. Development of antiangiogenic agents for the pediatric population has been complicated by largely theoretical concern for toxicities specific to the growing child and prioritization among the many antiangiogenic agents being developed for adults. This review summarizes the mechanism of action and preclinical data relevant to childhood cancers and early-phase clinical trials in childhood solid tumors. Single-agent adverse event profiles in adults and children are reviewed with emphasis on cardiovascular, bone health, and endocrine side effects. In addition, pharmacological factors that may be relevant for prioritizing clinical trials of these agents in children are reviewed. Considerations for further clinical evaluation should include preclinical data, relative potency, efficacy in adults, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval status. Toxicity profiles of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway inhibitors may be age dependent and ultimately, their utility in the treatment of childhood cancer will require combination with standard cytotoxic drugs or other molecularly targeted agents. In combination studies, toxicity profiles, potential drug interactions, and late effects must be considered. Studies to assess the long-term impact of VEGF signaling pathway inhibitors on cardiovascular, endocrine, and bone health in children with cancer are imperative if these agents are to be administered to growing children and adolescents with newly diagnosed cancers.

  3. Development of a locally advanced orthotopic prostate tumor model in rats for assessment of combined modality therapy

    PubMed Central

    TUMATI, VASU; MATHUR, SANJEEV; SONG, KWANG; HSIEH, JER-TSONG; ZHAO, DAWEN; TAKAHASHI, MASAYA; DOBIN, TIMOTHY; GANDEE, LEAH; SOLBERG, TIMOTHY D.; HABIB, AMYN A.; SAHA, DEBABRATA

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an aggressive locally advanced orthotopic prostate cancer model for assessing high-dose image-guided radiation therapy combined with biological agents. For this study, we used a modified human prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, PC3, in which we knocked down a tumor suppressor protein, DAB2IP (PC3-KD). These prostate cancer cells were implanted into the prostate of nude or Copenhagen rats using either open surgical implantation or a minimally invasive procedure under ultrasound guidance. We report that: i) these DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells form a single focus of locally advanced aggressive tumors in both nude and Copenhagen rats; ii) the resulting tumors are highly aggressive and are poorly controlled after treatment with radiation alone; iii) ultrasound-guided tumor cell implantation can be used successfully for tumor development in the rat prostate; iv) precise measurement of the tumor volume and the treatment planning for radiation therapy can be obtained from ultrasound and MRI, respectively; and v) the use of a fiducial marker for enhanced radiotherapy localization in the rat orthotopic tumor. This model recapitulates radiation-resistant prostate cancers which can be used to demonstrate and quantify therapeutic response to combined modality treatments. PMID:23525451

  4. Development of a locally advanced orthotopic prostate tumor model in rats for assessment of combined modality therapy.

    PubMed

    Tumati, Vasu; Mathur, Sanjeev; Song, Kwang; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Zhao, Dawen; Takahashi, Masaya; Dobin, Timothy; Gandee, Leah; Solberg, Timothy D; Habib, Amyn A; Saha, Debabrata

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an aggressive locally advanced orthotopic prostate cancer model for assessing high-dose image-guided radiation therapy combined with biological agents. For this study, we used a modified human prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, PC3, in which we knocked down a tumor suppressor protein, DAB2IP (PC3‑KD). These prostate cancer cells were implanted into the prostate of nude or Copenhagen rats using either open surgical implantation or a minimally invasive procedure under ultrasound guidance. We report that: i) these DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells form a single focus of locally advanced aggressive tumors in both nude and Copenhagen rats; ii) the resulting tumors are highly aggressive and are poorly controlled after treatment with radiation alone; iii) ultrasound-guided tumor cell implantation can be used successfully for tumor development in the rat prostate; iv) precise measurement of the tumor volume and the treatment planning for radiation therapy can be obtained from ultrasound and MRI, respectively; and v) the use of a fiducial marker for enhanced radiotherapy localization in the rat orthotopic tumor. This model recapitulates radiation-resistant prostate cancers which can be used to demonstrate and quantify therapeutic response to combined modality treatments.

  5. Overexpression of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 results in enhanced skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sung, Y M; He, G; Hwang, D H; Fischer, S M

    2006-09-07

    We previously showed that the EP2 knockout mice were resistant to chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the overexpression of the EP2 receptor in mouse skin carcinogenesis. To determine the effect of overexpression of EP2, we used EP2 transgenic (TG) mice and wild-type (WT) mice in a DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene)/TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) two-stage carcinogenesis protocol. EP2 TG mice developed significantly more tumors compared with WT mice. Overexpression of the EP2 receptor increased TPA-induced keratinocyte proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the epidermis of EP2 TG mice 48 h after topical TPA treatment was significantly thicker compared to that of WT mice. EP2 TG mice showed significantly increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the epidermis after prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) treatment. The inflammatory response to TPA was increased in EP2 TG mice, as demonstrated by an increased number of macrophages in the dermis. Tumors and 7 x TPA-treated and DMBA-TPA-treated (6 weeks) skins from EP2 TG mice produced more blood vessels than those of WT mice as determined by CD-31 immunostaining. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression was significantly increased in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples from EP2 TG mice compared that of WT mice. There was, however, no difference in the number of apoptotic cells in tumors from WT and EP2 TG mice. Together, our results suggest that the overexpression of the EP2 receptor plays a significant role in the protumorigenic action of PGE2 in mouse skin.

  6. The tumor suppressor HHEX inhibits axon growth when prematurely expressed in developing central nervous system neurons

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Matthew T; Venkatesh, Ishwariya; Callif, Ben L; Thiel, Laura K; Coley, Denise M; Winsor, Kristen N; Wang, Zimei; Kramer, Audra A; Lerch, Jessica K; Blackmore, Murray G

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the embryonic and peripheral nervous system respond to injury by activating transcriptional programs supportive of axon growth, ultimately resulting in functional recovery. In contrast, neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS) possess a limited capacity to regenerate axons after injury, fundamentally constraining repair. Activating pro-regenerative gene expression in CNS neurons is a promising therapeutic approach, but progress is hampered by incomplete knowledge of the relevant transcription factors. An emerging hypothesis is that factors implicated in cellular growth and motility outside the nervous system may also control axon growth in neurons. We therefore tested sixty-nine transcription factors, previously identified as possessing tumor suppressive or oncogenic properties in non-neuronal cells, in assays of neurite outgrowth. This screen identified YAP1 and E2F1 as enhancers of neurite outgrowth, and PITX1, RBM14, ZBTB16, and HHEX as inhibitors. Follow-up experiments focused on the tumor suppressor HHEX, one of the strongest growth inhibitors. HHEX is widely expressed in adult CNS neurons, including corticospinal tract neurons after spinal injury, but is present in only trace amounts in immature cortical neurons and adult peripheral neurons. HHEX overexpression in early postnatal cortical neurons reduced both initial axonogenesis and the rate of axon elongation, and domain deletion analysis strongly implicated transcriptional repression as the underlying mechanism. These findings suggest a role for HHEX in restricting axon growth in the developing CNS, and substantiate the hypothesis that previously identified oncogenes and tumor suppressors can play conserved roles in axon extension. PMID:26306672

  7. Development and validation of brief measures of positive and negative affect: the PANAS scales.

    PubMed

    Watson, D; Clark, L A; Tellegen, A

    1988-06-01

    In recent studies of the structure of affect, positive and negative affect have consistently emerged as two dominant and relatively independent dimensions. A number of mood scales have been created to measure these factors; however, many existing measures are inadequate, showing low reliability or poor convergent or discriminant validity. To fill the need for reliable and valid Positive Affect and Negative Affect scales that are also brief and easy to administer, we developed two 10-item mood scales that comprise the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The scales are shown to be highly internally consistent, largely uncorrelated, and stable at appropriate levels over a 2-month time period. Normative data and factorial and external evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the scales are also presented.

  8. Nondisjunction reduplication of chromosome 3 is not a common mechanism in the development of human renal cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, G; Wilkens, L; Papp, T

    1988-01-01

    Because of the recurrent loss of regions of the chromosome 3 short arm in renal cell carcinomas, a chromosomal mechanism for the expression of recessive cancer genes has been implicated in the development of this type of tumor. Nondisjunction and subsequent reduplication of a mutant chromosome is one of the presumed mitotic mechanisms leading to the expression of recessive cancer genes. Using variant fluorescence at the centromeric region of chromosome 3 and a restriction fragment length polymorphism on chromosome 3p, we found chromosome 3 heteromorphism in the constitutional cells of 14 of 15 patients with renal tumors showing two normal chromosomes 3. This heteromorphism was maintained in each tumor. Therefore, the mechanism of nondisjunction and reduplication in the development of homozygosity for a mutant chromosome 3 in renal tumors remains questionable.

  9. The biology of germ cell tumors in disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Hersmus, Remko; van Bever, Yolande; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P; Biermann, Katharina; Cools, Martine; Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2017-02-01

    Development of a malignant germ cell tumor, i.e., germ cell cancer (GCC) in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) depends on a number of (epi-)genetic factors related to early gonadal- and germ cell development, possibly related to genetic susceptibility. Fetal development of germ cells is orchestrated by strict processes involving specification, migration and the development of a proper gonadal niche. In this review we will discuss the early (epi-)genetic events in normal and aberrant germ cell and gonadal development. Focus will be on the formation of the precursor lesions of GCC in individuals who have DSD. In our view, expression of the different embryonic markers in, and epigenetic profile of the precursor lesions reflects the developmental stage in which these cells are blocked in their maturation. Therefore, these are not a primary pathogenetic driving force. Progression later in life towards a full blown cancer likely depends on additional factors such as a changed endocrine environment in a susceptible individual. Genetic susceptibility is, as evidenced by the presence of specific risk genetic variants (SNPs) in patients with a testicular GCC, related to genes involved in early germ cell and gonadal development.

  10. A key genetic factor for fucosyllactose utilization affects infant gut microbiota development

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Takahiro; Yahagi, Kana; Mori, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hoshitaka; Hara, Taeko; Tajima, Saya; Ogawa, Eishin; Kodama, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Yamada, Takuji; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Kurokawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that gut microbiota development influences infants' health and subsequent host physiology. However, the factors shaping the development of the microbiota remain poorly understood, and the mechanisms through which these factors affect gut metabolite profiles have not been extensively investigated. Here we analyse gut microbiota development of 27 infants during the first month of life. We find three distinct clusters that transition towards Bifidobacteriaceae-dominant microbiota. We observe considerable differences in human milk oligosaccharide utilization among infant bifidobacteria. Colonization of fucosyllactose (FL)-utilizing bifidobacteria is associated with altered metabolite profiles and microbiota compositions, which have been previously shown to affect infant health. Genome analysis of infants' bifidobacteria reveals an ABC transporter as a key genetic factor for FL utilization. Thus, the ability of bifidobacteria to utilize FL and the presence of FL in breast milk may affect the development of the gut microbiota in infants, and might ultimately have therapeutic implications. PMID:27340092

  11. Expanding a Model for Affective Development: Implications for an Activity Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrary, Nancye E.

    One useful framework for understanding and articulating instructional design to change biased beliefs is the Martin and Reigeluth model for affective development, appearing in Volume II of Reigeluth's "Instructional-Design Theories and Models" (1999). Using this recently developed framework to examine a Web-based multimedia instructional program…

  12. Developing Connections for Affective Regulation: Age-Related Changes in Emotional Brain Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Susan B.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of affective arousal is a critical aspect of children's social and cognitive development. However, few studies have examined the brain mechanisms involved in the development of this aspect of "hot" executive functioning. This process has been conceptualized as involving prefrontal control of the amygdala. Here, using functional…

  13. The Development of an Emotional Response to Writing Measure: The Affective Cognition Writing Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Ronald G.; Fischer, Jerome M.; Jain, Sachin

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to develop and initiate the validation of the Affective Cognition Writing Survey (ACWS), a psychological instrument used to measure emotional expression through writing. Procedures for development and validation of the instrument are reported. Subsequently, factor analysis extracted six factors: Positive Processing,…

  14. Trends and Issues Affecting Economic Development in Ohio, 2001-2005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jerold R.; Safrit, R. Dale

    Fourteen economic development practitioners were asked to participate in a modified Delphi study that attempted to provide a level of agreement about future trends and issues that affect economic development at the county level in Ohio. Literature from several fields was reviewed to find potential trends and issues and, using a Likert-type scale,…

  15. 78 FR 50425 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Brachyury Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... INFORMATION: Cancer immunotherapy is a recent approach where tumor associated antigens (TAAs), which are... metastasizing tumor cells, and could be a potential target for human T-cell mediated cancer immunotherapy, such... Brachyury Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Colorectal Cancer AGENCY: National Institutes...

  16. Rapid Copper Acquisition by Developing Murine Mesothelioma: Decreasing Bioavailable Copper Slows Tumor Growth, Normalizes Vessels and Promotes T Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Andrew; Jackaman, Connie; Beddoes, Katie M.; Ricciardo, Belinda; Nelson, Delia J.

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential trace element acquired through nutrition, is an important co-factor for pro-angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Decreasing bioavailable copper has been used as an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer strategy with promising results. However, the role of copper and its potential as a therapy in mesothelioma is not yet well understood. Therefore, we monitored copper levels in progressing murine mesothelioma tumors and analyzed the effects of lowering bioavailable copper. Copper levels in tumors and organs were assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mesothelioma tumors rapidly sequestered copper at early stages of development, the copper was then dispersed throughout growing tumor tissues. These data imply that copper uptake may play an important role in early tumor development. Lowering bioavailable copper using the copper chelators, penicillamine, trientine or tetrathiomolybdate, slowed in vivo mesothelioma growth but did not provide any cures similar to using cisplatin chemotherapy or anti-VEGF receptor antibody therapy. The impact of copper lowering on tumor blood vessels and tumor infiltrating T cells was measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Copper lowering was associated with reduced tumor vessel diameter, reduced endothelial cell proliferation (reduced Ki67 expression) and lower surface ICAM/CD54 expression implying reduced endothelial cell activation, in a process similar to endothelial normalization. Copper lowering was also associated with a CD4+ T cell infiltrate. In conclusion, these data suggest copper lowering is a potentially useful anti-mesothelioma treatment strategy that slows tumor growth to provide a window of opportunity for inclusion of other treatment modalities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24013775

  17. Development of enterohepatic fistula after embolization in ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Ho; Koo, Ja Seol; Jung, Chang Ho; Chung, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jae Joong; Kim, Seung Young; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Choung, Rok Seon; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jai Hyun

    2013-11-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract that has been associated with the formation of fistulas to adjacent organs in few case reports. However, GIST with enterohepatic fistula has not been reported. Here we report the case of an enterohepatic fistula that occurred after embolization of a liver mass originating in the distal ileum. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. On initial conventional endoscopy, a bleeding focus in the gastrointestinal tract was not found. Because of massive hematochezia, enteroscopy was performed through the anus. A protruding, ulcerative mass was found in the distal ileum that was suspected to be the source of the bleeding; a biopsy sample was taken. Electrocoagulation was not successful in controlling the bleeding; therefore, embolization was performed. After embolization, the patient developed a high fever and severe abdominal tenderness with rebound tenderness. Follow-up abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed an enterohepatic fistula between the liver and distal ileum. The fistula was treated surgically by segmental resection of the distal ileum and unlooping of the liver mass.

  18. Developing high-frequency ultrasound tomography for testicular tumor imaging in rats: An in vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Wei-Tsen

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a feasibility study for developing a 35-MHz high-frequency ultrasound computed-tomography (HFUCT) system for imaging rat testicles. Methods: The performances of two kinds of HFUCT-attenuation and sound-speed UCT-based on transmission and pulse-echo modes were investigated in this study. Experiments were carried out using phantoms and actual rat testiclesin vitro. HFUCT images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Results: The phantom experimental results indicated that all types of HFUCT can determine the dimensions of a plastic cylinder with a diameter of 500μm. Compared to sound-speed HFUCT, attenuation HFUCT exhibited a better performance in recognizing a tiny sclerosed region in a gelatin phantom. Therefore, the in vitro testicular experiments were performed using attenuation HFUCT based on transmission and pulse-echo modes. The experimentally measured attenuation coefficient and sound speed for healthy rat testicles were 2.92 ± 0.25 dB/mm and 1537 ± 25 m/s, respectively. Conclusions: A homogeneous texture was evident for healthy testicles using both modes. An artificial sclerosed tumor could also be clearly observed using two- and three-dimensional attenuation HFUCT in both modes. However, an object artifact was apparent in pulse-echo mode because of ultrasound beam refraction. All of the obtained experimental results indicate the potential of using HFUCT as a novel tool for monitoring the preclinical responses of testicular tumors in small animals.

  19. Prodrugs for targeted tumor therapies: recent developments in ADEPT, GDEPT and PMT.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Lutz F; Schmuck, Kianga

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of cancer with common anti-proliferative agents generally suffers from an insufficient differentiation between normal and malignant cells which results in extensive side effects. To enhance the efficacy and reduce the normal tissue toxicity of anticancer drugs, numerous selective tumor therapies have emerged including the highly promising approaches ADEPT (Antibody-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy), GDEPT (Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy) and PMT (Prodrug Monotherapy). These allow a selective release of cytotoxic agents from non-toxic prodrugs at the tumor site either by targeted antibody-enzyme conjugates, enzyme encoding genes or by exploiting physiological and metabolic aberrations in cancerous tissue. Herein, recent developments in the design and biological evaluation of prodrugs for use in ADEPT, GDEPT and PMT are reviewed. As a highlight, a series of novel glycosidic prodrugs based on the natural antibiotics CC-1065 and the duocarmycins will be discussed which show a therapeutic window of up to one million. Notably, the corresponding drugs have tremendously high cytotoxicities with IC(50) values of down to 110 fM.

  20. Tumoral profile in Down syndrome: A step towards the understanding of the consequences of aneuploidy and the development of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stage, D.; Sommelet, D.; Geneix, A.

    1994-09-01

    A review of the tumoral profile observed in Down syndrome has been done. Besides the well-known presence of congenital leukemia (recurring during childhood in 25% of cases) and the excess of acute leukemias occurring in the first two years of life where the nonlymphocytic (FAB M7) type is much more common than the lymphocytic (pre-B) type, some solid tumors are also observed more frequently in Down syndrome patients than in the general population. For example, one observes in Down syndrome patients an excess of lymphoma, germ cell tumors (testicular and extra testicular) as well as bone and pancreatic tumors. These tumors are often observed in male Down syndrome patients and occur sometimes during the fetal life. On the contrary, some tumors are less frequently observed in a Down syndrome population than in the general population. For example, in children, kidney and neurological (central and peripheral) tumors and in adults, digestive, pulmonary, skin, kidney, breast and uterine cancers are rare. These data suggest that there might be on chromosome 21, genes that may predispose or protect for cancer. The positioning of these genes by centromeric mapping in patients with trisomy 21 might be useful for the understanding of the consequences of aneuploidy and the development of cancer.

  1. [Pulmonary Metastasis from a Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast Developing Sixteen Years after Initial Surgery].

    PubMed

    Chang, Sung-Soo; Nakano, Takayuki; Okamoto, Taku; Takabatake, Daisuke

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of solitary pulmonary metastasis from a phyllodes tumor of the breast appearing 16 years after initial surgery. The patient was a 56-year-old woman who had undergone surgical extirpation of a left breast tumor diagnosed as phyllodes tumor (borderline malignancy) in 1998, and a right breast tumor diagnosed as fibromatosis in 2000. Sixteen years after the initial operation, she consulted our hospital because of a chest X-ray abnormality detected at a screening examination. Chest computed tomography revealed a well defined nodular shadow in the left upper lobe of the lung. Surgery was done since primary lung cancer was suspected. However, pathological diagnosis was a pulmonary metastasis from the phyllodes tumor of the left breast. Right breast tumor was also diagnosed as a metastasis from the left breast tumor by histopathological re-evaluation.

  2. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-03-17

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors.

  3. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  4. Tracking Official Development Assistance for Reproductive Health in Conflict-Affected Countries

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Preeti; Roberts, Bayard; Guy, Samantha; Lee-Jones, Louise; Conteh, Lesong

    2009-01-01

    Background Reproductive health needs are particularly acute in countries affected by armed conflict. Reliable information on aid investment for reproductive health in these countries is essential for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of aid. The purpose of this study was to analyse official development assistance (ODA) for reproductive health activities in conflict-affected countries from 2003 to 2006. Methods and Findings The Creditor Reporting System and the Financial Tracking System databases were the chosen data sources for the study. ODA disbursement for reproductive health activities to 18 conflict-affected countries was analysed for 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006. An average of US$20.8 billion in total ODA was disbursed annually to the 18 conflict-affected countries between 2003 and 2006, of which US$509.3 million (2.4%) was allocated to reproductive health. This represents an annual average of US$1.30 disbursed per capita in the 18 sampled countries for reproductive health activities. Non-conflict-affected least-developed countries received 53.3% more ODA for reproductive health activities than conflict-affected least-developed countries, despite the latter generally having greater reproductive health needs. ODA disbursed for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment increased by 119.4% from 2003 to 2006. The ODA disbursed for other direct reproductive health activities declined by 35.9% over the same period. Conclusions This study provides evidence of inequity in disbursement of reproductive health ODA between conflict-affected countries and non-conflict-affected countries, and between different reproductive health activities. These findings and the study's recommendations seek to support initiatives to make aid financing more responsive to need in the context of armed conflict. PMID:19513098

  5. Update on Brain Tumors: New Developments in Neuro-oncologic Diagnosis and Treatment, and Impact on Rehabilitation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Shahpar, Samman; Mhatre, Priya V; Huang, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Brain tumors can be a source of functional impairment to patients due to neurologic sequelae associated with the tumor itself as well as treatment side effects. As a result, many of these patients may require rehabilitation services. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy have been longstanding, primary treatment modalities in the management of brain tumors, though these treatments continue to evolve given new developments in research and technology. A better understanding of the diagnostic workup and current treatment standards helps the physiatrist and rehabilitation team identify rehabilitation services needed, recognize potential side-effects from anticipated or concurrent treatments, and coordinate care with referral sources. The purpose of this article is to review these new advances in diagnosis and treatment of patients with brain tumors, as well as discuss the rehabilitation implications for this population, including factors such as rehabilitation approach, timing of concomitant treatment, cost management, and coordination of care.

  6. Ex Vivo Treatment Response of Primary Tumors and/or Associated Metastases for Preclinical and Clinical Development of Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Brooke; Farooq, Mohammad; Modi, Shanu; Gerecitano, John; Chiosis, Gabriela; Alpaugh, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular analysis of established cancer cell lines has been the mainstay of cancer research for the past several decades. Cell culture provides both direct and rapid analysis of therapeutic sensitivity and resistance. However, recent evidence suggests that therapeutic response is not exclusive to the inherent molecular composition of cancer cells but rather is greatly influenced by the tumor cell microenvironment, a feature that cannot be recapitulated by traditional culturing methods. Even implementation of tumor xenografts, though providing a wealth of information on drug delivery/efficacy, cannot capture the tumor cell/microenvironment crosstalk (i.e., soluble factors) that occurs within human tumors and greatly impacts tumor response. To this extent, we have developed an ex vivo (fresh tissue sectioning) technique which allows for the direct assessment of treatment response for preclinical and clinical therapeutics development. This technique maintains tissue integrity and cellular architecture within the tumor cell/microenvironment context throughout treatment response providing a more precise means to assess drug efficacy. PMID:25350385

  7. Social brain development and the affective consequences of ostracism in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Catherine; Viding, Essi; Williams, Kipling D; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2010-02-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging studies have provided evidence for continued development of brain regions involved in social cognition during adolescence. In this paper, we review this rapidly expanding area of neuroscience and describe models of neurocognitive development that have emerged recently. One implication of these models is that neural development underlies commonly observed adolescent phenomena such as susceptibility to peer influence and sensitivity to peer rejection. Experimental behavioural evidence of rejection sensitivity in adolescence is currently sparse. Here, we describe a study that directly compared the affective consequences of an experimental ostracism manipulation (Cyberball) in female adolescents and adults. The ostracism condition led to significantly greater affective consequences in the adolescents compared with adults. This suggests that the ability to regulate distress resulting from ostracism continues to develop between adolescence and adulthood. The results are discussed in the context of models of neurocognitive development.

  8. Basics of tumor development and importance of human papilloma virus (HPV) for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittekindt, Claus; Wagner, Steffen; Mayer, Christina Sabine; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (HNSCC) are the 6th most common cancers worldwide. While incidence rates for cancer of the hypopharynx and larynx are decreasing, a significant increase in cancer of the oropharynx (OSCC) is observed. Classical risk factors for HNSCC are smoking and alcohol. It has been shown for 25 to 60% of OSCC to be associated with an infection by oncogenic human papilloma viruses (HPV). The development of “common” cancer of the head and neck is substantially enhanced by an accumulation of genetic changes, which lead to an inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of proto-oncogenes. A more or less uniform sequence of different DNA-damages leads to genetic instability. In this context, an early and frequent event is deletion on the short arm of chromosome 9, which results in inactivation of the p16-gene. In contrast, for HPV-induced carcinogenesis, expression of the viral proteins E6 and E7 is most important, since they lead to inactivation of the cellular tumor-suppressor-proteins p53 and Rb. The natural route of transoral infection is a matter of debate; peroral HPV-infections might be frequent and disappear uneventfully in most cases. Smoking seems to increase the probability for developing an HPV-associated OSCC. The association of HNSCC with HPV can be proven with established methods in clinical diagnostics. In addition to classical prognostic factors, diagnosis of HPV-association may become important for selection of future therapies. Prognostic relevance of HPV probably surmounts many known risk-factors, for example regional metastasis. Until now, no other molecular markers are established in clinical routine. Future therapy concepts may vary for the two subgroups of patients, particularly patients with HPV-associated OSCC may take advantage of less aggressive treatments. Finally, an outlook will be given on possible targeted therapies. PMID:23320061

  9. Epidermal CYLD inactivation sensitizes mice to the development of sebaceous and basaloid skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yingai Jane; Wang, Sally; Cho, Joshua; Selim, M. Angelica; Wright, Tim; Mosialos, George; Zhang, Jennifer Y.

