Science.gov

Sample records for affected employee wears

  1. Employees Wearing Religious Attire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry

    2004-01-01

    While adherents to many religions can be identified by distinctive clothing or accessories, the wearing of such garb by teachers is not necessarily related to evangelism in the classroom. The following case and the accompanying question-and-answer discussion illustrate the problem of the principal caught between the rock of First Amendment…

  2. Does wearing shoes affect your biomechanical efficiency?

    PubMed

    Rao, Guillaume; Chambon, Nicolas; Guéguen, Nils; Berton, Eric; Delattre, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Studies involving minimalist shoes have dramatically increased this past 10 years. While a deeper knowledge of the related modifications has ensued regarding the kinematics, electromyographic, and dynamic patterns, little is known regarding the modifications at the muscle forces and muscle fiber levels. The aim of the present study was to assess at a muscular level the modifications brought up when running barefoot, using 0mm midsole height running shoe, or using classical midsole height running shoes. An EMG-Driven model that combines the kinematics, dynamics, and electromyographic data was used to estimate the Triceps Surae (TS) muscle forces and fiber behavior during running using different footwear conditions. Despite differences at the joint level between barefoot and shod running when looking at ankle joint range of motion, or foot-ground angle at touchdown, the results showed no effect of footwear neither on the maximal muscle forces nor on the relative amount of force produced by each muscle within the TS muscle group when wearing different footwear. On the contrary, different behaviors of muscle fibers were shown with lower amplitudes of fiber lengths for the Gastrocnemii biarticular muscles when running barefoot. This particular results reveal that wearing a shoe, even with a very thin sole, could deeply modify the intricate muscle-tendon mechanics of running. PMID:25575884

  3. Is running style and economy affected by wearing respiratory apparatus?

    PubMed

    Siler, W L

    1993-02-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to compare selected gait parameters characteristic of running without respiratory apparatus on a treadmill (NOR) with those displayed while wearing a mouthpiece-breathing valve apparatus (MP) and while wearing a respiratory face mask (MASK), and to compare the running economy (RE) measured during MP with that measured during MASK. Seventeen male volunteers [age = 32 +/- 5 yr (mean +/- SD); mass = 72.4 +/- 9.0 kg] performed three treadmill runs in randomly assigned order. All runs were identical in terms of duration (10 min), speed [200 m. min-2 (7.5 mph)], and grade (0%). During the last minute of each run, RE was measured and coordinate data were collected for determination of mechanical variables. The mechanical analyses were limited to 12 subjects. Stride length, vertical oscillation of the center of mass, hip and ankle range of motion, and average internal mechanical power output were not different for NOR, MP, and MASK. Knee range of motion was significantly less (P < or = 0.05) during MP than during NOR and MASK, primarily due to a significant reduction in maximum knee flexion during nonsupport. MASK RE was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from MP RE. It was concluded that wearing MP or MASK generally does not affect running style of individuals running at comfortable, submaximal running speeds and that RE measured with MP is not different from that measured with MASK. PMID:8450730

  4. Mechanisms linking employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Chi; Huang, Yin-Mei

    2002-10-01

    Past empirical evidence has indicated that employee affective delivery can influence customer reactions (e.g., customer satisfaction, service quality evaluation). This study extends previous research by empirically examining mediating processes underlying the relationship between employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions. Data were collected from 352 employee-customer pairs in 169 retail shoe stores in Taiwan. Results showed that the influence of employee affective delivery on customers' willingness to return to the store and pass positive comments to friends was indirect through the mediating processes of customer in-store positive moods and perceived friendliness. The study also indicated that employee affective delivery influences customers' time spent in store, which, in turn, influences customer behavioral intentions. PMID:12395825

  5. 20 CFR 220.161 - How work affects an employee disability annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true How work affects an employee disability... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Disability Annuity Earnings Restrictions § 220.161 How work affects an employee disability annuity. In addition to the condition in § 220.160, the...

  6. 20 CFR 220.161 - How work affects an employee disability annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How work affects an employee disability... RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Disability Annuity Earnings Restrictions § 220.161 How work affects an employee disability annuity. In addition to the condition in § 220.160, the...

  7. Employees' organizational identification and affective organizational commitment: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Stinglhamber, Florence; Marique, Géraldine; Caesens, Gaëtane; Desmette, Donatienne; Hansez, Isabelle; Hanin, Dorothée; Bertrand, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have empirically supported the distinction between organizational identification (OI) and affective commitment (AC), there is still disagreement regarding how they are related. Precisely, little attention has been given to the direction of causality between these two constructs and as to why they have common antecedents and outcomes. This research was designed to fill these gaps. Using a cross-lagged panel design with two measurement times, Study 1 examined the directionality of the relationship between OI and AC, and showed that OI is positively related to temporal change in AC, confirming the antecedence of OI on AC. Using a cross-sectional design, Study 2 investigated the mediating role of OI in the relationship between three work experiences (i.e., perceived organizational support, leader-member exchange, and job autonomy) and AC, and found that OI partially mediates the influence of work experiences on AC. Finally, Study 3 examined longitudinally how OI and AC combine in the prediction of actual turnover, and showed that AC totally mediates the relationship between OI and turnover. Overall, these findings suggest that favorable work experiences operate via OI to increase employees' AC that, in turn, decreases employee turnover.

  8. Employees' organizational identification and affective organizational commitment: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Stinglhamber, Florence; Marique, Géraldine; Caesens, Gaëtane; Desmette, Donatienne; Hansez, Isabelle; Hanin, Dorothée; Bertrand, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have empirically supported the distinction between organizational identification (OI) and affective commitment (AC), there is still disagreement regarding how they are related. Precisely, little attention has been given to the direction of causality between these two constructs and as to why they have common antecedents and outcomes. This research was designed to fill these gaps. Using a cross-lagged panel design with two measurement times, Study 1 examined the directionality of the relationship between OI and AC, and showed that OI is positively related to temporal change in AC, confirming the antecedence of OI on AC. Using a cross-sectional design, Study 2 investigated the mediating role of OI in the relationship between three work experiences (i.e., perceived organizational support, leader-member exchange, and job autonomy) and AC, and found that OI partially mediates the influence of work experiences on AC. Finally, Study 3 examined longitudinally how OI and AC combine in the prediction of actual turnover, and showed that AC totally mediates the relationship between OI and turnover. Overall, these findings suggest that favorable work experiences operate via OI to increase employees' AC that, in turn, decreases employee turnover. PMID:25875086

  9. Mood and organizational citizenship behavior: the effects of positive affect on employee organizational citizenship behavior intentions.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Shiaw, W T

    1999-11-01

    This study, involving 139 employees from a variety of industries, organizations, and positions in Singapore, measured the effects of mood on the intentions of employees to contribute actions that are organizationally desirable but are not part of their formal job requirements (organizational citizenship behavior). After effects of established patterns of historical organizational citizenship behavior, demographic characteristics, and employee positive and negative affectivity had been controlled, stepwise regression analysis revealed that the amount of positive affect currently experienced by an employee significantly influenced the employee's intention to perform specific acts of organizational citizenship.

  10. 5 CFR 1.1 - Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter. 1.1 Section 1.1 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES COVERAGE AND DEFINITIONS (RULE I) § 1.1 Positions and employees affected by the rules...

  11. 5 CFR 1.1 - Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter. 1.1 Section 1.1 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES COVERAGE AND DEFINITIONS (RULE I) § 1.1 Positions and employees affected by the rules...

  12. 5 CFR 1.1 - Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter. 1.1 Section 1.1 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES COVERAGE AND DEFINITIONS (RULE I) § 1.1 Positions and employees affected by the rules...

  13. 5 CFR 1.1 - Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter. 1.1 Section 1.1 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES COVERAGE AND DEFINITIONS (RULE I) § 1.1 Positions and employees affected by the rules...

  14. 5 CFR 1.1 - Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Positions and employees affected by the rules in this subchapter. 1.1 Section 1.1 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES COVERAGE AND DEFINITIONS (RULE I) § 1.1 Positions and employees affected by the rules...

  15. 14 CFR 300.8 - Gifts and hospitality and other conduct affecting DOT employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to be performed by such DOT employee (18 U.S.C. 201). (b) Subject to 49 CFR part 99, it is improper... (49 CFR part 99), in order that they shall not encourage or cause any violation of the provisions of... affecting DOT employees. 300.8 Section 300.8 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT...

  16. Factors Affecting Hospital Employees' Knowledge Sharing Intention and Behavior, and Innovation Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Hong, Seong Ae

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the factors affecting employees' knowledge sharing intention, knowledge sharing behavior, and innovation behavior of the four top-ranked university hospitals in South Korea. Methods Data were collected from employees at three university hospitals in Seoul, Korea and one university hospital in Gyeonggi-Do, Korea through self-administered questionnaires. The survey was conducted from May 29, 2013 to July 17, 2013. A total of 779 questionnaires were analyzed by SPSS version 18.0 and AMOS version 18.0. Results Factors affecting hospital employees' knowledge sharing intention, knowledge sharing behavior, and innovation behavior are reciprocity, behavioral control, and trust. Conclusion It is important to select employees who have a propensity for innovation and continuously educate them about knowledge management based on trust. PMID:25180147

  17. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph C.

    This chapter examines cases reported during 1981 concerning school employees. In the format used, federal questions are addressed first, then issues associated with state laws. The author deals with cases in the areas of discrimination in employment, substantive constitutional rights of speech and association and privacy, and procedural due…

  18. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckham, Joseph C.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning the employment, dismissal, and tenuring of the employees of public agencies--in particular, public schools--are reported in this chapter. The chapter first addresses discrimination in employment based on race, sex, age, or physical limitations and notes that the shifting burden of…

  19. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Virginia Davis

    Cases involving employment interests of teachers, administrators, and other school employees generally continue trends set in earlier years. Discrimination considerations continue to play an important role. One area in which the courts might be said to intervene somewhat more than in others is the prevention and remediation of race discrimination.…

  20. Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Thomas S., Jr.

    In 1979 judicial activity continued to add to the body of law available relative to relationships between universities and colleges and their employees. Cases touched on the nature of the contract when an offer of employment has been made and accepted, benefits and working conditions, and termination and the procedural safeguards involved.…

  1. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  2. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed.

  3. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed. PMID:23067337

  4. Effects of Workplace Intervention on Affective Well-Being in Employees' Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; McHale, Susan M.; Almeida, David M.; Kelly, Erin L.; King, Rosalind B.

    2016-01-01

    Using a group-randomized field experimental design, this study tested whether a workplace intervention--designed to reduce work-family conflict--buffered against potential age-related decreases in the affective well-being of employees' children. Daily diary data were collected from 9- to 17-year-old children of parents working in an information…

  5. Employee Trust in Supervisors and Affective Commitment: The Moderating Role of Authentic Leadership.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kehan; Lin, Weipeng; Li, Jenny C; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Although previous research has examined the main/direct effects of subordinates' trust in their supervisors on the levels of subordinates' affective commitment towards the organizations, little attention has been paid to explore the boundary conditions of this relationship. Two studies were conducted to examine the moderating effect of authentic leadership on the relationship between subordinates' trust in supervisor and their levels of affective commitment towards the organization. In line with the hypothesized model, both Study 1 (cross-sectional design, n = 138) and Study 2 (lagged design, n = 154) demonstrated that authentic leadership moderated the relationship between employees' trust in supervisor and their levels of affective commitment towards their organizations. Specifically, the positive relationship was stronger for employees under higher levels of authentic leadership. The implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:27129786

  6. Wearing knee wraps affects mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Shorter, Kath A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing knee wraps on mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise. Ten resistance trained men (back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 160.5 ± 18.4 kg) performed 6 single back squats with 80% 1RM, 3 wearing knee wraps, 3 without. Mechanical output was obtained from ground reaction force, performance characteristics from digitized motion footage obtained from a single high-speed digital camera. Wearing knee wraps led to a 39% reduction (0.09 compared with 0.11 m, p = 0.037) in horizontal barbell displacement that continued during the lifting phase. Lowering phase vertical impulse remained within 1% across conditions; however, the lowering phase was performed 45% faster (1.13 compared with 1.57 seconds). This demonstrated that vertical force applied to the center of mass during the lowering phase was considerably larger and was likely a consequence of the generation and storage of elastic energy within the knee wrap. Subsequent vertical impulse applied to the center of mass was 10% greater (192 compared with 169 N·s, p = 0.018). Mechanical work involved in vertically displacing the center of mass was performed 20% faster and was reflected by a 10% increase in peak power (2,121 compared with 1,841 W, p = 0.019). The elastic properties of knee wraps increased mechanical output but altered back squat technique in a way that is likely to alter the musculature targeted by the exercise and possibly compromise the integrity of the knee joint. Knee wraps should not be worn during the strength and condition process, and perceived weakness in the knee joint should be assessed and treated.

  7. Effects of workplace intervention on affective well-being in employees' children.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Almeida, David M; Kelly, Erin L; King, Rosalind B

    2016-05-01

    Using a group-randomized field experimental design, this study tested whether a workplace intervention-designed to reduce work-family conflict-buffered against potential age-related decreases in the affective well-being of employees' children. Daily diary data were collected from 9- to 17-year-old children of parents working in an information technology division of a U.S. Fortune 500 company prior to and 12 months after the implementation of the Support-Transform-Achieve-Results (STAR) workplace intervention. Youth (62 with parents in the STAR group, 41 in the usual-practice group) participated in 8 consecutive nightly phone calls, during which they reported on their daily stressors and affect. Well-being was indexed by positive and negative affect and affective reactivity to daily stressful events. The randomized workplace intervention increased youth positive affect and buffered youth from age-related increases in negative affect and affective reactivity to daily stressors. Future research should test specific conditions of parents' work that may penetrate family life and affect youth well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26950240

  8. Perceived occupational stress, affective, and physical well-being among telecommunication employees in Greece.

    PubMed

    Lazuras, Lambros; Rodafinos, Angelos; Matsiggos, Georgios; Stamatoulakis, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    The present study examined four potential roles of work-related negative affectivity on the associations between self-reported occupational stress and physical well-being among telecommunication employees in Greece. Participants (764, predominantly male) completed a battery of self-report measures on perceived occupational stress, negative affectivity, and illness symptoms. In line with previous research, negative affectivity exerted a nuisance effect, by inflating the association between reported stressors and illness symptoms, and significantly predicted illness symptoms, over and above the effects of stressors. In addition, negative affectivity influenced reported illness symptom indirectly, through the effects of stressors, and moderated the relationship between interpersonal conflict at work and illness symptoms. The findings suggest that negative affectivity can largely explain and influence in different ways the associations between self-reported stress and physical strain. It is recommended that future studies of occupational stress should control for the effects of negative affectivity, and that health professionals should be cautious of its effects when interpreting relationships between self-reported occupational stress and physical well-being. PMID:19185405

  9. Negative core affect and employee silence: How differences in activation, cognitive rumination, and problem-solving demands matter.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Hector P; Patterson, Malcolm G; Leiva, Pedro I

    2015-11-01

    Employees can help to improve organizational performance by sharing ideas, suggestions, or concerns about practices, but sometimes they keep silent because of the experience of negative affect. Drawing and expanding on this stream of research, this article builds a theoretical rationale based on core affect and cognitive appraisal theories to describe how differences in affect activation and boundary conditions associated with cognitive rumination and cognitive problem-solving demands can explain employee silence. Results of a diary study conducted with professionals from diverse organizations indicated that within-person low-activated negative core affect increased employee silence when, as an invariant factor, cognitive rumination was high. Furthermore, within-person high-activated negative core affect decreased employee silence when, as an invariant factor, cognitive problem-solving demand was high. Thus, organizations should manage conditions to reduce experiences of low-activated negative core affect because these feelings increase silence in individuals high in rumination. In turn, effective management of experiences of high-activated negative core affect can reduce silence for individuals working under high problem-solving demand situations.

  10. 29 CFR 778.405 - What types of employees are affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Even if an employee does in fact work a variable workweek, the question must still be asked whether his..., some office employees whose duties compel them to work variable hours could also be in this category... unpredictable might also be compelled by the nature of her duties to work variable and unpredictable hours....

  11. 29 CFR 778.405 - What types of employees are affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Even if an employee does in fact work a variable workweek, the question must still be asked whether his..., some office employees whose duties compel them to work variable hours could also be in this category... unpredictable might also be compelled by the nature of her duties to work variable and unpredictable hours....

  12. 29 CFR 778.405 - What types of employees are affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Even if an employee does in fact work a variable workweek, the question must still be asked whether his..., some office employees whose duties compel them to work variable hours could also be in this category... unpredictable might also be compelled by the nature of her duties to work variable and unpredictable hours....

  13. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  14. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  15. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  16. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  17. 19 CFR 10.35 - Models of women's wearing apparel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Models of women's wearing apparel. 10.35 Section... Temporary Importations Under Bond § 10.35 Models of women's wearing apparel. (a) Models of women's wearing... the importer or his employees. (b) Invoices covering models of women's wearing apparel entered...

  18. 22 CFR 1203.735-212 - Wearing of uniforms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 1203.735-212 Wearing of... States to wear a uniform, care shall be taken that the uniform is worn only at authorized times and...

  19. Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Networks: The Factors Affecting Status of Employees' Network Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Gail M.

    2000-01-01

    A study of 1,150 employees (464 men, 682 women, 149 people of color) indicated that women and minorities who were not Asian, Black, or Latino had network members with significantly lower status because they held positions that limited access to powerful people. Structural rather than personal exclusion explained racial/ethnic and sex differences.…

  20. Does Employee Recognition Affect Positive Psychological Functioning and Well-Being?

    PubMed

    Merino, M Dolores; Privado, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Employee recognition is one of the typical characteristics of healthy organizations. The majority of research on recognition has studied the consequences of this variable on workers. But few investigations have focused on understanding what mechanisms mediate between recognition and its consequences. This work aims to understand whether the relationship between employee recognition and well-being, psychological resources mediate. To answer this question a sample of 1831 workers was used. The variables measured were: employee recognition, subjective well-being and positive psychological functioning (PPF), which consists of 11 psychological resources. In the analysis of data, structural equation models were applied. The results confirmed our hypothesis and showed that PPF mediate the relationship between recognition and well-being. The effect of recognition over PPF is two times greater (.39) with peer-recognition than with supervisor-recognition (.20), and, the effect of PPF over well-being is .59. This study highlights the importance of promoting employee recognition policies in organizations for the impact it has, not only on well-being, but also on the positive psychological functioning of the workers. PMID:26364645

  1. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  2. How does a vacation from work affect employee health and well-being?

    PubMed

    de Bloom, Jessica; Geurts, Sabine A E; Sonnentag, Sabine; Taris, Toon; de Weerth, Carolina; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2011-12-01

    Health and well-being (H&W) improve during vacation. However, it is unclear whether this general development applies to all employees, while also little is known about the underlying processes causing such an improvement. Our research questions were: (1) Does every worker experience a positive effect of vacation on H&W? and (2) Can vacation activities and experiences explain changes in H&W during vacation? In a 7-week longitudinal field study, 96 workers reported their H&W 2 weeks before, during, 1 week, 2 and 4 weeks after a winter sports vacation on 6 indicators (health status, mood, fatigue, tension, energy level and satisfaction). Sixty percent of the sample experienced substantial improvement of H&W during and after vacation. Yet, a small group experienced no (23%) or a negative effect of vacation (17%). Spending limited time on passive activities, pleasure derived from vacation activities, and the absence of negative incidents during vacation explained 38% of the variance in the vacation effect. Although vacation has a positive, longer lasting effect for many, it is not invariably positive for all employees. Choosing especially pleasant vacation activities and avoiding negative incidents as well as passive activities during active vacations apparently contributes to the positive effect of vacation on H&W. PMID:21678165

  3. Do high-commitment work systems affect creativity? A multilevel combinational approach to employee creativity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Song; Jia, Liangding; Takeuchi, Riki; Cai, Yahua

    2014-07-01

    In this article, some information about the data used in the article and a citation were not included. The details of the corrections are provided.] This study uses 3-level, 2-wave time-lagged data from a random sample of 55 high-technology firms, 238 teams, and 1,059 individuals in China to investigate a multilevel combinational model of employee creativity. First, we hypothesize that firm (macrolevel) high-commitment work systems are conducive to individual (microlevel) creativity. Furthermore, we hypothesize that this positive crosslevel main impact may be combined with middle-level (mesolevel) factors, including team cohesion and team task complexity, such that the positive impact of firm high-commitment work systems on individual creativity is stronger when team cohesion is high and the team task more complex. The findings from random coefficient modeling analyses provide support for our hypotheses. These sets of results offer novel insight into how firms can use macrolevel and mesolevel contextual variables in a systematic manner to promote employee creativity in the workplace, despite its complex nature.

  4. How does a vacation from work affect employee health and well-being?

    PubMed

    de Bloom, Jessica; Geurts, Sabine A E; Sonnentag, Sabine; Taris, Toon; de Weerth, Carolina; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2011-12-01

    Health and well-being (H&W) improve during vacation. However, it is unclear whether this general development applies to all employees, while also little is known about the underlying processes causing such an improvement. Our research questions were: (1) Does every worker experience a positive effect of vacation on H&W? and (2) Can vacation activities and experiences explain changes in H&W during vacation? In a 7-week longitudinal field study, 96 workers reported their H&W 2 weeks before, during, 1 week, 2 and 4 weeks after a winter sports vacation on 6 indicators (health status, mood, fatigue, tension, energy level and satisfaction). Sixty percent of the sample experienced substantial improvement of H&W during and after vacation. Yet, a small group experienced no (23%) or a negative effect of vacation (17%). Spending limited time on passive activities, pleasure derived from vacation activities, and the absence of negative incidents during vacation explained 38% of the variance in the vacation effect. Although vacation has a positive, longer lasting effect for many, it is not invariably positive for all employees. Choosing especially pleasant vacation activities and avoiding negative incidents as well as passive activities during active vacations apparently contributes to the positive effect of vacation on H&W.

  5. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  6. Development and Evaluation of the Method with an Affective Interface for Promoting Employees' Morale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Hidenori; Ishii, Hirotake; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    For the sustainable society, organization management not based on the mass production and mass consumption but having the flexibility to meet to various social needs precisely is required. For realizing such management, the emploees' work morale is required. Recently, however, the emploees' work morale is tend to decrease. Therefore, in this study, the authors developed the model of the method for promoting and keeping employees' work morale effectively and efficiently. Especially the authors thought “work morale” of “attitude to the work”. Based on this idea, it could be considered that the theory of the persuasion psychology and various persuasion techniques. Therefore, the model of the method applying the character agent was developed based on the forced compliance which is one of persuasion techniques based on the theory of the cognitive dissonance. By the evaluation experiment using human subjects, it was confirmed that developed method could improve workers' work morle effectively.

  7. A study of lubrication, processing conditions, and material combinations that affect the wear of micro-textured-carbide coated cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy surfaces used for artificial joints implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettienne-Modeste, Geriel A.

    Total joint replacement remains one of the most successful treatments for arthritis. The most common materials used for artificial joints are metals (e.g., cobalt-chrome alloys or titanium alloys), which articulate against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Wear related failures of artificial joints may be reduced with the use of novel micro-textured carbide surfaces. The micro-textured carbide surfaces were deposited on a CoCrMo alloy using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Wear tests were conducted to determine wear mechanisms and properties of the micro-textured surfaces. The research presented in this thesis addresses: (1) rheolgoical behavior of bovine calf serum with and without antibacterial agents to determine whether they can be used as appropriate models for synovial fluid, (2) the wear behavior of the micro-textured CoCrMo surface system, and (3) the mechanical and material properties of the micro-textured CoCrMo alloy surface relevant to wear performance. The rheological studies showed that the apparent viscosity of bovine calf serum increased with an increase in concentration before and after the serum was used for wear testing. The wear analysis showed that the processing conditions (2hr deposition vs. 4hr deposition times) affected the wear properties. The 2hr carbide-on-carbide lubricated in 50% BCS produced the lowest wear factor and rate for the five wear couple systems containing the carbide disk or plate material. Greater wear was produced in serum without penicillin/streptomycin (P/S) compared to the serum containing P/S. A greater carbide coating thickness 10 (micrometers) was produced during the 4hr deposition time than for the 2hr deposition (˜3mum). The nano-hardness value was higher than the micro-hardness for both the 4hr and 2hr carbide surfaces. The micro-hardness results of the worn carbide surfaces showed that an increase in BCS concentration from 0% to 100% increased the micro-hardness (HV) for carbide

  8. Changes in work affect in response to lunchtime walking in previously physically inactive employees: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Loughren, E A; Kinnafick, F-E; Taylor, I M; Duda, J L; Fox, K R

    2015-12-01

    Physical activity may regulate affective experiences at work, but controlled studies are needed and there has been a reliance on retrospective accounts of experience. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of lunchtime walks on momentary work affect at the individual and group levels. Physically inactive employees (N = 56; M age = 47.68; 92.86% female) from a large university in the UK were randomized to immediate treatment or delayed treatment (DT). The DT participants completed both a control and intervention period. During the intervention period, participants partook in three weekly 30-min lunchtime group-led walks for 10 weeks. They completed twice daily affective reports at work (morning and afternoon) using mobile phones on two randomly chosen days per week. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the data. Lunchtime walks improved enthusiasm, relaxation, and nervousness at work, although the pattern of results differed depending on whether between-group or within-person analyses were conducted. The intervention was effective in changing some affective states and may have broader implications for public health and workplace performance.

  9. Changes in work affect in response to lunchtime walking in previously physically inactive employees: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Loughren, E A; Kinnafick, F-E; Taylor, I M; Duda, J L; Fox, K R

    2015-12-01

    Physical activity may regulate affective experiences at work, but controlled studies are needed and there has been a reliance on retrospective accounts of experience. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of lunchtime walks on momentary work affect at the individual and group levels. Physically inactive employees (N = 56; M age = 47.68; 92.86% female) from a large university in the UK were randomized to immediate treatment or delayed treatment (DT). The DT participants completed both a control and intervention period. During the intervention period, participants partook in three weekly 30-min lunchtime group-led walks for 10 weeks. They completed twice daily affective reports at work (morning and afternoon) using mobile phones on two randomly chosen days per week. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the data. Lunchtime walks improved enthusiasm, relaxation, and nervousness at work, although the pattern of results differed depending on whether between-group or within-person analyses were conducted. The intervention was effective in changing some affective states and may have broader implications for public health and workplace performance. PMID:25559067

  10. The Combined Influence of Affective, Continuance and Normative Commitment on Employee Withdrawal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Mark John

    2009-01-01

    In a sample of 288 hospital nurses, commitment profiles were compared to turnover intentions, job search behavior, work withdrawal (absenteeism and lateness) and job stress. Five empirically-derived commitment profiles emerged: highly committed, affective-normative dominant, continuance-normative dominant, continuance dominant, and uncommitted.…

  11. How Does the Economic Crisis Affect the Psychological Well-Being? Comparing College Students and Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Kathrin; Mertens, Anne; Röbken, Heinke

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about differences in the impact of economic stress on students as compared to persons holding secure job positions. Besides the macroeconomic effects, an economic downturn can also affect individual's physical health and psychological well-being (Aytaç & Rankin, 2009). Prior research showed that socio-demographic…

  12. Understanding How Irritable Bowel Disease Affects Full-Time Employees at a Community College in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeGrand, Erin Trado

    2014-01-01

    The fields of Adult Education and Higher Education serve not only to educate students, but also as employers for many faculty and staff. All too often, employees are treated homogenously and little thought is given to employees who face the trials of coping with a chronic illness. Employees with chronic illness face marginalization in the…

  13. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid. PMID:26556515

  14. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  15. Exploring the effects of individual customer incivility encounters on employee incivility: the moderating roles of entity (in)civility and negative affectivity.

    PubMed

    Walker, David D; van Jaarsveld, Danielle D; Skarlicki, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Incivility between customers and employees is common in many service organizations. These encounters can have negative outcomes for employees, customers, and the organization. To date, researchers have tended to study incivility as an aggregated and accumulated phenomenon (entity perspective). In the present study, we examined incivility as it occurs during a specific service encounter (event perspective) alongside the entity perspective. Using a mixed-method multilevel field study of customer service interactions, we show that individual customer incivility encounters (i.e., events) trigger employee incivility as a function of the employee's overall accumulated impression of the (in)civility in his or her customer interactions, such that the effects are more pronounced among employees who generally perceive their customer interactions to be more versus less civil. We also find that these interactive effects occur only among employees who are lower (vs. higher) in negative affectivity. Our results show that, in order to expand the understanding of customer incivility, it is important to study the incivility encounter, the social context in which negative customer interactions occur, and individual differences.

  16. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail.

  17. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail. PMID:27303345

  18. How Do Internal and External CSR Affect Employees' Organizational Identification? A Perspective from the Group Engagement Model

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Imran; Riaz, Zahid; Arain, Ghulam A.; Farooq, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The literature examines the impact of firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities on employees' organizational identification without considering that such activities tend to have different targets. This study explores how perceived external CSR (efforts directed toward external stakeholders) and perceived internal CSR (efforts directed toward employees) activities influence employees' organizational identification. In so doing, it examines the alternative underlying mechanisms through which perceived external and internal CSR activities build employees' identification. Applying the taxonomy prescribed by the group engagement model, the study argues that the effects of perceived external and internal CSR flow through two competing mechanisms: perceived external prestige and perceived internal respect, respectively. Further, it is suggested that calling orientation (how employees see their work contributions) moderates the effects induced by these alternative forms of CSR. The model draws on survey data collected from a sample of 414 employees across five large multinationals in Pakistan. The results obtained using structural equation modeling support these hypotheses, reinforcing the notion that internal and external CSR operate through different mediating mechanisms and more interestingly employees' calling orientation moderates these relationships to a significant degree. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of results are discussed in detail. PMID:27303345

  19. Friction, wear, transfer and wear surface morphology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  20. Friction, wear, transfer, and wear surface morphology of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Tribological studies at 25 C in a 50-percent-relative-humidity air atmosphere were conducted using hemispherically tipped 440 C HT (high temperature) stainless steel pins sliding against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disks. The results indicate that sliding speed, sliding distance, contact stress and specimen geometry can markedly affect friction, UHMWPE wear, UHMWPE transfer and the type of wear mechanisms that occur. Adhesion appears to be the predominant wear mechanism; but after long sliding distances at slow speeds, heavy ridges of transfer result which can induce fatigue-like wear on the UHMWPE disk wear track. In one instance, abrasive wear to the metallic pin was observed. This was caused by a hard particle embedded in the UHMWPE disk wear track.

  1. Employee Selection Process: Integrating Employee Needs and Employer Motivators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Brian J.

    1989-01-01

    Offers suggestions for managers relative to the employee selection process, focusing on the identification of a potential employee's needs and the employer's motivators that affect employee productivity. Discusses the use of a preemployment survey and offers a questionnaire that allows matching of the employee's needs with employment…

  2. Understanding wear in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mair, L H

    1999-01-01

    Tooth wear is an increasing problem in dentistry. Traditionally, it has been divided into three categories: abrasion, attrition, and erosion. However, most clinical cases of tooth wear involve more than one of these processes. It is often easier to make a diagnosis by looking for the signs of the fundamental wear processes rather than trying to categorize the individual case. Wear can be caused by direct surface-to-surface wear, an intervening slurry, or a corrosive environment. Wear occurs during mastication, but also at other times, often at night. Although it may be possible to institute a preventive regimen, this will not always help the patient if his or her prime concern is esthetics. The same processes that cause tooth wear will cause wear to restorative materials. To diagnose and prevent wear, its processes must be understood.

  3. An Examination of Cultural Values and Employees' Perceptions of Support on Affective Reaction and the Desire to Participate in a Formal Mentoring Program in an Oilfield Services Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Hanna Bea

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have examined the effect of formal mentoring on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. However, there has been little or no focus on an employee's intent to participate in a formal mentoring program based upon an employee's perceived organizational support, and/or affective reaction (job satisfaction and…

  4. A new methodology for predictive tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sik

    An empirical approach to tool wear, which requires a series of machining tests for each combination of insert and work material, has been a standard practice for industries since early part of the twentieth century. With many varieties of inserts and work materials available for machining, the empirical approach is too experiment-intensive that the demand for the development of a model-based approach is increasing. With a model-based approach, the developed wear equation can be extended without additional machining experiments. The main idea is that the temperatures on the primary wear areas are increasing such that the physical properties of the tool material degrade substantially and consequently tool wear increases. Dissolution and abrasion are identified to be the main mechanisms for tool wear. Flank wear is predominantly a phenomenon of abrasion as evident by the presence of a scoring mark on the flank surface. Based on this statement, it is reasonable to expect that the flank-wear rate would increase with the content of hard inclusions. However, experimental flank wear results did not necessary correspond to the content of cementite phase present in the steels. Hence, other phenomena are believed to significantly affect wear behavior under certain conditions. When the cutting temperature in the flank interface is subjected to high enough temperatures, pearlitic structure austenizes. During the formation of a new austenitic phase, the existing carbon is dissolved into the ferrite matrix, which will reduce the abrasive action. To verify the austenitic transformation, turning tests were conducted with plain carbon steels. The machined surface areas are imaged using X-ray diffraction the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). On the other hand, crater wear occurs as a result of dissolution wear and abrasive wear. To verify the wear mechanisms of crater wear, various coating inserts as well as uncoated inserts were

  5. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  6. Managerial Responsibility for Employee Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafner, Arthur W.; Kibble-Smith, Brian G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses corrective action and employee discipline in library management, covering: (1) factors affecting the library manager's right to discipline; (2) employee orientation and training; (3) employee performance measurement; (4) corrective strategies; (5) termination as an option; (6) the importance of fairness; and (7) positive results of…

  7. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  8. Below the Salary Line: Employee Engagement of Non-Salaried Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Brad; Albornoz, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory empirical phenomological study looks at employee engagement using Kahn (1990) and Maslow's (1970) motivational theories to understand the experience of non-salaried employees. This study finds four themes that seem to affect employee engagement: work environment, employee's supervisor, individual characteristics of the employee,…

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of wear processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hualiang

    Wear has been recognized as a vital problem in many industries. It results in a loss of durability, reliability, and efficiency and costs tens of billions of dollars annually. Significant effort has been devoted in both experimental and theoretical studies. However, the mechanisms of wear are still poorly understood and therefore wear control is far behind its demand. One way to study wear process is via computer simulation, which has become more powerful with the rapid development in computer facilities and efficient algorithms. It allows observation of atomic scale deformation and therefore it is a very good tool to study wear mechanisms at the nano-scale. This study presents a series of molecular dynamic simulation of some nano-scale wear processes, such as indentation and plowing, with the goal of exploring the factors that affect wear and predicting wear for different conditions. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out on a system that includes an aluminum substrate and a hard tip. Embedded atom method (EAM) and Lennard-Jones potentials were used to describe interactions between atoms. For nano-indentation simulations, both constant indent force and constant loading speed were applied to study the wear mechanisms as well as material properties. Some phenomenon, such as jump-to-contact, local melting, and dislocation nucleation were observed. More importantly, the effects of system temperature, indent force, substrate orientation, tip-substrate bond, indenter shape, boundary condition, and defect concentrations of the substrate were systematically investigated during indentation. The results are in qualitative agreement with limited experimental data. Similar simulations were carried out for plowing. The effects of plowing force, substrate orientation, the tip-substrate bond, and alloy elements are discussed based on the simulation results. In addition, a simple analytic model of plowing behavior is provided. The model reveals two parameters, static

  10. The nature of surfaces and their influence in wear mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The wear of materials is strongly dependent upon the nature of the solid surfaces in contact, their properties and the nature of their films. Oxide films, orientation, crystal transformations, adhesive binding, crystal structure, hardness, and the presence of alloying agents are all shown to affect one or more of the forms of wear. The three most common forms of wear, adhesive, abrasive, and corrosive, are discussed in terms of the way each is affected by various material properties. Results presented indicate how wear can be optimized by concern for properties of materials.

  11. Wear Modeling: Evaluation and Categorization of Wear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hsien-Chung

    The objective of this study was to evaluate progress in wear modeling and propose guidelines for future work. Such guidelines can help wear modelers to make appropriate decisions and ascertain information relevant to wear modeling. Over 5,000 papers in the literature were surveyed. 182 erosion wear and sliding wear equations proposed between 1957 and 1992 were found and studied. Two approaches were taken to analyze the surveyed models. The first approach focuses on common features and variations in each of five wear modeling steps. The second approach identifies characteristics of the overall development of wear modeling. The conclusions and recommendations of this study: (1) No single universal equation or extensively accepted theory fully explains the many types of wear behavior. (2) Wear mechanisms as typically described in research literature are not fundamental processes of material loss. Mechanical, chemical, physical and metallurgical action are the four fundamental processes: future wear models should include consideration of these four simultaneously, together with their interactions. (3) Wear models based on a single academic discipline cannot fully explain a wearing process even if for a single wear mechanism. An interdisciplinary approach should be applied to build wear models. (4) Two characteristics in past development of wear modeling are positive and should be carried into future work: (a) progressively more and more local information about the variations of working conditions has been considered in wear modeling, and (b) the approaches of different disciplines has been more frequently and extensively applied together to build wear models which explain progressively more wear phenomena in a wearing system. (5) Wear modelers should derive wear equations to concisely present research results and to complete wear modeling. Out of the 5000 papers considered in this study, only 182 presented equations as well as word descriptions to describe erosion and

  12. Wear Behaviour of Pressible Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Rahman, Muhammad Izzat Abdul; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressible lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using 3D laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behaviour of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilisation and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. PMID:25980530

  13. Numerical and experimental investigations for the evaluation of the wear coefficient of reverse total shoulder prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Lorenza; Di Puccio, Francesca; Joyce, Thomas J; Ciulli, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, numerical and experimental wear investigations on reverse total shoulder arthroplasties (RTSAs) were combined in order to estimate specific wear coefficients, currently not available in the literature. A wear model previously developed by the authors for metal-on-plastic hip implants was adapted to RTSAs and applied in a double direction: firstly, to evaluate specific wear coefficients for RTSAs from experimental results and secondly, to predict wear distribution. In both cases, the Archard wear law (AR) and the wear law of UHMWPE (PE) were considered, assuming four different k functions. The results indicated that both the wear laws predict higher wear coefficients for RTSA with respect to hip implants, particularly the AR law, with k values higher than twofold the hip ones. Such differences can significantly affect predictive wear model results for RTSA, when non-specific wear coefficients are used. Moreover, the wear maps simulated with the two laws are markedly different, although providing the same wear volume. A higher wear depth (+51%) is obtained with the AR law, located at the dome of the cup, while with the PE law the most worn region is close to the edge. Taking advantage of the linear trend of experimental volume losses, the wear coefficients obtained with the AR law should be valid despite having neglected the geometry update in the model.

  14. Effect of Polyethylene Crosslinking and Bearing Design on Wear of Unicompartmental Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jonathan; Hermida, Juan C; D'Alessio, Jerry; Kester, Mark; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2015-08-01

    Wear and polyethylene damage continue to be important factors affecting outcomes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. We compared two design rationales for unicompartmental arthroplasty: fully congruent mobile bearings; or moderately conforming fixed bearings using experimental and computational wear simulation. Experimental wear rates were 3.89 (±0.12) mg/million cycles for the highly crosslinked Triathlon PKR fixed bearing compared to 18.35 (±0.19) mg/million cycles for the low crosslinked Oxford mobile bearing. Finite element analysis was used to calculate the effect of crosslinking and backside wear. Increase in polyethylene crosslinking reduced wear by 68% while backside wear comprised 46% of the total wear in the mobile bearing. Increasing conformity may not be the sole predictor of wear performance and highly crosslinked fixed-bearing polyethylene insert can also provide high wear performance.

  15. Employee relations.

    PubMed

    Demann, Eric T K; Stein, Pamela S; Levitt, Christine; Shelton, Keith E

    2008-07-01

    This review highlights some of the more important employee relation aspects involved in starting, establishing, or expanding an existing dental practice. Despite a competitive compensation package, staff-related conflicts can sometimes hamper the progress of a dental practice. Such conflicts can be reduced by having policies and procedures in place for each employee that set expectations concerning the hours of operation, professional manner, dress code, job tasks, performance evaluations, disciplinary actions, and termination if violations occur. Understanding the legal requirements set by various governmental agencies such as OSHA can help ensure that the rights and well-being of every employee are protected.

  16. On the influence of strain rate sensitivity on wear in the Archard regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Y.; Estrin, Y.

    1994-06-01

    As shown in the study, the wear rate is affected by the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress: the smaller S, the larger the wear rate. Of importance is the strain rate sensitivity correction to the wear coefficient in the Archard regime.

  17. Employee health.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a new guideline looking at improving the health and wellbeing of employees, with a particular focus on organisational culture and context, and the role of line managers. PMID:26309009

  18. An Exploration of the Impact of Employee Job Satisfaction, Affect, Job Performance, and Organizational Financial Performance: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Kidd, Cathy A.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive research has explored job satisfaction, job performance, and the financial performance of organizations. Job satisfaction and job performance have been explored separately and collectively. However, scholars only have begun to explore the relationship between employee job satisfaction and financial performance of organization. This paper…

  19. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity...

  20. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity...

  1. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders Affecting Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity...

  2. Morning employees are perceived as better employees: employees' start times influence supervisor performance ratings.

    PubMed

    Yam, Kai Chi; Fehr, Ryan; Barnes, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we draw from the stereotyping literature to suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are affected by employees' start times-the time of day they first arrive at work. Even when accounting for total work hours, objective job performance, and employees' self-ratings of conscientiousness, we find that a later start time leads supervisors to perceive employees as less conscientious. These perceptions in turn cause supervisors to rate employees as lower performers. In addition, we show that supervisor chronotype acts as a boundary condition of the mediated model. Supervisors who prefer eveningness (i.e., owls) are less likely to hold negative stereotypes of employees with late start times than supervisors who prefer morningness (i.e., larks). Taken together, our results suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are susceptible to stereotypic beliefs based on employees' start times. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24911178

  3. Morning employees are perceived as better employees: employees' start times influence supervisor performance ratings.

    PubMed

    Yam, Kai Chi; Fehr, Ryan; Barnes, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we draw from the stereotyping literature to suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are affected by employees' start times-the time of day they first arrive at work. Even when accounting for total work hours, objective job performance, and employees' self-ratings of conscientiousness, we find that a later start time leads supervisors to perceive employees as less conscientious. These perceptions in turn cause supervisors to rate employees as lower performers. In addition, we show that supervisor chronotype acts as a boundary condition of the mediated model. Supervisors who prefer eveningness (i.e., owls) are less likely to hold negative stereotypes of employees with late start times than supervisors who prefer morningness (i.e., larks). Taken together, our results suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are susceptible to stereotypic beliefs based on employees' start times. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Employee Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Madelyn

    2008-09-05

    Welcome to Berkeley Lab. You are joining or are already a part of a laboratory with a sterling tradition of scientific achievement, including eleven Nobel Laureates and thirteen National Medal of Science winners. No matter what job you do, you make Berkeley Lab the outstanding organization that it is. Without your hard work and dedication, we could not achieve all that we have. We value you and thank you for choosing to be part of our community. This Employee Handbook is designed to help you navigate the Lab. With over 3,000 employees, an additional 3,000 guests visiting from countries around the world, a 200-acre campus and many policies and procedures, learning all the ins and outs may seem overwhelming, especially if you're a new employee. However, even if you have been here for a while, this Handbook should be a useful reference tool. It is meant to serve as a guide, highlighting and summarizing what you need to know and informing you where you can go for more detailed information. The general information provided in this Handbook serves only as a brief description of many of the Lab's policies. Policies, procedures and information are found in the Lab's Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM), Summary Plan Descriptions, University of California policies, and provisions of Contract 31 between the Regents of the University and the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, specific terms and conditions for represented employees are found in applicable collective bargaining agreements. Nothing in this Handbook is intended to supplant, change or conflict with the previously mentioned documents. In addition, the information in this Handbook does not constitute a contract or a promise of continued employment and may be changed at any time by the Lab. We believe employees are happier and more productive if they know what they can expect from their organization and what their organization expects from them. The Handbook will familiarize you with the privileges, benefits

  5. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  6. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  7. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  8. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  9. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  10. Wear mechanism based on adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Various concepts concerning wear mechanisms and deformation behavior observed in the sliding wear track are surveyed. The mechanisms for wear fragment formation is discussed on the basis of adhesion. The wear process under unlubricated sliding conditions is explained in relation to the concept of adhesion at the interface during the sliding process. The mechanism for tearing away the surface layer from the contact area and forming the sliding track contour is explained by assuming the simplified process of material removal based on the adhesion theory.

  11. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  12. Toward Zero Micro/Macro-Scale Wear Using Periodic Nano-Layered Coatings.

    PubMed

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Devizenko, Alexander Yu; Khadem, Mahdi; Zubarev, Evgeniy N; Kondratenko, Valeriy V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-08-19

    Wear is an important phenomenon that affects the efficiency and life of all moving machines. In this regard, extensive efforts have been devoted to achieve the lowest possible wear in sliding systems. With the advent of novel materials in recent years, technology is moving toward realization of zero wear. Here, we report on the development of new functional coatings comprising periodically stacked nanolayers of amorphous carbon and cobalt that are extremely wear resistant at the micro and macro scale. Because of their unique structure, these coatings simultaneously provide high elasticity and ultrahigh shear strength. As a result, almost zero wear was observed even after one million sliding cycles without any lubrication. The wear rate was reduced by 8-10-fold compared with the best previously reported data on extremely low wear materials.

  13. Wear of metal fiber brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd Perryman, Jr.

    The goal of this dissertation was determining the wear mechanism of metal fiber brushes on commutators and slip rings with the goal of achieving the lowest possible wear rate. To this end, metal fiber brushes were operated, while conducting direct current, on gold-plated copper rotors with and without unfilled gaps to simulate slip rings and commutators, respectively. Wear rates on unfilled-groove commutators were found to be only modestly higher than on slip ring style rotors. Three possible causes for enhanced metal fiber brush wear on commutators were considered: (i) accelerated "adhesive" wear controlled by contact spots, (ii) fatigue induced wear and (iii) "fiber chopping". Similarly, SEM analysis of fiber tips and wear particles produced scant, if any, evidence of fiber chopping, which would occur as, again, fiber tips extend elastically into the commutator grooves and small slices of them would be "chopped" off by oncoming edges of commutator bars. Finally considered was "modified chopping", wherein fiber tips would be dragged over groove edges, resulting in tensile fracture and chopping. Only a single fiber fragment showed damage that might be compatible with that mechanism. Moreover, the fact that it was exemplified by a single tenuous case, rules it out as significant. The same conclusion also follows from comparing commutator wear rates with that on slip rings. These show good correlation in terms of effective brush pressure, which on commutators is increased because only bars conduct current and gaps do not support load. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. Clinical assessment of enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Schwindling, F S; Schmitter, M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure enamel wear caused by antagonistic monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia full molar crowns were placed in 20 patients. Patients with high activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were excluded. For analysis of wear, vinylpolysiloxane impressions were prepared after crown incorporation and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up. Wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists, and of two contralateral natural antagonists (control teeth) was measured by use of plaster replicas and a 3D laser-scanning device. Differences of wear between the zirconia crown antagonists and the control teeth were investigated by means of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. After 2 years, mean vertical loss was 46 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 19-26 μm for contralateral control teeth and 14 μm for zirconia crowns. Maximum vertical loss was 151 μm for enamel opposed to zirconia, 75-115 μm for control teeth and 60 μm for zirconia crowns. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between wear of enamel by zirconia-opposed teeth and by control teeth. Gender, which significantly affected wear, was identified as a possible confounder. Monolithic zirconia crowns generated more wear of opposed enamel than did natural teeth. Because of the greater wear caused by other dental ceramics, the use of monolithic zirconia crowns may be justified.

  15. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  16. Canine tooth wear in captive little brown bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Upper canine teeth of little brown bats Myotis lucifugus lucifugus held in stainless steel wire mesh cages underwent severe wear which exceeded that observed previously in caged big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus fuscus. This suggests a relationship between amount of wear and size of the caged bats with damage increasing as size decreases. Rapid wear of canine teeth by little brown bats resembled that observed in big brown bats in that it was limited to the first 2 weeks of captivity. This result indicates a universal interval for acclimation to cage conditions among vespertilionid bats. Dietary toxicants DDE and PCB did not affect the extent of wear. If bats are to be released to the wild, confinement in wire mesh cages should be avoided.

  17. In vivo measurements of tooth wear over 12 months.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J M; Austin, R S; Bartlett, D W

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the progression of tooth wear in a cohort of 63 patients, 43 males and 20 females with a mean age of 39.1 years. Recruitment followed referral from general practice to Guy's Hospital for advice/management of tooth wear. Addition silicone impressions were taken at 6-month intervals for a total of 12 months; impressions were subsequently poured in type IV gypsum. Casts were scanned using a non-contacting laser profilometer and then superimposed using Geomagic® Qualify 11. Wear was measured in μm by tooth per time interval. A questionnaire highlighting dietary, parafunctional and gastric risk factors was obtained from each participant. Clustered multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between tooth wear progression and risk factors. Maximum follow-up times were 6 months for 63 participants and 12 months for 30 participants. The measurement error was 15 μm. At the tooth level, 72.2% of 1,078 teeth wore <15 μm over a 6-month period. At the subject level, 77.7% of 63 participants showed median wear <15 μm over a 6-month period. There was a statistical trend towards tooth wear progression being associated with gastric risk factors (p < 0.05). The lower molars and the upper anterior teeth were the most commonly affected teeth; the lower molars and the upper central incisors were the most severely affected teeth. Tooth wear progression was slow in this cohort, suggesting that tooth wear may be cyclical and inactive in the majority of participants.

  18. Analysis and design of planar multibody systems with revolute joint wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukras, Saad M.

    Wear prediction on the components of a mechanical system without considering the system as a whole will, in most cases, lead to inaccurate predictions. This is because the wear is directly affected by the system dynamics which evolves simultaneously with the wear. In addition, the contact condition (regions of contact for the wearing bodies) also depends on the system dynamics and, in most cases, can only be determined in a multibody dynamics framework. In this work, a procedure to analyze planar multibody systems in which wear is present at one or more revolute joints is presented. The analysis involves modeling multibody systems with revolute joints that consist of clearance. Wear can then be incorporated into the system dynamic analysis by allowing the size and shape of the clearance to evolve as dictated by wear. An iterative wear prediction procedure based on the Archard's wear model is used to compute the wear as a function of the evolving dynamics and tribological data. In this framework, two procedures for the analysis of planar multibody systems with joint wear are developed. In the first procedure contact force at the concerned joint is determined using a contact force law and the wear prediction is based on the finite element method. In the second procedure, contact force determination and the wear prediction are based on the elastic foundation model. The two procedures are validated by comparing the wear predictions with wear on an experimental slider-crank mechanism. The experimental slider-crank is also used as a reference to assess the performance of the two models. It turns out that the procedure based on the finite element method provides reasonably accurate predictions for both wear profile and wear volume/mass whereas the procedure based on the elastic foundation model provides reasonably accurate estimates on the wear volume/mass, is computationally faster but provides progressively poor estimates on the wear profile. Finally an example is

  19. Employee Wellness Program in a small rural industry: employee evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Melondie; Gaskins, Susan; Shaw, Lynda

    2005-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine employees' perceptions of a wellness program resulting from collaboration between a small rural industry and a College of Nursing. Focus group methods were used to elicit evaluative data from 27 employees. A semi-structured interview guide of open-ended questions was used to elicit information. The employees readily identified the screenings and information they had received related to hypertension, blood sugar, and cholesterol to be helpful. Health behavior changes the employees identified based on the health promotion activities and screenings included diet changes, different food preparations, and exercise. The screenings were found to be beneficial because they helped them to understand the significance of the results and how they could alter them with health behaviors. The repeated screenings provided an opportunity for them to see how health behavior changes had affected their results.

  20. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. PMID:26199294

  1. New wear resistant composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Angers, R.; Champagne, B.; Fiset, M.; Chollet, P.

    1983-01-01

    A composite material consisting of WC-Co particles in a steel matrix was fabricated by sintering mixtures of WC-Co particles and a steel powder and infiltrating the sintered pieces with a copper alloy. Its wear resistance and mechanical properties were studied as a function of the content in WC-Co particles and other characteristics of the composite material microstructure. Infiltration provided a simple means to obtain a strong cohesion between WC-Co particles and the steel matrix. An effective matrix protection against wear is obtained with relatively low additions of particles especially with a silica abrasive which is soft with respect to cemented carbide. The experimental results show that this material has good mechanical properties and wear resistance. Depending upon abrasion resistance, wear losses are reduced up to 10 times by a 30 vol% addition of cemented carbide particles.

  2. Experiment on wear behavior of high pressure gas seal faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Peng, Xudong; Bai, Shaoxian; Meng, Xiangkai; Li, Jiyun

    2014-11-01

    Current researches show that mechanical deformation of seal ring face makes fluid film clearance decrease at high pressure side, thus a divergent clearance is formed and face wear occurs more seriously at the high pressure side than that on the low pressure side. However, there is still lack of published experimental works enough to prove the theoretical results. In this paper, a spiral groove dry gas seal at high pressures is experimentally investigated so as to prove the face wear happened at the high pressure side of seal faces due to the face mechanical deformation, and the wear behavior affected by seal ring structure is also studied. The experimental results show that face wear would occur at the high pressure side of seal faces due to the deformation, thus the leakage and face temperature increase, which all satisfies the theoretical predictions. When sealed pressure is not less than 5 MPa, the pressure can provide enough opening force to separate the seal faces. The seal ring sizes have obvious influence on face wear. Face wear, leakage and face temperature of a dry gas seal with the smaller cross sectional area of seal ring are less than that of a dry gas seal with bigger one, and the difference of leakage rate between these two sizes of seal face width is in the range of 24%-25%. Compared with the effect of seal ring sizes, the effect of secondary O-ring seal position on face deformation and face wear is less. The differences between these two types of dry gas seals with different secondary O-ring seal positions are less than 5.9% when the rotational speed varies from 0 to 600 r/min. By linking face wear and sealing performance changes to the shift in mechanical deformation of seal ring, this research presents an important experimental method to study face deformation of a dry gas seal at high pressures.

  3. Polyethylene Wear in Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Rajit; Elmallah, Randa D K; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Kurtz, Steven M; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene (PE) wear and osteolysis are common causes for late revisions of knee arthroplasties. Several implant and surgical factors have been implicated in contributing to the development of wear, such as type of bearing surface used, inaccurate articular geometry, and poor knee kinematics. In addition, patient-related factors, such as younger age and higher activity levels, may also contribute to wear. Our purpose was to evaluate and compare the effect of these variables on wear rates following knee arthroplasty. Recently, technological advancements have been aimed at reducing the incidence of wear by improving the PE manufacturing process, creating implants that minimize contact stresses, and refining our surgical techniques. Furthermore, the development of newer highly cross-linked PEs (HXLPEs) and the introduction of additives, such as vitamin E, to the PEs may improve overall implant survivorship. As a result, with the advent of newer implant and PE designs, wear is no longer the most common cause of early failure, though it remains an important factor in limiting long-term implant survivorship. However, there are a few clinical studies evaluating the long-term outcomes of newer HXLPEs and implant designs, with further evaluations necessary to determine the best implant-PE combination for improved knee arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:26030263

  4. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  5. Exploring Increased Productivity Through Employee Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Wayne K., Jr.

    Disengaged employees cost U.S. companies billions of dollars annually in lowered productivity, a cost which has been compounded by the difficult economic situations in the country. The potential for increasing productivity through increased employee engagement was examined in this study. Using personal engagement theory and the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore how the experiences of salaried aerospace employees affected productivity and the financial performance of an organization. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 aerospace employees whose responses were codified and analyzed to identify themes. The analysis indicated that (a) the lived experiences of employees influenced employee engagement, (b) employee engagement affects organizational commitment and performance, and (c) trust and respect and leadership are essential components to keep employees engaged. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that as employee engagement increases so too does organizational performance. The implications for positive social change include new insights for leaders seeking to increase productivity and financial performance, and to support employee engagement for maintaining sustainability, retaining talent, increasing profits, and improving the economy.

  6. Correlation between the wear resistance of Cu-Ni alloy and its electron work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X. C.; Lu, H.; He, H. B.; Yan, X. G.; Li, D. Y.

    2015-12-01

    This article reports our studies on the performance of isomorphous Cu-Ni alloy during sliding and erosive wear processes with attempt to correlate its wear behaviour with the electron work function (EWF). EWF, mechanical behaviour and wear resistance of the Cu-Ni alloy with respect to the concentration of Ni were measured using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-indenter, pin-on-disc and air-jet testers, respectively. It was demonstrated that EWF, hardness and Young's modulus of the alloy increased as the concentration of Ni increased. During solid-particle erosion tests, the wear resistance of the alloy was enhanced with an increase in the Ni concentration, corresponding to an increase in EWF. However, an opposite trend was observed during sliding wear tests, which was ascribed to the formation of oxide scale that affected the sliding wear resistance.

  7. Erosive Tooth Wear and Related Risk Factors in 8- and 14-Year-Old Greek Children.

    PubMed

    Provatenou, Efthymia; Kaklamanos, Eleftherios G; Kevrekidou, Aikaterini; Kosma, Ismini; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the erosive tooth wear of primary and permanent teeth and its association with related risk factors. Two groups of Greek children aged 8 (n = 329) and 14 years (n = 263) were examined in the classroom using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. Data concerning risk factors were collected using questionnaires. Dental caries (DMFS/dmfs) was also recorded. The data were analyzed using the t test, one-way ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, Fisher's exact test, and the χ2 test. In the 8-year-olds, the primary teeth showed a predominantly medium level of wear and the permanent teeth no wear. A majority of the 14-year-olds exhibited low risk levels of wear. The most frequently affected dental surface in both age groups was the occlusal surface of the mandibular posterior teeth. In the 8-year-olds, BEWE scores and the prevalence of wear in the primary teeth was influenced by gender (p = 0.020). In their permanent teeth, soft drink consumption (p < 0.0001) and preference for lemon/vinegar (p = 0.041) significantly affected wear prevalence and BEWE scores, while habitually retaining soft drinks in the mouth influenced wear prevalence (p = 0.008), risk (p = 0.004), and BEWE scores (p = 0.022). In the 14-year-olds, wear prevalence was significantly affected by the consumption of lemon-flavored candies (p = 0.016) and soft drinks (p = 0.050). BEWE scores were significantly affected by gender (p = 0.022) and soft drink consumption (p = 0.030). Gender influenced tooth wear risk in both age groups (p = 0.010 and p = 0.021, respectively). The results of this study indicate that erosive tooth wear differed between primary and permanent teeth and was influenced by gender and dietary factors. PMID:27286713

  8. Wear versus Thickness and Other Features of 5-Mrad Crosslinked UHMWPE Acetabular Liners

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fu-Wen; Lu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background The low wear rates of crosslinked polyethylenes provide the potential to use larger diameters to resist dislocation. However, this requires the use of thinner liners in the acetabular component, with concern that higher contact stresses will increase wear, offsetting the benefits of the crosslinking. Questions/purposes We asked the following questions: Is the wear of conventional and crosslinked polyethylene liners affected by ball diameter, rigidity of backing, and liner thickness? Are the stresses in the liner affected by thickness? Methods Wear rates were measured in a hip simulator and stresses were calculated using finite element modeling. Results Without crosslinking, the wear rate was 4% to 10% greater with a 36-mm diameter than a 28-mm diameter. With crosslinking, wear was 9% lower with a 36-mm diameter without metal backing and 4% greater with metal backing. Reducing the thickness from 6 mm to 3 mm increased the contact stress by 46%, but the wear rate decreased by 19%. Conclusions The reduction in wear with 5 Mrad of crosslinking was not offset by increasing the diameter from 28 mm to 36 mm or by using a liner as thin as 3 mm. Clinical Relevance The results indicate, for a properly positioned 5-Mrad crosslinked acetabular component and within the range of dimensions evaluated, neither wear nor stresses in the polyethylene are limiting factors in the use of larger-diameter, thinner cups to resist dislocation. PMID:20848244

  9. The effects of artificial wing wear on the flight capacity of the honey bee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jason T; Roberts, Stephen P

    2014-06-01

    The wings of bees and other insects accumulate permanent wear, which increases the rate of mortality and impacts foraging behavior, presumably due to effects on flight performance. In this study, we investigated how experimental wing wear affects flight performance in honey bees. Variable density gases and high-speed videography were used to determine the maximum hovering flight capacity and wing kinematics of bees from three treatment groups: no wing wear, symmetric and asymmetric wing wear. Wing wear was simulated by clipping the distal-trailing edge of one or both of the wings. Across all bees from treatment groups combined, wingbeat frequency was inversely related to wing area. During hovering in air, bees with symmetric and asymmetric wing wear responded kinematically so as to produce wingtip velocities similar to those bees with no wing wear. However, maximal hovering flight capacity (revealed during flight in hypodense gases) decreased in direct proportion to wing area and inversely to wing asymmetry. Bees with reduced wing area and high asymmetry produced lower maximum wingtip velocity than bees with intact or symmetric wings, which caused a greater impairment in maximal flight capacity. These results demonstrate that the magnitude and type of wing wear affects maximal aerodynamic power production and, likely, the control of hovering flight. Wing wear reduces aerodynamic reserve capacity and, subsequently, the capacity for flight behaviors such as load carriage, maneuverability, and evading predators.

  10. How to Calculate an Employee Relations Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, William B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Proposes using an employee relations index (ERI) to measure factors affecting employee relations and job performance ability. Examines five of ten major ERI factors: attenance, turnover, safety, grievances/complaints, and motor vehicle accidents. Discusses weighing the factors and interpreting the outcome. (CSS)

  11. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  12. Impact of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time Practices

    PubMed Central

    Woeller, Kara E.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Robertson-Smith, Amy L.; Bohman, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens. METHODS (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14–49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18–49 years, 74 teens, 12–17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising. RESULTS Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours). CONCLUSIONS Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited impact on established habits. PMID:26688668

  13. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  14. Sliding Wear Response of Beryl Reinforced Aluminum Composite - A Factorial Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat, V.; Durga Prasad, B.; Prabhakar, M. Bhovi; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Al-Beryl MMCs were successfully fabricated using powder metallurgy route. Processing conditions such as beryl content and particle size were varied and its influence on dry sliding wear response was studied. Effect of test parameters like applied load and sliding distance on wear performance of Al-Beryl MMCs were discussed detail. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a pin on disc machine based on the 24 (4 factors at 2 levels) factorial design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to obtain the contribution of control parameters on wear rate. The present study shows that wear resistance of Al-beryl MMCs not only depends on the beryl content but also influenced by normal load, sliding distance and particle size. The results show that most significant variables affecting wear rate of Al - beryl MMCs are size of the beryl particles (22%), beryl content (19.60%), sliding distance (18.47%), and normal load (10.30%). The interaction effects of these parameters are less significant in influencing wear rate compared to the individual parameters. The correlation between sliding wear and its parameters was obtained by multiple regression analysis. Regression model developed in the present study can be successfully implemented to predict the wear response of Al-Beryl MMCs.

  15. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  16. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Li, Y. B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, J. P.; Wu, G. X.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  17. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  18. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  19. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  20. Employee Training: Current Trends, Future Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorovitz, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Issues currently affecting employee training are the impact of high technology, worker adaptability, the communications revolution, job satisfaction, underinvestment in human capital, demographic shifts, and interest in productivity improvement. (SK)

  1. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  2. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  3. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-06-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients.

  4. Preliminary study on the effect of wear process on drug release of ALN-loaded UHMWPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Qu, Shuxin; Lin, Sunzhong; Huang, Jie; Fu, Rong; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2012-12-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) for anti-osteolysis was developed in our previous study. As a potential material of artificial joints, ALN-loaded UHMWPE is subjected to friction and wear which probably affect the ALN release in vivo. This study aims to explore the influence of friction and wear on the ALN release rate. For comparison, the specimens of control group, immersed motionlessly in distilled water, were not applied any friction. The morphological change of worn surface of ALN-loaded UHMWPE was observed through an independent wear test and was compared with that of control UHMWPE. The ALN release rate in the friction and wear process was higher than that of non-friction test. The cumulative mass of ALN increased slowly at the onset of wear process and then speeded up. The fibrils-like wear debris accumulated on the worn surface of ALN-loaded UHMWPE but did not appear on that of UHMWPE. The micro-pores formed during wear process, were probably favorable of the dissolution of ALN. It indicated that the ALN release of ALN-loaded UHMWPE was affected by the friction and wear. The frictional factors should be taken into account in predicting the ALN release rate of ALN-loaded UHMWPE.

  5. Computational wear prediction of artificial knee joints based on a new wear law and formulation.

    PubMed

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Liu, Feng; Brockett, Claire; Jennings, Louise; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2011-04-01

    Laboratory joint wear simulator testing has become the standard means for preclinical evaluation of wear resistance of artificial knee joints. Recent simulator designs have been advanced and become successful at reproducing the wear patterns observed in clinical retrievals. However, a single simulator test can be very expensive and take a long time to run. On the other hand computational wear modelling is an alternative attractive solution to these limitations. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. However, all these models have adopted the classical Archard's wear law, which was developed for metallic materials, and have selected wear factors arbitrarily. It is known that such an approach is not generally true for polymeric bearing materials and is difficult to implement due to the high dependence of the wear factor on the contact pressure. Therefore, these studies are generally not independent and lack general predictability. The objective of the present study was to develop a new computational wear model for the knee implants, based on the contact area and an independent experimentally determined non-dimensional wear coefficient. The effects of cross-shear and creep on wear predictions were also considered. The predicted wear volume was compared with the laboratory simulation measurements. The model was run under two different kinematic inputs and two different insert designs with curved and custom designed flat bearing surfaces. The new wear model was shown to be capable of predicting the difference of the wear volume and wear pattern between the two kinematic inputs and the two tibial insert designs. Conversely, the wear factor based approach did not predict such differences. The good agreement found between the computational and experimental results, on both the wear scar areas and volumetric wear rates, suggests that the computational wear modelling based on the new wear law and the

  6. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  7. Wear particle analysis using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The use of the Ferrograph in analyzing wear particles from a variety of different sources is reported. Examples of wear particles from gas turbine engines, bearing tests, friction and wear tests, hydraulic systems, and human joints are illustrated. In addition, the separation of bacteria and human cells is described.

  8. Wear patterns of, and wear volume formulae for, cylindrically elongated acetabular cup liners.

    PubMed

    Wu, James Shih-Shyn; Hsu, Shu-Ling; Chen, Jian-Horng

    2010-07-01

    This study analyzed the wear patterns of, and wear volume formulae for, cylindrically elongated acetabular cup liners. The geometric patterns of the wear surface were first classified, then wear volume formulae were derived by integral calculus. SolidWorks((R)) software or published formulae were used to verify the accuracy of the proposed formulae. The analytical results showed that the wear shape of the liner can be categorized into seven wear patterns, including the special case of wear at 90 degrees , and the seven corresponding wear formulae were derived. In addition, wear of the cylindrical elongation might add considerably to the volume loss of the liner, depending on the height and shape of the elongation and the depth and direction of the linear penetration, being maximally 21% in the investigated model. The proposed wear formulae and patterns will be useful for more accurate performance evaluation of existing hip components implanted in patients and for the designing of new hip components.

  9. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high energy brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Caliper-type brakes simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon-graphite material formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon-graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level and additions of B4C each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. This transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur. The exposure of the fiber structure of the cloth constituent is believed to play a role in the shear film disruption.

  10. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high-energy brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Caliper type brake simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon graphite materials formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, SiC additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level, additions of B4C, and additions of SiC each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. The transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur.

  11. A Novel Method to Assess Wear Rates of Retrieved Tibial Inserts Following in-vivo Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniogue, Tanille J.

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) on cobalt chrome is the bearing couple of choice for total knee arthroplasty. The number of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty has been steadily growing and is projected to continue increasing rapidly in the near future. Many of these patients are younger and more active and therefore need a longer lasting device. However, many of these devices fail prematurely and often the primary reason for failure and ultimately revision is due to wear related issues. Therefore, examining how wear rates of the UHMWPE tibial insert change during in-vivo use can help elucidate the mechanisms of accelerated wear and hopefully aid in finding solutions to combat wear related failures. Different crosslinking treatments have been employed by manufacturers to improve wear resistance of the polyethylene. While this has been shown to be an effective way to reduce wear, crosslinking has led to other issues such as oxidative instability and a decline in mechanical properties. The purpose of this body of work is to examine how changes in oxidation, after in-vivo use, affect wear resistance. A novel testing method was developed to test the native articular surface from retrieved tibial inserts in a laboratory Pin-on-Disk (POD) simulator. The method was validated using short-duration implant articular surfaces and non-articular control pins. In the absence of high surface oxidation or severe surface damage, the articular surface pins had comparable steady state wear rates to their bulk counterparts. Tests of devices with longer in-vivo service show chemical changes consistent with a free-radical mediated oxidation mechanism. Tribological assessment of the articular surfaces shows increasing wear rates as a function of oxidation. While this relationship has been hypothesized in the literature, these experiments represent the first physical demonstration of the phenomenon. The wear mechanism is further explored through infrared

  12. You Wear Me Out

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Joshua M.; Goldstein, Noah J.; Shapiro, Jenessa R.; Bargh, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Acts of self-control may deplete an individual's self-regulatory resources. But what are the consequences of perceiving other people's use of self-control? Mentally simulating the actions of others has been found to elicit psychological effects consistent with the actual performance of those actions. Here, we consider how simulating versus merely perceiving the use of willpower can affect self-control abilities. In Study 1, participants who simulated the perspective of a person exercising self-control exhibited less restraint over spending on consumer products than did other participants. In Study 2, participants who took the perspective of a person using self-control exerted less willpower on an unrelated lexical generation task than did participants who took the perspective of a person who did not use self-control. Conversely, participants who merely read about another person's self-control exerted more willpower than did those who read about actions not requiring self-control. These findings suggest that the actions of other people may either deplete or boost one's own self-control, depending on whether one mentally simulates those actions or merely perceives them. PMID:19207692

  13. Wear study under plastic deformation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B. M.; Singhal, S.; Singh, D. V.

    1994-03-01

    Lubrication in metalworking processes is characterized by plastic deformation conditions resulting in generation of a large amount of virgin surface and of heat of deformation. The study of wear under these conditions is important from the point of view of product quality and tool/die wear. A laboratory study of wear under simulated plastic deformation conditions using pairs of mild steel and EN31 discs on an Amsler friction and wear testing machine was carried out. The worn surfaces and wear particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that wear with a mineral oil was greater than that with a vegetable oil. This paper analyzes the phenomenon through an examination of the surfaces and the wear particles.

  14. Low wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  15. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  16. Nuclear fuel assembly wear sleeve

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, D.J.; Kmonk, S.

    1983-03-08

    An improved control rod guide tube for use in a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. The guide tube extends the complete length of the fuel assembly and has its upper end fastened in a cylindrical housing by swaging the guide tube material into grooves formed in the housing walls. To eliminate wear on the guide tube inner walls caused by hydraulic induced vibratory forces on a control rod adapted to move therein, a thin-walled chrome plated sleeve is threaded into the top end of the guide thimble and extends downwardly a distance sufficient to be engaged by the control rod during reactor operation. The sleeve serves as a highly resistant wear surface between the control rod and walls on the guide tube in the fuel assembly.

  17. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  18. Employee discipline: a changing paradigm.

    PubMed

    Raper, J L; Myaya, S N

    1993-12-01

    To increase the receptiveness of health care supervisors to a broader meaning of discipline and to simulate investigation of nontraditional methods of encouragement to employees who fail to meet minimum standards of conduct and thereby negatively affect the quality of patient care, a subjectively realistic view of the implications of the traditional punitive disciplinary paradigm is presented. Through the use of a case study, the authors present, explain, and apply the contemporary concept of discipline without punishment as first described by J. Huberman.

  19. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Fowley, M.