    2016-01-01

    The deubiquitinase-encoding gene Cyld displays a dominant genetic linkage to a wide spectrum of skin-appendage tumors, which could be collectively designated as CYLD mutant–syndrome (CYLDm-syndrome). Despite recent advances, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this painful and difficult-to-treat skin disease. Here, we generated a conditional mouse model with epidermis-targeted expression of a catalytically deficient CYLDm through K14-Cre–mediated deletion of exon 9 (hereafter refer to CyldEΔ9/Δ9). CyldEΔ9/Δ9 mice were born alive but developed hair and sebaceous gland abnormalities and dental defects at 100% and 60% penetrance, respectively. Upon topical challenge with DMBA/TPA, these animals primarily developed sebaceous and basaloid tumors resembling human CYLDm-syndrome as opposed to papilloma, which is most commonly induced in WT mice by this treatment. Molecular analysis revealed that TRAF6-K63-Ubiquitination (K63-Ub), c-Myc-K63-Ub, and phospho-c–Myc (S62) were markedly elevated in CyldEΔ9/Δ9 skin. Topical treatment with a pharmacological c-Myc inhibitor induced sebaceous and basal cell apoptosis in CyldEΔ9/Δ9 skin. Consistently, c-Myc activation was readily detected in human cylindroma and sebaceous adenoma. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CyldEΔ9/Δ9 mice represent a disease-relevant animal model and identify TRAF6 and c-Myc as potential therapeutic targets for CYLDm-syndrome. PMID:27478875

  10. Design and Development of an Affective Interface for Supporting Energy-saving Activities and its Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kyoko; Tomita, Daisuke; Imaki, Tomotaka; Hongo, Taishiro; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    Toward a sustainable society, energy and environmental issues are very important and controversial problems, and it is expected to support various human activities for the measures by using Information Technology. The purpose of this study is to develop an affective interface for supporting people's energy-saving activities. First, a model for supporting people's energy-saving activities involving affective elements has been constructed for supporting people's energy-saving activities, based on social psychological approaches. Based on the proposed model, the requirements on an affective interface for people's energy-saving activities have been considered. In this study, the affective interface presents suitable energy-saving activities and current electric energy consumption by a character agent with a graphical shape and synthesized voice. The character agent recommends people's energy-saving activities, tells the method of energy-saving activities and the effectiveness, and so on. The affective interface for supporting energy-saving activities has been designed in detail and developed. Then, the evaluation experiment of the developed interface has been conducted, and the results of the experiments were analyzed.

  11. Development and initial evaluation of Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT) for veterans with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Gros, Daniel F

    2014-12-15

    Considerable attention has focused on the growing need for evidence-based psychotherapy for veterans with affective disorders within the Department of Veteran Affairs. Despite, and possibly due to, the large number of evidence-based protocols available, several obstacles remain in their widespread delivery within Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. In part as an effort to address these concerns, newer transdiagnostic approaches to psychotherapy have been developed to provide a single treatment that is capable of addressing several, related disorders. The goal of the present investigation was to develop and evaluate a transdiagnostic psychotherapy, Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT), in veterans with affective disorders. Study 1 provided initial support for transdiagnostic presentation of evidence-based psychotherapy components in veterans with principal diagnoses of affective disorders (n=15). These findings were used to inform the development of the TBT protocol. In Study 2, an initial evaluation of TBT was completed in a second sample of veterans with principal diagnoses of affective disorders (n=29). The findings of Study 2 demonstrated significant improvements in symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, posttraumatic stress, and related impairment across participants with various principal diagnoses. Together, the investigation provided preliminary support for effectiveness of TBT in veterans with affective disorders.

  12. Functional Disruption of the Netrin-1 Guidance Gue Leads to Disruption in Mammary Gland Development and Increased Tumor Incidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    during gland development and disease . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Netrin-1, tumor suppressor, neogenin, Slit2 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18...and whether this loss serves as a prognostic indicator of disease outcome. Appendixes: 4 Netrin-1/Neogenin Interaction Stabilizes Multipotent...luminal epithelial bi-layers during ductal morphogenesis is uncertain. Desmosomal constituents are present during postnatal mammary gland development, but

  13. The emerging insights into catalytic or non-catalytic roles of TET proteins in tumors and neural development

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Hao; Li, Wen-Bin; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins have been recently identified as critical regulators in epigenetic modification, especially in the methylation of cytosine in DNA. TET-mediated DNA oxidation plays prominent roles in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, especially in tumor and neural development. TET proteins execute stepwise enzymatic conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). In addition to the more proverbial enzymatic role of TET proteins, TET proteins also possess non-enzymatic activity, through interacting with some epigenetic modifiers. In this review article, we focus on TET proteins dual activities (catalytic or non-catalytic) in tumor and neural development. Hence, the clarification of TET proteins dual activities will contribute to our further understanding of neural development and may open the possibility of new therapeutic avenues to human tumors. PMID:27557497

  14. Sequencing of Local Therapy Affects the Pattern of Treatment Failure and Survival in Children With Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Beltran, Chris; Wu, Shengjie; Sharma, Shelly; Boop, Frederick A.; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Helton, Kathleen J.; Wright, Karen D.; Broniscer, Alberto; Kun, Larry E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the pattern of treatment failure associated with current therapeutic paradigms for childhood atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with AT/RT of the central nervous system treated at our institution between 1987 and 2007 were retrospectively evaluated. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and cumulative incidence of local failure were correlated with age, sex, tumor location, extent of disease, and extent of surgical resection. Radiotherapy (RT) sequencing, chemotherapy, dose, timing, and volume administered after resection were also evaluated. Results: Thirty-one patients at a median age of 2.3 years at diagnosis (range, 0.45-16.87 years) were enrolled into protocols that included risk- and age-stratified RT. Craniospinal irradiation with focal tumor bed boost (median dose, 54 Gy) was administered to 18 patients. Gross total resection was achieved in 16. Ten patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. RT was delayed more than 3 months in 20 patients and between 1 and 3 months in 4; 7 patients received immediate postoperative irradiation preceding high-dose alkylator-based chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 48 months, the cumulative incidence of local treatment failure was 37.5% {+-} 9%; progression-free survival was 33.2% {+-} 10%; and OS was 53.5% {+-} 10%. Children receiving delayed RT ({>=}1 month postoperatively) were more likely to experience local failure (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23, p = 0.007); the development of distant metastases before RT increased the risk of progression (HR 3.49, p = 0.006); and any evidence of disease progressionbefore RT decreased OS (HR 20.78, p = 0.004). Disease progression occurred in 52% (11/21) of children with initially localized tumors who underwent gross total resection, and the progression rate increased proportionally with increasing delay from surgery to RT. Conclusions: Delayed RT is associated with a higher rate of local and metastatic

  15. Dogs in the Hall: A Case Study of Affective Skill Development in an Urban Veterinary Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael; Tummons, John; Ball, Anna; Bird, William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this bounded single case study was to explore how an urban high school veterinary program impacted students' affective skill development. The program was unique because students were required to participate in internships with local animal care businesses and care for animals within the school veterinary laboratory. The…

  16. Factors Affecting Female Participation in Education in Seven Developing Countries. Second Edition. Education Research Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Colin; Cammish, Nadine

    Factors affecting female participation in education in seven developing countries were examined through field visits to the following countries: Bangladesh, Cameroon, India, Jamaica, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, and Vanuatu. In each country, researchers interviewed key personnel, consulted local documentation, and conducted two empirical surveys…

  17. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  18. On the Affective Challenges of Developing a Pedagogy of Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Jason K.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the affective challenges I experienced while attempting to develop a pedagogy of teacher education during my first three years in teacher preparation. Data were collected systematically over the course of the study in the form of written interpretive accounts of my experiences. Analysis of these accounts revealed how…

  19. The Federal Policy Landscape: A Look at How Legislation Affects Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islas, M. Rene

    2010-01-01

    Four years ago, Learning Forward established "affecting the policy context" as the first of five strategic priorities that would guide its efforts through 2011. Learning Forward believes that good policy promotes good practice and that laws and policies that promote and support effective professional development are needed to achieve the…

  20. Do Regulable Features of Child-Care Homes Affect Children's Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Burchinal, Margaret; O'Brien, Marion; McCartney, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Used data from NICHD Study of Early Child Care to assess whether regulable features of child care homes affected children's development. Found caregivers' education and recency of training related to learning environment and caregiving sensitivity. More positive caregiving related to compliance with age-weighted group-size cut-offs. Caregiver…

  1. Factors that Affect Emergent Literacy Development When Engaging with Electronic Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Lynda G.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews extant literature with the purpose of identifying factors that affect the potential efficacy of electronic books to support literacy development during early childhood. Selection criteria include experimental, quasi-experimental, and observational studies from peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2013 with a target population…

  2. The Effect of Differentiation Approach Developed on Creativity of Gifted Students: Cognitive and Affective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altintas, Esra; Özdemir, Ahmet S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a differentiation approach for the mathematics education of gifted middle school students and to determine the effect of the differentiation approach on creative thinking skills of gifted students based on both cognitive and affective factors. In this context, the answer to the following question was searched:…

  3. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  4. Variables Affecting the Effects of Recasts on L2 Pronunciation Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated how recasts can promote the L2 pronunciation development of word-initial /?/ by Japanese learners of English in relation to two developmental stages of English /?/ acquisition (i.e. change in second formant [F2] ? change in third formant [F3]) as well as four affecting variables (i.e. the amount of recasts and…

  5. A Sharing Experience: Development of a Group for Families Affected by HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Diane; Appleby, Sue

    1995-01-01

    Describes the establishment and development of a support group for the parents of children infected and/or affected by HIV infection. The group is hospital-based, meeting monthly since April 1992, facilitated by professionals but with a self-help and peer support emphasis. Explains the planning, setting, and running of the group. Identifies…

  6. Wilms' Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... team and have training in child development, recreation, psychology or social work. If your child must remain ... conditions/wilms-tumor/basics/definition/CON-20043492 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  7. China’s Economic Development Plan in Xinjiang and How It Affects Ethnic Instability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    DEVELOPMENT PLAN IN XINJIANG AND HOW IT AFFECTS ETHNIC INSTABILITY by Susan W. K. Wong-Tworek March 2015 Thesis Advisor: Tristan J. Mabry...DATES COVERED March 2015 Master ’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS CHINA’S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLAN IN XINJIANG AND HOW IT ...economic zone. China is also investing in Central Asia to further meet its energy demand. A network of pipelines and major rail systems connect

  8. Tumor protein Tctp regulates axon development in the embryonic visual system

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Cláudio Gouveia; Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Lin, Julie Qiaojin; Holt, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    The transcript encoding translationally controlled tumor protein (Tctp), a molecule associated with aggressive breast cancers, was identified among the most abundant in genome-wide screens of axons, suggesting that Tctp is important in neurons. Here, we tested the role of Tctp in retinal axon development in Xenopus laevis. We report that Tctp deficiency results in stunted and splayed retinotectal projections that fail to innervate the optic tectum at the normal developmental time owing to impaired axon extension. Tctp-deficient axons exhibit defects associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and we show that Tctp interacts in the axonal compartment with myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl2 family. Mcl1 knockdown gives rise to similar axon misprojection phenotypes, and we provide evidence that the anti-apoptotic activity of Tctp is necessary for the normal development of the retinotectal projection. These findings suggest that Tctp supports the development of the retinotectal projection via its regulation of pro-survival signalling and axonal mitochondrial homeostasis, and establish a novel and fundamental role for Tctp in vertebrate neural circuitry assembly. PMID:26903505

  9. Cancer as a channelopathy: ion channels and pumps in tumor development and progression.

    PubMed

    Litan, Alisa; Langhans, Sigrid A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels and pumps not only regulate membrane potential, ion homeostasis, and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and differentiation. Consistent with a role in cell signaling, channel proteins and ion pumps can form macromolecular complexes with growth factors, and cell adhesion and other signaling molecules. And while cancer is still not being cataloged as a channelopathy, as the non-traditional roles of ion pumps and channels are being recognized, it is increasingly being suggested that ion channels and ion pumps contribute to cancer progression. Cancer cell migration requires the regulation of adhesion complexes between migrating cells and surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Cell movement along solid surfaces requires a sequence of cell protrusions and retractions that mainly depend on regulation of the actin cytoskeleton along with contribution of microtubules and molecular motor proteins such as mysoin. This process is triggered and modulated by a combination of environmental signals, which are sensed and integrated by membrane receptors, including integrins and cadherins. Membrane receptors transduce these signals into downstream signaling pathways, often involving the Rho GTPase protein family. These pathways regulate the cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for proper timing of adhesion, contraction and detachment of cells in order to find their way through extracellular spaces. Migration and adhesion involve continuous modulation of cell motility, shape and volume, in which ion channels and pumps play major roles. Research on cancer cells suggests that certain ion channels may be involved in aberrant tumor growth and channel inhibitors often lead to growth arrest. This review will describe recent research into the role of ion pumps and ion channels in cell migration and adhesion, and how they may contribute to tumor development.

  10. Effects on Tumor Development and Metastatic Dissemination by the NKG2D Lymphocyte Receptor Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Gazzar, Ahmed; Cai, Xin; Reeves, Rebecca S.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Caballero-Benitez, Andrea; McDonald, David L.; Vazquez, Julio; Gooley, Ted A.; Sale, George E.; Spies, Thomas; Groh, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension wherein cancer cells themselves coopt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNAi-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may impact immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete. PMID:24141776

  11. Effects on tumor development and metastatic dissemination by the NKG2D lymphocyte receptor expressed on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El-Gazzar, A; Cai, X; Reeves, R S; Dai, Z; Caballero-Benitez, A; McDonald, D L; Vazquez, J; Gooley, T A; Sale, G E; Spies, T; Groh, V

    2014-10-09

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension, wherein cancer cells themselves co-opt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self-stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor-promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may have an impact on immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete.

  12. Daikenchuto (TU-100) Suppresses Tumor Development in the Azoxymethane and APC(min/+) Mouse Models of Experimental Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takumu; Matsukawa, Jun; Ringus, Daina; Miyoshi, Jun; Hart, John; Kaneko, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka; Wang, Chong-Zi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Bissonnette, Marc; Musch, Mark W; Chang, Eugene B

    2017-01-01

    Chemopreventative properties of traditional medicines and underlying mechanisms of action are incompletely investigated. This study demonstrates that dietary daikenchuto (TU-100), comprised of ginger, ginseng, and Japanese pepper effectively suppresses intestinal tumor development and progression in the azoxymethane (AOM) and APC(min/+) mouse models. For the AOM model, TU-100 was provided after the first of six biweekly AOM injections. Mice were sacrificed at 30 weeks. APC(min/+) mice were fed diet without or with TU-100 starting at 6 weeks, and sacrificed at 24 weeks. In both models, dietary TU-100 decreased tumor size. In APC (min/+) mice, the number of small intestinal tumors was significantly decreased. In the AOM model, both TU-100 and Japanese ginseng decreased colon tumor numbers. Decreased Ki-67 and β-catenin immunostaining and activation of numerous transduction pathways involved in tumor initiation and progression were observed. EGF receptor expression and stimulation/phosphorylation in vitro were investigated in C2BBe1 cells. TU-100, ginger, and 6-gingerol suppressed EGF receptor induced Akt activation. TU-100 and ginseng and to a lesser extent ginger or 6-gingerol inhibited EGF ERK1/2 activation. TU-100 and some of its components and metabolites of these components inhibit tumor progression in two mouse models of colon cancer by blocking downstream pathways of EGF receptor activation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Analysis on spatial transfer model of energy development layout and the ecological footprint affection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jinfang

    2017-01-01

    Consider the global energy interconnection, the global is concentrating on carrying out clean energy alternative, which is mainly focusing on using the clean energy to take place of fossil energy, and change the global energy layout and ecological atmosphere condition. This research gives the energy spatial transfer model of energy development layout to analyse the global energy development layout condition and ecological affection. And it is a fast and direct method to analyse its energy usage process and environmental affection. The paper also gives out a system dynamics model of energy spatial transfer shows, which electric power transmission is better than original energy usage and transportation. It also gives the comparison of different parameters. The energy spatial transfer can affect the environment directly. Consider its three environmental factors, including energy saving, climate changing and conventional pollutant emission reduction, synthetic combine with the spatial transfer model, it can get the environmental change parameters, which showed that with the clean energy wide usage, the ecological footprint affection will be affected significantly.

  14. Development of a Novel PET Tracer [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 Targeting MMP2 for Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chao; Zhang, Dazhi; Zhang, Anyu; Wang, Lizhen; Jiang, Hongdie; Wang, Tao; Liu, Hongrui; Xu, Yuping; Yang, Runlin; Chen, Fei; Yang, Min; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The overexpression of gelatinases, that is, matrix metalloproteinase MMP2 and MMP9, has been associated with tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. To image MMP2 in tumors, we developed a novel ligand termed [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6, with consideration that: c(KAHWGFTLD)NH2 (herein, C6) is a selective gelatinase inhibitor; Cy5.5-C6 has been visualized in many in vivo tumor models; positron emission tomography (PET) has a higher detection sensitivity and a wider field of view than optical imaging; fluorine-18 (18F) is the optimal PET radioisotope, and the creation of a [18F]AlF-peptide complex is a simple procedure. Methods C6 was conjugated to the bifunctional chelator NOTA (1, 4, 7-triazacyclononanetriacetic acid) for radiolabeling [18F]AlF conjugation. The MMP2-binding characteristics and tumor-targeting efficacy of [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 were tested in vitro and in vivo. Results The non-decay corrected yield of [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 was 46.2–64.2%, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 95%. [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 was favorably retained in SKOV3 and PC3 cells, determined by cell uptake. Using NOTA-C6 as a competitive ligand, the uptake of [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 in SKOV3 cells decreased in a dose-dependent manner. In biodistribution and PET imaging studies, higher radioactivity concentrations were observed in tumors. Pre-injection of C6 caused a marked reduction in tumor tissue uptake. Immunohistochemistry showed MMP2 in tumor tissues. Conclusions [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 was easy to synthesize and has substantial potential as an imaging agent that targets MMP2 in tumors. PMID:26540114

  15. Soy promotes juvenile granulosa cell tumor development in mice and in the human granulosa cell tumor-derived COV434 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; James, Rebecca; Ligon, Alysse; Li, Xiaohui; Pangas, Stephanie A

    2014-10-01

    Soy attracts attention for its health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol or preventing breast and colon cancer. Soybeans contain isoflavones, which act as phytoestrogens. Even though isoflavones have beneficial health effects, a role for isoflavones in the initiation and progression of diseases including cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. While data from rodent studies suggest that neonatal exposure to genistein (the predominant isoflavone in soy) disrupts normal reproductive function, its role in ovarian cancers, particularly granulosa cell tumors (GCT), is largely unknown. Our study aimed to define the contribution of a soy diet in GCT development using a genetically modified mouse model for juvenile GCTs (JGCT; Smad1 Smad5 conditional double knockout mice) as well as a human JGCT cell line (COV434). While dietary soy cannot initiate JGCT development in mice, we show that it has dramatic effects on GCT growth and tumor progression compared to a soy-free diet. Loss of Smad1 and Smad5 alters estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) expression in granulosa cells, perhaps sensitizing the cells to the effects of genistein. In addition, we found that genistein modulates estrogen receptor expression in the human JGCT cell line and positively promotes cell growth in part by suppressing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Combined, our work suggests that dietary soy consumption has deleterious effects on GCT development.

  16. Soy Promotes Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumor Development in Mice and in the Human Granulosa Cell Tumor-Derived COV434 Cell Line1

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; James, Rebecca; Ligon, Alysse; Li, Xiaohui; Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soy attracts attention for its health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol or preventing breast and colon cancer. Soybeans contain isoflavones, which act as phytoestrogens. Even though isoflavones have beneficial health effects, a role for isoflavones in the initiation and progression of diseases including cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. While data from rodent studies suggest that neonatal exposure to genistein (the predominant isoflavone in soy) disrupts normal reproductive function, its role in ovarian cancers, particularly granulosa cell tumors (GCT), is largely unknown. Our study aimed to define the contribution of a soy diet in GCT development using a genetically modified mouse model for juvenile GCTs (JGCT; Smad1 Smad5 conditional double knockout mice) as well as a human JGCT cell line (COV434). While dietary soy cannot initiate JGCT development in mice, we show that it has dramatic effects on GCT growth and tumor progression compared to a soy-free diet. Loss of Smad1 and Smad5 alters estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) expression in granulosa cells, perhaps sensitizing the cells to the effects of genistein. In addition, we found that genistein modulates estrogen receptor expression in the human JGCT cell line and positively promotes cell growth in part by suppressing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Combined, our work suggests that dietary soy consumption has deleterious effects on GCT development. PMID:25165122

  17. Giant Cell Tumor Developing in Paget’s Disease of Bone: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Puri, Ajay; Shah, Sanket; Rekhi, Bharat; Gulia, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a disease of elderly characterized by disorganized bone remodeling. Development of secondary neoplasm in PDB is a known but rare phenomenon. Development of giant cell tumor in PDB (GCT-PDB) is extremely rare, and little is known about its etiopathogenesis and management. We present a case report of such a development with a review of the literature and the role of various new modalities of treatment available in the management of this rare condition. Case Report: A 40-year-old gentleman presented with back pain and on evaluation was diagnosed as a case of polyostotic PDB. He was treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D supplements. After an asymptomatic period of 3-year, he presented with a gluteal mass involving ilium and sacrum which was confirmed as GCT on biopsy. Serial angioembolization was attempted but mass progressed, so surgery performed with excision and curettage of the lesion. He presented with a local recurrence 2 years later with a large soft tissue component. He was started on denosumab, RANKL inhibitor, with the aim to downstage the lesion. The patient showed a good response after 6 doses with reduction in soft tissue mass followed by which he underwent surgery with partial T-1 internal hemipelvectomy and curettage of sacrum. Currently, the patient is asymptomatic at a follow-up of 15 months. Conclusion: GCT-PDB is a rare phenomenon occurring mainly in polyostotic PDB and is associated with more severe manifestations of the disease. The management is challenging and requires multimodality management. Pharmacological agents include use of bisphosphonates and RANK ligand inhibitor - denosumab. Although surgery is the mainstay of treatment for GCT, other modalities of treatment such as RANK ligand inhibitors (denosumab), selective arterial embolization, or radiation therapy has to be used for inoperable cases or where surgery would be functionally too morbid, especially in cases

  18. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost always benign (not cancerous), but can cause hormonal imbalances and interfere with the normal function of the pituitary gland. Because the pituitary affects so many functions of the body, ... the tumor mass or hormonal changes (either too much or too little hormone). ...

  19. Deiodinase knockdown during early zebrafish development affects growth, development, energy metabolism, motility and phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Enise; Heijlen, Marjolein; Vergauwen, Lucia; Hagenaars, An; Houbrechts, Anne M; Esguerra, Camila V; Blust, Ronny; Darras, Veerle M; Knapen, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3) decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray), biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO) knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO) and knockdown of D3 (D3MO) both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle) development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct TH balance

  20. Anthropogenic changes in sodium affect neural and muscle development in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Espeset, Anne; Boser, Christopher J; White, William A; Smykalski, Rhea

    2014-07-15

    The development of organisms is changing drastically because of anthropogenic changes in once-limited nutrients. Although the importance of changing macronutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, is well-established, it is less clear how anthropogenic changes in micronutrients will affect organismal development, potentially changing dynamics of selection. We use butterflies as a study system to test whether changes in sodium availability due to road salt runoff have significant effects on the development of sodium-limited traits, such as neural and muscle tissue. We first document how road salt runoff can elevate sodium concentrations in the tissue of some plant groups by 1.5-30 times. Using monarch butterflies reared on roadside- and prairie-collected milkweed, we then show that road salt runoff can result in increased muscle mass (in males) and neural investment (in females). Finally, we use an artificial diet manipulation in cabbage white butterflies to show that variation in sodium chloride per se positively affects male flight muscle and female brain size. Variation in sodium not only has different effects depending on sex, but also can have opposing effects on the same tissue: across both species, males increase investment in flight muscle with increasing sodium, whereas females show the opposite pattern. Taken together, our results show that anthropogenic changes in sodium availability can affect the development of traits in roadside-feeding herbivores. This research suggests that changing micronutrient availability could alter selection on foraging behavior for some roadside-developing invertebrates.

  1. Anthropogenic changes in sodium affect neural and muscle development in butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C.; Espeset, Anne; Boser, Christopher J.; White, William A.; Smykalski, Rhea

    2014-01-01

    The development of organisms is changing drastically because of anthropogenic changes in once-limited nutrients. Although the importance of changing macronutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, is well-established, it is less clear how anthropogenic changes in micronutrients will affect organismal development, potentially changing dynamics of selection. We use butterflies as a study system to test whether changes in sodium availability due to road salt runoff have significant effects on the development of sodium-limited traits, such as neural and muscle tissue. We first document how road salt runoff can elevate sodium concentrations in the tissue of some plant groups by 1.5–30 times. Using monarch butterflies reared on roadside- and prairie-collected milkweed, we then show that road salt runoff can result in increased muscle mass (in males) and neural investment (in females). Finally, we use an artificial diet manipulation in cabbage white butterflies to show that variation in sodium chloride per se positively affects male flight muscle and female brain size. Variation in sodium not only has different effects depending on sex, but also can have opposing effects on the same tissue: across both species, males increase investment in flight muscle with increasing sodium, whereas females show the opposite pattern. Taken together, our results show that anthropogenic changes in sodium availability can affect the development of traits in roadside-feeding herbivores. This research suggests that changing micronutrient availability could alter selection on foraging behavior for some roadside-developing invertebrates. PMID:24927579

  2. Development of a dendritic cell-targeting lipopeptide as an immunoadjuvant that inhibits tumor growth without inducing local inflammation.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Takashi; Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Nakajima, Hiroko; Nishizawa, Yasuko; Kodama, Ken; Sugiura, Kikuya; Inaba, Toshio; Inoue, Norimitsu

    2014-12-15

    Materials used for the past 30 years as immunoadjuvants induce suboptimal antitumor immune responses and often cause undesirable local inflammation. Some bacterial lipopeptides that act as Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 ligands activate immune cells as immunoadjuvants and induce antitumor effects. Here, we developed a new dendritic cell (DC)-targeting lipopeptide, h11c (P2C-ATPEDNGRSFS), which uses the CD11c-binding sequence of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 to selectively and efficiently activate DCs but not other immune cells. Although the h11c lipopeptide activated DCs similarly to an artificial lipopeptide, P2C-SKKKK (P2CSK4), via TLR2 in vitro, h11c induced more effective tumor inhibition than P2CSK4 at low doses in vivo with tumor antigens. Even without tumor antigens, h11c lipopeptide significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. P2CSK4 was retained subcutaneously at the vaccination site and induced severe local inflammation in in vivo experiments. In contrast, h11c was not retained at the vaccination site and was transported into the tumor within 24 hr. The recruitment of DCs into the tumor was induced by h11c more effectively, while P2CSK4 induced the accumulation of neutrophils leading to severe inflammation at the vaccination site. Because CD11b+ cells, but not CD11c+ cells, produced neutrophil chemotactic factors such as macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in response to stimulation with TLR2 ligands, the DC-targeting lipopeptide h11c induced less MIP-2 production by splenocytes than P2CSK4. In this study, we succeeded in developing a novel immunoadjuvant, h11c, which effectively induces antitumor activity without adverse effects such as local inflammation via the selective activation of DCs.