    2013-09-23

    pairs 1 through 6 be helical rather than flat, with the paddle pair 1 aligned with the feed augers in order to minimize the wear occurring in the SPF mixer. Based on the results of this testing, it is recommended that the mixer be inspected and critical measurements be taken whenever the SPF processing schedule allows in order to establish a wear rate of the 10-inch mixer paddles.5 Based on these measurements, the lifetime of paddles in the transition region can be established in order to set up a maintenance schedule for the mixer. Since replacing the entire mixer is very expensive and time intensive, replacing the worn paddles after a specific time period would allow for planned shutdowns as well as process optimization such that the mixer throughput is not compromised. In addition, further testing should be performed to determine an alternate liquid inlet location to better flush the mixer of residual grout at the end of processing. Sufficiently cleaning the mixer will help eliminate another potential source of wear. Another potential method for reducing the wear rate in the mixer is to reduce the mixer speed without affecting the throughput capacity. Since wear rate is a function of impact velocity of the grout and mixing paddles, testing could be done using the 2-inch mixer determine the optimum mixer speed to reduce wear but not adversely impact facility operations (e.g. throughput capacity and grout properties).

  20. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  1. Shift work and employee fatigue: implications for occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yumang-Ross, Doreen J; Burns, Candace

    2014-06-01

    Long work hours and irregular shifts are part of the nation's 24-hour society and contribute to employee fatigue. Factors affecting employee fatigue are circadian rhythm, sleep quality and quantity, individual health, the environment, and work tasks. Employee fatigue contributes to accidents and injuries, and affects occupational performance, safety, and health. These findings should be used by occupational health nurses to address fatigue management and develop comprehensive fatigue management programs.

  2. Tooth wear in the deciduous dentition of 5-7-year-old children: risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gatou, Tarsitsa; Mamai-Homata, Eleni

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the distribution and severity of tooth wear in deciduous dentition and its relationship with possible risk factors. A stratified cluster sample of 243 5-7-year-old children was examined using the tooth wear index of Smith and Knight, and their exposure to intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors was retrospectively investigated through a structured questionnaire. The severity of wear was quantitatively estimated by the number of surfaces with affected dentine and by the cumulative score of the sextants, based on the Basic Erosive Wear Examination scoring system. Only 1.6% of the children were tooth wear free, whereas 45.6% had moderate to severe wear involving dentine. Maxillary canines were the most affected teeth (83.2%), and occlusal/incisal the most affected surfaces (52.7%). The likelihood of tooth wear involving dentine was greater in boys than girls (OR = 1.72), in immigrants than in Greeks (OR = 1.93), and in 6- and 7-year olds than in 5-year olds (OR = 2.78 to 2.93). After adjustment for age, gender, and nationality, exposure to several dietary factors and especially to soft drinks was found to significantly affect the prevalence (OR = 1.27) and the severity of tooth wear. Every additional serving/week of consumption of soft drinks increases the number of surfaces with dentine affected by 0.03 per year (p < 0.05) and the cumulative score of sextants by 0.04 (p < 0.05). The cluster of children with the higher prevalence and severity of tooth wear had an average exposure to soft drinks of 10 servings/week for a duration of 4 years. The cumulative score of sextants was better predicted by the assessed risk factors, in comparison with the number of surfaces with affected dentine. Tooth wear is a common condition in children, related both to the physiological process of aging of dentition and to the erosive effect of dietary factors. Strategies to reduce the intake of soft drinks in children are expected to have multiple

  3. Oscillatory wear tests of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Pilliar, R M; Smith, D C; Maric, B

    1984-09-01

    The wear behavior of 12 commercial restorative composites (conventional and microfilled) and an unfilled restorative material was evaluated using an in vitro wear test referred to as an oscillatory wear test. The effect of varying test conditions was evaluated in a series of preliminary experiments in order to define test conditions for material evaluation. The materials were tested after being aged in water at 37 degrees C for periods of from seven days to one year. The results indicated consistently lower wear rates for the microfilled materials as compared with those of the conventional composites. Aging did not result in significant differences in wear rates measured by this method. Scanning electron micrography of worn surfaces suggested a possible effect of filler particle shape and bonding to the matrix to explain this difference. Although the relevance of the results to clinical behavior is not yet known, the study indicated the importance of material variables on wear.

  4. Enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns after 6 months of clinical use.

    PubMed

    Stober, T; Bermejo, J L; Rammelsberg, P; Schmitter, M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate enamel wear caused by monolithic zirconia crowns and to compare this with enamel wear caused by contralateral natural antagonists. Twenty monolithic zirconia crowns were placed in 20 patients requiring full molar crowns. For measurement of wear, impressions of both jaws were made at baseline after crown cementation and at 6-month follow-up. Mean and maximum wear of the occlusal contact areas of the crowns, of their natural antagonists and of the two contralateral natural antagonists were measured by the use of plaster replicas and 3D laser scanning methods. Wear differences were investigated by the use of two-sided paired Student's t-tests and by linear regression analysis. Mean vertical loss (maximum vertical loss in parentheses) was 10 (43) μm for the zirconia crowns, 33 (112) μm for the opposing enamel, 10 (58) μm for the contralateral teeth and 10 (46) μm for the contralateral antagonists. Both mean and maximum enamel wear were significantly different between the antagonists of the zirconia crowns and the contralateral antagonists. Gender and activity of the masseter muscle at night (bruxism) were identified as possible confounders which significantly affected wear. Under clinical conditions, monolithic zirconia crowns seem to be associated with more wear of opposed enamel than are natural teeth. With regard to wear behaviour, clinical application of monolithic zirconia crowns is justifiable because the amount of antagonistic enamel wear after 6 months is comparable with, or even lower than, that caused by other ceramic materials in previous studies.

  5. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear

    PubMed Central

    Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements. PMID:24297773

  6. The effect of insert conformity and material on total knee replacement wear.

    PubMed

    Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Brockett, Claire L; Liu, Feng; Jennings, Louise M; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    The mean average life is increasing; therefore, there is a need to increase the lifetime of the prostheses. To fulfil this requirement, new prosthetic designs and materials are being introduced. Two of the design parameters that may affect wear of total knee replacements, and hence the expected lifetime, are the insert conformity and material. Computational models have been used extensively for wear prediction and optimisation of artificial knee designs. The objective of the present study was to use a previously validated non-dimensional wear coefficient-based computational wear model to investigate the effect of insert conformity and material on the predicted wear in total knee replacements. Four different inserts (curved, lipped, partial flat and custom flat), with different conformity levels, were tested against the same femoral and under two different kinematic inputs (intermediate and high), with different levels of cross-shear. The insert bearing materials were either conventional or moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear predictions were validated against the experimental data from Leeds knee simulation tests. The predicted wear rates for the curved insert (most conformed) were more than three times those for the flat insert (least conformed). In addition, the computationally predicted average volumetric wear rates for moderately cross-linked UHMWPE bearings were less than half of their corresponding conventional UHMWPE bearings. Moreover, the wear of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was shown to be less dependent on the degree of cross-shear, compared to conventional UHMWPE. These results along with supporting experimental studies provide insight into the design variables, which may reduce wear in knee replacements.

  7. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  8. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  9. Employee Assistance: Policies and Programs. Pamphlet Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Gail Gleason

    Approximately six to eight percent of the nation's workers have problems which affect their job performance; without assistance, these problems become worse, affect others, and may have serious consequences to the employer as well. The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is a pragmatic but compassionate attempt to improve performance by constructing…

  10. Child Care Recommendations for Honeywell Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Chris, Ed.

    Quality child care is an issue affecting both an industry as a whole and the individuals within that industry. Employees' absenteeism, morale, and motivation are closely linked to concern for their child's well-being and this concern will ultimately affect both production and company success. In recognition of this issue, the Honeywell Corporation…

  11. Volumetric wear of various orthotic appliance materials.

    PubMed

    Issar-Grill, Noana; Roberts, Howard W; Wright, Edward F; Dixon, Sara A; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the resistance to wear of six commonly used orthotic appliance materials. These materials were: SR Ivocap (Ivoclar Vivadent, Inc., Amherst, NY), Eclipse (Dentsply International, York, PA), ProBase (Ivoclar Vivadent), Valplast (Valplast International Corp., Oceanside, NY), Impak (CMP Industries LLC, Albany, NY), and Clearsplint (Astron Dental Corp., Lake Zurich, IL). Twelve cylindrical specimens of each material were fabricated per manufacturer instructions. Occlusal wear was simulated in a custom-made wear simulator with each specimen receiving four wear scars in a two-body wear simulation using a 1.5 mm tungsten-carbide tipped stylus at 40 newtons for 2500 cycles at 1 Hz, while immersed in 37 degrees C distilled water (n = 48). The specimens were evaluated before and after wear testing using a three-dimensional (3D) noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2000, Scantron Corp., Eagan, MN). A mean change in volume was determined for each orthotic material. Results found that Clearsplint material displayed the greatest amount of volume loss/wear, while SR Ivocap, Eclipse, and ProBase materials had the least amount of wear. Valplast and Impak performed more moderately. Based upon this wear knowledge, practitioners are able to more reliably choose the appliance material necessary for their various patients. PMID:24308100

  12. Wear Performance of Laser Processed Tantalum Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10−4mm3(N.m)−1, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. PMID:22058608

  13. Predicting and preventing casing wear while drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Perdue, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    Drillpipe rotating inside a well`s intermediate string of casing has long been recognized as the principal cause of internal casing wear. Because today`s wells are longer and deeper than ever, prolonged contact can cause sufficient wear to either breach the casing or weaken it to the extent that it will rupture when the casing is pressure tested, delaying the project while an unplanned tieback casing string is installed. Based on more than 300 casing wear experiments, a computer program was developed to calculate the potential for casing wear during drilling operations. Taking proper precautions can save operators more than $1 million per well.

  14. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  15. Benefits for employees with children with ADHD: findings from the Collaborative Employee Benefit Study.

    PubMed

    Perrin, James M; Fluet, Chris; Kuhlthau, Karen A; Anderson, Betsy; Wells, Nora; Epstein, Susan; Allen, Debby; Tobias, Carol

    2005-02-01

    Parents of most children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are employed. Employers have interest in decreasing employee absenteeism and improving workplace productivity, partly through employee benefits. The authors interviewed employers to (1) determine how they view the needs of employees with children with ADHD and (2) identify benefits that might help employees with children with ADHD. The authors carried out a systematic interview study of mainly family-friendly, large employers in four U.S. urban markets (Boston, Cleveland, Miami, Seattle). Multidisciplinary interview teams used a protocol to gather basic company information, benefit philosophy, current insurance and other employee benefits, and knowledge of ADHD and its impacts on employees. Initially, the interview team and then the larger project team reviewed all protocols for common themes. The authors interviewed staff of 41 employers (human resource managers, work/life program directors, benefits directors). Only 15 of 41 interviewees knew about ADHD, its prevalence, or its effects on parents. They had little knowledge of how differences in managed behavioral health may affect families' access to diagnostic and treatment services for ADHD, although most had experience with primary care management of depression among employees. Employers offer a variety of other benefits, including work/life and employee assistance programs, occasionally providing employees help with caring for a child with a mental health condition, on-site parent training programs, or assistance with child care. Other potentially useful employee benefits include flexible work and leave policies and information and referral services that can link parents with community programs. Although employers have limited awareness of ADHD and its potential effect on employees' work, this study identified opportunities to improve both health insurance and other benefits for employees with children with ADHD.

  16. Surface chemical modification for exceptional wear life of MEMS materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Satyanarayana, N.; Sinha, Sujeet Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) are built at micro/nano-scales. At these scales, the interfacial forces are extremely strong. These forces adversely affect the smooth operation and cause wear resulting in the drastic reduction in wear life (useful operating lifetime) of actuator-based devices. In this paper, we present a surface chemical modification method that reduces friction and significantly extends the wear life of the two most popular MEMS structural materials namely, silicon and SU-8 polymer. The method includes surface chemical treatment using ethanolamine-sodium phosphate buffer, followed by coating of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) nanolubricant on (i) silicon coated with SU-8 thin films (500 nm) and (ii) MEMS process treated SU-8 thick films (50 μm). After the surface chemical modification, it was observed that the steady-state coefficient of friction of the materials reduced by 4 to 5 times and simultaneously their wear durability increased by more than three orders of magnitude (> 1000 times). The significant reduction in the friction coefficients is due to the lubrication effect of PFPE nanolubricant, while the exceptional increase in their wear life is attributed to the bonding between the -OH functional group of ethanolamine treated SU-8 thin/thick films and the -OH functional group of PFPE. The surface chemical modification method acts as a common route to enhance the performance of both silicon and SU-8 polymer. It is time-effective (process time ≤ 11 min), cost-effective and can be readily integrated into MEMS fabrication/assembly processes. It can also work for any kind of structural material from which the miniaturized devices are/can be made.

  17. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance < 25 mm) primarily on fresh, surface-ground samples, designed to analyze initial wear mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three

  18. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  19. Dry sliding wear behavior of epoxy composite reinforced with short palmyra fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Somen; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    The present work explores the possibility of using palmyra fiber as a replacement for synthetic fiber in conventional polymer composites for application against wear. An attempt has been made in this work to improve the sliding wear resistance of neat epoxy by reinforcing it with short palmyra fibers (SPF). Epoxy composites with different proportions (0, 4, 8 and 12 wt. %) of SPF are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear tests are performed on the composite samples using a pin-on-disc test rig as per ASTM G 99-05 standards under various operating parameters. Design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's L16 Orthogonal Arrays is used for the analysis of the wear. This parametric analysis reveals that the SPF content is the most significant factor affecting the wear process followed by the sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extensive range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN). A well trained ANN has been used to predict the sliding wear response of epoxy based composites over a wide range.

  20. Does wearing a necktie influence patient perceptions of emergency department care?

    PubMed

    Pronchik, D J; Sexton, J D; Melanson, S W; Patterson, J W; Heller, M B

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study of discharged emergency department (ED) patients to determine the effect of wearing a necktie by emergency physicians (EPs) had on patients' impression of their medical care. All male EPs were assigned randomly by dates to wear a necktie or no necktie, and the attire worn was otherwise similar in all respects. The study was conducted at a community teaching hospital with an Emergency Medicine residency and an annual census of 40,000. A total of 316 patients were surveyed. There were no statistically significant differences between patient groups in any of the five areas surveyed, including patient perception of physicians' appearance. Nearly 30% of patients incorrectly identified their doctor as wearing a necktie when no necktie was worn, and the perception of tie wearing was correlated with a positive impression of physician appearance. Wearing or not wearing a necktie did not significantly affect patients' impression of their physician or the care they received. However, patients seemingly preferred the appearance of physicians who were perceived to wear neckties. PMID:9696167

  1. Managing employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    Performance management consists of significantly more than periodic evaluation of performance. It is the art and science of dealing with employees in a manner intended to positively influence their thinking and behavior to achieve a desired level of performance. It is essential for the manager to always model positive behavior concerning performance; what one does or says as a manager always has an influence on others. The kinds of employee behavior most likely encountered relative to performance management efforts stem from resistance to change and lack of complete understanding of what is expected. Employee participation must be elicited whenever possible for performance improvement; as far as the inner working details of a specific job are concerned, there is no one who knows the job better than the person who does it everyday. For each task to be done, an employee needs to know what output is expected, how this output will be measured, and what standards are applied in assessing the output. Managing employee performance requires ongoing contact with each employee, regular feedback, and whatever coaching, counseling, and training are necessary to bring an employee back on track when a problem appears. Sustaining efficient and effective employee performance requires the manager's ongoing attention and involvement. PMID:15457845

  2. Understanding Generation X employees.

    PubMed

    Kupperschmidt, B R

    1998-12-01

    Understanding Generation X employees--those born between 1961 and 1981--is essential if they are to be recruited into and retained in nursing and their potential maximized. The author discusses the times, characteristics, and work values and demands of Generation X. Armed with an enhanced understanding, nurse administrators are better prepared to maximize the potential of Generation X employees.

  3. Managing employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    Performance management consists of significantly more than periodic evaluation of performance. It is the art and science of dealing with employees in a manner intended to positively influence their thinking and behavior to achieve a desired level of performance. It is essential for the manager to always model positive behavior concerning performance; what one does or says as a manager always has an influence on others. The kinds of employee behavior most likely encountered relative to performance management efforts stem from resistance to change and lack of complete understanding of what is expected. Employee participation must be elicited whenever possible for performance improvement; as far as the inner working details of a specific job are concerned, there is no one who knows the job better than the person who does it everyday. For each task to be done, an employee needs to know what output is expected, how this output will be measured, and what standards are applied in assessing the output. Managing employee performance requires ongoing contact with each employee, regular feedback, and whatever coaching, counseling, and training are necessary to bring an employee back on track when a problem appears. Sustaining efficient and effective employee performance requires the manager's ongoing attention and involvement.

  4. Theme: Employee Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Gordon); "Employee Ownership: Opportunities for Unions" (Blasi, Kruse); "Participation, Control, and Performance" (Rosen); Beyond the Contract: Taking on Ownership" (Mackin); "Worker Participation on Boards of Directors" (Hammer); and "Case Study of Employee Ownership and Governance in the Shipbuilding and Maritime…

  5. Employer-employee relations.

    PubMed

    Copeland, J D

    1993-09-01

    As an employer, a veterinarian must be vigilant to protect the rights of both job applicants and employees. Federal and state statutes guarantee that applicants and employees will not be subjected to discrimination in any aspect of employment, including recruitment, hiring, promotion, compensation, and termination of employment. An employer may not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, religion, age, or physical disability. In addition, common law tort actions give employees powerful causes of action be against those employers who injure employees. More than ever, employers must be diligent in obeying the law. Employers must also take measures to protect themselves from employee claims by instituting risk management plans and purchasing adequate insurance coverage.

  6. Astronaut James Buchli wearing extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut James F. Buchli, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), is about to be submerged in the weightless environment training facility (WETF) to simulate a contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) for STS 61-A. In this portrait view, Buchli is wearing a communications carrier assembly (CCA).

  7. Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    A review of studies and observations on the friction, wear, and lubrication behavior of materials in a vacuum environment is presented. The factors that determine and influence friction and wear are discussed. They include topographical, physical, mechanical, and the chemical nature of the surface. The effects of bulk properties such as deformation characteristics, fracture behavior, and structure are included.

  8. Association Between Causal Beliefs and Shoe Wearing to Prevent Podoconiosis: A Baseline Study.

    PubMed

    Ayode, Desta; Tora, Abebayehu; Farrell, David; Tadele, Getnet; Davey, Gail; McBride, Colleen M

    2016-05-01

    Podoconiosis is a neglected tropical disease caused by long-term barefoot exposure to volcanic clay soil. Our previous qualitative research identified various domains of beliefs about the causes of podoconiosis held by members of the community. This cross-sectional survey, conducted in southern Ethiopia, aimed to quantitatively evaluate the prevalence of these beliefs and to assess their association with observed shoe-wearing behavior. A total of 1,800 adult respondents (600 from affected families and 1,200 from unaffected families of an index child aged between 3 and 6 years) took part in the survey. Two standardized versions of an enumerator-administered survey were created, with "all day, everyday" shoe-wearing status of the index child assessed in parallel for the affected and unaffected household respondents. Associations between measures were assessed using logistic regression. Accuracy of understanding about podoconiosis was significantly lower among respondents from unaffected than affected households (P < 0.001). Among affected respondents, beliefs about heredity were negatively associated with reported shoe wearing of the index child (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.55-0.83). In both groups, associations of causal beliefs with shoe wearing were moderated by risk perceptions. Interventions aimed at preventing podoconiosis and improving shoe wearing should consider family-oriented education on hereditary susceptibility that targets affected and unaffected families in resource-limited settings. PMID:26928843

  9. Wear mechanisms of partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is devoted to an investigation of the wear mechanisms of magnesia and yttria partially-stabilized zirconia in ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal sliding-contact tribological systems at high temperature. It was found that the wear of ceramics rubbed against ceramics at room temperature may be attributed to intensive plastic deformation of surfaces resulting in low cycle fatigue. The wear mechanism of ceramics rubbed against metals was by polishing and surface fracture, while that of metals was adhesive transfer of material on to ceramic surfaces. Investigation of the wear behavior of magnesia partially-stabilized zirconia rubbed against itself showed that up to three orders of magnitude increase in wear resistance can be achieved in a particular temperature range, depending on both sliding speed and the ambient temperature. XRD analysis revealed that a thermally-induced phase transformation takes place on the frictional interface.

  10. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwai S.; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-01-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic–plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an α, α+β or β microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability. PMID:17224314

  11. Wear simulation effects on overdenture stud attachments.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate wear effects on overdenture resilient attachments. Six commercially available attachments were investigated: ERA orange and white (EO and EW), Locator pink, white and blue (LRP, LRW and LRB) and OP anchor (OP). Five specimens were used for wear simulation while other two specimens served as controls. Fifteen thousands insertion-removal cycles were simulated. Dimensional changes and surface characteristics were evaluated using light microscopy and SEM, respectively. Sudden decrease of retentive force was characteristic for EO and EW attachments. Retentive force of Locator attachments fluctuated throughout the wear simulation period. Dimensional changes and surface wear was more expressed on plastic cores than on plastic rings of attachment males. Based on SEM analysis, some of the specimens obtained smoother surface after wear simulation. Mechanism of retention loss of resilient overdenture attachments can be only partially explained by dimensional changes and surface alterations.

  12. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  13. Assessment of variations in wear test methodology.

    PubMed

    Gouvêa, Cresus V D; Weig, Karin; Filho, Thales R M; Barros, Renata N

    2010-01-01

    The properties of composite resin for dental fillings were improved by development, but its weakness continues to be its wear strength. Several tests have been proposed to evaluate wear in composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to verify how polishing and the type of abrasive can influence the wear rate of composite resin. The test was carried out on two groups. In one group we employed an ormocer and a hybrid composite that was polished group the composite was polished with the same abrasive paper plus a 1 microm and 0.25 microm grit diamond paste. A three-body wear test was performed using the metal sphere of the wear test machine, the composite and an abrasive. A diamond paste and aluminum oxide dispersion were used as abrasive. Analysis of the results showed that there was no difference between polishing techniques, but revealed a difference between abrasives.

  14. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  15. Wear of connector contacts exposed to relative motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, R. A.

    Connectors play a significant role in the performance, cost, and reliability of electronic equipment. In connection with the development of the system interconnection design, a factor which is often overlooked is related to the importance of connector selection and mounting to minimize relative motion between contacts during vibration encountered in handling, transportation, and service. This motion can lead to the loss of protective coatings (gold and nickel) due to frictional wear. If this happens, fretting corrosion of the base metals may occur. The produced damage can adversely affect performance due to increased joint resistance, eventually causing intermittent contacts. The present investigation is concerned with the study of different style contacts (tuning fork, box, and circular) to determine their endurance and wear characteristics when exposed to relative motion created by vibration. All contacts investigated were fabricated from brass, beryllium copper, or phosphor bronze, and had .00127 mm minimum gold plating over .00127 mm minimum nickel plating.

  16. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  17. "Kicking Up Some Dust": An Experimental Investigation Relating Lunar Dust Erosive Wear to Solar Power Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mpagazehe, Jeremiah N.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    2013-01-01

    The exhaust from retrograde rockets fired by spacecraft landing on the Moon can accelerate lunar dust particles to high velocities. Information obtained from NASA's Apollo 12 mission confirmed that these high-speed dust particles can erode nearby structures. This erosive wear damage can affect the performance of optical components such as solar concentrators. Solar concentrators are objects which collect sunlight over large areas and focus the light into smaller areas for purposes such as heating and energy production. In this work, laboratory-scale solar concentrators were constructed and subjected to erosive wear by the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant. The concentrators were focused on a photovoltaic cell and the degradation in electrical power due to the erosive wear was measured. It was observed that even moderate exposure to erosive wear from lunar dust simulant resulted in a 40 percent reduction in power production from the solar concentrators.

  18. An examination of the role of perceived support and employee commitment in employee-customer encounters.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Christian; Bentein, Kathleen; Michon, Richard; Chebat, Jean-Charles; Tremblay, Michel; Fils, Jean-François

    2007-07-01

    The authors examined the relationships between perceived organizational support, organizational commitment, commitment to customers, and service quality in a fast-food firm. The research design matched customer responses with individual employees' attitudes, making this study a true test of the service provider-customer encounter. On the basis of a sample of matched employee-customer data (N = 133), hierarchical linear modeling analyses revealed that perceived organizational support had both a unit-level and an employee-level effect on 1 dimension of service quality: helping behavior. Contrary to affective organizational commitment, affective commitment to customers enhanced service quality. The 2 sub-dimensions of continuance commitment to the organization--perceived high sacrifice and perceived lack of alternatives--exerted effects opposite in sign: The former fostered service quality, whereas the latter reduced it. The implications of these findings are discussed within the context of research on employee-customer encounters.

  19. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  20. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  1. Hiring the right employees.

    PubMed

    Reigle, Dale A

    2014-01-01

    Current employees provide the best examples of the type of aptitude, attitude, motivation, and fit we are looking for, or not looking for, in new employees. All four of these attributes are present in star employees. Using what we know about our best and worst employees can assist us in developing questions and scoring templates that will help us categorize current applicants. Hiring managers should formulate questions in a way that elicits informative responses from candidates about past performance in situations similar to those they will face on the job. Nonverbal clues can help provide insight beyond the simple verbal answer given by candidates. Practice, critique, and critical review of the outcomes of our hiring decisions improve our ability to become good hiring managers. PMID:25807621

  2. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  3. Understanding Employee Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, James R.

    1998-01-01

    Extension employees (n=23) ranked the following as the most important motivational factors: interesting work, good wages, appreciation, job security, and good working conditions. The findings were related to theories of motivation formulated by Herzberg, Adams, and Vroom. (SK)

  4. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  5. Wear mechanism of diamond coated cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Leyendecker, T.; Lemmer, O.; Esser, S.

    1995-12-31

    Since Diamond Coatings were introduced into the market in 1989, five years experience in industrial applications of diamond coated cutting tools enables to present an overview of tool life and wear behavior of diamond coated cutting tools due to different cutting conditions and workpiece-materials. Machining reinforced plastics, presintered ceramic compacts, aluminum alloys, metal-matrix composites and graphite, different wear behavior occurs at the cutting edges of diamond coated tools. Having a good adhesion fatigue and chemical wear of Diamond coatings determines life time of the tools. By a profound pretreatment procedure CVD Diamond coated tools can compete with conventional PCD-tools.

  6. Wear calculation possibility of slide-friction pair "shaft-plain bearing" for four-stroke engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springis, Guntis; Rudzitis, Janis; Avisane, Anita; Kumermanis, Maris

    2013-12-01

    The issues of the service life and its prediction for main four stroke engine parts such as shaft-plain bearing have always been of particular importance. The article determines the most suitable mathematical calculation model allowing considering the set of parameters needed for the slide-friction pair's calculation, thus achieving a result as precise as possible. Since the wear process is variable and many-sided it is influenced by very many different parameters, for example, the surface geometry (roughness, waviness, form deviation, etc.), the physical and mechanical conditions of the upper layer, component material, wear regime, wear temperature, etc. The offered wear calculation model taking into consideration as much as possible wear affecting parameters is based on the fatigue theory regularities of the friction surface's destroying, using the approach of probability theory.

  7. Brief communication: Comparative patterns of enamel thickness topography and oblique molar wear in two Early Neolithic and medieval population samples.

    PubMed

    Le Luyer, Mona; Rottier, Stéphane; Bayle, Priscilla

    2014-09-01

    Enamel thickness has been linked to functional aspects of masticatory biomechanics and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary plastic trait, selectively responsive to dietary changes, wear and tooth fracture. European Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers mainly show a flat wear pattern, while oblique molar wear has been reported as characteristic of Neolithic agriculturalists. We investigate the relationships between enamel thickness distribution and molar wear pattern in two Neolithic and medieval populations. Under the assumption that dietary and/or non-dietary constraints result in directional selective pressure leading to variations in enamel thickness, we test the hypothesis that these two populations will exhibit significant differences in wear and enamel thickness patterns. Occlusal wear patterns were scored in upper permanent second molars (UM2) of 64 Neolithic and 311 medieval subadult and adult individuals. Enamel thickness was evaluated by microtomography in subsamples of 17 Neolithic and 25 medieval individuals. Eight variables describing enamel thickness were assessed. The results show that oblique molar wear is dominant in the Neolithic sample (87%), while oblique wear affects only a minority (42%) of the medieval sample. Moreover, in the Neolithic molars, where buccolingually directed oblique wear is dominant and greatest enamel lost occurs in the distolingual quadrant, thickest enamel is found where occlusal stresses are the most important-on the distolingual cusp. These results reveal a correlation between molar wear pattern and enamel thickness that has been associated to dietary changes. In particular, relatively thicker molar enamel may have evolved as a plastic response to resist wear.

  8. Variations in the corneal surface temperature with contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Ooi, E H; Ng, E Y K; Purslow, C; Acharya, R

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents the two-dimensional simulation of heat propagation in the human eye model during contact lens wear with finite element analysis. Three types of contact lens are studied: Lotrafilcon A, Balafilcon A, and Etafilcon A. The models are solved for both steady and transient solutions. The corneal surface temperature during contact lens wear is found to decrease (average, 0.52 +/- 0.05 degrees C compared with a bare cornea for all lens types). A contact lens with a higher water content has a lower steady state temperature than a contact lens with a lower water content does. Various initial temperatures for the contact lens are found to affect the first 400 s of the temperature variation. When the initial temperature is lower than the corneal temperature, a reduction in temperature is observed during contact lens insertion while the opposite is observed when the initial temperature is higher than the corneal temperature. The increase in evaporation rate when a contact lens is worn increases the cooling effect on the ocular surface. This is suggested to be the cause of lower corneal surface temperature when wearing a contact lens.

  9. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  10. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

  11. Interactions among friction wear, and system stiffness. Part 3. Wear model

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, V.; D'Souza, A.F.; Kalpakjian, S.; Shareef, I.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that wear is an increasing function of system stiffness. The increase in the frequency of the applied load oscillations in normal direction causes increase of number of loading cycles per unit time that, in turn, causes increased rate of wear particles formation due to fatigue. A wear model has been developed which accounts for slider oscillation in the normal direction. Experimental data correlate very well with the theoretical analysis. 11 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outeiro, José C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Pina, José C.; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  13. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  14. Effect of size and dimensional tolerance of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty on wear: An in-silico study.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Lorenza; Di Puccio, Francesca; Joyce, Thomas J; Ciulli, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    Although huge research efforts have been devoted to wear analysis of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in hip and knee implants, shoulder prostheses have been studied only marginally. Recently, the authors presented a numerical wear model of reverse total shoulder arthroplasties (RTSAs), and its application for estimating the wear coefficient k from experimental data according to different wear laws. In this study, such model and k expressions are exploited to investigate the sensitivity of UHMWPE wear to implant size and dimensional tolerance. A set of 10 different geometries was analysed, considering nominal diameters in the range 36-42mm, available on the market, and a cup dimensional tolerance of +0.2, -0.0mm (resulting in a diametrical clearance ranging between 0.04-0.24mm), estimated from measurements on RTSAs. Since the most reliable wear law and wear coefficient k for UHMWPE are still controversial in the literature, both the Archard law (AR) and the wear law of UHMWPE (PE), as well as four different k expressions were considered, carrying out a total of 40 simulations. Results showed that the wear volume increases with the implant size and decreases with the dimensional tolerance for both the wear laws. Interestingly, different trends were obtained for the maximum wear depth vs. clearance: the best performing implants should have a high conformity according to the AR law but low conformity for the PE law. However, according to both laws, wear is highly affected by both implant size and dimensional tolerance, although it is much more sensitive to the latter, with up to a twofold variation of wear predicted. Indeed, dimensional tolerance directly alters the clearance, and therefore the lubrication and contact pressure distribution in the implant. Rather surprisingly the role of dimensional tolerance has been completely disregarded in the literature, as well as in the standards. Furthermore, this study notes some important issues for future

  15. Effect of size and dimensional tolerance of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty on wear: An in-silico study.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Lorenza; Di Puccio, Francesca; Joyce, Thomas J; Ciulli, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    Although huge research efforts have been devoted to wear analysis of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in hip and knee implants, shoulder prostheses have been studied only marginally. Recently, the authors presented a numerical wear model of reverse total shoulder arthroplasties (RTSAs), and its application for estimating the wear coefficient k from experimental data according to different wear laws. In this study, such model and k expressions are exploited to investigate the sensitivity of UHMWPE wear to implant size and dimensional tolerance. A set of 10 different geometries was analysed, considering nominal diameters in the range 36-42mm, available on the market, and a cup dimensional tolerance of +0.2, -0.0mm (resulting in a diametrical clearance ranging between 0.04-0.24mm), estimated from measurements on RTSAs. Since the most reliable wear law and wear coefficient k for UHMWPE are still controversial in the literature, both the Archard law (AR) and the wear law of UHMWPE (PE), as well as four different k expressions were considered, carrying out a total of 40 simulations. Results showed that the wear volume increases with the implant size and decreases with the dimensional tolerance for both the wear laws. Interestingly, different trends were obtained for the maximum wear depth vs. clearance: the best performing implants should have a high conformity according to the AR law but low conformity for the PE law. However, according to both laws, wear is highly affected by both implant size and dimensional tolerance, although it is much more sensitive to the latter, with up to a twofold variation of wear predicted. Indeed, dimensional tolerance directly alters the clearance, and therefore the lubrication and contact pressure distribution in the implant. Rather surprisingly the role of dimensional tolerance has been completely disregarded in the literature, as well as in the standards. Furthermore, this study notes some important issues for future

  16. Sliding wear studies using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, S.; Yu, C. W.; Yau, C. F.

    1993-04-01

    Deformation processes in solids, such as dislocation movements under plastic flow, crack propagation and void crushing, produce stress waves at ultrasonic frequencies, usually described as acoustic emission (AE), which can be detected by sensitive instruments and which are related to the severity and nature of the deformations. The paper discusses the characteristics of the stress waves and their variation with wear rates, wear regimes, and friction forces, as determined during laboratory experiments on metallic specimens in relative sliding motion, both unlubricated and with elastohydrodynamic lubrication. It is shown that there are systematic relationships between the acoustic emissions, the wear rates, the frictional work inputs and established tribological contact variables. The predominant frequencies of the emissions are also evaluated and considered in relation to the materials and wear conditions.

  17. The Wearing Out of Genre Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Joanna

    1971-01-01

    Scenes and plots wear out in three distinct stages: Innocence, Plausibility, and Decadence. Examines westerns, spy stories, nurse novels, detective stories, science fiction, pornography, avant-garde fiction, etc. (Author/RB)

  18. Epoxy matrix composites filled with micro-sized LD sludge: wear characterization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Abhilash; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the very high cost of conventional filler materials in polymer composites, exploring the possibility of using low cost minerals and industrial wastes for this purpose has become the need of the hour. In view of this, the present work includes the development and the wear performance evaluation of a new class of composites consisting of epoxy and microsized LD sludge. LD sludge or the Linz-Donawitz Sludge (LDS) are the fine solid particles recovered after wet cleaning of the gas emerging from LD convertors during steel making. Epoxy composites filled with different proportions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt %) of LDS are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear trials are performed on the composite specimens under different test conditions as per ASTM G 99 following a design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. The Taguchi approach leads to the recognition of most powerful variables that predominantly control the wear rate. This parametric analysis reveals that LDS content and sliding velocity affects the specific wear rate more significantly than normal load and sliding distance. Furthermore with increase in LDS content specific wear rate of the composite decreases for a constant sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extended range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN).

  19. Structure vs chemistry: friction and wear of Pt-based metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caron, A; Louzguine-Luzguin, D V; Bennewitz, R

    2013-11-13

    In comparison of a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with a Pt(111) single crystal we find that wearless friction is determined by chemistry through bond formation alloying, while wear is determined by structure through plasticity mechanisms. In the wearless regime, friction is affected by the chemical composition of the counter body and involves the formation of a liquid-like neck and interfacial alloying. The wear behavior of Pt-based metallic surfaces is determined by their structural properties and corresponding mechanisms for plastic deformation. In the case of Pt(111) wear occurs by dislocation-mediated homogeneous plastic deformation. In contrast the wear of Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass occurs through localized plastic deformation in shear bands that merge together in a single shear zone above a critical load and corresponds to the shear softening of metallic glasses. These results open a new route in the control of friction and wear of metals and are relevant for the development of self-lubricated and wear-resistant mechanical devices.

  20. Comparison of friction and wear of articular cartilage on different length scales.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Sandra; Boettcher, Kathrin; Wiegleb, Lorenz; Urban, Joanna; Burgkart, Rainer; Lieleg, Oliver; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-09-18

    The exceptional tribological properties of articular cartilage are still far from being fully understood. Articular cartilage is able to withstand high loads and provide exceptionally low friction. Although the regeneration abilities of the tissue are very limited, it can last for many decades. These biomechanical properties are realized by an interplay of different lubrication and wear protection mechanisms. The deterioration of cartilage due to aging or injury leads to the development of osteoarthritis. A current treatment strategy focuses on supplementing the intra-articular fluid with a saline solution containing hyaluronic acid. In the work presented here, we investigated how changing the lubricating fluid affects friction and wear of articular cartilage, focusing on the boundary and mixed lubrication as well as interstitial fluid pressurization mechanisms. Different length and time scales were probed by atomic force microscopy, tribology and profilometry. We compared aqueous solutions with different NaCl concentrations to a viscosupplement containing hyaluronic acid (HA). In particular, we found that the presence of ions changes the frictional behavior and the wear resistance. In contrast, hyaluronic acid showed no significant impact on the friction coefficient, but considerably reduced wear. This study confirms the previous notion that friction and wear are not necessarily correlated in articular cartilage tribology and that the main role of HA might be to provide wear protection for the articular surface.

  1. Effect of wear on the burst strength of l-80 steel casing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irawan, S.; Bharadwaj, A. M.; Temesgen, B.; Karuppanan, S.; Abdullah, M. Z. B.

    2015-12-01

    Casing wear has recently become one of the areas of research interest in the oil and gas industry especially in extended reach well drilling. The burst strength of a worn out casing is one of the significantly affected mechanical properties and is yet an area where less research is done The most commonly used equations to calculate the resulting burst strength after wear are Barlow, the initial yield burst, the full yield burst and the rupture burst equations. The objective of this study was to estimate casing burst strength after wear through Finite Element Analysis (FEA). It included calculation and comparison of the different theoretical bursts pressures with the simulation results along with effect of different wear shapes on L-80 casing material. The von Misses stress was used in the estimation of the burst pressure. The result obtained shows that the casing burst strength decreases as the wear percentage increases. Moreover, the burst strength value of the casing obtained from the FEA has a higher value compared to the theoretical burst strength values. Casing with crescent shaped wear give the highest burst strength value when simulated under nonlinear analysis.

  2. Is it safe to wear contact lenses with a full-facepiece respirator

    SciTech Connect

    Da Roza, R.A.; Weaver, C.

    1985-08-16

    The Federal OSHA regulation that prohibits the wearing of contact lenses while using a respirator is being challenged by users. We surveyed 9100 fire fighters around the US and Canada to determine if the wearing of contacts while using a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) had caused any serious problems to warrant this strict regulation. Of the 1405 questionnaires returned, 403 fire fighters do wear contacts with SCBA, despite the regulation. Of these, only six responded that contact-lens related problems had caused them to remove the facepiece in an environment in which the facepiece would normally be worn. In contrast, the safety-related problems caused by eyeglasses in SCBA - which are legal - are proportionately higher. Over half of the supervisors returning the questionnaire admitted that some of their employees wear contacts with SCBA; however, these supervisors knew of only eight cases when contact-lens problems had caused the facepiece to be removed when it should not have been. Our investigation has indicated that these problems were not significantly hazardous. We believe that the use of contacts with a respirator should not be prohibited. 7 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  4. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats

  5. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  6. Low stress abrasive wear behavior of a hardfaced steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Prasad, B. K.; Jha, A. K.; Modi, O. P.; Das, S.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    1998-04-01

    A plain carbon steel was overlayed with a wear-resistant hardfacing alloy by manual arc welding. Low stress abrasive wear tests were conducted with an ASTM rubber wheel abrasion tester using crushed silica and as the abrasive medium. The wear rate decreased with sliding distance, and there was an overall improvement in the abrasive wear resistance as a result of overlaying. The wear behavior of the samples has been discussed in terms of microstructural features while the examination of wear surface and subsurface regions provides insight into the wear mechanisms.

  7. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities.

  8. Casing wear caused by tooljoint hardfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Best, B.

    1986-02-01

    Casing wear caused by new tooljoint hardfacings, such as fine-mesh tungsten-carbide hardfacing and a hardfacing covered with a layer of relatively soft material, has been investigated in the laboratory. The tests were performed on a full-scale test facility with field conditions-forces, motions, and fluids-simulated as closely as possible. It was found that the major mechanisms responsible for casing wear by tooljoints are adhesive wear, abrasive wear, and ploughing. Wear mechanisms can be classified as mild, normal, and severe. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms could lead to measures for lessening casing wear. This can be achieved with (1) tooljoints that have a sufficiently large, smooth, round, and uniform surface and (2) an appropriate mud that has a sufficiently high content of soft solid particles, such as barites, to form a layer in the tooljoint/casing contact area so that metal-to-metal contact is avoided and small, hard mud particles are embedded.

  9. Drill wear monitoring in cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Staroveski, Tomislav; Brezak, Danko; Udiljak, Toma

    2015-06-01

    Medical drills are subject to intensive wear due to mechanical factors which occur during the bone drilling process, and potential thermal and chemical factors related to the sterilisation process. Intensive wear increases friction between the drill and the surrounding bone tissue, resulting in higher drilling temperatures and cutting forces. Therefore, the goal of this experimental research was to develop a drill wear classification model based on multi-sensor approach and artificial neural network algorithm. A required set of tool wear features were extracted from the following three types of signals: cutting forces, servomotor drive currents and acoustic emission. Their capacity to classify precisely one of three predefined drill wear levels has been established using a pattern recognition type of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network algorithm. Experiments were performed on a custom-made test bed system using fresh bovine bones and standard medical drills. Results have shown high classification success rate, together with the model robustness and insensitivity to variations of bone mechanical properties. Features extracted from acoustic emission and servomotor drive signals achieved the highest precision in drill wear level classification (92.8%), thus indicating their potential in the design of a new type of medical drilling machine with process monitoring capabilities. PMID:25922212

  10. Perceived importance of employees' traits in the service industry.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rense; Houran, James

    2009-04-01

    Selection assessments are common practice to help reduce employee turnover in the service industry, but as too little is known about employees' characteristics, which are valued most highly by human resources professionals, a sample of 108 managers and human resources professionals rated the perceived importance of 31 performance traits for Line, Middle, and Senior employees. Rasch scaling analyses indicated strong consensus among the respondents. Nonsocial skills, abilities, and traits such as Ethical Awareness, Self-motivation, Writing Skills, Verbal Ability, Creativity, and Problem Solving were rated as more important for higher level employees. By contrast, traits which directly affect the interaction with customers and coworkers (Service Orientation, Communication Style, Agreeableness, Sense of Humor, Sensitivity to Diversity, Group Process, and Team Building) were rated as more important for lower level employees. Respondents' age and sex did not substantially alter these findings. Results are discussed in terms of improving industry professionals' perceived ecological and external validities of generic and customized assessments of employee. PMID:19610487

  11. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  12. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... installed to comply with this standard are approved. Steam whistles, air horns, strobe lights or similar... light levels by all employees in the affected portions of the workplace. Tactile devices may be used...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... installed to comply with this standard are approved. Steam whistles, air horns, strobe lights or similar... light levels by all employees in the affected portions of the workplace. Tactile devices may be used...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... installed to comply with this standard are approved. Steam whistles, air horns, strobe lights or similar... light levels by all employees in the affected portions of the workplace. Tactile devices may be used...

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Engagement: Enabling Employees to Employ More of Their Whole Selves at Work.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ante

    2016-01-01

    Research at the individual level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been growing rapidly. Yet we still lack a more complete understanding of why and how individuals (i.e., employees) are affected by CSR. This study contributes to that gap by exploring the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. Moreover, in order to address the problem of low levels of employee engagement in the workplace, CSR is proposed and tested as a pathway for engaging a significant part of the workforce. Building on engagement theory, a model is tested in which CSR enables employees to bring more of their whole selves to work, which results in employees being more engaged. Data from 15,184 employees in a large professional service firm in the USA was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results show that authenticity (i.e., being able to show one's whole self at work) positively and significantly mediates the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. However, the other mediator tested in this study, perceived organizational support (POS; i.e., direct benefits to the employee), did not significantly mediate the relationship. In addition, results of moderated mediation suggest that when CSR is extra-role (i.e., not embedded in one's job design such as volunteering), it weakens the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. Moreover, post hoc analyses show that even when POS is controlled for, authenticity has an impact above and beyond POS on employee engagement. These results extend prior CSR literature which has often been top-down and has focused on how employees will be positively affected by what the organization can give them (e.g., POS). Rather, a bottom-up approach might reveal that the more that employees can give of their whole selves, the more engaged they might be at work.

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Engagement: Enabling Employees to Employ More of Their Whole Selves at Work

    PubMed Central

    Glavas, Ante

    2016-01-01

    Research at the individual level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been growing rapidly. Yet we still lack a more complete understanding of why and how individuals (i.e., employees) are affected by CSR. This study contributes to that gap by exploring the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. Moreover, in order to address the problem of low levels of employee engagement in the workplace, CSR is proposed and tested as a pathway for engaging a significant part of the workforce. Building on engagement theory, a model is tested in which CSR enables employees to bring more of their whole selves to work, which results in employees being more engaged. Data from 15,184 employees in a large professional service firm in the USA was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results show that authenticity (i.e., being able to show one’s whole self at work) positively and significantly mediates the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. However, the other mediator tested in this study, perceived organizational support (POS; i.e., direct benefits to the employee), did not significantly mediate the relationship. In addition, results of moderated mediation suggest that when CSR is extra-role (i.e., not embedded in one’s job design such as volunteering), it weakens the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. Moreover, post hoc analyses show that even when POS is controlled for, authenticity has an impact above and beyond POS on employee engagement. These results extend prior CSR literature which has often been top–down and has focused on how employees will be positively affected by what the organization can give them (e.g., POS). Rather, a bottom–up approach might reveal that the more that employees can give of their whole selves, the more engaged they might be at work. PMID:27303352

  17. Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Engagement: Enabling Employees to Employ More of Their Whole Selves at Work.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ante

    2016-01-01

    Research at the individual level of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been growing rapidly. Yet we still lack a more complete understanding of why and how individuals (i.e., employees) are affected by CSR. This study contributes to that gap by exploring the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. Moreover, in order to address the problem of low levels of employee engagement in the workplace, CSR is proposed and tested as a pathway for engaging a significant part of the workforce. Building on engagement theory, a model is tested in which CSR enables employees to bring more of their whole selves to work, which results in employees being more engaged. Data from 15,184 employees in a large professional service firm in the USA was analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results show that authenticity (i.e., being able to show one's whole self at work) positively and significantly mediates the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. However, the other mediator tested in this study, perceived organizational support (POS; i.e., direct benefits to the employee), did not significantly mediate the relationship. In addition, results of moderated mediation suggest that when CSR is extra-role (i.e., not embedded in one's job design such as volunteering), it weakens the relationship between CSR and employee engagement. Moreover, post hoc analyses show that even when POS is controlled for, authenticity has an impact above and beyond POS on employee engagement. These results extend prior CSR literature which has often been top-down and has focused on how employees will be positively affected by what the organization can give them (e.g., POS). Rather, a bottom-up approach might reveal that the more that employees can give of their whole selves, the more engaged they might be at work. PMID:27303352

  18. Geometry of wear in the sliding four-ball wear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunks, Gregory A.; Toth, Douglas K.; Saba, Costandy S.

    1992-10-01

    The geometry of the four-ball test configuration was examined to develop a method to calculate the wear volume of noncircular scars. It was found that the length of the scar normal to the direction of sliding is related to the relative displacement between the upper and lower balls. The width of the scar parallel to the direction of sliding is dependent upon the curvature of the scar normal to the sliding direction. This curvature is a function of upper ball wear, and it is the upper ball wear that causes noncircularity of the lower ball scars. A model was developed to calculate wear volumes for the upper and lower balls using the length and width of the scars on the lower balls to generate a dimensionless profile parameter, alpha. For an inhibited polyphenyl ether-based lubricant, the wear volume of the upper ball is consistently greater than the total wear volume of the three lower balls. In addition to wear volume calculations, this model can also be used to predict the scar shape for given lengths and widths of the lower ball wear scar.

  19. Growth and wear of incisor and cheek teeth in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) fed diets of different abrasiveness.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jacqueline; Clauss, Marcus; Codron, Daryl; Schulz, Ellen; Hummel, Jürgen; Fortelius, Mikael; Kircher, Patrick; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    Although patterns of tooth wear are crucial in palaeo-reconstructions, and dental wear abnormalities are important in veterinary medicine, experimental investigations on the relationship between diet abrasiveness and tooth wear are rare. Here, we investigated the effect of four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness (due to both internal [phytoliths] and external abrasives [sand]) or whole grass hay fed for 2 weeks each in random order to 16 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on incisor and premolar growth and wear, and incisor and cheek tooth length. Wear and tooth length differed between diets, with significant effects of both internal and external abrasives. While diet abrasiveness was linked to tooth length for all tooth positions, whole forage had an additional effect on upper incisor length only. Tooth growth was strongly related to tooth wear and differed correspondingly between diets and tooth positions. At 1.4-3.2 mm/week, the growth of cheek teeth measured in this study was higher than previously reported for rabbits. Dental abnormalities were most distinct on the diet with sand. This study demonstrates that concepts of constant tooth growth in rabbits requiring consistent wear are inappropriate, and that diet form (whole vs. pelleted) does not necessarily affect cheek teeth. Irrespective of the strong effect of external abrasives, internal abrasives have the potential to induce wear and hence exert selective pressure in evolution. Detailed differences in wear effects between tooth positions allow inferences about the mastication process. Elucidating feedback mechanisms that link growth to tooth-specific wear represents a promising area of future research.

  20. 29 CFR 215.3 - Employees represented by a labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employees represented by a labor organization. 215.3 Section 215.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GUIDELINES, SECTION 5333(b), FEDERAL TRANSIT LAW § 215.3 Employees represented by a labor organization. (a)(1) If affected employees are...

  1. 29 CFR 215.3 - Employees represented by a labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees represented by a labor organization. 215.3 Section 215.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GUIDELINES, SECTION 5333(b), FEDERAL TRANSIT LAW § 215.3 Employees represented by a labor organization. (a)(1) If affected employees are...

  2. 29 CFR 215.3 - Employees represented by a labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Employees represented by a labor organization. 215.3 Section 215.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GUIDELINES, SECTION 5333(b), FEDERAL TRANSIT LAW § 215.3 Employees represented by a labor organization. (a)(1) If affected employees are...

  3. 5 CFR 838.725 - Effect on employee and retiree election rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... on employee and retiree election rights. (a) A court order acceptable for processing that awards a former spouse survivor annuity does not affect a retiring employee's or retiree's rights and obligations... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect on employee and retiree...

  4. Strategic Planning for Employee Happiness: A Business Goal for Human Service Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Beth; Gould, Karen E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews evidence that employee happiness can substantially affect an organization's performance by influencing employee retention, absenteeism, and work performance. It reviews the workforce and environmental characteristics involved in planning for employee happiness and the steps needed to create an organizational culture in which…

  5. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  6. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  7. Enhancing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

  8. Assessing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on assessing employee skills. "Bridging the Training Gap: Identifying Work Place Transferable Skills Needs in Manufacturing Organizations in East Central Minnesota" (K. Peter Kuchinke, James M. Brown, Howie Anderson, Joe Hobson) reports a study of a workplace education program in rural Minnesota…

  9. Managing Employee Assistance Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidenberg, Olive C.; Cordery, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Interviews with 20 branch managers and 20 accountants in an Australian bank determined factors influencing the success of an employee assistance program (EAP). It was found that policies requiring supervisors to act against normal managerial practice doom EAPs to failure. Organizational analysis to integrate the EAP within existing organizational…

  10. Employee Communication: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balachandran, Sarojini

    This partially annotated bibliography of several hundred items includes material published since 1965. Entries are listed alphabetically by author. The following subject headings were used in the literature search for this bibliography: communication in management, communication in personnel management, reports to employees, attitude surveys,…

  11. Employees on the Move!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Sarah

    This paper describes a method for designing, implementing, and evaluating a work-site physical activity campaign aimed at employees who are currently sedentary in their leisure time. Inactivity is a major but modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease. Increasing the activity levels of underactive adults would have a positive impact on…

  12. The NOW Employee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, David

    The focus of this book is the relationship between the new generation of young people and the world of work. Basically the NOW (New Orientation to Work) employee views work as a means of self-actualization instead of merely a vehicle to economic security. The group under discussion is composed of those persons born between 1944 and 1951 who have…

  13. Coaching and counseling employees.

    PubMed

    Herakovic, J

    1992-01-01

    "To be effective, coaches need to exercise different forms of power," writes Dr. Herakovic in lesson two of his correspondence course on coaching and counseling employees. According to the professor, power has five forms: reward, coercive, legitimate, referent (charismatic) and expert power. He defines the five types of power and describes the uses and abuses of each type.

  14. Wear simulation of sucker rod couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that sucker rod strings are devices used to actuate pumps located at the bottom of oil wells. The individual rods are connected together by threaded couplings. Since the couplings have a larger diameter than the rods, they sometimes contact the inside diameter of the tubing during the up and down pumping cycle. Usually, this is not problem unless buckling occurs in the downstroke; however, this can lead to accelerated wear of the coupling and tubing. In nonvertical wells (offset, deviated, or slanted), the contact is more severe and rapid wear takes place. Couplings are more easily replaced during shutdowns; it is very important to minimize wear to tubing since it is virtually impossible to replace. TRIBONIC 20, an iron-based alloy containing approximately 13% Mn, 5% Si, 5.5% Cr, and 5% Ni, was laboratory evaluated to determine whether or not it could solve the sucker rod coupling-production tubing wear problem. The alloy demonstrated outstanding wear resistance both to itself and in protecting type 1019 steel.

  15. Magnetic Fluid Friction and Wear Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of two groups of magnetic fluids, one developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and a commercial fluid, were evaluated for boundary lubrication. Friction and wear measurements were made using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Three different ball materials were evaluated, (1) 440C, (2) Al2O3, and (3) Si3N4 against 440C disks. The first class of magnetic fluids have a low vapor pressure hydrocarbon base oil and are suitable for space application. Four variations of this fluid were evaluated: (1) the base oil, (2) base oil with anti-wear additives, (3) a 100 Gauss strength magnetic fluid, and (4) a 400 gauss magnetic fluid. The commercial fluid base oil and four different magnetic particle concentration levels have been evaluated. A space qualified fluorinated lubricant was tested for base line comparison. Hardness, optical microscopy, surface profilometry, and surface analysis were used to characterize the test specimens. Friction was unaffected by the concentration of magnetic particles. Wear rates for magnetic fluids were slightly higher than the base oil. The low vapor pressure magnetic fluid has better wear characteristics than the space qualified fluorinated lubricant.

  16. High Temperature Wear of Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.

    2005-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that advanced ceramics would exhibit favorable high te- friction and wear properties because of their high hot hardness and low achievable surface roughness welding observed in metals does not occur in ceramics. More recent tribological studies of many nitride, carbide, oxide and composite ceramics, however, have revealed that ceramics often exhibit high friction and wear in non-lubricated, high temperature sliding contacts. A summary is given to measure friction and wear factor coefficients for a variety of ceramics from self mated ceramic pin-on-disk tests at temperatures from 25 to up to 1200 C. Observed steady state friction coefficients range from about 0.5 to 1.0 or above. Wear factor coefficients are also very high and range from about to 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -2) cubic millimeters per N-m. By comparison, oil lubricated steel sliding results in friction coefficients of 0.1 or less and wear factors less than 10(exp -9) cubic millimeters per N-m.

  17. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  18. Brush seal shaft wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Harold

    1995-03-01

    Brush seals suffer from high wear, which reduces their effectiveness. This work sought to reduce brush seal wear by identifying and testing several industry standard coatings. One of the coatings was developed for this work. It was a co-sprayed PSZ with boron-nitride added for a high temperature dry lubricant. Other coatings tested were a PSZ, chrome carbide and a bare rotor. Testing of these coatings included thermal shocking, tensile testing and wear/coefficient of friction testing. Wear testing consisted of applying a coating to a rotor and then running a sample tuft of SiC ceramic fiber against the coating. Surface speeds at point of contact were slightly over 1000 ft/sec. Rotor wear was noted, as well as coefficient of friction data. Results from the testing indicates that the oxide ceramic coatings cannot withstand the given set of conditions. Carbide coatings will not work because of the need for a metallic binder, which oxidizes in the high heat produced by friction. All work indicated a need for a coating that has a lubricant contained within itself and the coating must be resistant to an oxidizing environment.

  19. Tooth wear: diet analysis and advice.

    PubMed

    Young, William George

    2005-04-01

    Diet analysis and advice for patients with tooth wear is potentially the most logical intervention to arrest attrition, erosion and abrasion. It is saliva that protects the teeth against corrosion by the acids which soften enamel and make it susceptible to wear. Thus the lifestyles and diet of patients at risk need to be analysed for sources of acid and reasons for lost salivary protection. Medical conditions which put patients at risk of tooth wear are principally: asthma, bulimia nervosa, caffeine addiction, diabetes mellitus, exercise dehydration, functional depression, gastroesophageal reflux in alcoholism, hypertension and syndromes with salivary hypofunction. The sources of acid are various, but loss of salivary protection is the common theme. In healthy young Australians, soft drinks are the main source of acid, and exercise dehydration the main reason for loss of salivary protection. In the medically compromised, diet acids and gastroesophageal reflux are the sources, but medications are the main reasons for lost salivary protection. Diet advice for patients with tooth wear must: promote a healthy lifestyle and diet strategy that conserves the teeth by natural means of salivary stimulation; and address the specific needs of the patients' oral and medical conditions. Individualised, patient-empowering erosion WATCH strategies; on Water, Acid, Taste, Calcium and Health, are urgently required to combat the emerging epidemic of tooth wear currently being experienced in westernised societies.

  20. Incisor wear and age in Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christianson, D.A.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Olexa, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Biologists commonly use tooth eruption and wear patterns or cementum annuli techniques to estimate age of ungulates. However, in some situations the accuracy or sampling procedures of either approach are undesirable. We investigated the progression of several quantitative measures of wear with age, using permanent first incisors from Yellowstone bison (Bison bison), and tested for differences between sexes and herds. We further investigated the relationship of wear and age to explore an age-estimation method. Labial-lingual width (LLW) correlated best with assigned age (r2=0.66, males; r2=0.76 females). Labial-lingual width differed between sexes, with females showing ∼0.2 mm more wear than males. Additionally, differences in rate of wear existed between bison of the northern and central Yellowstone herds (1.2 and 0.9 mm/year, respectively). We developed a regression formula to test the power of LLW as an estimator of Yellowstone bison age. Our method provided estimated ages within 1 year of the assigned age 73% and 82% of the time for female and male bison, respectively.

  1. Clinical Biomechanics of Wear in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C; Brown, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Complementary clinical and laboratory studies were performed to identify variables associated with polyethylene wear following total hip replacement, and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for accelerated wear in the total hip arthroplasty construct. Observational cohort studies were performed using a prospective clinical database of more than 4000 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by a single surgeon, to identify wear-related variables. These variables included head size, acetabular/femoral component impingement, and third body debris. Novel digital edge detection techniques were developed and employed to accurately measure wear, and to determine the relationships of head size and third body debris to acceleration of wear. A novel slidingdistance-coupled finite element model was formulated and employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for wear. The long-term cohort studies demonstrated smaller head sizes to be associated with less wear. Third body debris generated from cable fretting was associated with an increase in wear, osteolysis, and acetabular loosening, especially with larger head sizes. The sliding-distance-coupled finite element model replicated the wear rates occurring in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the importance of sliding distance on polyethylene wear following total hip arthroplasty. It also demonstrated substantial increases in wear associated with femoral head scratching from third body debris. Further extension of the finite element formulation demonstrated the potential for acetabular component rim damage from impingement wear, and the enhanced potential for third body ingress to the bearing surface with larger head sizes. Edge detection wear measurement techniques demonstrated that early wear rates were predictive of long-term wear rates. These complementary clinical and laboratory investigations have provided insight into 1) the significance of sliding distance and physiologic loci of motion as contributing

  2. Employee Perceptions of Quality Management: Effects of Employee Orientation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akdere, Mesut; Schmidt, Steven W.

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study examines employee perceptions of quality management at three different time periods. New employees at a large United States manufacturing organization were surveyed regarding their perceptions of their organization's quality management practices before they attended a new employee orientation training, immediately after the…

  3. Employee involvement: motivation or manipulation?

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1998-03-01

    Employee involvement is subject to a great deal of verbal tribute; there is hardly a manager at work today who will not praise the value of employee input. However, many employee involvement efforts leave employees feeling more manipulated than motivated. This occurs because supervisors and managers, while expecting employees to change the way they work, are themselves either unwilling to change or remain unconscious of the need to change. The result is that, although employee input is regularly solicited in a number of forms, it is often discounted, ignored, or altered to fit the manager's preconceptions. Often the employee is left feeling manipulated. Since the opportunity for involvement can be a strong motivator, it becomes the manager's task to learn how to provide involvement opportunity in manipulative fashion. This can be accomplished by providing involvement opportunity accompanied by clear outcome expectations and allowing employees the freedom to pursue those outcomes in their own way.

  4. Employee guide to respiratory protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This employee guide discusses use of respiratory protective equipment for particulates, gases, vapors, supplied air, and self-contained breathing apparatus. It also covers equipment selection medical factors, fitting criteria; care; and employee responsibilities. (PSB)

  5. Some wear studies on aircraft brake systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    An initial investigation of worn surfaces in friction pads and steel rotors used in current aircraft brakes was carried out using electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction analysis. It consists of the topographical study and the analysis of chemical element distribution. Based upon this initial examination, two approaches, microscopic and macroscopic have been conducted to interpret and formulate the wear mechanism of the aircraft brake materials. Microscopically, the wear particles were examined. The initiation and growth of surface cracks and the oxidation were emphasized in this investigation. Macroscopically, it has been found that, for the current copper based brake material sliding against 17-22 AS steel in a caliper brake, the surface temperature raised due to frictional heat is nonlinearly proportional to the load applied and slide time with speed at 1750 rpm. The wear of brake materials is then proportional to this temperature and is also a function of the melting temperature for copper.

  6. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  7. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  8. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  9. Mechanics of interaction and atomic-scale wear of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Grierson, David S; Turner, Kevin T; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-04-23

    Wear is one of the main factors that hinders the performance of probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM), including for the widely used amplitude modulation (AM-AFM) mode. Unfortunately, a comprehensive scientific understanding of nanoscale wear is lacking. We have developed a protocol for conducting consistent and quantitative AM-AFM wear experiments. The protocol involves controlling the tip-sample interaction regime during AM-AFM scanning, determining the tip-sample contact geometry, calculating the peak repulsive force and normal stress over the course of the wear test, and quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The peak repulsive tip-sample interaction force is estimated from a closed-form equation accompanied by an effective tip radius measurement procedure, which combines transmission electron microscopy and blind tip reconstruction. The contact stress is estimated by applying Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov contact mechanics model and also numerically solving a general contact mechanics model recently developed for the adhesive contact of arbitrary axisymmetric punch shapes. We discuss the important role that the assumed tip shape geometry plays in calculating both the interaction forces and the contact stresses. Contact stresses are significantly affected by the tip geometry while the peak repulsive force is mainly determined by experimentally controlled parameters, specifically, the free oscillation amplitude and amplitude ratio. The applicability of this protocol is demonstrated experimentally by assessing the performance of diamond-like carbon-coated and silicon-nitride-coated silicon probes scanned over ultrananocrystalline diamond substrates in repulsive mode AM-AFM. There is no sign of fracture or plastic deformation in the case of diamond-like carbon; wear could be characterized as a gradual atom-by-atom process. In contrast, silicon nitride wears through removal of the cluster of atoms and plastic

  10. Wear Mechanisms in a Reliability Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Danelle M.; Dugger, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    The main thrust in any reliability work is identifying failure modes and mechanisms. This is especially true for the new technology of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The methods are sometimes just as important as the results achieved. This paper will review some of the methods developed specifically for MEMS. Our methodology uses statistical characterization and testing of complex MEMS devices to help us identify dominant failure modes. We strive to determine the root cause of each failure mode and to gain a fundamental understanding of that mechanism. Test structures designed to be sensitive to a particular failure mechanism are typically used to gain understanding. The development of predictive models follows from this basic understanding. This paper will focus on the failure mechanism of wear and how our methodology was exercised to provide a predictive model. The MEMS device stressed in these studies was a Sandia-developed microengine with orthogonal electrostatic linear actuators connected to a gear on a hub. The dominant failure mechanism was wear in the sliding/contacting regions. A sliding beam-on-post test structure was also used to measure friction coefficients and wear morphology for different surface coatings and environments. Results show that a predictive model of failure-time as a function of drive frequency based on wear fits the functional form of the reliability data quite well, and demonstrates the benefit of a fundamental understanding of wear. The results also show that while debris of similar chemistry and morphology was created in the two types of devices, the dependence of debris generation on the operating environment was entirely different. The differences are discussed in terms of wear maps for ceramics, and the mechanical and thermal contact conditions in each device.

  11. Contact damage failure analyses of fretting wear behavior of the metal stem titanium alloy-bone cement interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanfeng; Ge, Shirong; Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qingliang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-11-01

    Although cemented titanium alloy is not favored currently in the Western world for its poor clinical and radiography outcomes, its lower modulus of elasticity and good biocompatibility are instrumental for its ability supporting and transforming physical load, and it is more suitable for usage in Chinese and Japanese populations due to their lower body weights and unique femoral characteristics. Through various friction tests of different cycles, loads and conditions and by examining fretting hysteresis loops, fatigue process curves and wear surfaces, the current study investigated fretting wear characteristics and wear mechanism of titanium alloy stem-bone cement interface. It was found that the combination of loads and displacement affected the wear quantity. Friction coefficient, which was in an inverse relationship to load under the same amplitude, was proportional to amplitudes under the same load. Additionally, calf serum was found to both lubricate and erode the wear interface. Moreover, cement fatigue contact areas appeared black/oxidative in dry and gruel in 25% calf serum. Fatigue scratches were detected within contact areas, and wear scars were found on cement and titanium surfaces, which were concave-shaped and ring concave/ convex-shaped, respectively. The coupling of thermoplastic effect and minimal torque damage has been proposed to be the major reason of contact damage. These data will be important for further studies analyzing metal-cement interface failure performance and solving interface friction and wear debris production issues. PMID:26241891

  12. Wear and Friction Behavior of the Spray-Deposited SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu Functionally Graded Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B.; Yan, H. G.; Chen, J. H.; Zeng, P. L.; Chen, G.; Chen, C. C.

    2013-05-01

    The spray-deposited SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu functionally graded material (FGM) can meet the structure design requirements of brake disk. The effects of rotational speed and load on the wear and friction behaviors of the SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM sliding against the resin matrix friction material were investigated. For comparison, the wear and friction behaviors of a commercially used cast iron (HT250) brake rotor were also studied. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of the SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM decreases constantly with the increase of load or rotational speed and is affected by the gradient distribution of SiC particles. The wear rate of the SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM firstly increases, then decreases and finally increases again with increasing load or speed, and is about 1/10 of that of HT250. Based on observations and analyses on the morphology and substructure of the worn surface, the mechanical mixing layer acts as a protective coating and lubricant, and its thickness reduces with the SiC content increasing. Furthermore, it is proposed that the dominant wear mechanism of SiCp/Al-20Si-3Cu FGM changes from the abrasive wear to the oxidative wear and further to the delamination wear with increasing load or speed.

  13. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  14. Does employee fitness decrease employee absenteeism and medical cost?

    PubMed

    White, P

    In recent years American have become increasingly interested in physical fitness and optimum health care. Health care is big business in the United States. American industry has lead the nation in a quest for wellness by establishing wellness programs for it's employees. This article will attempt to determine: 1) if employees on a fitness program facilitate cost containment for industry when compared to employees not participating in a fitness program; and 2) if employees on a fitness program experience reduced absenteeism due to health reasons and reduced medical costs compared to employees not participating in a fitness program.

  15. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  16. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Walker, Larry R; Xu, Hanbing; Parten, Randy J; Qu, Jun; Geer, Tom

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  17. Wear Test Of A Preselected Diamond Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, H. H.; Showman, G. A.

    1987-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop a set of criteria that would allow the typical user to preselect a diamond-turning tool for the most critical optical finishing operations. A wide variety of tools used in this study had their edge quality evaluated by Nomarski and scanning electron microscopy methods, and the diamond crystal orientation and quality were determined by Laue x-ray methods. One of the tools was subjected to a long-term machining test to evaluate the tool wear process and to correlate the wear observed with changes in the scattering properties of the surface.

  18. Temporary Employees: A Permanent Boon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonetti, Jack L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the growing use of temporary employees by companies, including the reasons that temporary help is popular. Describes the types of people likely to become temporary employees and reports results from a survey of 144 members of the American Society for Personnel Administration regarding their organizations' use of temporary employees. (CH)

  19. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  20. Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year old Malay school children and determine a feasible sample size for further study. Fifty-five subjects were examined clinically, followed by the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires consisted of socio-demographic and associated variables for tooth wear obtained from the literature. The Smith and Knight tooth wear index was used to chart tooth wear. Other oral findings were recorded using the WHO criteria. A software programme was used to determine pathological tooth wear. About equal ratio of male to female were involved. It was found that 18.2% of subjects have no tooth wear, 63.6% had very mild tooth wear, 10.9% mild tooth wear, 5.5% moderate tooth wear and 1.8 % severe tooth wear. In conclusion 18.2% of subjects were deemed to have pathological tooth wear (mild, moderate & severe). Exploration with all associated variables gave a sample size ranging from 560 – 1715. The final sample size for further study greatly depends on available time and resources. PMID:22589636

  1. First molar size and wear within and among modern hunter-gatherers and agricultural populations.

    PubMed

    Górka, Katarzyna; Romero, Alejandro; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    Apart from reflecting modern human dental variation, differences in dental size among populations provide a means for studying continuous evolutionary processes and their mechanisms. Dental wear, on the other hand, has been widely used to infer dietary adaptations and variability among or within diverse ancient human populations. Few such studies have focused on modern foragers and farmers, however, and diverse methods have been used. This research aimed to apply a single, standardized, and systematic quantitative procedure to measure dental size and dentin exposure in order to analyze differences among several hunter-gatherer and agricultural populations from various environments and geographic origins. In particular, we focused on sexual dimorphism and intergroup differences in the upper and lower first molars. Results indicated no sexual dimorphism in molar size and wear within the studied populations. Despite the great ethnographic variation in subsistence strategies among these populations, our findings suggest that differences in sexual division of labor do not affect dietary wear patterns. PMID:26032341

  2. On the recurrence of earthquakes: Role of wear in brittle faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    The time of occurrence of an earthquake is related to the state of the fault, tectonic loading, and possible triggering mechanisms, and it plays a prominent role in hazard assessment. In this paper we incorporate the effects of wear generation into a seismogenic model. We show that without wear the recurrence time of repeated earthquakes is constant through time and it is controlled by the initial conditions, tectonic loading and constitutive properties, including the presence of pore fluids. Our results indicate that considering the wear development into the fault model dramatically affects the temperature evolution of the fault, the stress release, the developed cosesimic slip and ultimately the duration of the seismic cycle. Moreover, we find that as long as the slipping zone thickness increases, the recurrence time continuously decreases through time. This further complicates the predictability of a subsequent earthquake, even in the simple case of an isolated fault.