  3. Keratinocyte-specific stat3 heterozygosity impairs development of skin tumors in human papillomavirus 8 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    De Andrea, Marco; Rittà, Massimo; Landini, Manuela M; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele; Kern, Florian; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Smola, Sigrun; Pfister, Herbert; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2010-10-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the genus β are thought to play a role in human skin cancers, but this has been difficult to establish using epidemiologic approaches. To gain insight into the transforming activities of β-HPV, transgenic mouse models have been generated that develop skin tumors. Recent evidence suggests a central role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) as a transcriptional node for cancer cell-autonomous initiation of a tumor-promoting gene signature associated with cell proliferation, cell survival, and angiogenesis. Moreover, high levels of phospho-Stat3 have been detected in tumors arising in HPV8-CER transgenic mice. In this study, we investigate the in vivo role of Stat3 in HPV8-induced skin carcinogenesis by combining our established experimental model of HPV8-induced skin cancer with epidermis-restricted Stat3 ablation. Stat3 heterozygous epidermis was less prone to tumorigenesis than wild-type epidermis. Three of the 23 (13%) Stat3(+/-):HPV8 animals developed tumors within 12 weeks of life, whereas 54.3% of Stat3(+/+):HPV8 mice already exhibited tumors in the same observation period (median age for tumor appearance, 10 weeks). The few tumors that arose in the Stat3(+/-):HPV8 mice were benign and never progressed to a more malignant phenotype. Collectively, these results offer direct evidence of a critical role for Stat3 in HPV8-driven epithelial carcinogenesis. Our findings imply that targeting Stat3 activity in keratinocytes may be a viable strategy to prevent and treat HPV-induced skin cancer.

  4. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters. Research report, January 1989-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M.

    1993-09-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that ozone and nitrogen dioxide modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors, in particular neuroendocrine cell tumors, in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen N-diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm) of ozone or 15 ppm nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. For positive controls, animals were treated with N-diethylnitrosamine and exposed to 65% oxygen. Ozone delayed the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. Ozone also seemed to mitigate development of hepatoxic lesions mediated by N-diethylnitrosamine. The role of ozone and nitrogen dioxide as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  5. Weaning Markedly Affects Transcriptome Profiles and Peyer’s Patch Development in Piglet Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Ryo; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nakatani, Masako; Okutani, Mie; Nishibayashi, Ryoichiro; Ogawa, Shohei; Harayama, Tomoko; Nagino, Takayuki; Hatanaka, Hironori; Fukuta, Kikuto; Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A.; Ushida, Kazunari; Kelly, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses were conducted on the ileal mucosa of 14- to 35-day-old piglets to investigate postnatal gut development during suckling and postweaning. The transcriptome profiles of 14-day-old suckling piglets showed a considerably higher number of differentially expressed genes than did those of 21-, 28-, and 35-day olds, indicating an intensive gut development during the first 14–21 postnatal days. In addition, the analysis of biological pathways indicated that Chemotaxis Leucocyte chemotaxis was the most significantly affected pathway in suckling piglets between 14 and 21 days of age. Weaning negatively affected pathways associated with acquired immunity, but positively affected those associated with innate immunity. Interestingly, pathway Chemotaxis Leucocyte chemotaxis was found positively affected when comparing 14- and 21-day-old suckling piglets, but negatively affected in 28-day-old piglets weaned at 21 days of age, when compared with 28-day-old suckling piglets. Genes CXCL13, SLA-DOA (MHC class II), ICAM1, VAV1, and VCAM1 were involved in the pathway Chemotaxis Leukocyte chemotaxis and they were found to significantly change between 14- and 21-day-old suckling piglets and between groups of suckling and weaned piglets. The expression of these genes significantly declined after weaning at 14, 21, and 28 days of age. This decline indicated that CXCL13, SLA-DOA, ICAM1, VAV1, and VCAM1 may be involved in the development of Peyer’s patches (PP) because lower gene expression clearly corresponded with smaller areas of PP in the ileal mucosa of piglets. Moreover, weaning piglets prior to a period of intensive gut development, i.e., 14 days of age, caused significant adverse effects on the size of PP, which were not reverted even 14 days postweaning. PMID:26697021

  6. Investigations into factors affecting the cascade developer used in ESDA--a review.

    PubMed

    Nic Daéid, N; Hayes, K; Allen, M

    2008-10-25

    The Electrostatic Detection Apparatus (ESDA) is a technique most commonly used for the visualisation of indented impressions on questioned documents. This work investigates some of the variables which are known to affect the results of ESDA and some variables which have, as yet, not been addressed. The investigation of variables included: examining the effects of different levels of indentation on different qualities of paper, chronological aging of cascade developer and the effects of repeated use of cascade developer on both the quality of results and the glass beads themselves, the effects of storage of cascade developer in a humidified environment and finally the effects of variation on the image development time. Results indicate that chronological aging of cascade developer does not have a negative effect on the quality of results and a 200 g portion of cascade developer will give good quality results for up to 30 traces before the quality will begin to deteriorate. Humidification of the cascade developer appears to have no advantages over storage in a normal environment and, in fact, the toner is lost sooner with humidification. The surface of the glass beads are affected through repeated use of cascade developer and appear to become visually smoother which may lead to a loss of attraction between them and the toner particles.

  7. AKT activation promotes PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome–associated cataract development

    PubMed Central

    Sellitto, Caterina; Li, Leping; Gao, Junyuan; Robinson, Michael L.; Lin, Richard Z.; Mathias, Richard T.; White, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene cause PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS), which includes cataract development among its diverse clinical pathologies. Currently, it is not known whether cataract formation in PHTS patients is secondary to other systemic problems, or the result of the loss of a critical function of PTEN within the lens. We generated a mouse line with a lens-specific deletion of Pten (PTEN KO) and identified a regulatory function for PTEN in lens ion transport. Specific loss of PTEN in the lens resulted in cataract. PTEN KO lenses exhibited a progressive age-related increase in intracellular hydrostatic pressure, along with, increased intracellular sodium concentrations, and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Collectively, these defects lead to lens swelling, opacities and ultimately organ rupture. Activation of AKT was highly elevated in PTEN KO lenses compared to WT mice. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of AKT restored normal Na+/K+-ATPase activity in primary cultured lens cells and reduced lens pressure in intact lenses from PTEN KO animals. These findings identify a direct role for PTEN in the regulation of lens ion transport through an AKT-dependent modulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and provide a new animal model to investigate cataract development in PHTS patients. PMID:24270425

  8. Sipuleucel-T: Prototype for development of anti-tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carballido, Estrella; Fishman, Mayer

    2011-04-01

    Prostate cancer immunotherapy officially debuted with the recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T. The novel trend of cancer immunotherapy relies on the identification of particular tumor-associated antigens, like prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). Sipuleucel-T consists of autologous dendritic cells activated in vitro with recombinant fusion protein PA2024, PAP-linked to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Sipuleucel-T represents a prototype for the development of cancer vaccines. Preclinical and clinical data as well as landmark studies for the existing narrow chemotherapy alternatives and early immunotherapy trials will be discussed. The pivotal trial demonstrated a 4.1-month difference of median survival, but with no effect on time to progression in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant patients. Several immunologic effects were observed in the treated population, including antibody and T cell-specific activity to P2024 and PAP. With all new therapies the extent of clinical and objective benefits versus encountered limitations should be evaluated. This review highlights the events and decisions in the process of the development of Sipuleucel-T. We discuss how this successful immunotherapy outcome challenges us to use it as a starting point for variations to or try to amplify practical anticancer progress within the antitumor vaccine paradigm.

  9. Photodynamic therapy: development of a treatment and dosimetry system adapted to superficial tumors of the bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lignon, Dominique; Jaboin, Y.; Wolf, D.; Meunier-Reynes, Anne; Guillemin, Francois H.

    1993-06-01

    Superficial tumors of the bladder or in situ carcinoma could be interesting indications of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), since a total mutilating cystectomy could be avoided. The plurifocality of the lesions requires a treatment of the whole mucose; the quantity of light energy must be homogenous and sufficient to induce a therapeutic effect, still non toxic for normal tissues. We therefore developed a system of treatment and intravesical dosimetry control so that the operator can have precise information on the light repartition in the bladder in real time to enable him to optimize the positioning of the irradiation source. This intravesical device consists of twelve light sensors with optical fiber distributed symmetrically against the walls of the bladder; the emitting source is constituted of a scattering isotropic sphere. The signals emitted by the sensors are converted into tension. The acquisition part of the system values consists of two parts : an analogic part, the values are multiplexed on a same oscilloscope track to see in real time their evolution according to the position of the emitting source. The other part is constituted by the numeric acquisition of values for further analysis. We developed, from a mathematical modelisation of the bladder, a centering program of the diffusor that indicates its position in the bladder, as well as a cartography program where the bladder is re-built by interpolation with the different lighting levels.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Tumor Marker for Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Major strides in the early detection, staging, monitoring, and risk stratification of men with prostate cancer have been realized over the last few decades. We have recently witnessed a reduction in the death rate for prostate cancer, stage migration with increased numbers of men with local/regional disease, and a greater understanding of the natural history of progression following recurrence. These advances, while not solely dependant on biomarkers, can be attributed to the discovery of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in the late 1970's. In the wake of these discoveries, we still continue to unnecessarily biopsy men at risk for having prostate cancer to identify the 1:4 with the disease, understage men with presumed local disease, continue to lack an accurate method for staging which can direct treatment options for the individual patient and continue to poorly understand the tumor biology and kinetics of disease progression. Clearly, discovery of a new tumor marker and validation/clinical investigation of the markers are mandatory to advance our knowledge and direct the care of men with prostate cancer. With this research, we intend to evaluate the clinical, diagnostic, and prognostic accuracy of new and existing biomarkers on a prospective serum bank collected from men either participating in early detection programs or engaging in pre or post treatment situations. By increasing our clinical research and specimen collections we hope to further advance the staging and direction for treatment in men with prostate cancer. This study approaches patients scheduled for a prostate biopsy, patients visiting the Urology Outpatient Clinic with PSA elevation, patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy, prostate cancer patients with scheduled appointments in Radiation Oncology and men participating in early prostate cancer detection screenings. Subjects will be excluded from the study if: 1) Subjects have any mental impairment that would hinder the ability to provide

  11. Fixing the Problem With Empathy: Development and Validation of the Affective and Cognitive Measure of Empathy.

    PubMed

    Vachon, David D; Lynam, Donald R

    2016-04-01

    Low empathy is a criterion for most externalizing disorders, and empathy training is a regular component of treatment for aggressive people, from school bullies to sex offenders. However, recent meta-analytic evidence suggests that current measures of empathy explain only 1% of the variance in aggressive behavior. A new assessment of empathy was developed to more fully represent the empathy construct and better predict important outcomes--particularly aggressive behavior and externalizing psychopathology. Across three independent samples (N = 210-708), the 36-item Affective and Cognitive measure of Empathy (ACME) was internally consistent, structurally reliable, and invariant across sex. The ACME bore significant associations to important outcomes, which were incremental relative to other measures of empathy and generalizable across sex. Importantly, the affective scales of the ACME-particularly a new "Affective Dissonance" scale--yielded moderate to strong associations with aggressive behavior and externalizing disorders. The ACME is a short, reliable, and useful measure of empathy.

  12. Expression of wilms' tumor gene and protein localization during ovarian formation and follicular development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Logan, Kathleen A; McNatty, Kenneth P; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2003-02-01

    Wilms' tumor protein (WT1) is a transcriptional repressor essential for the development of mammalian kidneys and gonads. To gain insight into possible roles of WT1 in ovarian formation and follicular function, we studied patterns of mRNA and protein localization throughout fetal gonadal development and in ovaries of 4-wk-old and adult sheep. At Day 24 after conception, strong expression of WT1 mRNA and protein was observed in the coelomic epithelial region of the mesonephros where the gonad was forming. By Day 30, expression was observed in the surface epithelium and in many mesenchymal and endothelial cells of the gonad. Epithelial cells continued to express WT1 throughout gonadal development, as did pregranulosa cells during the process of follicular formation. However, WT1 expression was not observed in germ cells. During follicular growth, granulosa cells expressed WT1 from the type 1 (primordial) to the type 4 stages, but thereafter expression was reduced in type 5 (antral) follicles, consistent with the differentiation of granulosa cells into steroid-producing cells. The possible progenitor cells for the theca interna (i.e., the cell streams in the ovarian interstitium) expressed WT1 heterogeneously. However, differentiated theca cells in antral follicles did not express WT1. Strong expression of WT1 was observed during gonadal development, which is consistent with a role for WT1 in ovarian and follicular formation in the ewe. WT1 was identified in many cells of the neonatal and adult ovaries, including granulosa cells, suggesting that this factor is important for preantral follicular growth. However, the decline in WT1 expression in antral follicles suggests that WT1 may prevent premature differentiation of somatic cells of the follicle during early follicular growth.

  13. Affective status in relation to impulsive, motor and motivational symptoms: personality, development and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Tomas; Beninger, Richard J; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Archer, Trevor

    2008-10-01

    The contributions of impulsive and risk-taking behaviour in depressive and bipolar disorders, motivational and motor behaviours in anhedonic and substance addictive states, and the factors, particularly distress and trauma, underlying the development of neuropathology in affective status are described from clinical, epidemiological and laboratory perspectives. In order to distinguish one case factor for biopsychological substrates of health, an array of self-reported characteristics, e.g., positive or negative affect, stress or energy, optimism, etc., that may be predictive or counterpredictive for the propensity for physical exercise and activity were analysed using a linear regression in twelve different studies. Several individual characteristics were found to be markedly and significantly predictive of the exercise propensity, i.e., positive affect, energy, health-seeking behaviour and character, while optimism was of lesser, though significant, importance. Several individual characteristics were found to be significantly counterpredictive: expression of BDI- and HAD-depression, major sleep problems and lack/negligence of health-seeking behaviour. The consequences of physical activity and exercise for both affective well-being, cognitive mobility and neurogenesis is noted, particularly with regard to developmental assets for younger individuals. Affective disorder states may be studied through analyses of personal characteristics that unfold predispositions for symptoms-profiles and biomarkers derived from properties of dysfunction, such as impulsiveness, temperament dimensions, anhedonia and 'over-sensitivity', whether interpersonal or to reward.

  14. Do laboratory rearing conditions affect auditory and mechanosensory development of zebrafish (Danio rerio)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poling, Kirsten R.; Jaworski, Eva; Fantetti, Kristen R.; Higgs, Dennis M.

    2005-04-01

    The effect of anthropogenic noise on the fish auditory system has become of increasing concern due to possible detrimental effects of intense sounds on auditory function and structures. This is especially problematic when raising fish in laboratory and aquaculture settings using filtration and aeration, which increase sound levels. To assess the effects of laboratory rearing conditions, one group of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos (``controls'') were placed into aerated aquaria in a normal laboratory rearing environment. A second set of embryos (``quiet'') were reared in aquaria with no aeration or filtration in a sound-resistant room. The intensity difference between the two sets of tanks was over 30 dB. Preliminary data show that there was no affect of differential rearing environments on saccular hair cell numbers or on hearing ability in fish up to 25 mm total length. However, rearing environment did affect neuromast number. ``Quiet'' fish had higher numbers of both cephalic and trunk superficial neuromasts, relative to controls. This difference was maintained up to 11 mm total length (the size at which canal formation begins). This suggests that acoustic environments normally found in the laboratory do not affect development of hearing in zebrafish, although laboratory acoustics may affect mechanosensory development.

  15. Pim-2 Modulates Aerobic Glycolysis and Energy Production during the Development of Colorectal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-hui; Yu, Hong-liang; Wang, Fu-jing; Han, Yong-long; Yang, Wei-liang

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells have higher rates of glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis to meet energy demands for proliferation and metastasis. The characteristics of increased glucose uptake, accompanied with aerobic glycolysis, has been exploited for the diagnosis of cancers. Although much progress has been made, the mechanisms regulating tumor aerobic glycolysis and energy production are still not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Pim-2 is required for glycolysis and energy production in colorectal tumor cells. Our results show that Pim-2 is highly expressed in colorectal tumor cells, and may be induced by nutrient stimulation. Activation of Pim-2 in colorectal cells led to increase glucose utilization and aerobic glycolysis, as well as energy production. While knockdown of Pim-2 decreased energy production in colorectal tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to apoptosis. Moreover, the effects of Pim-2 kinase on aerobic glycolysis seem to be partly dependent on mTORC1 signaling, because inhibition of mTORC1 activity reversed the aerobic glycolysis mediated by Pim-2. Our findings suggest that Pim-2-mediated aerobic glycolysis is critical for monitoring Warburg effect in colorectal tumor cells, highlighting Pim-2 as a potential metabolic target for colorectal tumor therapy.

  16. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is dispensable for virus-mediated liver and skin tumor development in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tung; Xu, Jianliang; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Pfister, Herbert; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) not only promotes immune diversity by initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes but also provokes genomic instability by introducing translocations and mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes. To test whether AID is essential for virus-induced tumor development, we used two transgenic tumor models: mice expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) core proteins (HCV-Tg), driven by the hepatitis B virus promoter, and mice expressing human papillomavirus type 8 proteins (HPV8-Tg), driven by the Keratin 14 promoter. Both strains were analyzed in the absence and presence of AID by crossing each with AID (-/-) mice. There was no difference in the liver tumor frequency between the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) and HCV-Tg/AID (-/-) mice at 20 months of age although the AID (+/+) mice showed more severe histological findings and increased cytokine expression. Furthermore, a low level of AID transcript was detected in the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) liver tissue that was not derived from hepatocytes themselves but from intra-hepatic immune cells. Although AID may not be the direct cause of HCV-induced oncogenesis, AID expressed in B cells, not in hepatocytes, may prolong steatosis and cause increased lymphocyte infiltration into HCV core protein-induced liver lesions. Similarly, there was no difference in the time course of skin tumor development between the HPV8-Tg/AID (-/-) and HPV8-Tg/AID (+/+) groups. In conclusion, AID does not appear to be required for tumor development in the two virus-induced tumor mouse models tested although AID expressed in infiltrating B cells may promote inflammatory reactions in HCV core protein-induced liver pathogenesis.

  17. Tumor progression locus 2 ablation suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma development by inhibiting hepatic inflammation and steatosis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), a serine threonine kinase, functions as a critical regulator of inflammatory pathways and mediates oncogenic events. The potential role of Tpl2 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains unkn...

  18. HORMONAL CONTROL OF OVARIAN FUNCTION FOLLOWING CHLOROTRIAZINE EXPOSURE: EFFECT ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION AND MAMMARY GLAND TUMOR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hormonal Control of Ovarian Function Following Chlorotriazine Exposure: Effect on Reproductive Function and Mammary Gland Tumor Development.

    Ralph L. Cooper, Susan C. Laws, Michael G. Narotsky, Jerome M. Goldman, and Tammy E. Stoker

    Abstract
    The studies review...

  19. Altered cytokine network in gestational diabetes mellitus affects maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Lauren; Belkacemi, Louiza

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an altered inflammatory profile, compared to the non-pregnant state with an adequate balance between pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines needed for normal development. Cytokines are small secreted proteins expressed mainly in immunocompetent cells in the reproductive system. From early developmental stages onward, the secretory activity of placenta cells clearly contributes to increase local as well as systemic levels of cytokines. The placental production of cytokines may affect mother and fetus independently. In turn because of this unique position at the maternal fetal interface, the placenta is also exposed to the regulatory influence of cytokines from maternal and fetal circulations, and hence, may be affected by changes in any of these. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an overall alteration of the cytokine network. This review discusses the changes that occur in cytokines post GDM and their negative effects on maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

  20. Haploinsufficiency of the Myc regulator Mtbp extends survival and delays tumor development in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Brian C.; Boyd, Kelli; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Eischen, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of specific genes can modulate aging. Myc, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of many genes involved in critical cellular functions was shown to have a role in controlling longevity. Decreased expression of Myc inhibited many of the deleterious effects of aging and increased lifespan in mice. Without altering Myc expression, reduced levels of Mtbp, a recently identified regulator of Myc, limit Myc transcriptional activity and proliferation, while increased levels promote Myc-mediated effects. To determine the contribution of Mtbp to the effects of Myc on aging, we studied a large cohort of Mtbp heterozygous mice and littermate matched wild-type controls. Mtbp haploinsufficiency significantly increased longevity and maximal survival in mice. Reduced levels of Mtbp did not alter locomotor activity, litter size, or body size, but Mtbp heterozygous mice did exhibit elevated markers of metabolism, particularly in the liver. Mtbp+/− mice also had a significant delay in spontaneous cancer development, which was most prominent in the hematopoietic system, and an altered tumor spectrum compared to Mtbp+/+ mice. Therefore, the data suggest Mtbp is a regulator of longevity in mice that mimics some, but not all, of the properties of Myc in aging. PMID:27803394

  1. ARTIE: An Integrated Environment for the Development of Affective Robot Tutors

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón Cuadrado, Luis-Eduardo; Manjarrés Riesco, Ángeles; De La Paz López, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade robotics has attracted a great deal of interest from teachers and researchers as a valuable educational tool from preschool to highschool levels. The implementation of social-support behaviors in robot tutors, in particular in the emotional dimension, can make a significant contribution to learning efficiency. With the aim of contributing to the rising field of affective robot tutors we have developed ARTIE (Affective Robot Tutor Integrated Environment). We offer an architectural pattern which integrates any given educational software for primary school children with a component whose function is to identify the emotional state of the students who are interacting with the software, and with the driver of a robot tutor which provides personalized emotional pedagogical support to the students. In order to support the development of affective robot tutors according to the proposed architecture, we also provide a methodology which incorporates a technique for eliciting pedagogical knowledge from teachers, and a generic development platform. This platform contains a component for identiying emotional states by analysing keyboard and mouse interaction data, and a generic affective pedagogical support component which specifies the affective educational interventions (including facial expressions, body language, tone of voice,…) in terms of BML (a Behavior Model Language for virtual agent specification) files which are translated into actions of a robot tutor. The platform and the methodology are both adapted to primary school students. Finally, we illustrate the use of this platform to build a prototype implementation of the architecture, in which the educational software is instantiated with Scratch and the robot tutor with NAO. We also report on a user experiment we carried out to orient the development of the platform and of the prototype. We conclude from our work that, in the case of primary school students, it is possible to identify, without

  2. ARTIE: An Integrated Environment for the Development of Affective Robot Tutors.

    PubMed

    Imbernón Cuadrado, Luis-Eduardo; Manjarrés Riesco, Ángeles; De La Paz López, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade robotics has attracted a great deal of interest from teachers and researchers as a valuable educational tool from preschool to highschool levels. The implementation of social-support behaviors in robot tutors, in particular in the emotional dimension, can make a significant contribution to learning efficiency. With the aim of contributing to the rising field of affective robot tutors we have developed ARTIE (Affective Robot Tutor Integrated Environment). We offer an architectural pattern which integrates any given educational software for primary school children with a component whose function is to identify the emotional state of the students who are interacting with the software, and with the driver of a robot tutor which provides personalized emotional pedagogical support to the students. In order to support the development of affective robot tutors according to the proposed architecture, we also provide a methodology which incorporates a technique for eliciting pedagogical knowledge from teachers, and a generic development platform. This platform contains a component for identiying emotional states by analysing keyboard and mouse interaction data, and a generic affective pedagogical support component which specifies the affective educational interventions (including facial expressions, body language, tone of voice,…) in terms of BML (a Behavior Model Language for virtual agent specification) files which are translated into actions of a robot tutor. The platform and the methodology are both adapted to primary school students. Finally, we illustrate the use of this platform to build a prototype implementation of the architecture, in which the educational software is instantiated with Scratch and the robot tutor with NAO. We also report on a user experiment we carried out to orient the development of the platform and of the prototype. We conclude from our work that, in the case of primary school students, it is possible to identify, without

  3. Development of an ErbB-overexpressing A-431 Optical Reporting Tumor Xenograft Model to Assess Targeted Photodynamic Therapy Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Savellano, Mark D.; Owusu-Brackett, Nicci; Son, Ji; Callier, Thierri; Savellano, Dagmar Högemann

    2010-01-01

    To better assess the efficacy of erbB-targeted therapies, it would help to have optical reporting human tumor xenograft models that abundantly express erbB receptors. A-431 cells have frequently been used in erbB1-targeting studies, but a well-characterized optical reporting version of the cell line has not been readily available. In this study, optical reporting A-431 clones were developed that express both a fluorescent protein reporter (green, GFP; or red, RFP) and a bioluminescent reporter, firefly luciferase. Reporter genes were transduced into cells using commercial lentiviral vectors, and clonal selection was carried out using a series of procedures. A number of clones were isolated for further characterization. A GFP/luciferase clone, A-431/D4, and an RFP/luciferase clone, A-431/G4, were obtained that exhibit erbB1 expression levels and tumor growth kinetics similar to the parental cells. To demonstrate the utility of the optical reporting clones, A-431/G4 tumors were grown subcutaneously in nude mice and treated with vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT), which targets the angiogenic consequences of erbB signaling. The A-431/G4 tumor model permitted highly sensitive longitudinal monitoring of PDT treatment response using optical imaging. A-431/D4 and A-431/G4 optical reporting tumor models should also prove useful for assessing therapies that directly target the erbB1 receptor. PMID:20880229

  4. Parents and early life environment affect behavioral development of laying hen chickens.

    PubMed

    de Haas, Elske N; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth; Kemp, Bas; Groothuis, Ton G G; Rodenburg, T Bas

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (SFP) in commercial laying hens is a maladaptive behavior which is associated with anxiety traits. Many experimental studies have shown that stress in the parents can affect anxiety in the offspring, but until now these effects have been neglected in addressing the problem of SFP in commercially kept laying hens. We therefore studied whether parental stock (PS) affected the development of SFP and anxiety in their offspring. We used flocks from a brown and white genetic hybrid because genetic background can affect SFP and anxiety. As SFP can also be influenced by housing conditions on the rearing farm, we included effects of housing system and litter availability in the analysis. Forty-seven rearing flocks, originating from ten PS flocks were followed. Behavioral and physiological parameters related to anxiety and SFP were studied in the PS at 40 weeks of age and in the rearing flocks at one, five, ten and fifteen weeks of age. We found that PS had an effect on SFP at one week of age and on anxiety at one and five weeks of age. In the white hybrid, but not in the brown hybrid, high levels of maternal corticosterone, maternal feather damage and maternal whole-blood serotonin levels showed positive relations with offsprings' SFP at one week and offsprings' anxiety at one and five weeks of age. Disruption and limitation of litter supply at an early age on the rearing farms increased SFP, feather damage and fearfulness. These effects were most prominent in the brown hybrid. It appeared that hens from a brown hybrid are more affected by environmental conditions, while hens from a white hybrid were more strongly affected by parental effects. These results are important for designing measures to prevent the development of SFP, which may require a different approach in brown and white flocks.

  5. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    PubMed Central

    D’Hollander, Antoine; Mathieu, Evelien; Jans, Hilde; Vande Velde, Greetje; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lagae, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3). Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. PMID:27536107

  6. Development of Advanced Technologies for Complete Genomic and Proteomic Characterization of Quantized Human Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    extending the period of performance soon. The Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) has...markers: (A) GFAP/astrocytes, (B), TUJ-1/neurons and (C) O4/oligodendrocytes. Cells were grown in NSA media without growth factors (EGF and FGF-2...Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) has collected potentially eligible tumor tissue from over forty GBM patients. • Primary GBM cell

  7. Development of a circulating miRNA assay to monitor tumor burden: From mouse to man.

    PubMed

    Greystoke, Alastair; Ayub, Mahmood; Rothwell, Dominic G; Morris, Dan; Burt, Deborah; Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Morrow, Christopher J; Smith, Nigel; Aung, Kyaw; Valle, Juan; Carter, Louise; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-02-01

    Circulating miRNA stability suggests potential utility of miRNA based biomarkers to monitor tumor burden and/or progression, particularly in cancer types where serial biopsy is impractical. Assessment of miRNA specificity and sensitivity is challenging within the clinical setting. To address this, circulating miRNAs were examined in mice bearing human SCLC tumor xenografts and SCLC patient derived circulating tumor cell explant models (CDX). We identified 49 miRNAs using human TaqMan Low Density Arrays readily detectable in 10 μl tail vein plasma from mice carrying H526 SCLC xenografts that were low or undetectable in non-tumor bearing controls. Circulating miR-95 measured serially in mice bearing CDX was detected with tumor volumes as low as 10 mm(3) and faithfully reported subsequent tumor growth. Having established assay sensitivity in mouse models, we identified 26 miRNAs that were elevated in a stage dependent manner in a pilot study of plasma from SCLC patients (n = 16) compared to healthy controls (n = 11) that were also elevated in the mouse models. We selected a smaller panel of 10 previously reported miRNAs (miRs 95, 141, 200a, 200b, 200c, 210, 335#, 375, 429) that were consistently elevated in SCLC, some of which are reported to be elevated in other cancer types. Using a multiplex qPCR assay, elevated levels of miRNAs across the panel were also observed in a further 66 patients with non-small cell lung, colorectal or pancreatic cancers. The utility of this circulating miRNA panel as an early warning of tumor progression across several tumor types merits further evaluation in larger studies.

  8. Misexpression of BRE gene in the developing chick neural tube affects neurulation and somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Chuai, Manli; Yeuk-Hon Chan, John; Lei, Jian; Münsterberg, Andrea; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-03-01

    The brain and reproductive expression (BRE) gene is expressed in numerous adult tissues and especially in the nervous and reproductive systems. However, little is known about BRE expression in the developing embryo or about its role in embryonic development. In this study, we used in situ hybridization to reveal the spatiotemporal expression pattern for BRE in chick embryo during development. To determine the importance of BRE in neurogenesis, we overexpressed BRE and also silenced BRE expression specifically in the neural tube. We established that overexpressing BRE in the neural tube indirectly accelerated Pax7(+) somite development and directly increased HNK-1(+) neural crest cell (NCC) migration and TuJ-1(+) neurite outgrowth. These altered morphogenetic processes were associated with changes in the cell cycle of NCCs and neural tube cells. The inverse effect was obtained when BRE expression was silenced in the neural tube. We also determined that BMP4 and Shh expression in the neural tube was affected by misexpression of BRE. This provides a possible mechanism for how altering BRE expression was able to affect somitogenesis, neurogenesis, and NCC migration. In summary, our results demonstrate that BRE plays an important role in regulating neurogenesis and indirectly somite differentiation during early chick embryo development.

  9. The Use of Narrative in Understanding how Cancer Affects Development: The Stories of One Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    LEE, CHRISTINA SUNMI

    2010-01-01

    Although cancer disrupts development, the experience of having cancer is often understood using developmental theories that do not assume serious illness at an early age. This article presents a narrative analysis of one patient’s story of survivorship. She tells three interrelated stories: how others have reacted to her illness; her struggles to understand her illness; and how it has changed her priorities. Taken together, her stories comprise an account of how the experience has affected her development. Her story is an example of how individuals integrate unusual life events into their development. It suggests that focusing more on how unusual life experiences contribute to development may expand and enrich our understanding of developmental processes. PMID:21151860

  10. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  11. Development of 124I-Immuno-PET Targeting Tumor Vascular TEM1/Endosialin

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Madhura; Mikitsh, John L.; Hu, Jia; Hou, Catherine; Grasso, Luigi; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Coukos, George

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1/endosialin) is a tumor vascular marker highly overexpressed in multiple human cancers with minimal expression in normal adult tissue. In this study, we report the preparation and evaluation of 124I-MORAb-004, a 124I-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody targeting an extracellular epitope of human TEM1 (hTEM1), for its ability to specifically and sensitively detect vascular cells expressing hTEM1 in vivo. Methods MAb MORAb-004 was directly iodinated with 125I and 124I, and in vitro binding and internalization parameters were characterized. The in vivo behavior of radioiodinated-MORAb-004 was characterized in mice bearing subcutaneous ID8 tumors enriched with mouse endothelial cells expressing hTEM1, or control tumors, by biodistribution studies and small animal immuno-PET studies. Results MORAb-004 was radiolabeled with high efficiency and isolated in high purity. In vitro studies demonstrated specific and sensitive binding of MORAb-004 to MS1 mouse endothelial cells expressing hTEM1, with no binding to control MS1 cells. 125I-MORAb-004 and 124I MORAb-004 both had an immunoreactivity of approximately 90%. In vivo biodistribution experiments revealed rapid, highly specific and sensitive uptake of MORAb-004 in MS1-TEM1 tumors at 4 h (153.2 ± 22.2 percent of injected dose per gram [%ID/g]), 24 h (127.1 ± 42.9 %ID/g), 48 h (130.3 ± 32.4 %ID/g), 72 h (160.9 ± 32.1 %ID/g), and 6 d (10.7 ± 1.8 %ID/g). Excellent image contrast was observed with 124I-immuno-PET. MORAb-004 uptake was statistically higher in TEM1-positive tumors versus control tumors, as measured by biodistribution and immuno-PET studies. Binding specificity was confirmed by blocking studies using excess nonlabeled MORAb-004. Conclusion In our preclinical model, with hTEM1 exclusively expressed on engineered murine endothelial cells that integrate into the tumor vasculature, 124I-MORAb-004 displays high tumor–to–background tissue contrast fordetection of hTEM1 in

  12. Institutional Guidance of Affective Bonding: Moral Values Development in Brazilian Military Education.

    PubMed

    Wortmeyer, Daniela Schmitz; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2016-09-01

    In this article, our aim is to analyze institutional practices guided to promote the development of moral values within the context of military education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers. From a cultural psychological approach, we discuss how social guidance within military culture operates at different levels of the affective-semiotic regulation of individuals, structuring complex experiences that give rise to hypergeneralized meaning fields regarding morality and military values. For this goal, we first introduce some theoretical topics related to values development, emphasizing their affective roots and role in the emergence, maintenance, amplification and attenuation of all relations between the person and the environment. Following a brief discussion on how social institutions try to promote changes in personal values, we provide an overview of values present in the military culture and socialization. Finally, the text focuses on the education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers, describing how practices related to different levels of affective-semiotic experience combine in order to promote the internalization and externalization of specific moral values. We conclude suggesting issues for future investigation.

  13. A Novel Forward Genetic Screen for Identifying Mutations Affecting Larval Neuronal Dendrite Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Paul Mark B.; Swick, Lance L.; Andersen, Ryan; Blalock, Zachary; Brenman, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate dendrites are information-processing compartments that can be found on both central and peripheral neurons. Elucidating the molecular underpinnings of information processing in the nervous system ultimately requires an understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate dendrite formation and maintenance. Despite the importance of dendrite development, few forward genetic approaches have been used to analyze the latest stages of dendrite development, including the formation of F-actin-rich dendritic filopodia or dendritic spines. We developed a forward genetic screen utilizing transgenic Drosophila second instar larvae expressing an actin, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein (actin∷GFP) in subsets of sensory neurons. Utilizing this fluorescent transgenic reporter, we conducted a forward genetic screen of >4000 mutagenized chromosomes bearing lethal mutations that affected multiple aspects of larval dendrite development. We isolated 13 mutations on the X and second chromosomes composing 11 complementation groups affecting dendrite outgrowth/branching, dendritic filopodia formation, or actin∷GFP localization within dendrites in vivo. In a fortuitous observation, we observed that the structure of dendritic arborization (da) neuron dendritic filopodia changes in response to a changing environment. PMID:16415365

  14. Preclinical Development of Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Combination Immunotherapy: Mouse Tumor Models, In Vitro Functional Studies, and Cynomolgus Macaque Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Mark J.; Engelhardt, John J.; Johnston, Robert J.; Lu, Li-Sheng; Han, Minhua; Thudium, Kent; Yao, Dapeng; Quigley, Michael; Valle, Jose; Wang, Changyu; Chen, Bing; Cardarelli, Pina M.; Blanset, Diann; Korman, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) and nivolumab (anti-PD-1) have shown remarkable antitumor activity in an increasing number of cancers. When combined, ipilimumab and nivolumab have demonstrated superior activity in patients with metastatic melanoma (CHECKMATE-067). Here we describe the preclinical development strategy that predicted these clinical results. Synergistic antitumor activity in mouse MC38 and CT26 colorectal tumor models was observed with concurrent, but not sequential CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade. Significant antitumor activity was maintained using a fixed dose of anti-CTLA-4 antibody with decreasing doses of anti-PD-1 antibody in the MC38 model. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses confirmed that CD3+ T cells accumulated at the tumor margin and infiltrated the tumor mass in response to the combination therapy, resulting in favorable effector and regulatory T-cell ratios, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and activation of tumor-specific T cells. Similarly, in vitro studies with combined ipilimumab and nivolumab showed enhanced cytokine secretion in superantigen stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and in mixed lymphocyte response assays. In a cynomolgus macaque toxicology study, dose-dependent immune-related gastrointestinal inflammation was observed with the combination therapy; this response had not been observed in previous single agent cynomolgus studies. Together, these in vitro assays and in vivo models comprise a preclinical strategy for the identification and development of highly effective antitumor combination immunotherapies. PMID:27610613

  15. Effects of paclitaxel on the development of neuropathy and affective behaviors in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Toma, Wisam; Kyte, S Lauren; Bagdas, Deniz; Alkhlaif, Yasmin; Alsharari, Shakir D; Lichtman, Aron H; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Bigbee, John W; Gewirtz, David A; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-02-22

    Paclitaxel, one of the most commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, effectively extends the progression-free survival of breast, lung, and ovarian cancer patients. However, paclitaxel and other chemotherapy drugs elicit peripheral nerve fiber dysfunction or degeneration that leads to peripheral neuropathy in a large proportion of cancer patients. Patients receiving chemotherapy also often experience changes in mood, including anxiety and depression. These somatic and affective disorders represent major dose-limiting side effects of chemotherapy. Consequently, the present study was designed to develop a preclinical model of paclitaxel-induced negative affective symptoms in order to identify treatment strategies and their underlying mechanisms of action. Intraperitoneal injections of paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) resulted in the development and maintenance of mechanical and cold allodynia. Carboplatin, another cancer chemotherapeutic drug that is often used in combination with paclitaxel, sensitized mice to the nociceptive effects of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel also induced anxiety-like behavior, as assessed in the novelty suppressed feeding and light/dark box tests. In addition, paclitaxel-treated mice displayed depression-like behavior during the forced swim test and an anhedonia-like state in the sucrose preference test. In summary, paclitaxel produced altered behaviors in assays modeling affective states in C57BL/6J male mice, while increases in nociceptive responses were longer in duration. The characterization of this preclinical model of chemotherapy-induced allodynia and affective symptoms, possibly related to neuropathic pain, provides the basis for determining the mechanism(s) underlying severe side effects elicited by paclitaxel, as well as for predicting the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions.

  16. Paving the Road to Tumor Development and Spreading: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells are Ruling the Fate

    PubMed Central

    Meirow, Yaron; Kanterman, Julia; Baniyash, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development is dependent on intrinsic cellular changes as well as inflammatory factors in the tumor macro and microenvironment. The inflammatory milieu nourishes the tumor and contributes to cancer progression. Numerous studies, including ours, have demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is immunosuppressive, impairing the anticancer immune responses. Chronic inflammation was identified as the key process responsible for this immunosuppression via induction of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Upon a prolonged immune response, MDSCs are polarized toward immunosuppressive cells meant to control the exacerbated immune response. In cancer, the chronic inflammatory response renders the MDSCs harmful. Polarized MDSCs suppress T-cells and natural killer cells, as well as antigen-presenting cells, abrogating the beneficial immune response. These changes in the immunological milieu could also lead to high frequency of mutations, enhanced cancer cell stemness, and angiogenesis, directly supporting tumor initiation, growth, and spreading. The presence of MDSCs in cancer poses a serious obstacle in a variety of immune-based therapies, which rely on the stimulation of antitumor immune responses. Cumulative data, including our own, suggest that the selection of an appropriate and effective anticancer therapy must take into consideration the host’s immune status as well as tumor-related parameters. Merging biomarkers for immune monitoring into the traditional patient’s categorization and follow-up can provide new predictive and diagnostic tools to the clinical practice. Chronic inflammation and MDSCs could serve as novel targets for therapeutic interventions, which can be combined with conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and cancer cell-targeted and immune-based therapies. Intervention in environmental and tumor-specific inflammatory mechanisms will allow better clinical management of cancer toward more efficient

  17. Helicobacter pylori Infection Promotes Methylation and Silencing of Trefoil Factor 2, Leading to Gastric Tumor Development in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Anthony J.; Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; O’Connor, Louise; Walduck, Anna K.; Fox, James G.; Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Minamoto, Toshinari; Ong, Eng Kok; Wang, Timothy C.; Judd, Louise M.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Trefoil factors (TFFs) regulate mucosal repair and suppress tumor formation in the stomach. Tff1 deficiency results in gastric cancer, whereas Tff2 deficiency increases gastric inflammation. TFF2 expression is frequently lost in gastric neoplasms, but the nature of the silencing mechanism and associated impact on tumorigenesis have not been determined. METHODS We investigated the epigenetic silencing of TFF2 in gastric biopsy specimens from individuals with Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, gastric cancer, and disease-free controls. TFF2 function and methylation were manipulated in gastric cancer cell lines. The effects of Tff2 deficiency on tumor growth were investigated in the gp130F/F mouse model of gastric cancer. RESULTS In human tissue samples, DNA methylation at the TFF2 promoter began at the time of H pylori infection and increased throughout gastric tumor progression. TFF2 methylation levels were inversely correlated with TFF2 messenger RNA levels and could be used to discriminate between disease-free controls, H pylori-infected, and tumor tissues. Genome demethylation restored TFF2 expression in gastric cancer cell lines, so TFF2 silencing requires methylation. In Tff2-deficient gp130F/F/Tff2−/− mice, proliferation of mucosal cells and release of T helper cell type-1 (Th-1) 1 cytokines increased, whereas expression of gastric tumor suppressor genes and Th-2 cytokines were reduced, compared with gp130F/Fcontrols. The fundus of gp130F/F/Tff2−/− mice displayed glandular atrophy and metaplasia, indicating accelerated preneoplasia. Experimental H pylori infection in wild-type mice reduced antral expression of Tff2 by increased promoter methylation. CONCLUSIONS TFF2 negatively regulates preneoplastic progression and subsequent tumor development in the stomach, a role that is subverted by promoter methylation during H pylori infection. PMID:20801119

  18. Phyllodes tumor of the breast: role of Axl and ST6GalNAcII in the development of mammary phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongliang; Li, Yanyan; Gong, Yanxin; Xu, Jingchao; Miao, Xiaolong; Li, Xiangnan; Liu, Chen; Jia, Li; Zhao, Yongfu

    2014-10-01

    Phyllodes tumor exhibits an aggressive growth. The expression of many biological markers has been explored to discriminate between different grades of phyllodes tumor and to predict their behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implications of Axl and ST6GalNAcII in phyllodes tumors. Real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical were used to analyze differential expression of ST6GalNAcII and Axl in phyllodes tumor (PT) cell lines and tissue specimens. RNAi assay, ECM invasion assay, and tumorigenicity assay were used to analyze the altered expression of ST6GalNAcII gene effects on the expression of Axl and invasive ability of phyllodes tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Compared to benign tumors, borderline and malignant ones showed a remarkable increase in mRNA levels of Axl and ST6GalNAcII gene, and it was higher in malignant tumor cells than in borderline tumor cells. When ST6GalNAcII was silenced, compared to the control, the expression level of Axl was significantly reduced in malignant tumor cell transfectants and knockdown of ST6GalNAcII gene significantly inhibited invasive activity in malignant tumor cells. The high expression of ST6GalNAcII and Axl was significantly correlated with tumor grade and distance metastasis by immunohistochemical analysis. Axl and ST6GalNAcII expression increases with increasing tumor grade in mammary phyllodes tumors. ST6GalNAc II might be participated in the glycosylation of Axl, and this Axl glycosylation may mediate the tumorigenicity, invasion, and distant metastasis of PT cells.

  19. The CCK(2) receptor antagonist, YF476, inhibits Mastomys ECL cell hyperplasia and gastric carcinoid tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M; Siddique, Z-L; Drozdov, I; Gustafsson, B I; Camp, R L; Black, J W; Boyce, M; Modlin, I M

    2010-06-08

    YF476 is a potent and highly selective cholecystokin 2 (CCK(2)) receptor antagonist of the benzodiazepine class. It inhibits gastric neuroendocrine enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell secretion, proliferation and spontaneous formation of gastric neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) in cotton rats. The Mastomys rodent species exhibits a genetic predisposition to gastric ECL neuroendocrine tumor formation which can be accelerated by acid suppression and induction of hypergastrinemia. In this respect, it mimics the human condition of atrophic gastritis, hypergastrinemia and gastric carcinoid development. We investigated whether YF476 could inhibit acid suppression-induced ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia in this model. In addition, we examined whether YF476 could reverse established ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia. Targeting the CCK(2) receptor during Loxtidine-induced hypergastrinemia resulted in a reduction in ECL cell secretion (plasma and mucosal histamine, and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) transcripts, p<0.05) and proliferation (numbers of HDC-positive cells, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 transcription). This was associated with a decrease in ECL cell hyperplasia and a 60% reduction in gastric ECL cell microcarcinoid (tumors <0.3mm in size) formation. YF476 inhibited ECL cell neoplasia (gastric carcinoid) in animals with hyperplasia, inhibited the formation of ECL cell tumors when co-administered with Loxtidine and reversed the growth and developement of gastric ECL cell carcinoids in long-term acid suppressed Mastomys. Variable importance analysis using a logistic multinomial regression model indicated the effects of YF476 were specific to the ECL cell and alterations in ECL cell function reflected inhibition of transcripts for HDC, Chromogranin A (CgA), CCK(2) and the autocrine growth factor, CTGF. We conclude that specifically targeting the CCK(2) receptor inhibits gastrin-mediated ECL cell secretion and ECL cell proliferation and tumor

  20. Management and outcomes of intramedullary spinal cord tumors: A single center experience from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Saqib K.; Waqas, Muhammad; Shakaib, Baila; Enam, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative neurophysiology, high magnification microscopes, and ultrasonic aspirators are considered essential aid for the safe resection of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs). Most centers in developing countries such as Pakistan still lack these facilities. The purpose of this study was to review the management of IMSCTs at our hospital and to determine factors associated with the outcomes of surgery. Methods: This was a retrospective review of medical records of adult patients undergoing surgery for IMSCT over 12 years. The institutional ethical review committee approved this study. Data were collected regarding demographics, clinical and radiological features, and surgical details. Modified McCormick Scale was used to grade patients’ neurological status at admission, discharge, and follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 22. Results: Forty three cases were reviewed. Mean age was 33.8 ± 15.1 years whereas median follow-up was 5 months (range: 0.25–96 months). Most patients had ependymoma (n = 16; 73%). Cervical region was the most commonly involved (n = 15; 34.9%). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 30 cases (69.8%). The preoperative McCormick grade was significantly associated with follow-up McCormick grade (P value = 0.002). Eight patients (18.6%) underwent intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring, out of which GTR was achieved in all cases, and none had disease progression or recurrence. Ten patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Thirty five patients (81.4%) had progression free survival at last follow-up. Conclusions: We achieved a GTR rate of 68.9% for IMSCTs with limited resources. In few cases, where intraoperative electrophysiology was used, the rate of GTR was 100%. Preoperative neurological status was associated with better postoperative McCormick score. PMID:27656322

  1. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  2. Fluoride-Induced Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress in Osteosarcoma Cells: Does It Affect Bone Development Pathway?

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Deepa; Naoghare, Pravin K; Bafana, Amit; Kannan, Krishnamurthi; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is reported to negatively affect osteoblast cells. Present study reports oxidative and inflammatory signatures in fluoride-exposed human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells, and their possible association with the genes involved in osteoblastic differentiation and bone development pathways. HOS cells were challenged with sublethal concentration (8 mg/L) of sodium fluoride for 30 days and analyzed for transcriptomic expression. In total, 2632 transcripts associated with several biological processes were found to be differentially expressed. Specifically, genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, osteoblastic differentiation, and bone development pathways were found to be significantly altered. Variation in expression of key genes involved in the abovementioned pathways was validated through qPCR. Expression of serum amyloid A1 protein, a key regulator of stress and inflammatory pathways, was validated through western blot analysis. This study provides evidence that chronic oxidative and inflammatory stress may be associated with the fluoride-induced impediment in osteoblast differentiation and bone development.

  3. Vertical transmission of Zika virus targeting the radial glial cells affects cortex development of offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; Zuo, Guo-Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Xing-Yao; Cao, Wu-Chun; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2016-01-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in Latin America coincided with a marked increase in microcephaly in newborns. However, the causal link between maternal ZIKV infection and malformation of the fetal brain has not been firmly established. Here we show a vertical transmission of ZIKV in mice and a marked effect on fetal brain development. We found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a contemporary ZIKV strain in pregnant mice led to the infection of radial glia cells (RGs) of dorsal ventricular zone of the fetuses, the primary neural progenitors responsible for cortex development, and caused a marked reduction of these cortex founder cells in the fetuses. Interestingly, the infected fetal mice exhibited a reduced cavity of lateral ventricles and a discernable decrease in surface areas of the cortex. This study thus supports the conclusion that vertically transmitted ZIKV affects fetal brain development and provides a valuable animal model for the evaluation of potential therapeutic or preventative strategies. PMID:27174054

  4. Developing fragility functions for the areas affected by the 2009 Samoa earthquake and tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokon, H.; Koshimura, S.; Imai, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Namegaya, Y.; Nishimura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Fragility functions in terms of flow depth, flow velocity and hydrodynamic force are developed to evaluate structural vulnerability in the areas affected by the 2009 Samoa earthquake and tsunami. First, numerical simulations of tsunami propagation and inundation are conducted to reproduce the features of tsunami inundation. To validate the results, flow depths measured in field surveys and waveforms measured by Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) gauges are utilized. Next, building damage is investigated by visually interpreting changes between pre- and post-tsunami high-resolution satellite images. Finally, the data related to tsunami features and building damage are integrated using Geographic Information System (GIS), and tsunami fragility functions are developed based on the statistical analyses. From the developed fragility functions, we quantitatively understood the vulnerability of a coastal region in American Samoa characterized by steep terrains and ria coasts.

  5. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  6. A positive affect intervention for people experiencing health-related stress: development and non-randomized pilot test.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie; Hult, Jen R; Duncan, Larissa G; Cohn, Michael A; Maurer, Stephanie; Bussolari, Cori; Acree, Michael

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present background, theoretical rationale, and pilot data on the development of an intervention designed to increase positive affect in people living with serious health-related stress. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a multiple-component positive affect intervention is feasible and acceptable for people newly diagnosed with HIV. Retention in the intervention and adherence to home practice were high. Participants reported significant increases in positive affect and significant decreases in negative affect. This positive affect intervention can serve as a template for programs to be developed to help people experiencing health-related and other types of life stress.

  7. Affective determinants of anxiety and depression development in children and adolescents: an individual growth curve analysis.

    PubMed

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Clercq, Barbara; Decuyper, Mieke; De Fruyt, Filip

    2011-12-01

    The tripartite model (in Clark and Watson, J Abnorm Psychol 100:316-336, 1991) comprises Negative Affect (NA), Positive Affect (PA), and Physiological Hyperarousal (PH), three temperamental-based dimensions. The current study examined the tripartite model's assumptions that (a) NA interacts with PA to predict subsequent depressive (but not anxiety) symptom developments and (b) NA interacts with PH to predict subsequent anxiety (but not depressive) symptom developments in a sample of 243 community and referred children and adolescents (42.8% boys; M age = 10.87 years, SD = 1.83). Results confirmed that individuals with a combined high NA/low PA profile display the least favorable course of depressive -but not anxiety- symptoms. In contrast with the model, the combination of NA and PH influenced the development of depression, but not anxiety. Relations were not moderated by sex or sample. Results revealed that the assessment of the tripartite components is warranted as it can help to identify children at risk for an unfavorable depressive symptom course.

  8. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Konstantina; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E; Bryan, Glenn J; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection.

  9. Insight on Genes Affecting Tuber Development in Potato upon Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Runxuan; Bonar, Nicola; Morris, Jenny; Hedley, Pete E.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Kalantidis, Kriton; Hornyik, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) is a natural host of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) which can cause characteristic symptoms on developing plants including stunting phenotype and distortion of leaves and tubers. PSTVd is the type species of the family Pospiviroidae, and can replicate in the nucleus and move systemically throughout the plant. It is not well understood how the viroid can affect host genes for successful invasion and which genes show altered expression levels upon infection. Our primary focus in this study is the identification of genes which can affect tuber formation since viroid infection can strongly influence tuber development and especially tuber shape. In this study, we used a large-scale method to identify differentially expressed genes in potato. We have identified defence, stress and sugar metabolism related genes having altered expression levels upon infection. Additionally, hormone pathway related genes showed significant up- or down-regulation. DWARF1/DIMINUTO, Gibberellin 7-oxidase and BEL5 transcripts were identified and validated showing differential expression in viroid infected tissues. Our study suggests that gibberellin and brassinosteroid pathways have a possible role in tuber development upon PSTVd infection. PMID:26937634

  10. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  11. Aging affect the anti-tumor potential of dendritic cell vaccination, but it can be overcome by co-stimulation with anti-OX40 or anti-4-1BB.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjay; Dominguez, Ana Lucia; Lustgarten, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    It has been well established that there is a decline in immune function with age resulting in a diminished capacity to respond to infections or tumors. Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of autologous dendritic cells (DC) vaccines in stimulating an anti-tumor immune response in the young, almost none of these reports consider the effect that aging has on the immune system or test whether DC-vaccination is effective in old hosts. In this study we compared the efficacy of DC-vaccination in young and old mice. Our results showed that DC-vaccination in young animals induced an anti-tumor response resulting in approximately 60% tumor growth inhibition, while minimal protection was observed in old animals. DC vaccination plus rIL-2 further enhanced the anti-tumor response in young animals (approximately 70-75% inhibition), while ineffective in old animals. In contrast, co-administration of anti-OX-40 or anti-4-1BB mAbs vigorously enhanced the anti-tumor immune response in both young (approximately 85-90% inhibition) and old mice (approximately 70-75% inhibition). Our data indicate that although old mice have a decline in immune function, they have the capacity to develop strong anti-tumor responses as long as they are provided with efficient co-stimulation.