  3. Wear mechanism and tribological characteristics of porous NiTi shape memory alloy for bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Wu, Guosong; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zheng, Dong; Chung, C Y; Xu, Z S; Chu, Paul K

    2013-09-01

    The abraded debris might cause osteocytic osteolysis on the interface between implants and bone tissues, thus inducing the subsequent mobilization of implants gradually and finally resulting in the failure of bone implants, which imposes restrictions on the applications of porous NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this work, the effects of the annealing temperature, applied load, and porosity on the tribological behavior and wear resistance of three-dimensional porous NiTi SMA are investigated systematically. The porous structure and phase transformation during the exothermic process affect the tribological properties and wear mechanism significantly. In general, a larger porosity leads to better tribological resistance but sometimes, SMAs with small porosity possess better wear resistance than ones with higher porosity during the initial sliding stage. It can be ascribed to the better superelasticity of the former at the test temperature. The porous NiTi phase during the exothermic reaction also plays an important role in the wear resistance. Generally, porous NiTi has smaller friction coefficients under high loads due to stress-induced superelasticity. The wear mechanism is discussed based on plastic deformation and microcrack propagation.

  4. Field Variable Associations With Scratch Orientation-Dependence of UHMWPE Wear: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Matthew C.; Glennon, Liam P.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Scratches on the metal bearing surface of metal-on-polyethylene total joint replacements have been found to appreciably accelerate abrasive/adhesive wear of polyethylene, and constitute a source of the considerable variability of wear rate seen within clinical cohorts. Scratch orientation with respect to the local direction of relative surface sliding is presumably a factor affecting instantaneous debris liberation during articulation. Method of Approach A three-dimensional local finite element model was developed of orientation-specific polyethylene articulation with a scratched metal counterface, to explore continuum-level stress/strain parameters potentially correlating with the orientation dependence of scratch wear in a corresponding physical experiment. Results Computed maximum stress values exceeded the yield strength of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for all scratch orientations, but did not vary appreciably among scratch orientations. Two continuum-level parameters judged most consistent overall with the direction dependence of experimental wear were: (1) cumulative compressive total normal strain in the direction of loading, and (2) maximum instantaneous compressive total normal strain transverse to the sliding direction. Conclusions Such stress/strain metrics could be useful in global computational models of wear acceleration, as surrogates to incorporate anisotropy of local metal surface roughening. PMID:19045548

  5. Productivity of older workers: perceptions of employers and employees.

    PubMed

    Van Dalen, Hendrik P; Henkens, Kène; Schippers, Joop

    2010-01-01

    What determines the perceived productivity of the older worker and how does this perception compare to the perception of the productivity of the younger worker? In this study we present evidence based on data from Dutch employers and employees. Productivity perceptions are affected by one's age and one's position in the hierarchy. The young favor the young, the old favor the old, and employers value the productivity of workers less than employees do. However, there are also remarkable similarities across employers and employees. By distinguishing the various dimensions that underlie the productivity of younger and older workers, we tested whether soft qualities and abilities-e.g., reliability and commitment-are just as important as hard qualities-cognitive and physically based skills-in the eyes of both employers and employees. It appears that both employers and employees, young and old, view hard skills as far more important than soft skills. PMID:20734554

  6. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  7. Influence of hip joint simulator design and mechanics on the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene bearings.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murat; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Partridge, Susan; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Hip joint simulators are used extensively for preclinical testing of hip replacements. The variation in simulator design and test conditions used worldwide can affect the tribological performance of polyethylene. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of simulator mechanics and design on the wear and creep of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. In the first part of this study, an electromechanical simulator and pneumatic simulator were used to compare the wear and creep of metal-on-polyethylene components under the same standard gait conditions. In the second part of the study, the same electromechanical hip joint simulator was used to investigate the influence of kinematics on wear. Higher wear rates and penetration depths were observed from the electromechanical simulator compared with the pneumatic simulator. When adduction/abduction was introduced to the gait cycle, there was no significant difference in wear with that obtained under the gait cycle condition without adduction/abduction. This study confirmed the influence of hip simulator design and loading conditions on the wear of polyethylene, and therefore direct comparisons of absolute wear rates between different hip joint simulators should be avoided. This study also confirmed that the resulting wear path was the governing factor in obtaining clinically relevant wear rates, and this can be achieved with either two axes or three axes of rotations. However, three axes of rotation (with the inclusion of adduction/abduction) more closely replicate clinical conditions and should therefore be the design approach for newly developed hip joint simulators used for preclinical testing. PMID:27160559

  8. Wear-Out Sensitivity Analysis Project Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Adam

    2015-01-01

    During the course of the Summer 2015 internship session, I worked in the Reliability and Maintainability group of the ISS Safety and Mission Assurance department. My project was a statistical analysis of how sensitive ORU's (Orbital Replacement Units) are to a reliability parameter called the wear-out characteristic. The intended goal of this was to determine a worst case scenario of how many spares would be needed if multiple systems started exhibiting wear-out characteristics simultaneously. The goal was also to determine which parts would be most likely to do so. In order to do this, my duties were to take historical data of operational times and failure times of these ORU's and use them to build predictive models of failure using probability distribution functions, mainly the Weibull distribution. Then, I ran Monte Carlo Simulations to see how an entire population of these components would perform. From here, my final duty was to vary the wear-out characteristic from the intrinsic value, to extremely high wear-out values and determine how much the probability of sufficiency of the population would shift. This was done for around 30 different ORU populations on board the ISS.

  9. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  10. Lubrication And Wear Of Hot Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Deadmore, D.; Miyoshi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of experiments on tribological properties of ceramics. Describes friction and wear characteristics of some ceramics under consideration for use in gas turbines, diesel engines, and Stirling engines. Discusses formulation of composite plasma-sprayed ceramics containing solid lubricant additives, and data for carbide- and oxide-based composite coatings for use at temperatures up to at least 900 degree C.

  11. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated.

  12. Long-wearing TFE/metal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, R. A.; Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Method for making metal/polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) bearing surfaces embeds long-wearing layer of TFE in microscopic pits in metal. Technique has potential applications in automotive gears, ball joints, and roller chain components. Other applications are in use of unlubricated bearings in chemical, pharmaceutical, and food-processing equipment.

  13. Measuring Bearing Wear Via Weight Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, John E.; Moore, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Wear in critical parts of bearings measured via amounts of weight lost during use. Technique applicable in general to bearings made of nonporous materials. Weight-loss measurements easier, faster, more precise, and less likely to damage measured parts. Weight-loss measurements performed in clean rooms and under constraint of extreme cleanliness for compatability with liquid oxygen.

  14. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s‑1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%–50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  15. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  16. Importance of Properties of Solids to Friction and Wear Behaviour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czichos, H.

    1984-01-01

    The main properties of solids which influence friction and wear are discussed and published rules which relate material properties to friction and wear are considered. In addition, recent experimental results on the tribological behaviour of metals and polymers illustrating the effect of some important interaction characteristics on friction and wear are presented. Finally, a framework for the systematic compilation and documentation of relevant tribological parameters in experimental friction and wear investigations is given.

  17. A panorama of tooth wear during the medieval period.

    PubMed

    Esclassan, Rémi; Hadjouis, Djillali; Donat, Richard; Passarrius, Olivier; Maret, Delphine; Vaysse, Frédéric; Crubézy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a natural phenomenon and a universal occurrence that has existed from the origin of humankind and depends on the way of life, especially diet. Tooth wear was very serious in ancient populations up to the medieval period. The aim of this paper is to present a global view of tooth wear in medieval times in Europe through different parameters: scoring systems, quantity and direction of wear, gender, differences between maxilla and mandible, relations with diet, caries, tooth malpositions and age.

  18. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2004-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, wear problems of mineral processing equipment including screens, sieve bends, heavy media vessel, dewatering centrifuge, etc., were identified. A novel surface treatment technology, high density infrared (HDI) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated samples were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of AISI 4140 and ASTM A36 steels can be increased 3 and 5 folds, respectively by the application of HDI coatings.

  19. Evaluation of burnout syndrome in oncology employees.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Senem; Yildirim, Yasemin Kuzeyli; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Uslu, Ruchan; Yalman, Deniz; Aras, Arif B

    2010-09-01

    Burnout is an important occupational problem for health care workers. We aimed to assess the burnout levels among oncology employees and to evaluate the sociodemographic and occupational factors contributing to burnout levels. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, which is designed to measure the three stages of burnout-emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA), was used. The study sample consisted of 90 participants with a median age of 34 (range 23-56). The mean levels of burnout in EE, DP and PA stages were 23.80 +/- 10.98, 5.21 +/- 4.99, and 36.23 +/- 8.05, respectively, for the entire sample. Among the 90 participants, 42, 20, and 35.6% of the employees had high levels of burnout in the EE, DP, and PA substage, respectively. Sociodemographic and occupational factors associated with higher levels of burnout included age of less than 35, being unmarried, being childless, >40 work hours per week, working on night shifts, and <10 years experience in the medicine/oncology field. Within all oncology clinics, medical oncology employees had the highest levels of burnout. Furthermore, employees who are not pleased with working in oncology field, who would like to change their specialty if they have an opportunity, and whose family and social lives have been negatively affected by their work experienced higher levels of burnout. Burnout syndrome may influence physical and mental health of the employee and affects the quality of health care as well. Therefore, several individual or organizational efforts should be considered for dealing with burnout.

  20. Sliding Wear and Fretting Wear of DLC-Based, Functionally Graded Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pohlchuck, B.; Street, Kenneth W.; Zabinski, J. S.; Sanders, J. H.; Voevodin, A. a.; Wu, R. L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Improving the tribological functionality of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films--developing, good wear resistance, low friction, and high load-carrying capacity-was the aim of this investigation. Nanocomposite coatings consisting of an amorphous DLC (a-DLC) top layer and a functionally graded titanium-titanium carbon-diamondlike carbon (Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC) underlayer were produced on AISI 440C stainless steel substrates by the hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and pulsed-laser deposition. The resultant DLC films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. Two types of wear experiment were conducted in this investioation: sliding friction experiments and fretting wear experiments. Unidirectional ball-on-disk sliding friction experiments were conducted to examine the wear behavior of an a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC-coated AISI 440C stainless steel disk in sliding contact with a 6-mm-diameter AISI 440C stainless steel ball in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air. Although the wear rates for both the coating and ball were low in all three environments, the humid air and dry nitrogen caused mild wear with burnishing, in the a-DLC top layer, and the ultrahigh vacuum caused relatively severe wear with brittle fracture in both the a-DLC top layer and the Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC underlayer. For reference, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (H-DLC) films produced on a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC nanocomposite coatings by using an ion beam were also examined in the same manner. The H-DLC films markedly reduced friction even in ultrahigh vacuum without sacrificing wear resistance. The H-DLC films behaved much like the a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC nanocomposite coating in dry nitrogen and humid air, presenting low friction and low wear. Fretting wear experiments were conducted in humid air (approximately 50% relative humidity) at a frequency of 80 Hz and an amplitude of 75 micron on an a

  1. Structural transformations, strengthening, and wear resistance of titanium nickelide upon abrasive and adhesive wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Pushin, V. G.; Chernenko, N. L.; Makarov, V. V.

    2010-07-01

    Wear resistance and structural transformations upon abrasive and adhesive wear of titanium nickelide Ti49.4Ni50.6 in microcrystalline (MC) and submicrocrystalline (SMC) states have been investigated. It has been shown that the abrasive wear resistance of this alloy exceeds that of the steel 12Kh18N9 by a factor of about 2, that of the steel 110G13 (Hadfield steel), by a factor of 1.3, and is close to that of the steel 95Kh18. Upon adhesive wear in a testing-temperature range from -50 to +300°C, the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy, as compared to the steel 12Kh18N9, is characterized by the wear rate that is tens of times smaller and by a reduced (1.5-2.0 times) friction coefficient. The enhanced wear resistance of the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy is due to the development of intense strain hardening in it and to a high fracture toughness, which is a consequence of effective relaxation of high contact stresses arising in the surface layer of the alloy. The SMC state produced in the alloy with the help of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) has no effect on the abrasive wear resistance of the alloy. The favorable effect of ECAP on the wear resistance of the Ti49.4Ni50.6 alloy takes place under conditions of its adhesive wear at temperatures from -25 to +70°C. The electron-microscopic investigation showed that under conditions of wear at negative and room temperatures in the surface layer (1-5 μm thick) of titanium nickelide there arises a mixed structure consisting of an amorphous phase and nanocrystals of supposedly austenite and martensite. Upon friction at 200-300°C, a nanocrystalline structure of the B2 phase arises near the alloy surface, which, as is the case with the amorphous-nanocrystalline structure, is characterized by significant effective strength and wear resistance.

  2. Friction and wear characteristics of carbon steels in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verkin, B. I.; Lyubarskiy, I. M.; Udovenko, V. F.; Guslyakov, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    The nature of carbon steel friction and wear under vacuum conditions is described within the framework of general friction and wear theory. Friction is considered a dynamic process and wear is considered to be the result of a continuous sequence of transitions of the friction surface material from one state into another.

  3. Engine wear and lubricating oil contamination from plant oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Darcey, C.L.; LePori, W.A.; Yarbrough, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    Engine disassembly with wear measurements, and lubricating oil analysis were used to determine wear rates on a one cylinder diesel engine. Results are reported from short duration tests on the wear rates of various levels of processed sunflower oil, a 25% blend with diesel fuel, and processed cottonseed oil.

  4. 32 CFR 507.12 - Possession and wearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Possession and wearing. 507.12 Section 507.12... Possession and wearing. (a) The wearing of any decoration, service medal, badge, service ribbon, lapel button... possession by a person of any of the articles prescribed in § 507.8 of this part is authorized provided...

  5. Increasing Wearing of Prescription Glasses in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLeon, Iser G.; Hagopian, Louis P.; Rodriguez-Catter, Vanessa; Bowman, Lynn G.; Long, Ethan S.; Boelter, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated an intervention for promoting wearing of prescription glasses in 4 individuals with mental retardation who had refused to wear their glasses previously. Distraction through noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) increased independent glasses wearing for 1 of the 4 participants. An intervention consisting of NCR, response cost, and…

  6. Validation of the Basic Erosive Wear Examination.

    PubMed

    Olley, R C; Wilson, R; Bartlett, D; Moazzez, R

    2014-01-01

    The Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) is a practical index for screening tooth wear, using a 4-point ordinal scale (0-3). The highest score is recorded in each sextant and a total score (or BEWE sextant cumulative) is calculated per subject. This study aims to investigate if the BEWE sextant cumulative score compares to one comprising a percentage score from all tooth surfaces and as a highest BEWE per subject. The aim is to assess the validity of this score. A total of 350 subjects were recruited from hospital and general practice in south-east England. Buccal, occlusal and lingual/palatal BEWE scores were collected and percentages calculated based on scores 1, 1 and above, 2 and above and 3. BEWE sextant cumulative scores and highest BEWE scores were also recorded per subject. Spearman's correlation coefficients (p values) assessed the relationship between BEWE sextant cumulative scores, BEWE percentages and BEWE highest score per subject. The BEWE sextant cumulative score correlates significantly to a BEWE score taken as a percentage score from all tooth surfaces (Spearman's r > 0.5, p < 0.001) and especially to BEWE surface scores of 1 and above and 2 and above (r > 0.8, p < 0.001) and as a highest surface score per subject (r > 0.8, p < 0.001). BEWE sextant score provides a representation of tooth wear on all tooth surfaces. This study validates a tooth wear index, which provides clinicians with risk indicators of a patient's level of tooth wear and may help to guide clinical management. PMID:24217059

  7. Evaluation of surface water characteristics of novel daily disposable contact lens materials, using refractive index shifts after wear

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Jeffery; Steffen, Robert; Reindel, William; Chinn, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Contact lens wearers today spend much time using digital display devices. Contact lens manufacturers are challenged to develop products that account for longer periods of time where blink rate is reduced and tear-film evaporation rate is increased, affecting both visual acuity and comfort. Two manufacturers recently introduced novel daily disposable contact lenses with high surface water content. The objective of the present study was to compare surface water characteristics before and after initial wear of recently introduced nesofilcon A and delefilcon A high surface water lenses with those of etafilcon A lenses. Patients and methods Twenty healthy subjects wore each of the three lens types studied in a randomly determined order for 15 minutes. After each wearing, lenses were removed and the surface refractive index (RI) of each lens was immediately measured. Results The mean RI of the unworn delefilcon A lens was 1.34, consistent with water content in excess of 80%. After 15 minutes of wear, the surface RI shifted to 1.43, consistent with its reported 33% bulk water content. In contrast, the mean surface RI of the nesofilcon A lens was 1.38, both initially and after 15 minutes of wear, and that of the etafilcon A lens was 1.41 initially and 1.42 after 15 minutes of wear. Conclusion The surface of the delefilcon A lens behaves like a high water hydrogel upon insertion but quickly dehydrates to behave like its low-water silicone-hydrogel bulk material with respect to surface water content during wear, while both nesofilcon A and etafilcon A lenses maintain their water content during initial wear. The nesofilcon A lens appears unique among high water lenses in maintaining high surface and bulk water content during wear. This is important because changes in surface RI due to dehydration are reported to lead to visual aberration affecting user experience. PMID:26543349

  8. Wear and degradation on retrieved zirconia femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Nogiwa-Valdez, A A; Rainforth, W M; Stewart, T D

    2014-03-01

    Zirconia femoral heads retrieved from patients after different implantation periods (up to 13 years) were analysed using vertical scanning interferometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. A range of topographical and compositional changes on the surface of the retrievals are reported in this work. The study revealed that changes in roughness are the result of a combination of factors, i.e. scratching, surface upheaval due to transformation to the monoclinic phase and grain pull-out. Clusters of transformed monoclinic grains were observed on heads implanted for more than 3 years. The phase composition of these clusters was confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy. Increased abrasive wear and a higher monoclinic phase content concentrated on the pole of the femoral heads, confirming that the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation was not only induced by the tetragonal phase metastability and environmental conditions but mechanical and tribological factors, also affected the transformation kinetics. Additionally, the head implanted for 13 years showed evidence of a self-polishing mechanism leading to a considerable smoothening of the surface. These observations provide an insight into the interrelated mechanisms underlying the wear and transformation process on zirconia ceramics during implantation. PMID:24140384

  9. Comfort evaluation of maternity support garments in a wear trial.

    PubMed

    Ho, S S; Yu, W; Lao, T T; Chow, D H K; Chung, J W; Li, Y

    2008-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the wear comfort of eight commercially available maternity support garments. The thermophysiological, sensory/tactile and movement comfort were assessed in a wear trial using a 19-item questionnaire. Fourteen pregnant Chinese women aged 32.3 +/- 4.2 years were recruited from a local obstetric clinic. The results show that the tested garments generally provided greater sensory comfort than thermophysiological comfort. The thermophysiological comfort was mainly influenced by the fibre contents and breathability. Significant linear relationships were found between material appearance and hand feel (r = 0.86, p < 0.001), and between non-itchiness and no red mark (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Movement comfort was influenced by the garment type and style features. Overall, the soft, good-fit, cotton/elastane maternity brief was perceived as the best product. The findings of comfort needs in pregnant women and the effects of various garment attributes would be helpful for the development of maternity support garment design criteria that are required to satisfy critical ergonomic needs. Low back pain during pregnancy is a common and significant health problem. A maternity support garment is regarded as a convenient and safe device to stabilise the lumbar spine so as to relieve pain. However, patient compliance is likely to be affected by discomfort and inconvenience. The results of this study provide guidance for the optimal design of maternity support clothing.

  10. Employee recruitment: using behavioral assessments as an employee selection tool.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K

    2007-01-01

    The labor shortage of skilled health care professionals continues to make employee recruitment and retention a challenge for health care managers. Greater accountability is being placed on health care managers to retain their employees. The urgency to retain health care professionals is largely an issue that should be considered during the initial recruitment of potential employees. Health care managers should analyze candidates rigorously to ensure that appropriate hiring decisions are made. Behavioral assessments can be used as a useful employee selection tool to assist managers in the appropriate placement and training of potential new employees. When administered appropriately, these tools can provide managers with a variety of useful information. This information can assist health care managers in demystifying the hiring process. Although there are varying organizational concerns to address when using behavioral assessments as an employee selection tool, the potential return on investment is worth the effort. PMID:17938588

  11. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  12. Dynamic-scanning-electron-microscope study of friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    A friction and wear apparatus was built into a real time scanning electron microscope (SEM). The apparatus and SEM comprise a system which provides the capability of performing dynamic friction and wear experiments in situ. When the system is used in conjunction with dispersive X-ray analysis, a wide range of information on the wearing process can be obtained. The type of wear and variation with speed, load, and time can be investigated. The source, size, and distribution of wear particles can be determined and metallic transferal observed. Some typical results obtained with aluminum, copper, and iron specimens are given.

  13. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    SciTech Connect

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  14. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  15. Aluminum nanocomposites having wear resistance better than stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    An, Linan; Qu, Jun; Luo, Jinsong; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Ligong; Liu, Jinling; Xu, Chengying; Blau, Peter Julian

    2011-01-01

    Tribological behavior of alumina-particle-reinforced aluminum composites made by powder metallurgy process has been investigated. The nanocomposite containing 15 vol% of Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits excellent wear resistance by showing significantly low wear rate and abrasive wear mode. The wear rate of the nanocomposite is even lower than stainless steel. We have also demonstrated that such excellent wear resistance only occurred in the composite reinforced with the high volume fraction of nanosized reinforcing particles. The results were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the nanocomposite.

  16. Wear Characteristics of Vitrified cBN Grinding Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Masakazu; Ichida, Yoshio; Sato, Ryunosuke

    To clarify the wheel wear characteristics in grinding process using vitrified cBN wheels, we have investigated the change in wheel wear behavior when the load on the grain cutting edge is increased by increasing work speed. Wheel wear behavior in the grinding process may be classified into two main types, a) wheel wear process-type 1, that is consists of initial and steady-state wheel wear regions, and b) wheel wear process-type 2, that is consists of initial, steady-state and abnormal wheel wear regions. In the steady-state wear region of wheel wear process-type 1, lower wheel wear rate, lower stable grinding forces and good finished surface roughness are obtained, because self-sharpening due to micro fractures of the cutting edges takes place. In grinding with wheel wear process-type 2, it is very hard to obtain good finished surface and high grinding ratio, because of occurrences of fracture or releasing of cBN grains.

  17. NASA interdisciplinary collaboration in tribology. A review of oxidational wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, T. F. J.

    1983-01-01

    An in-depth review of oxidational wear of metals is presented. Special emphasis is given to a description of the concept of oxidational wear and the formulation of an Oxidational Wear Theory. The parallelism between the formation of an oxide film for dry contact conditions and the formation of other surface films for a lubricated contact is discussed. The description of oxidational wear is prefaced with a unification of wear modes into two major classes of mild and severe wear including both lubricated and dry contacts. Oxidational wear of metals is a class of mild wear where protective oxide films are formed at real areas of contact and during the time of contact at temperataure T sub c. When the oxide reaches a critical thickness, frequently in the range of 1 to 3 microns, the oxide breaks up and eventually appears as a wear particle. These oxides are preferentially formed on plateaux which alternately carry the load as they reach their critical thickness and are removed. If the system is operated at elevated temperatures, thick oxides can form both out of contact and between the plateaux. Temperature is important in determining the structure of the oxide film present. Spinel oxide (Fe3O4) which forms above 300 C is more protective than the lower temperature rhomobohedral (alpha-Fe2O3) oxide which is abrasive. An Oxidational Wear Theory is derived using a modified Archard wear law expressed in terms of activation energy (Qp) and Arrhenius constant (Ap).

  18. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 0 - Statutes Governing Conduct of Federal Employees

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... are referred to in this appendix. a. bribery and graft .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 201, prohibits... affecting the government .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 203, prohibits an officer or employee from receiving... officers and employees in claims against and other matters affecting the government .01Title 18,...

  19. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 0 - Statutes Governing Conduct of Federal Employees

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... are referred to in this appendix. a. bribery and graft .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 201, prohibits... affecting the government .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 203, prohibits an officer or employee from receiving... officers and employees in claims against and other matters affecting the government .01Title 18,...

  20. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 0 - Statutes Governing Conduct of Federal Employees

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... are referred to in this appendix. a. bribery and graft .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 201, prohibits... affecting the government .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 203, prohibits an officer or employee from receiving... officers and employees in claims against and other matters affecting the government .01Title 18,...

  1. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 0 - Statutes Governing Conduct of Federal Employees

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... are referred to in this appendix. a. bribery and graft .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 201, prohibits... affecting the government .01Title 18, U.S.C., section 203, prohibits an officer or employee from receiving... officers and employees in claims against and other matters affecting the government .01Title 18,...

  2. 29 CFR 215.3 - Employees represented by a labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LABOR GUIDELINES, SECTION 5333(b), FEDERAL TRANSIT LAW § 215.3 Employees represented by a labor... satisfied. (5) The Department will notify labor organizations representing potentially affected transit... Transit Administration of an application involving affected employees represented by a labor...

  3. 29 CFR 215.3 - Employees represented by a labor organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LABOR GUIDELINES, SECTION 5333(b), FEDERAL TRANSIT LAW § 215.3 Employees represented by a labor... satisfied. (5) The Department will notify labor organizations representing potentially affected transit... Transit Administration of an application involving affected employees represented by a labor...

  4. 7-Be Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greife, Uwe; Erikson, L.; Patel, N.; Wimmer, M.; Dwiwedi, Y.; Laurent, M.; Chipps, K.; Blackmon, J.; Kozub, R.; Bardayan, D.; Gross, C.; Stracener, D.; Smith, M.; Nesaraya, C.; Rehm, E.; Ahmed, I.; Greene, J.

    2010-11-01

    The current generation of highly cross linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (PE) for hip and knee joint replacement have achieved such low in vitro wear rates that efforts have been underway to develop more sensitive methods to measure polyethylene wear. The most widely used technique, the gravimetric method, suffers from the notable disadvantage that mass gain by fluid absorption can considerably exceed mass loss by wear, making the wear measurement inaccurate, sometimes even leading to negative ``wear'' values. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the use of a radioactive tracer, beryllium-7 (7-Be), to circumvent the problem of fluid absorption and thereby achieve a much more sensitive and accurate wear measurement. This proof of principle study demonstrated the general feasibility of 7-Be implantation (performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory) for PE wear analysis.

  5. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  6. Fitness and employee productivity.

    PubMed

    Howard, J; Mikalachki, A

    1979-09-01

    What should management consider when deciding whether to sponsor a company fitness program? This article gives pragmatic answers to the business community as well as outlining critical avenues for future research for both academics and corporations. Understanding the nature of the commitment is a prerequisite for success. Whether the program should be short term and serve as a catalyst for future individual efforts, or a long-term commitment, is a question which must be considered. Decisions of this type are partially dependent on what criteria are used to evaluate success. As measurements of employee productivity are very subjective or non-existent, absenteeism and turnover are potential yardsticks. Details of employee programs must also address the issue of participation as well as the frequency, intensity and duration. Future research must separate the effect of the fitness improvement from the benfits derived from just being in a program. The measurement of productivity and the long-term effect of fitness programs, especially short-term programs, are also areas for future work.

  7. Investigations of the effects of particle properties on the wear resistance of the particle reinforced composites using a novel wear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. Ram

    2016-08-01

    A wear model is developed based on the discrete lattice spring-mass approach to study the effects of particle volume fraction, size, and stiffness on the wear resistance of particle reinforced composites. To study these effects, we have considered three volume fractions (10%, 20% and 30%), two sizes (10 × 10 and 4 × 4 sites), and two different stiffness of particles embedded in the matrix in a regular pattern. In this model, we have discretized the composite system (400 × 100 sites) into the lumped masses connected with interaction spring elements in two dimensions. The interaction elements are assumed as linear elastic and ideal plastic under applied forces. Each mass is connected to its first and second nearest neighbors by springs. The matrix and particles sites are differentiated by choosing the different stiffness values. The counter surface is simulated as a rigid body that moves on the composite material at a constant sliding speed along the horizontal direction. The governing equations are formed by equating the spring force between the pair of sites given by Hooke’s law plus external contact forces and the force due to the motion of the site given by the equation of motion. The equations are solved for the plastic strain accumulated in the springs using an explicit time stepping procedure based on a finite difference form of the above equations. If the total strain accumulated in the spring elements connected to a lump mass site exceeds the failure strain, the springs are considered to be broken, and the mass site is removed or worn away from the lattice and accounts as a wear loss. The model predicts that (i) increasing volume fraction, reducing particle size and increasing particle stiffness enhance the wear resistance of the particle reinforced composites, (ii) the particle stiffness is the most significant factor affecting the wear resistance of the composites, and (iii) the wear resistance reduced above the critical volume fraction (Vc), and Vc

  8. Wear aspects of internal combustion engine valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panţuru, M.; Chicet, D.; Paulin, C.; Alexandru, A.; Munteanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Because the surface engineering is becoming an increasingly viable alternative to the constructive changes made to improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines, have been proposed and tested various types of coatings of some organs of internal combustion engines. One vital organ is the engine valves, which is subjected during operation to combined thermal, mechanical, corrosion and wear solicitations, which are leading to severe corrosion and complete breakdown. In this paper were analyzed aspects of valves wear and the active surfaces were coated using the atmospheric plasma spraying method (APS) with two commercial powders: Ni-Al and YSZ. Microstructural analyzes were made on these layers and also observations regarding the possibility of using them as thermal barrier and anti-oxidant coatings.

  9. Predicted wear resistances of binary carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, B.M.

    1986-11-01

    A mechanistic model of the tool wear process has been presented (B. M. Kramer and P. K. Judd, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 3, 2439 (1985)) that includes the effects of both the abrasion of the tool material by inclusions within the workpiece and the chemical dissolution of the tool material into the matrix of the workpiece. Machining tests have been run on steel with titanium carbide coated tooling and the resulting test data have been employed to produce a rough calibration of the proposed model. This model has been used to predict the wear resistances of the other group IV B carbides and of the (Ti,Hf)C system in the machining of steel.

  10. Minimum wear tube support hole design

    DOEpatents

    Glatthorn, Raymond H.

    1986-01-01

    A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

  11. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  12. Wirelessly Interrogated Wear or Temperature Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2010-01-01

    Sensors for monitoring surface wear and/or temperature without need for wire connections have been developed. Excitation and interrogation of these sensors are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. In a sensor of the present type as in the previously reported ones, the capacitance and, thus, the resonance frequency, varies as a known function of the quantity of interest that one seeks to determine. Hence, the resonance frequency is measured and used to calculate the quantity of interest.

  13. Alcohol fuel anti-wear additive

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R. L.

    1985-11-05

    A novel fuel composition contains methanol or methanol/gasoline blends plus, as a wear-inhibiting additive, a reaction product of an aldehyde, e.g., paraformaldehyde, and N-alkyl-alkylene diamine, e.g., N-alkyl-1,3-propane diamine with a salicylic acid ester of a polyol, e.g., alpha-hydroxy-omega hydroxy-poly (oxyethylene) poly (oxypropylene) poly (oxyethylene) block copolymer.

  14. Amiodarone keratopathy and rigid contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Astin, C L

    2001-01-01

    Two cases are presented of patients wearing rigid gas permeable contact lenses who exhibited the typical fan-shaped patterns of corneal pigment deposition related to long-term medication containing amiodarone. The vortex corneal epitheliopathy and contact lens tolerance were monitored over several years. In both cases, the lens material was replaced with one incorporating an ultra-violet light inhibitor in view of the possibility of medically induced photosensitivity.

  15. Low-Wear Ball-Bearing Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkinson, Elden L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed ball-bearing separator for use in cryogenic pump stronger and more resistant to wear. Consists of molded plastic-and-metal composite ring imbued with solid lubricant and containing embedded metal ring. Obtains combination of strength and lubricity. Before molding and machining, ring includes tooling portion for handling and indexing. Molded composite blend of PTFE and fluorinated ethylene/propylene (FEP) filled with brass and bronze powder and molybdenum disulfide powder.

  16. Gaze Tracking System for User Wearing Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Su Yeong; Cho, Chul Woo; Lee, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Won Oh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional gaze tracking systems are limited in cases where the user is wearing glasses because the glasses usually produce noise due to reflections caused by the gaze tracker's lights. This makes it difficult to locate the pupil and the specular reflections (SRs) from the cornea of the user's eye. These difficulties increase the likelihood of gaze detection errors because the gaze position is estimated based on the location of the pupil center and the positions of the corneal SRs. In order to overcome these problems, we propose a new gaze tracking method that can be used by subjects who are wearing glasses. Our research is novel in the following four ways: first, we construct a new control device for the illuminator, which includes four illuminators that are positioned at the four corners of a monitor. Second, our system automatically determines whether a user is wearing glasses or not in the initial stage by counting the number of white pixels in an image that is captured using the low exposure setting on the camera. Third, if it is determined that the user is wearing glasses, the four illuminators are turned on and off sequentially in order to obtain an image that has a minimal amount of noise due to reflections from the glasses. As a result, it is possible to avoid the reflections and accurately locate the pupil center and the positions of the four corneal SRs. Fourth, by turning off one of the four illuminators, only three corneal SRs exist in the captured image. Since the proposed gaze detection method requires four corneal SRs for calculating the gaze position, the unseen SR position is estimated based on the parallelogram shape that is defined by the three SR positions and the gaze position is calculated. Experimental results showed that the average gaze detection error with 20 persons was about 0.70° and the processing time is 63.72 ms per each frame. PMID:24473283

  17. Microstructure and wear behavior of quasicrystalline thermal sprayed

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Krotz, P.D.; Daniel, R.L.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    An Al-Cu-Fe alloy coating which forms a quasicrystalline phase is a potential candidate for replacing electro-deposited chromium on various components in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Coatings were deposited by air and vacuum plasma spraying and by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. Finer starting powders tended to lose Al during spraying, which affected the phase equilibrium of the coatings. Coatings which retained the starting powder composition were richer in the desired quasicrystalline phase. Ball-on-disk wear tests between 440 C stainless steel ball and the Al-Cu-Fe coatings were performed. Coefficients of friction ranged from 0.60 to 1.2 for the different coatings.

  18. Factors that prevent roughstock rodeo athletes from wearing protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S; Ferguson, Alishia; Bosha, Phil; Cassas, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design, this study sought to determine usage rates and barriers to the use of protective equipment in roughstock athletes. Between 2004 and 2006, amateur, collegiate, and professional roughstock athletes were surveyed using national organizational mailing lists. Findings revealed that during competition, 69% never wore a helmet. Barriers were a negative effect on performance and sport persona. Conversely, 88% always wore a vest. The perception that vest usage was required encouraged roughstock athletes to wear them. Mouthpiece use results were mixed; 58% always used and 21% never used a mouthpiece. Barriers were discomfort and frequent forgetfulness. Reported injury rate was high, with users noting fewer injuries to head and ribs than nonusers, and riders agreed that protective equipment prevented injury to the head, ribs, and mouth. However, equipment usage rates varied widely by type and seemed to be underutilized because the equipment affected performance, was uncomfortable, and "not cowboy." PMID:21068566

  19. Temperature rise and wear of sliding contact of alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Arindam Roy; Sardar, Santanu; Karmakar, Santanu Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The tribo-failure of machine elements under relative sliding velocities is greatly affected by frictional heating and resultant contact temperature rise. Nevertheless, the tribo-failure of automotive components is a combined effect of mechanical, thermal and chemical phenomena. Over the decades, there have been developed a number of different mathematical models for predicting surface temperature rise at sliding contact under different geometries of asperity contacts and operating conditions. The experimental investigation is still relevant today to find out the surface temperature rise at sliding contact along with the outcomes of friction and wear under various operating conditions for real time applications. The present work aims at finding average surface temperature rise at different sliding velocities, normal loads with different surface roughness experimentally. It also involves to prepare two different rough surfaces of alloy steels and to study their influences in the process of generating contact temperature rise under a given operating conditions.