  12. Factors affecting the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle.

  13. Select nutrients, progesterone, and interferon tau affect conceptus metabolism and development.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Kim, Jingyoung; Song, Gwonhwa; Ka, Hakhyun; Tekwe, Carmen D; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT), a novel multifunctional type I interferon secreted by trophectoderm, is the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants that also has antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory bioactivities. IFNT, with progesterone, affects availability of the metabolic substrate in the uterine lumen by inducing expression of genes for transport of select nutrients into the uterine lumen that activate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cell signaling responsible for proliferation, migration, and protein synthesis by conceptus trophectoderm. As an immunomodulatory protein, IFNT induces an anti-inflammatory state affecting metabolic events that decrease adiposity and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 activity, while increasing insulin sensitivity, nitric oxide production by endothelial cells, and brown adipose tissue in rats. This short review focuses on effects of IFNT and progesterone affecting transport of select nutrients into the uterine lumen to stimulate mTOR cell signaling required for conceptus development, as well as effects of IFNT on the immune system and adiposity in rats with respect to its potential therapeutic value in reducing obesity.

  14. Development of a diagnosis index of tropical cyclones affecting the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Won; Cha, Yumi

    2016-06-01

    This study has developed the index for diagnosis on possibility that tropical cyclones (TCs) affect Korean Peninsula. This index is closely related to the strength of the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH), which is calculated as a difference in meridional wind between at the highest correlation area (around Korean Peninsula) and at the lowest correlation area (sea southeast of Japan) through a correlation analysis between TC frequency that affects Korean Peninsula and 500 hPa meridional wind. In low frequency years that selected from Korea affecting TC index, anomalous northeasterly is strengthened from Korea to the South China Sea because the center of anomalous anticyclonic circulation is located to northwest of Korean Peninsula. Thus, TCs tend to move westward from the sea east of the Philippines to the mainland China. On the other hand, in high frequency years, anomalous southwesterly serves as steering flow that more TCs move toward Korean Peninsula because the center of anomalous anticyclonic circulation is located to sea east of Japan. Consequently, this study suggests that if this index is calculated using real time 500 hPa meridional winds that forecasted by dynamic models during the movement of TCs, the possibility that TCs approach Korean Peninsula can be diagnosed in real time.

  15. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development.

    PubMed

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  16. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development

    PubMed Central

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W.; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:27622039

  17. Vagotomy affects the development of oral tolerance and increases susceptibility to develop colitis independently of the alpha-7 nicotinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Bosmans, Goele; Meroni, Elisa; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Florens, Morgane; Farro, Giovanna; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Matteoli, Gianluca; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2016-06-14

    Vagotomy (VGX) increases the susceptibility to develop colitis suggesting a crucial role for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the regulation of the immune responses. Since oral tolerance and the generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial to preserve mucosal immune homeostasis, we studied the effect of vagotomy and the involvement of α7 nicotinic receptors (α7nAChR) at the steady state and during colitis. Therefore, the development of both oral tolerance and colitis (induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or via T cell transfer) was studied in vagotomized mice and in α7nAChR(-/-) mice. VGX, but not α7nAChR deficiency, prevented oral tolerance establishment. This effect was associated with reduced Treg conversion in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymphnodes. To the same extent, vagotomized mice, but not α7nAChR(-/-) mice, developed a more severe DSS colitis compared with control mice treated with DSS, associated with a decreased number of colonic Tregs. However, neither VGX nor absence of α7nAChR in recipient mice affected colitis development in the T cell transfer model. In line, deficiency of α7nAChR exclusively in T cells did not influence the development of colitis induced by T cell transfer. Our results indicate a key role for the vagal intestinal innervation in the development of oral tolerance and colitis, most likely by modulating induction of Tregs independently of α7nAChR.

  18. Vagotomy Affects the Development of Oral Tolerance and Increases Susceptibility to Develop Colitis Independently of α-7 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Bosmans, Goele; Meroni, Elisa; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Florens, Morgane; Farro, Giovanna; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Matteoli, Gianluca; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2016-01-01

    Vagotomy (VGX) increases the susceptibility to develop colitis suggesting a crucial role for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the regulation of the immune responses. Since oral tolerance and the generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial to preserve mucosal immune homeostasis, we studied the effect of vagotomy and the involvement of α7 nicotinic receptors (α7nAChR) at the steady state and during colitis. Therefore, the development of both oral tolerance and colitis (induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or via T cell transfer) was studied in vagotomized mice and in α7nAChR-/- mice. VGX, but not α7nAChR deficiency, prevented oral tolerance establishment. This effect was associated with reduced Treg conversion in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymphnodes. To the same extent, vagotomized mice, but not α7nAChR-/- mice, developed a more severe DSS colitis compared with control mice treated with DSS, associated with a decreased number of colonic Tregs. However, neither VGX nor absence of α7nAChR in recipient mice affected colitis development in the T cell transfer model. In line, deficiency of α7nAChR exclusively in T cells did not influence the development of colitis induced by T cell transfer. Our results indicate a key role for the vagal intestinal innervation in the development of oral tolerance and colitis, most likely by modulating induction of Tregs independently of α7nAChR. PMID:27341335

  19. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer strategy for new drug development in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Denis; Brandes, Alba A; van den Bent, Martin

    2003-12-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) has carried out clinical trials for nearly 30 years. During this time, several disease-oriented groups within the EORTC have been shaped by rapidly changing regulations in the area of drug development. Continual networking, dissemination of knowledge, and the establishment of specialized administrative units have allowed the EORTC to play a leading role in the development of improved treatment options for patients with brain tumors. Recently, the EORTC Brain Tumor Group and the EORTC New Drug Development Group have been integrated to create a network of institutions dedicated to screening new chemotherapy agents for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. Indeed, several new regimens and agents have already been investigated by this collaboration. Most notable are the recently closed study on temozolomide (Temodar [US], Temodal [international]; Schering-Plough Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ) in the adjuvant setting and in combination with radiotherapy in patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, and the ongoing study on oral STI571 for the treatment of gliomas. Within the current networks, a well-defined strategy has been implemented to select specific and targeted agents for the drug screening process. By sharing their expertise with the EORTC networks, medical oncologists, neuro-oncologists, and radiologists can assist in the clinical development of potentially active agents in patients with brain tumors.

  20. Children affected by HIV/AIDS: SAFE, a model for promoting their security, health, and development.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Theresa S; Fawzi, Mary K S; Bruderlein, Claude; Desmond, Chris; Kim, Jim Y

    2010-05-01

    A human security framework posits that individuals are the focus of strategies that protect the safety and integrity of people by proactively promoting children's well being, placing particular emphasis on prevention efforts and health promotion. This article applies this framework to a rights-based approach in order to examine the health and human rights of children affected by HIV/AIDS. The SAFE model describes sources of insecurity faced by children across four fundamental dimensions of child well-being and the survival strategies that children and families may employ in response. The SAFE model includes: Safety/protection; Access to health care and basic physiological needs; Family/connection to others; and Education/livelihoods. We argue that it is critical to examine the situation of children through an integrated lens that effectively looks at human security and children's rights through a holistic approach to treatment and care rather than artificially limiting our scope of work to survival-oriented interventions for children affected by HIV/AIDS. Interventions targeted narrowly at children, in isolation of their social and communal environment as outlined in the SAFE model, may in fact undermine protective resources in operation in families and communities and present additional threats to children's basic security. An integrated approach to the basic security and care of children has implications for the prospects of millions of children directly infected or indirectly affected by HIV/AIDS around the world. The survival strategies that young people and their families engage in must be recognized as a roadmap for improving their protection and promoting healthy development. Although applied to children affected by HIV/AIDS in the present analysis, the SAFE model has implications for guiding the care and protection of children and families facing adversity due to an array of circumstances from armed conflict and displacement to situations of extreme poverty.

  1. Radiation Dose to the Brain and Subsequent Risk of Developing Brain Tumors in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Interventional Neuroradiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Chef; Simon, S. L.; Land, C. E.; Miller, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose to the brain and subsequent lifetime risk of diagnosis of radiation-related brain tumors were estimated for pediatric patients undergoing intracranial embolization. Average dose to the whole brain was calculated using dosimetric data from the Radiation Doses in Interventional Radiology Study for 49 pediatric patients who underwent neuroradiological procedures, and lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain tumors was estimated using published algorithms based on A-bomb survivor data. The distribution of absorbed dose within the brain can vary significantly depending on field size and movement during procedures. Depending on the exposure conditions and age of the patient, organ-averaged brain dose was estimated to vary from 6 to 1600 mGy. The lifetime risk of brain tumor diagnosis was estimated to be increased over the normal background rates (57 cases per 10,000) by 3 to 40% depending on the dose received, age at exposure, and gender. While significant uncertainties are associated with these estimates, we have quantified the range of possible dose and propagated the uncertainty to derive a credible range of estimated lifetime risk for each subject. Collimation and limiting fluoroscopy time and dose rate are the most effective means to minimize dose and risk of future induction of radiation-related tumors. PMID:18959462

  2. Development of a novel systemic gene delivery system for cancer therapy with a tumor-specific cleavable PEG-lipid.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, H; Akita, H; Kogure, K; Oishi, M; Nagasaki, Y; Kihira, Y; Ueno, M; Kobayashi, H; Kikuchi, H; Harashima, H

    2007-01-01

    For successful cancer gene therapy via intravenous (i.v.) administration, it is essential to optimize the stability of carriers in the systemic circulation and the cellular association after the accumulation of the carrier in tumor tissue. However, a dilemma exists regarding the use of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which is useful for conferring stability in the systemic circulation, but is undesirable for the cellular uptake and the following processes. We report the development of a PEG-peptide-lipid ternary conjugate (PEG-Peptide-DOPE conjugate (PPD)). In this strategy, the PEG is removed from the carriers via cleavage by a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), which is specifically expressed in tumor tissues. An in vitro study revealed that the PPD-modified gene carrier (Multifunctional Envelope-type Nano Device: MEND) exhibited pDNA expression activity that was dependent on the MMP expression level in the host cells. In vivo studies further revealed that the PPD was potent in stabilizing MEND in the systemic circulation and facilitating tumor accumulation. Moreover, the i.v. administration of PPD or PEG/PPD dually-modified MEND resulted in the stimulation of pDNA expression in tumor tissue, as compared with a conventional PEG-modified MEND. Thus, MEND modified with PPD is a promising device, which has the potential to make in vivo cancer gene therapy achievable.

  3. Endostar enhances the antitumor effects of radiation by affecting energy metabolism and alleviating the tumor microenvironment in a Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, YONG-FA; GE, WEI; XU, HUI-LIN; CAO, DE-DONG; LIU, LIANG; MING, PING-PO; LI, CHANG-HU; XU, XI-MING; TAO, WEI-PING; TAO, ZE-ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have identified that an improvement in treatment efficacy was achieved using Endostar; however, the role of Endostar in lung cancer remains poorly understood. The present study investigated whether the enhanced antitumor effects of Endostar in combination with radiation involved changes in the metabolism and microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer. A Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model was used, including the control, Endostar (ES), radiotherapy (RT) and Endostar plus radiotherapy (ES + RT) groups. The tumor inhibition rates and growth were described based on changes in tumor volume. In addition, ultraviolet enzymatic analysis was performed to determine the lactate level and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the mRNA expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A Meph-3 pH meter was used to detect the ranges of tumor interstitial tissue pH, and immunohistochemical analysis was adopted to examine hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment. The tumor inhibition rate of the ES + RT group was significantly higher compared with the other three groups (P<0.05). Following treatment, the lactate levels decreased in all three treatment groups compared with the control, particularly in the ES + RT group (P<0.05). Reduced LDH expression and hypoxic fraction in the tumor microenvironment were also observed in the ES + RT group (P<0.05). Furthermore, changes from acidic to alkaline pH in the tumor microenvironment were detected in the ES + RT group. The present study suggested that Endostar is involved in the regulation of metabolism and tumor microenvironment hypoxia, which may be responsible for the enhanced antitumor effect of Endostar in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:26722291

  4. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Panis, C.; Victorino, V. J.; Herrera, A. C. S. A.; Cecchini, A. L.; Simão, A. N. C.; Tomita, L. Y.; Cecchini, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  5. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  6. Moderate recurrent hypoglycemia during early development leads to persistent changes in affective behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Moore, Holly; Craft, Tara K S; Grimaldi, Lisa M; Babic, Bruna; Brunelli, Susan A; Vannucci, Susan J

    2010-07-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is a common problem among infants and children that is associated with several metabolic disorders and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Although studies have reported a relationship between a history of juvenile hypoglycemia and psychological health problems, the direct effects of recurrent moderate hypoglycemia have not been fully determined. Thus, in this study, we used an animal model to examine the effects of recurrent hypoglycemia during the juvenile period on affective, social, and motor function (assessed under euglycemic conditions) across development. To model recurrent hypoglycemia, rats were administered 5 U/kg of insulin or saline twice per day from postnatal day (P)10 to P19. Body weight gain was retarded in insulin-treated rats during the treatment period, but recovered by the end of treatment. However, insulin-treated rats displayed increases in affective reactivity that emerged early during treatment and persisted after treatment into early adulthood. Specifically, insulin-treated pups showed increased maternal separation-induced vocalizations as infants, and an exaggerated acoustic startle reflex as juveniles and young adults. Moreover, young adult rats with a history of recurrent juvenile hypoglycemia exhibited increased fear-potentiated startle and increases in behavioral and hormonal responses to restraint stress. Some of these effects were sex-dependent. The changes in affective behavior in insulin-exposed pups were accompanied by decreases in adolescent social play behavior. These results provide evidence that recurrent, transient hypoglycemia during juvenile development can lead to increases in fear-related behavior and stress reactivity. Importantly, these phenotypes are not reversed with normalization of blood glucose and may persist into adulthood.

  7. Genetic deletion of the EGFR ligand epigen does not affect mouse embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Schäfer, Matthias; Wolf, Eckhard; Schneider, Marlon R

    2013-02-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor with manifold functions during development, tissue homeostasis and disease. EGFR activation, the formation of homodimers or heterodimers (with the related ERBB2-4 receptors) and downstream signaling is initiated by the binding of a family of structurally related growth factors, the EGFR ligands. Genetic deletion experiments clarified the biological function of all family members except for the last characterized ligand, epigen. We employed gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mice lacking epigen expression. Loss of epigen did not affect mouse development, fertility, or organ physiology. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed increased expression of betacellulin and EGF in a few organs of epigen-deficient mice, suggesting a functional compensation by these ligands. In conclusion, we completed the genetic analysis of EGFR ligands and show that epigen has non-essential functions or functions that can be compensated by other EGFR ligands during growth and tissue homeostasis.

  8. Early life antibiotic exposure affects pancreatic islet development and metabolic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaying; Yang, Kaiyuan; Ju, Tingting; Ho, Tracy; McKay, Catharine A.; Gao, Yanhua; Forget, Shay K.; Gartner, Stephanie R.; Field, Catherine J.; Chan, Catherine B.; Willing, Benjamin P.

    2017-01-01

    Childhood antibiotic exposure has been recently linked with increased risk of metabolic disease later in life. A better understanding of this association would potentially provide strategies to reduce the childhood chronic disease epidemic. Therefore, we explored the underlying mechanisms using a swine model that better mimics human infants than rodents, and demonstrated that early life antibiotic exposure affects glucose metabolism 5 weeks after antibiotic withdrawal, which was associated with changes in pancreatic development. Antibiotics exerted a transient impact on postnatal gut microbiota colonization and microbial metabolite production, yet changes in the expression of key genes involved in short-chain fatty acid signaling and pancreatic development were detected in later life. These findings suggest a programming effect of early life antibiotic exposure that merits further investigation. PMID:28150721

  9. 7-Rhamnosylated Flavonols Modulate Homeostasis of the Plant Hormone Auxin and Affect Plant Development*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Benjamin M.; Errafi, Sanae; Bucher, Rahel; Dobrev, Petre; Geisler, Markus; Bigler, Laurent; Zažímalová, Eva; Ringli, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Flavonols are a group of secondary metabolites that affect diverse cellular processes. They are considered putative negative regulators of the transport of the phytohormone auxin, by which they influence auxin distribution and concomitantly take part in the control of plant organ development. Flavonols are accumulating in a large number of glycosidic forms. Whether these have distinct functions and diverse cellular targets is not well understood. The rol1-2 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is characterized by a modified flavonol glycosylation profile that is inducing changes in auxin transport and growth defects in shoot tissues. To determine whether specific flavonol glycosides are responsible for these phenotypes, a suppressor screen was performed on the rol1-2 mutant, resulting in the identification of an allelic series of UGT89C1, a gene encoding a flavonol 7-O-rhamnosyltransferase. A detailed analysis revealed that interfering with flavonol rhamnosylation increases the concentration of auxin precursors and auxin metabolites, whereas auxin transport is not affected. This finding provides an additional level of complexity to the possible ways by which flavonols influence auxin distribution and suggests that flavonol glycosides play an important role in regulating plant development. PMID:26742840

  10. 7-Rhamnosylated Flavonols Modulate Homeostasis of the Plant Hormone Auxin and Affect Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Benjamin M; Errafi, Sanae; Bucher, Rahel; Dobrev, Petre; Geisler, Markus; Bigler, Laurent; Zažímalová, Eva; Ringli, Christoph

    2016-03-04

    Flavonols are a group of secondary metabolites that affect diverse cellular processes. They are considered putative negative regulators of the transport of the phytohormone auxin, by which they influence auxin distribution and concomitantly take part in the control of plant organ development. Flavonols are accumulating in a large number of glycosidic forms. Whether these have distinct functions and diverse cellular targets is not well understood. The rol1-2 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is characterized by a modified flavonol glycosylation profile that is inducing changes in auxin transport and growth defects in shoot tissues. To determine whether specific flavonol glycosides are responsible for these phenotypes, a suppressor screen was performed on the rol1-2 mutant, resulting in the identification of an allelic series of UGT89C1, a gene encoding a flavonol 7-O-rhamnosyltransferase. A detailed analysis revealed that interfering with flavonol rhamnosylation increases the concentration of auxin precursors and auxin metabolites, whereas auxin transport is not affected. This finding provides an additional level of complexity to the possible ways by which flavonols influence auxin distribution and suggests that flavonol glycosides play an important role in regulating plant development.

  11. Gallium maltolate inhibits human cutaneous T-cell lymphoma tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesong; Wang, Timothy W; Lessmann, George M; Saleh, Jamal; Liu, Xiping; Chitambar, Christopher R; Hwang, Sam T

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) represent a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an accumulation of malignant CD4 T cells in the skin. The group IIIa metal salt, gallium nitrate, is known to have antineoplastic activity against B-cell lymphoma in humans, but its activity in CTCLs has not been elaborated in detail. Herein, we examined the antineoplastic efficacy of a gallium compound, gallium maltolate (GaM), in vitro and in vivo with murine models of CTCLs. GaM inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis of cultured CTCL cells. In human CTCL xenograft models, peritumoral injection of GaM limited the growth of CTCL cells, shown by fewer tumor formations, smaller tumor sizes, and decreased neovascularization in tumor microenvironment. To identify key signaling pathways that have a role in GaM-mediated reduction of tumor growth, we analyzed inflammatory cytokines, as well as signal transduction pathways in CTCL cells treated by GaM. IFN-γ-induced chemokines and IL-13 were found to be notably increased in GaM-treated CTCL cells. However, immunosuppressive cytokines, such as IL-10, were decreased with GaM treatment. Interestingly, both oxidative stress and p53 pathways were involved in GaM-induced cytotoxicity. These results warrant further investigation of GaM as a therapeutic agent for CTCLs.

  12. Nickel affects gill and muscle development in oriental fire-bellied toad (Bombina orientalis) embryos.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Jin; Song, Sang Ha; Kim, Dae Han; Gye, Myung Chan

    2017-01-01

    The developmental toxicity of nickel was examined in the embryos of Bombina orientalis, a common amphibian in Korea. Based on a standard frog embryo teratogenesis assay, the LC50 and EC50 for malformation of nickel after 168h of treatment were 33.8μM and 5.4μM, respectively. At a lethal concentration (100μM), nickel treatment decreased the space between gill filaments and caused epithelial swelling and abnormal fusion of gill filaments. These findings suggest that nickel affects the functional development of gills, leading to embryonic death. At sublethal concentrations (1-10μM), nickel produced multiple embryonic abnormalities, including bent tail and tail dysplasia. At 10μM, nickel significantly decreased tail length and tail muscle fiber density in tadpoles, indicating inhibition of myogenic differentiation. Before hatching, the pre-muscular response to muscular response stages (stages 26-31) were the most sensitive period to nickel with respect to tail muscle development. During these stages, MyoD mRNA was upregulated, whereas myogenic regulatory factor 4 mRNA was downregulated by 0.1μM nickel. Calcium-dependent kinase activities in muscular response stage embryos were significantly decreased by nickel, whereas these activities were restored by exogenous calcium. In tadpoles, 10μM nickel significantly decreased the expression of the myosin heavy chain and the 12/101 muscle marker protein in the tail. Expression was restored by exogenous calcium. Our results indicate that nickel affects muscle development by disrupting calcium-dependent myogenesis in developing B. orientalis embryos.

  13. Paternal benzo[a]pyrene exposure affects gene expression in the early developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Brevik, Asgeir; Lindeman, Birgitte; Rusnakova, Vendula; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Duale, Nur

    2012-09-01

    The health of the offspring depends on the genetic constitution of the parental germ cells. The paternal genome appears to be important; e.g., de novo mutations in some genes seem to arise mostly from the father, whereas epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones are frequent in the paternal gonads. Environmental contaminants which may affect the integrity of the germ cells comprise the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). B[a]P has received much attention due to its ubiquitous distribution, its carcinogenic and mutagenic potential, and also effects on reproduction. We conducted an in vitro fertilization (IVF) experiment using sperm cells from B[a]P-exposed male mice to study effects of paternal B[a]P exposure on early gene expression in the developing mouse embryo. Male mice were exposed to a single acute dose of B[a]P (150 mg/kg, ip) 4 days prior to isolation of cauda sperm, followed by IVF of oocytes from unexposed superovulated mice. Gene expression in fertilized zygotes/embryos was determined using reverse transcription-qPCR at the 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, and blastocyst cell stages of embryo development. We found that paternal B[a]P exposure altered the expression of numerous genes in the developing embryo especially at the blastocyst stage. Some genes were also affected at earlier developmental stages. Embryonic gene expression studies seem useful to identify perturbations of signaling pathways resulting from exposure to contaminants, and can be used to address mechanisms of paternal effects on embryo development.

  14. Induced autoimmunity against gonadal proteins affects gonadal development in juvenile zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Presslauer, Christopher; Nagasawa, Kazue; Dahle, Dalia; Babiak, Joanna; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Babiak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    A method to mitigate or possibly eliminate reproduction in farmed fish is highly demanded. The existing approaches have certain applicative limitations. So far, no immunization strategies affecting gonadal development in juvenile animals have been developed. We hypothesized that autoimmune mechanisms, occurring spontaneously in a number of diseases, could be induced by targeted immunization. We have asked whether the immunization against specific targets in a juvenile zebrafish gonad will produce an autoimmune response, and, consequently, disturbance in gonadal development. Gonadal soma-derived factor (Gsdf), growth differentiation factor (Gdf9), and lymphocyte antigen 75 (Cd205/Ly75), all essential for early gonad development, were targeted with 5 immunization tests. Zebrafish (n = 329) were injected at 6 weeks post fertilization, a booster injection was applied 15 days later, and fish were sampled at 30 days. We localized transcripts encoding targeted proteins by in situ hybridization, quantified expression of immune-, apoptosis-, and gonad-related genes with quantitative real-time PCR, and performed gonadal histology and whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Bcl2-interacting-killer (Bik) pro-apoptotic protein. The treatments resulted in an autoimmune reaction, gonad developmental retardation, intensive apoptosis, cell atresia, and disturbed transcript production. Testes were remarkably underdeveloped after anti-Gsdf treatments. Anti-Gdf9 treatments promoted apoptosis in testes and abnormal development of ovaries. Anti-Cd205 treatment stimulated a strong immune response in both sexes, resulting in oocyte atresia and strong apoptosis in supporting somatic cells. The effect of immunization was FSH-independent. Furthermore, immunization against germ cell proteins disturbed somatic supporting cell development. This is the first report to demonstrate that targeted autoimmunity can disturb gonadal development in a juvenile fish. It shows a straightforward potential

  15. Gene expression patterns through oral squamous cell carcinoma development: PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Costa, Joao Paulo; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; da Silveira, Giorgia Gobbi; Amaya, Peter; Wu, Yongqi; Park, Kyoung-Joo Jenny; Gigliola, Mabel Pinilla; Lustberg, Maryam; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common tumor of the oral cavity and has been associated with poor prognosis. Scarce prognostic markers are available for guiding treatment and/or sub-classifying patients. This study aims to identify biomarkers by searching for genes whose expression is increased or decreased during tumor progression (through T1 to T4 stages). Thirty-six samples from all tumor size stages (from T1 to T4) were analyzed using cDNA microarrays. Selected targets were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in circulating tumor cells by immunofluorescence and Nanostring. Correlation was shown between PD-L1 and tumor size and lymph node metastasis, HOXB9 and tumor size, BLNK and perineural invasion, and between ZNF813 and perineural invasion. PD-L1 positivity was an independent prognostic factor in this cohort (p = 0.044, HH = 0.426). In CTCs from patients with locally advanced OSCC, we found a strong cytoplasmatic expression of PD-L1. PD-L1 is a ligand of PD-1 and is believed to limit T cell activity in inflammatory responses and limit autoimmune diseases. We demonstrated an important role for PD-L1 in primary tumors according to tumor size, and in disease specific survival. Therefore, we could further determine individuals with PD-L1+ CTCs, and possibly follow treatment using CTCs. PMID:26041877

  16. Gene expression patterns through oral squamous cell carcinoma development: PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Costa, Joao Paulo; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; da Silveira, da Giorgia Gobbi; Amaya, Peter; Wu, Yongqi; Park, Kyoung-Joo Jenny; Gigliola, Mabel Pinilla; Lustberg, Maryam; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo

    2015-08-28

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common tumor of the oral cavity and has been associated with poor prognosis. Scarce prognostic markers are available for guiding treatment and/or sub-classifying patients. This study aims to identify biomarkers by searching for genes whose expression is increased or decreased during tumor progression (through T1 to T4 stages). Thirty-six samples from all tumor size stages (from T1 to T4) were analyzed using cDNA microarrays. Selected targets were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in circulating tumor cells by immunofluorescence and Nanostring. Correlation was shown between PD-L1 and tumor size and lymph node metastasis, HOXB9 and tumor size, BLNK and perineural invasion, and between ZNF813 and perineural invasion. PD-L1 positivity was an independent prognostic factor in this cohort (p = 0.044, HH = 0.426). In CTCs from patients with locally advanced OSCC, we found a strong cytoplasmatic expression of PD-L1. PD-L1 is a ligand of PD-1 and is believed to limit T cell activity in inflammatory responses and limit autoimmune diseases. We demonstrated an important role for PD-L1 in primary tumors according to tumor size, and in disease specific survival. Therefore, we could further determine individuals with PD-L1+ CTCs, and possibly follow treatment using CTCs.

  17. Type of Inflammation Differentially Affects Expression of Interleukin 1β and 6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Toll-Like Receptors in Subclinical Endometritis in Mares

    PubMed Central

    Szóstek, Anna Z.; Gajos, Katarzyna; Kozdrowski, Roland; Nowak, Marcin; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Mares that fail to conceive or lose their embryos, without showing typical signs of clinical endometritis, should be suspected of subclinical endometritis (SE). In this study, the question was addressed: does SE fully activate selected mechanisms of innate immunity in mares? For this aim, expression of mRNAs for Toll-like Receptor 2 and 4 (TLR 2/4), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) was examined in control mares versus either mares suffering from chronic endometritis (ChE) or subacute suppurative endometritis (SSE). The concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in supernatants from endometrial tissue cultures after 4 h incubation were measured using the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method. Eighty-two warmblood mares, of known breeding history, were enrolled in this study. Based on histopathological assessment, mares were classified as suffering from ChE, SSE or as being healthy. In addition, immuno-localization of both TLR2 and TLR4 as well as TNF-α was investigated in the equine endometria. The mRNA expression of TLR2 (P < 0.01), IL-1β (P < 0.0001), IL-6 (P < 0.0001) and TLR4 and TNF (P < 0.05) was up-regulated in endometria of mares suffering from SSE compared with unaffected mares. Concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α were increased only in mares exhibiting SSE, compared with unaffected (P < 0.01 for both) and ChE mares (P < 0.05 for both). Immuno-localization of TNF-α and TLRs was confirmed, both in unaffected and SE-affected endometria, and was present in the luminal and glandular epithelia and stromal cells. The severity of inflammation impacts the immune response and fosters activation of innate immunity mechanisms, as observed in the endometria of mares. The intracellular localization of TLRs and TNF-α in the endometria indicates a key role of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells in the immune response and inflammation. PMID:27152525

  18. Hypoxic tumor kinase signaling mediated by STAT5A in development of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Røe, Kathrine; Bratland, Åse; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Ragnum, Harald Bull; Saelen, Marie Grøn; Olsen, Dag Rune; Marignol, Laure; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer, although initially efficient, induces changes in the tumor kinome, which subsequently promote development of castration-resistant (CR) disease. Recognizing the correlation between tumor hypoxia and poor prognosis in prostate cancer, we further hypothesized that such changes might be influenced by hypoxia. Microarrays with 144 kinase peptide substrates were applied to analyze CWR22 prostate carcinoma xenograft samples from ADT-naïve, androgen-deprived (AD), long-term AD (ADL), and CR disease stages. The impact of hypoxia was assessed by matching the xenograft kinase activity profiles with those acquired from hypoxic and normoxic prostate carcinoma cell cultures, whereas the clinical relevance was evaluated by analyzing prostatectomy tumor samples from patients with locally advanced disease, either in ADT-naïve or early CR disease stages. By using this novel peptide substrate microarray method we revealed high kinase activity mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) in CR prostate cancer. Additionally, we uncovered high STAT5A kinase activity already in regressing ADL xenografts, before renewed CR growth was evidenced. Finally, since increased STAT5A kinase activity also was detected after exposing prostate carcinoma cells to hypoxia, we propose long-term ADT to induce tumor hypoxia and stimulate STAT5A kinase activity, subsequently leading to renewed CR tumor growth. Hence, the study detected STAT5A as a candidate to be further investigated for its potential as marker of advanced prostate cancer and as possible therapeutic target protein.

  19. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  20. Characterization of the Tumor Microenvironment and Tumor–Stroma Interaction by Non-invasive Preclinical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Tumors are often characterized by hypoxia, vascular abnormalities, low extracellular pH, increased interstitial fluid pressure, altered choline-phospholipid metabolism, and aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). The impact of these tumor characteristics has been investigated extensively in the context of tumor development, progression, and treatment response, resulting in a number of non-invasive imaging biomarkers. More recent evidence suggests that cancer cells undergo metabolic reprograming, beyond aerobic glycolysis, in the course of tumor development and progression. The resulting altered metabolic content in tumors has the ability to affect cell signaling and block cellular differentiation. Additional emerging evidence reveals that the interaction between tumor and stroma cells can alter tumor metabolism (leading to metabolic reprograming) as well as tumor growth and vascular features. This review will summarize previous and current preclinical, non-invasive, multimodal imaging efforts to characterize the tumor microenvironment, including its stromal components and understand tumor–stroma interaction in cancer development, progression, and treatment response. PMID:28197395

  1. Do Phases of the Moon Affect Phases of Science Software Development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleig, A. J.; Linda, M.; Tilmes, C.

    2004-12-01

    This paper is based on observation of a number of satellite remote sensing missions and their associated data production efforts. Projects typically transition from initial concept through pre-launch development, launch and early operations, initial release of data, release of "validated" data and into final reprocessing and end of life. Different drivers affect development of the science code during each phase. Science teams tend to create new algorithm versions in distinct patterns during each project phase. One result of this is that a multitude of software and data set versions are created for each data product. This paper will delineate typical project phases, examine the main drivers behind algorithm change, and illustrate typical patterns of science software versions for each phase. Understanding these phases and the nature of the data prodceed in each can improve estimates of both the time it will take and the magnitude and schedule of resources needed to develop, produce, archive and distribute data. It can also help users understand when they will be able to obtain and use data from new projects and how the data sets will change with time. By the way we have not found any connection between moon phases and data set development phases.

  2. Development of Upper Respiratory Tract Microbiota in Infancy is Affected by Mode of Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Astrid A T M; Levin, Evgeni; van Houten, Marlies A; Hasrat, Raiza; Kalkman, Gino; Biesbroek, Giske; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; de Groot, Pieter-Kees C M; Pernet, Paula; Keijser, Bart J F; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-07-01

    Birth by Caesarian section is associated with short- and long-term respiratory morbidity. We hypothesized that mode of delivery affects the development of the respiratory microbiota, thereby altering its capacity to provide colonization resistance and consecutive pathobiont overgrowth and infections. Therefore, we longitudinally studied the impact of mode of delivery on the nasopharyngeal microbiota development from birth until six months of age in a healthy, unselected birth cohort of 102 children (n=761 samples). Here, we show that the respiratory microbiota develops within one day from a variable mixed bacterial community towards a Streptococcus viridans-predominated profile, regardless of mode of delivery. Within the first week, rapid niche differentiation had occurred; initially with in most infants Staphylococcus aureus predominance, followed by differentiation towards Corynebacterium pseudodiphteriticum/propinquum, Dolosigranulum pigrum, Moraxella catarrhalis/nonliquefaciens, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and/or Haemophilus influenzae dominated communities. Infants born by Caesarian section showed a delay in overall development of respiratory microbiota profiles with specifically reduced colonization with health-associated commensals like Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum, thereby possibly influencing respiratory health later in life.

  3. Melatonin, But not auxin, affects postnatal reproductive development in the marsh rice rat (Oryzomys palustris).

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Kent E

    2013-06-01

    Melatonin and the plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) have some structural similarity and, may thus exert comparable physiological effects on reproduction and growth. To test this possibility, I examined the effects of melatonin and auxin administration on reproductive and non-reproductive organ development in an animal model, the marsh rice rat Oryzomys palustris. Juvenile males housed under 14L:10D conditions were injected daily for four weeks with saline, melatonin, auxin, or melatonin and auxin, and the development of the testes and other organs was assessed. Melatonin alone significantly inhibited the development of the testes, seminal vesicles, Harderian glands, and overall somatic growth, but not the spleen. Auxin did not affect any endpoint measured. When melatonin was administered simultaneously with auxin, the melatonin effects dominated in suppressing reproduction and growth. The administration of melatonin or auxin in the drinking water produced results similar to the effects of melatonin and auxin injections reported herein. Lastly, both melatonin and auxin in the drinking water failed to alter any short photoperiod-induced reproductive inhibition. These data suggest that structural similarities between melatonin and auxin do not result in similar postnatal effects on reproductive and non-reproductive organ development on a long photoperiod and further suggest that melatonin and auxin do not operate through a common physiological mechanism.

  4. P-element mutations affecting embryonic peripheral nervous system development in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, A.; Salzberg, A.; Bhat, M.

    1995-04-01

    The Drosophila embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) is an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanisms governing neural development. To identify genes controlling PNS development, we screened 2000 lethal P-element insertion strains. The PNS of mutant embryos was examined using the neural specific marker MAb 22C10, and 92 mutant strains were retained for further analysis. Genetic and cytological analysis of these strains shows that 42 mutations affect previously isolated genes that are known to be required for PNS development: longitudinals lacking (19), mastermind (15), numb (4), big brain (2), and spitz (2). The remaining 50 mutations were classified into 29 complementation groups and the P-element insertions were cytologically mapped. The mutants were classified in five major classes on the basis of their phenotype: gain of neurons, loss of neurons, organizational defects, pathfinding defects and morphological defects. Herein we report the preliminary phenotypic characterization of each of these complementation groups as well as the embryonic lacZ expression pattern of each P-element strain. Our analysis indicates that in most of the P-element insertion strains, the lacZ reporter gene is not expressed in the developing PNS. 52 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Maternal creatine supplementation affects the morpho-functional development of hippocampal neurons in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Sartini, S; Lattanzi, D; Ambrogini, P; Di Palma, M; Galati, C; Savelli, D; Polidori, E; Calcabrini, C; Rocchi, M B L; Sestili, P; Cuppini, R

    2016-01-15

    Creatine supplementation has been shown to protect neurons from oxidative damage due to its antioxidant and ergogenic functions. These features have led to the hypothesis of creatine supplementation use during pregnancy as prophylactic treatment to prevent CNS damage, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Unfortunately, very little is known on the effects of creatine supplementation during neuron differentiation, while in vitro studies revealed an influence on neuron excitability, leaving the possibility of creatine supplementation during the CNS development an open question. Using a multiple approach, we studied the hippocampal neuron morphological and functional development in neonatal rats born by dams supplemented with 1% creatine in drinking water during pregnancy. CA1 pyramidal neurons of supplemented newborn rats showed enhanced dendritic tree development, increased LTP maintenance, larger evoked-synaptic responses, and higher intrinsic excitability in comparison to controls. Moreover, a faster repolarizing phase of action potential with the appearance of a hyperpolarization were recorded in neurons of the creatine-treated group. Consistently, CA1 neurons of creatine exposed pups exhibited a higher maximum firing frequency than controls. In summary, we found that creatine supplementation during pregnancy positively affects morphological and electrophysiological development of CA1 neurons in offspring rats, increasing neuronal excitability. Altogether, these findings emphasize the need to evaluate the benefits and the safety of maternal intake of creatine in humans.

  6. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K.; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P.; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243517

  7. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  8. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    patterns of contactin-associated protein (Caspr) clustering were observed at the sites of Node of Ranvier, suggesting that 5-HT exposure may affect other axon-derived factors for myelination. In summary, this is the first study to demonstrate that manipulation of serotonin levels affects OL development and myelination, which may contribute to altered neural connectivity noted in SSRIs-treated animals. The current in vitro study demonstrated that exposure to high level of serotonin (5-HT) led to aberrant oligodendrocyte (OL) development, cell injury, and myelination deficit. We propose that elevated extracellular serotonin levels in the fetal brain, such as upon the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy, may adversely affect OL development and/or myelination, thus contributing to altered neural connectivity seen in Autism Spectrum Disorders. OPC = oligodendrocyte progenitor cell.

  9. Intestinal development of bovine foetuses during gestation is affected by foetal sex and maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gionbelli, T R S; Rotta, P P; Veloso, C M; Valadares Filho, S C; Carvalho, B C; Marcondes, M I; Ferreira, M F L; Souza, J V F; Santos, J S A A; Lacerda, L C; Duarte, M S; Gionbelli, M P

    2016-08-03

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of maternal nutrition (MN) and foetal sex on the intestinal development of bovine foetuses throughout different days of gestation (DG). Forty-four multiparous, dry Holstein × Gyr cows with average initial body weight of 480 ± 10 kg were fed the same diet of either restricted feeding at 1.15% of body weight (CO, n = 24) or fed ad libitum (overnourished, ON, n = 20). Six cows from CO group and five cows from ON group were slaughtered at 139, 199, 241 and 268 DG, and foetuses were necropsied to evaluate the intestinal development. The mass, length and density of foetal intestines were not affected by MN (p ≥ 0.260). An interaction between MN and DG was observed for the villi length of jejunum (p = 0.006) and ileum (p < 0.001). Villi length of jejunum and ileum was higher (p < 0.10) in foetuses from ON-fed cows than in foetuses from CO-fed cows at 139 DG. However, at 199 DG, the villi length of jejunum and ileum of foetuses from CO-fed cows was higher than in foetuses from ON-fed cows. Despite these differences, MN did not affect the villi length of jejunum and ileum at 268 DG (p > 0.10). Female foetuses had greater small intestine mass (p = 0.093), large intestine mass (p = 0.022), small intestine mass in proportion to body mass (p = 0.017) and large intestine mass in proportion to body mass (p < 0.001) than male foetuses. Female foetuses had also longer small intestine (p = 0.077) and greater small intestine density (p = 0.021) and villi length of jejunum (p = 0.001) and ileum (p = 0.010) than males. We conclude that MN affects the pathway for the development of foetal villi length throughout the gestation in bovine foetuses without changing the final villi length. Female foetuses had higher intestinal mass, density and villi length than males during the foetal phase in bovines.

  10. Development and biophysical characterization of HK polymer for siRNA delivery to tumor in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Szu-Ting

    Delivery has been the major obstacle for nucleic acid therapeutics, including the RNA interference (RNAi) approach. Mixson's lab has been focused on the development of a non-viral peptide-based delivery system, HK (histidine-lysine) polymers, which have shown promise as carriers of plasmids and small interference RNA (siRNA) in several cell lines and in tumor-bearing models. In a previous study, a four-branched peptide, denoted H3K(+H)4b, with the predominant repeating -HHHK- sequence in the branch, has been shown to be the most effective and least toxic carrier in vitro and in vivo.. Building on these results, I utilized different approaches including several structure and stability molecular characterization methods to study polyplex and to develop more effective carriers for improved therapy with siRNAs targeting malignancies. To understand the role of histidine in the stability of the H3K(+H)4b/siRNA polyplex, the physicochemical properties were investigated. With the use of isothermal titration calorimetry and heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, histidines were shown to form hydrogen bonds with siRNA, which enhanced the stability and biological activity of the polyplexes. In addition, to enhance resistance to nucleases and to target the tumors selectively, H3K(+H)4b was chemically modified with different patterns of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and cyclic RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp, cRGD) peptide conjugates. The luciferase marker gene expressed stably by tumor xenografts in mouse models was targeted in order to evaluate the efficacy of HK carriers of siRNA that differed in location and number of cRGD-PEG attachments. The most effective carrier was (RGD-PEG)4H3K(+H) (RP-HK), which has a cRGD-PEG on each of its four terminal branches. Consistent with its prolonged stability, as observed by pharmacokinetic studies, the RP-HK polyplex down-regulated luciferase activity in tumor xenografts by nearly 70% compared with the untreated group. Subsequently, the RP-HK polyplex

  11. Phenothiazine Inhibitors of TLKs Affect Double-Strand Break Repair and DNA Damage Response Recovery and Potentiate Tumor Killing with Radiomimetic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ronald, Sharon; Awate, Sanket; Rath, Abhijit; Carroll, Jennifer; Galiano, Floyd; Dwyer, Donard; Kleiner-Hancock, Heather; Mathis, J Michael; Vigod, Simone; De Benedetti, Arrigo

    2013-01-01

    The Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are involved in chromatin assembly, DNA repair, and transcription. Two TLK genes exist in humans, and their expression is often dysregulated in cancer. TLKs phosphorylate Asf1 and Rad9, regulating double-strand break (DSB) repair and the DNA damage response (DDR). TLKs maintain genomic stability and are important therapeutic intervention targets. We identified specific inhibitors of TLKs from several compound libraries, some of which belong to the family of phenothiazine antipsychotics. The inhibitors prevented the TLK-mediated phosphorylation of Rad9(S328) and impaired checkpoint recovery and DSB repair. The inhibitor thioridazine (THD) potentiated tumor killing with chemotherapy and also had activity alone. Staining for γ-H2AX revealed few positive cells in untreated tumors, but large numbers in mice treated with low doxorubicin or THD alone, possibly the result of the accumulation of DSBs that are not promptly repaired as they may occur in the harsh tumor growth environment.

  12. An unusual manifestation of brain tumor: development of delayed hemiplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Kazuhiro; Hisahara, Manabu; Ando, Yusuke; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral swelling after cardiopulmonary bypass might trigger a critical cerebral consequence resulting from intracranial space-occupying lesion. We experienced a 75-year-old woman who suffered from a delayed left hemiplegia after mitral valve replacement. Urgent diagnostic imaging revealed the presence of a brain tumor with perifocal cerebral edema. Fluid shifts occurring within a few days after the cardiopulmonary bypass, manifesting the focal cerebral edema, played a key role in this unique clinical course.

  13. Role of GCNS in Estrogen Response, Tumor Suppression, and Breast Development in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Cancer biology, tumor suppression, chromatin, histone acetylation 9 1 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18...Completed. We found that GCN5 can acetylate p53 in vitro. " Goal 3: Perform co-transfection experiments to determine if GCN5 augments p53...can acetylate p53 in vitro. "* Creation of mice that carry null alleles of p53 and Gcn5 in cis on chromosome 11, and characterization of double mutant

  14. The Role of the RAS Tumor Suppressor, Lysyl Oxidase, in Breast Cancer Development and Progression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    lymphocytes. In ductal carcinoma, lysyl oxidase expression was absent in some cases , patchy in others, and sometimes appeared unchanged. The expression of...in tumor tissue sections. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). Several cases of DCIS, IDC and mixed DCIS-IDC...were examined by in situ RT-PCR. The expression of lysyl oxidase in cases of ductal carcinoma was variable. In some patients, lysyl oxidase message

  15. Endocrine Gland-Derived Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor/Prokineticin-1 in Cancer Development and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Corlan, Ana Silvia; Jitariu, Adriana-Andreea; Melnic, Eugen; Raica, Marius

    2017-01-01

    A lot of data suggests endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) to be restricted to endocrine glands and to some endocrine-dependent organs. Many evidences show that EG-VEGF stimulates angiogenesis and cell proliferation, although it is not a member of the VEGF family. At the time, a lot of data regarding the role of this growth factor in normal development are available. However, controversial results have been published in the case of pathological conditions and particularly in malignant tumors. Thus, our present paper has been focused on the role of EG-VEGF in normal tissues and various malignant tumors and their angiogenic processes. PMID:28386275

  16. Tart cherry anthocyanins inhibit tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and reduce proliferation of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soo-Young; Seeram, Navindra P; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2003-05-08

    Anthocyanins, which are bioactive phytochemicals, are widely distributed in plants and especially enriched in tart cherries. Based on previous observations that tart cherry anthocyanins and their respective aglycone, cyanidin, can inhibit cyclooxygenase enzymes, we conducted experiments to test the potential of anthocyanins to inhibit intestinal tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and growth of human colon cancer cell lines. Mice consuming the cherry diet, anthocyanins, or cyanidin had significantly fewer and smaller cecal adenomas than mice consuming the control diet or sulindac. Colonic tumor numbers and volume were not significantly influenced by treatment. Anthocyanins and cyanidin also reduced cell growth of human colon cancer cell lines HT 29 and HCT 116. The IC(50) of anthocyanins and cyanidin was 780 and 63 microM for HT 29 cells, respectively and 285 and 85 microM for HCT 116 cells, respectively. These results suggest that tart cherry anthocyanins and cyanidin may reduce the risk of colon cancer.

  17. Role and molecular mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in tumor development and progression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the hnRNP family, which exists in the nucleus and the cytoplasm simultaneously. It is a multifunctional protein that can participate in a variety of regulatory progressions of gene expression and signal transduction, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription, RNA alternative splicing and translation. hnRNP K not only directly binds to the kinases, but also recruits the associated factors regarding transcription, splicing and translation to control gene expression, and therefore, it serves as a docking platform for integrating transduction pathways to nucleic acid-directed processes. Numerous studies also show that abnormal expression of hnRNP K is closely associated with the tumor formation. This protein is overexpressed in numerous types of cancer and its aberrant cytoplasmic localization is also associated with a worse prognosis for patients. These results consistently indicate that hnRNP K has a key role in cancer progression. To understand the hnRNP K pathophysiological process in tumor disease, the previous research results regarding the association between hnRNP K and tumors were reviewed.

  18. Development of an oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus using a tumor-specific HIF-responsive promoter

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Sharon L.; Griffith, Christopher; Glass, Aaron; Shillitoe, Edward J.; Post, Dawn E.

    2010-01-01

    We exploited the differential activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent gene expression in tumors versus normal tissue for the design of a targeted oncolytic Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). A gene that is essential for viral replication, ICP4, was placed under the regulation of a HIF-responsive promoter and then introduced into the thymidine kinase locus (UL23) of HSV d120 which contains partial deletions in the two endogenous ICP4 genes. Recombinant HIF-HSV were isolated and their derivation from d120 was verified by expression of a truncated, nonfunctional form of ICP4 protein. Disruption of the UL23 locus was confirmed by loss of thymidine kinase expression and resistance to acyclovir. Unexpectedly, HIF-HSV expressed ICP4 and induced tumor cell lysis at similar levels under normoxia and hypoxia. The lack of HIF-dependent ICP4 transgene expression by HIF-HSV was due to two factors that have not previously been reported- reversion of the ICP4 gene region to its wild-type configuration and increased HIF-transcriptional activity under normoxia when cells were infected with any strain of HSV-1. The findings that an oncolytic HSV-1 is genetically unstable and can activate a tumor-related promoter in a non-specific manner have important implications for any proposed use of this virus in cancer therapy. PMID:20930860

  19. Early history of development of boron neutron capture therapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Sweet, W H

    1997-05-01

    The stable isotope 10B has a peculiarly marked avidity to capture slow neutrons whereupon it disintegrates into a lithium and a helium atom. These give up the 2.4 MeV of disintegration energy which they share within 5 and 9 microns of the 10B atom respectively. This means that the cell closest to the 10B atom bears the brunt of its atomic explosion. The objective of the tumor therapist is to find a carrier molecule for the boron atom which will concentrate in the tumor. Although a number of investigators saw the peculiar advantage of this selective tactic to achieve destruction of a species of unwanted cells, no success in animal studies was achieved until 1950. Sweet and colleagues found that the capillary blood-brain barrier keeps many substances out of the normal brain but that the gliomas had much less of such a barrier. He, Brownell, Soloway and Hatanaka in Boston together with Farr. Godwin, Robertson, Stickley. Konikowski and others at the Brookhaven. National Laboratory worked partially in collaboration and partly independently. We irradiated at 3 nuclear reactors several series of glioma patients with no long-term remission, much less a cure being achieved. Hatanaka on his return to Japan kept BNCT alive by treating a total of 140 patients with various brain tumors. Beginning in 1972, Mishima and colleagues have achieved useful concentrations of 10B-borono-phenylalanine, an analogue of the melanin precursor tyrosine, for BNCT of melanomas.

  20. Ozone affects growth and development of Pieris brassicae on the wild host plant Brassica nigra.

    PubMed

    Khaling, Eliezer; Papazian, Stefano; Poelman, Erik H; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Blande, James D

    2015-04-01

    When plants are exposed to ozone they exhibit changes in both primary and secondary metabolism, which may affect their interactions with herbivorous insects. Here we investigated the performance and preferences of the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae on the wild plant Brassica nigra under elevated ozone conditions. The direct and indirect effects of ozone on the plant-herbivore system were studied. In both cases ozone exposure had a negative effect on P. brassicae development. However, in dual-choice tests larvae preferentially consumed plant material previously fumigated with the highest concentration tested, showing a lack of correlation between larval preference and performance on ozone exposed plants. Metabolomic analysis of leaf material subjected to combinations of ozone and herbivore-feeding, and focussing on known defence metabolites, indicated that P. brassicae behaviour and performance were associated with ozone-induced alterations to glucosinolate and phenolic pools.

  1. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie; Pedersen, Anne Stilling; Mortensen, Mette Sidsel; Jørgensen, Jennifer Solgaard; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hass, Ulla

    2015-07-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures of environmentally relevant EDCs with estrogenic, anti-androgenic or dissimilar modes of action (TotalMix) of 100-, 200- or 450-fold high end human intake estimates. Mammary glands of prepubertal and adult female and male offspring were examined. Oestrogens increased mammary outgrowth in prepubertal females and the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-3, which may be a potential biomarker for increased outgrowth. Mixtures of EDCs gave rise to ductal hyperplasia in adult males. Adult female mammary glands of the TotalMix group showed morphological changes possibly reflecting increased prolactin levels. In conclusion both estrogenic and anti-androgenic chemicals given during foetal life and lactation affected mammary glands in the offspring.

  2. A systems theory approach to career development: Exploring factors that affect science as a career choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liskey, Brian K.