  20. Effect of processing, sterilization and crosslinking on UHMWPE fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a bearing surface in total joint replacements (TJR) for nearly five decades. This semi-crystalline polymer has extraordinary energetic toughness owing to its high molecular weight and entanglement density. However, it is challenged by a need to offer a combined resistance to fatigue, wear and oxidation in vivo. The processing, sterilization treatment, and microstructural tailoring of UHMWPE has evolved considerably in the past 50 years but an optimized microstructure remains elusive. This review seeks to provide an overview of this processing history to address two primary questions: First, how does microstructure affect fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in UHMWPE? And second, can microstructure be optimized to provide resistance to fatigue, oxidation and wear in vivo? Previous literature demonstrates that while crosslinking improves resistance to adhesive/abrasive wear, it also reduces resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fatigue wear by restricting molecular mobility and rendering the polymer more brittle. Crystallinity improves fatigue resistance but generally increases elastic modulus and concomitant contact stresses in vivo. The presence of fusion defects or oxidation reduces further fatigue resistance and enhances fatigue wear. Thus, UHMWPE microstructural evolution comes with trade-offs. Currently there is no singular formulation of UHMWPE that is ideal for all TJR applications. PMID:26386167

  1. Effect of processing, sterilization and crosslinking on UHMWPE fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farzana; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used as a bearing surface in total joint replacements (TJR) for nearly five decades. This semi-crystalline polymer has extraordinary energetic toughness owing to its high molecular weight and entanglement density. However, it is challenged by a need to offer a combined resistance to fatigue, wear and oxidation in vivo. The processing, sterilization treatment, and microstructural tailoring of UHMWPE has evolved considerably in the past 50 years but an optimized microstructure remains elusive. This review seeks to provide an overview of this processing history to address two primary questions: First, how does microstructure affect fatigue fracture and fatigue wear mechanisms in UHMWPE? And second, can microstructure be optimized to provide resistance to fatigue, oxidation and wear in vivo? Previous literature demonstrates that while crosslinking improves resistance to adhesive/abrasive wear, it also reduces resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fatigue wear by restricting molecular mobility and rendering the polymer more brittle. Crystallinity improves fatigue resistance but generally increases elastic modulus and concomitant contact stresses in vivo. The presence of fusion defects or oxidation reduces further fatigue resistance and enhances fatigue wear. Thus, UHMWPE microstructural evolution comes with trade-offs. Currently there is no singular formulation of UHMWPE that is ideal for all TJR applications.

  2. Human tooth wear in the past and the present: tribological mechanisms, scoring systems, dental and skeletal compensations.

    PubMed

    d'Incau, Emmanuel; Couture, Christine; Maureille, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    This review of human tooth wear describes the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process. Using the tribological approach they can be systematised and this in turn aids our understanding of them. In past populations wear was ubiquitous, intense, abrasive and physiological as it was related to their food and their technologies. In these populations, it affected the proximal surfaces, and the occlusal surfaces which modified the occlusal plane profoundly. To categorise this wear many different classification systems are used, from which we can determine diet, cultural changes and the age at death of individuals. They also illustrate the evolution of certain functional dental and skeletal compensations in the masticatory apparatus such as continuous dental eruption, mesial drift of the arches and incisor lingual tipping which can then be monitored. These physiological adaptations related mainly to function and ontogenesis can also be found in present-day populations where wear is moderate, although they are much less obtrusive. Apart from certain pathological cases associated with a specific parafunction, iatrogenic tooth brushing or an eating disorder and encouraged by an acid environment, they are the result of a physiological process that should not be halted. To ensure this, it is essential to prevent lesions related to tooth wear, to detect them early and establish a reliable diagnosis. Types of tooth wear that had remained unchanged since the origin of humanity have undergone profound changes in a very short space of time. Today's tribochemical pathological model has replaced the abrasive physiological model of the past. PMID:21920497

  3. Wear reduction systems liquid piston ring

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R.J.; Chen, T.N.; DiNanno, L.

    1990-09-01

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of achieving an acceptable wear rate for the cylinder liner, piston, and piston rings in a coal/water-slurry-fueled engine that utilized the concept of a liquid piston ring above the conventional piston rings and to identify technical barriers and required research and development. The study included analytical modeling of the system, a bench study of the fluid motion in the liquid piston ring, and a single-cylinder test rig for wear comparison. A system analysis made on the different variations of the liquid supply system showed the desirability of the once-through version from the standpoint of system simplicity. The dynamics of the liquid ring were modeled to determine the important design parameters that influence the pressure fluctuation in the liquid ring during a complete engine cycle and the integrity of the liquid ring. This analysis indicated the importance of controlling heat transfer to the liquid ring through piston and liner to avoid boiling the liquid. A conceptual piston design for minimizing heat transfer is presented in this report. Results showed that the liquid piston ring effectively reduced the solid particles on the wall by scrubbing, especially in the case where a surfactant was added to the water. The wear rates were reduced by a factor of 2 with the liquid ring. However, leakage of the contaminated liquid ring material past the top ring limited the effectiveness of the liquid ring concept. 8 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Employee Perceived Training Effectiveness Relationship to Employee Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahinidis, Alexandros G.; Bouris, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between perceived employee training effectiveness and job satisfaction, motivation and commitment. Design/methodology/approach: The study examined the responses of 134 employees and lower managers, of five large Greek organizations, after they had completed a training program.…

  5. Experimental, numerical and analytical studies of abrasive wear: correlation between wear mechanisms and friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezlini, Salah; Zidi, M.; Arfa, H.; Ben Tkaya, Mohamed; Kapsa, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    The transport of granular material often generates severe damage. Understanding the correlation between the friction coefficient, particle geometry and wear mechanisms is of primary importance for materials undergoing abrasive wear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle geometry on wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. Numerical and analytical simulations and experimental results have been compared. The process to be studied is the scratch made by a rigid cone with different attack angles on a 5xxx aluminium alloy (Al-Mg) flat surface. A scratch test was used and the wear mechanisms were observed for different attack angles. A numerical study with a finite element code was made in order to understand the effect of attack angle on the friction coefficient. The contact surface and the friction coefficient were also studied, and the results compared to the Bowden and Tabor model. The superposition of the numerical, analytical and experimental results showed a better correlation between the wear mechanisms and the friction coefficient. It also showed the importance of the model hypothesis used to simulate the scratch phenomenon. To cite this article: S. Mezlini et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  6. Grafting of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) on polyethylene liner in artificial hip joints reduces production of wear particles.

    PubMed

    Moro, Toru; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Masami; Tanaka, Sakae; Ito, Hideya; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takatori, Yoshio

    2014-03-01

    Despite improvements in the techniques, materials, and fixation of total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic osteolysis, a complication that arises from this clinical procedure and causes aseptic loosening, is considered to be a major clinical problem associated with total hip arthroplasty. With the objective of reducing the production of wear particles and eliminating periprosthetic osteolysis, we prepared a novel hip polyethylene (PE) liner whose surface graft was made of a biocompatible phospholipid polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)). This study investigated the wear resistance of the poly(MPC)-grafted cross-linked PE (CLPE; MPC-CLPE) liner during 15×10(6) cycles of loading in a hip joint simulator. The gravimetric analysis showed that the wear of the acetabular liner was dramatically suppressed in the MPC-CLPE liner, as compared to that in the non-treated CLPE liner. Analyses of the MPC-CLPE liner surface revealed that it suffered from no or very little wear even after the simulator test, whereas the CLPE liners suffered from substantial wears. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the wear particles isolated from the lubricants showed that poly(MPC) grafting dramatically decreased the total number, area, and volume of the wear particles. However, there was no significant difference in the particle size distributions, and, in particular, from the SEM image, it was observed that particles with diameters less than 0.50μm were present in the range of the highest frequency. In addition, there were no significant differences in the particle size descriptors and particle shape descriptors. The results obtained in this study show that poly(MPC) grafting markedly reduces the production of wear particles from CLPE liners, without affecting the size of the particles. These results suggest that poly(MPC) grafting is a promising technique for increasing the longevity of artificial hip joints.

  7. Erosive tooth wear and wedge-shaped defects in 1996 and 2006: cross- sectional surveys of Swiss army recruits.

    PubMed

    Lussi, Adrian; Strub, Matthias; Schürch, Ernst; Schaffner, Markus; Bürgin, Walter; Jaeggi, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible etiological factors of erosive tooth wear and wedge-shaped defects in Swiss Army recruits and compare the findings with those of an analogous study conducted in 1996. In 2006, 621 recruits between 18 and 25 years of age (1996: 417 recruits; ages 19 to 25) were examined for erosive tooth wear and wedge-shaped defects. Additional data was acquired using a questionnaire about personal details, education, dentition’s subjective condition, oral hygiene, eating and drinking habits, medications used, and general medical problems. In 2006, 60.1% of those examined exhibited occlusal erosive tooth wear not involving the dentin (1996: 82.0%) and 23.0% involving the dentin (1996: 30.7%). Vestibular erosive tooth wear without dentin involvement was seen in 7.7% in 2006 vs. 14.4% in 1996. Vestibular erosive tooth wear with dentin involvement was rare in both years (0.5%). Oral erosive tooth wear lacking exposed dentin was also rare in those years, although more teeth were affected in 2006 (2.1%) than in 1996 (0.7%). The examinations in 2006 found one or more initial wedge-shaped lesions in 8.5% of the recruits, while 20.4% of the study participants exhibited such in 1996. In 1996, 53% consumed acidic foods and beverages more than 5 times/day; in 2006, 83.9% did so. In neither study did multivariate regression analyses show any significant correlations between occurrence and location of erosive tooth wear and wedge-shaped defects and various other parameters, e.g., eating and hygiene habits, or dentin hyper-sensitivity. Despite a significant increase in consumption of acidic products between 1996 and 2006, the latter study found both fewer erosive tooth wear and fewer wedge-shaped defects (i.e., fewer non-carious lesions.).

  8. Motivating pharmacy employees.

    PubMed

    White, S J; Generali, J A

    1984-07-01

    Concepts from theories of motivation are used to suggest methods for improving the motivational environment of hospital pharmacy departments. Motivation--the state of being stimulated to take action to achieve a goal or to satisfy a need--comes from within individuals, but hospital pharmacy managers can facilitate motivation by structuring the work environment so that it satisfies employees' needs. Concepts from several theories of motivation are discussed, including McGregor's theory X and theory Y assumptions, Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg's motivation hygiene theory, and Massey's value system theory. Concepts from the Japanese style of management that can be used to facilitate motivation, such as quality circles, also are described. The autocratic, participative, and laissez faire styles of leadership are discussed in the context of the motivation theories, and suggested applications of theoretical concepts to practice are presented.

  9. Motivating pharmacy employees.

    PubMed

    White, S J; Generali, J A

    1984-07-01

    Concepts from theories of motivation are used to suggest methods for improving the motivational environment of hospital pharmacy departments. Motivation--the state of being stimulated to take action to achieve a goal or to satisfy a need--comes from within individuals, but hospital pharmacy managers can facilitate motivation by structuring the work environment so that it satisfies employees' needs. Concepts from several theories of motivation are discussed, including McGregor's theory X and theory Y assumptions, Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg's motivation hygiene theory, and Massey's value system theory. Concepts from the Japanese style of management that can be used to facilitate motivation, such as quality circles, also are described. The autocratic, participative, and laissez faire styles of leadership are discussed in the context of the motivation theories, and suggested applications of theoretical concepts to practice are presented. PMID:6465152

  10. Finite element based simulation of dry sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegadekatte, V.; Huber, N.; Kraft, O.

    2005-01-01

    In order to predict wear and eventually the life-span of complex mechanical systems, several hundred thousand operating cycles have to be simulated. Therefore, a finite element (FE) post-processor is the optimum choice, considering the computational expense. A wear simulation approach based on Archard's wear law is implemented in an FE post-processor that works in association with a commercial FE package, ABAQUS, for solving the general deformable-deformable contact problem. Local wear is computed and then integrated over the sliding distance using the Euler integration scheme. The wear simulation tool works in a loop and performs a series of static FE-simulations with updated surface geometries to get a realistic contact pressure distribution on the contacting surfaces. It will be demonstrated that this efficient approach can simulate wear on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional surface topologies. The wear on both the interacting surfaces is computed using the contact pressure distribution from a two-dimensional or three-dimensional simulation, depending on the case. After every wear step the geometry is re-meshed to correct the deformed mesh due to wear, thus ensuring a fairly uniform mesh for further processing. The importance and suitability of such a wear simulation tool will be enunciated in this paper.

  11. Wear analysis of revolute joints with clearance in multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, ZhengFeng; Zhao, Yang; Wang, XingGui

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the prediction of wear for revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems is investigated using a computational methodology. The contact model in clearance joint is established using a new hybrid nonlinear contact force model and the friction effect is considered by using a modified Coulomb friction model. The dynamics model of multibody system with clearance is established using dynamic segmentation modeling method and the computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint in multibody systems is presented. The main computational process for wear analysis of clearance joint includes two steps, which are dynamics analysis and wear analysis. The dynamics simulation of multibody system with revolute clearance joint is carried out and the contact forces are drawn and used to calculate the wear amount of revolute clearance joint based on the Archard's wear model. Finally, a four-bar multibody mechanical system with revolute clearance joint is used as numerical example application to perform the simulation and show the dynamics responses and wear characteristics of multibody systems with revolute clearance joint. The main results of this work indicate that the contact between the joint elements is wider and more frequent in some specific regions and the wear phenomenon is not regular around the joint surface, which causes the clearance size increase non-regularly after clearance joint wear. This work presents an effective method to predict wear of revolute joint with clearance in multibody systems.

  12. Fret wear mediation of NIRCam filter wheel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privári, Béla I.

    2011-10-01

    We will discuss a fret wear solution developed for the James Webb Space Telescope NIRCam filter wheel assembly by implementation of a hard coating. With mechanisms and structures designed for space flight application, titanium is often selected as the choice material of construction. Titanium offers a low-density high strength material that is good for use with many optical instruments due to its' favorable thermal properties. An important factor to consider with titanium mechanisms and structures are component fits and the vibration environment that must be survived during launch. In many instances, small (slip) fits between titanium components can cause fret wear during launch induced vibration. Titanium is particularly susceptible to fret wear, although other materials also demonstrate the fret wear. Fretting is adhesive failure of a material that experiences impact and micro-slip with an adjacent part. The mechanism of fret wear involves small particles that are pulled from the surface of parts that turn into hard oxides that further accelerate the wear between the parts. To mitigate fret wear, the mechanism or structure can be designed to eliminate all slip fits altogether, lubricants may be added to the wear surfaces or hard coatings can be applied to the wear surfaces when the other approaches are not feasible. For the NIRCam filter wheel assembly, which must operate at 35K and remain optically clean, only hard coatings are feasible. A discussion of several coating alternatives and associated wear testing will be presented along with the selection of an optimal solution.

  13. Wear characteristics of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Domiaty, A.; El-Fadaly, M.; Nassef, A. Es.

    2002-10-01

    The wear of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearing against 316 stainless steel or cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloy was measured using a 12-channel wear tester especially developed for the evaluation of candidate materials for prosthetic joints. The coefficient of friction and wear rate were determined as a function of lubricant, contact stress, and metallic surface roughness in tests lasting 2 3 million cycles, the equivalent of several years use of a prosthesis. Wear was determined by the weight loss of the polyethylene (PE) specimens corrected for the effect of fluid absorption. The friction and wear processes in blood serum differed markedly from those in saline solution or distilled water. Only serum lubrication produced wear surfaces resembling those observed on removed prostheses. The experimental methods provided accurate reproducible measurement of PE wear. The long-term wear rates were proportional to load and sliding distance. Although the PE wear rate increased with increasing surface roughness, wear was not severe except with very coarse metal surfaces. The data obtained in these studies formed a comparison basis for the subsequent evaluation of potentially superior materials for prosthetic joints.

  14. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated.

  15. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  16. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Employee organizations. 700.549 Section 700.549 Indians... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.549 Employee organizations. An employee may not knowingly be a member of an organization of Government employees that advocates the overthrow of the United...

  17. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee organizations. 700.549 Section 700.549 Indians... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.549 Employee organizations. An employee may not knowingly be a member of an organization of Government employees that advocates the overthrow of the United...

  18. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Employee organizations. 700.549 Section 700.549 Indians... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.549 Employee organizations. An employee may not knowingly be a member of an organization of Government employees that advocates the overthrow of the United...

  19. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Employee organizations. 700.549 Section 700.549 Indians... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.549 Employee organizations. An employee may not knowingly be a member of an organization of Government employees that advocates the overthrow of the United...

  20. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Employee organizations. 700.549 Section 700.549 Indians... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.549 Employee organizations. An employee may not knowingly be a member of an organization of Government employees that advocates the overthrow of the United...

  1. Role Stress, Interrole Conflict, and Job Satisfaction among University Employees: The Creation and Test of a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Keisha M.; Tatman, Anthony W.; Chapman, Benjamin P.

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have experienced financial hardships during the recent economic downturn. To save money, several have resorted to laying off employees, which has often resulted in increased work and stress for the remaining employees. Such an increase has the potential to adversely affect employees' sense of job satisfaction. This study created…

  2. Effect of Leadership Style, Motivation, and Giving Incentives on the Performance of Employees--PT. Kurnia Wijaya Various Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elqadri, Zaenal Mustafa; Priyono; Suci, Rahayu Puji; Chandra, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify and examine the importance of leadership style, motivation, and incentives to improve employee performance. Variables examined as factors that affect performance of employees were style of leadership (X1), motivation (X2), and the provision of incentives (X3). The population of this study was all employees in the Sales…

  3. The influence of social networking technologies on female religious veil-wearing behavior in Iran.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Shakiba, Abbas; Kwok, Justin; Montazeri, Mohammad Sadegh

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Social networking technologies can influence attitudes, behaviors, and social norms. Research on this topic has been conducted primarily among early adopters of technology and within the United States. However, it is important to evaluate how social media might affect people's behaviors in international settings, especially among countries with longstanding, government recommended, cultural and religious traditions and behaviors, such as Iran. This study seeks to assess whether Iranian women who have been using social networking technologies for a longer time (compared to those who have recently joined) would be less likely to cover themselves with a veil and be more comfortable publicly displaying pictures of this behavior on Facebook. Iranian females (N=253) were selected through snowball sampling from nongovernmental organizations in November 2011 and asked to complete a survey assessing their use of Facebook, concerns about not wearing a veil in Facebook pictures, and their actual likelihood of wearing a veil. Items were combined to measure lack of interest in wearing a veil. Length of time as a Facebook user was significantly associated with not wearing a veil (b=0.16, p<0.01), controlling for age, education, and frequency of using Facebook. Results also revealed a significant relationship such that older people were more likely to adhere to the religious behavior of wearing a veil (b=-0.45, p<0.01). Social networking technologies can affect attitudes and behaviors internationally. We discuss methods of using social media for self-presentation and expression, as well as the difficulties (and importance) of studying use of technologies, such as social media, internationally. PMID:24611768

  4. The Influence of Social Networking Technologies on Female Religious Veil-Wearing Behavior in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Abbas; Kwok, Justin; Montazeri, Mohammad Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Social networking technologies can influence attitudes, behaviors, and social norms. Research on this topic has been conducted primarily among early adopters of technology and within the United States. However, it is important to evaluate how social media might affect people's behaviors in international settings, especially among countries with longstanding, government recommended, cultural and religious traditions and behaviors, such as Iran. This study seeks to assess whether Iranian women who have been using social networking technologies for a longer time (compared to those who have recently joined) would be less likely to cover themselves with a veil and be more comfortable publicly displaying pictures of this behavior on Facebook. Iranian females (N=253) were selected through snowball sampling from nongovernmental organizations in November 2011 and asked to complete a survey assessing their use of Facebook, concerns about not wearing a veil in Facebook pictures, and their actual likelihood of wearing a veil. Items were combined to measure lack of interest in wearing a veil. Length of time as a Facebook user was significantly associated with not wearing a veil (b=0.16, p<0.01), controlling for age, education, and frequency of using Facebook. Results also revealed a significant relationship such that older people were more likely to adhere to the religious behavior of wearing a veil (b=−0.45, p<0.01). Social networking technologies can affect attitudes and behaviors internationally. We discuss methods of using social media for self-presentation and expression, as well as the difficulties (and importance) of studying use of technologies, such as social media, internationally. PMID:24611768

  5. The influence of social networking technologies on female religious veil-wearing behavior in Iran.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Shakiba, Abbas; Kwok, Justin; Montazeri, Mohammad Sadegh

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Social networking technologies can influence attitudes, behaviors, and social norms. Research on this topic has been conducted primarily among early adopters of technology and within the United States. However, it is important to evaluate how social media might affect people's behaviors in international settings, especially among countries with longstanding, government recommended, cultural and religious traditions and behaviors, such as Iran. This study seeks to assess whether Iranian women who have been using social networking technologies for a longer time (compared to those who have recently joined) would be less likely to cover themselves with a veil and be more comfortable publicly displaying pictures of this behavior on Facebook. Iranian females (N=253) were selected through snowball sampling from nongovernmental organizations in November 2011 and asked to complete a survey assessing their use of Facebook, concerns about not wearing a veil in Facebook pictures, and their actual likelihood of wearing a veil. Items were combined to measure lack of interest in wearing a veil. Length of time as a Facebook user was significantly associated with not wearing a veil (b=0.16, p<0.01), controlling for age, education, and frequency of using Facebook. Results also revealed a significant relationship such that older people were more likely to adhere to the religious behavior of wearing a veil (b=-0.45, p<0.01). Social networking technologies can affect attitudes and behaviors internationally. We discuss methods of using social media for self-presentation and expression, as well as the difficulties (and importance) of studying use of technologies, such as social media, internationally.

  6. Wear characterization of abrasive waterjet nozzles and nozzle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanduri, Madhusarathi

    Parameters that influence nozzle wear in the abrasive water jet (AWJ) environment were identified and classified into nozzle geometric, AWJ system, and nozzle material categories. Regular and accelerated wear test procedures were developed to study nozzle wear under actual and simulated conditions, respectively. Long term tests, using garnet abrasive, were conducted to validate the accelerated test procedure. In addition to exit diameter growth, two new measures of wear, nozzle weight loss and nozzle bore profiles were shown to be invaluable in characterizing and explaining the phenomena of nozzle wear. By conducting nozzle wear tests, the effects of nozzle geometric, and AWJ system parameters on nozzle wear were systematically investigated. An empirical model was developed for nozzle weight loss rate. To understand the response of nozzle materials under varying AWJ system conditions, erosion tests were conducted on samples of typical nozzle materials. The effect of factors such as jet impingement angle, abrasive type, abrasive size, abrasive flow rate, water pressure, traverse speed, and target material was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on eroded samples as well as worn nozzles to understand the wear mechanisms. The dominant wear mechanism observed was grain pullout. Erosion models were reviewed and along the lines of classical erosion theories a semi-empirical model, suitable for erosion of nozzle materials under AWJ impact, was developed. The erosion data correlated very well with the developed model. Finally, the cutting efficiency of AWJ nozzles was investigated in conjunction with nozzle wear. The cutting efficiency of a nozzle deteriorates as it wears. There is a direct correlation between nozzle wear and cutting efficiency. The operating conditions that produce the most efficient jets also cause the most wear in the nozzle.

  7. Helping the New Employee Adjust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, James L.

    1981-01-01

    A manager training a new employee should explain what is expected, encourage questions, allow flexibility, expect mistakes, and review procedures. When problems arise, the manager must be honest, set guidelines, and inform the employee of his/her progress. (Author/MLF)

  8. Employee Ownership, Motivation and Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michie, Jonathan; Oughton, Christine; Bennion, Yvonne

    The relationship between employee ownership, motivation, and productivity was explored. The main data collection activities were as follows: (1) a literature review; (2) interviews with management and employees from 10 selected companies across the United Kingdom; (3) surveys of ICOM (the federation of worker cooperatives) member companies and…

  9. Sexual Misconduct by School Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1992-01-01

    The recent United States Supreme Court decision in "Franklin v. Gwinnett County Public Schools" highlights the additional risks facing school districts and employees under federal statutes and the common law as a result of sexual misconduct by school employees. The "Franklin" case illustrates that damages could be available to the student and that…

  10. Training Guidelines for Employee Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This set of guidelines is intended for use by employers desiring to establish the training needs of those involved in employee relations. The 16 guidelines cover the following principal activities normally associated with employee relations: staff management policy and aims, staff recruitment and selection, terms and conditions of employment,…

  11. Employee Incentive System for Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The purpose of this monograph is to discuss employee incentive plans with a potential for cost containment in order to assist hospitals in providing efficient and effective delivery of health care. Based on an examination of employee incentive systems both in and outside the health care field, the information is intended to aid the administrative…

  12. Assessing New Employee Orientation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo, Jose M.; Yancey, George B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the importance of new employee orientation (NEO) programs, the quality of typical NEOs, and how to improve NEOs. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a viewpoint of the importance of new employee orientation programs, the quality of typical NEOs, and how to improve NEOs. Findings: Although western…

  13. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  14. Counseling Employees: A Multifaceted Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandhu, Daya Singh, Ed.

    This book is divided into five major sections that focus on the various perspectives, needs, and concerns of employees in the workplace. Chapters include: (1) Work: Meaning, Mattering, and Job Satisfaction (K. M. Connolly); (2) Spirituality in the Workplace: An Overview (E. J. Looby and D. S. Sandhu); (3) Developing the Whole Employee: Some…

  15. Load and wear experiments on the impact hammer of a vertical shaft impact crusher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. H.; Fang, H. Y.; Luo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Impact hammers are important components of impact crushers, and are often shortlived due to the high-impact nature of their use. Wear-resistant alloys are welded to the surface of impact hammers to prolong their service life. In this paper, a simulation model of the rotor and impact hammers in impact crushers was designed to utilize the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The wear-resistant alloy on each impact hammer was divided into twenty-two action regions. The load distribution on each alloy block is affected by the structural and manufacturing parameters of the impact crusher. The wear distribution of the impact hammer was measured by shape morphology according to relative impact crushers. The results demonstrated that the real measurements of wear distribution on the impact hammer were similar to simulated load distribution measurements on the same surface. The study of load distribution of impact hammers by DEM established a theoretical foundation on which to base the optimal design of impact crushers.

  16. Effect of Porosity on Particle Erosion Wear Behavior of Lab. Scale SICF/SIC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Min-Soo; Kohyama, Akira

    The use of silicon-based ceramics and composites as combustor liners and turbine vanes provides the potential of improving next-generation turbine engine performance, through lower emissions and higher cycle efficiency, relative to today's use of super alloy hot-section components. As a series of research for FOD resistant, a particle erosion wear test was carried out for continuous Pre-SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites with a new concept of lab. scale fabrication by LPS process. The result shows that aperture (some form of porosity) between fiber and interface has a deleterious effect on erosion resistance. Aperture along the fiber interfaces consequently causes a severe wear in the form of fiber detachment. Wear rate increase proportional as contents of open porosity increases. For nearly full dense composite materials of about 0.5 % porosity, are about 200 % more wear-resistant than about 5 % porous composites. Grain growth and consolidate condition of matrix which directly affects to FOD resistant are also discussed.

  17. Polyethylene wear particle generation in vivo in an alumina medial pivot total knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Yukihide; Kobayashi, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Miyaguchi, Masatsugu; Kadoya, Yoshinori; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2005-10-01

    Polyethylene wear particle generation is one of the most important factors affecting mid- to long-term results of total knee arthroplasties. It has been reported that the medial pivot total knee prosthesis (MP) design and alumina ceramic femoral component reduce polyethylene wear. The aim of this study is to evaluate in vivo polyethylene wear particle generation in the newly introduced alumina MP, in comparison with a metal MP. Synovial fluid was obtained from 11 knees with alumina MP and 15 knees with metal MP at nine months after the operation. Polyethylene particles were isolated, and examined using scanning electron microscope and image analyzer. Total number of particles in each knee was 7.10+/-2.86x10(6) in alumina (mean+/-standard error), and 5.70+/-2.82x10(7) in metal MP (p=0.048). Particle size (equivalent circle diameter) was 0.78+/-0.04 microm in alumina, and 0.66+/-0.06 microm in metal MP (p=0.120). Particle shape (aspect ratio) was 1.52+/-0.05 in alumina, and 1.88+/-0.11 in metal MP (p=0.014). Apart from the femoral component, the material and manufacturing method of polyethylene insert differed between the two groups, although the sterilization method was the same. Alumina MP generated fewer and rounder polyethylene wear particles than metal MP in early clinical stage, and could potentially reduce prevalence of osteolysis and aseptic loosening. PMID:15893371

  18. Factors Affecting Willingness to Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Gatti, Paola; Quaglino, Gian Piero

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a survey among 300 employees in Northern Italy to assess the willingness to mentor and identify the factors that affect it. Men and respondents with previous mentoring experience indicate a higher willingness to be a mentor. Willingness is affected by personal characteristics that are perceived as necessary for a mentor and the…

  19. Prevalence of erosive tooth wear in risk groups.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Nadine; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2014-01-01

    Individuals have different risks for developing erosive lesions depending on background, behavioural, dietary and medical variables. It is anticipated that people with regular impact of gastric juice, i.e. patients with eating disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have a specially high risk of developing dental erosions; the same could be true for those with special diets, regular consumption of acidic beverages, medicine and drug intake and occupational exposure to acids. Eating disorders are associated with an increased occurrence, severity and risk for dental erosion, even though not all bulimic patients show a pathological level of tooth wear. There seems also to be a tendency that in the case of GERD, erosion is more common and more severe than in healthy controls. Regarding exogenous causes, many studies, though not all, document a positive association between the consumption of acidic beverages and dental erosions and there seems to be a dose-response relationship; however, further studies are necessary for a final statement. The same applies for the association between drug or medication intake or special diet and erosion prevalence. Though only few studies exist, there seems to be a tendency for an increase of erosion prevalence amongst persons abusively consuming alcohol. Some studies show an increased risk for dental erosion for employees testing wine or working in acid processing factories. Even though some associations between acid impact and erosion prevalence appear clear, the number of studies is small. There is a lack of controlled prevalence studies, making it difficult to give final statements for all risk groups.

  20. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  1. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  2. Wear testing of total hip replacements under severe conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Reinders, Joern; Dammer, Rebecca; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Bader, Rainer; Sonntag, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Controlled wear testing of total hip replacements in hip joint simulators is a well-established and powerful method, giving an extensive prediction of the long-term clinical performance. To understand the wear behavior of a bearing and its limits under in vivo conditions, testing scenarios should be designed as physiologically as possible. Currently, the ISO standard protocol 14242 is the most common preclinical testing procedure for total hip replacements, based on a simplified gait cycle for normal walking conditions. However, in recent years, wear patterns have increasingly been observed on retrievals that cannot be replicated by the current standard. The purpose of this study is to review the severe testing conditions that enable the generation of clinically relevant wear rates and phenomena. These conditions include changes in loading and activity, third-body wear, surface topography, edge wear and the role of aging of the bearing materials. PMID:26048088

  3. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  4. Sliding wear resistance of epoxy polymers against stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, G.M.; Dimovski, L.; Samandi, M.

    1993-12-31

    The wear mechanisms occurring during sliding contact between epoxy resins and a smooth steel counterface have been investigated. The samples were prepared from a commercial diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy and cured with various hardeners. The cured resins displayed a wide range of mechanical properties (particularly fracture toughness), and crosslink densities. The wear rates of the samples were found to vary by up to four orders of magnitude. It was found that the wear rates correlated to the inverse of the fracture toughness, which was in accord with previous studies on the wear of plastics by Omar et al. The mechanism was found to involve an ``adhesive/fatigue`` process, as proposed by Omar. Additionally, it was found that the addition of a rubber toughening agent had no effect on the wear rate, whilst sliding contact between polymer and polymer resulted in a much higher rate of wear. Possible explanations for this behavior are given.

  5. Friction and the development of hard alloy surface microstructures during wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyusov, S. F.; Tarassov, S. Yu.

    1997-12-01

    Investigations of wear in sliding friction of WC-Hadfield steel hard alloy against cast tool steel have been carried out in a broad range of velocities and pressure values. Structural and phase composition variations have been revealed. Friction-affected zone was found to be 450 µm in depth. Structural γ → α, γ → transformation regions are located within 100 μm of the surface. These transformations contributed to the total solid solution deformation hardening.

  6. Employee Assistance Program Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettleman, Alan G.; McGuire, William

    1999-01-01

    Employee Assistance Program (EAP) officers, as well as personnel in other disciplines from eight NASA Centers, attended this breakout session. Ms. Brenda Blair, MA, CEAP, a guest speaker at the conference, also attended as a consultant. Representatives from the NASA Centers introduced themselves and spoke briefly about their programs. In a discussion related to the conference theme on benchmarking, quality control issues within the EAP community and adequate documentation of cases were addressed. Disposition and provision for quality assurance checks for EAP providers in single person offices were also discussed. Ms. Blair presented methods for consulting with other NASA personnel in single person EAP offices as a quality control measure. EAP intervention in critical incidents was discussed. The question of whether EAP assistance is an asset or a potential liability in those situations was addressed. Suggestions were made of topics for future EAP video-teleconference topics. A program on EAP ethics was planned for a September video teleconference. Each person was asked to provide intake forms they use to Mr. Gettleman or Ms. Blair. Ms. Blair said she would review the forms to ensure that adequate notification is provided to the client for confidentiality. She would also review them to ensure they have adequate limits of confidentiality--a topic for future video teleconferencing. Mr. Gettleman described the NASA initiative to reduce stresses in the workplace, and the activities of an ad-hoc EAP group that will make recommendations to NASA senior management. Alternative training methods were discussed for reaching target audiences such as employees at risk, supervisors, and others. Pfc. David A. Pendleton, Victim Assistance Coordinator, U.S. Capitol Police. U.S. House of Representatives made a special presentation. Pfc. Pendleton was on duty during the tragic shooting of two Federal guards at the U.S. Capitol. He related the events immediately after the incident. He

  7. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Jager, D H J; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abrasion. Eleven volunteers wore for 3 weeks, during working hours, appliances containing 2 control and 2 FV-treated human enamel samples. Erosion took place extraorally 3 times a day (5 min) in the soft drink Sprite. At the end of each experimental day one control and one FV sample (C-er+abr and FV-er+abr) were brushed (5 s) with fluoridated dentrifice. The remaining control and FV sample (C-er and FV-er) were left unbrushed. Enamel volume loss was quantified by optical profilometry at day 5, 10 and 15. A statistically significant progression in enamel loss was found for the C-er, C-er+abr and FV-er+abr groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively) but not for the FV-er group (p = 0.053). The values of cumulative normalized volume loss (x10(8) mum) at day 15 were: C-er 5.53 +/- 2.14, C-er+abr 5.70 +/- 2.07, FV-er 0.79 +/- 0.67 and FV-er+abr 2.76 +/- 1.35. The FV-er and FV-er+abr groups showed significant lower volume loss than the C-er group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively) and the C-er+abr group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). The results indicate that fluoride varnish is effective in the reduction of erosive wear. PMID:17167261

  8. Aging mourning doves by outer primary wear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wight, H.M.; Blankenship, L.H.; Tomlinson, R.E.

    1967-01-01

    Many immature mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) cannot be aged by the conventional white-tipped primary covert method if molt has proceeded beyond the 7th primary. A new method of aging doves in this group is based on the presence (immature) or absence (adult) of a buff-colored fringe on the tips of the 9th and 10th primaries. Experienced biologists were nearly 100 percent accurate in aging wings of 100 known-age doves from eastern and midwestern states. The technique is not as reliable for doves from southwestern United States because of added feather wear, apparently from harsh vegetative and soil conditions.

  9. Elastomer Compound Developed for High Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D.; Feuer, H.; Flanagan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Teets, A.; Touchet, P.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army is currently spending 300 million dollars per year replacing rubber track pads. An experimental rubber compound has been developed which exhibits 2 to 3 times greater service life than standard production pad compounds. To improve the service life of the tank track pads various aspects of rubber chemistry were explored including polymer, curing and reinforcing systems. Compounds that exhibited superior physical properties based on laboratory data were then fabricated into tank pads and field tested. This paper will discuss the compounding studies, laboratory data and field testing that led to the high wear elastomer compound.