    This research project was designed to examine the factors that affect students' choice in a career. Specifically, the factors of (a) achievement, (b) interest, (c) self-efficacy, (d) perceived preparation for a career, and (e) being informed about a career will be under investigation. Of key importance to the study is how these factors can affect a student's perception about choosing a science career. A quantitative analysis of secondary data from the 2006 and 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) international assessment and attitudinal questionnaire provided data on student perceptions and aptitude in science. The sample from PISA included over 400,000 15 year-old students from 57 countries. From the 57 countries, 30 countries, comprised by Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development (OECD), were isolated for analysis. Within this group of 30, 11 were selected for comparison based on their questionnaire response to expectations for a career in science at age 30. The Institute for Educational Science's, International Data Explorer was utilized to acquire and analyze data from the 2006 and 2009 PISA international tests and questionnaires to determine significance between scaled scores and PISA indices. Variables were chosen as factors affecting student's perception on various systems outlined by the Systems Theory of Career Development (Patton & McMahon, 1997) and the Systems Theory of Career Development Framework (Patton & McMahon, 1999). Four country groups were established based on student responses to question 30a from the 2006 PISA attitudinal questionnaire, which asks what career students expected to have at age 30. The results from comparing country groups showed that countries in Group A, which showed the highest values for students expecting a career in science, also had the highest average values for achievement on the PISA science literacy assessment. Likewise, countries that had the lowest values for expecting a career in

  3. A study of language development and affecting factors in children aged 5 to 27 months.

    PubMed

    Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Bayoğlu, Birgül; Anlar, Banu

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the factors that affect language development in infants and toddlers using data obtained during developmental screening. Our study group consisted of 505 children-244 (48.3%) boys and 261 (51.7%) girls, aged 5 to 27 months. The children were divided into four age groups: group 1, which we designated as the "6 months" group (age range: 5 to 7 mo); group 2, designated as the "12 months" group (11 to 13 mo); group 3, designated as the "18 months" group (17 to 19 mo); and group 4, designated as the "24 months" group (23 to 27 mo). In addition to demographic data, we compiled data using the Denver II Developmental Screening Test, as well as neurologic examination findings and medical histories. At 6 months, the social item "Works for toy out of reach" was positively related to all language development items. Two gross motor development items-"Pull to sit, no head lag" and "Lifts chest with arm support"-were related to the "Turns to sound" and "Turns to voice" items, respectively. Overall, children whose mothers had higher education levels and who were living in higher socioeconomic areas showed significantly greater language development, as did boys, specifically. At 12 months, higher maternal ages, some gross motor development items, and some social items were related to better language development, and children living in higher socioeconomic areas had a significantly increased ability to pass the "4 words other than mama/dada" item. At 18 months, the ability of girls to pass the "4 words other than mama/dada" item increased, and children who passed the "4 words other than mama/dada" item did not pass the "Throws ball" gross motor item. At 24 months, children whose mothers were older had better "Combines 2 words" and "Speech half intelligible" items, girls had better "Comprehends prepositions (such as under/above)" skills, and boys had better "Shows 4 parts of doll" skills. We conclude that language items appear to change together with

  4. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  5. Unilateral deafness in children affects development of multi-modal modulation and default mode networks

    PubMed Central

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Plante, Elena; Holland, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Monaural auditory input due to congenital or acquired unilateral hearing loss (UHL) may have neurobiological effects on the developing brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the effect of UHL on the development of functional brain networks used for cross-modal processing. Children ages 7–12 with moderate or greater unilateral hearing loss of sensorineural origin (UHL-SN; N = 21) and normal-hearing controls (N = 23) performed an fMRI-compatible adaptation of the Token Test involving listening to a sentence such as “touched the small green circle and the large blue square” and simultaneously viewing an arrow touching colored shapes on a video. Children with right or severe-to-profound UHL-SN displayed smaller activation in a region encompassing the right inferior temporal, middle temporal, and middle occipital gyrus (BA 19/37/39), evidencing differences due to monaural hearing in cross-modal modulation of the visual processing pathway. Children with UHL-SN displayed increased activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus, likely the result either of more effortful low-level processing of auditory stimuli or differences in cross-modal modulation of the auditory processing pathway. Additionally, children with UHL-SN displayed reduced deactivation of anterior and posterior regions of the default mode network. Results suggest that monaural hearing affects the development of brain networks related to cross-modal sensory processing and the regulation of the default network during processing of spoken language. PMID:24723873

  6. Oakleaf: an S locus-linked mutation of Primula vulgaris that affects leaf and flower development.

    PubMed

    Cocker, Jonathan M; Webster, Margaret A; Li, Jinhong; Wright, Jonathan; Kaithakottil, Gemy; Swarbreck, David; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    In Primula vulgaris outcrossing is promoted through reciprocal herkogamy with insect-mediated cross-pollination between pin and thrum form flowers. Development of heteromorphic flowers is coordinated by genes at the S locus. To underpin construction of a genetic map facilitating isolation of these S locus genes, we have characterised Oakleaf, a novel S locus-linked mutant phenotype. We combine phenotypic observation of flower and leaf development, with classical genetic analysis and next-generation sequencing to address the molecular basis of Oakleaf. Oakleaf is a dominant mutation that affects both leaf and flower development; plants produce distinctive lobed leaves, with occasional ectopic meristems on the veins. This phenotype is reminiscent of overexpression of Class I KNOX-homeodomain transcription factors. We describe the structure and expression of all eight P. vulgaris PvKNOX genes in both wild-type and Oakleaf plants, and present comparative transcriptome analysis of leaves and flowers from Oakleaf and wild-type plants. Oakleaf provides a new phenotypic marker for genetic analysis of the Primula S locus. We show that none of the Class I PvKNOX genes are strongly upregulated in Oakleaf leaves and flowers, and identify cohorts of 507 upregulated and 314 downregulated genes in the Oakleaf mutant.

  7. Do early life factors affect the development of knee osteoarthritis in later life: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Antony, Benny; Jones, Graeme; Jin, Xingzhong; Ding, Changhai

    2016-09-13

    Osteoarthritis (OA) mainly affects older populations; however, it is possible that early life factors contribute to the development of OA in later life. The aim of this review is to describe the association between childhood or early adulthood risk factors and knee pain, structural imaging markers and development of knee OA in later life. A narrative overview of the literature synthesising the findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerised databases and manual searches was conducted. We found that only a few studies have explored the long-term effect of childhood or early adulthood risk factors on the markers of joint health that predispose people to OA or joint symptoms. High body mass index (BMI) and/or overweight status from childhood to adulthood were independently related to knee pain and OA in later life. The findings regarding the association between strenuous physical activity and knee structures in young adults are still conflicting. However, a favourable effect of moderate physical activity and fitness on knee structures is reported. Childhood physical activity and performance measures had independent beneficial effects on knee structures including knee cartilage in children and young adults. Anterior knee pain syndrome in adolescence could lead to the development of patellofemoral knee OA in the late 40s. Furthermore, weak evidence suggests that childhood malalignment, socioeconomic status and physical abuse are associated with OA in later life. The available evidence suggests that early life intervention may prevent OA in later life.

  8. Impaired astrocytic extracellular matrix distribution under congenital hypothyroidism affects neuronal development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Alchini, Ricardo; Zucco, Juliana Klein; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Decker, Helena; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Tasca, Carla Inês; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves

    2010-11-15

    Astrocytes clearly play a role in neuronal development. An indirect mechanism of thyroid hormone (T3) in the regulation of neuronal development mediated by astrocytes has been proposed. T3 alters the production and organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and proteoglycans, producing a high-quality substrate for neuronal differentiation. The present study investigated the effect of hypothyroidism on the astrocyte production of fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN) as well as their involvement in neuronal growth and neuritogenesis. Our results demonstrated that the amount of both FN and LN were significantly reduced in cultures of hypothyroid astrocytes from rat cerebellum compared with normal cells. This effect was accompanied by reduced numbers of neurons and neuritogenesis. Similarly, the proportions of neurons and neurons with neurites were reduced in cultures on ECM prepared from hypothyroid astrocytes in comparison with normal cells. The proportion of both normal and hypothyroid neurons is strongly reduced in astrocyte ECM compared with cocultures on astrocyte monolayers, suggesting that extracellular factors other than ECM proteins are involved in this process. Moreover, treatment of hypothyroid astrocytic cultures with T3 restored the area of both FN and LN immunostaining to normal levels and partially reestablished neuronal survival and neuritogenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrated that hypothyroidism involves impairment of the astrocytic microenvironment and affects the production of ECM proteins. Thus, hypothyroidism is implicated in impaired neuronal development.

  9. Does social support affect development of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Feride T.; Sabancıogullari, Selma; Aldemir, Kadriye; Kumsar, Azime K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine cognitive functions and perceived social support (SS) among individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM), and the effects of SS on the development of cognitive dysfunction (CD). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 121 patients with DM presenting at the Endocrinology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Health Services Application and Research Hospital, Sivas, Turkey between April and June 2014. Data were collected utilizing the “Patient Assessment Form”, “Standardized Mini Mental State Examination (SMMSE)”, and “Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS)”. Results: The mean score obtained for DM patients from the SMMSE was 21.55±5.7, with 65.3% found to have cognitive impairment. The total mean score of the participants for MSPSS was considered moderate (66.61±14.42). There was a significant positive correlation between cognitive function and SS (r=0.273, p=0.002). It was determined that individuals with CD had low levels of perceived SS, and that insufficient support from families and significant others contributed to the development of CD (p=0.008). Conclusion: In this study, it was determined that the cognitive function of individuals with DM was impaired and would improve as the perception of SS increased, and that perceived SS would affect the development of CD. Therefore, health professionals can contribute to the improvement of cognitive function of individuals with DM by facilitating the use of SS sources. PMID:26620984

  10. Language development and affecting factors in 3- to 6-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Bayoğlu, Birgül; Anlar, Banu

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess factors affecting language developmental screening test results in 33.0- to 75.0-month-old children. The study group consists of 402 children, 172 (42.8%) boys and 230 (57.2%) girls, aged 33.0-75.0 months who were examined in four age groups: 3 years (33.0-39.0 months), 4 years (45.0-51.0 months), 5 years (57.0-63.0 months) and 6 years (69.0-75.0 months). Demographic data and medical history obtained by a standard questionnaire and Denver II Developmental Test results were evaluated. Maternal factors such as mother's age, educational level, and socioeconomic status (SES) correlated with language items in all age groups. Linear regression analysis indicated a significant effect of mother's education and higher SES on certain expressive and receptive language items at 3 and 4 years. Fine motor items were closely related to language items at all ages examined, while in the younger (3- and 4-year-old) group gross motor items also were related to language development. Maternal and socioeconomic factors influence language development in children: these effects, already discernible with a screening test, can be potential targets for social and educational interventions. The interpretation of screening test results should take into account the interaction between fine motor and language development in preschool children.

  11. Exposure to Sevoflurane Affects the Development of Parvalbumin Interneurons in the Main Olfactory Bulb in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Chen, Jing; Cai, Guohong; Lu, Rui; Sun, Tingting; Luo, Tingting; Wu, Shengxi; Ling, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is widely used in adult and pediatric patients during clinical surgeries. Although studies have shown that exposure to sevoflurane impairs solfactory memory after an operation, the neuropathological changes underlying this effect are not clear. This study detected the effect of sevoflurane exposure on the development of calcium-binding proteins-expressing interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We exposed neonatal mice to 2% sevoflurane at two different developmental time points and found that exposing mice to sevoflurane at postnatal day (PD) 7 significantly decreased the expression of GAD67 and parvalbumin (PV) in the olfactory bulb (OB) but did not alter the expression of calretinin (CR) or calbindin D28k (CB). The number and dendritic morphology of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB were impaired by exposure to sevoflurane at PD7. However, exposure to sevoflurane at PD10 had no effect on calcium-binding protein expression or the number and dendritic morphology of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB. These results suggest that exposing neonatal mice to sevoflurane during a critical period of olfactory development affects the development of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB. PMID:27445710

  12. Different immunological responses to early-life antibiotic exposure affecting autoimmune diabetes development in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youjia; Jin, Ping; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-08-01

    Environmental factors clearly influence the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease. We have studied gut microbiota as important environmental agents that could affect the initiation or progression of type 1 diabetes especially in the prenatal period. We used neomycin, targeting mainly Gram negative or vancomycin, targeting mainly Gram positive bacteria, to treat pregnant NOD mothers and to study autoimmune diabetes development in their offspring. Neomycin-treated offspring were protected from diabetes, while vancomycin-treated offspring had accelerated diabetes development, and both antibiotics caused distinctly different shifts in gut microbiota composition compared with the offspring from untreated control mice. Our study demonstrated that neomycin treatment of pregnant mothers leads to generation of immune-tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the offspring and these APCs had reduced specific autoantigen-presenting function both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the protection from diabetes mediated by tolerogenic APCs was vertically transmissible to the second generation. In contrast, more diabetogenic inflammatory T cells were found in the lymphoid organs of the offspring from the vancomycin-treated pregnant mothers. This change however was not transmitted to the second generation. Our results suggested that prenatal exposure to antibiotic influenced gut bacterial composition at the earliest time point in life and is critical for consequent education of the immune system. As different bacteria can induce different immune responses, understanding these differences and how to generate self-tolerogenic APCs could be important for developing new therapy for type 1 diabetes.

  13. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  14. Modest maternal caffeine exposure affects developing embryonic cardiovascular function and growth.

    PubMed

    Momoi, Nobuo; Tinney, Joseph P; Liu, Li J; Elshershari, Huda; Hoffmann, Paul J; Ralphe, John C; Keller, Bradley B; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2008-05-01

    Caffeine consumption during pregnancy is reported to increase the risk of in utero growth restriction and spontaneous abortion. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that modest maternal caffeine exposure affects in utero developing embryonic cardiovascular (CV) function and growth without altering maternal hemodynamics. Caffeine (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) subcutaneous) was administered daily to pregnant CD-1 mice from embryonic days (EDs) 9.5 to 18.5 of a 21-day gestation. We assessed maternal and embryonic CV function at baseline and at peak maternal serum caffeine concentration using high-resolution echocardiography on EDs 9.5, 11.5, 13.5, and 18.5. Maternal caffeine exposure did not influence maternal body weight gain, maternal CV function, or embryo resorption. However, crown-rump length and body weight were reduced in maternal caffeine treated embryos by ED 18.5 (P < 0.05). At peak maternal serum caffeine concentration, embryonic carotid artery, dorsal aorta, and umbilical artery flows transiently decreased from baseline at ED 11.5 (P < 0.05). By ED 13.5, embryonic aortic and umbilical artery flows were insensitive to the peak maternal caffeine concentration; however, the carotid artery flow remained affected. By ED 18.5, baseline embryonic carotid artery flow increased and descending aortic flow decreased versus non-caffeine-exposed embryos. Maternal treatment with the adenosine A(2A) receptor inhibitor reproduced the embryonic hemodynamic effects of maternal caffeine exposure. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene expression levels of ED 11.5 embryo and ED 18.5 uterus were decreased. Results suggest that modest maternal caffeine exposure has adverse effects on developing embryonic CV function and growth, possibly mediated via adenosine A(2A) receptor blockade.

  15. Early Supplementation of Phospholipids and Gangliosides Affects Brain and Cognitive Development in Neonatal Piglets123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongnan; Radlowski, Emily C; Conrad, Matthew S; Li, Yao; Dilger, Ryan N; Johnson, Rodney W

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because human breast milk is a rich source of phospholipids and gangliosides and breastfed infants have improved learning compared with formula-fed infants, the importance of dietary phospholipids and gangliosides for brain development is of interest. Objective: We sought to determine the effects of phospholipids and gangliosides on brain and cognitive development. Methods: Male and female piglets from multiple litters were artificially reared and fed formula containing 0% (control), 0.8%, or 2.5% Lacprodan PL-20 (PL-20; Arla Foods Ingredients), a phospholipid/ganglioside supplement, from postnatal day (PD) 2 to PD28. Beginning on PD14, performance in a spatial T-maze task was assessed. At PD28, brain MRI data were acquired and piglets were killed to obtain hippocampal tissue for metabolic profiling. Results: Diet affected maze performance, with piglets that were fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 making fewer errors than control piglets (80% vs. 75% correct on average; P < 0.05) and taking less time to make a choice (3 vs. 5 s/trial; P < 0.01). Mean brain weight was 5% higher for piglets fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 (P < 0.05) than control piglets, and voxel-based morphometry revealed multiple brain areas with greater volumes and more gray and white matter in piglets fed 0.8% and 2.5% PL-20 than in control piglets. Metabolic profiling of hippocampal tissue revealed that multiple phosphatidylcholine-related metabolites were altered by diet. Conclusion: In summary, dietary phospholipids and gangliosides improved spatial learning and affected brain growth and composition in neonatal piglets. PMID:25411030

  16. Gastric tumor development in Smad3-deficient mice initiates from forestomach/glandular transition zone along the lesser curvature.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Taek; O'Neal, Ryan; Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Yong Chan; Coffey, Robert J; Goldenring, James R

    2012-06-01

    SMAD proteins are downstream effectors of the TGF-β signaling pathway. Smad3-null mice develop colorectal cancer by 6 months of age. In this study, we have examined whether the loss of Smad3 promotes gastric neoplasia in mice. The stomachs of Smad3⁻/⁻ mice were compared with age-matched Smad3 heterozygous and wild-type mice. E-cadherin, Ki-67, phosphoSTAT3, and TFF2/SP expression was analyzed by immunohistochemisty. The short hairpin RNA (ShRNA)-mediated knockdown of Smad3 in AGS and MKN28 cells was also performed. In addition, we examined alterations in DCLK1-expressing cells. Smad3⁻/⁻ mouse stomachs at 6 months of age revealed the presence of exophytic growths along the lesser curvature in the proximal fundus. Six-month-old Smad3⁻/⁻ mouse stomachs showed metaplastic columnar glands initiating from the transition zone junction between the forestomach and the glandular epithelium along the lesser curvature. Ten-month-old Smad3⁻/⁻ mice all exhibited invasive gastric neoplastic changes with increased Ki-67, phosphoSTAT3 expression, and aberrant cytosolic E-cadherin staining in papillary glands within the invading submucosal gland. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of Smad3 in AGS and MKN28 cells promoted the expression of phosphoSTAT3. DCLK1-expressing cells, which also stained for the tuft cell marker acetylated-α-tubulin, were observed in 10-month-old Smad3⁻/⁻ mice within tumors and in fundic invasive lesions. In conclusion, Smad3-null mice develop gastric tumors in the fundus, which arise from the junction between the forestomach and the glandular epithelium and progress to prominent invasive tumors over time. Smad3-null mice represent a novel model of fundic gastric tumor initiated from forestomach/glandular transition zone along the lesser curvature.

  17. Development of Y-shaped peptide for constructing nanoparticle systems targeting tumor-associated macrophages in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu; Gao, Yunxiang; Pierce, Ryan; Dai, Liming; Kim, Julian; Zhang, Mei

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) is increasingly being viewed as a target of great interest in tumor microenvironment due to its important role in the progression and metastasis of cancers. It has been shown that TAM indeed overexpresses unique surface marker legumain. In this study, we designed and synthesized a Y-shaped legumain-targeting peptide (Y-Leg) with functional groups allowing for further conjugation with imaging and therapeutic moieties (vide infra). The in vitro cell experiments using FITC-conjugated Y-Leg revealed its specific and selective interaction with M2-polarized macrophages (i.e., TAMs) with preference to M1 macrophages, and that the interaction was not interfered with by conjugating FITC to its functional group. Further, we constructed a nanotube system by grafting Y-Leg onto oxidized carbon nanotubes (OCNTs) loaded with paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The intravenous injection of the resultant Y-Leg-OCNT/Fe3O4 nanotubes to 4T1 mammary tumor-bearing mouse led to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of TAM-infiltrated tumor microenvironment, revealing the targeting specificity of Y-Leg-conjugated nanotubes in vivo. The Y shape of peptide and its functional groups containing amines and imidazole can protonate at different pHs, contributing to the in vitro and in vivo targeting specificity. This study represents the first development of novel peptide and peptide-grafted nanotube system targeting M2-polarized TAMs in vivo. The methodology developed in this study is applicable to the construction of various multifunctional nanoparticle systems for selectively targeting, imaging and manipulating of TAMs for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers and inflammatory diseases identified with macrophage-infiltrated disease tissue.

  18. [Some factors affecting in vitro development of porcine embryo reconstitution from somatic cells nuclear transfer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Fu; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yin; Wang, Kai; Schellander, Karl; Lin, Cai Lu

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, a study on reconstitution of porcine oocytes by using nuclear transfer with cumulus cells(CC) and fibroblast cells(FC) was carried out. Reconstituted oocytes which were the fusion with CC and showed a cleavage rate of 56.7%, developed to morula(11.7%) and blastocysts(6.7%) phases which were higher than those derived from the fusion with FC(p < 0.05). The results of this study also involved the effects of oocyte collection method and maturational age of recipient oocytes during the in vitro development of nuclear-transfer embryos which were reconstructed with cultured cumulus cells. The cumulus cells synchronized in G0/G1 phases through serum-starvation culture, were transferred into enucleated oocytes which were collected by aspiration or dissection method and cultured for 33 or 44 h. Reconstituted embryos were activated with a combination of calcium ionophore A23187 or electric pulsation and 6-DMAP, and cultured for 6 days. As for the oocytes collection methods, activation treatment in the presence of cytochalasin B did not affect the developmental rate of embryos reconstituted with 44-h-mature recipients. However, the development rate of reconstituted embryos with 33-h-mature recipients was significantly higher(p < 0.05) by activation with the combination of electric pulsation and 6-DMAP. These results suggest that reconstituted porcine embryos derived from cultured cumulus cells can develop to the blastocyst stage and that the development of the former could be improved by reconstruction with young oocyte cytoplast after the activation with the combination of electric pulsation and 6-DMAP.

  19. How musical training affects cognitive development: rhythm, reward and other modulating variables.

    PubMed

    Miendlarzewska, Ewa A; Trost, Wiebke J

    2013-01-01

    Musical training has recently gained additional interest in education as increasing neuroscientific research demonstrates its positive effects on brain development. Neuroimaging revealed plastic changes in the brains of adult musicians but it is still unclear to what extent they are the product of intensive music training rather than of other factors, such as preexisting biological markers of musicality. In this review, we synthesize a large body of studies demonstrating that benefits of musical training extend beyond the skills it directly aims to train and last well into adulthood. For example, children who undergo musical training have better verbal memory, second language pronunciation accuracy, reading ability and executive functions. Learning to play an instrument as a child may even predict academic performance and IQ in young adulthood. The degree of observed structural and functional adaptation in the brain correlates with intensity and duration of practice. Importantly, the effects on cognitive development depend on the timing of musical initiation due to sensitive periods during development, as well as on several other modulating variables. Notably, we point to motivation, reward and social context of musical education, which are important yet neglected factors affecting the long-term benefits of musical training. Further, we introduce the notion of rhythmic entrainment and suggest that it may represent a mechanism supporting learning and development of executive functions. It also hones temporal processing and orienting of attention in time that may underlie enhancements observed in reading and verbal memory. We conclude that musical training uniquely engenders near and far transfer effects, preparing a foundation for a range of skills, and thus fostering cognitive development.

  20. How musical training affects cognitive development: rhythm, reward and other modulating variables

    PubMed Central

    Miendlarzewska, Ewa A.; Trost, Wiebke J.

    2014-01-01

    Musical training has recently gained additional interest in education as increasing neuroscientific research demonstrates its positive effects on brain development. Neuroimaging revealed plastic changes in the brains of adult musicians but it is still unclear to what extent they are the product of intensive music training rather than of other factors, such as preexisting biological markers of musicality. In this review, we synthesize a large body of studies demonstrating that benefits of musical training extend beyond the skills it directly aims to train and last well into adulthood. For example, children who undergo musical training have better verbal memory, second language pronunciation accuracy, reading ability and executive functions. Learning to play an instrument as a child may even predict academic performance and IQ in young adulthood. The degree of observed structural and functional adaptation in the brain correlates with intensity and duration of practice. Importantly, the effects on cognitive development depend on the timing of musical initiation due to sensitive periods during development, as well as on several other modulating variables. Notably, we point to motivation, reward and social context of musical education, which are important yet neglected factors affecting the long-term benefits of musical training. Further, we introduce the notion of rhythmic entrainment and suggest that it may represent a mechanism supporting learning and development of executive functions. It also hones temporal processing and orienting of attention in time that may underlie enhancements observed in reading and verbal memory. We conclude that musical training uniquely engenders near and far transfer effects, preparing a foundation for a range of skills, and thus fostering cognitive development. PMID:24672420

  1. An investigation of the factors affecting flatfoot in children with delayed motor development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Chung; Tung, Li-Chen; Tung, Chien-Hung; Yeh, Chih-Jung; Yang, Jeng-Feng; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of flatfoot in children with delayed motor development and the relevant factors affecting it. In total, 121 preschool-aged children aged 3-6 with delayed motor development (male: 81; female: 40) were enrolled in the motor-developmentally delayed children group, and 4 times that number, a total of 484 children (male: 324; female: 160), of gender- and age-matched normal developmental children were used as a control group for further analyses. The age was from 3.0 to 6.9 years old for the participants. The judgment criterion of flatfoot was the Chippaux-Smirak index >62.70%, in footprint measurement. The results showed that the prevalence of flatfoot in children with motor developmental delay was higher than that in normal developmental children, approximately 58.7%, and that it decreased with age from 62.8% of 3-year-olds to 50.0% of 6-year-olds. The results also showed that motor-developmentally delayed children with flatfoot are at about 1.5 times the risk of normal developmental children (odds ratio=1.511, p=0.005). In addition, the prevalence of flatfoot is relatively higher in overweight children with delayed motor development, and that in obese children is even as high as 95.8% (23/24). Children with both excessive joint laxity and delayed development are more likely to suffer from flatfoot. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for clinical workers to deal with foot issues in children with delayed motor development.