  10. Complications in primary total hip arthroplasty: avoidance and management: wear.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Many factors, including polyethylene processing, sterilization method, counterface material, femoral head size, femoral offset, acetabular component position, implant design, and patient activity level, affect the rate of wear in total hip arthroplasty. For patients with life expectancy that exceeds the longevity of the conventional implant materials, an alternative bearing surface (highly cross-linked polyethylene, metal-on-metal, or ceramic-on-ceramic) may be considered. Although laboratory wear tests with these materials are very favorable, clinical outcomes have not been clearly established. When osteolysis does develop in response to particulate debris, the location and progression of the lesions may be quite variable. Asymptomatic stable lesions can be followed clinically and radiographically while symptomatic or enlarging lesions or those that may compromise the integrity of the periprosthetic bone stock require surgery. If acetabular component revision is necessary and an adequate rim of host bone is maintained to support a revision acetabular component, defects can be filled with particulate bone graft. Large segmental defects generally require structural allografts. If the acetabular shell is well fixed in good position and the osteolytic defects are accessible, treatment with curettage and bone grafting of the lesions with liner revision is appropriate to avoid use of a structural allograft. Proximal femoral defects around a well-fixed stem can be managed in a similar manner with curettage and bone grafting. Distal lesions associated with risk of periprosthetic femur fracture or implant loosening require stem revision. Osteoclastic resportion of bone in response to particulate debris can be impaired with use of some drugs such as alendronate. However, the safety and efficacy of alendronate in the clinical management of osteolysis associated with total hip arthroplasty has not been established. PMID:12690853

  11. Electrochemical Wear of Carbon Cathodes in Electrowinning of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschöpe, Kati; Støre, Anne; Solheim, Asbjørn; Skybakmoen, Egil; Grande, Tor; Ratvik, Arne Petter

    2013-11-01

    Cathode wear is the main factor limiting the lifetime of high-amperage aluminum electrolysis cells with graphitized cathodes. The current article deals with an investigation of cathode wear in a laboratory cell, where the cathode is directly exposed to the electrolyte during electrolysis. The wear was shown to be electrochemical in nature and dependent on the current density, the rotation speed, and the depth of prefabricated slots in the cylindrical cathodes. The wear mechanism is discussed with respect to kinetics influencing the electrochemistry as well as the solubility of aluminum carbide in the electrolyte.

  12. Fretting Wear of Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Lerch, Bradley A.; Draper, Susan L.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the wear behavior of gamma titanium aluminide (Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb in atomic percent) in contact with a typical nickel-base superalloy under repeated microscopic vibratory motion in air at temperatures from 296-823 K. The surface damage observed on the interacting surfaces of both Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb and superalloy consisted of fracture pits, oxides, metallic debris, scratches, craters, plastic deformation, and cracks. The Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb transferred to the superalloy at all fretting conditions and caused scuffing or galling. The increasing rate of oxidation at elevated temperatures led to a drop in Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear at 473 K. Mild oxidative wear was observed at 473 K. However, fretting wear increased as the temperature was increased from 473-823 K. At 723 and 823 K, oxide disruption generated cracks, loose wear debris, and pits on the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear surface. Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb wear generally decreased with increasing fretting frequency. Both increasing slip amplitude and increasing load tended to produce more metallic wear debris, causing severe abrasive wear in the contacting metals. Keywords

  13. Wear comparison of thermoplastic materials used for orthodontic retainers.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Gary D; Dunn, William J; Taloumis, Louis

    2003-09-01

    Clear thermoplastic retainers are an alternative to fixed lingual retainers and removable Hawley appliances. However, thermoplastic retainers have demonstrated poor wear resistance and durability after only a few months of use. In this study, a simulated wear device was used to compare the wear of different thermoplastic materials used for orthodontic retainers. Three thermoplastic products were evaluated: C+ (Raintree Essix, New Orleans, La),.040-in Invisacryl C (Great Lakes Orthodontics, Towanda, NY), and.040-in TR sheet material (Bay Dental Direct, Bay City, Mich). Twenty specimens were fabricated for each group. The specimens were vacuum thermoformed according to the manufacturers' recommendations and subjected to wear for 1000 cycles in a wear apparatus with steatite ceramic abraders. Depth of wear was determined by surface profilometry. The maximum peak-to-valley measurement was recorded for each specimen. Mean wear (SD) in microns was as follows: C+, 5.9 (2.4); Invisacryl C, 6.1 (2.6); and TR, 1.6 (0.9). One-way analysis of variance detected a significant difference between groups (P <.001). TR material, a hard polyethylene terephthalate glycol copolymer (PETG), demonstrated greater resistance to wear than did the other 2 materials, which were softer, polypropylene-based thermoplastics. There was no evidence to suggest a difference in mean wear between the 2 polypropylene-based materials (P >.05).

  14. Wear of seal materials used in aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Ludwig, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    A review of various types of seal locations in a gas turbine engine and the significance of wear for each type are presented. Material selection guidelines and the PV (contact pressure times sliding velocity) criteria for seal materials are discussed, and examples of wear mechanisms in positive contact seals are given. It is suggested that improved wear, erosion, and oxidation resistant materials will be required for improved seal durability; finally, a correlation is proposed between wear characteristics and a factor that includes material strength, ductility, specific heat and hot-working temperature to attain low porosity metallic gas path seal materials.

  15. 3D finite element modeling of sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buentello Hernandez, Rodolfo G.

    Wear is defined as "the removal of material volume through some mechanical process between two surfaces". There are many mechanical situations that can induce wear and each can involve many wear mechanisms. This research focuses on the mechanical wear due to dry sliding between two surfaces. Currently there is a need to identify and compare materials that would endure sliding wear under severe conditions such as high velocities. The high costs associated with the field experimentation of systems subject to high-speed sliding, has prevented the collection of the necessary data required to fully characterize this phenomena. Simulating wear through Finite Elements (FE) would enable its prediction under different scenarios and would reduce experimentation costs. In the aerospace, automotive and weapon industries such a model can aid in material selection, design and/or testing of systems subjected to wear in bearings, gears, brakes, gun barrels, slippers, locomotive wheels, or even rocket test tracks. The 3D wear model presented in this dissertation allows one to reasonably predict high-speed sliding mechanical wear between two materials. The model predictions are reasonable, when compared against those measured on a sled slipper traveling over the Holloman High Speed Tests Track. This slipper traveled a distance of 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s.

  16. Characterizing wear processes on orthopaedic materials using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. A.; O'Rourke, B.; Dawson, P.; Turner, R. J.; Walmsley, D. G.; Spedding, P. L.; Watters, E. P.

    The operational lifetime of hip replacement prostheses can be severely limited due to the occurrence of excessive wear at the load-bearing interfaces. The aim of this study was to investigate how the surface topography of articulating counterfaces evolves over the duration of a laboratory wear run. It was observed that modular stainless steel femoral heads wearing against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) can themselves be subject to wearing. A comparison with retrieved in vivo-aged femoral heads shows many topographical similarities: in a qualitative sense, scratching and pitting are evident on laboratory and in vivo-worn femoral heads; quantitatively, roughness comparisons between the new and worn devices are seen to increase typically by a factor of 4 after laboratory wearing. The observations suggest that a particular wear mode, namely third-body wear, is responsible for the increased roughness. It is conjectured that third bodies might arise through surface fatigue wear on the metal counterface. Wear debris is also observed to have been generated from the polymer surface, creating rounded debris with sizes predominantly in the range 0.4-0.8 microns: dimensions that are comparable to values previously reported for in vivo generated debris.

  17. Influence of alloying elements on friction and wear of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics were determined for copper binary alloys containing 10 atomic percent aluminum, silicon, indium, and tin. A ternary alloy containing 10 atomic percent aluminum and 5 atomic percent silicon was also examined. The effectiveness of each of the alloying elements aluminum and silicon were very effective in reducing friction. Silicon, however, also reduced wear appreciably. With lubrication, silicon, indium, and tin were all effective alloying elements in reducing friction and wear from values obtained for copper. Silicon was the most effective single element in reducing friction and wear in dry sliding and with lubrication.

  18. Effect of humidity on fretting wear of several pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goto, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Fretting wear experiments with several pure metals were conducted in air at various relative humidity levels. The materials used were iron, aluminum, copper, silver, chromium, titanium, and nickel. Each pure metal had a maximum fretting wear volume at a specific humidity level RH sub max that was not dependent on mechanical factors such as contact load, fretting amplitude, and frequency in the ranges studied. The weight loss due to fretting wear at RH sub max for each pure metal decreased with increasing heat of oxygen adsorption on the metal, indicating that adhesive wear dominated at RH sub max.

  19. Employees with Sleep Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... health condition. Insomnia, in general, often increases with age and affects women more (National Women’s Health Information Center, n.d.). Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy’s primary characteristic is ...

  20. Every employee an owner. Really.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Corey; Case, John; Staubus, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Surveys indicate that when new rules on expensing stock options take effect, many companies are likely to limit the number of employees who can receive equity compensation. But companies that reserve equity for executives are bound to suffer in the long run. Study after study proves that broad-based ownership, when done right, leads to higher productivity, lower workforce turnover, better recruits, and bigger profits. "Done right" is the key. Here are the four most important factors in implementing a broad-based employee equity plan: A significant portion of the workforce--generally, most of the full-time people--must hold equity; employees must think the amounts they hold can significantly improve their financial prospects; managerial practices and policies must reinforce the plan; and employees must feel a true sense of company ownership. Those factors add up to an ownership culture in which employees' interests are aligned with the company's. The result is a workforce that is loyal, cooperative, and willing to go above and beyond to make the organization successful. A wide variety of companies have recorded exceptional business performance with the help of employee-ownership programs supported by management policies. The authors examine two: Science Applications International, a research and development contractor, and Scot Forge, which shapes metal and other materials for industrial machinery. At both companies, every employee with a year or so of service holds equity, and employees who stay on can accumulate a comfortable nest egg. Management's sharing of financial information reinforces workers' sense of ownership. So does the expectation that employees will accept the responsibilities of ownership. Workers with an ownership stake internalize their responsibilities and feel they have an obligation not only to management but to one another.

  1. 28 CFR 115.331 - Employee training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and professionally with residents, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, or gender... the gender of the residents at the employee's facility. The employee shall receive additional...

  2. Quantitative wear and wear damage analysis of composite resins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Koottathape, Natthavoot; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate volume loss and worn surfaces' morphologies of eight composite resins: Durafill VS (DUR), Clearfil AP-X (APX), Filtek Z250 (Z250), Filtek Supreme XT (FIL), Kalore (KAL), MI Flow (MFL), Venus Diamond (VED) and Venus Pearl (VEP). Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated and mounted in a ball-on-disc wear testing machine and abraded in water or with the third-body media, poppy seed slurry and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slurry. Volume loss (n=5) was determined after 50k sliding cycles, and analyzed using two-way ANOVA (α=0.05). The worn surfaces were examined with SEM. Two-way ANOVA suggested significant interaction between composite and wear condition. DUR, KAL and MFL showed low wear in water. DUR, Z250 and FIL showed moderate wear with PMMA slurry, whereas APX, KAL and MFL were deeper abraded. Under the action of poppy seed slurry DUR proved high volume loss. SEM showed that Z250, FIL and MFL were uniformly abraded in water. KAL and MFL with poppy seed were heavily destructed, whereas VED and VEP appeared very smooth. KAL and MFL abraded with PMMA slurry showed many cracks, but VEP remained crack-free and smooth. Volume loss and worn surfaces' morphologies varied with type of composite and third-body media used. PMID:24219861

  3. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  4. Ceramic wear in indentation and sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved with single-crystal ceramic materials in indentation and in sliding contacts. Experiments simulating interfacial events have been conducted with hemispherical, conical and pyramidal indenters (riders). With spherical riders, under either abrasive or adhesive conditions, two types of fracture pits have been observed. First, spherical-shaped fracture pits and wear particles are found as a result of either indenting or sliding. These are shown to be due to a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories. Second, polyhedral fracture pits and debris, produced by anisotropic fracture, and also found both during indenting and sliding. These are primarily controlled by surface and subsurface cracking along cleavage planes. Several quantitative results have also been obtained from this work. For example, using a pyramidal diamond, crack length of Mn-Zn ferrite in the indentation process grows linearly with increasing normal load. Moreover, the critical load to fracture both in indentation and sliding is essentially isotropic and is found to be directly proportional to the indenter radius.

  5. Gas Gun Studies of Interface Wear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Tyler; Kennedy, Greg; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of interface wear were studied by performing gas gun experiments at velocities up to 1 km/s. The approach involved developing coefficients of constitutive strength models for Al 6061 and OFHC-Cu, then using those to design die geometry for interface wear gas gun experiments. Taylor rod-on-anvil impact experiments were performed to obtain coefficients of the Johnson-Cook constitutive strength model by correlating experimentally obtained deformed states of impacted samples with those predicted using ANSYS AUTODYN hydrocode. Simulations were used with validated strength models to design geometry involving acceleration of Al rods through a copper concentric cylindrical angular extrusion die. Experiments were conducted using 7.62 mm and 80 mm diameter gas guns. Differences in the microstructure of the interface layer and microhardness values illustrate that stress-strain conditions produced during acceleration of Al through the hollow concentric copper die, at velocities less than 800 m/s, result in formation of a layer via solid state alloying due to severe plastic deformation, while higher velocities produce an interface layer consisting of melted and re-solidified aluminum.

  6. Exposure and risks from wearing asbestos mitts

    PubMed Central

    Cherrie, John W; Tindall, Matthew; Cowie, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    Background Very high fibre inhalation exposure has been measured while people were wearing personal protective equipment manufactured from chrysotile asbestos. However, there is little data that relates specifically to wearing asbestos gloves or mitts, particularly when used in hot environments such as those found in glass manufacturing. The aim of this study was to assess the likely personal exposure to asbestos fibres when asbestos mitts were used. Results Three types of work activity were simulated in a small test room with unused mitts and artificially aged mitts. Neither pair of mitts were treated to suppress the dust emission. The measured respirable fibre exposure levels ranged from <0.06 to 0.55 fibres/ml, with no significant difference in fibre exposure between aged and unused mitts. The use of high localised ventilation to simulate convective airflows from a furnace reduced exposure levels by about a factor of five. Differences between tasks were statistically significant, with simulated "rowing" of molten glass lowest and replacement of side seals on the furnace highest. Estimated lifetime cancer risk from 20 years exposure at the upper end of the exposure range measured during the study is less than 22 per 100,000. Conclusion People who wore asbestos mitts were likely to have been exposed to relatively low levels of airborne chrysotile asbestos fibres, certainly much lower than the standards that were accepted in the 1960's and 70's. The cancer risks from this type of use are likely to be very low. PMID:16202137

  7. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  8. Employee leasing ... then and now.

    PubMed

    Cogdill, D M

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the case history of an employee leasing plan for the Green Clinic, beginning in 1980 and terminating in 1987. The advantages, disadvantages and effects on the Clinic's operation are noted within.

  9. Responding to the NOW Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, David

    1970-01-01

    The NOW employee (New Orientation to Work) of the 1970s will come to work in great numbers, with a high educational level, and with a values system much different than that of their parents or older colleagues. (EB)

  10. Employee Benefit Reporting After ERISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Wesley W.

    1976-01-01

    The statutory reporting requirements of ERISA and some of the regulations recently promulgated are discussed. All type of employee benefit plans are covered. For journal availability see HE 508 741. (LBH)

  11. Surface films and metallurgy related to lubrication and wear. Ph.D. Thesis - Tokyo Inst. of Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the tribological surface is identified and characterized with respect to adhesion, friction, wear, and lubricating properties. Surface analysis is used to identify the role of environmental constituents on tribological behavior. The effect of solid to solid interactions for metals in contact with metals, ceramics, semiconductors, carbons, and polymers is discussed. The data presented indicate that the tribological surface is markedly different than an ideal solid surface. The environment is shown to affect strongly the behavior of two solids in contact. Results also show that small amounts of alloying elements in base metals can alter markedly adhesion, friction, and wear by segregating to the solid surface.

  12. Surface modification of Monel K-500 as a means of reducing friction and wear in high-pressure oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunaji, Mohan; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Schoenman, Leonard; Kazaroff, John

    1989-01-01

    A study is conducted of the tribological characteristics of Monel K-500 during rubbing in a high pressure oxygen atmosphere, upon surface treatment by ion-implanted oxygen, chromium, lead, and silver, as well as electrolyzed chromium and an electroless nickel/SiC composite. The electrolyzed chromium dramatically increased total sample wear, while other surface treatments affected sample wear only moderately. Although the ion-implant treatments reduced the average coefficient of friction at low contact pressure, higher contact pressures eliminated this improvement.

  13. Influence of the sliding velocity and the applied potential on the corrosion and wear behavior of HC CoCrMo biomedical alloy in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Gil, Roberto Alonso; Muñoz, Anna Igual

    2011-11-01

    The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of an as-cast high carbon CoCrMo alloy immersed in phosphate buffered solution (PBS) and phosphate buffered solution with bovine serum albumin (PBS+BSA) have been analyzed by electrochemical techniques and surface microscopy. After the electrochemical characterization of the alloy in both solutions, the sample was studied tribo-electrochemically (by open circuit potential, OCP measurements, potentiodynamic curves and potentiostatic tests) in a ball-on-disk tribometer rotating in different sliding velocities. The influence of solution chemistry, sliding velocity and applied potential on the corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of the CoCrMo alloy has been studied. Anodic current density increases with sliding velocity but wear rate does not change at an applied anodic potential; on the other hand, BSA modifies the wear debris behavior (by agglomerating the debris formed by mechanical removal of particles) thus increasing the mechanical wear volume. Under cathodic conditions, cathodic current density also increases during mechanical contact while the wear rate decreases with sliding velocity and BSA lubricates the contact thus reducing the total wear volume with respect to the non-containing BSA solution. The work shows how the electrode potential critically affects the corrosion and tribocorrosion rates by increasing the wear coefficients at applied anodic potentials due to severe wear accelerated corrosion.

  14. Manager-employee interaction in ambulance services: an exploratory study of employee perspectives on management communication.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Managers of ambulance stations face many communicative challenges in their interaction with employees working in prehospital first-line services. The article presents an exploratory study of how paramedics experience these challenges in communication with station leaders. On the basis of a dialogue perspective in qualitative method, 24 paramedics were interviewed in one-to-one and focus group settings. Naturalistic and phenomenological approaches were used to analyze the interviews. All the paramedics said that they wished to be more involved in decision processes and that station managers should provide better explanations of information "from above." The paramedics understood that it was difficult for the managers to find time for extensive dialogue, but many thought that the managers should give more priority to communication. The paramedics' views correspond to theoretical assumptions in human resource management. According to this model, employees should be involved in decision processes on management levels, as long as it is realistically possible to do so. Furthermore, expressing emotional support and positive attitudes does not take much time, and the study suggests that many ambulance managers should focus more on interpersonal relations to employees. It has been extensively documented that management communication affects organizational performance. The study indicates that managers of ambulance stations should be more aware of how their leadership style affects professional commitment and motivation in the first-line services.

  15. Manager-employee interaction in ambulance services: an exploratory study of employee perspectives on management communication.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Managers of ambulance stations face many communicative challenges in their interaction with employees working in prehospital first-line services. The article presents an exploratory study of how paramedics experience these challenges in communication with station leaders. On the basis of a dialogue perspective in qualitative method, 24 paramedics were interviewed in one-to-one and focus group settings. Naturalistic and phenomenological approaches were used to analyze the interviews. All the paramedics said that they wished to be more involved in decision processes and that station managers should provide better explanations of information "from above." The paramedics understood that it was difficult for the managers to find time for extensive dialogue, but many thought that the managers should give more priority to communication. The paramedics' views correspond to theoretical assumptions in human resource management. According to this model, employees should be involved in decision processes on management levels, as long as it is realistically possible to do so. Furthermore, expressing emotional support and positive attitudes does not take much time, and the study suggests that many ambulance managers should focus more on interpersonal relations to employees. It has been extensively documented that management communication affects organizational performance. The study indicates that managers of ambulance stations should be more aware of how their leadership style affects professional commitment and motivation in the first-line services. PMID:25909398

  16. 46 CFR 169.825 - Wearing of safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wearing of safety belts. 169.825 Section 169.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.825 Wearing of safety belts. The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person...

  17. 46 CFR 169.825 - Wearing of safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wearing of safety belts. 169.825 Section 169.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.825 Wearing of safety belts. The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person...

  18. 46 CFR 169.825 - Wearing of safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wearing of safety belts. 169.825 Section 169.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.825 Wearing of safety belts. The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person...

  19. 46 CFR 169.825 - Wearing of safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wearing of safety belts. 169.825 Section 169.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.825 Wearing of safety belts. The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person...

  20. 46 CFR 169.825 - Wearing of safety belts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wearing of safety belts. 169.825 Section 169.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.825 Wearing of safety belts. The master of each vessel shall ensure that each person...

  1. 46 CFR 122.508 - Wearing of life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wearing of life jackets. 122.508 Section 122.508... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.508 Wearing of life jackets. (a) The master of a vessel shall require passengers to don life jackets when possible hazardous conditions exist, including, but not limited to:...

  2. 46 CFR 122.508 - Wearing of life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wearing of life jackets. 122.508 Section 122.508... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.508 Wearing of life jackets. (a) The master of a vessel shall require passengers to don life jackets when possible hazardous conditions exist, including, but not limited to:...

  3. 46 CFR 185.508 - Wearing of life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wearing of life jackets. 185.508 Section 185.508... TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.508 Wearing of life jackets. (a) The master of a vessel shall require passengers to don life jackets when possible hazardous conditions exist,...

  4. 46 CFR 185.508 - Wearing of life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wearing of life jackets. 185.508 Section 185.508... TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.508 Wearing of life jackets. (a) The master of a vessel shall require passengers to don life jackets when possible hazardous conditions exist,...

  5. Wear Behavior of Newly Developed Bainitic Wheel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-02-01

    The present work concentrates on the analysis of wear behavior of bainitic steels made by austempering from a microalloyed steel MAS2, meant for making railway wheel, and comparison with that of a conventional railway wheel steel, wheel-R19. Austempering of the MAS2 steel samples has been performed at different times and temperatures to obtain different morphologies of bainite. Linearly reciprocating dry sliding wear tests of these samples have been carried out at laboratory scale using five different loads. The wear behavior of the bainitic steels has been compared with that of the ferritic-pearlitic steel, wheel-R19. Mechanical properties of the bainitic MAS2 steels are found to be more than that of the wheel-R19 steel. Considerable enhancement in wear resistance of the bainitic steels is attributed to high hardness and strength of the steels. The wear mechanism has been critically analyzed by examining wear track morphology. The wear data gathered have been graphically presented in the form of wear mechanism map to understand the material behavior under different sliding conditions and subsequent morphological variations.

  6. Using Noncontingent Reinforcement to Increase Compliance with Wearing Prescription Prostheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richling, Sarah M.; Rapp, John T.; Carroll, Regina A.; Smith, Jeanette N.; Nystedt, Aaron; Siewert, Brook

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) on compliance with wearing foot orthotics and a hearing aid with 2 individuals. Results showed that NCR increased the participants' compliance with wearing prescription prostheses to 100% after just a few 5-min sessions, and the behavior change was maintained during lengthier sessions.…

  7. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2006-07-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a 2 times improvement of the service life.

  8. The effect of real-time aging on the oxidation and wear of highly cross-linked UHMWPE acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Wannomae, Keith K; Christensen, Steven D; Freiberg, Andrew A; Bhattacharyya, Shayan; Harris, William H; Muratoglu, Orhun Kamil

    2006-03-01

    Irradiation decreases the wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) but generates residual free radicals, precursors to long-term oxidation. Melting or annealing is used in quenching free radicals. We hypothesized that irradiated and once-annealed UHMWPE would oxidize while irradiated and melted UHMWPE would not, and that the oxidation in the former would increase wear. Acetabular liners were real-time aged by immersion in an aqueous environment that closely mimicked the temperature and oxygen concentration of synovial fluid. After 95 weeks of real-time aging, once-annealed components were oxidized; the melted components were not. The wear rate of the real-time aged irradiated and once-annealed components was higher than the literature reported values of other contemporary highly cross-linked UHMWPEs. Single annealing after irradiation used with terminal gamma sterilization may adversely affect the long-term oxidative stability of UHMWPE components.

  9. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; R. Honaker; B. K. Parekh

    2007-09-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral and coal processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a significant improvement of the service life.

  10. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2005-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, a novel surface treatment technology, laser surface engineering (LSE) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimen were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and AISI 4140 steels can be increased 10 and 25 folds, respectively by the application of LSE process. Initial field testing showed a 2 times improvement of the service life of a raw coal screen panel.

  11. Influence of Plasma Intensity on Wear and Erosion Resistance of Conventional and Nanometric WC-Co Coatings Deposited by APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonache, V.; Salvador, M. D.; García, J. C.; Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.

    2011-03-01

    The effects of plasma intensity and powder particle size on wear and erosion resistance have been evaluated for WC-12 wt.%Co coatings deposited by Air Plasma Spraying. Coatings were deposited from micrometric and nanostructured powders. SEM and XRD characterization showed the presence of WC, W2C, W, and an amorphous Co-rich matrix. The performance of the different coatings was compared in sliding wear tests (ball-on-disk), under dry friction conditions. Wear debris and tracks were analyzed by SEM. The debris generated during the test was found to have a great influence on the sliding properties. Wear follows a "three-body abrasive mechanism" and is dominated by coating spallation because of sub-surface cracking. In order to evaluate erosion behavior, solid particle erosion tests were conducted. Eroded coatings were analyzed by SEM, and erosion mainly occurs by a "cracking and chipping mechanism." The study shows that wear and erosion behavior is strongly affected by plasma arc intensity.

  12. 5 CFR 5501.111 - Awards tendered to employees of the National Institutes of Health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to the acceptance by an employee of an award pursuant to 5 CFR 2635.204(d): (1) Limitations... substantially affected by the programs, policies, or operations of any agency component or subcomponent under... employee shall accept an award under 5 CFR 2635.204(d) or this section unless the receipt thereof has...

  13. 75 FR 51369 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Department of Agriculture...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... flexibility and fairness while raising the level of decision-making visibility and accountability. Requiring... establishing supplemental standards of ethical conduct for employees of USDA (65 FR 58635-40, October 2, 2000... affiliate is affected by decisions of the particular RD office in which the RD employee serves....

  14. Person-Organization (Culture) Fit and Employee Commitment under Conditions of Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Hecht, Tracy D.; Gill, Harjinder; Toplonytsky, Laryssa

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines how person-organization fit, operationalized as congruence between perceived and preferred organizational culture, relates to employees' affective commitment and intention to stay with an organization during the early stages of a strategic organizational change. Employees in a large energy company completed surveys…

  15. 5 CFR 838.502 - Expressly dividing a refund of employee contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders.... (a) A court order directed at a refund of employee contributions is not a court order acceptable for... employee contributions as required by paragraph (a) of this section, the court order must— (1) Identify...

  16. 5 CFR 838.502 - Expressly dividing a refund of employee contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders.... (a) A court order directed at a refund of employee contributions is not a court order acceptable for... employee contributions as required by paragraph (a) of this section, the court order must— (1) Identify...

  17. 5 CFR 838.502 - Expressly dividing a refund of employee contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Requirements for Court Orders.... (a) A court order directed at a refund of employee contributions is not a court order acceptable for... employee contributions as required by paragraph (a) of this section, the court order must— (1) Identify...

  18. Effects of Nonverbal Behavior on Perceptions of a Female Employee's Power Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguinis, Herman; Henle, Christine A.

    2001-01-01

    Examines whether nonverbal behavior affects how people perceive a female employee's power base. U.S. undergraduate students read vignettes describing a female employee engaged in three types of nonverbal behavior, then rated their perception of her power base. Reports an increase in student perception of coercive power when direct eye contact was…

  19. Learned Behavior: The Key to Understanding and Preventing Employee Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mealiea, Laird W.

    1978-01-01

    Develops a conceptual model that describes how and why employees learn to resist planned change within an organizational setting. Planned change, when introduced by management, has the potential of blocking affected employees from satisfying their dominant need structures. Change strategies are developed for management to reduce employee…

  20. 29 CFR 825.800 - Special rules for airline flight crew employees, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Airline... affect the hours of service requirement for determining the eligibility of airline flight crew employees, the calculation of leave for those employees, and the recordkeeping requirements for employers......

  1. 29 CFR 825.600 - Special rules for school employees, definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Employees of... example, employees of a rural school would not be eligible for FMLA leave if the school has fewer than 50... board) within 75 miles. (c) The special rules affect the taking of intermittent leave or leave on......

  2. 29 CFR 825.600 - Special rules for school employees, definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Employees of... example, employees of a rural school would not be eligible for FMLA leave if the school has fewer than 50... board) within 75 miles. (c) The special rules affect the taking of intermittent leave or leave on......

  3. 29 CFR 825.600 - Special rules for school employees, definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Employees of... example, employees of a rural school would not be eligible for FMLA leave if the school has fewer than 50... board) within 75 miles. (c) The special rules affect the taking of intermittent leave or leave on......

  4. 29 CFR 825.800 - Special rules for airline flight crew employees, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Airline... affect the hours of service requirement for determining the eligibility of airline flight crew employees, the calculation of leave for those employees, and the recordkeeping requirements for employers......

  5. 29 CFR 825.600 - Special rules for school employees, definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Employees of... example, employees of a rural school would not be eligible for FMLA leave if the school has fewer than 50... board) within 75 miles. (c) The special rules affect the taking of intermittent leave or leave on......

  6. 29 CFR 825.600 - Special rules for school employees, definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Special Rules Applicable to Employees of... example, employees of a rural school would not be eligible for FMLA leave if the school has fewer than 50... board) within 75 miles. (c) The special rules affect the taking of intermittent leave or leave on......

  7. Employee Commitment in Context: The Nature and Implication of Commitment Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, Laura J.; Parfyonova, Natalya M.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that employee commitment can take different forms (e.g., affective, normative, and continuance), yet it is only recently that theory has been advanced to explain how these different forms combine to influence behavior (Meyer & Herscovitch, 2001). We tested this theory with data from employees in three human services…

  8. 34 CFR 84.640 - Employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 84.640 Section 84.640 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in...

  9. 29 CFR 1904.35 - Employee involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... former employee. (iii) If an employee or representative asks for access to the OSHA 300 Log, when do I... representative asks for copies of your current or stored OSHA 300 Log(s) for an establishment the employee or former employee has worked in, you must give the requester a copy of the relevant OSHA 300 Log(s) by...

  10. 28 CFR 97.12 - Employee training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee training. 97.12 Section 97.12... OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.12 Employee training. Private prisoner transport companies must require the completion of a minimum of 100 hours of employee training before an employee may transport violent...

  11. 31 CFR 20.640 - Employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 20.640 Section 20.640 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee...

  12. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers'...

  13. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers'...

  14. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers'...

  15. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers'...

  16. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers'...

  17. 10 CFR 607.640 - Employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 607.640 Section 607.640 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly...

  18. Employee Ownership Plans. Background Paper No. 34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Robert N.

    Employee ownership through employee stock ownership plans (ESOPs) was first mentioned in federal legislation in the Regional Rail Reorganization Act of 1973. Since then, at least 19 pieces of federal legislation have been enacted that deal with employee ownership in some way, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and tax…

  19. 29 CFR 94.640 - Employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employee. 94.640 Section 94.640 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 94.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the...

  20. 28 CFR 83.640 - Employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 83.640 Section 83.640 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in...

  1. 22 CFR 171.41 - Covered employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PUBLIC Ethics in Government Act Provisions § 171.41 Covered employees. (a) Officers and employees (including special Government employees as defined in 18 U.S.C. 202) whose positions are classified at grades... Director of the Office of Government Ethics to be of equal classification to GS-16; (c) Employees in...

  2. 22 CFR 171.41 - Covered employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PUBLIC Ethics in Government Act Provisions § 171.41 Covered employees. (a) Officers and employees (including special Government employees as defined in 18 U.S.C. 202) whose positions are classified at grades... Director of the Office of Government Ethics to be of equal classification to GS-16; (c) Employees in...

  3. Study of Erosive Wear Behaviour on SIC/SIC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Min-Soo

    In the field of aerospace propulsion system, erosive wear on continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibre-reinforced SiC (SiC/SiC) composites is of significant issue to achieve high energy efficiency. This paper proposes a crucial factor and a design guideline of SiC/SiC composites for higher erosion performance regarding cost effectiveness. Fabrication and evaluation of impacts and wear on SiC/SiC composites are successfully carried out. Erosive wear behaviours of the CVI and the LPS composites evidently show that the crucial fabrication factor against solid particle erosion (SPE). Erosive wear mechanisms on various SiC/SiC composites are determined based on the analysis of erosive wear behaviour. Designing guideline for the SiC/SiC composites for pursuit of high erosion performance is also proposed as focusing on the followings; volume fraction of matrix, strength of the matrix, bonding strength, and PyC interface.

  4. Sex differences in Hadza dental wear patterns : a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Berbesque, J Colette; Marlowe, Frank W; Pawn, Ian; Thompson, Peter; Johnson, Guy; Mabulla, Audax

    2012-09-01

    Among hunter-gatherers, the sharing of male and female foods is often assumed to result in virtually the same diet for males and females. Although food sharing is widespread among the hunting and gathering Hadza of Tanzania, women were observed eating significantly more tubers than men. This study investigates the relationship between patterns of dental wear, diet, and extramasticatory use of teeth among the Hadza. Casts of the upper dentitions were made from molds taken from 126 adults and scored according to the Murphy dental attrition scoring system. Females had significantly greater anterior occlusal wear than males when we controlled for age. Males exhibited greater asymmetry in wear, with greater wear on the left side in canines, first premolars, and first molars. We suggest that these sex differences in wear patterns reflect the differences seen in the diet, as well as in the use of teeth as tools.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of low cobalt wear materials for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Wilson, W.L.; Rosengarth, K.W.; Wire, G.L.

    1994-09-01

    Laboratory wear and corrosion screening tests were conducted on several commercially available, low-cobalt and cobalt-free hardsurfacing alloys to evaluate their relative wear and corrosion performance under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary heat transport circuit conditions. Wear tests were performed under reciprocating, sliding contact. Corrosion performance was evaluated in both steady state and off-normal chemistry conditions. The wear behavior of the candidate hardsurfacing alloys was generally comparable to or better than that of Stellite 6, a material of proven wear performance under PWR operating conditions. With the exception of Tristelle 5183, the iron base alloys exhibited unacceptable corrosion behavior under wet layup conditions. The Tristelle 5183 experienced minor corrosion attack in primary coolant having elevated oxygen levels. The twelve percent cobalt alloy, Tristelle TS-2, performed well but exhibited some attack after a simulated decontamination treatment.

  6. Methodology for proximal wear evaluation in posterior resin composites.

    PubMed

    Ziemiecki, T L; Wendt, S L; Leinfelder, K F

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a methodology to measure proximal wear of posterior resin composites with respect to time. A group of 10 teeth (5 premolars and 5 molars) were restored with P-30, a posterior resin composite restorative. At placement the proximal contacts were judged to be closed visually, and with unwaxed dental floss. The patients were then recalled at intervals of 6, 12, and 36 months for indirect wear evaluations. Resin composite transfer copings were made and indexed on baseline models. A zoom stereomicroscope, at 20 microns resolution, was used to determine proximal wear. For the posterior restorative material the premolar and molar teeth wore at the same rate. The amount of wear was statistically greater for premolar teeth at 6 and 12-month evaluation periods than molar teeth. At 36 months, there was no statistical difference in wear between premolar and molar teeth.

  7. The Role of Employee Reactions in Predicting Training Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, James A.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Boyce, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Reactions to training programs tend to be poor predictors of training success, yet most training programs are evaluated based solely on trainee reactions. In this study, we proposed that distinguishing between affective and cognitive employee reactions may improve the prediction of trainee learning. Our results indicated that cognitive employee…

  8. Are happy employees healthy employees? Researching the effects of employee engagement on absenteeism.

    PubMed

    Hoxsey, Dann

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, a survey was conducted to measure the levels of workplace engagement for British Columbian civil servants. Following the Heskett et al. model of the “service profit chain” (1994, 2002), the government's primary concerns were the increasing attrition rates and their effects on service delivery. Essentially, the model demonstrated that employees who were more engaged were more committed to their work and more likely to stay within the civil service and that this culminated in improved customer service. Under the joint rubrics of absenteeism and job satisfaction, this study uses a construct of engagement (i.e., job satisfaction) to test whether different levels of engagement have any effect on the amount of sick time (absenteeism) an employee incurs. Specifically, the author looks at whether there is any correlation between the amount of sick time used and an individual's level of engagement and proposes that there is an inverse negative relationship: as job engagement increases, sick time used decreases. Testing the old adage “A happy employee is a healthy employee,” this research demonstrates that, though a more engaged employee may use less sick time, the differences in use between highly engaged employees and those not engaged are fairly marginal and that correlations are further confounded by a host of other (often missing) factors. PMID:21132939

  9. Effect of ion implantation on subsequent erosion and wear behavior of solids

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The removal of material from a solid surface by mechanical forces is influenced by material properties (hardness, fracture toughness, yield strength, surface free energy) as well as system parameters (force, velocity of loading, environment). Ion implantation can modify many of the material properties either by directly affecting the deformation characteristics or indirectly by affecting the chemical or phase composition at the surface. The various forms of wear and erosion are analyzed to determine the material and system parameters which control material removal. The effects of implantation on these critical parameters are noted and examples of changes in surface topography under various test conditions are discussed. 18 figs.

  10. 49 CFR 225.12 - Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Reports alleging employee human factor as cause; Employee Human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... employee human factor as cause; Employee Human Factor Attachment; notice to employee; employee supplement..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.12 Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Reports alleging employee human factor as cause; Employee Human Factor Attachment; notice to employee; employee supplement. (a) Rail...

  11. 49 CFR 225.12 - Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Reports alleging employee human factor as cause; Employee Human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... employee human factor as cause; Employee Human Factor Attachment; notice to employee; employee supplement..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.12 Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Reports alleging employee human factor as cause; Employee Human Factor Attachment; notice to employee; employee supplement. (a) Rail...

  12. Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhao; Du, Yangge; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35–49 yrs and 50–74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35–49 and 50–74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50–74 yr group than in the 35–49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators. PMID:27583435

  13. Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhao; Du, Yangge; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Baojun; Du, Minquan; Jiang, Han

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35-49 yrs and 50-74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35-49 and 50-74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50-74 yr group than in the 35-49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators. PMID:27583435

  14. Tool wear in turning of titanium alloy after thermohydrogen treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weihua; Xu, Jiuhua; Fu, Yucan; Yang, Shubao

    2012-07-01

    The influence of hydrogen contents on the tool wear has been mainly focused on the flank wear of the common tool, and the influence of hydrogen contents on the rake crater wear (main wear type) of the tool, particularly for the fine granular material tool, has been less investigated comprehensively. In this paper, for the purpose of researching the influence of hydrogen contents on tool wear, the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V is hydrogenated at 800 °C by thermohydrogen treatment technology and the turning experiments are carried out by applying uncoated WC-Co cemented carbide tool. The three-dimensional video microscope is used to take photos and measure tool wear. The results show that both of crater wear depth ( K T) and average flank wear width ( V B) firstly decreases and then increases with the increasing of hydrogen content. The maximum reducing amplitude of K T and V B is about 50% and 55%, respectively. Under the given conditions, the optimum hydrogen content is 0.26%. It is considered that the reduction of cutting temperature is an important factor for improving tool wear after the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is properly hydrogenated. Furthermore, the reasons of hydrogen effect on the tool wear are chiefly attributed to comprehensive effect of hydrogen contents on microstructure, physical properties and dynamic mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The proposed research provides the basic data for evaluating the machinability of hydrogenation Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and promotes practical application of thermohydrogen treatment technology in titanium alloys.

  15. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  16. Optical wear assessment system for grinding tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Thomas; Pandit, Madhukar C.

    2003-04-01

    The inspection and monitoring of the wear of grinding tools is essential in order to ensure the quality of the grinding tool and the finished product. Present methods rely on dismounting the grinding tool for examination of the grinding tool surface. Often, the state of the grinding tool surface is checked indirectly by evaluating the quality of the workpiece. The application of image processing which offers an effective means for in situ inspection and monitoring is described in the paper. By using multi-directional illumination and image fusion, an image with a high degree of relevant information is generated that is then segmented using the wavelet transform (MSA) and classified to distinguish grains and cavities. Results of the application of the algorithms for a high performance grinding wheel with CBN grains embedded in a resin base are presented.

  17. Law and the Wearing of Religious Symbols: European Bans on the Wearing of Religious Symbols in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Written in accessible language, Law and the Wearing of Religious Symbols is a comprehensive analysis of a topical subject that is being widely debated across Europe. The book provides an overview of emerging case law from the European Court of Human Rights as well as from national courts and equality bodies in European countries on the wearing of…

  18. Go Naked: Diapers Affect Infant Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Whitney G.; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants' poor balance and wide stance. We show that…

  19. Wear mechanisms and improvements of wear resistance in cobalt-chromium alloy femoral components in artificial total knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Que, Like

    Wear is one of the major causes of artificial total knee arthroplasty (TKA) failure. Wear debris can cause adverse reactions to the surrounding tissue which can ultimately lead to loosening of the prosthesis. The wear behavior of UHMWPE tibial components have been studied extensively, but relatively little attention has been paid to the CoCrMo femoral component. The goal of the present study was to investigate the wear mechanisms of CoCrMo femoral components, to study the effect of CoCrMo alloy surface roughness on the wear of UHMWPE, and to determine the effect of heat treatments on the wear resistance of the CoCrMo implant alloys. The surface roughness of twenty-seven retrieved CoCrMo femoral components was analyzed. A multiple station wear testing machine and a wear fixture attached to an MTS 858 bionix system were built and used for in vitro wear studies of the CoCrMo/UHMWPE bearing couple. Solution and aging treatments were applied to the CoCrMo alloys. A white light interference surface profilometer (WLISP) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to measure the surface roughness and to study wear mechanisms of CoCrMo alloy. An optical microscope was used for alloy microstructure study. X-ray diffraction tests were performed to identify alloy phase transformation after aging. The micro-structure, hardness, and wear resistance of the alloys were studied. Surface roughness was used to quantify alloy wear, and the minimum number of surface roughness measurements required to obtain a reliable and repeatable characterization of surface roughness for a worn alloy surface was determined. The surfaces of the retrieved CoCrMo femoral components appeared to be damaged by metal particles embedded in the UHMWPE tibial component and metal-on-metal wear due to UHMWPE tibial component through-wear. Surface roughness of the femoral components was not correlated with patient age, weight, sex, or length of implantation. In vitro wear tests showed that when the Co

  20. Evaluation of hardness and wear resistance of interim restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Fathi, Mohamad Hossein; Navabi, Amir Arsalan; Savabi, Ghazal

    2013-01-01

    Background: The interim restorative materials should have certain mechanical properties to withstand in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness and wear resistance of interim restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Fifteen identical rectangular shape specimens with dimensions of 2 mm × 10 mm × 30 mm were made from 7 interim materials (TempSpan, Protemp 3 Garant, Revotek, Unifast LC, Tempron, Duralay, and Acropars). The Vickers hardness and abrasive wear of specimens were tested in dry conditions and after 1 week storage in artificial saliva. The depth of wear was measured using surface roughness inspection device. Data were subjected to Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between hardness and wear (α =0.05). Results: TempSpan had the highest hardness. The wear resistance of TempSpan (in dry condition) and Revotek (after conditioning in artificial saliva) was significantly higher (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant correlation between degree of wear and hardness of the materials (P = 0.281, r = −0.31). Conclusion: Hardness and wear resistance of interim resins are material related rather than category specified. PMID:23946734

  1. Friction and wear of nickel in sulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with elemental nickel sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid in concentrations ranging from very dilute (10 -4 N, i.e., 5 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent) acid. Load and reciprocating sliding speeds were kept constant. With the most dilute concentration (10 -4 N) no observable corrosion occurred in or outside the wear area. This was used as the base condition to determine the high contribution of corrosion to total wear loss at acid concentrations between 0.5 percent (0.1 N) and 75 percent. Corrosion reached a maximum rate of 100 millimeters per year at 30 percent acid. At the same time, general corrosion outside the wear area was very low, in agreement with published information. It is clear that friction and wear greatly accelerated corrosion in the wear area. At dilute concentrations of 0.001 and 0.01 N, corrosion in the wear area was low, and general corrosion outside was also low, but local outside regions in the direction of the wear motion experienced some enhanced corrosion, apparently due to fluid motion of the acid.

  2. Assessment of polyethylene wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Devane, P A; Horne, J G

    1999-12-01

    The three-dimensional technique is a method for the measurement of polyethylene wear in patients with total hip joint replacement. Application of image processing technology allows automation of point selection from digital images of radiographs scanned into the computer. Validation of image processing modifications reveals a three-fold increase in accuracy and a 40-fold increase in reproducibility compared with manual input of points from a digitizer during bench testing. A review of three-dimensional technique application to clinical patients gives information on the factors that influence polyethylene wear. Increasing age, activity level, femoral head size, decreasing polyethylene thickness, and insertion of total hip prostheses without cement all increase polyethylene wear. Restoration of femoral offset during total hip replacement seems to decreases polyethylene wear. No apparent difference in polyethylene wear rate could be found between two groups of patients, one group had a stainless steel-polyethylene articulation and the other had a ceramic-polyethylene articulation. Measurement of the serial polyethylene wear of individual patients reveals a high rate of femoral head penetration during the first 2 years after total hip replacement using metal-backed acetabular components inserted without cement. Interpretation of this femoral head penetration as true polyethylene wear may be erroneous, however, because creep of the polyethylene and acetabular liner movement within its metal shell cannot be measured. PMID:10611861

  3. Wear simulation strategies for reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants.

    PubMed

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A; Medley, John B

    2016-05-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a clinically accepted surgical procedure; however, its long-term wear performance is not known. The purpose of this work is to review wear simulator testing of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, to develop a wear simulator protocol for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, and to test it by performing a pilot study. The review of wear simulator testing in the literature revealed considerable variation in protocols. A combination of our own cadaveric testing and those of other research groups helped in determining the magnitude and direction of joint loading for the development of the present protocol. A MATCO orbital-bearing simulator was adapted using custom fixtures to simulate a circumduction motion of the shoulder under mildly adverse conditions, and a pilot study gave wear rates within the wide range found in the literature. Arguments were presented in support of the currently developed protocol, but it was also suggested that, rather than rely on one protocol, a series of simulator wear protocols should be developed to fully test the implant wear performance in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

  4. Steady-state wear and friction in boundary lubrication studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to obtain improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester-base and C-ether-base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a friction and wear apparatus. Conditions included loads of 1/2 and 1 kg and sliding velocities of 3.6 to 18.2 m/min in a dry air atmosphere and stepwise time intervals from 1 to 250 min for wear measurements. The wear rate results were compared with those from previous studies where a single 25 min test period was used. Satisfactory test conditions for studying friction and wear in boundary lubrication for this apparatus were found to be 1 kg load; sliding velocities of 7.1 to 9.1 m/min (50 rpm disk speed); and use of a time stepwise test procedure. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates and steady-state friction coefficients were determined under boundary conditions. Wear rates and coefficients of friction were constant following initially high values during run-in periods.

  5. Wear Analysis of Thermal Spray Coatings on 3D Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.

    2014-01-01

    Even though the application of thermal spray coatings on complex geometries gained a greater interest in the last decade, the effect of different geometrical features on the wear behavior is still ill-defined. In this study, the wear resistance of FTC-FeCSiMn coated 3D surfaces was investigated. The wear test was carried out by means of two innovative testing procedures. The first test is a Pin-on-Tubes test where the rotating motion is realized by a lathe chuck. The specimens in the second test were fixed on the table and a robot arm operated the pin. This wear test was applied on specimens with concave or convex surfaces. The residual stresses, which were determined by means of an incremental hole-drilling method, show a dependency on the substrate geometry. The obtained stresses were put in relation to the different radii. After the wear test, a 3D-profilometer determined the wear volume and the sections of the coatings were characterized by a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the wear resistance is strongly influenced by the geometry of the substrate.

  6. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  7. Wear simulation strategies for reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants.

    PubMed

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A; Medley, John B

    2016-05-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is a clinically accepted surgical procedure; however, its long-term wear performance is not known. The purpose of this work is to review wear simulator testing of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, to develop a wear simulator protocol for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, and to test it by performing a pilot study. The review of wear simulator testing in the literature revealed considerable variation in protocols. A combination of our own cadaveric testing and those of other research groups helped in determining the magnitude and direction of joint loading for the development of the present protocol. A MATCO orbital-bearing simulator was adapted using custom fixtures to simulate a circumduction motion of the shoulder under mildly adverse conditions, and a pilot study gave wear rates within the wide range found in the literature. Arguments were presented in support of the currently developed protocol, but it was also suggested that, rather than rely on one protocol, a series of simulator wear protocols should be developed to fully test the implant wear performance in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27160563

  8. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  9. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  10. The effects of novel surface treatments on the wear and fatigue properties of steel and chilled cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jason William

    Contact fatigue driven wear is a principal design concern for gear and camshaft engineering of power systems. To better understand how to engineer contact fatigue resistant surfaces, the effects of electroless nickel and hydrogenated diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings on the fatigue life at 108 cycles of SAE 52100 steel were studied using ultrasonic fatigue methods. The addition of DLC and electroless nickel coatings to SAE 52100 bearing steel had no effect on the fatigue life. Different inclusion types were found to affect the stress intensity value beyond just the inclusion size, as theorized by Murakami. The difference in stress intensity values necessary to propagate a crack for Ti (C,N) and alumina inclusions was due to the higher driving force for crack extension at the Ti (C,N) inclusions and was attributed to differences in the shape of the inclusion: rhombohedral for the Ti (C,N) versus spherical for the oxides. A correction factor was added to the Murakami equation to account for inclusion type. The wear properties of DLC coated SAE 52100 and chilled cast iron were studied using pin-on-disk tribometry and very high cycle ultrasonic tribometry. A wear model that includes sliding thermal effects as well as thermodynamics consistent with the wear mechanism for DLCs was developed based on empirical results from ultrasonic wear testing to 108 cycles. The model fit both ultrasonic and classic tribometer data for wear of DLCs. Finally, the wear properties of laser hardened steels - SAE 8620, 4140, and 52100 - were studied at high contact pressures and low numbers of cycles. A design of experiments was conducted to understand how the laser processing parameters of power, speed, and beam size, as well as carbon content of the steel, affected surface hardness. A hardness maximum was found at approximately 0.7 wt% carbon most likely resulting from increased amounts of retained austenite. The ratcheting contact fatigue model of Kapoor was found to be useful in

  11. Tooth wear in three ethnic groups in Sabah (northern Borneo).

    PubMed

    Milosevic, A; Lo, M S

    1996-12-01

    The prevalence and associated aetiologies of tooth wear were investigated in three ethnic groups in Sabah (Northern Borneo) using the Tooth Wear Index (TWI). The number of surfaces with enamel wear only, dentine exposed for less than a third or dentine exposed for more than a third were categorised into the TW minimal, moderate or severe respectively. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit medical/dental history, oral hygiene practices, satisfaction with body image, diet and other personal habits/details. The sample comprised of a self selected sample of 148 dental hospital attenders; 47 (32 per cent) each of ethnic Chinese and Malay and 54 (36 per cent) of ethnic Kadazan, matched for age and with a similar number of scoreable teeth per subject. Dentine exposure within the total sample was a common finding (95 per cent TW with moderate, 41 per cent TW severe). The Kadazan group had significantly (P < 0.05) more surfaces with severe tooth wear than the Chinese or Malay. Tobacco chewing was positively associated (rho = +0.4, P < 0.05) with both moderate and severe tooth wear, as was the habit of crushing/eating bones. Neither carbonated beverages or fresh fruit intake were associated with tooth wear, but their frequency of consumption was low. The buccal and occlusal surfaces of the posterior teeth were the most severely worn. Generally, wear was greater in the upper anterior sextant compared to the lower anterior sextant, with the exception of the lower incisal edges in the Kadazan group. Tooth wear into dentine was a common occurrence, especially among the Kadazan subjects and least among the Chinese subjects. The aetiological factors associated with this tooth wear are different to those encountered in Western cultures. PMID:9023582

  12. Employee contract issues for dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher E; Indest, George F

    2013-12-01

    Employees and employers routinely face negotiating and preparing physician employment contracts. It is important for both sides to know and understand the basic information on what a comprehensive employment contract for a dermatologist should contain. There are various employment contract provisions from both the employee's perspective and the employer's perspective that must be considered when preparing physician employment contracts. This article provides basic advice and recommendations on requirements that should be included in such contracts. It suggests legal pitfalls that can be avoided through various contract clauses.

  13. Employee contract issues for dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher E; Indest, George F

    2013-12-01

    Employees and employers routinely face negotiating and preparing physician employment contracts. It is important for both sides to know and understand the basic information on what a comprehensive employment contract for a dermatologist should contain. There are various employment contract provisions from both the employee's perspective and the employer's perspective that must be considered when preparing physician employment contracts. This article provides basic advice and recommendations on requirements that should be included in such contracts. It suggests legal pitfalls that can be avoided through various contract clauses. PMID:24800433

  14. Exploring Employee Engagement from the Employee Perspective: Implications for HRD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, M. Brad; Rocco, Tonette S.; Albornoz, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine an employee's unique experience of being engaged in their work. Design/methodology/approach: Following Yin's case study design method, researchers collected documents, conducted semi-structured interviews and recorded observations at a large multinational service corporation ranked as one of the…

  15. The limitation of hearth sidewall wear at Redcar blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Parratt, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Redcar blast furnace with 14m hearth diameter was blown-in for its second campaign in August 1996. It is currently in its 10th year of operation and to date has produced just over 30 million tonnes. Current plans are to continue the second campaign to the year 2000 and beyond, producing over 40 million tonnes. In order to achieve this objective, any further wear on the lining, and in particular the hearth sidewall, needs to be minimized. This paper describes the present hearth design, the monitoring of hearth wear, the predicted wear profile, and the protection measures that have been taken or are being considered.

  16. Relation between contact lens wear and Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ong, B L

    1996-03-01

    This study attempted to determine whether contact lens wear has any adverse effect on the Meibomian glands. The study also tried to elucidate the prevalence of Meibomian gland dysfunction in the general population. The results of the study showed that Meibomian gland dysfunction exists in 43% of the population (lens wearers and nonlens wearers), 49% of the contact lens wearing population (81 subjects), and 39% of nonlens wearers (150 subjects). No statistically significant difference was found in the prevalence of Meibomian gland dysfunction between healthy contact lens wearers and the control group of nonlens wearers. The study therefore could not prove that contact lens wear is a contributing factor to Meibomian gland dysfunction.

  17. Friction and wear behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The friction and wear rate characteristics of 50/50 (weight percent) graphite fiber polyimide composites were studied by sliding metallic hemispherically tipped riders against disks made from the composites. Two different polyimides and two different graphite fibers were evaluated. Also studied were such variables as the effect of moisture in an air atmosphere; the effect of temperature; and the effect of different sliding speeds. In general, wear to the the metallic riders was negligible, and composite wear increased at a constant rate as a function of number of sliding cycles.

  18. Physiological responses wearing MOPP-IV after atropine and pralidoxime administration in warm and cool environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kolka, M.A.; Cadarette, B.S.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of cholinolytic and oxime (2 mg atropine + 600 mg pralidoxime) therapy on temperature regulation was evaluated in 8 subjects wearing chemical warfare protective clothing (MOPP-level IV). Subjects were tested in two environments: 35 c, 60% rh and 13 C, 44% rh during very light physical activity (1-2 Met) over a six-hour period. Sweating was suppressed approximately 40% by atropine and pralidoxime, and heart rate increased approximately 30 beats/min with drug treatment. At 13 C, all eight subjects completed 350 minutes of exposure in both drug and control experiments. Rectal temperature (t sub re) averaged 38.24 C in both treatments when subjects terminated their exposure at 35 C. Mean skin temperature averaged 37.42 C for both groups at termination. The treatment of subjects with atropine and pralidoxime when wearing chemical protective clothing does not adversely affect the length of time individuals can remain in a cool environment during very light work. However, the wearing of chemical protective clothing will decrease exposure time significantly (approx. 40%) in both control and drug treated subjects in a warm environment.

  19. Wearing a Wetsuit Alters Upper Extremity Motion during Simulated Surfboard Paddling

    PubMed Central

    Nessler, J. A.; Silvas, M.; Carpenter, S.; Newcomer, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Surfers often wear wetsuits while paddling in the ocean. This neoprene covering may be beneficial to upper extremity movement by helping to improve proprioceptive acuity, or it may be detrimental by providing increased resistance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of wearing a wetsuit on muscle activation, upper extremity motion, heart rate, and oxygen consumption during simulated surfboard paddling in the laboratory. Twelve male, recreational surfers performed two paddling trials at a constant workload on a swim bench ergometer both with and without a wetsuit. Kinematic data and EMG were acquired from the right arm via motion capture, and oxygen consumption and heart rate were recorded with a metabolic cart and heart rate monitor. Wearing a wetsuit had no significant effect on oxygen consumption or heart rate. A significant increase in EMG activation was observed for the middle deltoid but not for any of the other shoulder muscle evaluated. Finally, approximate entropy and estimates of the maximum Lyapunov exponent increased significantly for vertical trajectory of the right wrist (i.e. stroke height) when a wetsuit was worn. These results suggest that a 2mm wetsuit has little effect on the energy cost of paddling at lower workloads but does affect arm motion. These changes may be the result of enhanced proprioceptive acuity due to mechanical compression from the wetsuit. PMID:26551321

  20. Effects of wearing compression garments on thermoregulation during simulated team sport activity in temperate environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence A; Dawson, Brian; Maloney, Shane K

    2009-03-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests compression garments (CGs) are being worn underneath normal playing attire during team sports. Wearing CGs as a baselayer could possibly increase heat storage, and so this field study investigated the effects of wearing CGs, comprising knee-length shorts and short-sleeved top underneath normal match-day attire (COMP), versus normal match-day attire alone (NORM) on thermoregulation during simulated team sport activity. Ten match-fit field hockey players twice performed 4x15min exercise bouts consisting of repeated cycles of intermittent, varied-intensity 20m shuttle running (Loughborough intermittent shuttle test), once in COMP and once in NORM. Testing was conducted in an indoor gymnasium (ambient conditions: approximately 17 degrees C, approximately 60% relative humidity). Participants acted as their own controls. Heart rate (HR), 15m sprint time, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), blood lactate concentration, sweat rate and body core temperature (T(core)) were similar between trials (p>0.05). Mean skin temperature (T(skin)) was significantly higher in COMP than NORM (p<0.05). Overall, CGs worn as a baselayer during simulated team sport exercise in temperate ambient conditions had no thermoregulatory benefits nor any detrimental effects on T(core), physiological performance or dehydration. However, the higher T(skin) may affect individual preference for wearing CGs as an undergarment during team sports.

  1. Employee experience of structural change in two Norwegian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Roald, J; Edgren, L

    2001-01-01

    Advances in medical and technological procedures, together with changes in demography, demand structural changes in the Nordic health care systems. Few studies have focused on employee perceptions of these structural changes. This study aims to describe employee reactions following a merger between two Norwegian hospitals. A Grounded theory approach has been used in this study. The theoretical model is based on empirical data collected from employees directly affected by the structural change process. Employee resistance was found to be the core category. Three categories were found in relation to this core category; goal uncertainty, organizational culture and individual insecurity. Different perceptions and interpretations of vaguely formulated goals lead to employee resistance. The difference between the organizational cultures in the two hospitals impeded the merger according to the project plan, and very few positive results could be seen. Individual insecurity regarding the future was experienced in connection with the implementation of structural change. The authors propose a strategy to counteract resistance in similar mergers. PMID:11771150

  2. Employee Associations and Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLorenzo, Andrea

    This report reviews the opinions of the National Education Association (NEA) and the approaches taken by and concerns of employee associations that are state affiliates of the NEA. The NEA supports the concept of charters if appropriate standards are upheld and appropriate practices are enforced. The energy and enthusiasm being brought to the…

  3. SEA - A Simplified Employee Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, L

    2001-04-23

    This paper presents a proposal for modifying the current employee annual evaluation process in SCAD. It purports to simplify that process, primarily by breaking up the resultant document into a set of more or less independent components. It claims to reduce the overall time and effort required from each actor.

  4. Good Endings: Managing Employee Terminations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnie, Robert A., Jr.; Sniffin, Paul B.

    A guide to managing employee terminations and resulting changes is presented for administrators. Three reasons for termination that are legitimate, nondiscriminatory, and acceptable in today's marketplace and courts are: cause (serious misconduct, dishonesty, unethical, or dangerous behavior); job elimination (reduction in force, economic…

  5. Employee Development in Student Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan Holtzer

    A survey was undertaken of staff in Student Affairs of the University of California at Davis in December 1979. Data gathered in that survey and relating to professional development activities of the staff are presented. The objective is to provide information on development opportunities for those employees, staff participation in them, and need…

  6. Empowerment managers promote employee growth.

    PubMed

    Boyadjis, G

    1990-03-01

    Organizations that encourage individual abilities and hold employees accountable for achieving goals are more likely to succeed. Groups that take an empowerment approach to management prefer action in place of further study; decisions made by subordinates rather than managers; personal responsibility instead of strict rules; and specific rewards for achievement, not broad gestures of thanks.

  7. Managing Employees through Progressive Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Ronald F.

    1981-01-01

    The process of "progressive discipline" is one method of improving employee performance by documenting areas needing improvement. Each disciplinary case must be dealt with as though the administrator would be asked to argue it before an arbitrator or a court of law. (Author/MLF)

  8. Employee and independent contractor relationships.

    PubMed

    Wren, K R; Wren, T L; Monti, E J; Turco, S J

    1999-05-01

    Most practitioners find themselves at a disadvantage in dealing with business issues and relationships. As health care continues to change, knowledge of contracts and business relationships will help CRNA practitioners navigate new as well as traditional practice settings. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of two business relationships: employee and independent contractor. PMID:10504911

  9. Applying Employee Involvement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Susan Albers; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of employee-involvement approaches to the management of schools is explored, describing three approaches (parallel-suggestion involvement, job involvement, and high involvement). Design issues (technology; organizational structure; leadership; organizational boundaries, customer definition, and relation to stakeholder; measures;…

  10. NASA grievance system: Employee handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This revised handbook updates the minimum provisions of the agency-wide Grievance System and applies to NASA Headquarters and field installations. All grievances initiated on or after June 15, 1981, will be processed under these provisions. NASA recognizes and endorses the importance of bringing to light and adjusting grievances promptly and of treating all employees reasonably and fairly. Achieving these objectives requires great competence, mature judgment, and true willingness to reach a satisfactory solution. Provisions of the NASA Grievance System are directed to this purpose. Grievances and misunderstandings can arise in almost any working situation. It follows then that an employee's initiation of a grievance in good faith should not cast any reflection on the employee's standing with his or her supervisor or loyalty and importance to the organization. At the same time, the initiation of a grievance should not automatically be considered as a reflection on the employee's supervisor or on the general management of the activity. This handbook should be used in conjunction with Office of Personnel Management regulations in 5 CFR Part 771 and Chapter 771 of the Federal Personnel Manual. Installations may issue implementing instructions, e.g. specifying when fact-finding is required or when an unresolved grievance must be referred to a higher level of authority.

  11. Organizational Silence in Sports Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastug, Gulsum; Pala, Adem; Yilmaz, Taner; Duyan, Mehdi; Gunel, Ilker

    2016-01-01

    Organizational silence can be defined as a way of behaviour belonging to men and women employees in the organization exhibited without reflecting their feelings, ideas, concerns and suggestions related with their workplaces, works for which they are responsible or other activities of the organization. In the period of organizational silence,…

  12. THE CASE FOR EMPLOYEE EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUBOIS, EDWARD A.C.

    BUSINESS HAS A MORAL RESPONSIBILITY TO PROVIDE EDUCATION FOR ITS EMPLOYEES SINCE IT PROFITS FROM THE FACT THAT AMERICA HAS BECOME AN EDUCATION STATE, WITH THE INCREASED EDUCATION OF THE LABOR FORCE ACCOUNTING FOR 23 PERCENT OF ECONOMIC GROWTH BETWEEN 1929 AND 1957, AND SINCE BUSINESS ITSELF HAS CONTRIBUTED TO THE CRISIS IN EDUCATION BY INSISTING…

  13. Energy and wear optimisation of train longitudinal dynamics and of traction and braking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, R.; Galardi, E.; Meli, E.; Nocciolini, D.; Pugi, L.; Rindi, A.

    2015-05-01

    Traction and braking systems deeply affect longitudinal train dynamics, especially when an extensive blending phase among different pneumatic, electric and magnetic devices is required. The energy and wear optimisation of longitudinal vehicle dynamics has a crucial economic impact and involves several engineering problems such as wear of braking friction components, energy efficiency, thermal load on components, level of safety under degraded or adhesion conditions (often constrained by the current regulation in force on signalling or other safety-related subsystem). In fact, the application of energy storage systems can lead to an efficiency improvement of at least 10% while, as regards the wear reduction, the improvement due to distributed traction systems and to optimised traction devices can be quantified in about 50%. In this work, an innovative integrated procedure is proposed by the authors to optimise longitudinal train dynamics and traction and braking manoeuvres in terms of both energy and wear. The new approach has been applied to existing test cases and validated with experimental data provided by Breda and, for some components and their homologation process, the results of experimental activities derive from cooperation performed with relevant industrial partners such as Trenitalia and Italcertifer. In particular, simulation results are referred to the simulation tests performed on a high-speed train (Ansaldo Breda Emu V250) and on a tram (Ansaldo Breda Sirio Tram). The proposed approach is based on a modular simulation platform in which the sub-models corresponding to different subsystems can be easily customised, depending on the considered application, on the availability of technical data and on the homologation process of different components.

  14. Meibomian therapy in problematic contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Paugh, J R; Knapp, L L; Martinson, J R; Hom, M M

    1990-11-01

    Utilizing the principal diagnostic criterion of an absent or cloudy Meibomian gland secretion upon repeated expression, patients with Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) were selected to participate in a study of the efficacy of lid scrubs and massage in the treatment of MGD. Twenty-one patients with contact lens intolerance unrelated to lens, care system, or health factors were randomly assigned to treatment of one eye with common clinical therapy for MGD. After 2 weeks of treatment, gland expression, biomicroscopy, staining, comfort, and fluorescein breakup time were assessed in a masked manner. Analyzed using a paired-data t-test, the results indicated a significant increase in mean tear film breakup time (BUT) in the treated eye at follow-up compared to baseline (mean increase = 4.0 s, p = 0.0001). The control eye demonstrated no significant change (mean increase = 0.2 s, p = 0.5955). These objective results were corroborated by reports of improved subjective comfort with contact lens wear after therapy.

  15. Automated visual inspection of brake shoe wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shengfang; Liu, Zhen; Nan, Guo; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid development of high-speed railway, the automated fault inspection is necessary to ensure train's operation safety. Visual technology is paid more attention in trouble detection and maintenance. For a linear CCD camera, Image alignment is the first step in fault detection. To increase the speed of image processing, an improved scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method is presented. The image is divided into multiple levels of different resolution. Then, we do not stop to extract the feature from the lowest resolution to the highest level until we get sufficient SIFT key points. At that level, the image is registered and aligned quickly. In the stage of inspection, we devote our efforts to finding the trouble of brake shoe, which is one of the key components in brake system on electrical multiple units train (EMU). Its pre-warning on wear limitation is very important in fault detection. In this paper, we propose an automatic inspection approach to detect the fault of brake shoe. Firstly, we use multi-resolution pyramid template matching technology to fast locate the brake shoe. Then, we employ Hough transform to detect the circles of bolts in brake region. Due to the rigid characteristic of structure, we can identify whether the brake shoe has a fault. The experiments demonstrate that the way we propose has a good performance, and can meet the need of practical applications.

  16. Wear Calculation for Sliding Friction Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springis, G.; Rudzitis, J.; Avisane, A.; Leitans, A.

    2014-04-01

    One of the principal objectives of modern production process is the improvement of quality level; this means also guaranteeing the required service life of different products and increase in their wear resistance. To perform this task, prediction of service life of fitted components is of crucial value, since with the development of production technologies and measuring devices it is possible to determine with ever increasing precision the data to be used also in analytical calculations. Having studied the prediction theories of wear process that have been developed in the course of time and can be classified into definite groups one can state that each of them has shortcomings that might strongly impair the results thus making unnecessary theoretical calculations. The proposed model for wear calculation is based on the application of theories from several branches of science to the description of 3D surface micro-topography, assessing the material's physical and mechanical characteristics, substantiating the regularities in creation of the material particles separated during the wear process and taking into consideration definite service conditions of fittings. ums Mūsdienu ražošanas procesa viens no pamatmērķiem ir produkcijas kvalitātes līmeņa paaugstināšana, tas nozīmē arī dažādu izstrādājumu nepieciešamā kalpošanas laika nodrošināšanu un nodilumizturības palielināšanu. Svarīga loma šī uzdevuma sasniegšanā ir salāgojamo detaļu kalpošanas laika prognozēšanai, kas ir ļoti aktuāls jautājums, jo attīstoties dažādām ražošanas, kā arī mēriekārtu tehnoloģijām, kļūst iespējams arvien precīzāk noteikt nepieciešamos datus, kuri vēlāk tiek izmantoti arī analītiskajos aprēķinos. Apskatot laika gaitā izstrādātās dilšanas procesa prognozēšanas teorijas, kuras var klasificēt, apkopojot tās noteiktās grupās, ņemot par pamatu līdzīgas teorētiskās pieejas, jāsaka, ka katrai no tām piemīt da

  17. Adverse events in allergy sufferers wearing contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Urgacz, Agnieszka; Mrukwa, Ewa; Gawlik, Radoslaw

    2015-06-01

    Allergy is the fifth leading chronic condition in industrialized countries among all ages, and the third most common chronic disease among children under 18 years old. Many of allergic patients also have problems with vision and want to improve their quality of life by wearing contact lenses. They are most frequently young and active individuals, for whom contact lenses provide greater convenience and more satisfying vision correction than spectacles. However, application of high quality and immunologically neutral products do not protect from allergic side reactions. Nowadays, eye-related allergy and contact lens wear concern larger and larger populations worldwide. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on ocular complications associated with wearing contact lenses. The article presents indications for allergic patients especially on the care system and wear schedule.

  18. Surgery to improve contact lens wear in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moodaley, L; Buckley, R J; Woodward, E G

    1991-04-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone that gives rise to contact lens related abrasions. These nebulae do not flatten when contact lens wear is discontinued. We describe a simple technique of superficial keratectomy to remove proud nebulae in which the resulting defect healed quickly under a therapeutic hydrogel lens. In all of the six cases described patients were able to resume contact lens wear within one month of the procedure. One case was lost to follow-up. Of the remaining five (follow-up 3-9 months), all achieved comfortable wearing times of 8 hours or more and visual acuities of 20/40 or better. One patient developed a recurrent epithelial defect that resolved on discontinuing lens wear for one week. Corneal transplantation was thus avoided. PMID:2049822

  19. Wear and Friction Behavior of Metal Impregnated Microporous Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goller, Gultekin; Koty, D. P.; Tewari, S. N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-01-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  20. Friction and Wear Behavior of Selected Dental Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongee; Pekkan, Gurel; Ozturk, Abdullah

    The purpose of this study was to determine the friction coefficients and wear rates of six commercially available dental ceramics including IPS Empress 2 (E2), Cergo Pressable Ceramic (CPC), Cercon Ceram (CCS) and Super porcelain EX-3 (SPE). Bovine enamel (BE) was also tested as a reference material for comparison purposes. Samples of the dental ceramics were prepared according to the instructions described by the manufacturers in disk-shape with nominal dimensions of 12 mm × 2 mm. The wear tests were performed by means of a pin-on-disk type tribometer. The friction coefficients and specific wear rates of the materials were determined at a load of 10 N and rotating speed of 0.25 cm/s without lubrication. Surface morphology of the wear tracks was examined using a scanning electron microscope. Statistical analyses were made using one-way ANOVA and Turkey's HSD (P < 0.05).