  2. Pancreas-Specific Deletion of Prox1 Affects Development and Disrupts Homeostasis of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    WESTMORELAND, JOBY J.; KILIC, GAMZE; SARTAIN, CAROLINE; SIRMA, SEMA; BLAIN, JENNIFER; REHG, JEROLD; HARVEY, NATASHA; SOSA–PINEDA, BEATRIZ

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The exocrine portion of the pancreas functions in digestion and preserves pancreatic homeostasis. Learning how this tissue forms during embryogenesis could improve our understanding of human pancreatic diseases. Expression of the homeo-box gene Prox1 in the exocrine pancreas changes throughout development in mice. We investigated the role of Prox1 in development of the exocrine pancreas in mice. METHODS Mice with pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 (Prox1ΔPanc) were generated and their pancreatic tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, histologic techniques, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and morphometric analysis. RESULTS Loss of Prox1 from the pancreas led to multiple exocrine alterations, most notably premature acinar cell differentiation, increased ductal cell proliferation, altered duct morphogenesis, and imbalanced expression of claudin proteins. Prox1ΔPanc mice also had some minor alterations in islet cells, but beta-cell development was not affected. The exocrine congenital defects of Prox1ΔPanc pancreata appeared to initiate a gradual process of deterioration that resulted in extensive loss of acinar cells, lipomatosis, and damage to ductal tissue in adult mice. CONCLUSIONS Pancreas-specific deletion of Prox1 causes premature differentiation of acinar cells and poor elongation of epithelial branches; these defects indicate that Prox1 controls the expansion of tip progenitors in the early developing pancreas. During later stages of embryogenesis, Prox1 appears to regulate duct cell proliferation and morphogenesis. These findings identify Prox1 as an important regulator of pancreatic exocrine development. PMID:22178591

  3. Essential fats: how do they affect growth and development of infants and young children in developing countries? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Sandra L; Harika, Rajwinder K; Eilander, Ans; Osendarp, Saskia J M

    2011-10-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are known to play an essential role in the development of the brain and retina. Intakes in pregnancy and early life affect growth and cognitive performance later in childhood. However, total fat intake, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and DHA intakes are often low among pregnant and lactating women, infants and young children in developing countries. As breast milk is one of the best sources of ALA and DHA, breastfed infants are less likely to be at risk of insufficient intakes than those not breastfed. Enhancing intake of ALA through plant food products (soy beans and oil, canola oil, and foods containing these products such as lipid-based nutrient supplements) has been shown to be feasible. However, because of the low conversion rates of ALA to DHA, it may be more efficient to increase DHA status through increasing fish consumption or DHA fortification, but these approaches may be more costly. In addition, breastfeeding up to 2 years and beyond is recommended to ensure an adequate essential fat intake in early life. Data from developing countries have shown that a higher omega-3 fatty acid intake or supplementation during pregnancy may result in small improvements in birthweight, length and gestational age based on two randomized controlled trials and one cross-sectional study. More rigorous randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm this effect. Limited data from developing countries suggest that ALA or DHA supplementation during lactation and in infants may be beneficial for growth and development of young children 6-24 months of age in these settings. These benefits are more pronounced in undernourished children. However, there is no evidence for improvements in growth following omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in children >2 years of age.

  4. The role of semaphorin 4D in tumor development and angiogenesis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongchao; Chen, Ceshi; Sun, Qiangming; Wu, Jing; Qiu, Lijuan; Gao, Change; Liu, Weiqing; Yang, Jun; Jun, Nie; Dong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is highly expressed in certain types of tumors and functions in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and growth. However, it is still not clear regarding the roles of Sema4D in breast cancer. This study was designed to explore the effects of Sema4D on proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, invasion, migration, tumor growth, and angiogenesis in breast cancer. Materials and methods The expression level of Sema4D was investigated in MCF10A, 184A1, HCC1937, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, Hs578T, BT474, MCF-7, and T47D breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting analysis. Sema4D downregulation or overexpression was established by infection with lentiviruses-encoding Sema4D short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or Sema4D. To evaluate the effects of Sema4D on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, invasion, and migration of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells, methods including MTT assay, flow cytometry, wound healing assay, and transwell experiments were applied. BALB/c nude mice were injected with MDA-MB-231 cells, which were respectively infected with lentiviruses-encoding Sema4D, Sema4D shRNA, and GFP, followed by tumor angiogenesis assay. Results Sema4D was expressed at higher levels in breast cancer cell lines compared with the normal human breast epithelial cell lines, especially in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Cell proliferation ability was remarkably inhibited in Sema4D downregulated condition, whereas the proportions of cells in the G0/G1 phase and apoptosis increased in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. In addition, the invasion and migration abilities of these cells were obviously reduced. Xenograft growth as well as angiogenesis was inhibited when infected with lentiviruses-encoding Sema4D shRNA in vivo. Conclusion Downregulation of Sema4D had notable influence on cell proliferation ability, invasion, migration, and apoptosis of both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Furthermore, infection with lentiviruses

  5. Molecular pathways undergoing dramatic transcriptomic changes during tumor development in the human colon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The malignant transformation of precancerous colorectal lesions involves progressive alterations at both the molecular and morphologic levels, the latter consisting of increases in size and in the degree of cellular atypia. Analyzing preinvasive tumors of different sizes can therefore shed light on the sequence of these alterations. Methods We used a molecular pathway-based approach to analyze transcriptomic profiles of 59 colorectal tumors representing early and late preinvasive stages and the invasive stage of tumorigenesis. Random set analysis was used to identify biological pathways enriched for genes differentially regulated in tumors (compared with 59 samples of normal mucosa). Results Of the 880 canonical pathways we investigated, 112 displayed significant tumor-related upregulation or downregulation at one or more stages of tumorigenesis. This allowed us to distinguish between pathways whose dysregulation is probably necessary throughout tumorigenesis and those whose involvement specifically drives progression from one stage to the next. We were also able to pinpoint specific changes within each gene set that seem to play key roles at each transition. The early preinvasive stage was characterized by cell-cycle checkpoint activation triggered by DNA replication stress and dramatic downregulation of basic transmembrane signaling processes that maintain epithelial/stromal homeostasis in the normal mucosa. In late preinvasive lesions, there was also downregulation of signal transduction pathways (e.g., those mediated by G proteins and nuclear hormone receptors) involved in cell differentiation and upregulation of pathways governing nuclear envelope dynamics and the G2>M transition in the cell cycle. The main features of the invasive stage were activation of the G1>S transition in the cell cycle, upregulated expression of tumor-promoting microenvironmental factors, and profound dysregulation of metabolic pathways (e.g., increased aerobic glycolysis

  6. Pleomorphic adenoma--unusual presentation of a salivary gland tumor in the neck of a child.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, K V; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bansal, Vishal; Saxena, Susmita; Elhence, Poonam

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic salivary gland tumors are rare in children. When salivary gland tumors do develop, they preferentially affect major salivary glands and then minor salivary glands. Pleomorphic adenoma, also referred to as a benign mixed tumor, is the most common tumor of the salivary glands. Approximately 90% of these tumors occur in the parotid gland, while the remaining 10% affect the minor salivary glands. However, it is uncommon to find them elsewhere in the head and neck region. We report a rare case of pleomorphic adenoma in the upper neck, an unusual site in an 8-year-old boy.

  7. Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes Affect the Outcome of Patients with Operable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Combination with Mutated Amino Acid Classes

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Lakis, Sotiris; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Zagouri, Flora; Alexopoulou, Zoi; Gogas, Helen; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Pentheroudakis, George; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzopoulos, Kyriakos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Nicolaou, Irene; Razis, Evangelia; Psyrri, Amanda; Kosmidis, Paris; Papadimitriou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) density is an outcome predictor in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Herein we asked whether TILs are related to coding mutation load and to the chemical class of the resulting mutated amino acids, i.e., charged, polar, and hydrophobic mutations. Methods We examined paraffin tumors from TNBC patients who had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy mostly within clinical trials (training cohort, N = 133; validation, N = 190) for phenotype concordance; TILs density; mutation load and types. Results Concordance of TNBC phenotypes was 42.1% upon local / central, and 72% upon central / central pathology assessment. TILs were not associated with mutation load, type and class of mutated amino acids. Polar and charged mutation patterns differed between TP53 and PIK3CA (p<0.001). Hydrophobic mutations predicted for early relapse in patients with high nodal burden and <50% TILs tumors (training: HR 3.03, 95%CI 1.11–8.29, p = 0.031; validation: HR 2.90, 95%CI 0.97–8.70, p = 0.057), especially if compared to patients with >50% TILs tumors (training p = 0.003; validation p = 0.015). Conclusions TILs density is unrelated to mutation load in TNBC, which may be regarded as an unstable phenotype. If further validated, hydrophobic mutations along with TILs density may help identifying TNBC patients in higher risk for relapse. PMID:27685159

  8. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8(+)T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    PubMed

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-05-04

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing.

  9. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8+T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing. PMID:27143649

  10. Development of near-infrared photoactivable phthalocyanine-loaded nanoparticles to kill tumor cells: An improved tool for photodynamic therapy of solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Serena; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Dozza, Barbara; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Cattini, Luca; Ballestri, Marco; Dambruoso, Paolo; Guerrini, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Varchi, Greta; Lucarelli, Enrico; Blanco, Jeronimo

    2016-10-01

    Conventional photodynamic therapy has shown to be beneficial in the treatment of a variety of tumors. However, one of its major limitations is the inadequate penetration depth of visible light. In order to overcome this constraint, we developed 80nm poly-methylmethacrylate core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles (FNP) loaded with the photosensitizer tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (Ptl). To demonstrate the efficacy of our Ptl@FNP we performed in vitro and in vivo studies using a human prostate tumor model. Our data reveal that Ptl@FNP are internalized by tumor cells, favour Ptl intracellular accumulation, and efficiently trigger cell death through the generation of ROS upon irradiation with 680nm light. When directly injected into tumors intramuscularly induced in SCID mice, Ptl@FNP upon irradiation significantly reduce tumor growth with higher efficiency than the bare Ptl. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the newly developed nanoparticles may be utilized as a delivery system for antitumor phototherapy in solid cancers.

  11. IL-1α Expression in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Affects the Tumor Cell Migration and Is Regulated by the p38MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tjomsland, Vegard; Bojmar, Linda; Sandström, Per; Bratthäll, Charlotte; Messmer, Davorka; Spångeus, Anna; Larsson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between the tumor cells and the surrounding stroma creates inflammation, which promotes tumor growth and spread. The inflammation is a hallmark for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is to high extent driven by IL-1α. IL-1α is expressed and secreted by the tumor cells and exerting its effect on the stroma, i.e. cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF), which in turn produce massive amount of inflammatory and immune regulatory factors. IL-1 induces activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κβ (NF-κβ), but also activator protein 1 (AP-1) via the small G-protein Ras. Dysregulation of Ras pathways are common in cancer as this oncogene is the most frequently mutated in many cancers. In contrast, the signaling events leading up to the expression of IL-1α by tumor cells are not well elucidated. Our aim was to examine the signaling cascade involved in the induction of IL-1α expression in PDAC. We found p38MAPK, activated by the K-Ras signaling pathway, to be involved in the expression of IL-1α by PDAC as blocking this pathway decreased both the gene and protein expression of IL-1α. Blockage of the P38MAPK signaling in PDAC also dampened the ability of the tumor cell to induce inflammation in CAFs. In addition, the IL-1α autocrine signaling regulated the migratory capacity of PDAC cells. Taken together, the blockage of signaling pathways leading to IL-1α expression and/or neutralization of IL-1α in the PDAC microenvironment should be taken into consideration as possible treatment or complement to existing treatment of this cancer. PMID:23951028

  12. Tumor stroma as targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jinsong

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is not only composed malignant epithelial component but also stromal components such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells, by which an appropriate tumor microenvironment (TME) is formed to promote tumorigenesis, progression, and metastasis. As the most abundant component in the TME, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are involved in multifaceted mechanistic details including remodeling the extracellular matrix, suppressing immune responses, and secreting growth factors and cytokines that mediate signaling pathways to extensively affect tumor cell growth and invasiveness, differentiation, angiogenesis, and chronic inflammatory milieu. Today, more and more therapeutic strategies are purposefully designed to target the TME as well as tumor cells. This review will focus on the role of CAFs in tumor development and the novel strategies to target this component to inhibit the tumor growth. PMID:23064233

  13. Somatotroph pituitary tumors in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Langohr, I M; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2012-05-01

    A series of 11 pituitary tumors in budgerigars were classified on the basis of their clinical, gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical characteristics. Affected birds were young to middle-aged. Clinically, neurologic signs--including difficulties flying, ataxia, and blindness--were most commonly reported. Additional clinical signs included weight loss, abnormal feathers or molting, increased respiratory efforts, and exophthalmos. Nine birds were diagnosed with chromophobic pituitary adenomas, and 2 birds had chromophobic pituitary carcinomas. Only 1 tumor was delimited to the pituitary gland; the other 10 variably invaded the brain, skull, and retrobulbar space. Distant metastases were identified in 2 birds. All tumors were immunohistochemically strongly positive for growth hormone, consistent with the diagnosis of somatotroph tumors. The common occurrence and early onset may suggest a genetic predisposition of budgerigars to develop somatotroph pituitary tumors with a high incidence of local invasion and with metastatic potential.

  14. Early exposure to caffeine affects gene expression of adenosine receptors, DARPP-32 and BDNF without affecting sensibility and morphology of developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Nazario, Luiza Reali; Pohlmann, Julhana Bianchini; de Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Fazenda, Lidiane; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are the most important biochemical targets of caffeine, a common trimethylxanthine found in food and beverages. Adenosine plays modulatory action during the development through adenosine receptors and their intracellular pathways activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate if caffeine gave to zebrafish in the very first steps of development is able to affect its direct targets, through the adenosine receptors mRNA expression evaluation, and latter indirect targets, through evaluation of the pattern of dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that zebrafish express adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A1, A2A2 and A2B) since 24h post-fertilization (hpf) and that caffeine exposure is able to affect the expression of these receptors. Caffeine exposure from 1 hpf is able to increase A1 expression at 72-96 hpf and A2A1 expression at 72 hpf. No alterations occurred in A2A2 and A2B expression after caffeine treatment. DARPP-32, a phosphoprotein involved in adenosine intracellular pathway is also expressed since 24 hpf and early exposure to caffeine increased DARPP-32 expression at 168 hpf. We also evaluate the expression of BDNF as one of the targets of adenosine intracellular pathway activation. BDNF was also expressed since 24 hpf and caffeine treatment increased its expression at 48 and 72 hpf. No morphological alterations induced by caffeine treatment were registered by the check of general body features and total body length. Assessment of tactile sensibility also demonstrated no alterations by caffeine treatment. Altogether, these results suggest that caffeine is able to affect expression of its cellular targets since early phases of development in zebrafish without affect visible features. The up-regulation of direct and indirect targets of caffeine presents as a compensatory mechanism of maintenance of adenosinergic modulation during the developmental phase.

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Open-Source Software Package “CGITA” for Quantifying Tumor Heterogeneity with Molecular Images

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Lin, Chien-Yu; Shih, Meng-Jung; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ho, Tsung-Ying; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background. The quantification of tumor heterogeneity with molecular images, by analyzing the local or global variation in the spatial arrangements of pixel intensity with texture analysis, possesses a great clinical potential for treatment planning and prognosis. To address the lack of available software for computing the tumor heterogeneity on the public domain, we develop a software package, namely, Chang-Gung Image Texture Analysis (CGITA) toolbox, and provide it to the research community as a free, open-source project. Methods. With a user-friendly graphical interface, CGITA provides users with an easy way to compute more than seventy heterogeneity indices. To test and demonstrate the usefulness of CGITA, we used a small cohort of eighteen locally advanced oral cavity (ORC) cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapies. Results. In our case study of ORC data, we found that more than ten of the current implemented heterogeneity indices outperformed SUVmean for outcome prediction in the ROC analysis with a higher area under curve (AUC). Heterogeneity indices provide a better area under the curve up to 0.9 than the SUVmean and TLG (0.6 and 0.52, resp.). Conclusions. CGITA is a free and open-source software package to quantify tumor heterogeneity from molecular images. CGITA is available for free for academic use at http://code.google.com/p/cgita. PMID:24757667

  16. Inhibitory effects of low-dose aloe-emodin on the development of colorectal tumors in min mice.

    PubMed

    Shimpo, Kan; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki; Beppu, Hidehiko; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Shinzato, Masanori; Yukitake, Jun; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE), a natural anthraquinone compound, has been reported to exhibit anticancer activity in various cancer cell lines and anti-inflammatory effects in murine macrophages. In the present study, we investigated the cancer chemopreventive effects of AE in an Apc-deficient Min mouse model. In the first experiment, male Min mice were fed a basal diet or diets containing 5 ppm AE and 10 ppm AE for 12 weeks. The dietary administration of 5 ppm AE significantly reduced the number of colorectal tumors. In a second experiment, we investigated the effects of AE on colitis-related colon carcinogenesis in Min mouse treated with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Female Min mice were administered 1% DSS in their drinking water for 7 days. AE was given to mice in their diet at a dose of 5 or 50 ppm for 5 weeks. Feeding with AE significantly reduced the number of colorectal tumors. When proliferation of cells in normal-appearing colonic mucosa was assessed by monoclonal anti-rat Ki-67 antibody (MIB-5) immunohistochemistry in experiments 1 and 2, the AE treatment significantly decreased the mean MIB-5-labeling index. These results suggest that the dietary administration of low-dose AE may have chemopreventive effects against development of colorectal tumors in Min mice, possibly in part by reducing cell proliferation in colorectal mucosa.

  17. Development and preclinical evaluation of new (124)I-folate conjugates for PET imaging of folate receptor-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    AlJammaz, I; Al-Otaibi, B; Al-Rumayan, F; Al-Yanbawi, S; Amer, S; Okarvi, S M

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to develop new folate radiotracers with favorable biochemical properties for detecting folate receptor-positive cancers, we have synthesized [(124)I]-SIB- and [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugates using a straightforward and two-step simple reactions. Radiochemical yields for [(124)I]-SIB- and [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugates were greater than 90 and 60% respectively, with total synthesis time of 30-40min. Radiochemical purities were always greater than 98% without HPLC purification. These synthetic approaches hold considerable promise as rapid and simple method for (124)I-folate conjugate preparation with high radiochemical yield in short synthesis time. In vitro tests on KB cell line showed that the significant amounts of the radioconjugates were associated with cell fractions. In vivo characterization in normal Balb/c mice revealed rapid blood clearance of these radioconjugates and favorable biodistribution profile for [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugate over [(124)I]-SIB-folate conjugate. Biodistribution studies of [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugate in nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts, demonstrated significant tumor uptake. The uptake in the tumors was blocked by excess injection of folic acid, suggesting a receptor-mediated process. These results demonstrate that [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugate may be useful as a molecular probe for detecting and staging of folate receptor-positive cancers, such as ovarian cancer and their metastasis as well as monitoring tumor response to treatment.

  18. Considering the oxygen effect: Further development of a volumetric model of tumor response to radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephanie S.

    Mathematical modeling of tumor response to radiation therapy (RT) has great potential for designing therapy plans that are more personalized, more adaptive, and more reliable for outcome predictions. A preexisting model of tumor response to radiation therapy for cervical cancer has been shown to generate model parameters that correlate strongly with both tumor local control and disease-specific survival. This model is further developed through incorporation of another effect of RT not previously accounted for: the oxygen effect. An easily obtainable form of input data, hemoglobin level, enables simulation of the oxygen effect simultaneously with the other major model effects. For the Local Control (LC) patient group, the changes in the model parameters caused by incorporation of the oxygen effect are found to significantly improve the agreement of those parameters with actual patient data. For the Local Failure (LF) group and the overall patient group, the oxygen effect is incorporated without significant change to the agreement between the model-simulated output parameters and the actual patient data. Also, a strategy is presented for solving the main model equations to obtain analytic expressions for surviving cell fraction and regression volume ratio as functions of time.

  19. Chromosome Condensation 1-Like (Chc1L) Is a Novel Tumor Suppressor Involved in Development of Histiocyte-Rich Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Newbigging, Susan; Wang, Youdong; Shi, Chang-Xin; Cho, Hae-Ra; Shimizu, Hiroki; Gramolini, Anthony; Liu, Mingyao; Wen, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Human chromosomal region 13q14 is a deletion hotspot in prostate cancer, multiple myeloma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This region is believed to host multiple tumor suppressors. Chromosome Condensation 1-like (CHC1L) is located at 13q14, and found within the smallest common region of loss of heterozygosity in prostate cancer. Decreased expression of CHC1L is linked to pathogenesis and progression of both prostate cancer and multiple myeloma. However, there is no direct evidence for CHC1L’s putative tumor suppressing role in current literature. Presently, we describe the generation and characterization of Chc1L knockout mice. Chc1L-/- mice do not develop cancer at a young age, but bone marrow and spleen cells from 8–12 week-old mice display an exaggerated proliferative response. By approximately two years of age, knockout and heterozygote mice have a markedly increased incidence of tumorigenesis compared to wild-type controls, with tumors occurring mainly in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and intestinal tract. Histopathological analysis found that most heterozygote and knockout mice succumb to either Histiocytic Sarcoma or Histiocyte-Associated Lymphoma. Our study suggests that Chc1L is involved in suppression of these two histiocyte-rich neoplasms in mice and supports clinical data suggesting that CHC1L loss of function is an important step in the pathogenesis of cancers containing 13q14 deletion. PMID:26291700

  20. Genomic characterization of a large panel of patient-derived hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft tumor models for preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingyang; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Hongye; Xu, Qiang; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Guan; Luo, Qin; Xu, Weiguo; Yang, Shuqun; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Shengxian; Liang, Guibai; Ji, Qunsheng; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chung; Zhou, Weiping; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Hongyang; Fang, Douglas D

    2015-08-21

    Lack of clinically relevant tumor models dramatically hampers development of effective therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Establishment of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models that faithfully recapitulate the genetic and phenotypic features of HCC becomes important. In this study, we first established a cohort of 65 stable PDX models of HCC from corresponding Chinese patients. Then we showed that the histology and gene expression patterns of PDX models were highly consistent between xenografts and case-matched original tumors. Genetic alterations, including mutations and DNA copy number alterations (CNAs), of the xenografts correlated well with the published data of HCC patient specimens. Furthermore, differential responses to sorafenib, the standard-of-care agent, in randomly chosen xenografts were unveiled. Finally, in the models expressing high levels of FGFR1 gene according to the genomic data, FGFR1 inhibitor lenvatinib showed greater efficacy than sorafenib. Taken together, our data indicate that PDX models resemble histopathological and genomic characteristics of clinical HCC tumors, as well as recapitulate the differential responses of HCC patients to the standard-of-care treatment. Overall, this large collection of PDX models becomes a clinically relevant platform for drug screening, biomarker discovery and translational research in preclinical setting.

  1. States and compacts: Issues and events affecting facility development efforts, including the Barnwell opening

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Ten years have passed since the first regional low-level radioactive waste compacts received Congressional consent and initiated their efforts to develop new disposal capacity. During these 10 years, both significant achievements and serious setbacks have marked our efforts and affect our current outlook. Recent events in the waste marketplace, particularly in the operating status of the Barnwell disposal facility, have now raised legitimate questions about the continued rationale for the regional framework that grew out of the original legislation enacted by Congress in 1980. At the same time, licensing activities for new regional disposal facilities are under way in three states, and a fourth awaits the final go-ahead to begin construction. Uncertainty over the meaning and reliability of the marketplace events makes it difficult to gauge long-term implications. In addition, differences in the status of individual state and compact facility development efforts lead to varying assessments of the influence these events will, or should, have on such efforts.

  2. Diurnal Temperature Variations Affect Development of a Herbivorous Arthropod Pest and its Predators

    PubMed Central

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen’s inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen’s inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes. PMID:25874697

  3. Diurnal temperature variations affect development of a herbivorous arthropod pest and its predators.

    PubMed

    Vangansbeke, Dominiek; Audenaert, Joachim; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Verhoeven, Ruth; Gobin, Bruno; Tirry, Luc; De Clercq, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The impact of daily temperature variations on arthropod life history remains woefully understudied compared to the large body of research that has been carried out on the effects of constant temperatures. However, diurnal varying temperature regimes more commonly represent the environment in which most organisms thrive. Such varying temperature regimes have been demonstrated to substantially affect development and reproduction of ectothermic organisms, generally in accordance with Jensen's inequality. In the present study we evaluated the impact of temperature alternations at 4 amplitudes (DTR0, +5, +10 and +15°C) on the developmental rate of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot and Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and their natural prey, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). We have modelled their developmental rates as a function of temperature using both linear and nonlinear models. Diurnally alternating temperatures resulted in a faster development in the lower temperature range as compared to their corresponding mean constant temperatures, whereas the opposite was observed in the higher temperature range. Our results indicate that Jensen's inequality does not suffice to fully explain the differences in developmental rates at constant and alternating temperatures, suggesting additional physiological responses play a role. It is concluded that diurnal temperature range should not be ignored and should be incorporated in predictive models on the phenology of arthropod pests and their natural enemies and their performance in biological control programmes.

  4. Rearing Tenebrio molitor in BLSS: Dietary fiber affects larval growth, development, and respiration characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leyuan; Stasiak, Michael; Li, Liang; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Gidzinski, Danuta; Dixon, Mike; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Rearing of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) will provide good animal nutrition for astronauts in a bioregenerative life support system. In this study, growth and biomass conversion data of T. molitor larvae were tested for calculating the stoichiometric equation of its growth. Result of a respiratory quotient test proved the validity of the equation. Fiber had the most reduction in mass during T. molitor‧s consumption, and thus it is speculated that fiber is an important factor affecting larval growth of T. molitor. In order to further confirm this hypothesis and find out a proper feed fiber content, T. molitor larvae were fed on diets with 4 levels of fiber. Larval growth, development and respiration in each group were compared and analyzed. Results showed that crude-fiber content of 5% had a significant promoting effect on larvae in early instars, and is beneficial for pupa eclosion. When fed on feed of 5-10% crude-fiber, larvae in later instars reached optimal levels in growth, development and respiration. Therefore, we suggest that crude fiber content in feed can be controlled within 5-10%, and with the consideration of food palatability, a crude fiber of 5% is advisable.

  5. Leading trends in environmental regulation that affect energy development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R V; Attaway, L D; Christerson, J A; Kikel, D A; Kuebler, J D; Lupatkin, B M; Liu, C S; Meyer, R; Peyton, T O; Sussin, M H

    1980-01-01

    Major environmental issues that are likely to affect the implementation of energy technologies between now and the year 2000 are identified and assessed. The energy technologies specifically addressed are: oil recovery and processing; gas recovery and processing; coal liquefaction; coal gasification (surface); in situ coal gasification; direct coal combustion; advanced power systems; magnetohydrodynamics; surface oil shale retorting; true and modified in situ oil shale retorting; geothermal energy; biomass energy conversion; and nuclear power (fission). Environmental analyses of these technologies included, in addition to the main processing steps, the complete fuel cycle from resource extraction to end use. A comprehensive survey of the environmental community (including environmental groups, researchers, and regulatory agencies) was carried out in parallel with an analysis of the technologies to identify important future environmental issues. Each of the final 20 issues selected by the project staff has the following common attributes: consensus of the environmental community that the issue is important; it is a likely candidate for future regulatory action; it deals with a major environmental aspect of energy development. The analyses of the 20 major issues address their environmental problem areas, current regulatory status, and the impact of future regulations. These analyses are followed by a quantitative assessment of the impact on energy costs and nationwide pollutant emissions of possible future regulations. This is accomplished by employing the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS) for a subset of the 20 major issues. The report concludes with a more general discussion of the impact of environmental regulatory action on energy development.

  6. Cj1199 Affect the Development of Erythromycin Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni through Regulation of Leucine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Li, Fei; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Sun, Yawei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui