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Sample records for affected sib pairs

  1. Genetics of NIDDM in France: studies with 19 candidate genes in affected sib pairs.

    PubMed

    Vionnet, N; Hani, E H; Lesage, S; Philippi, A; Hager, J; Varret, M; Stoffel, M; Tanizawa, Y; Chiu, K C; Glaser, B; Permutt, M A; Passa, P; Demenais, F; Froguel, P

    1997-06-01

    As part of an ongoing search for susceptibility loci for NIDDM, we tested 19 genes whose products are implicated in insulin secretion or action for linkage with NIDDM. Loci included the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels expressed in beta-cells (KCNJ3 and KCNJ7), glucagon (GCG), glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), glucagon-like peptide I receptor (GLP1R), LIM/homeodomain islet-1 (ISL1), caudal-type homeodomain 3 (CDX3), proprotein convertase 2 (PCSK2), cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR), hexokinase 1 (HK1), hexokinase 2 (HK2), mitochondrial FAD-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2), liver and muscle forms of pyruvate kinase (PKL, PKM), fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), hepatic phosphofructokinase (PFKL), protein serine/threonine phosphatase 1 beta (PPP1CB), and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Additionally, we tested the histidine-rich calcium locus (HRC) on chromosome 19q. All regions were tested for linkage with microsatellite markers in 751 individuals from 172 families with at least two patients with overt NIDDM (according to World Health Organization criteria) in the sibship, using nonparametric methods. These 172 families comprise 352 possible affected sib pairs with overt NIDDM or 621 possible affected sib pairs defined as having a fasting plasma glucose value of >6.1 mmol/l or a glucose value of >7.8 mmol/l 2 h after oral glucose load. No evidence for linkage was found with any of the 19 candidate genes and NIDDM in our population by nonparametric methods, suggesting that those genes are not major contributors to the pathogenesis of NIDDM. However, some evidence for suggestive linkage was found between a more severe form of NIDDM, defined as overt NIDDM diagnosed before 45 years of age, and the CCKBR locus (11p15.4; P = 0.004). Analyses of six additional markers spanning 27 cM on chromosome 11p confirmed the suggestive linkage in this region. Whether an NIDDM susceptibility gene lies on chromosome 11p in our population

  2. Affected-sib-pair analyses reveal support of prior evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder, on 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Badner, J.A.; Goldin, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    In 22 multiplex pedigrees screened for linkage to bipolar disorder, by use of 18 markers on chromosome 21q, single-locus affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis detected a high proportion (57%-62%) of alleles shared identical by descent (IBD), with P values of .049-.0008 on nine marker loci. Multilocus ASP analyses revealed locus trios in the distal region between D21S270 and D21S171, with excess allele sharing (nominal P values <.01) under two affection-status models, ASM I (bipolars and schizoaffectives) and ASM II (ASM I plus recurrent unipolars). In addition, under ASM I, the proximal interval spanned by D21S1436 and D21S65 showed locus trios with excess allele sharing (nominal P values of .03-.0003). These findings support prior evidence that a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is on 21q. 38 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Power of sib-pair and sib-trio linkage analysis with assortative mating and multiple disease loci

    SciTech Connect

    Sribney, W.M.; Swift, M. )

    1992-10-01

    Sib-pair linkage analysis has been proposed for identifying genes that predispose to common diseases. The authors have shown that the presence of assortative mating and multiple disease-susceptibility loci (genetic heterogeneity) can increase the required sample size for affected-affected sib pairs several fold over the sample size required under random mating. They propose a new test statistic based on sib trios composed of either one unaffected and two affected siblings or one affected and two unaffected siblings. The sample-size requirements under assortative mating and multiple disease loci for these sib-trio statistics are much smaller, under most conditions, than the corresponding sample sizes for sib pairs. Study designs based on data from sib trios with one or two affected members are recommended whenever assortative mating and genetic heterogeneity are suspected. 31 refs.

  4. A test statistic for the affected-sib-set method.

    PubMed

    Lange, K

    1986-07-01

    This paper discusses generalizations of the affected-sib-pair method. First, the requirement that sib identity-by-descent relations be known unambiguously is relaxed by substituting sib identity-by-state relations. This permits affected sibs to be used even when their parents are unavailable for typing. In the limit of an infinite number of marker alleles each of infinitesimal population frequency, the identity-by-state relations coincide with the usual identity-by-descent relations. Second, a weighted pairs test statistic is proposed that covers affected sib sets of size greater than two. These generalizations make the affected-sib-pair method a more powerful technique for detecting departures from independent segregation of disease and marker phenotypes. A sample calculation suggests such a departure for tuberculoid leprosy and the HLA D locus.

  5. A Novel Framework for Sib Pair Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poznik, G. David; Adamska, Katarzyna; Xu, Xin; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Rogus, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Sib pair linkage analysis of a dichotomous trait is a popular method for narrowing the search for genes that influence complex diseases. Although the pedigree structures are uncomplicated and the underlying genetic principles straightforward, a surprising degree of complexity is involved in implementing a sib pair study and interpreting the results. Ascertainment may be based on affected, discordant, or unaffected sib pairs, as well as on pairs defined by threshold values for quantitative traits, such as extreme discordant sib pairs. To optimize power, various domain restrictions and null hypotheses have been proposed for each of these designs, yielding a wide array of choices for the analyst. To begin, we systematically classify the major sources of discretion in sib pair linkage analysis. Then, we extend the work of Kruglyak and Lander (1995), to bring the various forms into a unified framework and to facilitate a more general approach to the analysis. Finally, we describe a new, freely available computer program, Splat (Sib Pair Linkage Analysis Testing), that can perform any sib pair statistical test currently in use, as well as any user-defined test yet to be proposed. Splat uses the expectation maximization algorithm to calculate maximum-likelihood estimates of sharing (subject to user-specified conditions) and then plots LOD scores versus chromosomal position. It includes a novel grid-scanning capability that enables simultaneous visualization of multiple test statistics. This can lead to further insight into the genetic basis of the disease process under consideration. In addition, phenotype definitions can be modified without the recalculation of inheritance vectors, thereby providing considerable flexibility for exploratory analysis. The application of Splat will be illustrated with data from studies on the genetics of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:16358216

  6. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D.

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Nonpaternity in linkage studies of extremely discordant sib pairs.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2002-02-01

    An approach commonly used to increase statistical power in linkage studies is the study of extremely discordant sibling pairs. This design is powerful under both additive and dominant-gene models and across a wide range of allele frequencies. A practical problem with the design is that extremely discordant pairs that are ostensibly full sibs may be half sibs. Although estimates vary, the population rates of such nonpaternity may be as high as 5%-10%. The proportion in discordant pairs may be much higher. The present article explores this potential inflation as a function of the resemblance of sib pairs and the criteria for discordance used for selection.

  8. Identification of susceptibility loci for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a two stage genome scan of affected sib-pairs.

    PubMed

    Prescott, N J; Lees, M M; Winter, R M; Malcolm, S

    2000-03-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a complex disorder of multigenic origin involving between two and ten loci. Linkage and association studies of CL/P have implicated a number of candidate genes and regions but have often proved difficult to replicate. Here, we report the findings from a two-stage genome-wide scan of 92 affected sib-pairs to identify susceptibility loci to CL/P. An initial set of 400 microsatellite markers was used, with an average spacing of 10 cM throughout the genome. Eleven regions on eight chromosomes were found to have a P-value smaller than 0.05. These eight chromosomes were then further mapped with a second set of markers to increase the average map density to 5 cM. In seven out of eleven areas densely mapped, significance was markedly increased by decreasing the marker interval. Excessive allele sharing was found at 1p (NPL=2.35, P=0.009, MLS=1.51), 2p (NPL=1.77, P= 0.04, MLS=0.66), 6p (NPL=2.35, P=0.009, MLS=1.34), 8q (NPL=2.15, P=0.015, MLS= 1.51) 11 cen (NPL=2.70, P=0.003, MLS=2.10), 12q (NPL=2.08, P=0.02, MLS= 1.5), 16p (NPL=2.1, P=0.018, MLS=0.97) and Xcen-q (NPL=2.40, P=0.008, MLS=2.68). Although none reached the level required for significant susceptibility loci, two of these areas have previously been implicated in CL/P, viz. 2p13, an area harbouring the TGFA gene, and 6p23-24. We also demonstrate highly suggestive linkage to a susceptibility locus for nonsyndromic clefting on the X chromosome. Further studies are currently underway to replicate these findings in a larger cohort of affected sib-pairs.

  9. Two-Locus Heterogeneity Cannot Be Distinguished from Two-Locus Epistasis on the Basis of Affected-Sib-Pair Data

    PubMed Central

    Vieland, Veronica J.; Huang, Jian

    2003-01-01

    The observation of multiple linkage signals in the course of conducting genome screens for complex disorders raises the question of whether distinct genes represent independent causes of disease (heterogeneity) or whether they interact to produce the phenotype of interest (epistasis); and there has been a corresponding interest in statistical methods for detecting and/or exploiting the distinction between these two possibilities. At the same time, researchers are increasingly relying on affected-sib-pair (ASP) data. Here, we demonstrate an apparently unrecognized fact about two-locus (2L) models and ASP data, namely, 2L heterogeneity and 2L epistasis cannot, in general, be distinguished from one another on the basis of ASP marker data, as a matter of mathematical principle and therefore regardless of sample size. By the same token, correlations across ASPs in single-locus LOD scores or other measures also cannot be used to distinguish 2L heterogeneity from 2L epistasis. This raises questions about the measurement of gene-gene interactions in terms of patterns of correlation in marker data. Portions of our results carry over to larger pedigree structures as well, as long as only affected individuals are included in analyses; the extent to which our overall findings apply to general pedigrees (including unaffected individuals) remains to be investigated. PMID:12830401

  10. A genome-wide linkage analysis for the personality trait neuroticism in the Irish affected sib-pair study of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Neale, Michael C; Riley, Brien P; Patterson, Diana G; Walsh, Dermot; Prescott, Carol A; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2007-06-05

    Neuroticism is a personality trait which reflects individual differences in emotional stability and vulnerability to stress and anxiety. Consistent evidence shows substantial genetic influences on variation in this trait. The present study seeks to identify regions containing susceptibility loci for neuroticism using a selected sib-pair sample from Ireland. Using Merlin regress, we conducted a 4 cM whole-genome linkage analysis on 714 sib-pairs. Evidence for linkage to neuroticism was found on chromosomes 11p, 12q, and 15q. The highest linkage peak was on 12q at marker D12S1638 with a Lod score of 2.13 (-log p = 2.76, empirical P-value <0.001). Our data also support gender specific loci for neuroticism, with male specific linkage regions on chromosomes 1, 4, 11, 12, 15, 16, and 22, and female specific linkage regions on chromosomes 2, 4, 9, 12, 13, and 18. Some genome regions reported in the present study replicate findings from previous linkage studies of neuroticism. These results, together with prior studies, indicate several potential regions for quantitative trait loci for neuroticism that warrant further study.

  11. Consanguinity and the sib-pair method: An approach using identity by descent between and within individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpoux, F.

    1996-11-01

    To test for linkage between a trait and a marker, one can consider identical marker alleles in related individuals, for instance, sibs. For recessive diseases, it has been shown that some information may be gained from the identity by descent (IBD) of the two alleles of an affected inbred individual at the marker locus. The aim of this paper is to extend the sib-pair method of linkage analysis to the situation of sib pairs sampled from consanguineous populations. This extension takes maximum advantage of the information provided by both the IBD pattern between sibs and allelic identity within each sib of the pair. This is possible through the use of the condensed identity coefficients. Here, we propose a new test of linkage based on a {Chi}{sup 2}. We compare the performance of this test with that of the classical {Chi}{sup 2} test based on the distribution of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD. For sib pairs from first-cousin matings, the proposed test can better detect the role of a disease-susceptibility (DS) locus. Its power is shown to be greater than that of the classical test, especially for models where the DS allele may be common and incompletely penetrant; that is to say for situations that may be encountered in multifactorial diseases. A study of the impact of inbreeding on the expected proportions of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD is also performed here. Ignoring inbreeding, when in fact inbreeding exists, increases the rate of type I errors in tests of linkage. 21 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. A sib-pair approach to interval mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed Central

    Fulker, D. W.; Cardon, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    An interval mapping procedure based on the sib-pair method of Haseman and Elston is developed, and simulation studies are carried out to explore its properties. The procedure is analogous to other interval mapping procedures used with experimental material, such as plants and animals, and yields very similar results in terms of the location and effect size of a quantitative trait locus (QTL). The procedure offers an advantage over the conventional Haseman and Elston approach, in terms of power, and provides useful information concerning the location of a QTL. Because of its simplicity, the method readily lends itself to the analysis of selected samples for increased power and the evaluation of multilocus models of complex phenotypes. PMID:8198132

  13. Multivariate sib-pair linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes by three step-wise analysis approaches

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zheng; Li, Xia; Rao, Shaoqi; Moser, Kathy L; Zhang, Tianwen; Gong, Binsheng; Shen, Gongqing; Li, Lin; Cannata, Ruth; Zirzow, Erich; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing

    2003-01-01

    Background Current statistical methods for sib-pair linkage analysis of complex diseases include linear models, generalized linear models, and novel data mining techniques. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the utility and properties of a novel pattern recognition technique (step-wise discriminant analysis) using the chromosome 10 linkage data from the Framingham Heart Study and by comparing it with step-wise logistic regression and linear regression. Results The three step-wise approaches were compared in terms of statistical significance and gene localization. Step-wise discriminant linkage analysis approach performed best; next was step-wise logistic regression; and step-wise linear regression was the least efficient because it ignored the categorical nature of disease phenotypes. Nevertheless, all three methods successfully identified the previously reported chromosomal region linked to human hypertension, marker GATA64A09. We also explored the possibility of using the discriminant analysis to detect gene × gene and gene × environment interactions. There was evidence to suggest the existence of gene × environment interactions between markers GATA64A09 or GATA115E01 and hypertension treatment and gene × gene interactions between markers GATA64A09 and GATA115E01. Finally, we answered the theoretical question "Is a trichotomous phenotype more efficient than a binary?" Unlike logistic regression, discriminant sib-pair linkage analysis might have more power to detect linkage to a binary phenotype than a trichotomous one. Conclusion We confirmed our previous speculation that step-wise discriminant analysis is useful for genetic mapping of complex diseases. This analysis also supported the possibility of the pattern recognition technique for investigating gene × gene or gene × environment interactions. PMID:14975136

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Lymphoblasts from Autistic and Nonaffected Sib Pairs: Altered Pathways in Neuronal Development and Steroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Valerie W.; Nguyen, AnhThu; Kim, Kyung Soon; Steinberg, Mara E.; Sarachana, Tewarit; Scully, Michele A.; Soldin, Steven J.; Luu, Truong; Lee, Norman H.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the identification of numerous autism susceptibility genes, the pathobiology of autism remains unknown. The present “case-control” study takes a global approach to understanding the molecular basis of autism spectrum disorders based upon large-scale gene expression profiling. DNA microarray analyses were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines from over 20 sib pairs in which one sibling had a diagnosis of autism and the other was not affected in order to identify biochemical and signaling pathways which are differentially regulated in cells from autistic and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics and gene ontological analyses of the data implicate genes which are involved in nervous system development, inflammation, and cytoskeletal organization, in addition to genes which may be relevant to gastrointestinal or other physiological symptoms often associated with autism. Moreover, the data further suggests that these processes may be modulated by cholesterol/steroid metabolism, especially at the level of androgenic hormones. Elevation of male hormones, in turn, has been suggested as a possible factor influencing susceptibility to autism, which affects ∼4 times as many males as females. Preliminary metabolic profiling of steroid hormones in lymphoblastoid cell lines from several pairs of siblings reveals higher levels of testosterone in the autistic sibling, which is consistent with the increased expression of two genes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Global gene expression profiling of cultured cells from ASD probands thus serves as a window to underlying metabolic and signaling deficits that may be relevant to the pathobiology of autism. PMID:19492049

  15. Gene expression profiling of lymphoblasts from autistic and nonaffected sib pairs: altered pathways in neuronal development and steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Valerie W; Nguyen, AnhThu; Kim, Kyung Soon; Steinberg, Mara E; Sarachana, Tewarit; Scully, Michele A; Soldin, Steven J; Luu, Truong; Lee, Norman H

    2009-06-03

    Despite the identification of numerous autism susceptibility genes, the pathobiology of autism remains unknown. The present "case-control" study takes a global approach to understanding the molecular basis of autism spectrum disorders based upon large-scale gene expression profiling. DNA microarray analyses were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines from over 20 sib pairs in which one sibling had a diagnosis of autism and the other was not affected in order to identify biochemical and signaling pathways which are differentially regulated in cells from autistic and nonautistic siblings. Bioinformatics and gene ontological analyses of the data implicate genes which are involved in nervous system development, inflammation, and cytoskeletal organization, in addition to genes which may be relevant to gastrointestinal or other physiological symptoms often associated with autism. Moreover, the data further suggests that these processes may be modulated by cholesterol/steroid metabolism, especially at the level of androgenic hormones. Elevation of male hormones, in turn, has been suggested as a possible factor influencing susceptibility to autism, which affects approximately 4 times as many males as females. Preliminary metabolic profiling of steroid hormones in lymphoblastoid cell lines from several pairs of siblings reveals higher levels of testosterone in the autistic sibling, which is consistent with the increased expression of two genes involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Global gene expression profiling of cultured cells from ASD probands thus serves as a window to underlying metabolic and signaling deficits that may be relevant to the pathobiology of autism.

  16. Path analytic, sib-pair linkage and co-twin control studies of asthma and atopy

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, D.L.; Healey, S.C.; Martin, N.G.

    1994-09-01

    Asthma and atopy are complex traits with multifactorial determinants, and require appropriate choice of phenotypes and analyses, including a linkage analysis of the putative 11q atopy locus. Participants in a large registry-based twin study of asthma were invited to take part in clinical testing. A total of 863 individuals including 419 complete twin pairs (where one or both members reported a history of wheeze) underwent histamine inhalation challenge, allergen skin prick testing, and venesection. Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and bronchial responsiveness (BR) to histamine were highest in those who had wheezed most recently, and whose skin tests demonstrated allergy to house dust mite, cockroach, and rye grass. In ascertainment-corrected path analyses (FISHER), the heritability of IgE and BR were both 60%. Monozygotic (MZ) co-twin control analyses suggested house dust mite sensitization was the single strongest environmentally controlled risk factor for wheeze, while path analyses suggested genetic determination. In dizygotic (DZ) co-twin control analyses, sensitization to grasses was also an important predictor, suggesting pollinosis to be genetically correlated with wheezing, rather than causative. Multivariate path analyses suggested separate (correlated) genetic factors for BR, IgE, and allergy to house dust mite. A sib-pair (Haseman-Elston) linkage analysis of 220 DZ twin pairs did not support linkage to the high-affinity IgE receptor beta-subunit gene on 11q13 of atopy or BR. More recent linkage analyses that include parental genotyping will also be discussed. We conclude that the atopic phenotype consists of a number of traits with specific genetic allergens. Exposure to particular allergens can then cause specific outcomes, such as asthma.

  17. A large sample of finnish diabetic sib-pairs reveals no evidence for a non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus susceptibility locus at 2qter.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Hauser, E R; Magnuson, V L; Valle, T; Ally, D S; Karanjawala, Z E; Rayman, J B; Knapp, J I; Musick, A; Tannenbaum, J; Te, C; Eldridge, W; Shapiro, S; Musick, T; Martin, C; So, A; Witt, A; Harvan, J B; Watanabe, R M; Hagopian, W; Eriksson, J; Nylund, S J; Kohtamaki, K; Tuomilehto-Wolf, E; Boehnke, M

    1998-01-01

    In the first reported positive result from a genome scan for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), Hanis et al. found significant evidence of linkage for NIDDM on chromosome 2q37 and named the putative disease locus NIDDM1 (Hanis et al. 1996. Nat. Genet. 13:161-166). Their total sample was comprised of 440 Mexican-American affected sib-pairs from 246 sibships. The strongest evidence for linkage was at marker D2S125 and best estimates of lambdas (risk to siblings of probands/population prevalence) using this marker were 1.37 under an additive model and 1.36 under a multiplicative model. We examined this chromosomal region using linkage analysis in a Finnish sample comprised of 709 affected sib-pairs from 472 sibships. We excluded this region in our sample (multipoint logarithm of odds score /= 1.37. We discuss possible reasons why linkage to 2q37 was not found and conclude that this region is unlikely to be playing a major role in NIDDM susceptibility in the Finnish Caucasian population. PMID:9710438

  18. A general test for gene-environment interaction in sib pair-based association analysis of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Sophie; Dolan, Conor V; Neale, Michael C; Posthuma, Danielle

    2008-07-01

    Several association studies support the hypothesis that genetic variants can modify the influence of environmental factors on behavioral outcomes, i.e., G x E interaction. The case-control design used in these studies is powerful, but population stratification with respect to allele frequencies can give rise to false positive or false negative associations. Stratification with respect to the environmental factors can lead to false positives or false negatives with respect to environmental main effects and G x E interaction effects as well. Here we present a model based on Fulker et al. (1999) and Purcell (2002) for the study of G x E interaction in family-based association designs, in which the effects of stratification can be controlled. Simulations illustrate the power to detect genetic and environmental main effects, and G x E interaction effects for the sib pair design. The power to detect interaction was studied in eight different situations, both with and without the presence of population stratification, and for categorical and continuous environmental factors. Results show that the power to detect genetic and environmental main effects, and G x E interaction effects, depends on the allele frequencies and the distribution of the environmental moderator. Admixture effects of realistic effect size lead only to very small stratification effects in the G x E component, so impractically large numbers of sib pairs are required to detect such stratification.

  19. Familial testicular cancer: a report of the UK family register, estimation of risk and an HLA class 1 sib-pair analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Forman, D.; Oliver, R. T.; Brett, A. R.; Marsh, S. G.; Moses, J. H.; Bodmer, J. G.; Chilvers, C. E.; Pike, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-two families with two or more cases of testicular cancer have been reported to the UK Register for Familial Testicular Cancer, comprising two pairs of identical twins, 27 sets of other brothers (25 pairs, two triples), nine father-son pairs, two pairs of first cousins and two uncle-nephew pairs. In total 91 testicular tumours are described in 86 individuals (42 (46%) pure seminoma, 49 (54%) other germ cell tumours). The median age at diagnosis in these patients was significantly younger than that in a comparable series of non-familial patients (29 c.f. 32.5 years, P less than 0.01). In a case-control comparison of 794 testicular cancer patients, eight patients (1.0%) had a brother and four patients (0.5%) had a father with a previous diagnosis of testicular cancer at the time of their own diagnosis (and these families are all included in this report). Two out of 794 controls (0.3%) had a first degree relative with testicular cancer. The cumulative risk to a brother of a patient for developing testicular cancer by the age of 50 years was estimated to be 2.2% (95% C.I. 0.6-3.8%) which results in a relative risk of 9.8 (95% C.I. 2.8-16.7) in comparison with the general population. HLA Class I typing of 21 affected sib-pairs demonstrated four (19%) sharing two haplotypes, 13 pairs (62%) sharing one and four pairs (19%) sharing none. This did not differ significantly from the expected proportions of 25%/50%/25%. It is unlikely, therefore, that there is a major gene associated with testicular cancer predisposition within or closely linked to the major histocompatibility gene complex on chromosome 6. PMID:1739626

  20. Candidate-gene studies of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype: a sib-pair linkage analysis of DZ women twins.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, M A; Talmud, P J; Luong, L A; Haddad, L; Day, I N; Newman, B; Edwards, K L; Krauss, R M; Humphries, S E

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence supporting the roles of small, dense LDL and plasma triglyceride (TG), both features of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype, as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Although family studies and twin studies have demonstrated genetic influences on these risk factors, the specific genes involved remain to be determined definitively. The purpose of this study was to investigate genetic linkage between LDL size, TG, and related atherogenic lipoproteins and candidate genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. The linkage analysis was based on a sample of 126 DZ women twin pairs, which avoids the potentially confounding effects of both age and gender, by use of a quantitative sib-pair linkage-analysis approach. Eight candidate genes were examined, including those for microsomal TG-transfer protein (MTP), hepatic lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, apolipoprotein (apo) B, apo CIII, apo E, insulin receptor, and LDL receptor. The analysis suggested genetic linkage between markers for the apo B gene and LDL size, plasma levels of TG, of HDL cholesterol, and of apo B, all features of the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype. Furthermore, evidence for linkage was maintained when the analysis was limited to women with a major LDL-subclass diameter >255 A, indicating that the apo B gene may influence LDL heterogeneity in the intermediate-to-large size range. In addition, linkage was found between the MTP gene and TG, among all the women. These findings add to the growing evidence for genetic influences on the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype and its role in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. PMID:9463319

  1. The distribution of genome shared identical by descent for a pair of full sibs by means of the continuous time Markov chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julie, Hongki; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.; Pancoro, Adi

    2015-12-01

    This paper will allow Markov Chain's application in genome shared identical by descent by two individual at full sibs model. The full sibs model was a continuous time Markov Chain with three state. In the full sibs model, we look for the cumulative distribution function of the number of sub segment which have 2 IBD haplotypes from a segment of the chromosome which the length is t Morgan and the cumulative distribution function of the number of sub segment which have at least 1 IBD haplotypes from a segment of the chromosome which the length is t Morgan. This cumulative distribution function will be developed by the moment generating function.

  2. A high-density SNP linkage scan with 142 combined subtype ADHD sib pairs identifies linkage regions on chromosomes 9 and 16.

    PubMed

    Asherson, P; Zhou, K; Anney, R J L; Franke, B; Buitelaar, J; Ebstein, R; Gill, M; Altink, M; Arnold, R; Boer, F; Brookes, K; Buschgens, C; Butler, L; Cambell, D; Chen, W; Christiansen, H; Feldman, L; Fleischman, K; Fliers, E; Howe-Forbes, R; Goldfarb, A; Heise, A; Gabriëls, I; Johansson, L; Lubetzki, I; Marco, R; Medad, S; Minderaa, R; Mulas, F; Müller, U; Mulligan, A; Neale, B; Rijsdijk, F; Rabin, K; Rommelse, N; Sethna, V; Sorohan, J; Uebel, H; Psychogiou, L; Weeks, A; Barrett, R; Xu, X; Banaschewski, T; Sonuga-Barke, E; Eisenberg, J; Manor, I; Miranda, A; Oades, R D; Roeyers, H; Rothenberger, A; Sergeant, J; Steinhausen, H-C; Taylor, E; Thompson, M; Faraone, S V

    2008-05-01

    As part of the International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics project we completed an affected sibling pair study of 142 narrowly defined Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition combined type attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) proband-sibling pairs. No linkage was observed on the most established ADHD-linked genomic regions of 5p and 17p. We found suggestive linkage signals on chromosomes 9 and 16, respectively, with the highest multipoint nonparametric linkage signal on chromosome 16q23 at 99 cM (log of the odds, LOD=3.1) overlapping data published from the previous UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) (LOD>1, approximately 95 cM) and Dutch (LOD>1, approximately 100 cM) studies. The second highest peak in this study was on chromosome 9q22 at 90 cM (LOD=2.13); both the previous UCLA and German studies also found some evidence of linkage at almost the same location (UCLA LOD=1.45 at 93 cM; German LOD=0.68 at 100 cM). The overlap of these two main peaks with previous findings suggests that loci linked to ADHD may lie within these regions. Meta-analysis or reanalysis of the raw data of all the available ADHD linkage scan data may help to clarify whether these represent true linked loci.

  3. Decreasing Signs of Negative Affect and Correlated Self-Injury in an Individual with Mental Retardation and Mood Disturbances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindauer, Steven E.; DeLeon, Iser G.; Fisher, Wayne W.

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of an enriched environment, based on a paired-choice preference assessment, on rates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) and frequency of negative affect displayed by a woman with mental retardation and a mood disorder. Results suggested that SIB and negative affect were highly correlated and that the enriched environment…

  4. Image-Word Pairing-Congruity Effect on Affective Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabria Z., Jorge C.; Cho, Youngil; Sambai, Ami; Yamanaka, Toshimasa

    The present study explores the effects of familiarity on affective responses (pleasure and arousal) to Japanese ad elements, based on the schema incongruity theory. Print ads showing natural scenes (landscapes) were used to create the stimuli (images and words). An empirical study was conducted to measure subjects' affective responses to image-word combinations that varied in terms of incongruity. The level of incongruity was based on familiarity levels, and was statistically determined by a variable called ‘pairing-congruity status’. The tested hypothesis proposed that even highly familiar image-word combinations, when combined incongruously, would elicit strong affective responses. Subjects assessed the stimuli using bipolar scales. The study was effective in tracing interactions between familiarity, pleasure and arousal, although the incongruous image-word combinations did not elicit the predicted strong effects on pleasure and arousal. The results suggest a need for further research incorporating kansei (i.e., creativity) into the process of stimuli selection.

  5. Scales of Independent Behavior (SIB).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paulette J.

    1990-01-01

    Designed for use with individuals ages 3 months to 44 years, the Scales of Independent Behavior (SIB) measure adaptive behavior and problem behaviors in such areas as motor skills, social interaction, language, personal self-care, punctuality, destructiveness, and inattention. This paper describes the SIB's administration, scoring,…

  6. Familial Clustering of Executive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pair Families with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Swaab-Barneveld, Hanna; De Sonneville, Leo; Buitelaar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate familial clustering of executive functioning (i.e., response inhibition, fine visuomotor functioning, and attentional control) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-affected sibling pairs. Method: Fifty-two affected sibling pairs aged 6 to 18 years and diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV performed the…

  7. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP) genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF). Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT). The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL). All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL) identified 18 (22) additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error), were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error), were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions Tests to remove

  8. A genome-wide scan in affected sibling pairs with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage suggests genetic linkage.

    PubMed

    Kolte, A M; Nielsen, H S; Moltke, I; Degn, B; Pedersen, B; Sunde, L; Nielsen, F C; Christiansen, O B

    2011-06-01

    Previously, siblings of patients with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage (IRM) have been shown to have a higher risk of miscarriage. This study comprises two parts: (i) an epidemiological part, in which we introduce data on the frequency of miscarriage among 268 siblings of 244 patients with IRM and (ii) a genetic part presenting data from a genome-wide linkage study of 38 affected sibling pairs with IRM. All IRM patients (probands) had experienced three or more miscarriages and affected siblings two or more miscarriages. The sibling pairs were genotyped by the Affymetrix GeneChip 50K XbaI platform and non-parametric linkage analysis was performed via the software package Merlin. We find that siblings of IRM patients exhibit a higher frequency of miscarriage than population controls regardless of age at the time of pregnancy. We identify chromosomal regions with LOD scores between 2.5 and 3.0 in subgroups of affected sibling pairs. Maximum LOD scores were identified in four occurrences: for rs10514716 (3p14.2) when analyzing sister-pairs only; for rs10511668 (9p22.1) and rs341048 (11q13.4) when only analyzing families where the probands have had four or more miscarriages; and for rs10485275 (6q16.3) when analyzing one sibling pair from each family only. We identify no founder mutations. Concluding, our results imply that IRM patients and their siblings share factors which increase the risk of miscarriage. In this first genome-wide linkage study of affected sibling pairs with IRM, we identify regions on chromosomes 3, 6, 9 and 11 which warrant further investigation in order to elucidate their putative roles in the genesis of IRM.

  9. New support for an old hypothesis: density affects extra-pair paternity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian; Pasinelli, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Density has been suggested to affect variation in extra-pair paternity (EPP) in avian mating systems, because increasing density promotes encounter rates and thus mating opportunities. However, the significance of density affecting EPP variation in intra- and interspecific comparisons has remained controversial, with more support from intraspecific comparisons. Neither experimental nor empirical studies have consistently provided support for the density hypothesis. Testing the density hypothesis is challenging because density measures may not necessarily reflect extra-pair mating opportunities, mate guarding efforts may covary with density, populations studied may differ in migratory behavior and/or climatic conditions, and variation in density may be insufficient. Accounting for these potentially confounding factors, we tested whether EPP rates within and among subpopulations of the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) were related to density. Our analyses were based on data from 13 subpopulations studied over 4 years. Overall, 56.4% of totally 181 broods contained at least one extra-pair young (EPY) and 37.1% of totally 669 young were of extra-pair origin. Roughly 90% of the extra-pair fathers were from the adjacent territory or from the territory after the next one. Within subpopulations, the proportion of EPY in broods was positively related to local breeding density. Similarly, among subpopulations, proportion of EPY was positively associated with population density. EPP was absent in subpopulations consisting of single breeding pairs, that is, without extra-pair mating opportunities. Our study confirms that density is an important biological factor, which significantly influences the amount of EPP within and among subpopulations, but also suggests that other mechanisms influence EPP beyond the variation explained by density. PMID:23533071

  10. Iron-restricted pair-feeding affects renal damage in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yoshiro; Senchi, Aya; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Horimatsu, Tetsuo; Okuno, Keisuke; Yasumura, Seiki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that dietary iron restriction prevents the development of renal damage in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, iron deficiency is associated with appetite loss. In addition, calorie restriction is reported to prevent the development of end-stage renal pathology in CKD rats. Thus, the beneficial effect of iron restriction on renal damage may depend on calorie restriction. Here, we investigate the effect of pair-feeding iron restriction on renal damage in a rat model of CKD. Methods First, to determine the amount of food intake, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly given an ad libitum normal diet or an iron-restricted diet, and the food intake was measured. Second, CKD was induced by a 5/6 nephrectomy in SD rats, and CKD rats were given either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet. Results Food intake was reduced in the iron-restricted diet group compared to the normal diet group of SD rats for 16 weeks (mean food intake; normal diet group and iron-restricted diet group: 25 and 20 g/day, respectively). Based on the initial experiments, CKD rats received either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet (20 g/day) for 16 weeks. Importantly, pair-feeding iron restriction prevented the development of proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial damage in CKD rats. Interestingly, pair-feeding iron restriction attenuated renal expression of nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor in CKD rats. Conclusions Pair-feeding iron restriction affected renal damage in a rat model of CKD. PMID:28196143

  11. S-IB Nose Cone Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions. The Saturn IB vehicle was a two-stage rocket and had a payload capability about 50 percent greater than the Saturn I vehicle. The first stage, S-IB stage, was a redesigned first stage of the Saturn I. This photograph is of the S-IB nose cone #3 during assembly in building 4752.

  12. S-IB Stage Entering Point Barrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The Saturn 1B first stage (S-IB) enters the NASA barge Point Barrow, in March 1968. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) utilized a number of water transportation craft to transport the Saturn stages to-and-from the manufacturing facilities and test sites, as well as delivery to the Kennedy Space Center for launch. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized the eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  13. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair.

  14. Genome Scan for Tourette Disorder in Affected-Sibling-Pair and Multigenerational Families

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Tourette disorder (TD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a complex mode of inheritance and is characterized by multiple waxing and waning motor and phonic tics. This article reports the results of the largest genetic linkage study yet undertaken for TD. The sample analyzed includes 238 nuclear families yielding 304 “independent” sibling pairs and 18 separate multigenerational families, for a total of 2,040 individuals. A whole-genome screen with the use of 390 microsatellite markers was completed. Analyses were completed using two diagnostic classifications: (1) only individuals with TD were included as affected and (2) individuals with either TD or chronic-tic (CT) disorder were included as affected. Strong evidence of linkage was observed for a region on chromosome 2p (-logP=4.42, P=3.8×10-5) in the analyses that included individuals with TD or CT disorder as affected. Results in several other regions also provide moderate evidence (−logP >2.0) of additional susceptibility loci for TD. PMID:17304708

  15. [Reliability and validity of the Severe Impairment Battery, short form (SIB-s), in patients with dementia in Spain].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Agüera-Ortiz, Luis F; Montorio-Cerrato, Ignacio; León-Salas, Beatriz; Valle de Juan, M Cristina; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduccion. Las personas con demencia progresiva evolucionan hacia un estado donde los tests neuropsicologicos tradicionales dejan de ser eficaces. La bateria de evaluacion del deterioro grave, en su forma completa (SIB) y abreviada (SIB-s), se desarrollo para evaluar el estado cognitivo de pacientes con demencia avanzada. Objetivo. Evaluar los atributos psicometricos de la SIB-s en poblacion española. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio transversal de 127 pacientes con demencia (86,6%, mujeres; edad media: 82,6 ± 7,5 años) evaluados con la SIB-s y las siguientes medidas: escala de deterioro global, miniexamen cognitivo (MEC), miniexamen del estado mental grave (sMMSE), indice de Barthel y escala del estado funcional. Resultados. La puntuacion media total de la SIB-s fue de 19,1 ± 15,34 (rango: 0-48). Efectos suelo y techo < 20%. El analisis factorial identifico un unico factor que explica el 68% de la varianza total de la escala. La consistencia interna fue alta (alfa de Cronbach: 0,96). La correlacion item-total corregida oscilo entre 0,27 y 0,83, y la homogeneidad de los items fue de 0,43. La fiabilidad test-retest e interevaluador fue satisfactoria (coeficiente de correlacion intraclase: 0,96 y 0,95, respectivamente), asi como la validez de constructo convergente con otras medidas cognitivas (MEC: 0,83; sMMSE: 0,9). La SIB-s mostro una correlacion moderada con escalas cognitivas de dependencia funcional (indice de Barthel: 0,48; FAST: –0,74). El error estandar de la medida fue de 3,07 para el total de la escala. Conclusiones. La SIB-s es un instrumento fiable y valido, relativamente breve, para evaluar a pacientes con demencia avanzada en la poblacion española.

  16. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first (S-IVB) stage, arrives at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) S-IB static test stand. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings. The S-IB, developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  17. Artificial night lighting affects dawn song, extra-pair siring success, and lay date in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Kempenaers, Bart; Borgström, Pernilla; Loës, Peter; Schlicht, Emmi; Valcu, Mihai

    2010-10-12

    Associated with a continued global increase in urbanization, anthropogenic light pollution is an important problem. However, our understanding of the ecological consequences of light pollution is limited. We investigated effects of artificial night lighting on dawn song in five common forest-breeding songbirds. In four species, males near street lights started singing significantly earlier at dawn than males elsewhere in the forest, and this effect was stronger in naturally earlier-singing species. We compared reproductive behavior of blue tits breeding in edge territories with and without street lights to that of blue tits breeding in central territories over a 7 year period. Under the influence of street lights, females started egg laying on average 1.5 days earlier. Males occupying edge territories with street lights were twice as successful in obtaining extra-pair mates than their close neighbors or than males occupying central forest territories. Artificial night lighting affected both age classes but had a stronger effect on yearling males. Our findings indicate that light pollution has substantial effects on the timing of reproductive behavior and on individual mating patterns. It may have important evolutionary consequences by changing the information embedded in previously reliable quality-indicator traits.

  18. Occurrence of the Cys311 DRD2 variant in a pedigree multiply affected with panic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Hoyne, J.; Diaz, P.

    1995-08-14

    Following the detection of the rare DRD2 codon 311 variant (Ser{yields}Cys) in an affected member from a large, multiply affected panic disorder family, we investigated the occurrence of this variant in other family members. The variant occurred in both affected and unaffected individuals. Further screening in panic disorder sib pairs unrelated to this family failed to detect the Cys311 variant. Our data suggests that this variant has no pathogenic role in panic disorder. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Social isolation affects partner-directed social behavior and cortisol during pair formation in marmosets, Callithrix geoffroyi

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam S.; Birnie, Andrew K.; French, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Pair-bonded relationships form during periods of close spatial proximity and high sociosexual contact. Like other monogamous species, marmosets form new social pairs after emigration or ejection from their natal group resulting in periods of social isolation. Thus, pair formation often occurs following a period of social instability and a concomitant elevation in stress physiology. Research is needed to assess the effects that prolonged social isolation has on the behavioral and cortisol response to the formation of a new social pair. We examined the sociosexual behavior and cortisol during the first 90-days of cohabitation in male and female Geoffroy's tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi) paired either directly from their natal group (Natal-P) or after a prolonged period of social isolation (ISO-P). Social isolation prior to pairing seemed to influence cortisol levels, social contact, and grooming behavior; however, sexual behavior was not affected. Cortisol levels were transiently elevated in all paired marmosets compared to natal-housed marmosets. However, ISO-P marmosets had higher cortisol levels throughout the observed pairing period compared to Natal-P marmoset. This suggests that the social instability of pair formation may lead to a transient increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity while isolation results in a prolonged HPA axis dysregulation. In addition, female social contact behavior was associated with higher cortisol levels at the onset of pairing; however, this was not observed in males. Thus, isolation-induced social contact with a new social partner may be enhanced by HPA axis activation, or a moderating factor. PMID:21712050

  20. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workmen at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) dock on the Ternessee River unload S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage, from the NASA barge Palaemon. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings in MSFC's S-IB static test stand.

  1. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workmen at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) dock on the Ternessee River unload S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage, from the NASA barge Palaemon. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings in Marshall's S-IB static test stand.

  2. A genome-wide screen identifies genes that affect somatic homolog pairing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Jack R; Larschan, Erica; D'Souza, Ryan; Marshall, Lauren S; Dempsey, Kyle E; Johnson, Justine E; Mellone, Barbara G; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2012-07-01

    In Drosophila and other Dipterans, homologous chromosomes are in close contact in virtually all nuclei, a phenomenon known as somatic homolog pairing. Although homolog pairing has been recognized for over a century, relatively little is known about its regulation. We performed a genome-wide RNAi-based screen that monitored the X-specific localization of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, and we identified 59 candidate genes whose knockdown via RNAi causes a change in the pattern of MSL staining that is consistent with a disruption of X-chromosomal homolog pairing. Using DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we confirmed that knockdown of 17 of these genes has a dramatic effect on pairing of the 359 bp repeat at the base of the X. Furthermore, dsRNAs targeting Pr-set7, which encodes an H4K20 methyltransferase, cause a modest disruption in somatic homolog pairing. Consistent with our results in cultured cells, a classical mutation in one of the strongest candidate genes, pebble (pbl), causes a decrease in somatic homolog pairing in developing embryos. Interestingly, many of the genes identified by our screen have known roles in diverse cell-cycle events, suggesting an important link between somatic homolog pairing and the choreography of chromosomes during the cell cycle.

  3. Genotypic variation in tetraploid wheat affecting homoeologous pairing in hybrids with Aegilops peregrina.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Feldman, M

    2001-12-01

    The Ph1 gene has long been considered the main factor responsible for the diploid-like meiotic behavior of polyploid wheat. This dominant gene, located on the long arm of chromosome 5B (5BL), suppresses pairing of homoeologous chromosomes in polyploid wheat and in their hybrids with related species. Here we report on the discovery of genotypic variation among tetraploid wheats in the control of homoeologous pairing. Compared with the level of homoeologous pairing in hybrids between Aegilops peregrina and the bread wheat cultivar Chinese Spring (CS), significantly higher levels of homoeologous pairing were obtained in hybrids between Ae. peregrina and CS substitution lines in which chromosome 5B of CS was replaced by either 5B of Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides line 09 (TTD09) or 5G of Triticum timopheevii ssp. timopheevii line 01 (TIMO1). Similarly, a higher level of homoeologous pairing was found in the hybrid between Ae. peregrina and a substitution line of CS in which chromosome arm 5BL of line TTD140 substituted for 5BL of CS. It appears that the observed effect on the level of pairing is exerted by chromosome arm 5BL of T turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, most probably by an allele of Ph1. Searching for variation in the control of homoeologous pairing among lines of wild tetraploid wheat, either T turgidum ssp. dicoccoides or T timopheevii ssp. armeniacum, showed that hybrids between Ae. peregrina and lines of these two wild wheats exhibited three different levels of homoeologous pairing: low, low intermediate, and high intermediate. The low-intermediate and high-intermediate genotypes may possess weak alleles of Ph1. The three different T turgidum ssp. dicoccoides pairing genotypes were collected from different geographical regions in Israel, indicating that this trait may have an adaptive value. The availability of allelic variation at the Ph1 locus may facilitate the mapping, tagging, and eventually the isolation of this important gene.

  4. Reduced rDNA copy number does not affect "competitive" chromosome pairing in XYY males of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Maggert, Keith A

    2014-03-20

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a "competitive" situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments.

  5. Reduced rDNA Copy Number Does Not Affect “Competitive” Chromosome Pairing in XYY Males of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a “competitive” situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments. PMID:24449686

  6. Pair housing differentially affects motivation to self-administer cocaine in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Westenbroek, Christel; Perry, Adam N; Becker, Jill B

    2013-09-01

    Female rats exhibit greater intake and motivation to self-administer cocaine. In females but not males, isolation by itself is a stressor, which could lead to increased drug intake. Therefore, we hypothesized that social housing would buffer against stress and reduce the motivation to self-administer cocaine primarily in females. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually or in same-sex pairs. The individually housed rats and one of each pair were allowed to self-administer (SA) a low dose of cocaine (0.2 mg/kg/inf) on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule for one week. Motivation for cocaine SA was measured for an additional 2 weeks on a progressive ratio schedule. Isolated females had greater cocaine-intake on the FR1 schedule and greater motivation to take cocaine than males. Pair-housing in females, but not males, attenuated the motivation to take cocaine. Isolated females, but not males, showed escalation of their motivation to take cocaine, which was attenuated by pair housing of females. Concluding, the motivation to take cocaine escalates in females but not males, and pair-housing of females attenuates this escalation.

  7. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's (S-IVB) first stage, after installation at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) S-IB static test stand. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings. The S-IB, developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  8. How Proficiency-Pairing Affects Students' Peer-Mediated Revisions of EFL Writing: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports on a teacher's classroom-based research into the influence of proficiency-pairing on students' peer-mediated draft revisions. Three students of an EFL writing course at a Chinese university, who formed into peer dyads with their classmates voluntarily, participated in the study. Throughout the EFL writing course, they…

  9. Juvenile social experience affects pairing success at adulthood: congruence with the loser effect?

    PubMed Central

    Mariette, Mylene M.; Cathaud, Charlène; Chambon, Rémi; Vignal, Clémentine

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions with adults are often critical for the development of mating behaviours. However, the potential role of other primary social partners such as juvenile counterparts is rarely considered. Most interestingly, it is not known whether interactions with juvenile females improve males’ courtship and whether, similar to the winner and loser effects in a fighting context—outcome of these interactions shapes males’ behaviour in future encounters. We investigated the combined effects of male quality and juvenile social experience on pairing success at adulthood in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We manipulated brood size to alter male quality and then placed males in either same- or mixed-sex juvenile dyads until adulthood. We found that males from reduced broods obtained more copulations and males from mixed-sex dyads had more complete courtships. Furthermore, independent of their quality, males that failed to pair with juvenile females, but not juvenile males, had a lower pairing success at adulthood. Our study shows that negative social experience with peers during adolescence may be a potent determinant of pairing success that can override the effects of early environmental conditions on male attractiveness and thereby supports the occurrence of an analogous process to the loser effect in a mating context. PMID:23902911

  10. Microwave irradiation affects ion pairing in aqueous solutions of alkali halide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Bren, Urban

    2017-01-01

    Using the molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we investigate the effects of water's rotational motion on the ion pairing of ionic solutes in aqueous solutions. The situation with rotational temperature higher than the translational one, Trot>Ttrs , is mimicking the non-equilibrium effects of microwaves on model solutions of alkali halide salts. The simulations reveal that an increase in the rotational temperature at constant translational temperature exerts significant changes in the structure of the solution. The latter are reflected in increased pairing of the oppositely charged ions, which can be explained by the weaker ability of rotationally excited water to screen and separate the opposite charges. It seems that Collins' law of matching water affinities retains its validity also in the non-equilibrium situation where the rotational temperature exceeds the translational one. On the other hand, the equilibrium effect (i.e., an increase in the solution's overall temperature T ≡Trot = Ttrs) favors the formation of small-small (NaCl), while it has a little effect on large-large (CsI) ion pairs. This is in accordance with water becoming less polar solvent upon a temperature increase. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of excited translational motion of water (and ions) on the ion pairing by increasing the translational temperature, while keeping the rotational one unchanged (i.e., Ttrs>Trot ). Interestingly, in certain cases the faster translational motion causes an increase in correlations. The temperature variations in the like-ion association constants, Kas++ and Kas-, are also examined. Here the situation is more complex but, in most cases, a decrease in the ion pairing is observed.

  11. S-IB Stage at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The Saturn 1B S-IB (first) stage being prepared for shipment at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), near New Orleans, Louisiana. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the S-IB stage utilized the eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  12. Saturn IB, S-IB-1 at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    S-IB-1, the first flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage (S-IB stage), sat in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Saturn IB static test stand on March 15, 1965. Developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, Louisiana, the 90,000-pound booster utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  13. Saturn IB, S-IB-1 at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Workers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) hoist S-IB-1, the first flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage (S-IB stage), into the Saturn IB static test stand on March 15, 1965. Developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, Louisiana, the 90,000-pound booster utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  14. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first (S-IVB) stage, on its way to Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) west test area. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings. The S-IB, developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  15. Power analysis of QTL detection in half-sib families using selective DNA pooling.

    PubMed

    Baro JA; Carleos, C; Corral, N; López, T; Cañón, J

    2001-01-01

    Individual loci of economic importance (QTL) can be detected by comparing the inheritance of a trait and the inheritance of loci with alleles readily identifiable by laboratory methods (genetic markers). Data on allele segregation at the individual level are costly and alternatives have been proposed that make use of allele frequencies among progeny, rather than individual genotypes. Among the factors that may affect the power of the set up, the most important are those intrinsic to the QTL: the additive effect of the QTL, and its dominance, and distance between markers and QTL. Other factors are relative to the choice of animals and markers, such as the frequency of the QTL and marker alleles among dams and sires. Data collection may affect the detection power through the size of half-sib families, selection rate within families, and the technical error incurred when estimating genetic frequencies. We present results for a sensitivity analysis for QTL detection using pools of DNA from selected half-sibs. Simulations showed that conclusive detection may be achieved with families of at least 500 half-sibs if sires are chosen on the criteria that most of their marker alleles are either both missing, or one is fixed, among dams.

  16. Affecteds-only linkage methods are not a panacea

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.A.; Hodge, S.E. |; Vieland, V.J.; Spence, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    Affected-sib-pair (ASP) methods and their variations, such as the affected-pedigree-member (APM) method, have become preferred methods of analysis. Three reasons are usually given as the advantages of ASP/APM methods over LOD-score analysis (likelihood-maximization techniques). First, the most frequently cited is that ASP/APM analysis is non-parametric, whereas LOD-score analysis requires specification of a genetic model. A related consideration is that penetrance is not a confounding factor in ASP/APM analysis, as it is with LOD scores. Second, ASP/APM methods require the collection of data from only a limited number of family members - and, presumably, from those most motivated to help research in the disease, i.e., those affected. A third reason concerns the ease and intuitive appeal of the theory and calculations. Sib-pair analysis is easily understood and can be done on the {open_quotes}back of the envelope.{close_quotes} Except for the more sophisticated ASP methods, one need only count the numbers of sibs sharing no, one, or two alleles in common and apply conventional statistics, to get an answer (although APM methods do require more sophisticated analysis). LOD-score analysis, on the other hand, appears more complex, requiring likelihood maximization, computers and sophisticated programs, and the assumption of a mode of inheritance. 32 refs.

  17. "The lion, the witch and the wardrobe": impact on sibs of individuals with AAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fanos, Joanna H; Strange, Charlie

    2004-10-15

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a genetic disorder that may cause serious pulmonary or liver impairment in children or adults. Although genetic sequencing of the AAT gene has only been available for 20 years, analysis of the amount and electrophoretic mobility of the AAT protein has allowed clinical phenotyping for more than 40 years. There have been no studies assessing the psychological impact of having a sib affected by AAT deficiency. Twenty-five participants drawn from the Alpha-1 Research Registry completed a questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Respondents were supportive of testing prior to adulthood for AAT status; 18 thought it was a good idea to test a child, three did not know, and four said children should not be tested, primarily citing insurance concerns. Of those 18 who stated it was a good idea, 14 would test at birth. Knowledge of genetics of AAT deficiency was limited; only 44% of respondents understood the inheritance pattern. We recommend: (1) parents and sibs need help in mourning the loss of children with AAT deficiency; young sibs are at risk for trauma and long-term developmental problems. (2) Teams evaluating donors for liver transplantation should be aggressive in ruling out AAT deficiency prior to invasive testing. (3) Testing should be offered to individuals with a family history of AAT deficiency to obtain the health benefits of lifestyle modification and limit the burden of disease discovery in symptomatic relatives. (4) Awareness of liver disease from AAT deficiency should be increased.

  18. Linkage of the VNTR/insulin-gene and type I diabetes mellitus: Increased gene sharing in affected sibling pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Owerbach, D.; Gabbay, K.H. )

    1994-05-01

    Ninety-six multiplex type I diabetic families were typed at the 5' flanking region of the insulin gene by using a PCR assay that better resolves the VNTR into multiple alleles. Affected sibling pairs shared 2, 1, and 0 VNTR alleles - identical by descent - at a frequency of .47, .45, and .08, respectively, a ratio that deviated from the expected 1:2:1 ratio (P<.001). These results confirm linkage of the chromosome 11p15.5 region with type I diabetes mellitus susceptibility. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Hydrogen abstraction from metal surfaces: when electron-hole pair excitations strongly affect hot-atom recombination.

    PubMed

    Galparsoro, Oihana; Pétuya, Rémi; Busnengo, Fabio; Juaristi, Joseba Iñaki; Crespos, Cédric; Alducin, Maite; Larregaray, Pascal

    2016-11-23

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict that the inclusion of nonadiabatic electronic excitations influences the dynamics of preadsorbed hydrogen abstraction from the W(110) surface by hydrogen scattering. The hot-atom recombination, which involves hyperthermal diffusion of the impinging atom on the surface, is significantly affected by the dissipation of energy mediated by electron-hole pair excitations at low coverage and low incidence energy. This issue is of importance as this abstraction mechanism is thought to largely contribute to molecular hydrogen formation from metal surfaces.

  20. Asymptomatic type II hyperprolinaemia associated with hyperglycinaemia in three sibs.

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, L; Mollica, F; Levy, H L

    1975-01-01

    Three clinically normal sibs were discovered to have type II hyperprolinaemia in a routine serum amino acid screening programme in Sicily. In addition to the basic biochemical features of type II hyperprolinaemia, all 3 children had marked hyperglycinaemia, whereas their parents had both normal blood proline and glycine concentrations. Clinical normality in individuals with hyperprolinaemia may suggest that these two metabolic disorders (types I and II) are benign entities. Furthermore, the absence of clinical abnormality in these sibs, despite the presence of marked hyperprolinaemia and hyperglycinaemia, may suggest that neither of these findings alone causes brain damage. The hyperglycinaemia in these sibs is unexplained and is an unusual if not unique finding in association with hyperprolinaemia. PMID:1200680

  1. Glucoraphasatin and glucoraphenin, a redox pair of glucosinolates of brassicaceae, differently affect metabolizing enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Barillari, Jessica; Iori, Renato; Broccoli, Massimiliano; Pozzetti, Laura; Canistro, Donatella; Sapone, Andrea; Bonamassa, Barbara; Biagi, Gian Luigi; Paolini, Moreno

    2007-07-11

    Brassica vegetables are an important dietary source of glucosinolates (GLs), whose breakdown products exhibit anticancer activity. The protective properties of Brassicaceae are believed to be due to the inhibition of Phase-I or induction of Phase-II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), thus enhancing carcinogen clearance. To study whether GLs affect XMEs and the role of their chemical structure, we focused on two alkylthio GLs differing in the oxidation degree of the side chain sulfur. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were supplemented (per oral somministration by gavage) with either glucoraphasatin (4-methylthio-3-butenyl GL; GRH) or glucoraphenin (4-methylsulfinyl-3-butenyl GL; GRE), at 24 or 120 mg/kg body weight in a single or repeated fashion (daily for four consecutive days), and hepatic microsomes were prepared for XME analyses. Both GLs were able to induce XMEs, showing different induction profiles. While the inductive effect was stronger after multiple administration of the higher GRH dosage, the single lower GRE dose was the most effective in boosting cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-associated monooxygenases and the postoxidative metabolism. CYP3A1/2 were the most affected isoforms by GRH treatment, whereas GRE induced mainly CYP1A2 supported oxidase. Glutathione S-transferase increased up to approximately 3.2-fold after a single (lower) GRE dose and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase up to approximately 2-fold after four consecutive (higher) GRH doses. In conclusion, the induction profile of these GLs we found is not in line with the chemopreventive hypothesis. Furthermore, the oxidation degree of the side chain sulfur of GLs seems to exert a crucial role on XME modulation.

  2. Saturn IB First Stage (S-IB Stage) at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Workers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) begin hoisting S-IB-200D, a dynamic test version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage (S-IB stage), into the Center's Dynamic Test Stand on January 11, 1965. Test Laboratory persornel assembled a complete Saturn IB to test the structural soundness of the launch vehicle. Developed by the MSFC as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine large boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions.

  3. Saturn IB First Stage (S-IB Stage) at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    S-IB-200D, a dynamic test version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage (S-IB), makes its way to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area on January 4, 1965. Test Laboratory persornel assembled a complete Saturn IB to test the structural soundness of the launch vehicle in the Dynamic Test Stand. Developed by the MSFC as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions.

  4. Growth performance of larval and juvenile manila clam ( Ruditapes philippinarum) from divergently selected individuals of a full-sib family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhongming; Li, Xiaotong; Sun, Qian; Li, Yongren; Zhang, Xuekai; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the method of divergent selection was employed to test the larval and juvenile growth performance within a full-sib family of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. The 10% largest and 10% smallest clam individuals (on the basis of shell length) of a full-sib family were selected as parents for the fast and slow growing lines, respectively. The difference in shell length was significant among the three lines (fast, control, and slow) tested. The sequence of shell length were fast line > control line > slow line. The responses to selection, realized heritability, and genetic gain were 0.06%-0.81%, 0.04%-0.47% and 0.58%-18.89% in the fast direction, respectively; and were 0.14%-1.27%, 0.08%-0.73%, and 0.31%-49.03% in the slow direction, respectively. The results suggested that there was a large portion of additive genetic variance affecting the growth in the full-sib family. Selection in the fast direction within the full-sib family would greatly improve the growth of R. philippinarum.

  5. Maximum Likelihood Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Using Full-Sib Families

    PubMed Central

    Knott, S. A.; Haley, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    A maximum likelihood method is presented for the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) using flanking markers in full-sib families. This method incorporates a random component for common family effects due to additional QTL or the environment. Simulated data have been used to investigate this method. With a fixed total number of full sibs power of detection decreased substantially with decreasing family size. Increasing the number of alleles at the marker loci (i.e., polymorphism information content) and decreasing the interval size about the QTL increased power. Flanking markers were more powerful than single markers. In testing for a linked QTL the test must be made against a model which allows for between family variation (i.e., including an unlinked QTL or a between family variance component) or the test statistic may be grossly inflated. Mean parameter estimates were close to the simulated values in all situations when fitting the full model (including a linked QTL and common family effect). If the common family component was omitted the QTL effect was overestimated in data in which additional genetic variance was simulated and when compared with an unlinked QTL model there was reduced power. The test statistic curves, reflecting the likelihood of the QTL at each position along the chromosome, have discontinuities at the markers caused by adjacent pairs of markers providing different amounts of information. This must be accounted for when using flanking markers to search for a QTL in an outbred population. PMID:1459438

  6. A large phenotypic sib-sib discordance for the Rh blood system. A possible new feto-maternal compatibility system.

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, C Y; Harb, Z; Avendaño, A; Acuña, M P

    1982-01-01

    A large sib-sib phenotypic discordance for the Rh system has been found in a longitudinal follow-up study on growth and development. Sibs born no more than 3 years later than their respective indexes show a significant tendency to have a different phenotype from that of their indexes. The hypothesis that distortion is due to eggs or fetal loss finds support in the existence of increased time intervals between indexes' and sibs' births in those cases in which the losses were suspected. Two groups of index families made according to the presence or absence of the cde haplotype in their genotype show important differences in segregation and reproductive patterns. The observed distortions cannot be explained by the differences in known antigenic Rh specificities. The existence of a new feto-maternal compatibility system would better fit these facts and would also allow the reinterpretation of several distortions associated with Rh described in the literature that have never been satisfactorily explained. PMID:6808831

  7. Temperament and its relationship to autistic symptoms in a high-risk infant sib cohort.

    PubMed

    Garon, Nancy; Bryson, Susan E; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Smith, Isabel M; Brian, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Szatmari, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The present study prospectively investigated early temperamental profiles and their associations with autistic symptoms in high-risk infants (N = 138) with an older sibling with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and low-risk infants (N = 73) with no family history of ASD. Children who were diagnosed with ASD at 36 months were distinguished from non-ASD sibs and controls by a temperament profile marked by lower positive affect, higher negative affect and difficulty controlling attention and behavior, which we labeled Effortful Emotion Regulation. This profile also distinguished the non-ASD sib group from the control group. Children with ASD were distinguished from both of the other two groups by a temperament profile of low Behavioral Approach (lower sensitivity to "social" reward cues). Low levels of Behavioral Approach were associated with a higher number of ASD symptoms, even after taking into account IQ, sex and group membership. Finally, a cluster analysis revealed two ASD subgroups distinguished by number of ASD symptoms, IQ, age of diagnosis and scores on the Behavioral Approach profile. These findings suggest that temperament may be a useful framework for understanding the emergence of ASD early in life.

  8. QST-FST comparisons with unbalanced half-sib designs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kimberly J; Whitlock, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    QST , a measure of quantitative genetic differentiation among populations, is an index that can suggest local adaptation if QST for a trait is sufficiently larger than the mean FST of neutral genetic markers. A previous method by Whitlock and Guillaume derived a simulation resampling approach to statistically test for a difference between QST and FST , but that method is limited to balanced data sets with offspring related as half-sibs through shared fathers. We extend this approach (i) to allow for a model more suitable for some plant populations or breeding designs in which offspring are related through mothers (assuming independent fathers for each offspring; half-sibs by dam); and (ii) by explicitly allowing for unbalanced data sets. The resulting approach is made available through the R package QstFstComp.

  9. Different outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in a pair of twins affected by juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; De Filippi, Paola; Di Meglio, Annamaria; Leszl, Anna; Donska, Svetlana; Zaccaron, Ada; Cagioni, Claudia; Galavotti, Roberta; Danesino, Cesare; Aprili, Fiorenza; Cugno, Chiara; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Zecca, Marco; Bresolin, Silvia

    2014-02-01

    A twin pair affected by juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) with the same somatic PTPN11 mutation and abnormal chromosome 7 in bone marrow samples but distinct prognostic gene expression signatures, received a matched-unrelated donor and matched-unrelated cord blood transplant, respectively. Both twins fully engrafted, but after 6 months, the twin with an acute-myeloid-like (AML-like) signature at diagnosis rejected the graft and had an autologous reconstitution. A second transplant with an unrelated 5/6-HLA-matched-loci cord blood performed after 4 months from rejection was unsuccessful. After 25 months from diagnosis, the twin with the AML-like gene expression signature died of liver failure while on progression of his JMML. The other twin, who had a non-acute-myeloid-like (non-AML-like) gene expression signature at diagnosis is in complete hematological remission with full donor chimera. This observation suggests a biological diversity of JMML also in patients with a common genetic background.

  10. Evaluation of factors affecting continuous performance test identical pairs version score of schizophrenic patients in a Japanese clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takayoshi; Aleksic, Branko; Kikuchi, Tsutomu; Banno, Masahiro; Kohmura, Kunihiro; Adachi, Yasunori; Kawano, Naoko; Iidaka, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP), which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit) and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) scores) in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d' score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d' score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score.

  11. The Generalized Relative Pairs IBD Distribution: Its Use in the Detection of Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    I introduce a novel approach to derive the distribution of disease affectional status given alleles identical by descent (IBD) sharing through ITO method. My approach tremendously simplifies the calculation of the affectional status distribution compared to the conventional method, which requires the parental mating information, and could be applied to disease with both dichotomous trait and quantitative trait locus (QTL). This distribution is shown to be independent of relative relationship and be employed to develop the marker IBD distributions for relative relationship. In addition, three linkage tests: the proportion, the mean test, and the LOD score test are proposed for different relative pairs based on their marker IBD distributions. Among all three tests, the mean test for sib pair requires the least sample size, thus, has the highest power. Finally, I evaluate the significance of different relative relationships by a Monte-Carlo simulation approach. PMID:27933287

  12. A new plan quality index for nasopharyngeal cancer SIB IMRT.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Yi, J; Zhou, Y; Yan, H; Han, C; Xie, C

    2014-02-01

    A new plan quality index integrating dosimetric and radiobiological indices was proposed to facilitate the evaluation and comparison of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients. Ten NPC patients treated by SIB-IMRT were enrolled in the study. Custom software was developed to read dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves from the treatment planning system (TPS). A plan filtering matrix was introduced to filter plans that fail to satisfy treatment protocol. Target plan quality indices and organ at risk (OAR) plan quality indices were calculated for qualified plans. A unique composite plan quality index (CPQI) was proposed based on the relative weight of these indices to evaluate and compare competing plans. Plan ranking results were compared with detailed statistical analysis, radiation oncology quality system (ROQS) scoring results and physician's evaluation results to verify the accuracy of this new plan quality index. The average CPQI values for plans with OAR priority of low, normal, high, and PTV only were 0.22 ± 0.08, 0.49 ± 0.077, 0.71 ± 0.062, and -0.21 ± 0.16, respectively. There were significant differences among these plan quality indices (One-way ANOVA test, p < 0.01). This was consistent with statistical analysis, ROQS results and physician's ranking results in which 90% OAR high plans were selected. Plan filtering matrix was able to speed up the plan evaluation process. The new matrix plan quality index CPQI showed good consistence with physician ranking results. It is a promising index for NPC SIB-IMRT plan evaluation.

  13. Saturn IB First Stage (S-IB) at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Workers at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Dynamic Test Stand install S-IB-200D, a dynamic test version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage, on January 11, 1965. MSFC Test Laboratory persornel assembled a complete Saturn IB to test the launch vehicle's structural soundness. Developed by the MSFC as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions.

  14. The aunt and uncle effect: an empirical evaluation of the confounding influence of full sibs of parents on pedigree reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J B; Busack, C; Britt, J; Bentzen, P

    2001-01-01

    This study used simulations and a known two-generation pedigree of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to evaluate the effect of full sibs of parents on pedigree reconstruction. Parentage analysis was conducted on 100 parent pair-offspring relationships from pedigrees with unrelated (simulation) and related (chinook salmon) candidate parents. Parentage assignment success for the chinook salmon was lower than in the simulated populations. For example, the six most variable loci (mean H(E) = 0.87) provided a mean of 97% unambiguous assignments in the simulated population and 67% unambiguous assignments for the chinook salmon. Estimates of the pairwise relatedness coefficient ((xy)) for most nonexcluded false parents and true parents of chinook salmon offspring exceeded 0.50. These results support the conclusion that closely related candidate parents decrease the power of genetic markers for pedigree reconstruction based on exclusion. Ambiguous parentage may be resolved using single parent- and parent pair-offspring likelihood analysis, however, these methods should be used with caution and they are not replacements for using more loci when many candidate parents are full sibs.

  15. Sibs with atopy and asthma share marker alleles at 11q13, but not at 7q31 or 14q32

    SciTech Connect

    Kate, L.P. ten; Collee, J.M.; Vries, H.G. de

    1994-09-01

    We studied allele sharing in 26 sib-pairs affected with atopy and asthma, recruited through a pediatric pulmonology department. Inclusion criteria were a positive score (2 symptoms or more) on a modified Dutch version of the MRC/ECCS questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and positive IgE tests (specific IgE 0.35 PRU/ml or more; total serum IgE for children under 10 years as described by Kjellmann et al., 1976; for older children 100 U/ml or over). Twenty-six sibpairs fulfilled these criteria. The microsatellites and polymorphic markers used in the analysis were 17bTA (an intragenic marker in the cystic fibrosis gene on 7q31); D11S534, D11S527, D11S97, PYGM, D11S480, Fc{epsilon}RI (all on 11q13, ordered from telomere to centromere) and D14S51 (a CA repeat close to the {alpha}-1-antitrypsin gene). We observed no sharing with the markers on 7q31 and 14q32, but significant sharing with markers on chromosome 11q13, especially D11S97, PYGM and D11S480. Sharing patterns were consistent with the existence of a dominant gene involved in the pathogenesis of atopic asthma on chromosome 11.

  16. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  17. Ethosuximide Affects Paired-Pulse Facilitation in Somatosensory Cortex of WAG\\Rij Rats as a Model of Absence Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Ghamkhari Nejad, Ghazaleh; Shahabi, Parviz; Alipoor, Mohamad Reza; Ghaderi Pakdel, Firouz; Asghari, Mohammad; Sadighi Alvandi, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The interaction between somatosensory cortex and thalamus via a thalamocortical loop is a theory behind induction of absence epilepsy. Inside peri-oral somatosensory (S1po) and primary somatosensory forelimb (S1fl) regions, excitatory and inhibitory systems are not balanced and GABAergic inhibitory synapses seem to play a fundamental role in short-term plasticity alterations. Methods: We investigated the effects of Ethosuximide on presynaptic changes by utilizing paired-pulse stimulation that was recorded from somatosensory cortex in 18 WAG\\Rij rats during epileptic activity. A twisted tripolar electrode including two stimulating electrodes and one recording electrode was implanted into the S1po and S1FL according to stereotaxic landmarks. Paired-pulses (200 µs, 100-1000 µA, 0.1 Hz) were applied to somatosensory cortex at 50, 100, 400, 500 ms inter-pulse intervals for 50 min period. Results: The results showed that paired-pulse facilitation was significantly reduced at all intervals in all times, but compared to the control group of epileptic WAG/Rij rats (p<0.05), it was exceptional about the first 10 minutes after the injection. At the intervals of 50 and 100 ms, a remarkable PPD was found in second, third, fourth and fifth 10-min post injection. Conclusion: These experiments indicate that Ethosuximide has effects on presynaptic facilitation in somatosensory cortex inhibitory loops by alteration in GABA levels that leads to a markedly diminished PPF in paired-pulse stimulation. PMID:26819920

  18. Saturn IB S-IB Stage at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, install the last engine on the S-IB stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the S-IB stage utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  19. Multiple Regression Analysis of Sib-Pair Data on Reading to Detect Quantitative Trait Loci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulker, D. W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Applies an extension of an earlier multiple regression model for twin analysis to the problem of detecting linkage in a quantitative trait. Detects a number of possible linkages, indicating that the approach is effective. Discusses detecting genotype-environment interaction and the issue of power. (RS)

  20. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics’ resources: focus on curated databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB's Bioinformatics resource portal ExPASy features over 150 resources, including UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, ENZYME, PROSITE, neXtProt, STRING, UniCarbKB, SugarBindDB, SwissRegulon, EPD, arrayMap, Bgee, SWISS-MODEL Repository, OMA, OrthoDB and other databases, which are briefly described in this article. PMID:26615188

  1. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics' resources: focus on curated databases.

    PubMed

    2016-01-04

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB's Bioinformatics resource portal ExPASy features over 150 resources, including UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, ENZYME, PROSITE, neXtProt, STRING, UniCarbKB, SugarBindDB, SwissRegulon, EPD, arrayMap, Bgee, SWISS-MODEL Repository, OMA, OrthoDB and other databases, which are briefly described in this article.

  2. Bilateral sensorineural deafness and hydrocephalus due to foramen of Monro obstruction in sibs: A newly described autosomal recessive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Chudley, A.E.; McCullough, C.; McCullough, D.W.

    1997-01-31

    We identified a Canadian-Mennonite family in which a brother and sister have hydrocephalus due to obstruction at the foramen of Monro and profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. This appears to be a unique combination of anomalies and, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Both parents and a brother are phenotypically normal. The parents are second cousins. Thus, on the basis of consanguinity, affected sibs of both sexes, and in the absence of evidence for intrauterine infections or other adverse perinatal events, this syndrome is likely inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Saturn IB S-IB Stage Assembly at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In the clustering procedure, an initial assembly step for the first stage (S-IB stage) of the Saturn IB launch vehicle, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, place the first of eight outboard fuel tanks next to the central liquid-oxygen tank of the S-IB stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the S-IB stage utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  4. Test Firing of Saturn IB S-IB-1 at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    S-IB-1, the first flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage (S-IB stage), undergoes a full-duration static firing in Saturn IB static test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on April 13, 1965. Developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, Louisiana, the 90,000-pound booster utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds. Between April 1965 and July 1968, MSFC performed thirty-two static tests on twelve different S-IB stages.

  5. Saturn IB S-IB Stage in Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In one of the initial assembly steps for the first stage (S-IB stage) of the Saturn IB launch vehicle, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, position a 'Spider Beam' to the central liquid-oxygen tank of the S-IB stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the S-IB stage utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  6. Saturn IB S-IB Stage Assembly at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In the 'clustering' procedure, an initial assembly step for the first stage (S-IB stage) of the Saturn IB launch vehicle, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, place the first of eight outboard fuel tanks (left) next to the central liquid-oxygen tank of S-IB stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the S-IB stage utilized eight H-1 engines to produce a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  7. Base-pair opening dynamics of the microRNA precursor pri-miR156a affect temperature-responsive flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Eun; Kim, Wanhui; Lee, Ae-Ree; Jin, Suhyun; Jun, A Rim; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2017-03-18

    Internal and environmental cues, including ambient temperature changes, regulate the timing of flowering in plants. Arabidopsis miR156 represses flowering and plays an important role in the regulation of temperature-responsive flowering. However, the molecular basis of miR156 processing at lower temperatures remains largely unknown. Here, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance studies to investigate the base-pair opening dynamics of model RNAs at 16 °C and investigated the in vivo effects of the mutant RNAs on temperature-responsive flowering. The A9C and A10CG mutations in the B5 bulge of the lower stem of pri-miR156a stabilized the C15∙G98 and U16∙A97 base-pairs at the cleavage site of pri-miR156a at 16 °C. Consistent with this, production of mature miR156 was severely affected in plants overexpressing the A9C and A10CG constructs and these plants exhibited almost no delay in flowering at 16 °C. The A10G and A9AC mutations did not strongly affect C15∙G98 and U16∙A97 base-pairs at 16 °C, and plants overexpressing A10G and A9AC mutants of miR156 produced more mature miR156 than plants overexpressing the A9C and A10CG mutants and showed a strong delay in flowering at 16 °C. Interestingly, the A9AC mutation had distinct effects on the opening dynamics of the C15∙G98 and U16∙A97 base-pairs between 16 °C and 23 °C, and plants expressing the A9AC mutant miR156 showed only a moderate delay in flowering at 16 °C. Based on these results, we propose that fine-tuning of the base-pair stability at the cleavage site is essential for efficient processing of pri-miR156a at a low temperature and for reduced flowering sensitivity to ambient temperature changes.

  8. Structured exploratory data analysis (SEDA) of finger ridge-count inheritance: II. Association arrays in parent-offspring and sib-sib pairs.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Williams, P T; Chakraborty, R; Mathew, S

    1983-12-01

    Familial similarity of the dermatoglyphic trait values of finger ridge-count scores and pattern intensity index is examined for 125 nuclear families from the Velanadu Brahmin population of Southern India by the method of association arrays. This methodology assesses parent-offspring and sibship similarity through a collection of measures of dependence that is sensitive to a variety of nonlinear trends and stochastic relationships between trait values. The method is used in conjunction with various weights to determine the relationship between family size and the level and form of dependence. These analyses reveal that siblings are most strongly associated for ridge-counts of the middle digit and less associated for the thumb and fifth digit ridge-counts. Further, sibship similarity for ridge-counts increases with family size for the thumb and fifth digit but remains relatively constant over all family sizes for the middle finger. Family size effects are also observed for total ridge-counts of the left hand, right hand, and both hands combined, and for the pattern intensity index. These effects of family size may be due to the most pronounced changes occurring in the amniotic environment between the first and second pregnancy, which are most strongly manifested in the sibship associations of smaller families.

  9. Saturn IB S-IB Stage at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In the clustering procedure, an initial assembly step for the Saturn IB launch vehicle's S-IB (first) stage, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, position the central liquid-oxygen tank. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  10. Saturn IB S-IB Stage Thrust Structure Assembly at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In one of the initial assembly steps for the Saturn IB launch vehicle's S-IB (first) stage, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, complete the thrust structure. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  11. Saturn I S-IB Stage, Lower Shroud, at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In one of the initial assembly steps for the Saturn IB launch vehicle's S-IB (first) stage, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, complete the lower shroud assembly. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized the eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  12. Saturn IB S-IB Stage at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In one of the initial assembly steps for the Saturn IB launch vehicle's S-IB (first) stage, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, position the thrust structure. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  13. Saturn IB S-IB Stage Thrust Structure Assembly at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, hoist the thrust structure assembly for the Saturn IB S-IB (first) stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  14. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome in two sibs with peripheral nerve involvement and bisalbuminaemia

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Maria

    1974-01-01

    Two sibs are described with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. Another sib died in early life with signs which appear to be indicative of the same condition. In the two cases studied we have documented signs of peripheral nerve involvement (not previously reported in the literature) which point towards a pathological process acting on ectodermal structures to a greater extent than has previously been considered. Images PMID:4448995

  15. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  16. Non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in two sibs with mild psycho-neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, G; son Blomquist, H K

    1977-02-01

    Non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH) has been diagnosed in two sibs. At the age 2:5 years and 1:3 years respectively only moderate psycho-motor retardation and muscular hypotonia were seen in the elderly child while no psycho-neurological symptoms were seen in the younger sib. Neither of the children had convulsions. This observation is in contrast to earlier published cases of this disorder. A summary of earlier published cases of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia is presented.

  17. Paradigm Diagnostics Salmonella Indicator Broth (PDX-SIB) for detection of Salmonella on selected environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olstein, Alan; Griffith, Leena; Feirtag, Joellen; Pearson, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The Paradigm Diagnostics Salmonella Indicator Broth (PDX-SIB) is intended as a single-step selective enrichment indicator broth to be used as a simple screening test for the presence of Salmonella spp. in environmental samples. This method permits the end user to avoid multistep sample processing to identify presumptively positive samples, as exemplified by standard U.S. reference methods. PDX-SIB permits the outgrowth of Salmonella while inhibiting the growth of competitive Gram-negative and -positive microflora. Growth of Salmonella-positive cultures results in a visual color change of the medium from purple to yellow when the sample is grown at 37 +/- 1 degree C. Performance of PDX-SIB has been evaluated in five different categories: inclusivity-exclusivity, methods comparison, ruggedness, lot-to-lot variability, and shelf stability. The inclusivity panel included 100 different Salmonella serovars, 98 of which were SIB-positive during the 30 to 48 h incubation period. The exclusivity panel included 33 different non-Salmonella microorganisms, 31 of which were SIB-negative during the incubation period. Methods comparison studies included four different surfaces: S. Newport on plastic, S. Anatum on sealed concrete, S. Abaetetuba on ceramic tile, and S. Typhimurium in the presence of 1 log excess of Citrobacter freundii. Results of the methods comparison studies demonstrated no statistical difference between the SIB method and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference method, as measured by the Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square test. Ruggedness studies demonstrated little variation in test results when SIB incubation temperatures were varied over a 34-40 degrees C range. Lot-to-lot consistency results suggest no detectable differences in manufactured goods using two reference Salmonella serovars and one non-Salmonella microorganism.

  18. Covariance Between Genotypic Effects and its Use for Genomic Inference in Half-Sib Families

    PubMed Central

    Wittenburg, Dörte; Teuscher, Friedrich; Klosa, Jan; Reinsch, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In livestock, current statistical approaches utilize extensive molecular data, e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to improve the genetic evaluation of individuals. The number of model parameters increases with the number of SNPs, so the multicollinearity between covariates can affect the results obtained using whole genome regression methods. In this study, dependencies between SNPs due to linkage and linkage disequilibrium among the chromosome segments were explicitly considered in methods used to estimate the effects of SNPs. The population structure affects the extent of such dependencies, so the covariance among SNP genotypes was derived for half-sib families, which are typical in livestock populations. Conditional on the SNP haplotypes of the common parent (sire), the theoretical covariance was determined using the haplotype frequencies of the population from which the individual parent (dam) was derived. The resulting covariance matrix was included in a statistical model for a trait of interest, and this covariance matrix was then used to specify prior assumptions for SNP effects in a Bayesian framework. The approach was applied to one family in simulated scenarios (few and many quantitative trait loci) and using semireal data obtained from dairy cattle to identify genome segments that affect performance traits, as well as to investigate the impact on predictive ability. Compared with a method that does not explicitly consider any of the relationship among predictor variables, the accuracy of genetic value prediction was improved by 10–22%. The results show that the inclusion of dependence is particularly important for genomic inference based on small sample sizes. PMID:27402363

  19. Covariance Between Genotypic Effects and its Use for Genomic Inference in Half-Sib Families.

    PubMed

    Wittenburg, Dörte; Teuscher, Friedrich; Klosa, Jan; Reinsch, Norbert

    2016-09-08

    In livestock, current statistical approaches utilize extensive molecular data, e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to improve the genetic evaluation of individuals. The number of model parameters increases with the number of SNPs, so the multicollinearity between covariates can affect the results obtained using whole genome regression methods. In this study, dependencies between SNPs due to linkage and linkage disequilibrium among the chromosome segments were explicitly considered in methods used to estimate the effects of SNPs. The population structure affects the extent of such dependencies, so the covariance among SNP genotypes was derived for half-sib families, which are typical in livestock populations. Conditional on the SNP haplotypes of the common parent (sire), the theoretical covariance was determined using the haplotype frequencies of the population from which the individual parent (dam) was derived. The resulting covariance matrix was included in a statistical model for a trait of interest, and this covariance matrix was then used to specify prior assumptions for SNP effects in a Bayesian framework. The approach was applied to one family in simulated scenarios (few and many quantitative trait loci) and using semireal data obtained from dairy cattle to identify genome segments that affect performance traits, as well as to investigate the impact on predictive ability. Compared with a method that does not explicitly consider any of the relationship among predictor variables, the accuracy of genetic value prediction was improved by 10-22%. The results show that the inclusion of dependence is particularly important for genomic inference based on small sample sizes.

  20. Sibs with the fetal akinesia sequence, fetal edema, and malformations: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Toriello, H V; Bauserman, S C; Higgins, J V

    1985-06-01

    Pena and Shokeir [J Pediatr 85:373-375. 1974] first described a syndrome characterized by multiple ankyloses, camptodactyly, facial anomalies, and pulmonary hypoplasia, which was later termed Pena-Shokeir I syndrome. Recent evidence suggests that a more accurate designation for this condition is the fetal akinesia sequence, which is almost certainly a heterogeneous entity. We describe sibs who were diagnosed as having Pena-Shokeir I syndrome but who did not have the muscular or anterior horn cell changes characteristic of other infants with the fetal akinesia sequence. In addition, both sibs had fetal edema, the first sib had coarctation of the aorta, and the second had polydactyly and thyroid hypoplasia. We suggest that this case provides further evidence for heterogeneity in the fetal akinesia sequence and may represent a provisionally unique syndrome.

  1. Saturn IB S-IB Stage in Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In the clustering procedure, an initial assembly step for the Saturn IB launch vehicle's S-IB (first) stage, workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, place the first of eight outboard fuel tanks atop the central liquid-oxygen tank. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), the S-IB utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  2. Non-random X chromosome inactivation in an affected twin in a monozygotic twin pair discordant for Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Oestavik, R.E.; Eiklid, K.; Oerstavik, K.H.

    1995-03-27

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a syndrome including exomphalos, macroglossia, and generalized overgrowth. The locus has been assigned to 11p15, and genomic imprinting may play a part in the expression of one or more genes involved. Most cases are sporadic. An excess of female monozygotic twins discordant for WBS have been reported, and it has been proposed that this excess could be related to the process of X chromosome inactivation. We have therefore studied X chromosome inactivation in 13-year-old monozygotic twin girls who were discordant for WBS. In addition, both twins had Tourette syndrome. The twins were monochorionic and therefore the result of a late twinning process. This has also been the case in previously reported discordant twin pairs with information on placentation. X chromosome inactivation was determined in DNA from peripheral blood cells by PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The affected twin had a completely skewed X inactivation, where the paternal allele was on the active X chromosome in all cells. The unaffected twin had a moderately skewed X inactivation in the same direction, whereas the mother had a random pattern. Further studies are necessary to establish a possible association between the expression of WBS and X chromosome inactivation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, A.

    1996-02-01

    The change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations was analyzed. The implications of these papers is important in terms of the fixation probability of genes because, for the same equilibrium inbreeding coefficient, fixation rates of mutant genes would be larger for partial full-sib mating than for partial selfing. 4 refs.

  4. Saturn IB S-IB Stages at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Three S-IB stages near completion at the NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, in November 1967. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the 90,000-pound booster utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust for the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage.

  5. Maternal systemic lupus erythematosus and chondrodysplasia punctata in two sibs: phenocopy or coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Elçioglu, N; Hall, C M

    1998-01-01

    Two sibs with chondrodysplasia punctata in whom the mother was suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus are presented and the radiological features described. Comparison with other forms of chondrodysplasia punctata with a review of the relevant publications is presented and the possible association with maternal systemic lupus erythematosus is highlighted. Images PMID:9719382

  6. Quantitative trait loci analysis for growth and carcass traits in a half-sib family of purebred Japanese Black (Wagyu) cattle.

    PubMed

    Mizoshita, K; Watanabe, T; Hayashi, H; Kubota, C; Yamakuchi, H; Todoroki, J; Sugimoto, Y

    2004-12-01

    We used a half-sib family of purebred Japanese Black (Wagyu) cattle to locate economically important quantitative trait loci. The family was composed of 348 fattened steers, 236 of which were genotyped for 342 microsatellite markers spanning 2,664 cM of 29 bovine autosomes. The genome scan revealed evidence of 15 significant QTL (<5% chromosome-wise level) affecting growth and carcass traits. Of the 15 QTL, six QTL were significant at the 5% experiment-wise level and were located in bovine chromosomes (BTA) 4, 5, and 14. We analyzed these three chromosomes in more detail in the 348 steers, with an average marker interval of 1.2 cM. The second scan revealed that the same haplotype of the BTA 4 region (52 to 67 cM) positively affected LM area and marbling. We confirmed the QTL for carcass yield estimate on BTA 5 in the region of 45 to 54 cM. Five growth-related QTL located on BTA 14, including slaughter and carcass weights, were positively affected by the same region of the haplotype of BTA 14 (29-51 cM). These data should provide a useful reference for further marker-assisted selection in the family and positional cloning research. The research indicates that progeny design with moderate genotyping efforts is a powerful method for detecting QTL in a purebred half-sib family.

  7. Supporting NEESPI with Data Services - The SIB-ESS-C e-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Schmullius, C.; Frotscher, K.

    2009-04-01

    Data discovery and retrieval is commonly among the first steps performed for any Earth science study. The way scientific data is searched and accessed has changed significantly over the past two decades. Especially the development of the World Wide Web and the technologies that evolved along shortened the data discovery and data exchange process. On the other hand the amount of data collected and distributed by earth scientists has increased exponentially requiring new concepts for data management and sharing. One such concept to meet the demand is to build up Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) or e-Infrastructures. These infrastructures usually contain components for data discovery allowing users (or other systems) to query a catalogue or registry and retrieve metadata information on available data holdings and services. Data access is typically granted using FTP/HTTP protocols or, more advanced, through Web Services. A Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach based on standardized services enables users to benefit from interoperability among different systems and to integrate distributed services into their application. The Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (SIB-ESS-C) being established at the University of Jena (Germany) is such a spatial data infrastructure following these principles and implementing standards published by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The prime objective is to provide researchers with focus on Siberia with the technical means for data discovery, data access, data publication and data analysis. The region of interest covers the entire Asian part of the Russian Federation from the Ural to the Pacific Ocean including the Ob-, Lena- and Yenissey river catchments. The aim of SIB-ESS-C is to provide a comprehensive set of data products for Earth system science in this region. Although SIB-ESS-C will be equipped with processing capabilities for in-house data generation

  8. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  9. Assessment of fertility and infertility in boron-exposed Turkish subpopulations: 3. Evaluation of fertility among sibs and in "borate families".

    PubMed

    Sayli, B S

    2001-09-01

    As a part of a work to reveal the health effects of boron and its compounds, fertility and infertility states of sibs of probands, contacted and interviewed in the field, and of their spouses were given. The purposes were to prevent duplications seemingly inevitable in a relatively small community with prevailing consanguinity while analyzing marriages over respective generations and to reveal if there occurred an aggregation of infertile couples. Any family without offspring after about the second year of marriage was considered primary infertile as adopted throughout the study and such families were ascertained through the individual pedigree charts set up according to the instructions of the proband, he (she) himself (herself) being excluded. The rates of childless families of this type were 0.0-3.4% among male and 0.9-3.8% among female sibs of the participant, and 2.3-10.0% among male and 0.0-5.6% among female sibs of his (her) spouse with averages of 2.3% of 1589, 2.6% of 1589, 4.0% of 1314, and 3.3% of 1436 instances, respectively. The differences were insignificant and the rates were not different from those concerning probands themselves and that of a comparable segment of the Turkish population. "Borate families/kindreds" with two or more members engaged in the borate industry were also assessed in order to detect if there was a significant clustering of infertiles within the kindred. Although it was difficult to compare with a matched group, few couples were examples of familial concentration of infertility. These results provided further support that boron exposure does not affect human reproduction primarily and most probably secondarily.

  10. Full-Sibs in Cohorts of Newly Settled Coral Reef Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Giacomo; Beldade, Ricardo; Holbrook, Sally J.; Schmitt, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    Reef fishes exhibit a bipartite life cycle where a benthic adult stage is preceded by a pelagic dispersal phase during which larvae are presumed to be mixed and transported by oceanic currents. Genetic analyses based on twelve microsatellite loci of 181 three-spot dascyllus (Dascyllus trimaculatus) that settled concurrently on a small reef in French Polynesia revealed 11 groups of siblings (1 full sibs and 10 half-sibs). This is the first evidence that fish siblings can journey together throughout their entire planktonic dispersal phase (nearly a month long for three-spot dascyllus). Our findings have critical implications for the dynamics and genetic structure of fish populations, as well as for the design of marine protected areas and management of fisheries. PMID:23028700

  11. Testing the Simple Biosphere model (SiB) using point micrometeorological and biophysical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Dorman, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The suitability of the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model of Sellers et al. (1986) for calculation of the surface fluxes for use within general circulation models is assessed. The structure of the SiB model is described, and its performance is evaluated in terms of its ability to realistically and accurately simulate biophysical processes over a number of test sites, including Ruthe (Germany), South Carolina (U.S.), and Central Wales (UK), for which point biophysical and micrometeorological data were available. The model produced simulations of the energy balances of barley, wheat, maize, and Norway Spruce sites over periods ranging from 1 to 40 days. Generally, it was found that the model reproduced time series of latent, sensible, and ground-heat fluxes and surface radiative temperature comparable with the available data.

  12. Installation of H-1 Engines to Saturn IB S-IB Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, install the H-1 engines into the Saturn I, S-IB (first) stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the 90,000-pound booster utilized eight H-1 engines. Each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  13. Two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rump, R; Hamel, B C; Pinckers, A J; van Dop, P A

    1997-01-01

    We describe two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome, a rare but distinct pleiotropic single gene disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The cases presented illustrate that this syndrome is still poorly recognised. We provide a review and analysis of previously reported cases and the differential diagnosis, which might aid in the identification of additional cases. Images PMID:9321767

  14. Modeling Surface Climate in US Cities Using Simple Biosphere Model Sib2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Thome, Kurtis; Wolfe, Robert; Imhoff, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We combine Landsat- and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based products in the Simple Biosphere model (SiB2) to assess the effects of urbanized land on the continental US (CONUS) surface climate. Using National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA), we define more than 300 urban settlements and their surrounding suburban and rural areas over the CONUS. The SiB2 modeled Gross Primary Production (GPP) over the CONUS of 7.10 PgC (1 PgC= 10(exp 15) grams of Carbon) is comparable to the MODIS improved GPP of 6.29 PgC. At state level, SiB2 GPP is highly correlated with MODIS GPP with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. An increasing horizontal GPP gradient is shown from the urban out to the rural area, with, on average, rural areas fixing 30% more GPP than urbans. Cities built in forested biomes have stronger UHI magnitude than those built in short vegetation with low biomass. Mediterranean climate cities have a stronger UHI in wet season than dry season. Our results also show that for urban areas built within forests, 39% of the precipitation is discharged as surface runoff during summer versus 23% in rural areas.

  15. Larval and juvenile growth performance of Manila clam hybrids of two full-sib families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu; Zhao, Liqiang; Liang, Jian; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-06-01

    In order to determine whether growth performance could be improved by hybridizing full-sib families of Manila clam ( Ruditapes philippinarum), crosses between two full-sib families including self and reciprocal crosses were carried out. The effects of heterosis, combining ability and interaction on the growth of shell length were estimated. The results showed that the growth of hybrid larvae was intermediate between parents on days 6 and 9. Heterosis on shell length was observed, which varied at juvenile stage. The cross of ♂A × ♀B ( Hp varied between 10.41% and 68.27%) displayed larger heterosis than ♂B × ♀A ( Hp varied between 1.89% and 32.33%) did, suggesting that ♂A × ♀B was an ideal hatchery method of improving the growth performance of Manila clam. The variances of general combining ability (GCA), special combining ability (SCA) and interaction (I) were significant in shell length (P < 0.05), indicating that both additive and non-additive genetic factors were important contributors to the growth of larvae and juveniles. The GCA for shell length of ♂A × ♀B was higher than that of ♂B × ♀A at both larval and juvenile stages. This confirmed that the cross between ♂A and ♀B showed great growth in shell length. In summary, the growth of Manila clam seeds could be improved by hybridizing selected parents from large numbers of full-sib families.

  16. Humero-radial synostosis, microcephaly, short corpus callosum, and abnormal genitalia in sibs.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Romain; Baumann, Clarisse; Garel, Catherine; Huten, Yolène; Oury, Jean-François; Delezoide, Anne-Lise

    2008-07-15

    We report on two male sib fetuses with humero-radial synostosis and thumb hypoplasia, microcephaly with simplified gyral pattern, short corpus callosum and ambiguous genitalia. The main clinical, anatomopathological and imaging findings are presented and compared with previous cases of humero-radial synostosis as a prominent manifestation and with the X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia syndrome (X-LAG). To our knowledge, this combination of anomalies has never been described before, and we propose that this disorder comprises a new humero-radial synostosis syndrome with an autosomal recessive or X-linked pattern of inheritance.

  17. Multiple congenital malformations in two sibs reminiscent of hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Dincsoy, M.Y.; Salih, M.A.M.; Al-Jurayyan, N.

    1995-04-10

    We report on two sibs, born to consanguineous parents, with defects of the midline including cleft lip and palate, flat nose, hypotelorism, and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, in addition to short limbs, radiolucent tibial notch, digital anomalies, ambiguous genitalia, and hypopituitarism. In spite of the similarities between this condition and the hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes, our patients had neither preaxial nor postaxial polydactyly, but had previously undescribed bilateral radiolucent tibial notch, which is not known to be part of those two syndromes. The cases presented here may very well represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A simplified treatment of SiB's land surface albedo parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Suarez, Max J.

    1991-01-01

    The earlier presented surface albedo parameterization is simplified by assuming that the reflectance of direct solar radiation is a simple function of solar zenith angle. The function chosen contains three parameters that vary with vegetation type, greenness, and leaf area index. Tables of parameter values are presented. Using these tables, SiB's (Simple Biosphere model) absorbances of direct solar radiation can be reproduced with an average relative error of less than 0.5 percent. Finally, the direct reflectance function is integrated over zenith angle to produce an equation for the surface reflectance of diffuse radiation.

  19. Strategies for implementing genomic selection in family-based aquaculture breeding schemes: double haploid sib test populations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Simulation studies have shown that accuracy and genetic gain are increased in genomic selection schemes compared to traditional aquaculture sib-based schemes. In genomic selection, accuracy of selection can be maximized by increasing the precision of the estimation of SNP effects and by maximizing the relationships between test sibs and candidate sibs. Another means of increasing the accuracy of the estimation of SNP effects is to create individuals in the test population with extreme genotypes. The latter approach was studied here with creation of double haploids and use of non-random mating designs. Methods Six alternative breeding schemes were simulated in which the design of the test population was varied: test sibs inherited maternal (Mat), paternal (Pat) or a mixture of maternal and paternal (MatPat) double haploid genomes or test sibs were obtained by maximum coancestry mating (MaxC), minimum coancestry mating (MinC), or random (RAND) mating. Three thousand test sibs and 3000 candidate sibs were genotyped. The test sibs were recorded for a trait that could not be measured on the candidates and were used to estimate SNP effects. Selection was done by truncation on genome-wide estimated breeding values and 100 individuals were selected as parents each generation, equally divided between both sexes. Results Results showed a 7 to 19% increase in selection accuracy and a 6 to 22% increase in genetic gain in the MatPat scheme compared to the RAND scheme. These increases were greater with lower heritabilities. Among all other scenarios, i.e. Mat, Pat, MaxC, and MinC, no substantial differences in selection accuracy and genetic gain were observed. Conclusions In conclusion, a test population designed with a mixture of paternal and maternal double haploids, i.e. the MatPat scheme, increases substantially the accuracy of selection and genetic gain. This will be particularly interesting for traits that cannot be recorded on the selection candidates and

  20. The Treatment of Severe Self-Injurious Behavior by the Systematic Fading of Restraints: Effects of Self-Injury, Self-Restraint, Adaptive Behavior, and Behavioral Correlates of Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Hall, Scott; Hales, Jackie; Watts, Derek; Murphy, Glynis

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effects of introducing flexion into a straight-arm splint, on self-injurious behavior (SIB), self-restraint, adaptive behavior, and behavioral correlates of affect for three individuals with severe mental retardation. For two individuals, SIB was reduced to zero, while overall level of restriction was also significantly…

  1. Using Interviews and Peer Pairs to Better Understand How School Environments Affect Young Children's Playground Physical Activity Levels: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Anne-Maree; Yeatman, Heather; Iverson, Don; Russell, Ken

    2012-01-01

    School break times provide a daily opportunity for children to be active; however, research indicates this time is underutilized. Reasons for low children's playground activity levels have primarily focused on physical barriers. This research aimed to contribute to physical environmental findings affecting children's playground physical activity…

  2. Implementing the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) in a general circulation model: Methodologies and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, N.; Sellers, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Schneider, E. K.; Shukla, J.; Kinter, J. L., III; Hou, Y.-T.; Albertazzi, E.

    1989-01-01

    The Simple Biosphere MOdel (SiB) of Sellers et al., (1986) was designed to simulate the interactions between the Earth's land surface and the atmosphere by treating the vegetation explicitly and relistically, thereby incorporating biophysical controls on the exchanges of radiation, momentum, sensible and latent heat between the two systems. The steps taken to implement SiB in a modified version of the National Meteorological Center's spectral GCM are described. The coupled model (SiB-GCM) was used with a conventional hydrological model (Ctl-GCM) to produce summer and winter simulations. The same GCM was used with a conventional hydrological model (Ctl-GCM) to produce comparable 'control' summer and winter variations. It was found that SiB-GCM produced a more realistic partitioning of energy at the land surface than Ctl-GCM. Generally, SiB-GCM produced more sensible heat flux and less latent heat flux over vegetated land than did Ctl-GCM and this resulted in the development of a much deeper daytime planetary boundary and reduced precipitation rates over the continents in SiB-GCM. In the summer simulation, the 200 mb jet stream and the wind speed at 850 mb were slightly weakened in the SiB-GCM relative to the Ctl-GCM results and equivalent analyses from observations.

  3. Electrochemical properties of carbon-coated Si/B composite anode for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Sun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Cho, Byung Won

    Carbon-coated Si and Si/B composite powders prepared by hydrocarbon gas (argon + 10 mol% propylene) pyrolysis were investigated as the anodes for lithium-ion batteries. Carbon-coated silicon anode demonstrated the first discharge and charge capacity as 1568 mAh g -1 and 1242 mAh g -1, respectively, with good capacity retention for 10 cycles. The capacity fading rate of carbon-coated Si/B composite anode decreased as the amounts of boron increased. In addition, the cycle life of carbon-coated Si/B/graphite composite anode has been significantly improved by using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR)/NaCMC mixture binders compared to the poly(vinylidene fluoride, PVdF) binder. A reversible capacity of about 550 mAh g -1 has been achieved at 0.05 mAm g -1 rate and its capacity could be maintained up to 450 mAh g -1 at high rate of 0.2 mAm g -1 even after 30 cycles. The improvement of the cycling performance is attributed to the lower interfacial resistance due to good electric contact between silicon particles and copper substrate.

  4. [Establishment of full-sib families of Branchiostoma japonicum and the relationship between early development patterns and larvae survival rates].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ye; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2013-10-01

    One general requirement of individual laboratory animals is that they have known genetic backgrounds. However, ensuring such genetic similarity is difficult, and can be facilitated by breeding a full strain for experimentation. To this end, the authors bred 34 full-sib families of amphioxus larvae/embryos. Due to the high mortality of the embryos and larvae, only seven full-sib families of juvenile amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum were obtained. Among them, the highest and lowest survival ratios were 32.4% and 1.67%, respectively, whereas the shortest metamorphosis and longest larva duration were 24 d and 42 d, respectively. These results demonstrate the feasibility of establishing full-sib families of amphioxus, and provide fundamental data needed for the future breeding of amphioxus strains.

  5. Magnetic properties of Fe5SiB2 and its alloys with P, S, and Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werwiński, Mirosław; Kontos, Sofia; Gunnarsson, Klas; Svedlindh, Peter; Cedervall, Johan; Höglin, Viktor; Sahlberg, Martin; Edström, Alexander; Eriksson, Olle; Rusz, Ján

    2016-05-01

    Fe5SiB2 has been synthesized and magnetic measurements have been carried out, revealing that Msat=0.92 MA/m at T =300 K. The M versus T curve shows a broad peak around T =160 K. The anisotropy constant K1, estimated at T =300 K, is 0.25 MJ/m3. Theoretical analysis of Fe5SiB2 system has been carried out and extended to the full range of Fe5Si1 -xPxB2 ,Fe5P1 -xSxB2 , and (Fe1 -xCox )5SiB2 compositions. The electronic band structures have been calculated using the full-potential local-orbital minimum-basis scheme (FPLO-14). The calculated total magnetic moments are 9.20, 9.15, 9.59, and 2.42 μB per formula units of Fe5SiB2 ,Fe5PB2 ,Fe5SB2 , and Co5SiB2 , respectively. In agreement with experiment, magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies (MAE's) calculated for T =0 K change from a negative (easy-plane) anisotropy -0.28 MJ/m3 for Fe5SiB2 to the positive (easy-axis) anisotropy 0.35 MJ/m3 for Fe5PB2 . Further increase of the number of p electrons in Fe5P1 -xSxB2 leads to an increase of MAE up to 0.77 MJ/m3 for the hypothetical Fe5P0.4S0.6B2 composition. Volume variation and fixed spin moment calculations (FSM) performed for Fe5SiB2 show an inverse relation between MAE and magnetic moment in the region down to about 15% reduction of the spin moment. The alloying of Fe5SiB2 with Co is proposed as a practical realization of magnetic moment reduction, which ought to increase MAE. MAE calculated in virtual crystal approximation (VCA) for a full range of (Fe1 -xCox )5SiB2 compositions reaches the maximum value of 1.16 MJ/m3 at Co concentration x =0.3 , with the magnetic moment 7.75 μB per formula unit. Thus, (Fe0.7Co0.3 )5SiB2 is suggested as a candidate for a rare-earth free permanent magnet. For the stoichiometric Co5SiB2 there is an easy-plane magnetization, with the value of MAE=-0.15 MJ/m3.

  6. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element.

    PubMed

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W; Kuenzle, C C

    1997-06-15

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer (Emu) not only stimulates transcription but also V(D)J recombination of chromosomally integrated recombination substrates. We aimed at reproducing this effect in recombination competent cells by transient transfection of extrachromosomal substrates. These we prepared by interposing between the recombination signal sequences (RSS) of the plasmid pBlueRec various fragments, including Emu, possibly affecting V(D)J recombination. Our work shows that sequences inserted between RSS 23 and RSS 12, with distances from their proximal ends of 26 and 284 bp respectively, can markedly affect the frequency of V(D)J recombination. We report that the entire Emu, the Emu core as well as its flanking 5' and 3' matrix associated regions (5' and 3' MARs) upregulate V(D)J recombination while the downstream section of the 3' MAR of Emu does not. Also, prokaryotic sequences markedly suppress V(D)J recombination. This confirms previous results obtained with chromosomally integrated substrates, except for the finding that the full length 3' MAR of Emu stimulates V(D)J recombination in an episomal but not in a chromosomal context. The fact that other MARs do not share this activity suggests that the effect is no mediated through attachment of the recombination substrate to a nuclear matrix-associated recombination complex but through cis-activation. The presence of a 26 bp A-T-rich sequence motif in the 5' and 3' MARs of Emu and in all of the other upregulating fragments investigated, leads us to propose that the motif represents a novel recombinational enhancer element distinct from those constituting the Emu core.

  7. Early growth performance of full-sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies at three different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Aimin, Atirah Abdullah; Abdullah, Mohd Zaki; Muhammad, Norwati; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Field trials of 14 full sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies were evaluated for growth performance at three sites (Bintulu, Mentakab and Segamat). Results indicated that there were significant differences (p> 0.05) for diameter breast height (Dbh) and total height (Ht) among the progenies and different sites. Superior progenies have been identified for future tree selection and improvement.

  8. Pairing Learners in Pair Work Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Neomy; Aldosari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in…

  9. The effect of multifunctional monomers/oligomers Additives on electron beam radiation crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinping; Soucek, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of multifunctional monomers or oligomers (MFM/O) additives on electron beam (E-beam) radiation induced crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS) was studied. Ten types of MFM/O were investigated, including trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA), triallyl cyanurate (TAC), polybutadiene diacrylate (PB-diacrylate), ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA), butylene glycol dimethacrylate (BGDMA), 1,2-polybutadiene. The effects of MFM/O concentration and E-beam radiation dose on properties of SIBS were studied including tensile strength, elongation-at-break, modulus, gel content, equilibrium swelling and crosslink density. TMPTA significantly improved the tensile modulus and crosslink density of SIBS. SIBS with TMPTMA and TMTPMA with inhibitor showed a 50% increase in tensile strength. The solubility of MFM/O in SIBS was also investigated by a selective swelling method. The MFM/O were found to be soluble in both phases of SIBS. The viscosity of SIBS with methacrylate type MFM/O was stable at 200 °C.

  10. In vivo pharmacological characterization of (+/-)-4-[2-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]thiophenol hydrochloride (SIB-1553A), a novel cholinergic ligand: microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Rao, Tadimeti S; Reid, Richard T; Correa, Lucia D; Santori, Emily M; Gardner, Michael F; Sacaan, Aida I; Lorrain, Daniel; Vernier, Jean-Michel

    2003-10-03

    SIB-1553A ((+/-)-4-[2-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]thiophenol HCl) is a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligand which is active in rodent and primate models of cognition. In functional assays, SIB-1553A exhibits marked subtype selectivity for nAChRs as compared to nicotine. In addition SIB-1553A also exhibits affinities to histaminergic (H3) and serotonergic (5-HT1 and 5HT2) receptors and sigma binding sites. In the present investigation, we characterized SIB-1553A-induced neurotransmitter release in vivo. Following subcutaneous injection (s.c., 10 mg/kg), SIB-1553A rapidly entered the brain achieving concentration of approximately 20 microM 15 min post-injection and was eliminated from plasma with a terminal half-life of approximately 32 min. In freely moving rats, SIB-1553A (1-40 mg/kg, s.c.), markedly increased ACh release in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In both regions, the magnitude of SIB-1553A-induced ACh release was greater than that seen with the prototypical nAChR agonist, nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c.). Both isomers of SIB-1553A induced similar levels of increase in hippocampal ACh release. Increased hippocampal ACh release was also observed following oral administration of SIB-1553A (40 mg/kg) or after local perfusion into the hippocampus (1 mM). SIB-1553A-induced hippocampal ACh release was significantly attenuated by two nAChR antagonists, mecamylamine (MEC) and dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE), and by the dopamine (DA) (D1) antagonist, SCH-23390, arguing that ACh release, in part, involves activation of nAChRs and a permissive DA synapse. In contrast to its robust effects on ACh release, SIB-1553A (40 mg/kg, s.c.) modestly increased striatal DA release (approximately 180% of baseline). Due to the proposed role of cholinergic pathways in learning and memory, the neurochemical profile of SIB-1553A suggests a potential for it to treat cognitive dysfunction.

  11. Highly Significant Linkage to the SLI1 Locus in an Expanded Sample of Individuals Affected by Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is defined as an unexplained failure to acquire normal language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. We have reported elsewhere a full-genome scan in 98 nuclear families affected by this disorder, with the use of three quantitative traits of language ability (the expressive and receptive tests of the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals and a test of nonsense word repetition). This screen implicated two quantitative trait loci, one on chromosome 16q (SLI1) and a second on chromosome 19q (SLI2). However, a second independent genome screen performed by another group, with the use of parametric linkage analyses in extended pedigrees, found little evidence for the involvement of either of these regions in SLI. To investigate these loci further, we have collected a second sample, consisting of 86 families (367 individuals, 174 independent sib pairs), all with probands whose language skills are ⩾1.5 SD below the mean for their age. Haseman-Elston linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.84 on chromosome 16 and an MLS of 2.31 on chromosome 19, both of which represent significant linkage at the 2% level. Amalgamation of the wave 2 sample with the cohort used for the genome screen generated a total of 184 families (840 individuals, 393 independent sib pairs). Analysis of linkage within this pooled group strengthened the evidence for linkage at SLI1 and yielded a highly significant LOD score (MLS = 7.46, interval empirical P<.0004). Furthermore, linkage at the same locus was also demonstrated to three reading-related measures (basic reading [MLS = 1.49], spelling [MLS = 2.67], and reading comprehension [MLS = 1.99] subtests of the Wechsler Objectives Reading Dimensions). PMID:15133743

  12. Soil Surface Runoff Scheme for Improving Land-Hydrology and Surface Fluxes in Simple SiB (SSiB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Mocko, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Evapotranspiration on land is hard to measure and difficult to simulate. On the scale of a GCM grid, there is large subgrid-scale variability of orography, soil moisture, and vegetation. Our hope is to be able to tune the biophysical constants of vegetation and soil parameters to get the most realistic space-averaged diurnal cycle of evaporation and its climatology. Field experiments such as First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE), Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), and LBA help a great deal in improving our evapotranspiration schemes. However, these improvements have to be matched with, and coupled to, consistent improvement in land-hydrology; otherwise, the runoff problems will intrinsically reflect on the soil moisture and evapotranspiration errors. Indeed, a realistic runoff simulation also ensures a reasonable evapotranspiration simulation provided the precipitation forcing is reliable. We have been working on all of the above problems to improve the simulated hydrologic cycle. Through our participation in the evaluation and intercomparison of land-models under the behest of Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP), we identified a few problems with Simple SiB (SSIB; Xue et al., 1991) hydrology in regions of significant snowmelt. Sud and Mocko (1999) show that inclusion of a separate snowpack model, with its own energy budget and fluxes with the atmosphere aloft and soil beneath, helps to ameliorate some of the deficiencies of delayed snowmelt and excessive spring season runoff. Thus, much more realistic timing of melt water generation was simulated with the new snowpack model in the subsequent GSWP re-evaluations using 2 years of ISLSCP Initiative I forcing data for 1987 and 1988. However, we noted an overcorrection of the low meltwater infiltration of SSiB. While the improvement in snowmelt timing was found everywhere, the snowmelt infiltration has became excessive in some regions, e.g., Lena river basin. This leads to much reduced runoff in many basins as

  13. A Two Phase HfB2-SiB4 Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuchina, Eric J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A two phase HfB2-SiB4 material which is useful as a high temperature oxidation resistant coating. This invention relates to ceramic coatings and more particularly to ceramic coatings containing metal borides. Boride materials are known to have good oxidation resistance, with HfB2 considered to be the best pure boride for oxidation applications. It has been shown that the addition of 10 to 20 percent SiC to HfB2 increases the oxidation resistance. The HfB2-SiC materials are prepared by hot pressing powder mixtures. Hot pressing powder mixtures has limited ability to produce fine grained multiphase materials due to particle coarsening during the sintering process. Additionally, the purity of the final monolithic structure is limited to the purity of the starting powders. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a method of producing highly pure multiphase ceramics, with better control of microstructure. Researchers have tried to produce HfB2-SiC coatings by CVD but without success.

  14. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties and dislocation luminescence of isotopically enriched silicon {sup 29}Si:B

    SciTech Connect

    Koplak, O. V.; Shteynman, E. A.; Tereschenko, A. N.; Morgunov, R. B.

    2015-09-15

    A correlation between the temperature dependences of the D1-line intensity of dislocation luminescence and the magnetic moment of plastically deformed isotopically enriched crystals {sup 29}Si:B is found. It is established that the magnetic susceptibility of the deformed crystals obtained by integration of the spectra of electron spin resonance and the D1-line intensity undergo similar nonmonotonic variations with temperature varying in the range of 20–32 K.

  15. Genetic dissection of powdery mildew resistance in interspecific half-sib grapevine families using SNP-based maps.

    PubMed

    Teh, Soon Li; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Clark, Matthew D; Gadoury, David M; Sun, Qi; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Luby, James J

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification in perennial fruit crops is impeded largely by their lengthy generation time, resulting in costly and labor-intensive maintenance of breeding programs. In a grapevine (genus Vitis) breeding program, although experimental families are typically unreplicated, the genetic backgrounds may contain similar progenitors previously selected due to their contribution of favorable alleles. In this study, we investigated the utility of joint QTL identification provided by analyzing half-sib families. The genetic control of powdery mildew was studied using two half-sib F1 families, namely GE0711/1009 (MN1264 × MN1214; N = 147) and GE1025 (MN1264 × MN1246; N = 125) with multiple species in their ancestry. Maternal genetic maps consisting of 1077 and 1641 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, respectively, were constructed using a pseudo-testcross strategy. Ratings of field resistance to powdery mildew were obtained based on whole-plant evaluation of disease severity. This 2-year analysis uncovered two QTLs that were validated on a consensus map in these half-sib families with improved precision relative to the parental maps. Examination of haplotype combinations based on the two QTL regions identified strong association of haplotypes inherited from 'Seyval blanc', through MN1264, with powdery mildew resistance. This investigation also encompassed the use of microsatellite markers to establish a correlation between 206-bp (UDV-015b) and 357-bp (VViv67) fragment sizes with resistance-carrying haplotypes. Our work is one of the first reports in grapevine demonstrating the use of SNP-based maps and haplotypes for QTL identification and tagging of powdery mildew resistance in half-sib families.

  16. Global, Self-Consistent Carbon Flux and Pool Estimates Utilizing The Simple Biosphere Model (SiB4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, K.; Baker, I. T.; Denning, A.; Stockli, R.; Schaefer, K. M.; Lokupitiya, E. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon fluxes and pools cannot be measured directly on regional and global scales, thus land surface models are a vital tool in improving estimates of carbon sources, sinks, above and below ground biomass, and soil stocks. The Simple Biosphere Model (SiB4) is a self-consistent model that uses minimal input data to simulate carbon fluxes and pools in a fully prognostic system. Land surface models like SiB4 can be evaluated against a variety of data: carbon pools from field campaigns; carbon fluxes from chambers and flux towers; leaf out and senescence timing, as well as length of growing season from in situ observations; crop yields; and remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI), productivity, fluorescence, and biomass. To improve the simulation of the carbon cycle, this study evaluates SiB4 against these metrics. Preliminary results show that SiB4 has skill at predicting carbon pools and fluxes over forests and crops (maize, soybean, and wheat). Biomass, crop yield, LAI, fluorescence, and productivity are reasonable compared to data. Calculating the leaf pool explicitly improves the LAI over satellite-derived estimates, particularly in boreal, temperate, and agricultural ecosystems; and the improved LAI combined with the use of carbon pools to calculate autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration results in an improvement in carbon fluxes. Vegetation-specific comparisons highlight deficiencies in both grasslands and shrubs, which are addressed and will be further developed in the future. The resulting carbon pools and fluxes provide a realistic estimate of the current global terrestrial carbon cycle and are also realistic a priori fluxes for use by the NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) Flux Project to help attribute CO2 climate forcing to spatially resolved emissions.

  17. Functional and genetic characterization of gas exchange and intrinsic water use efficiency in a full-sib family of Pinus pinaster Ait. in response to drought.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Marina; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Cervera, María Teresa; Aranda, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    Drought is an important environmental factor in Mediterranean ecosystems affecting seedling recruitment, productivity or susceptibility to fires and pathogens. Studying water use efficiency in these environments is crucial due to its adaptive value allowing trees to cope with low water availability. We studied the phenotypic variability and genetic control of intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE(i)) and related traits in a full-sib family of Pinus pinaster under drought imposition. We detected significant differences in WUE(i) between clones of the same family and moderate heritability estimates that indicate some degree of genetic control over this trait. Stomatal conductance to water vapor was the trait most affected by drought imposition and it showed the strongest influence in WUE(i). Stomatal conductance to water vapor and specific leaf area (SLA) were the traits with highest heritabilities and they showed a significant genetic correlation with WUE(i), suggesting that selection of needles with low SLA values will improve WUE(i) in this species by reducing water losses through stomatal control.

  18. Using the Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Model SiB3-RAMS to Evaluate Fossil Fuel Emissions Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, K. D.; Denning, A. S.; Parazoo, N.; Schuh, A.; Baker, I.; Lu, L.

    2006-12-01

    Using atmospheric tracer transport models, inverse modelers can estimate the strengths and spatial distribution of carbon sources and sinks; however, fossil fuel CO2 emissions must be accurately estimated to isolate and quantify biospheric and oceanic fluxes. To help achieve unbiased estimates of carbon exchange, high-resolution fossil fuel emissions estimates (36 km spatial resolution at timescales of one hour) are being produced for the United States [Gurney, 2006]. The goal of this research is use the coupled biosphere-atmosphere model SiB-RAMS to evaluate these emissions estimates. We have coupled the latest version of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3) to the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and have developed the capability to calculate the respiration factor and initial soil moisture for each grid cell using offline SiB3. In addition, we have implemented the capability to set the initial CO2 field to concentrations from the Parameterized Chemical Transport Model (PCTM) and to nudge lateral boundary concentrations to PCTM mixing ratios, which have a three-hour time-step. Carbon monoxide production and oxidation will be simulated using prescribed fields of the hydroxyl radical and methane. To investigate fossil fuel emissions, SiB3-RAMS simulations across large urban airsheds will be evaluated against CO and CO2 observations.

  19. Thigmomorphogenesis: anatomical, morphological and mechanical analysis of genetically different sibs of Pinus taeda in response to mechanical perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telewski, F. W.; Jaffe, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three open pollinated families (half-sibs) and four controlled pollinated families (full-sibs) of Pinus taeda L. (loblolly pine) were grown in a greenhouse and analyzed for changes induced by mechanical perturbation (MP). These changes included inhibition of stem and needle elongation, bracing of branch nodes, and increased radial growth in the direction of the MP. Inhibition of stem elongation was the least variable feature measured. Leaf extension and stem diameter were highly variable between half-sibs. MP induced increased drag in greenhouse grown P. taeda in wind-tunnel tests. In P. taeda, MP induced decreased flexibility and increased elasticity and plasticity of the stem. The increased radial growth of the stems overrode the increase in elasticity, resulting in an overall decrease in flexibility. MP trees had a higher rupture point than non-MP controls. Increased radial growth is a result of more rapid cell divisions of the vascular cambium, resulting in increased numbers of tracheids. The decreased leader growth is partly due to a decreased tracheid length in response to MP.

  20. Linkage analysis between dominant and co-dominant makers in full-sib families of out-breeding species.

    PubMed

    Alves, Alexandre Alonso; Bhering, Leonardo Lopes; Cruz, Cosme Damião; Alfenas, Acelino Couto

    2010-07-01

    As high-throughput genomic tools, such as the DNA microarray platform, have lead to the development of novel genotyping procedures, such as Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), it is likely that, in the future, high density linkage maps will be constructed from both dominant and co-dominant markers. Recently, a strictly genetic approach was described for estimating recombination frequency (r) between co-dominant markers in full-sib families. The complete set of maximum likelihood estimators for r in full-sib families was almost obtained, but unfortunately, one particular configuration involving dominant markers, segregating in a 3:1 ratio and co-dominant markers, was not considered. Here we add nine further estimators to the previously published set, thereby making it possible to cover all combinations of molecular markers with two to four alleles (without epistasis) in a full-sib family. This includes segregation in one or both parents, dominance and all linkage phase configurations.

  1. Cytogenetic analysis of the susceptibility of the wheat line Hobbit sib (Dwarf A) to Septoria tritici blotch.

    PubMed

    Arraiano, L S; Kirby, J; Brown, J K M

    2007-12-01

    Septoria tritici blotch, caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola (anamorph Septoria tritici), is one of the most important foliar diseases of wheat in much of the world. Susceptibility of host plants to septoria was investigated by cytogenetic analysis. A line of Hobbit sib (Dwarf A) in which translocated chromosome 5BS-7BS was nominally substituted by chromosome arms 5BS and 7BS from Bezostaya 1 had a much lower mean level of septoria than Hobbit sib itself. By the use of microsatellite markers, it was shown that the 5BS arm of this line had in fact been substituted by the homologous arm of Chinese Spring. Further investigation of substitution and nullitetrasomic lines demonstrated that chromosome arm 5BS of Hobbit sib possesses genes, which either promote susceptibility to septoria or suppress resistance. This chromosome arm has previously been shown to carry genes for resistance to yellow (stripe) rust and powdery mildew, implying a trade-off between resistances to these two diseases and to septoria in wheat breeding. Bezostaya 1 was found to have specific resistance to M. graminicola isolate IPO323, probably controlled by the gene Stb6 on chromosome arm 3AS, present in numerous wheat cultivars. It also had partial resistance to septoria distributed over several chromosomes, which may explain the value of this cultivar as a source of septoria resistance.

  2. The sensitivity of ground surface temperature prediction to soil thermal properties Using the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Gao, Zhiqiu; Wei, Dongping

    2012-05-01

    Using the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB2), soil thermal properties (STP) were examined in a Tibetan prairie during the monsoon period to investigate ground surface temperature prediction. We improved the SiB2 model by incorporating a revised force-restore method (FRM) to take the vertical heterogeneity of soil thermal diffusivity ( k) into account. The results indicate that (1) the revised FRM alleviates daytime overestimation and nighttime underestimation in modeled ground surface temperature ( T g), and (2) its role in little rainfall events is significant because the vertical gradient of k increases with increasing surface evaporation. Since the original formula of thermal conductivity ( λ) in the SiB2 greatly underestimates soil thermal conductivity, we compared five algorithms of λ involving soil moisture to investigate the cause of overestimation during the day and underestimation at night on the basis of the revised FRM. The results show that (1) the five algorithms significantly improve T g prediction, especially in daytime, and (2) taking one of these five algorithms as an example, the simulated T g values in the daytime are closer to the field measurements than those in the nighttime. The differences between modeled T g and field measurements are mostly within the margin of error of ±2 K during 3 August to 4 September 1998.

  3. TM9/Phg1 and SadA proteins control surface expression and stability of SibA adhesion molecules in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Froquet, Romain; le Coadic, Marion; Perrin, Jackie; Cherix, Nathalie; Cornillon, Sophie; Cosson, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    TM9 proteins form a family of conserved proteins with nine transmembrane domains essential for cellular adhesion in many biological systems, but their exact role in this process remains unknown. In this study, we found that genetic inactivation of the TM9 protein Phg1A dramatically decreases the surface levels of the SibA adhesion molecule in Dictyostelium amoebae. This is due to a decrease in sibA mRNA levels, in SibA protein stability, and in SibA targeting to the cell surface. A similar phenotype was observed in cells devoid of SadA, a protein that does not belong to the TM9 family but also exhibits nine transmembrane domains and is essential for cellular adhesion. A contact site A (csA)-SibA chimeric protein comprising only the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of SibA and the extracellular domain of the Dictyostelium surface protein csA also showed reduced stability and relocalization to endocytic compartments in phg1A knockout cells. These results indicate that TM9 proteins participate in cell adhesion by controlling the levels of adhesion proteins present at the cell surface.

  4. Characterization of physiological responses of two alfalfa half-sib families with improved salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anower, M Rokebul; Mott, Ivan W; Peel, Michael D; Wu, Yajun

    2013-10-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage crop worldwide that is relatively sensitive to soil salinity. Improved cultivars with high production on saline soil will benefit many producers and land managers. This study reports the characterization of physiological responses of two unrelated experimental alfalfa half-sib families, HS-A and HS-B, selected for their improved survival under saline conditions (up to EC 18). Six-week-old plants were subjected to NaCl-nutrient solution treatment for three weeks starting at an electrical conductivity (EC) of 3 dS m(-1) with incremental increases of 3 dS m(-1) every week, reaching 9 dS m(-1) in the third week. HS-B showed greater leaf number (72%) and stem length (44%) while HS-A showed better leaf production (84%) under salt treatment compared to the initial genetic backgrounds from which they were developed. This improved growth is associated with 208% and 78% greater accumulation of chlorophyll content in HS-B and HS-A, respectively. Both HS-A and HS-B also showed improved capability to maintain water content (RWC) under salt stress compared to the initial populations. Differing from its initial populations (P-B), HS-B did not accumulate Na in shoots after salt treatment. HS-B also maintained K(+)/Na(+) and Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratios, while P-B showed 59% and 69% decrease in these ion ratios, respectively. Na(+) content in HS-A was not different from its initial populations (P-A) after salt treatment. However, HS-A showed an enhanced accumulation of Ca(2+) and maintained the levels of Mg(2+) and K(+) in shoots compared to the P-A populations. This study provides physiological support of improved salt tolerance in HS-A and HS-B and suggests that these plants maintain ion homeostasis but have different mechanisms of coping with high salinity.

  5. Inbreeding depression on growth and survival of full-sib family of Manila clam ( Ruditapes philippinarum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhongming; Li, Na; Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Ying; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng

    2017-02-01

    In present study, the inbreeding depression ( ID) of growth and survival of Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) was investigated at larval and juvenile stages. Nine inbred families ( A 2, B 2, C 2, D 2, E 2, F 2, G 2, H 2 and I 2) were established by mating within nine full-sib families with expected inbreeding coefficient of 0.25. Inbred families showed significant differences in shell length and hatching rate of D-larvae (straight-hinged larvae). The larvae of the nine inbred families grew slower than those of control group ( CG), and their ID value ranged from 0.81% ± 6.09% to 16.10% ± 1.49%. The ID value of larval survival rate varied between 27.47% ± 9.36% and 70.50% ± 13.66%. The ID was also detected for juvenile growth in A 2, B 2, C 2, and D 2, which ranged from 4.60 ± 2.21 to 17.71 ± 7.73. The A 2 family maintained the highest juvenile survival rate, whereas the other inbred families exhibited ID values varying between 62.79% ± 4.54% and 96.14% ± 0.87%. The linear relationship of estimated ID between growth and survival was negatively correlated ( R = -0.434, P < 0.05). The results of this study suggested that the ID of growth was common at the larval stage but was less prevalent at juvenile stage. In contrast, the ID of survival increased from larval to juvenile stage. A better understanding of the effect of inbreeding may aid to selective breeding of Manila clam.

  6. Simultaneous-integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in the treatment of early-stage left-sided breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Singla, Rajanish; King, Stephanie C.; Albuquerque, Kevin . E-mail: kalbuqu@lumc.edu; Creech, Steve M.S.; Dogan, Nesrin

    2006-10-01

    We assessed the feasibility and impact of simultaneous-integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in the treatment of left breast carcinoma and compared target coverage and normal tissue doses with SIB-IMRT and 3-dimensional (3D) conformal RT using opposed tangential fields. For each of 10 patients with early-stage left-sided invasive breast carcinoma, 5 plans were generated; the first 4 were 3D conformal opposed tangential fields-2 with wedges, 2 with compensators and either photon or electron boost. A dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions was prescribed to the left breast and an additional 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the lumpectomy bed. When compared to the tangential plans, SIB-IMRT maintained coverage (V{sub 95%}) to the left breast and lumpectomy bed without significantly increasing the left breast maximum dose. SIB-IMRT was able to reduce the lung mean dose, maximum dose, and the V{sub 20} by 55-104 cGy, 983-1298 cGy (p < 0.001), and 3.7-4.4%, respectively. In addition, SIB-IMRT reduced the maximum heart dose by 1032-1173 cGy and contralateral breast dose was increased (although p = NS). The mean and maximum dose to the unspecified tissues was also significantly reduced by 81-88 cGy and 516-942 cGy, respectively. SIB-IMRT resulted in a significant improvement in target dose conformality by up to 67%. Our findings that SIB-IMRT could improve dose conformality, reduce total treatment times, and reduce some of the normal structure doses presents it as an alternative technique for adjuvant breast radiotherapy; however this needs to be studied further in the clinic setting.

  7. Maintenance of adaptive differentiation by Wolbachia induced bidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility: the importance of sib-mating and genetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Antoine; Vavre, Fabrice; Silvain, Jean-François; Dupas, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are reproductive parasites widespread among arthropods. The most common effect arising from the presence of Wolbachia in a population is Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI), whereby postmating reproductive isolation occurs in crosses between an infected male and an uninfected female, or when a male is infected with a different strain of Wolbachia to that of the female (bidirectional CI). Previous theoretical models have demonstrated that bidirectional CI can contribute to the genetic divergence of populations in haploid and diploid organisms. However, haplodiploid organisms were not considered in these models even though they include Nasonia parasitoid wasps – the best example of the implication of Wolbachia in ongoing speciation. Moreover, previous work did not investigate inbreeding mating systems, which are frequently observed in arthropod species. Results We developed a stochastic two-island model which simulated three genetic scenarios, diploidy, haploidy, and haplodiploidy, with two CI phenotypes being considered for the latter: (1) male development of female progeny; and (2) mortality of fertilized eggs. We also investigated the effect of varying the proportion of sib mating. In the model each allopatric population was initially fixed for a single allele at a nuclear locus under positive selection and infected with one strain of Wolbachia. Each simulation presupposed that the two populations were fixed for a different allele and a different strain of Wolbachia. The degree of genetic differentiation observed in the locus under selection due to bidirectional CI was much lower for the two haplodiploid phenotypes than for either diploids or haploids. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sib-mating may compensate for the lower efficiency of bidirectional CI in haplodiploids by maintaining genetic divergence. Conclusion Our model suggests that maintenance of genetic differentiation facilitated by Wolbachia is more likely to

  8. Magnetic and structural properties of ferromagnetic Fe5PB2 and Fe5SiB2 and effects of Co and Mn substitutions

    DOE PAGES

    McGuire, Michael A.; Parker, David S.

    2015-10-22

    Crystallographic and magnetic properties of Fe5PB2, Fe4CoPB2, Fe4MnPB2, Fe5SiB2, Fe4CoSiB2, and Fe4MnSiB2 are reported. All adopt the tetragonal Cr5B3 structure-type and are ferromagnetic at room temperature with easy axis of magnetization along the c-axis. The spin reorientation in Fe5SiB2 is observed as an anomaly in the magnetization near 170 K, and is suppressed by substitution of Co or Mn for Fe. The silicides are found to generally have larger magnetic moments than the phosphides, but the data suggests smaller magnetic anisotropy in the silicides. Cobalt substitution reduces the Curie temperatures by more than 100 K and ordered magnetic moments bymore » 16-20%, while manganese substitution has a much smaller effect. This suggests Mn moments align ferromagnetically with the Fe and that Co does not have an ordered moment in these structures. Anisotropic thermal expansion is observed in Fe5PB2 and Fe5SiB2, with negative thermal expansion seen along the c-axis of Fe5SiB2. First principles calculations of the magnetic properties of Fe5SiB2 and Fe4MnSiB2 are reported. The results, including the magnetic moment and anisotropy, and are in good agreement with experiment.« less

  9. Ion pair receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Kuk

    2010-01-01

    Compared with simple ion receptors, which are able to bind either a cation or an anion, ion pair receptors bearing both a cation and an anion recognition site offer the promise of binding ion pairs or pairs of ions strongly as the result of direct or indirect cooperative interactions between co-bound ions. This critical review focuses on the recent progress in the design of ion pair receptors and summarizes the various binding modes that have been used to accommodate ion pairs (110 references). PMID:20737073

  10. Two-locus admixture linkage analysis of bipolar and unipolar affective disorder supports the presence of susceptibility loci on chromosomes 11p15 and 21q22

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, C.; Kalsi, G.; O`Neill, J.

    1997-02-01

    Following a report of a linkage study that yielded evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder on the long arm of chromosome 21, we studied 23 multiply affected pedigrees collected from Iceland and the UK, using the markers PFKL, D21S171, and D21S49. Counting only bipolar cases as affected, a two-point LOD of 1.28 was obtained using D21S171 ({theta} = 0.01, {alpha} = 0.35), with three Icelandic families producing LODs of 0.63, 0.62, and 1.74 (all at {theta} = 0.0). Affected sib pair analysis demonstrated increased allele sharing at D21S171 (P = 0.001) when unipolar cases were also considered affected. The same set of pedigrees had previously been typed for a tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH) polymorphism at 11p15 and had shown some moderate evidence for linkage. When information from TH and the 21q markers was combined in a two-locus admixture analysis, an overall admixture LOD of 3.87 was obtained using the bipolar affection model. Thus the data are compatible with the hypothesis that a locus at or near TH influences susceptibility in some pedigrees, while a locus near D21S171 is active in others. Similar analyses in other datasets should be carried out to confirm or refute our tentative finding. 66 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Stereo Pair, Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This stereoscopic image pair is a perspective view that shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north toward the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada Flintridge are also shown. The cluster of large buildings left of center, at the base of the mountains, is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Data shown in this image can be used to predict both how wildfires spread over the terrain and how mudflows are channeled down the canyons.

    The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation, U. S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provided the image detail, and the Landsat Thematic Mapper provided the color. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data and the aerial photography. The image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  12. Interaction of glutathione reductase with heavy metal: the binding of Hg(II) or Cd(II) to the reduced enzyme affects both the redox dithiol pair and the flavin.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Thierry; Desbois, Alain

    2006-12-26

    To determine the inhibition mechanism of yeast glutathione reductase (GR) by heavy metal, we have compared the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the enzyme in its oxidized (Eox) and two-electron reduced (EH2) forms, in the absence and the presence of Hg(II) or Cd(II). The spectral data clearly show a redox dependence of the metal binding. The metal ions do not affect the absorption and RR spectra of Eox. On the contrary, the EH2 spectra, generated by addition of NADPH, are strongly modified by the presence of heavy metal. The absorption changes of EH2 are metal-dependent. On the one hand, the main flavin band observed at 450 nm for EH2 is red-shifted at 455 nm for the EH2-Hg(II) complex and at 451 nm for the EH2-Cd(II) complex. On the other hand, the characteristic charge-transfer (CT) band at 540 nm is quenched upon metal binding to EH2. In NADPH excess, a new CT band is observed at 610 nm for the EH2-Hg(II)-NADPH complex and at 590 nm for EH2-Cd(II)-NADPH. The RR spectra of the EH2-metal complexes are not sensitive to the NADPH concentration. With reference to the RR spectra of EH2 in which the frequencies of bands II and III were observed at 1582 and 1547 cm-1, respectively, those of the EH2-metal complexes are detected at 1577 and 1542 cm-1, indicating an increased flavin bending upon metal coordination to EH2. From the frequency shifts of band III, a concomitant weakening of the H-bonding state of the N5 atom is also deduced. Taking into account the different chemical properties of Hg(II) and Cd(II), the coordination number of the bound metal ion was deduced to be different in GR. A mechanism of the GR inhibition is proposed. It proceeds primarily by a specific binding of the metal to the redox thiol/thiolate pair and the catalytic histidine of EH2. The bound metal ion then acts on the bending of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD as well as on the hydrophobicity of its microenvironment.

  13. How Mg(2+) ion and water network affect the stability and structure of non-Watson-Crick base pairs in E. coli loop E of 5S rRNA: a molecular dynamics and reference interaction site model (RISM) study.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Sudhanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2016-08-02

    The non-Watson-Crick (non-WC) base pairs of Escherichia coli loop E of 5S rRNA are stabilized by Mg(2+) ions through water-mediated interaction. It is important to know the synergic role of Mg(2+) and the water network surrounding Mg(2+) in stabilizing the non-WC base pairs of RNA. For this purpose, free energy change of the system is calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation as Mg(2+) is pulled from RNA, which causes disturbance of the water network. It was found that Mg(2+) remains hexahydrated unless it is close to or far from RNA. In the pentahydrated form, Mg(2+) interacts directly with RNA. Water network has been identified by two complimentary methods; MD followed by a density-based clustering algorithm and three-dimensional-reference interaction site model. These two methods gave similar results. Identification of water network around Mg(2+) and non-WC base pairs gives a clue to the strong effect of water network on the stability of this RNA. Based on sequence analysis of all Eubacteria 5s rRNA, we propose that hexahydrated Mg(2+) is an integral part of this RNA and geometry of base pairs surrounding it adjust to accommodate the [Formula: see text]. Overall the findings from this work can help in understanding the basis of the complex structure and stability of RNA with non-WC base pairs.

  14. Familiality of Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Heritability Analysis in a Large Sib-Pair Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Carol A.; Grados, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a genetic component that is highly comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic relations between these disorders have not been clearly elucidated. This study examined the familial relations among TS,…

  15. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  16. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  17. Cooper pairs and bipolarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhno, Victor

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that Cooper pairs are a solution of the bipolaron problem for model Fröhlich Hamiltonian. The total energy of a pair for the initial Fröhlich Hamiltonian is found. Differences between the solutions for the model and initial two-particle problems are discussed.

  18. Unusual expression of Gaucher's disease: cardiovascular calcifications in three sibs homozygous for the D409H mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Chabás, A; Cormand, B; Grinberg, D; Burguera, J M; Balcells, S; Merino, J L; Mate, I; Sobrino, J A; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Vilageliu, L

    1995-01-01

    Three sisters suffering from an unusual form of Gaucher's disease are described. These patients had cardiovascular abnormalities consisting of calcification of the ascending aorta and of the aortic and mitral valves. Neurological findings included ophthalmoplegia and saccadic eye movements in two patients, and tonic-clonic seizures in the third. The three patients died, two of them after having undergone aortic valve replacement. Tissue was obtained from one of the sibs and fibroblast and liver beta-glucocerebrosidase activity was reduced to 4% and 11% of mean normal values. Genotype analysis indicated that the patient was homozygous for the D409H mutation. It is tempting to relate the phenotype of severe cardiac involvement to the D409H/D409H genotype, although further cases will be needed before this association can be confirmed. Images PMID:8544197

  19. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  20. Response of a gall wasp community to genetic variation in the host plant Quercus crispula: a test using half-sib families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masato; Ozaki, Kenichi

    2005-02-01

    The structure of a herbivore community may change consistently along the genetic cline of a host plant, change at particular points along the cline, or respond independently of the cline. To reveal such relationships between a gall wasp community and genetic variation in the host plant Quercus crispula, we examined patterns in the species richness and abundance of gall wasps along a genetic cline of the host plant, using 12 half-sib families from six different regions. The genetic relationships among the half-sib families of Q. crispula were quantified on the basis of leaf morphology, which represented a morphological cline from leaves typical of Q. crispula to leaves resembling another oak species, Q. dentata. The morphological cline could be regarded as a genetic cline caused by a history of hybridization with Q. dentata. The mean numbers of gall types varied among the half-sib families, but did not show a consistent increase or decrease along the genetic cline. This pattern could be explained by the fact that responses to host plant variation differed among the gall wasp species. The half-sib families were classified into three groups based on an ordination analysis of the species composition of the gall wasp community that to some extent also reflected the genetic cline of Q. crispula. This suggests that the species composition of gall wasps changed intermittently along the genetic cline, rather than gradually and consistently along the cline.

  1. Vaccination of full-sib channel catfish families against enteric septicemia of catfish with an oral live attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the efficacy of an oral live-attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine against enteric septicemia of catfish in 20 full-sib fingerling channel catfish families. Each family was split into vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups. The vaccine was delivered orally by feeding fish diet...

  2. Some developments on the affected-pedigree-member method of linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Some improvements are presented for the affected-pedigree-member method of linkage analysis, which is a generalization of the sib-pair method. The test statistic is extended to include contrasts between affected and unaffected pedigree members, so that it now utilizes marker information from all typed pedigree members rather than just the typed affected members. Computer simulation using a sample pedigree of 14 individuals shows that this modification can substantially increase statistical power where there is a direct association between marker variation and disease and where disease risk is elevated in carriers of the disease allele. Data on Huntington disease in 16 British families, which were analyzed previously using only the affected individuals, are reanalyzed with the unaffected individuals included. Strong rejection of the null hypothesis of no association between Huntington disease and the HindIII polymorphism is confirmed, but the particular families in which the association is significant differs from that obtained through an analysis based only on affected individuals and reflects more closely the results obtained from a lod-score analysis. The test statistic is also modified here to incorporate contrasts between individuals of zero kinship, if needed. This enables contrasts between individuals from different predigrees, as well as contrasts involving individuals sampled from the general population, to be incorporated into the test of association. For population data, the methodology reduces to a type of contingency-table analysis, in which the rows of the table correspond to different marker-locus genotypes and in which the two columns categorize subjects into an affected group versus an unaffected, or control, group. The methodology formulated here greatly reduces the number of coefficients to be calculated, thereby enhancing the computational efficiency of the computer program. 29 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Enabling the development of Community Extensions to GI-cat - the SIB-ESS-C case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigagli, L.; Meier, N.; Boldrini, E.; Gerlach, R.

    2009-04-01

    GI-cat is a Java software package that implements discovery and access services for disparate geospatial resources. An instance of GI-cat provides a single point of service for querying and accessing remote, as well as local, heterogeneous sources of geospatial information, either through standard interfaces, or taking advantage of GI-cat advanced features, such as incremental responses, query feedback, etc. GI-cat supports a number of de-iure and de-facto standards, but can also be extended to additional community catalog/inventory services, by defining appropriate mediation components. The GI-cat and the SIB-ESS-C development teams collaborated in the development of a mediator to the Siberian Earth Science System Cluster (SIB-ESS-C), a web-based infrastructure to support the communities of environmental and Earth System research in Siberia. This activity resulted in the identification of appropriate technologies and internal mechanisms supporting the development of GI-cat extensions, that are the object of this work. GI-cat is actually built up of a modular framework of SOA components, that can be variously arranged to fit the needs of a community of users. For example, a particular GI-cat instance may be configured to provide discovery functionalities onto an OGC WMS; or to adapt a THREDDS catalog to the standard OGC CSW interface; or to merge a number of CDI repositories into a single, more efficient catalog. The flexibility of GI-cat framework is achieved thanks to its design, that follows the Tree of Responsibility (ToR) pattern and the Uniform Pipe and Filter architectural style. This approach allows the building of software blocks that can be flexibly reused and composed in multiple ways. In fact, the components that make up any GI-cat configuration all implement two common interfaces (i.e. IChainNode and ICatalogService), that support chaining one component to another . Hence, it would suffice to implement those interfaces (plus an appropriate factory

  4. Utilizing Field Campaign, Flux Tower, and Satellite Data To Improve Simulated Carbon Fluxes and Pools in The Simple Biosphere Model (SiB4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; Denning, S.; Stockli, R.; Schaefer, K. M.; Lokupitiya, E.

    2012-12-01

    Since terrestrial carbon fluxes and pools cannot be measured directly on regional and global scales, land surface models are an important tool in improving estimates of carbon sources and sinks. A variety of data sets now exist to evaluate land surface models against, which can help isolate shortcomings in the model and identify processes not being properly simulated. A variety of ecological properties are measured and hence can be investigated: above and below ground biomass and carbon pools from field campaigns; carbon fluxes from chambers and flux towers; and remotely sensed tree height, wood pools and leaf area index (LAI). In order to compare against these metrics, the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB4) has been restructured to include land cover heterogeneity, prognostic phenology, and carbon pools. This study presents results from SiB4, focusing on boreal North America and tropical South America. By utilizing data collected from field campaigns (the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study, BOREAS, and the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia, LBA), satellite data (remotely sensed LAI and IceSAT LIDAR measurements), and flux tower measurements, we analyze SiB4 results to help identify and resolve shortcomings and missing processes in the model. Land cover heterogeneity, prognostic phenology, and carbon pools have recently been combined in SiB4; and this study will investigate not only the impacts of these features, but also the overall performance of SiB4 in an effort to help improve terrestrial biogeochemical models and to advance our knowledge of the carbon cycle.

  5. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  6. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  7. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Andrea; Atyeo, John; Cox, Jennifer; Rinks, Marianne; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  8. Evidence of major genes affecting stress response in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a first step towards the genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting stress response variation in rainbow trout, we performed complex segregation analyses (CSA) fitting mixed inheritance models of plasma cortisol using Bayesian methods in large full-sib families of rainbow trout. ...

  9. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  10. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 independent assessment: Semiscale Mod-2A intermediate break test S-IB-3

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L N

    1986-02-01

    The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 independent assessment project at Sandia National Laboratories is part of an overall effort funded by the NRC to determine the ability of various system codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of light water reactors during accident and off-normal conditions. The TRAC code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, an intermediate break test (S-IB-3), performed at the Semiscale Mod-2A facility, has been analyzed. Using an input model with a 3-D VESSEL component, the vessel and downcomer inventories during 3-IB-3 were generally well predicted, but the core heatup was underpredicted compared to data. An equivalent calculation with an all 1-D input model ran about twice as fast as our basecase analysis using a 3-D VESSEL in the input model, but the results of the two calculations diverged significantly for many parameters of interest, with the 3-D VESSEL model results in better agreement with data. 22 refs., 100 figs.

  11. PREFACE: III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing (SibTest 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    This issue of the journal is devoted to the research and studies presented at the III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing SibTest. The conference was held in Altai, Russia, on 27-31 July 2015. The conference brought together experts from different countries and organizations who had a great opportunity to share knowledge during oral and poster presentations and to initiate discussions on topics that are of interest to the conference attendees. The conference aimed to discuss innovative methods and the application of advanced technologies in non-destructive testing. The conference also attempted to bring together university, academic and industrial science, to expand the co-operation of scientists from different countries in research and development and the commercialization of innovative technologies in non-destructive testing. The key themes of the conference were: ultrasonic and acoustic testing; electromagnetic and thermal testing; various types of radiation non-destructive testing; passive and active testing techniques. The conference organizers are the Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, with the assistance of the Russian Society for Non-Destructive Testing and Technical Diagnostics, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, National Research Tomsk State University, Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation.

  12. Wnt-Ror signaling to SIA and SIB neurons directs anterior axon guidance and nerve ring placement in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kennerdell, Jason R.; Fetter, Richard D.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Wnt signaling through Frizzled proteins guides posterior cells and axons in C. elegans into different spatial domains. Here we demonstrate an essential role for Wnt signaling through Ror tyrosine kinase homologs in the most prominent anterior neuropil, the nerve ring. A genetic screen uncovered cwn-2, the C. elegans homolog of Wnt5, as a regulator of nerve ring placement. In cwn-2 mutants, all neuronal structures in and around the nerve ring are shifted to an abnormal anterior position. cwn-2 is required at the time of nerve ring formation; it is expressed by cells posterior of the nerve ring, but its precise site of expression is not critical for its function. In nerve ring development, cwn-2 acts primarily through the Wnt receptor CAM-1 (Ror), together with the Frizzled protein MIG-1, with parallel roles for the Frizzled protein CFZ-2. The identification of CAM-1 as a CWN-2 receptor contrasts with CAM-1 action as a non-receptor in other C. elegans Wnt pathways. Cell-specific rescue of cam-1 and cell ablation experiments reveal a crucial role for the SIA and SIB neurons in positioning the nerve ring, linking Wnt signaling to specific cells that organize the anterior nervous system. PMID:19855022

  13. Minimal Pairs: Minimal Importance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Adam

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that minimal pairs do not merit as much attention as they receive in pronunciation instruction. There are other aspects of pronunciation that are of greater importance, and there are other ways of teaching vowel and consonant pronunciation. (13 references) (VWL)

  14. Recurrence of achondrogenesis type 2 in sibs: Additional evidence for germline mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Jessica M; Putnam, Angelica R; Sangle, Nikhil; Lowichik, Amy; Rose, Nancy C; Opitz, John M

    2010-07-01

    Achondrogenesis Type II (ACG2) is a lethal skeletal disorder caused by a dominant mutation in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1). Familial cases have been reported, suggesting both germline and somatic mosaicism. We report on two pregnancies from the same couple with gross, radiologic, and microscopic findings of ACG2. Molecular analysis of the second infant demonstrated heterozygosity for a c.2303G > A transition (p.Gly768Asp) in exon 33 of the COL2A1 gene. Although this mutation could not be proven by molecular studies in the first infant, identical findings in two affected pregnancies support germline mosaicism as the cause of ACG2 in this family.

  15. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, 0 and 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  16. Junctionless Cooper pair transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, K. Yu.; Lehtinen, J. S.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum phase slip (QPS) is the topological singularity of the complex order parameter of a quasi-one-dimensional superconductor: momentary zeroing of the modulus and simultaneous 'slip' of the phase by ±2π. The QPS event(s) are the dynamic equivalent of tunneling through a conventional Josephson junction containing static in space and time weak link(s). Here we demonstrate the operation of a superconducting single electron transistor (Cooper pair transistor) without any tunnel junctions. Instead a pair of thin superconducting titanium wires in QPS regime was used. The current-voltage characteristics demonstrate the clear Coulomb blockade with magnitude of the Coulomb gap modulated by the gate potential. The Coulomb blockade disappears above the critical temperature, and at low temperatures can be suppressed by strong magnetic field.

  17. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis find that over 40 loci affect risk of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey C; Clayton, David G; Concannon, Patrick; Akolkar, Beena; Cooper, Jason D; Erlich, Henry A; Julier, Cécile; Morahan, Grant; Nerup, Jørn; Nierras, Concepcion; Plagnol, Vincent; Pociot, Flemming; Schuilenburg, Helen; Smyth, Deborah J; Stevens, Helen; Todd, John A; Walker, Neil M; Rich, Stephen S

    2009-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common autoimmune disorder that arises from the action of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. We report the findings of a genome-wide association study of T1D, combined in a meta-analysis with two previously published studies. The total sample set included 7,514 cases and 9,045 reference samples. Forty-one distinct genomic locations provided evidence for association with T1D in the meta-analysis (P < 10(-6)). After excluding previously reported associations, we further tested 27 regions in an independent set of 4,267 cases, 4,463 controls and 2,319 affected sib-pair (ASP) families. Of these, 18 regions were replicated (P < 0.01; overall P < 5 × 10(-8)) and 4 additional regions provided nominal evidence of replication (P < 0.05). The many new candidate genes suggested by these results include IL10, IL19, IL20, GLIS3, CD69 and IL27.

  18. Limited variation found among Norway spruce half-sib families in physiological response to drought and resistance to embolism.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Daniel J; Guzicka, Marzenna; McCulloh, Katherine A; Żytkowiak, Roma

    2016-02-01

    Projections of future climates suggest that droughts (Ds) may become more frequent and severe in many regions. Genetic variation, especially within populations in traits related to D resistance, is poorly investigated in forest trees, but this knowledge is necessary to better understand how forests will respond to water shortages. In this study, we investigated variability among seven open-pollinated half-sib families of a single population and two population-level progenies of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) in their gas exchange response to imposed D and xylem vulnerability to embolism. During their third growing season, saplings were subjected to three treatments-control (C), D (for 19 weeks) and broken drought (BD, 54 days without watering starting in mid-July, then well-watered). In response to D, all families reduced their stomatal conductance (gs) and light-saturated rates of photosynthesis (Amax) in a similar way. After rewatering, the xylem water potential (Ψ) recovered in the BD treatment, but gs and Amax remained lower than in C. Needle starch concentration was altered in both D treatments compared with C. Xylem of D-exposed trees was more vulnerable to embolism than in C. The minimum attained safety margin remained positive for all families, indicating that no catastrophic hydraulic failure occurred in stem xylem during D. Significant family variation was found for Ψ early in the D (midday Ψ between -1.2 and -1.8 MPa), and for needle damage, but not for sapling mortality. Family variation found at the initial stages of D, and not afterward, suggests that all families responded similarly to greater D intensity, exhibiting the species-specific response. Limited variation at the family level indicates that the response to D and the traits we examined were conservative within the species. This may limit breeding opportunities for increased D resistance in Norway spruce in light of expected climatic changes.

  19. Functional molecular markers (EST-SSR) in the full-sib reciprocal recurrent selection program of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Galvão, K S C; Ramos, H C C; Santos, P H A D; Entringer, G C; Vettorazzi, J C F; Pereira, M G

    2015-07-03

    This study aimed to improve grain yield in the full-sib reciprocal recurrent selection program of maize from the North Fluminense State University. In the current phase of the program, the goal is to maintain, or even increase, the genetic variability within and among populations, in order to increase heterosis of the 13th cycle of reciprocal recurrent selection. Microsatellite expressed sequence tags (EST-SSRs) were used as a tool to assist the maximization step of genetic variability, targeting the functional genome. Eighty S1 progenies of the 13th recur-rent selection cycle, 40 from each population (CIMMYT and Piranão), were analyzed using 20 EST-SSR loci. Genetic diversity, observed heterozygosity, information content of polymorphism, and inbreeding co-efficient were estimated. Subsequently, analysis of genetic dissimilarity, molecular variance, and a graphical dispersion of genotypes were conducted. The number of alleles in the CIMMYT population ranged from 1 to 6, while in the Piranão population the range was from 2 to 8, with a mean of 3.65 and 4.35, respectively. As evidenced by the number of alleles, the Shannon index showed greater diversity for the Piranão population (1.04) in relation to the CIMMYT population (0.89). The genic SSR markers were effective in clustering genotypes into their respective populations before selection and an increase in the variation between populations after selection was observed. The results indicate that the study populations have expressive genetic diversity, which cor-responds to the functional genome, indicating that this strategy may contribute to genetic gain, especially in association with the grain yield of future hybrids.

  20. The evolutionary origin and elaboration of sociality in the aculeate Hymenoptera: maternal effects, sib-social effects, and heterochrony.

    PubMed

    Linksvayer, Timothy A; Wade, Michael J

    2005-09-01

    We discuss the evolutionary origin and elaboration of sociality using an indirect genetic effects perspective. Indirect genetic effects models simultaneously consider zygotic genes, genes expressed in social partners (especially mothers and siblings), and the interactions between them. Incorporation of these diverse genetic effects should lead to more realistic models of social evolution. We first review haplodiploidy as a factor that promotes the evolution of eusociality. Social insect biologists have doubted the importance of relatedness asymmetry caused by haplodiploidy and focused on other predisposing factors such as maternal care. However; indirect effects theory shows that maternal care evolves more readily in haplodiploids, especially with inbreeding and despite multiple mating. Because extended maternal care is believed to be a precondition for the evolution of eusociality, the evolutionary bias towards maternal care in haplodiploids may result in a further bias towards eusociality in these groups. Next, we compare kin selection and parental manipulation and then briefly review additional hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of eusociality. We present a verbal model for the evolutionary origin and elaboration of sib-social care from maternal care based on the modification of the timing of expression of maternal care behaviors. Specifically, heterochrony genes cause maternal care behaviors to be expressed prereproductively towards siblings instead of postreproductively towards offspring. Our review demonstrates that both maternal effect genes (expressed in a parental manipulation manner) and direct effect zygotic genes (expressed in an offspring control manner) are likely involved in the evolution of eusociality. We conclude by describing theoretical and empirical advances with indirect genetic effects and sociogenomics, and we provide specific quantitative genetic and genomic predictions from our heterochrony model for the evolutionary origin and

  1. Pair of Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.5 meters per pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a pair of small meteor impact craters in the Arena Colles region of Mars, located north of Isidis Planitia.

    Location near: 22.7oN, 278.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  2. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  3. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  4. Genetic evidence of extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in the monk parakeet

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) is a widespread invasive species native to southern South America that has become established in many regions of the world. Monk parakeets breed in a large, fully enclosed structure built from twigs, which consist of one to many individual brooding chambers. The species has been considered to be socially and genetically monogamous. However, genetic relatedness of adults to juveniles in the native area was found to be lower than expected for monogamy. To assess the significance of this discrepancy, we examined individual and population genetic patterns of microsatellite loci at two sites in Córdoba province, Argentina. Results We sampled 154 nestlings and 42 adults in Córdoba, Argentina. Mean value of pairwise relatedness of nestlings within chambers was about 0.40. Contrarily, relatedness of nestlings between chambers was close to zero. We found a considerable degree of variation in nestling pairwise relatedness and parentage within chambers, including chambers with combinations of unrelated, half-sib, and full-sib nestlings. The proportion of sibling relatedness indicated monogamy in 47% and extra pair-paternity in 40% of the chambers. We also found intra-brood parasitism in 3% of the chambers. Conclusions Our results indicate that the monk parakeet is sexually polygamous in its native range in Argentina, which is consistent with the observed mean value of relatedness of adults to juveniles of about 0.4. We also confirm the existence of intra-brood parasitism. High density of monk parakeets may favor occurrence of extra-pair paternity and intra-brood parasitism in the native sites. PMID:24209709

  5. Assessing the feasibility of volumetric-modulated arc therapy using simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-VMAT): An analysis for complex head-neck, high-risk prostate and rectal cancer cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cilla, Savino; Deodato, Francesco; Digesù, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Ferro, Marica; Sallustio, Giuseppina; De Spirito, Marco; Piermattei, Angelo; Morganti, Alessio G.

    2014-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allowed the simultaneous delivery of different doses to different target volumes within a single fraction, an approach called simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). As consequence, the fraction dose to the boost volume can be increased while keeping low doses to the elective volumes, and the number of fractions and overall treatment time will be reduced, translating into better radiobiological effectiveness. In recent years, volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been shown to provide similar plan quality with respect to fixed-field IMRT but with large reduction in treatment time and monitor units (MUs) number. However, the feasibility of VMAT when used with SIB strategy has few investigations to date. We explored the potential of VMAT in a SIB strategy for complex cancer sites. A total of 15 patients were selected, including 5 head-and-neck, 5 high-risk prostate, and 5 rectal cancer cases. Both a double-arc VMAT and a 7-field IMRT plan were generated for each case using Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system for an Elekta Precise linac. Dosimetric indexes for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared based on dose-volume histograms. Conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose-contrast index were used for target analyses. The equivalent uniform doses and the normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for main OARs. MUs number and treatment time were analyzed to score treatment efficiency. Pretreatment dosimetry was performed using 2-dimensional (2D)-array dosimeter. SIB-VMAT plans showed a high level of fluence modulation needed for SIB treatments, high conformal dose distribution, similar target coverage, and a tendency to improve OARs sparing compared with the benchmark SIB-IMRT plans. The median treatment times reduced from 13 to 20 minutes to approximately 5 minutes for all cases with SIB-VMAT, with a MUs reduction up to 22.5%. The 2D-array ion-chambers' measurements reported an agreement

  6. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  7. Stage 2 of the Wellcome Trust UK-Irish bipolar affective disorder sibling-pair genome screen: evidence for linkage on chromosomes 6q16-q21, 4q12-q21, 9p21, 10p14-p12 and 18q22.

    PubMed

    Lambert, D; Middle, F; Hamshere, M L; Segurado, R; Raybould, R; Corvin, A; Green, E; O'Mahony, E; Nikolov, I; Mulcahy, T; Haque, S; Bort, S; Bennett, P; Norton, N; Owen, M J; Kirov, G; Lendon, C; Jones, L; Jones, I; Holmans, P; Gill, M; Craddock, N

    2005-09-01

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is a common psychiatric disorder with complex genetic aetiology. We have undertaken a genome-wide scan in one of the largest samples of bipolar affected sibling pairs (ASPs) using a two-stage approach combining sample splitting and marker grid tightening. In this second stage analysis, we have examined 17 regions that achieved a nominally significant maximum likelihood LOD score (MLS) threshold of 0.74 (or 1.18 for the X-chromosome) in stage one. The second stage has added 135 ASP families to bring the total stage 2 sample to 395 ASPs. In total, 494 microsatellite markers have been used to screen the human genome at a density of 10 cM in the first stage sample (260 ASPs) and 5 cM in the second stage. Under the broad diagnostic model, two markers gave LOD scores exceeding 3 with two-point analysis: D4S392 (LOD=3.30) and D10S197 (LOD=3.18). Multipoint analysis demonstrated suggestive evidence of linkage between BPAD and chromosomal regions 6q16-q21 (MLS=2.61) and 4q12-q21 (MLS=2.38). 6q16-q21 is of particular interest because our data, together with those from two recent genome scans, make this the best supported linkage region in BPAD. Further, our data show evidence of a gender effect at this locus with increased sharing predominantly within the male-male pairs. Our scan also provides support for linkage (MLS> or =1.5) at several other regions that have been implicated in meta-analyses of bipolar disorder and/or schizophrenia including 9p21, 10p14-p12 and 18q22.

  8. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence.

  9. Genetic Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Growth and Wood Quality Traits in Eucalyptus Grandis Using a Maternal Half-Sib Family and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Bertolucci, FLG.; Penchel, R.; Sederoff, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping. BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  10. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling growth and wood quality traits in Eucalyptus grandis using a maternal half-sib family and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Bertolucci, F L; Penchel, R; Sederoff, R R

    1996-11-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping, BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding.

  11. Prediction of phase distribution pattern in phase field simulations on Mo5SiB2-primary areas in near eutectic Mo-Si-B alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    A Mo-10.9Si-20.3B (if not stated otherwise all compositions are given in at.%) alloy was modeled using the phase field method with linearized phase diagrams and thermodynamic data. The simulation results showed that there are two specific microstructural constituents. According to the simulations and experimental microstructural investigations the primary Mo5SiB2 phase observed in this study was combined by the Moss-Mo3Si-Mo5SiB2 eutectics. The overall composition of the both primary and eutectic area was probed and the phase evolution along with the concentration change of the core areas were explored and visualized in the solidification domain. To verify the accuracy of the simulation results, they were comprised with the experimental achievements. In terms of the fraction of phases, the portion of the primary phase and the eutectic constituent and the phase distribution pattern our results were in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Genetic diversity and morphological characterization of half-sib families of Heliconia bihai L., H. chartacea Lane ex Barreiros, and H. wagneriana Peterson.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F R A; Moraes Filho, R M; Martins, L S S; Montarroyos, A V V; Loges, V

    2016-06-20

    The Neotropical Heliconia genus contains highly diversified plants and up to 220 species have been reported from the north of Mexico to the South of Brazil. Heliconia are cultivated as ornamental garden plants and as cut flowers. All species can be propagated by seeds or vegetatively, through rhizomes. Depending on the species, an individual plant can spread and form large clonal populations. H. bihai L., H. chartacea Lane ex Barreiros, and H. wagneriana Petersen are among the most cultivated Heliconia species. However, they still have undesirable characteristics that could be improved for the international market. This study aimed to characterize 15 half-sib families originating from commercial cultivations, by morphological and molecular markers. The genetic diversity (ĤE), considering all individuals of the three species was 0.103. For H. bihai half-sib families, the value of ĤE was 0.242, showing high genetic diversity. The ĤE value for H. chartacea was 0.068, indicating low genetic diversity. All individuals of H. wagneriana showed the same band patterns, suggesting that the two parental plants were propagated vegetatively from the same plant and may have undergone some endogamic crossings. These results showed that molecular characterization can differentiate individuals closely related as half-siblings for H. bihai and H. chartacea, despite the low variation observed with morphological descriptors. The high genetic diversity observed in H. bihai half-sibling genotypes can provide valuable resources for breeding programs.

  13. Comparison of GCM subgrid fluxes calculated using BATS and SiB schemes with a coupled land-atmosphere high-resolution model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinmei; Arritt, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of land-atmosphere interactions and biosphere in climate change studies has long been recognized, and several land-atmosphere interaction schemes have been developed. Among these, the Simple Biosphere scheme (SiB) of Sellers et al. and the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) of Dickinson et al. are two of the most widely known. The effects of GCM subgrid-scale inhomogeneities of surface properties in general circulation models also has received increasing attention in recent years. However, due to the complexity of land surface processes and the difficulty to prescribe the large number of parameters that determine atmospheric and soil interactions with vegetation, many previous studies and results seem to be contradictory. A GCM grid element typically represents an area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2}. Within such an area, there exist variations of soil type, soil wetness, vegetation type, vegetation density and topography, as well as urban areas and water bodies. In this paper, we incorporate both BATS and SiB2 land surface process schemes into a nonhydrostatic, compressible version of AMBLE model (Atmospheric Model -- Boundary-Layer Emphasis), and compare the surface heat fluxes and mesoscale circulations calculated using the two schemes. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Geometrical parameters of E+S pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Local environmental conditions (i.e., density and angular momentum properties of protogalactic clouds) are thought to be factors affecting the ultimate morphology of a galaxy. The existence of significant numbers of mixed morphology (E/SO+S) pairs of galaxies would represent a direct challenge to this idea unless all early-type components are formed by mergers. The authors wished to isolate candidate E+S pairs for detailed study. The authors have observed 22 pairs of mixed morphology galaxies (containing at least one early-type component) selected from a catalog of Sulentic (1988: unpublished) based upon the ESO sky survey. The observed sample and relevant morphological and interaction characteristics are summarized in tabular form. The authors report the relevant geometrical properties of the galaxies in another table. They list the maximum values measured for the ellipticity and the a(4)/a shape parameter together with the total measured twisting along the profile beyond the seeing disk (they set an inner limit of 3 arcsed). An asterisk indicates objects in which a(4)/a is neither predominantly boxy nor disky. They found a large number of true mixed pairs with 13/22 E+S pairs in the present sample. The remaining objects include 5 disk pairs (composed of SO and S members) and 3 early-type pairs comprising E and SO members. They estimate that between 25 and 50 percent of the pairs in any complete sample will be of the E+S type. This suggests that 100 to 200 such pairs exist on the sky brighter than m sub pg = 16.0. They found no global evidence for a difference between E members of this sample and those in more general samples (e.g., Bender et al. 1989). In particular, they found that about 30 percent of the early-type galaxies cannot be classified either predominantly boxy or disky because the a(4)/a profile shows both of these features at a comparable level or does not show any significant trend. Isophotal twisting is observed with a range and distribution

  15. SDSS DR2 Merging pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; SDSS Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    We present and analyze a catalog of 9,000 Merging pairs candidates to g=21 from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Second Data Release (DR2). Candidates were selected using an automated algorithm (Allam et al. 2004) that is efficient in its selection of galaxy pairs. We highlight possible science applications of such a large photometric sample of merging pais and discuss future improvements, including incorporating magnitudes and pushing to higher redshifts and fainter pairs.

  16. Controversies in kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Montgomery, Robert A; Segev, Dorry L

    2012-07-01

    Kidney paired donation represented 10% of living kidney donation in the United States in 2011. National registries around the world and several separate registries in the United States arrange paired donations, although with significant variations in their practices. Concerns about ethical considerations, clinical advisability, and the quantitative effectiveness of these approaches in paired donation result in these variations. For instance, although donor travel can be burdensome and might discourage paired donation, it was nearly universal until convincing analysis showed that living donor kidneys can sustain many hours of cold ischemia time without adverse consequences. Opinions also differ about whether the last donor in a chain of paired donation transplants initiated by a nondirected donor should donate immediately to someone on the deceased donor wait-list (a domino or closed chain) or should be asked to wait some length of time and donate to start another sequence of paired donations later (an open chain); some argue that asking the donor to donate later may be coercive, and others focus on balancing the probability that the waiting donor withdraws versus the number of additional transplants if the chain can be continued. Other controversies in paired donation include simultaneous versus nonsimultaneous donor operations, whether to enroll compatible pairs, and interactions with desensitization protocols. Efforts to expand public awareness of and participation in paired donation are needed to generate more transplant opportunities.

  17. Electronic pairing in exotic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L. ); Maple, M.B. )

    1995-02-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials and high T[sub c] cuprates may involve electronic pairing with unconventional symmetries and mechanisms. Although there has been no smoking-gun proof, numerous pieces of circumstantial evidence combined with heuristic theoretical arguments make a compelling case that these materials have pairs with exotic symmetry bound by nonphonon glue. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Homologous pairing and the role of pairing centers in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; McKee, Bruce D

    2011-06-15

    Homologous pairing establishes the foundation for accurate reductional segregation during meiosis I in sexual organisms. This Commentary summarizes recent progress in our understanding of homologous pairing in meiosis, and will focus on the characteristics and mechanisms of specialized chromosome sites, called pairing centers (PCs), in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. In C. elegans, each chromosome contains a single PC that stabilizes chromosome pairing and initiates synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Specific zinc-finger proteins recruited to PCs link chromosomes to nuclear envelope proteins--and through them to the microtubule cytoskeleton--thereby stimulating chromosome movements in early prophase, which are thought to be important for homolog sorting. This mechanism appears to be a variant of the 'telomere bouquet' process, in which telomeres cluster on the nuclear envelope, connect chromosomes through nuclear envelope proteins to the cytoskeleton and lead chromosome movements that promote homologous synapsis. In Drosophila males, which undergo meiosis without recombination, pairing of the largely non-homologous X and Y chromosomes occurs at specific repetitive sequences in the ribosomal DNA. Although no other clear examples of PC-based pairing mechanisms have been described, there is evidence for special roles of telomeres and centromeres in aspects of chromosome pairing, synapsis and segregation; these roles are in some cases similar to those of PCs.

  19. Modeling of Energy, Water, and CO2 Flux in a Temperate Grassland Ecosystem with SiB2: May-October 1987.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colello, G. D.; Grivet, C.; Sellers, P. J.; Berry, J. A.

    1998-04-01

    The Simple Biosphere Model, version 2 (SiB2), was designed for use within atmospheric general circulation models as a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer scheme that includes CO2 flux prediction. A stand-alone version of SiB2 was used to simulate a grassland at Station 16 of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) located near Manhattan, Kansas, for a period of 142 days of the 1987 growing season. Modeled values of soil temperature and moisture were initialized, using field measurements from the soil profile, and thereafter updated solely by model calculations. The model was driven by half-hourly atmospheric observations and regular observations of canopy biophysics. This arrangement was intended to mimic model forcing in a GCM. Three model versions are compared: (i) a Control run using parameter values taken from look-up tables used for running the Colorado State University GCM; (ii) a Tuned run with many adjustments to optimize SiB2 to this ecosystem; and (iii) a Calibrated run, which calibrated the Control version soil to the local site and incorporated two important changes from the Tuned version. Modeled fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, soil heat, net radiation, and net site CO2 were compared to over 800 half-hourly observations; modeled surface and deep soil temperatures compared to 6500 observations; and three layers of modeled soil water content compared to 15 measurements of the soil water profile. Statistical methods were used to analyze these results. In the absence of water stress all three versions accurately simulated photosynthesis and canopy conductance. However, during episodes of drought, only the Tuned and Calibrated versions accurately simulated physiological control of canopy fluxes. The largest errors were encountered in the simulation of soil respiration. These were traced to problems predicting water content and temperature in the soil profile. These results highlight the need for improved simulation of soil biophysics to obtain

  20. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  1. Stereo Pair, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, at Los Menucos, Argentina shows remnants of relatively young volcanoes built upon an eroded plain of much older and contorted volcanic, granitic, and sedimentary rocks. The large purple, brown, and green 'butterfly' pattern is a single volcano that has been deeply eroded. Large holes on the volcano's flanks indicate that they may have collapsed soon after eruption, as fluid molten rock drained out from under its cooled and solidified outer shell. At the upper left, a more recent eruption occurred and produced a small volcanic cone and a long stream of lava, which flowed down a gully. At the top of the image, volcanic intrusions permeated the older rocks resulting in a chain of small dark volcanic peaks. At the top center of the image, two halves of a tan ellipse pattern are offset from each other. This feature is an old igneous intrusion that has been split by a right-lateral fault. The apparent offset is about 6.6 kilometers (4 miles). Color, tonal, and topographic discontinuities reveal the fault trace as it extends across the image to the lower left. However, young unbroken basalt flows show that the fault has not been active recently.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive

  2. Stereo Pair: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (green patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (blue). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7 satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The

  3. Pair creation: Back reactions and damping

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J. C. R.; Mizerny, V. A.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Smolyansky, S. A.; Vinnik, D. V.

    1999-12-01

    We solve the quantum Vlasov equation for fermions and bosons, incorporating spontaneous pair creation in the presence of back reactions and collisions. Pair creation is initiated by an external impulse field and the source term is non-Markovian. A simultaneous solution of Maxwell's equation in the presence of feedback yields an internal current and electric field that exhibit plasma oscillations with a period {tau}{sub pl}. Allowing for collisions, these oscillations are damped on a time scale {tau}{sub r} determined by the collision frequency. Plasma oscillations cannot affect the early stages of the formation of a quark-gluon plasma unless {tau}{sub r}>>{tau}{sub pl} and {tau}{sub pl}{approx}1/{lambda}{sub QCD}{approx}1 fm/c. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  4. Genetic variability, character association, and path analysis for economic traits in menthofuran rich half-sib seed progeny of Mentha piperita L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Birendra; Mali, Himanshi; Gupta, Ekta

    2014-01-01

    Menthofuran rich eight half-sib seed progeny of Mentha piperita (MPS-36) were studied for various genetic parameters, namely, coefficient of variation, heritability, genetic advance, correlation, and path of various plant and oil attributes, namely, plant height, L:S ratio, herb yield, β -myrcene, limonene, 1,8-cineole, menthone, menthofuran, neomenthone, pulegone, and menthol. Maximum genotypic coefficient of variation and genetic advance as percentage of mean were recorded for pulegone, followed by menthofuran and 1,8-cineole. The genotypic correlation in general was higher than phenotypic; positive significant correlation was recorded for limonene with 1,8-cineole and menthone, β -myrcene with limonene, and 1,8-cineole and menthofuran with neomenthol. A high direct positive effect on menthofuran was of neomenthol.

  5. A rank-based nonparametric method for mapping quantitative trait loci in outbred half-sib pedigrees: application to milk production in a granddaughter design.

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, W; Kvasz, A; Farnir, F; Arranz, J J; Grisart, B; Mackinnon, M; Georges, M

    1998-01-01

    We describe the development of a multipoint nonparametric quantitative trait loci mapping method based on the Wilcoxon rank-sum test applicable to outbred half-sib pedigrees. The method has been evaluated on a simulated dataset and its efficiency compared with interval mapping by using regression. It was shown that the rank-based approach is slightly inferior to regression when the residual variance is homoscedastic normal; however, in three out of four other scenarios envisaged, i.e., residual variance heteroscedastic normal, homoscedastic skewed, and homoscedastic positively kurtosed, the latter outperforms the former one. Both methods were applied to a real data set analyzing the effect of bovine chromosome 6 on milk yield and composition by using a 125-cM map comprising 15 microsatellites and a granddaughter design counting 1158 Holstein-Friesian sires. PMID:9649541

  6. Neuropsychological assessment of the severely impaired elderly patient: validation of the Italian short version of the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB). Gruppo di Studio sull'Invecchiamento Cerebrale della Società Italiana di Gerontologia e Geriatria.

    PubMed

    Pippi, M; Mecocci, P; Saxton, J; Bartorelli, L; Pettenati, C; Bonaiuto, S; Cucinotta, D; Masaraki, G; Neri, M; Tammaro, A E; Vergani, C; Chionne, F; Senin, U

    1999-08-01

    One hundred and sixty-nine severely demented patients were tested in a multicenter study with the short version of the Severe Impairment Battery which was translated into Italian with the purpose of adapting and validating it for an Italian population. Patients were enrolled in Italian geriatric centers participating in the Study Group on Aging Brain of the Italian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Following thorough clinical and instrumental examinations, they were evaluated with the Mini Mental State Examination, the Clinical Dementia Rating, the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB), the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen Rating Scale for Dementia, the Activity of Daily Living index, and the Bedford Alzheimer Nursing Severity scale (BANS.s). The inter-rater reliability of the SIB was highly significant for the total score and its subtests; test-retest reliability showed the same significance in all items. Also concurrent validity, performed comparing the total SIB score with the total BANS.s score, was significant. The short Italian version of the SIB proved to be a very reliable tool for the evaluation of severely demented patients; it has the advantage of being easy to administer, it evaluates more cognitive domains that, are typically assessed in dementia, and has a wide enough range of scores to detect even small differences in the examined abilities.

  7. Increased extra-pair paternity in broods of aging males and enhanced recruitment of extra-pair young in a migratory bird

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, E. Keith; Forsman, Anna M.; Masters, Brian S.; Johnson, Bonnie G. P.; Johnson, L. Scott; Sakaluk, Scott K.; Thompson, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite keen interest in extra-pair mating in birds, its adaptive significance remains unresolved. Here, we use a multi-year dataset to test whether traits of a female’s social mate influence her propensity to produce extra-pair offspring in a population of house wrens, and whether producing extra-pair young has consequences for a female’s fitness through effects on offspring survival. Females were most likely to produce extra-pair offspring when paired with old males and when paired with males on poor-quality territories, although this latter effect was marginally non-significant. Among offspring, the cutaneous immunity of within-pair young decreased as the age of their sires increased, but cutaneous immunity of extra-pair young was not affected by the age of their extra-pair sires or by the age of the males rearing them. Extra-pair offspring were more likely than within-pair offspring to return as breeding adults to the local population, with extra-pair sons being more likely to return as a breeder for multiple years. Our findings support the hypothesis that females produce extra-pair offspring to enhance their inclusive fitness beyond what they are capable of given the male with which they are socially paired. PMID:26258950

  8. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  9. Superconductivity: The persistence of pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, Alex; Littlewood, Peter

    2015-05-20

    Superconductivity stems from a weak attraction between electrons that causes them to form bound pairs and behave much like bosons. These so-called Cooper pairs are phase coherent, which leads to the astonishing properties of zero electrical resistance and magnetic flux expulsion typical of superconducting materials. This coherent state may be qualitatively understood within the Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) model, which predicts that a gas of interacting bosons will become unstable below a critical temperature and condense into a phase of matter with a macroscopic, coherent population in the lowest energy state, as happens in 4He or cold atomic gases. The successful theory proposed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) predicts that at the superconducting transition temperature Tc, electrons simultaneously form pairs and condense, with no sign of pairing above Tc. Theorists have long surmised that the BCS and BEC models are opposite limits of a single theory and that strong interactions or low density can, in principle, drive the system to a paired state at a temperature Tpair higher than Tc, making the transition to the superconducting state BEC-like (Fig. 1). Yet most superconductors to date are reasonably well described by BCS theory or its extensions, and there has been scant evidence in electronic materials for the existence of pairing independent of the full superconducting state (though an active debate rages over the cuprate superconductors). Writing in Nature, Jeremy Levy and colleagues have now used ingenious nanostructured devices to provide evidence for electron pairing1. Perhaps surprisingly, the material they have studied is a venerable, yet enigmatic, low-temperature superconductor, SrTiO3.

  10. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  11. Pair-Starved Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model for the innermost (within the light cylinder of canonical radius, approx. c/Omega) structure of open-magnetic-field lines of a rotating neutron star (NS) with relativistic outflow of charged particles (electrons/positrons) and arbitrary angle between the NS spin and magnetic axes. We present the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations for the magnetic field and electric current in the pair-starved regime where the density of electron-positron plasma generated above the pulsar polar cap is not sufficient to completely screen the accelerating electric field and thus establish thee E . B = 0 condition above the pair-formation front up to the very high altitudes within the light cylinder. The proposed mode1 may provide a theoretical framework for developing the refined model of the global pair-starved pulsar magnetosphere.

  12. Invisibly Sanitizable Signature without Pairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Lee, Pil Joong

    Sanitizable signatures allow sanitizers to delete some pre-determined parts of a signed document without invalidating the signature. While ordinary sanitizable signatures allow verifiers to know how many subdocuments have been sanitized, invisibly sanitizable signatures do not leave any clue to the sanitized subdocuments; verifiers do not know whether or not sanitizing has been performed. Previous invisibly sanitizable signature scheme was constructed based on aggregate signature with pairings. In this article, we present the first invisibly sanitizable signature without using pairings. Our proposed scheme is secure under the RSA assumption.

  13. WE-AB-204-03: A Novel 3D Printed Phantom for 4D PET/CT Imaging and SIB Radiotherapy Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To construct and test a 3D printed phantom designed to mimic variable PET tracer uptake seen in lung tumor volumes. To assess segmentation accuracy of sub-volumes of the phantom following 4D PET/CT scanning with ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion. To plan, deliver and verify delivery of PET-driven, gated, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy plans. Methods: A set of phantoms and inserts were designed and manufactured for a realistic representation of lung cancer gated radiotherapy steps from 4D PET/CT scanning to dose delivery. A cylindrical phantom (40x 120 mm) holds inserts for PET/CT scanning. The novel 3D printed insert dedicated to 4D PET/CT mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and lower uptake in the periphery. This insert is a variable density porous cylinder (22.12×70 mm), ABS-P430 thermoplastic, 3D printed by uPrint SE Plus with inner void volume (5.5×42 mm). The square pores (1.8×1.8 mm2 each) fill 50% of outer volume, resulting in a 2:1 SUV ratio of PET-tracer in the void volume with respect to porous volume. A matching in size cylindrical phantom is dedicated to validate gated radiotherapy. It contains eight peripheral holes matching the location of the porous part of the 3D printed insert, and one central hole. These holes accommodate adaptors for Farmer-type ion chamber and cells vials. Results: End-to-end test were performed from 4D PET/CT scanning to transferring data to the planning system and target volume delineation. 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of the phantom with different respiratory motion patterns and gating windows. A measured 2:1 18F-FDG SUV ratio between inner void and outer volume matched the 3D printed design. Conclusion: The novel 3D printed phantom mimics variable PET tracer uptake typical of tumors. Obtained 4D PET/CT scans are suitable for segmentation, treatment planning and delivery in SIB gated treatments of NSCLC.

  14. ON THE POLAR CAP CASCADE PAIR MULTIPLICITY OF YOUNG PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Timokhin, A. N.; Harding, A. K.

    2015-09-10

    We study the efficiency of pair production in polar caps of young pulsars under a variety of conditions to estimate the maximum possible multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres. We develop a semi-analytic model for calculation of cascade multiplicity which allows efficient exploration of the parameter space and corroborate it with direct numerical simulations. Pair creation processes are considered separately from particle acceleration in order to assess different factors affecting cascade efficiency, with acceleration of primary particles described by recent self-consistent non-stationary model of pair cascades. We argue that the most efficient cascades operate in the curvature radiation/synchrotron regime, the maximum multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres is ∼few × 10{sup 5}. The multiplicity of pair plasma in magnetospheres of young energetic pulsars weakly depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of magnetic field lines and has a stronger dependence on pulsar inclination angle. This result questions assumptions about very high pair plasma multiplicity in theories of pulsar wind nebulae.

  15. Pairing gap in the inner crust of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Broglia, R.A.; Vigezzi, E.; Barranco, F.

    1995-08-01

    The pairing gap in the inner crust of a neutron star can be strongly affected by the presence of heavy nuclei. The effect is commonly estimated in a semiclassical description, using the local density approximation. It was found that the nuclear specific heat can become comparable to the electronic specific heat at certain densities and temperatures. The quantitative result depends critically upon the magnitude of the pairing gap. We therefore decided to assess the validity of the semiclassical approach. This is done by solving the quantal BCS pairing gap equation for neutrons that are confined to the Wigner-Seitz cell that surrounds a heavy nucleus. We performed calculations that are based on the Gogny pairing force. They are feasible for realistic densities of neutrons and heavy nuclei that are expected to be found in the inner crust of neutron stars. The results will be compared to the semiclassical predictions. This work is in progress.

  16. Missing energies at pair creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ela, A. A.; Hassan, S.; Bagge, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Wilson cloud chamber measurements of the separated spectra of positrons and electrons produced by gamma quanta of 6.14 MeV differ considerably from the theoretically predicted spectra by BETHE and HEITLER, but are in good agreement with those of a modified theory of pair creation.

  17. Pairing Linguistic and Music Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiEdwardo, MaryAnn Pasda

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how music in the language classroom setting can be a catalyst for developing reading, writing, and understanding skills. Studies suggest that pairing music and linguistic intelligences in the college classroom improves students' grades and abilities to compose theses statements for research papers in courses that emphasize…

  18. Pick a Pair. Being Bony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2004-01-01

    This column suggests pairings of fiction and nonfiction books to meet curricular needs and help students to compare/contrast the texts as they may be asked on state tests. The author of this paper focuses on activities surrounding Halloween. Since many schools are discouraged from teaching about Halloween, this can be a great time to investigate…

  19. Behavioral Profiles of Affected and Unaffected Siblings of Children with Autism: Contribution of Measures of Mother-Infant Interaction and Nonverbal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozga, Agata; Hutman, Ted; Young, Gregory S.; Rogers, Sally J.; Ozonoff, Sally; Dapretto, Mirella; Sigman, Marian

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether deficits in social gaze and affect and in joint attention behaviors are evident within the first year of life among siblings of children with autism who go on to be diagnosed with autism or ASD (ASD) and siblings who are non-diagnosed (NoASD-sib) compared to low-risk controls. The ASD group did not differ from the other two…

  20. Three rare diseases in one Sib pair: RAI1, PCK1, GRIN2B mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome, cytosolic PEPCK deficiency and NMDA receptor glutamate insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Adams, David R; Yuan, Hongjie; Holyoak, Todd; Arajs, Katrina H; Hakimi, Parvin; Markello, Thomas C; Wolfe, Lynne A; Vilboux, Thierry; Burton, Barbara K; Fajardo, Karin Fuentes; Grahame, George; Holloman, Conisha; Sincan, Murat; Smith, Ann C M; Wells, Gordon A; Huang, Yan; Vega, Hugo; Snyder, James P; Golas, Gretchen A; Tifft, Cynthia J; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hanson, Richard W; Traynelis, Stephen F; Kerr, Douglas S; Gahl, William A

    2014-11-01

    The National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program evaluates patients for whom no diagnosis has been discovered despite a comprehensive diagnostic workup. Failure to diagnose a condition may arise from the mutation of genes previously unassociated with disease. However, we hypothesized that this could also co-occur with multiple genetic disorders. Demonstrating a complex syndrome caused by multiple disorders, we report two siblings manifesting both similar and disparate signs and symptoms. They shared a history of episodes of hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis, but had differing exam findings and developmental courses. Clinical acumen and exome sequencing combined with biochemical and functional studies identified three genetic conditions. One sibling had Smith-Magenis Syndrome and a nonsense mutation in the RAI1 gene. The second sibling had a de novo mutation in GRIN2B, which resulted in markedly reduced glutamate potency of the encoded receptor. Both siblings had a protein-destabilizing homozygous mutation in PCK1, which encodes the cytosolic isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C). In summary, we present the first clinically-characterized mutation of PCK1 and demonstrate that complex medical disorders can represent the co-occurrence of multiple diseases.

  1. What Controls the Net Forest-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide? Results from 2 Years of Eddy Flux Measurements and SiB Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, R. A.; Commane, R.; Baker, I. T.; Munger, J. W.; Saleska, S. R.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is currently a focus of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based measurements as well as of model development, owing mainly to its potential use as a large-scale proxy for gross primary production (GPP). OCS is taken up by leaves and either taken up or emitted by soils, depending on the circumstances. Because OCS is destroyed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase within the leaf rather than by any light-dependent reaction, the leaf uptake is expected to be related to the conductance of the diffusive pathway into the leaf (stomata + mesophyll + leaf boundary air layer) rather than to GPP directly, though GPP and the diffusive conductance are often strongly correlated. Here we use 2 years of eddy covariance measurements of the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of OCS, along with measurements of the vertical profile of OCS within the forest, to investigate the controls on ecosystem-scale OCS uptake and emission. We compare the OCS measurements, and simultaneous CO2 isotope flux and profile measurements, to predictions from the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model, which has been used to simulate OCS and 13CO2 fluxes for both vegetation and soils but has not yet been systematically tested against these relatively novel tracers. We thereby address the key question: How can measurements of the net ecosystem-atmosphere OCS exchange contribute to empirical quantification of stomatal conductance and GPP and to improving process-based ecosystem models?

  2. Phenogenetic response of silver birch populations and half-sib families to elevated ozone and ultraviolet-B radiation at juvenile age.

    PubMed

    Pliura, Alfas; Baliuckiene, Asta; Baliuckas, Virgilijus

    2008-11-01

    Phenogenetic response of silver birch populations and half-sib families to separate and combined elevated ozone (O(3)) concentrations and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation dozes was studied at juvenile age in the climatic chambers. Significant population and family effects were found for seedling height, lamina width, and leaf damage. The exposure to UV-B radiation decreased genetic variation at the stage of seed germination. Complex exposure to UV-B and O(3) caused an increase of genetic variation at the stage of intensive seedling growth: seedling height genetic variation in separate treatments increased from 23.7-38.6 to 33.7-65.7%, the increase for lamina width was from 10.2-13.9 to 13.6-31.8%. Different populations and families demonstrated differing response to elevated complex UV-B and O(3) exposure. Changes of genetic intra-population variation were population-specific. Such changes in genetic variation under the impact of stressors can alter adaptation, stability, and competitive ability of regenerating populations in a hardly predictive way.

  3. Applying Two Binned Methods to the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) for Improving the Representation of Spatially Varying Precipitation and Soil Wetness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, I. D.; Denning, A.

    2011-12-01

    Representing subgrid-scale variability is a continuing challenge for modelers, but is crucial for accurately calculating the exchanges of energy, moisture, and momentum between the land surface and atmospheric boundary layer. Soil wetness is highly spatially variable and difficult to resolve at grid length scales (~100 km) used in General Circulation Models (GCMs). Currently, GCMs use an area average precipitation rate that results in a single soil wetness value for the entire grid area, and due to the highly nonlinear relationship between soil wetness and evapotranspiration, significant inaccuracies arise in the calculation of the grid area latent heat flux. Using a finer GCM resolution will not solve this problem completely, and other methods of modeling need to be considered. For this study, the binned and alternative binned method of Sellers et al. (2007) are applied to the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) for improving the representation of spatially varying precipitation, soil wetness and surface-atmosphere fluxes. The methods are tested in a dry, semi-arid, and wet biome for two off-line precipitation distribution experiments, and results are compared to an explicit method, which is ideal for resolving subgrid-scale variability, and the bulk method (area averaged), which is currently in use with GCMs. Results indicate that the alternative binned method better captures the spatial variability in soil wetness and grid area flux calculations produced by the explicit method, and deals realistically with spatially varying precipitation at little additional computational cost to the bulk method.

  4. PREFACE: International Scientific and Research Conference on Topical Issues in Aeronautics and Astronautics (dedicated to the 55th anniversary from the foundation of SibSAU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    The International Scientific and Research Conference ''Topical Issues in Aeronautics and Astronautics'' is one of the most significant scientific conferences arranged by the Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University (SibSAU) which is located in the Krasnoyarsk Region of Russian Federation. In April 2015 this Conference was dedicated to the 55th anniversary from the foundation of the University. Traditionally, the Conference is seen as emblematic of the University's specialty and is annually organized in April, when the first human travelled into space. This Conference is arranged for undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate students, scientists and lecturers, as well as developers, designers and constructors representing leading companies and enterprises of the aerospace sector to give opportunities to present their projects, research work and results. The Conference is a great chance to connect scientists and highly-qualified and skilled specialists with a new community of future scientists and practitioners in the aerospace sector. The Conference proceedings include papers presented by creative young specialists closely connected with aviation and space vehicles - design, production, problem-solving in space machine building and aerospace education, macro- and microeconomic development of the field, new approaches to solving philosophical and social problems, - experienced scientists and specialists, and all those who want to dedicate themselves to aeronautics and astronautics. The selected papers are presented in these proceedings to share University research results, innovations and cutting-edge technologies with the international community to develop aeronautics and astronautics on a global scale.

  5. Re Effects on Phase Stability and Mechanical Properties of MoSS+Mo3Si+Mo5SiB2 alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P; Tiley, Jaimie

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high melting points and good oxidation resistance Mo-Si-B alloys are of interest as potential ultrahigh-temperature structural materials. But their major drawbacks are poor ductility and fracture toughness at room temperature. Since alloying with Re has been suggested as a possible solution, we investigate here the effects of Re additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a ternary alloy with the composition Mo-12.5Si-8.5B (at.%). This alloy has a three-phase microstructure consisting of Mo solid-solution (MoSS), Mo3Si, and Mo5SiB2 and our results show that up to 8.4 at.% Re can be added to it without changing its microstructure or forming any brittle phase at 1600 C. Three-point bend tests using chevron-notched specimens showed that Re did not improve fracture toughness of the three-phase alloy. Nanoindentation performed on the MoSS phase in the three-phase alloy showed that Re increases Young s modulus, but does not lower hardness as in some Mo solid solution alloys. Based on our thermodynamic calculations and microstructural analyses, the lack of a Re softening effect is attributed to the increased Si levels in the Re-containing MoSS phase since Si is known to increase its hardness. This lack of softening is possibly why there is no Re-induced improvement in fracture toughness.

  6. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  7. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  8. Septin pairs, a complex choreography.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Helge

    2011-06-13

    Septins form a filamentous collar at the mother-bud neck in budding yeast. In cytokinesis, this collar splits into two rings and the septin complexes undergo a dramatic reorientation. Using fluorescence polarization microscopy, DeMay et al. (2011. J. Cell Biol. doi:10.1083/jcb.201012143) now demonstrate that septin complexes assemble as paired filaments in vivo and reveal new insights into septin organization during cytokinesis.

  9. Steady streaming around a cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, W.

    2016-11-01

    The steady streaming motion that appears around a pair of circular cylinders placed in a small-amplitude oscillatory flow is considered. Attention is focused on the case where the Stokes layer thickness at the surface of the cylinders is much smaller than the cylinder radius, and the streaming Reynolds number is of order unity or larger. In that case, the steady streaming velocity that persists at the edge of the Stokes layer can be imposed as a boundary condition to numerically solve the outer streaming motion that it drives in the bulk of the fluid. It is investigated how the gap width between the cylinders and the streaming Reynolds number affect the flow topology. The results are compared against experimental observations.

  10. Extra-Pair Mating and Evolution of Cooperative Neighbourhoods

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Sigrunn; Jørgensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A striking but unexplained pattern in biology is the promiscuous mating behaviour in socially monogamous species. Although females commonly solicit extra-pair copulations, the adaptive reason has remained elusive. We use evolutionary modelling of breeding ecology to show that females benefit because extra-pair paternity incentivizes males to shift focus from a single brood towards the entire neighbourhood, as they are likely to have offspring there. Male-male cooperation towards public goods and dear enemy effects of reduced territorial aggression evolve from selfish interests, and lead to safer and more productive neighbourhoods. The mechanism provides adaptive explanations for the common empirical observations that females engage in extra-pair copulations, that neighbours dominate as extra-pair sires, and that extra-pair mating correlates with predation mortality and breeding density. The models predict cooperative behaviours at breeding sites where males cooperate more towards public goods than females. Where maternity certainty makes females care for offspring at home, paternity uncertainty and a potential for offspring in several broods make males invest in communal benefits and public goods. The models further predict that benefits of extra-pair mating affect whole nests or neighbourhoods, and that cuckolding males are often cuckolded themselves. Derived from ecological mechanisms, these new perspectives point towards the evolution of sociality in birds, with relevance also for mammals and primates including humans. PMID:24987839

  11. Metacognitive decision making and social interactions during paired problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goos, Merrilyn

    1994-12-01

    The study described in this paper investigated the metacognitive strategies used by a pair of senior secondary school students while working together on mechanics problems. Verbal protocols from think-aloud paired problem-solving sessions were analysed in order to examine the monitoring contributions of each individual student, and the significance of student-student interactions. Although the students were generally successful in coordinating their different, yet complementary, problem-solving roles, their metacognitive decision making was sometimes adversely affected by the social interaction between them. The findings suggest some potential benefits and pitfalls of using small group work for problem solving.

  12. Phenomenology of transionospheric pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, R. S.; Holden, D. N.

    1995-09-01

    Recent observations of transient radio impulses by an Earth-orbiting satellite appear to be quite unlike any previously reported. They appear as pairs of brief (a few microseconds), noiselike bursts, separated by a few tens of microseconds, and are dispersed in a way that implies subionospheric origin. Over 300 of these events have now been observed. These "transionospheric pulse pairs" (TIPPs) have not yet been associated with any known source, although thunderstorms are suspected. The observations, made by the Blackbeard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite, are digitized records of the electric field in a passband from about 25 to 100 MHz. Ground-based observations of lightning in this band appear quite different, even accounting for ionospheric dispersion: bursts of short pulses last hundreds of microseconds and have much lower power (when propagated to the satellite) than TIPP events. Signals that resemble the ground-based data have been observed by Blackbeard but, being much weaker, are much less likely to trigger the instrument than are the strong pulse pair events. In this paper we analyze 97 of the early TIPP observations. We compute several parameters that describe the events: the location of the satellite at the time of reception, the energy in each pulse, the separation between pulses, the duration of each pulse, and the dispersion of each pulse. The statistical distributions of these parameters provide clues to and constraints on possible source mechanisms. The possibility that the pulses might be the direct and reflected signals from a high-altitude source is considered and cannot be rejected by the data.

  13. Accurate calculations of spectroscopic parameters, transition properties of 17 Λ-S states and 32 Ω states of SiB+ cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2017-02-01

    This work computed the potential energy curves of 17 Λ-S states, which came from the first three dissociation limits, Si+(2Pu) + B(2Pu), Si(3Pg) + B+(1Sg), and Si(1Dg) + B+(1Sg), of the SiB+ cation. The potential energy curves were also calculated for the 32 Ω states generated from these Λ-S states. The calculations were done using the CASSCF method, which was followed by internally contracted MRCI approach with Davidson correction. To obtain the reliable and accurate spectroscopic parameters and vibrational properties, core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were included. Of these 17 Λ-S states, the C3Σ+, E3Π, 33Π, 23Σ+, 21Π, and 31Σ+ states had double wells. The 31Π state had three wells. The D3Σ-, E3Π, 33Π, and B3Δ states were inverted with the spin-orbit coupling effect accounted for. The 21Δ state, the first well of 31Σ+ state, the second wells of 33Π, 23Σ+, and 21Π states and the second and third wells of 31Π state were weakly bound, which well depths were within several hundreds cm-1. The second well of 31Π state had no vibrational states. The first wells of E3Π and 31Σ+ states had only one vibrational state. The spectroscopic parameters were evaluated. The vibrational properties of some weaklybound states were predicted. Franck-Condon factors of some transitions between different two Λ-S states were determined. The spin-orbit coupling effect on the spectroscopic parameters and vibrational properties was discussed. These results reported here can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  14. Paired circularly polarized heterodyne ellipsometer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.-J.; Lin, C.-E.; Yu, L.-P.; Chou, C

    2009-02-01

    We develop a paired circularly polarized heterodyne ellipsometer (PCPHE), in which a heterodyne interferometer based on a two-frequency circularly polarized laser beam is set up. It belongs to an amplitude-sensitive ellipsometer that is able to provide not only a wider dynamic range of polarization modulation frequency but also a higher detection sensitivity than that of a conventional photometric ellipsometer. A real-time and precise measurement of ellipsometric parameters, which demonstrated an accuracy of less than 1 nm on thickness measurement of SiO2 thin film deposited on silicon substrate, can be applied with the PCPHE.

  15. Behavioral profiles of affected and unaffected siblings of children with autism: contribution of measures of mother-infant interaction and nonverbal communication.

    PubMed

    Rozga, Agata; Hutman, Ted; Young, Gregory S; Rogers, Sally J; Ozonoff, Sally; Dapretto, Mirella; Sigman, Marian

    2011-03-01

    We investigated whether deficits in social gaze and affect and in joint attention behaviors are evident within the first year of life among siblings of children with autism who go on to be diagnosed with autism or ASD (ASD) and siblings who are non-diagnosed (NoASD-sib) compared to low-risk controls. The ASD group did not differ from the other two groups at 6 months of age in the frequency of gaze, smiles, and vocalizations directed toward the caregiver, nor in their sensitivity to her withdrawal from interaction. However, by 12 months, infants in the ASD group exhibited lower rates of joint attention and requesting behaviors. In contrast, NoASD-sibs did not differ from comparison infants on any variables of interest at 6 and 12 months.

  16. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhter, R. I.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Jonson, M.; Aharony, A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals.

  17. Optical conductivity from pair density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhehao; Lee, Patrick A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theory of optical conductivity in systems with finite-momentum Cooper pairs. In contrast to the BCS pairing where ac conductivity is purely imaginary in the clean limit, there is nonzero ac absorption across the superconducting gap for finite-momentum pairing if we break the Galilean symmetry explicitly in the electronic Hamiltonian. Vertex correction is crucial for maintaining the gauge invariance in the mean-field formalism and dramatically changes the optical conductivity in the direction of the pairing momentum. We carried out a self-consistent calculation and gave an explicit formula for optical conductivity in a simple case. This result applies to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state and candidates with pair density waves proposed for high-Tc cuprates. It may help detect pair density waves and determine the pairing gap as well as the direction of the pairing momentum in experiments.

  18. Maximizing the significance in Higgs boson pair analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Felix; Plehn, Tilman; Schichtel, Peter

    2017-02-01

    We study Higgs pair production with a subsequent decay to a pair of photons and a pair of bottoms at the LHC. We use the log-likelihood ratio to identify the kinematic regions which either allow us to separate the di-Higgs signal from backgrounds or to determine the Higgs self-coupling. We find that both regions are separate enough to ensure that details of the background modeling will not affect the determination of the self-coupling. Assuming dominant statistical uncertainties we determine the best precision with which the Higgs self-coupling can be probed in this channel. We finally comment on the same questions at a future 100 TeV collider.

  19. Simultaneous master-slave Omega pairs. [navigation system featuring low cost receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Master-slave sequence ordering of the Omega system is suggested as a method of improving the pair geometry for low-cost receiver user benefit. The sequence change will not affect present sophisticated processor users other than require new labels for some pair combinations, but may require worldwide transmitter operators to slightly alter their long-range synchronizing techniques.

  20. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    PubMed

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  1. Stellar kinematics of elliptical galaxies in pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejsky, Rainer; Bender, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    In both galaxy pairs Arp 166 and 3C 278 the authors find radially increasing velocity dispersions indicating a perturbed, non-equilibrium state of the galaxies after the tidal interaction. In all galaxies, the increase is most pronounced in the regions which correspond to the centers of the outer isophotes. The authors suggest a scenario in which the galaxies are strongly decelerated on their orbits during the encounter. The deceleration depends on the radial position in the perturbed galaxy and vanishes in the center of the perturbed galaxy (Spitzer, 1958). In addition, the crossing time of the stars near the center is very short, implying that the tidal perturbations can be averaged over several orbital periods (e.g., Binney and Tremaine, 1987). In consequence, the central parts are not affected by the tidal interaction while the outer parts are strongly decelerated. This leads to a displacement of the central parts of the galaxies with respect to their envelopes in an anti-symmetrical way for the two components of each galaxy pair. The motions of the central parts subsequently are opposed by dynamical friction with the surrounding envelopes. Due to dynamical friction, the density of the stars increases in the wakes of the moving central parts (Mulder, 1983). The overdensity of stars in the wakes of the moving central parts efficiently decelerates the motions of the central parts. The reaction of the stars in the overdensity regions leads to an increase of the velocity dispersion mainly along the orbits of the moving central parts. The presented observations, especially the asymmetrical luminosity profiles and the radially increasing velocity dispersions support consistently the above scenario of tidal interaction between galaxies. Further spectroscopic observations are necessary in order to investigate the degree of anisotropy in the kinematically perturbed regions.

  2. Effects of Habitat Complexity on Pair-Housed Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Keck, Victoria A; Edgerton, Dale S; Hajizadeh, Susan; Swift, Larry L; Dupont, William D; Lawrence, Christian; Boyd, Kelli L

    2015-07-01

    Sexually mature zebrafish were housed as single male-female pairs with or without plastic vegetation for 1, 5, or 10 d for comparison of whole-body cortisol measured by radioimmunoassay. Individually housed male zebrafish were used as controls. In the fish that were pair-housed without vegetation (NVeg), one animal died in 5 of 24 pairs, and one animal was alive but wounded in an additional pair. No deaths or wounds occurred in the fish that were pair-housed with vegetation (Veg). Cortisol levels did not differ between the treatment groups on day 1. On day 5, cortisol values were higher in the Veg group than in the individually housed fish (P < 0.0005) and the NVeg fish (P = 0.004). On day 10, the relationships were inversed: cortisol levels had risen in the individually housed and NVeg groups and had fallen to baseline levels in the Veg group. Cortisol values on day 10 were lower in the Veg group than in the individually housed (P = 0.004) and NVeg (P = 0.05) groups. Cortisol levels in individually housed male zebrafish increased over time. Although this study did not demonstrate a reduction in cortisol levels associated with providing vegetation, this enrichment prevented injury and death from fighting. These findings show how commonly used housing situations may affect the wellbeing of laboratory zebrafish.

  3. Effects of Habitat Complexity on Pair-Housed Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Victoria A; Edgerton, Dale S; Hajizadeh, Susan; Swift, Larry L; Dupont, William D; Lawrence, Christian; Boyd, Kelli L

    2015-01-01

    Sexually mature zebrafish were housed as single male-female pairs with or without plastic vegetation for 1, 5, or 10 d for comparison of whole-body cortisol measured by radioimmunoassay. Individually housed male zebrafish were used as controls. In the fish that were pair-housed without vegetation (NVeg), one animal died in 5 of 24 pairs, and one animal was alive but wounded in an additional pair. No deaths or wounds occurred in the fish that were pair-housed with vegetation (Veg). Cortisol levels did not differ between the treatment groups on day 1. On day 5, cortisol values were higher in the Veg group than in the individually housed fish (P < 0.0005) and the NVeg fish (P = 0.004). On day 10, the relationships were inversed: cortisol levels had risen in the individually housed and NVeg groups and had fallen to baseline levels in the Veg group. Cortisol values on day 10 were lower in the Veg group than in the individually housed (P = 0.004) and NVeg (P = 0.05) groups. Cortisol levels in individually housed male zebrafish increased over time. Although this study did not demonstrate a reduction in cortisol levels associated with providing vegetation, this enrichment prevented injury and death from fighting. These findings show how commonly used housing situations may affect the wellbeing of laboratory zebrafish. PMID:26224437

  4. Inhomogeneous ensembles of radical pairs in chemical compasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    The biophysical basis for the ability of animals to detect the geomagnetic field and to use it for finding directions remains a mystery of sensory biology. One much debated hypothesis suggests that an ensemble of specialized light-induced radical pair reactions can provide the primary signal for a magnetic compass sensor. The question arises what features of such a radical pair ensemble could be optimized by evolution so as to improve the detection of the direction of weak magnetic fields. Here, we focus on the overlooked aspect of the noise arising from inhomogeneity of copies of biomolecules in a realistic biological environment. Such inhomogeneity leads to variations of the radical pair parameters, thereby deteriorating the signal arising from an ensemble and providing a source of noise. We investigate the effect of variations in hyperfine interactions between different copies of simple radical pairs on the directional response of a compass system. We find that the choice of radical pair parameters greatly influences how strongly the directional response of an ensemble is affected by inhomogeneity.

  5. Inhomogeneous ensembles of radical pairs in chemical compasses

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The biophysical basis for the ability of animals to detect the geomagnetic field and to use it for finding directions remains a mystery of sensory biology. One much debated hypothesis suggests that an ensemble of specialized light-induced radical pair reactions can provide the primary signal for a magnetic compass sensor. The question arises what features of such a radical pair ensemble could be optimized by evolution so as to improve the detection of the direction of weak magnetic fields. Here, we focus on the overlooked aspect of the noise arising from inhomogeneity of copies of biomolecules in a realistic biological environment. Such inhomogeneity leads to variations of the radical pair parameters, thereby deteriorating the signal arising from an ensemble and providing a source of noise. We investigate the effect of variations in hyperfine interactions between different copies of simple radical pairs on the directional response of a compass system. We find that the choice of radical pair parameters greatly influences how strongly the directional response of an ensemble is affected by inhomogeneity. PMID:27804956

  6. Deletion of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) in Prader-Willi syndrome detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Two sibs with the typical phenotype without a cytogenetic deletion in chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kibe, Tetsuya; Wada, Yoshiro

    1996-04-24

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene is regarded as one of the candidates for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We describe two sibs with typical PWS presenting deletion of SNRPN detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Neither a cytogenetically detectable 15q12 deletion nor a deletion for the D15S11, D15S10, and GABRB3 cosmid probes were found in either patient. This implies a smaller deletion limited to the PWS critical region. FISH with a SNRPN probe will permit analysis of PWS patients with limited deletions not detectable with other probes. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Top quark pair production cross section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cortiana, Giorgio; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.

    2008-04-01

    Top quark pair production cross section has been measured at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 collaborations using different channels and methods, in order to test standard model predictions, and to search for new physics hints affecting the t{bar t} production mechanism or decay. Measurements are carried out with an integrated luminosity of 1.0 to 2.0 fb{sup -1}, and are found to be consistent with standard model expectations.

  8. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST’s position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed. PMID:26958435

  9. FIR statistics of paired galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the effects of interaction on galaxies (see reviews in this volume by Heckman and Kennicutt). Evidence for enhanced emission from galaxies in pairs first emerged in the radio (Sulentic 1976) and optical (Larson and Tinsley 1978) domains. Results in the far infrared (FIR) lagged behind until the advent of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). The last five years have seen numerous FIR studies of optical and IR selected samples of interacting galaxies (e.g., Cutri and McAlary 1985; Joseph and Wright 1985; Kennicutt et al. 1987; Haynes and Herter 1988). Despite all of this work, there are still contradictory ideas about the level and, even, the reality of an FIR enhancement in interacting galaxies. Much of the confusion originates in differences between the galaxy samples that were studied (i.e., optical morphology and redshift coverage). Here, the authors report on a study of the FIR detection properties for a large sample of interacting galaxies and a matching control sample. They focus on the distance independent detection fraction (DF) statistics of the sample. The results prove useful in interpreting the previously published work. A clarification of the phenomenology provides valuable clues about the physics of the FIR enhancement in galaxies.

  10. Pulsational Pair-instability Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 70–140 {\\text{}}{M}ȯ is explored. Depending upon their mass loss history and rotation rates, these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae (PPISN) producing a great variety of observational transients with total durations ranging from weeks to millennia and luminosities from 1041 to over 1044 erg s‑1. No nonrotating model radiates more than 5× {10}50 erg of light or has a kinetic energy exceeding 5× {10}51 erg, but greater energies are possible, in principle, in magnetar-powered explosions, which are explored. Many events resemble SNe Ibn, SNe Icn, and SNe IIn, and some potential observational counterparts are mentioned. Some PPISN can exist in a dormant state for extended periods, producing explosions millennia after their first violent pulse. These dormant supernovae contain bright Wolf–Rayet stars, possibly embedded in bright X-ray and radio sources. The relevance of PPISN to supernova impostors like Eta Carinae, to superluminous supernovae, and to sources of gravitational radiation is discussed. No black holes between 52 and 133 {\\text{}}{M}ȯ are expected from stellar evolution in close binaries.

  11. Pair Housing of Dairy Calves and Age at Pairing: Effects on Weaning Stress, Health, Production and Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Sarah L; Boyland, Natasha K; Mlynski, David T; James, Richard; Croft, Darren P

    2017-01-01

    The early social environment can influence the health and behaviour of animals, with effects lasting into adulthood. In Europe, around 60% of dairy calves are reared individually during their first eight weeks of life, while others may be housed in pairs or small groups. This study assessed the effects of varying degrees of social contact on weaning stress, health and production during pen rearing, and on the social networks that calves later formed when grouped. Forty female Holstein-Friesian calves were allocated to one of three treatments: individually housed (I, n = 8), pair-housed from day five (P5, n = 8 pairs), and pair-housed from day 28 (P28, n = 8 pairs). From day 48, calves were weaned by gradual reduction of milk over three days, and vocalisations were recorded as a measure of stress for three days before, during and after weaning. Health and production (growth rate and concentrate intakes) were not affected by treatment during the weaning period or over the whole study. Vocalisations were highest post-weaning, and were significantly higher in I calves than pair-reared calves. Furthermore, P28 calves vocalised significantly more than P5 calves. The social network of calves was measured for one month after all calves were grouped in a barn, using association data from spatial proximity loggers. We tested for week-week stability, social differentiation and assortment in the calf network. Additionally, we tested for treatment differences in: coefficient of variation (CV) in association strength, percentage of time spent with ex-penmate (P5 and P28 calves only) and weighted degree centrality (the sum of the strength of an individual's associations). The network was relatively stable from weeks one to four and was significantly differentiated, with individuals assorting based on prior familiarity. P5 calves had significantly higher CV in association strength than I calves in week one (indicating more heterogeneous social associations) but there were no

  12. Pair Housing of Dairy Calves and Age at Pairing: Effects on Weaning Stress, Health, Production and Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mlynski, David T.; James, Richard; Croft, Darren P.

    2017-01-01

    The early social environment can influence the health and behaviour of animals, with effects lasting into adulthood. In Europe, around 60% of dairy calves are reared individually during their first eight weeks of life, while others may be housed in pairs or small groups. This study assessed the effects of varying degrees of social contact on weaning stress, health and production during pen rearing, and on the social networks that calves later formed when grouped. Forty female Holstein-Friesian calves were allocated to one of three treatments: individually housed (I, n = 8), pair-housed from day five (P5, n = 8 pairs), and pair-housed from day 28 (P28, n = 8 pairs). From day 48, calves were weaned by gradual reduction of milk over three days, and vocalisations were recorded as a measure of stress for three days before, during and after weaning. Health and production (growth rate and concentrate intakes) were not affected by treatment during the weaning period or over the whole study. Vocalisations were highest post-weaning, and were significantly higher in I calves than pair-reared calves. Furthermore, P28 calves vocalised significantly more than P5 calves. The social network of calves was measured for one month after all calves were grouped in a barn, using association data from spatial proximity loggers. We tested for week-week stability, social differentiation and assortment in the calf network. Additionally, we tested for treatment differences in: coefficient of variation (CV) in association strength, percentage of time spent with ex-penmate (P5 and P28 calves only) and weighted degree centrality (the sum of the strength of an individual’s associations). The network was relatively stable from weeks one to four and was significantly differentiated, with individuals assorting based on prior familiarity. P5 calves had significantly higher CV in association strength than I calves in week one (indicating more heterogeneous social associations) but there were no

  13. Ordered pairing in liquid metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsson, A. E.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1983-01-01

    We study two possible types of pairing involving the protons of a proposed low-temperature liquid phase metallic hydrogen. Electron-proton pairing, which can result in an insulating phase, is investigated by using an approximate solution of an Eliashberg-type equation for the anomalous self-energy. A very low estimate of the transition temperature is obtained by including proton correlations in the effective interaction. For proton-proton pairing, we derive a new proton pair potential based on the Abrikosov wave function. This potential includes the electron-proton interaction to all orders and has a much larger well depth than is obtained with linear screening methods. This suggests the possibility of either a superfluid paired phase analogous to that in He-3, or alternatively a phase with true molecular pairing.

  14. Ensemble treatments of thermal pairing in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen Quang; Dang, Nguyen Dinh

    2009-10-01

    A systematic comparison is conducted for pairing properties of finite systems at nonzero temperature as predicted by the exact solutions of the pairing problem embedded in three principal statistical ensembles, namely the grandcanonical ensemble, canonical ensemble and microcanonical ensemble, as well as the unprojected (FTBCS1+SCQRPA) and Lipkin-Nogami projected (FTLN1+SCQRPA) theories that include the quasiparticle number fluctuation and coupling to pair vibrations within the self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The numerical calculations are performed for the pairing gap, total energy, heat capacity, entropy, and microcanonical temperature within the doubly-folded equidistant multilevel pairing model. The FTLN1+SCQRPA predictions are found to agree best with the exact grand-canonical results. In general, all approaches clearly show that the superfluid-normal phase transition is smoothed out in finite systems. A novel formula is suggested for extracting the empirical pairing gap in reasonable agreement with the exact canonical results.

  15. Dynamical evolution of comet pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Andrea; Fernández, Julio A.

    2016-10-01

    Some Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits (thereafter NEJFCs) show a remarkable similarity in their present orbits, like for instance 169P/NEAT and P/2003 T12 (SOHO), or 252P/LINEAR and P/2016 BA14 (PANSTARRS). By means of numerical integrations we studied the dynamical evolution of these objects. In particular, for each pair of presumably related objects, we are interested in assessing the stability of the orbital parameters for several thousand years, and to find a minimum of their relative spatial distance, coincident with a low value of their relative velocity. For those cases for which we find a well defined minimum of their relative orbital separation, we are trying to reproduce the actual orbit of the hypothetical fragment by modeling a fragmentation of the parent body. Some model parameters are the relative ejection velocity (a few m/s), the orbital point at which the fragmentation could have happened (e.g. perihelion), and the elapsed time since fragmentation. In addition, some possible fragmentation mechanisms, like thermal stress, rotational instability, or collisions, could be explored. According to Fernández J.A and Sosa A. 2015 (Planetary and Space Science 118,pp.14-24), some NEJFCs might come from the outer asteroid belt, and then they would have a more consolidated structure and a higher mineral content than that of comets coming from the trans-Neptunian belt or the Oort cloud. Therefore, such objects would have a much longer physical lifetime in the near-Earth region, and could become potential candidates to produce visible meteor showers (as for example 169P/NEAT which has been identified as the parent body of the alpha-Capricornid meteoroid stream, according to Jenniskens, P., Vaubaillon, J., 2010 (Astron. J. 139), and Kasuga, T., Balam, D.D., Wiegert, P.A., 2010 (Astron. J. 139).

  16. Lax pairs for deformed Minkowski spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyono, Hideki; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    We proceed to study Yang-Baxter deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime based on a conformal embedding. We first revisit a Melvin background and argue a Lax pair by adopting a simple replacement law invented in 1509.00173. This argument enables us to deduce a general expression of Lax pair. Then the anticipated Lax pair is shown to work for arbitrary classical r-matrices with Poincaré generators. As other examples, we present Lax pairs for pp-wave backgrounds, the Hashimoto-Sethi background, the Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich background.

  17. Dual origin of pairing in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idini, A.; Potel, G.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    The pairing correlations of the nucleus 120Sn are calculated by solving the Nambu-Gor'kov equations, including medium polarization effects resulting from the interweaving of quasiparticles, spin and density vibrations, taking into account, within the framework of nuclear field theory (NFT), processes leading to self-energy and vertex corrections and to the induced pairing interaction. From these results one can not only demonstrate the inevitability of the dual origin of pairing in nuclei, but also extract information which can be used at profit to quantitatively disentangle the contributions to the pairing gap Δ arising from the bare and from the induced pairing interaction. The first is the strong 1 S 0 short-range NN potential resulting from meson exchange between nucleons moving in time reversal states within an energy range of hundreds of MeV from the Fermi energy. The second results from the exchange of vibrational modes between nucleons moving within few MeV from the Fermi energy. Short- ( v p bare) and long-range ( v p ind) pairing interactions contribute essentially equally to nuclear Cooper pair stability. That is to the breaking of gauge invariance in open-shell superfluid nuclei and thus to the order parameter, namely to the ground state expectation value of the pair creation operator. In other words, to the emergent property of generalized rigidity in gauge space, and associated rotational bands and Cooper pair tunneling between members of these bands.

  18. Analysis of a familial three way translocation involving chromosomes 3q, 6q, and 15q by high resolution banding and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) shows two different unbalanced karyotypes in sibs.

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, D; Engels, H; Viersbach, R; Henke, B; Schwanitz, G; Passarge, E

    1998-01-01

    We report on a familial three way translocation involving chromosomes 3, 6, and 15 identified by prometaphase banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Two mentally retarded sibs with different phenotypic abnormalities, their phenotypically normal sister and mother, and two fetuses of the phenotypically normal sister were analysed. The terminal regions of chromosomes 3q, 6q, and 15q were involved in a reciprocal translocation, in addition to a paracentric inversion of the derivative chromosome 15. Conventional cytogenetic studies with high resolution GTG banding did not resolve this rearrangement. FISH using whole chromosome paints (WCPs) identified the chromosomal regions involved, except the aberrant region of 3q, which was undetectable with these probes. Investigation of this region with the subtelomeric FISH probe D3S1445/D3S1446 showed a balanced karyotype, 46,XX,t(3;15;6) (q29;q26.1;q26), inv der(15) (q15.1q26.1) in two adult females and one fetus. It was unbalanced in two sibs, showing two different types of unbalanced translocation resulting in partial trisomy 3q in combination with partial monosomy 6q in one patient and partial trisomy 15q with partial monosomy 6q in the other patient and one fetus. These represent apparently new chromosomal phenotypes. Images PMID:9678698

  19. Synthesis, base pairing and structure studies of geranylated RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Vangaveti, Sweta; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V.; Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Haruehanroengra, Phensinee; Chen, Alan; Sheng, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Natural RNAs utilize extensive chemical modifications to diversify their structures and functions. 2-Thiouridine geranylation is a special hydrophobic tRNA modification that has been discovered very recently in several bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella Typhimurium. The geranylated residues are located in the first anticodon position of tRNAs specific for lysine, glutamine and glutamic acid. This big hydrophobic terpene functional group affects the codon recognition patterns and reduces frameshifting errors during translation. We aimed to systematically study the structure, function and biosynthesis mechanism of this geranylation pathway, as well as answer the question of why nature uses such a hydrophobic modification in hydrophilic RNA systems. Recently, we have synthesized the deoxy-analog of S-geranyluridine and showed the geranylated T-G pair is much stronger than the geranylated T-A pair and other mismatched pairs in the B-form DNA duplex context, which is consistent with the observation that the geranylated tRNAGluUUC recognizes GAG more efficiently than GAA. In this manuscript we report the synthesis and base pairing specificity studies of geranylated RNA oligos. We also report extensive molecular simulation studies to explore the structural features of the geranyl group in the context of A-form RNA and its effect on codon–anticodon interaction during ribosome binding. PMID:27307604

  20. Meiotic chromosome pairing in triploid and tetraploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Loidl, J.

    1995-04-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability ({approximately}40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Meiotic Chromosome Pairing in Triploid and Tetraploid Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Loidl, J.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability (~40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. PMID:7789756

  2. Heritability of Biomarkers of Oxidized Lipoproteins: A Twin Pair Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Fangwen; Schork, Andrew J.; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Marcovina, Santica; Miller, Elizabeth R.; Witztum, Joseph L.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are genetically determined. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a heritable risk factor and carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). Approach and Results We measured OxPL-apoB, Lp(a), IgG and IgM autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL), copper oxidized LDL (CuOxLDL) and apoB-immune complexes (ApoB-IC) in 386 monozygotic and dizygotic twins to estimate trait heritability (h2) and determine specific genetic effects among traits. A genome wide linkage study followed by genetic association was performed. The h2 (scale:0-1) for Lp(a) was 0.91±0.01 and for OxPL-apoB 0.87±0.02, which were higher than physiologic, inflammatory, or lipid traits. h2 of IgM MDA-LDL, CuOxLDL and ApoB-IC were 0.69±0.04, 0.67±0.05, and 0.80±0.03, respectively, and for IgG MDA-LDL, CuOxLDL and apoB-IC 0.62±0.05, 0.52±0.06, and 0.53±0.06, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the major apo(a) isoform and OxPL-apoB (R=-0.49, p<0.001), and Lp(a) (R=-0.48, p<0.001) and OxPL-apoB was modestly correlated with Lp(a) (ρ=0.57, p<0.0001). The correlation in major apo(a) isoform size was concordant (R=1.0, p<0.001) among monozygotic twins but not dizygotic twins (R=0.40, p=0.055). Lp(a) and OxPL-apoB shared genetic co-determination (genetic covariance: ρG = 0.774±0.032, p=1.09×10-38), though not environmental determination (environmental covariance: ρE= 0.081±0.15, p=0.15). In contrast, Lp(a) shared environmental but not genetic co-determination with autoantibodies to MDA-LDL and CuOxLDL and ApoB-IC. Sib-pair genetic linkage of the Lp(a) trait revealed that SNP rs10455872 was significantly associated with OxPL-apoB after adjusting for Lp(a). Conclusions OxPL-apoB and other biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are highly heritable cardiovascular risk factors that suggest novel genetic origins of atherothrombosis. PMID:25953646

  3. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  4. Pair condensation in a finite Fermi system

    SciTech Connect

    Sambataro, M.

    2007-05-15

    The lowest seniority-zero eigenstates of an exactly solvable multilevel pairing Hamiltonian for a finite Fermi system are examined at different pairing regimes. After briefly reviewing the form of the eigenstates in the Richardson formalism, we discuss a different representation of these states in terms of the collective pairs resulting from the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian in a space of two degenerate time-reversed fermions. We perform a two-fold analysis by working both in the fermionic space of these collective pairs and in a space of corresponding elementary bosons. On the fermionic side, we monitor the variations which occur, with increasing the pairing strength, in the structure of both these collective pairs and the lowest eigenstates. On the bosonic side, after reviewing a fermion-boson mapping procedure, we construct exact images of the fermion eigenstates and study their wave function. The analysis allows a close examination of the phenomenon of pair condensation in a finite Fermi system and gives new insights into the evolution of the lowest (seniority-zero) excited states of a pairing Hamiltonian from the unperturbed regime up to a strongly interacting one.

  5. Exploring Pair Programming Benefits for MIS Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dongo, Tendai; Reed, April H.; O'Hara, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Pair programming is a collaborative programming practice that places participants in dyads, working in tandem at one computer to complete programming assignments. Pair programming studies with Computer Science (CS) and Software Engineering (SE) majors have identified benefits such as technical productivity, program/design quality, academic…

  6. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  7. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  8. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  9. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  10. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  11. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  12. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, T. A.; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  13. PAIR: the predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhi; Shen, Xueling; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    The predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource (PAIR, http://www.cls.zju.edu.cn/pair/), comprised of 5990 experimentally reported molecular interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana together with 145,494 predicted interactions, is currently the most comprehensive data set of the Arabidopsis interactome with high reliability. PAIR predicts interactions by a fine-tuned support vector machine model that integrates indirect evidences for interaction, such as gene co-expressions, domain interactions, shared GO annotations, co-localizations, phylogenetic profile similarities and homologous interactions in other organisms (interologs). These predictions were expected to cover 24% of the entire Arabidopsis interactome, and their reliability was estimated to be 44%. Two independent example data sets were used to rigorously validate the prediction accuracy. PAIR features a user-friendly query interface, providing rich annotation on the relationships between two proteins. A graphical interaction network browser has also been integrated into the PAIR web interface to facilitate mining of specific pathways.

  14. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (about 200 feet) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 192 km (119 miles) x 142 km (88 miles) Location: 17.8 deg. South lat., 178.0 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  15. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  16. Detecting a preformed pair phase: Response to a pairing forcing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliavini, A.; Capone, M.; Toschi, A.

    2016-10-01

    The normal state of strongly coupled superconductors is characterized by the presence of "preformed" Cooper pairs well above the superconducting critical temperature. In this regime, the electrons are paired, but they lack the phase coherence necessary for superconductivity. The existence of preformed pairs implies the existence of a characteristic energy scale associated with a pseudogap. Preformed pairs are often invoked to interpret systems where some signatures of pairing are present without actual superconductivity, but an unambiguous theoretical characterization of a preformed-pair system is still lacking. To fill this gap, we consider the response to an external pairing field of an attractive Hubbard model, which hosts one of the cleanest realizations of a preformed pair phase, and a repulsive model where s -wave superconductivity cannot be realized. Using dynamical mean-field theory to study this response, we identify the characteristic features which distinguish the reaction of a preformed pair state from a normal metal without any precursor of pairing. The theoretical detection of preformed pairs is associated with the behavior of the second derivative of the order parameter with respect to the external field, as confirmed by analytic calculations in limiting cases. Our findings provide a solid test bed for the interpretation of state-of-the-art calculations for the normal state of the doped Hubbard model in terms of d -wave preformed pairs and, in perspective, of nonequilibrium experiments in high-temperature superconductors.

  17. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  18. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, Francesco; Elyiv, Andrii

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  19. Hippocampus is required for paired associate memory with neither delay nor trial uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jinah; Seo, Yeran; Kim, Jangjin; Lee, Inah

    2012-01-01

    Cued retrieval of memory is typically examined with delay when testing hippocampal functions, as in delayed matching-to-sample tasks. Equally emphasized in the literature, on the other hand, is the hippocampal involvement in making arbitrary associations. Paired associate memory tasks are widely used for examining this function. However, the two variables (i.e., delay and paired association) were often mixed in paired associate tasks, and this makes it difficult to localize the cognitive source of deficits with hippocampal perturbation. Specifically, a few studies have recently shown that rats can learn arbitrary paired associations between certain locations and nonspatial items (e.g., object or flavor) and later can retrieve the paired location when cued by the item remotely. Such tasks involve both (1) delay between sampling the cue and retrieving the target location and (2) arbitrary association between the cueing object and its paired location. Here, we tested whether delay was necessary in a cued paired associate task by using a task in which no delay existed between object cueing and the choice of its paired associate. Moreover, fixed associative relationships between the cueing objects and their paired locations were repeatedly used, thus involving no trial-unique association. Nevertheless, inactivations of the dorsal hippocampus with muscimol severely disrupted retrieval of paired associates, whereas the same manipulations did not affect discriminating individual objects or locations. The results powerfully demonstrate that the hippocampus is inherently required for retrieving paired associations between objects and places, and that delay and trial uniqueness of the paired associates are not necessarily required. PMID:22174309

  20. A Curious Pair of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope has taken the best image ever of a strange and chaotic duo of interwoven galaxies. The images also contain some surprises -- interlopers both far and near. ESO PR Photo 11a/09 A Curious Pair of Galaxies ESO PR Video 11a/09 Arp 261 zoom in ESO PR Video 11b/09 Pan over Arp 261 Sometimes objects in the sky that appear strange, or different from normal, have a story to tell and prove scientifically very rewarding. This was the idea behind Halton Arp's catalogue of Peculiar Galaxies that appeared in the 1960s. One of the oddballs listed there is Arp 261, which has now been imaged in more detail than ever before using the FORS2 instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The image proves to contain several surprises. Arp 261 lies about 70 million light-years distant in the constellation of Libra, the Scales. Its chaotic and very unusual structure is created by the interaction of two galaxies that are engaged in a slow motion, but highly disruptive close encounter. Although individual stars are very unlikely to collide in such an event, the huge clouds of gas and dust certainly do crash into each other at high speed, leading to the formation of bright new clusters of very hot stars that are clearly seen in the picture. The paths of the existing stars in the galaxies are also dramatically disrupted, creating the faint swirls extending to the upper left and lower right of the image. Both interacting galaxies were probably dwarfs not unlike the Magellanic Clouds orbiting our own galaxy. The images used to create this picture were not actually taken to study the interacting galaxies at all, but to investigate the properties of the inconspicuous object just to the right of the brightest part of Arp 261 and close to the centre of the image. This is an unusual exploding star, called SN 1995N, that is thought to be the result of the final collapse of a massive star at the end of its life, a so-called core collapse supernova. SN 1995N is unusual because

  1. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  2. Pure Pairing Modes in Trapped Fermion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzi, P.; Hernández, E. S.; Szybisz, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present numerical predictions for the shape of the pairing fluctuations in harmonically trapped atomic 6Li with two spin projections, based on the fluiddynamical description of cold fermions with pairing interactions. In previous works it has been shown that when the equilibrium of a symmetric mixture is perturbed, the linearized fluiddynamic equations decouple into two sets, one containing the sound mode of fermion superfluids and the other the pairing mode. The latter corresponds to oscillations of the modulus of the complex gap and is driven by the kinetic energy densities of the particles and of the pairs. Assuming proportionality between the heat flux and the energy gradient, the particle kinetic energy undergoes a diffusive behavior and the diffusion parameter is the key parameter for the relaxation time scale. We examine a possible range of values for this parameter and find that the shape of the pairing oscillation is rather insensitive to the precise value of the transport coefficient. Moreover, the pairing fluctuation is largely confined to the center of the trap, and the energy of the pairing mode is consistent with the magnitude of the equilibrium gap.

  3. SU-E-T-451: Hybrid-VMAT: A Novel Technique Combining VMAT and 3D in Planning Whole Breast Radiotherapy with a Simultaneously-Integrated Boost (WBRT+SIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, K; Qamar, K; Thompson, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The RTOG 1005 trial offered a hypofractionated arm in delivering WBRT+SIB. Traditionally, treatments were planned at our institution using field-in-field (FiF) tangents with a concurrent 3D conformal boost. With the availability of VMAT, it is possible that a hybrid VMAT-3D planning technique could provide another avenue in treating WBRT+SIB. Methods: A retrospective study of nine patients previously treated using RTOG 1005 guidelines was performed to compare FiF+3D plans with the hybrid technique. A combination of static tangents and partial VMAT arcs were used in base-dose optimization. The hybrid plans were optimized to deliver 4005cGy to the breast PTVeval and 4800cGy to the lumpectomy PTVeval over 15 fractions. Plans were optimized to meet the planning goals dictated by RTOG 1005. Results: Hybrid plans yielded similar coverage of breast and lumpectomy PTVs (average D95 of 4013cGy compared to 3990cGy for conventional), while reducing the volume of high dose within the breast; the average D30 and D50 for the hybrid technique were 4517cGy and 4288cGy, compared to 4704cGy and 4377cGy for conventional planning. Hybrid plans increased conformity as well, yielding CI95% values of 1.22 and 1.54 for breast and lumpectomy PTVeval volumes; in contrast, conventional plans averaged 1.49 and 2.27, respectively. The nearby organs at risk (OARs) received more low dose with the hybrid plans due to low dose spray from the partial arcs, but all hybrid plans did meet the acceptable constraints, at a minimum, from the protocol. Treatment planning time was also reduced, as plans were inversely optimized (VMAT) rather than forward optimized. Conclusion: Hybrid-VMAT could be a solution in delivering WB+SIB, as plans yield very conformal treatment plans and maintain clinical standards in OAR sparing. For treating breast cancer patients with a simultaneously-integrated boost, Hybrid-VMAT offers superiority in dosimetric conformity and planning time as compared to FIF

  4. Pair supersolid with atom-pair hopping on the state-dependent triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanzhou; Yin, Ruoxi; Wang, Yancheng

    2013-11-01

    We systematically study an extended Bose-Hubbard model with atom hopping and atom-pair hopping in the presence of a three-body constraint on the triangular lattice. By means of large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations, the ground-state phase diagram is studied. We find a first-order transition between the atomic superfluid phase and the pair superfluid phase when the ratio of the atomic hopping and the atom-pair hopping is adapted. The first-order transition remains unchanged under various conditions. We then focus on the interplay among the atom-pair hopping, the on-site repulsion, and the nearest-neighbor repulsion. With on-site repulsion present, we observe first-order transitions between the Mott insulators and pair superfluid driven by the pair hopping. With the nearest-neighbor repulsion turning on, three typical solid phases with 2/3, 1, and 4/3 filling emerge at small atom-pair hopping region. A stable pair supersolid phase is found at small on-site repulsion. This is due to the three-body constraint and the pair hopping, which essentially make the model a quasihardcore boson system. Thus the pair supersolid state emerges basing on the order-by-disorder mechanism, by which hardcore bosons avoid classical frustration on the triangular lattice. Without on-site repulsion, the transitions between the pair supersolid and the atom superfluid or pair superfluid are first order, except for the particle-hole symmetric point. With weak on-site repulsion and atom hopping turning on, the transition between the pair supersolid and pair superfluid phase becomes continuous. The transition between solid and pair supersolid is three-dimensional XY university, with dynamical exponent z=1 and correlation exponent ν=0.67155. The thermal melting of pair supersolid belongs to the two-dimensional Ising university. We check both energetic and mechanical balance of pair supersolid phase. Lowering the three-body constraint, no pair supersolid is found due to the absence of

  5. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  6. Enhanced extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of bridged nanohole pairs and their sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Li, Jingqi; Wu, Ying; Chen, Longqing; Ooi, Boon; Wang, Xianbin; Zhang, Xi-Xiang

    2014-06-01

    Extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) through arrays of gold nanoholes was studied with light across the visible to the near-infrared spectrum. The EOT effect was found to be improved by bridging pairs of nanoholes due to the concentration of the electromagnetic field in the slit between the holes. The geometrical shape and separation of the holes in these pairs of nanoholes affected the intensity of the transmission and the wavelength of resonance. Changing the geometrical shapes of these nanohole pairs from triangles to circles to squares leads to increased transmission intensity as well as red-shifting resonance wavelengths. The performance of bridged nanohole pairs as a plasmonic sensor was investigated. The bridged nanohole pairs were able to distinguish methanol, olive oil and microscope immersion oil for the different surface plasmon resonance in transmission spectra. Numerical simulation results were in agreement with experimental observations.

  7. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Harman, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  8. Pair Creation at Large Inherent Angles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T.; Schroeder, D.V.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    In the next-generation linear colliders, the low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs created during the collision of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} beams would cause potential deleterious background problems to the detectors. At low collider energies, the pairs are made essentially by the incoherent process, where the pair is created by the interaction of beamstrahlung photons on the individual particles in the oncoming beam. This problem was first identified by Zolotarev, et al[1]. At energies where the beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon} lies approximately in the range 0.6 {approx}< {Upsilon} {approx}< 100, pair creation from the beamstrahlung photons is dominated by a coherent process, first noted by Chen[2]. The seriousness of this pair creation problem lies in the transverse momenta that the pair particles carry when leaving the interaction point (IP) with large angles. One source of transverse momentum is from the kick by the field of the oncoming beam which results in an outcoming angle {theta} {proportional_to} 1/{radical}x, where x is the fractional energy of the particle relative to the initial beam particle energy[2,3]. As was shown in Ref. 131, there in fact exists an energy threshold for the coherent pairs, where x{sub th} {approx}> 1/2{Upsilon}. Thus within a tolerable exiting angle, there exists an upper limit for {Upsilon} where all coherent pairs would leave the detector through the exhaust port[4]. A somewhat different analysis has been done by Schroeder[5]. In the next generation of linear colliders, as it occurs, the coherent pairs can be exponentially suppressed[2] by properly choosing the {Upsilon}({approx}< 0.6). When this is achieved, the incoherent pairs becomes dominant. Since the central issue is the transverse momentum for particles with large angles, we notice that there is another source for it. Namely, when the pair particles are created at low energies, the intrinsic angles of these pairs when produced may already be large. This issue was

  9. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  10. Anyon pairing via phonon-mediated interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, B. S.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we study the pairing of anyons subjected to an external uniform magnetic field and confined in a two-dimensional parabolic quantum dot within the framework of Fröhlich large bipolaron theory, motivated by the Wilczek’s prescription that treats anyons as composites having both charges and fictitious flux tubes. In this model, electrons bound to Aharanov-Bohm type flux tubes and surrounded by a cloud of virtual LO phonons interact with each other through the long range Coulomb and statistical potentials. In order to discuss the effects of both spatial confinement potential and external uniform magnetic field on the boundaries of the stability region of such a pairing in real space, we perform a self-consistent treatment of the ground-state energies of both an interacting anyon pair and two noninteracting anyons. Our results suggest that two interacting anyons can be bound into a condensate anyon pair through a phonon-mediated interaction.

  11. Temporal Multimode Storage of Entangled Photon Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiranov, Alexey; Strassmann, Peter C.; Lavoie, Jonathan; Brunner, Nicolas; Huber, Marcus; Verma, Varun B.; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P.; Lita, Adriana E.; Marsili, Francesco; Afzelius, Mikael; Bussières, Félix; Gisin, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Multiplexed quantum memories capable of storing and processing entangled photons are essential for the development of quantum networks. In this context, we demonstrate and certify the simultaneous storage and retrieval of two entangled photons inside a solid-state quantum memory and measure a temporal multimode capacity of ten modes. This is achieved by producing two polarization-entangled pairs from parametric down-conversion and mapping one photon of each pair onto a rare-earth-ion-doped (REID) crystal using the atomic frequency comb (AFC) protocol. We develop a concept of indirect entanglement witnesses, which can be used as Schmidt number witnesses, and we use it to experimentally certify the presence of more than one entangled pair retrieved from the quantum memory. Our work puts forward REID-AFC as a platform compatible with temporal multiplexing of several entangled photon pairs along with a new entanglement certification method, useful for the characterization of multiplexed quantum memories.

  12. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  13. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  14. Mixed parity pairing in a dipolar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruun, G. M.; Hainzl, C.; Laux, M.

    2016-10-01

    We show that fermionic dipoles in a two-layer geometry form Cooper pairs with both singlet and triplet components when they are tilted with respect to the normal of the planes. The mixed parity pairing arises because the interaction between dipoles in the two different layers is not inversion symmetric. We use an efficient eigenvalue approach to calculate the zero-temperature phase diagram of the system as a function of the dipole orientation and the layer distance. The phase diagram contains purely triplet as well as mixed singlet and triplet superfluid phases. We show in detail how the pair wave function for dipoles residing in different layers smoothly changes from singlet to triplet symmetry as the orientation of the dipoles is changed. Our results indicate that dipolar quantum gases can be used to unambiguously observe mixed parity pairing.

  15. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-02-14

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  16. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    ScienceCinema

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  17. Pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Smith, R. A.; Jackson, A. D.

    1981-12-01

    The correlated-basis-function method is extended to deal with pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. With a variational ansatz for the model wave function we derive the "correlated" analog of the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (or Balian-Werthamer), Anderson-Brinkman-Morel theory of pairing. A suitable (and well-controlled) set of approximations brings the theory into a form identical to the conventional theories, but with the bare interaction replaced by a weak effective interaction and the bare single-particle energies replaced by an effective single-particle spectrum. As usual, liquid 3He provides a very stringent test of the theory, as both the interaction and the experimental facts are pretty clear. The variational estimates for the pairing interaction are improved by nonorthogonal perturbation theory. We find the expected enhancement of the attraction in P waves, although the restriction to effective two-body interactions appears to be insufficient to generate P-wave pairing.

  18. Investigation of the Gravitational Interaction between the Components of the Galaxy Pairs CPG 165

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfeek, Amira A.; Ali, Gamal B.; Amin, Magdy Y.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper the effect of interaction between the components of the galaxy pair CPG 165 on the symmetry of their morphologies and structures is studied by applying the technique of surface photometry. For each component of the pair we present the isophotal contours, profiles of surface brightness (SB), major-axis position angle (PA), and isophotal center-shift. The present analysis is done using the r- and i-band images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observation. It is found that the position angle and the isophotal center shift are strongly affected by the state of interaction between the components of the pair CPG 165.

  19. Polarization proximity effect in isolator crystal pairs.

    PubMed

    Linzon, Y; Ferrera, M; Razzari, L; Pignolet, A; Morandotti, R

    2008-12-01

    We experimentally study the polarization dynamics (orientation and ellipticity) of near-infrared light transmitted through magneto-optical yttrium iron garnet isolator crystal pairs using a modified balanced detection scheme. When the pair separation is in the submillimeter range, we observed a proximity effect in which the saturation field is reduced by up to 20%. One-dimensional calculations suggest that the proximity effect originates from magnetostatic interactions between the dipole moments of the isolator crystals.

  20. Alternative DNA base pairing through metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Clever, Guido H; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Base-pairing in the naturally occurring DNA and RNA oligonucleotide duplexes is based on π-stacking, hydrogen bonding, and shape complementarity between the nucleobases adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine as well as on the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance in aqueous media. This complex system of multiple supramolecular interactions is the product of a long-term evolutionary process and thus highly optimized to serve its biological functions such as information storage and processing. After the successful implementation of automated DNA synthesis, chemists have begun to introduce artificial modifications inside the core of the DNA double helix in order to study various aspects of base pairing, generate new base pairs orthogonal to the natural ones, and equip the biopolymer with entirely new functions. The idea to replace the hydrogen bonding interactions with metal coordination between ligand-like nucleosides and suitable transition metal ions culminated in the development of a plethora of artificial base-pairing systems termed "metal base-pairs" which were shown to strongly enhance the DNA duplex stability. Furthermore, they show great potential for the use of DNA as a molecular wire in nanoscale electronic architectures. Although single electrons have proven to be transmitted by natural DNA over a distance of several base pairs, the high ohmic resistance of unmodified oligonucleotides was identified as a serious obstacle. By exchanging some or all of the Watson-Crick base pairs in DNA with metal complexes, this problem may be solved. In the future, these research efforts are supposed to lead to DNA-like materials with superior conductivity for nano-electronic applications. Other fields of potential application such as DNA-based supramolecular architecture and catalysis may be strongly influenced by these developments as well. This text is meant to illustrate the basic concepts of metal-base pairing and give an outline over recent developments in this field.

  1. Ultrabright source of entangled photon pairs.

    PubMed

    Dousse, Adrien; Suffczyński, Jan; Beveratos, Alexios; Krebs, Olivier; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Bloch, Jacqueline; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale

    2010-07-08

    A source of triggered entangled photon pairs is a key component in quantum information science; it is needed to implement functions such as linear quantum computation, entanglement swapping and quantum teleportation. Generation of polarization entangled photon pairs can be obtained through parametric conversion in nonlinear optical media or by making use of the radiative decay of two electron-hole pairs trapped in a semiconductor quantum dot. Today, these sources operate at a very low rate, below 0.01 photon pairs per excitation pulse, which strongly limits their applications. For systems based on parametric conversion, this low rate is intrinsically due to the Poissonian statistics of the source. Conversely, a quantum dot can emit a single pair of entangled photons with a probability near unity but suffers from a naturally very low extraction efficiency. Here we show that this drawback can be overcome by coupling an optical cavity in the form of a 'photonic molecule' to a single quantum dot. Two coupled identical pillars-the photonic molecule-were etched in a semiconductor planar microcavity, using an optical lithography method that ensures a deterministic coupling to the biexciton and exciton energy states of a pre-selected quantum dot. The Purcell effect ensures that most entangled photon pairs are emitted into two cavity modes, while improving the indistinguishability of the two optical recombination paths. A polarization entangled photon pair rate of 0.12 per excitation pulse (with a concurrence of 0.34) is collected in the first lens. Our results open the way towards the fabrication of solid state triggered sources of entangled photon pairs, with an overall (creation and collection) efficiency of 80%.

  2. Formation of asteroid pairs by rotational fission.

    PubMed

    Pravec, P; Vokrouhlický, D; Polishook, D; Scheeres, D J; Harris, A W; Galád, A; Vaduvescu, O; Pozo, F; Barr, A; Longa, P; Vachier, F; Colas, F; Pray, D P; Pollock, J; Reichart, D; Ivarsen, K; Haislip, J; Lacluyze, A; Kusnirák, P; Henych, T; Marchis, F; Macomber, B; Jacobson, S A; Krugly, Yu N; Sergeev, A V; Leroy, A

    2010-08-26

    Pairs of asteroids sharing similar heliocentric orbits, but not bound together, were found recently. Backward integrations of their orbits indicated that they separated gently with low relative velocities, but did not provide additional insight into their formation mechanism. A previously hypothesized rotational fission process may explain their formation-critical predictions are that the mass ratios are less than about 0.2 and, as the mass ratio approaches this upper limit, the spin period of the larger body becomes long. Here we report photometric observations of a sample of asteroid pairs, revealing that the primaries of pairs with mass ratios much less than 0.2 rotate rapidly, near their critical fission frequency. As the mass ratio approaches 0.2, the primary period grows long. This occurs as the total energy of the system approaches zero, requiring the asteroid pair to extract an increasing fraction of energy from the primary's spin in order to escape. We do not find asteroid pairs with mass ratios larger than 0.2. Rotationally fissioned systems beyond this limit have insufficient energy to disrupt. We conclude that asteroid pairs are formed by the rotational fission of a parent asteroid into a proto-binary system, which subsequently disrupts under its own internal system dynamics soon after formation.

  3. On cooperative instabilities of parallel vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, R. L.; Ortega, J. M.; Marcus, P. S.; Savas, Ö.

    2004-10-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the instabilities of a pair of parallel unequal-strength vortices. We extend the analyses of a vortex in an external strain field (Crow, AIAA J. vol. 8, 1970, p. 2172; Widnall et al., J. Fluid Mech. vol. 66, 1974, p. 35) to include the orbital motion of the vortex pair. For counter-rotating pairs, the classic Crow-type periodic displacement perturbations are unstable for all vortex strength ratios, with fastest-growing wavelengths several times the vortex spacing. For co-rotating pairs, the orbital motion acts to suppress instability due to displacement perturbations. Instabilities in this case arise for elliptic perturbations at wavelengths that scale with the vortex core size. We also examine the influence of a second vortex pair by extending Crouch's (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 350, 1997, p. 311) analysis. Numerical results from a spectral initial-value code with subgrid-scale modelling agree with the growth rates from the theoretical models. Computations reveal the nonlinear evolution at late times, including wrapping and ring-rejection behaviour observed in experiments. A pair of co-rotating Gaussian vortices perturbed by noise develops elliptic instabilities, leading to the formation of vorticity bridges between the two vortices. The bridging is a prelude to vortex merger. Analytic, computational and experimental results agree well at circulation Reynolds numbers of order 10(5) .

  4. Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandra; Verma, Savita Arora

    2011-01-01

    Parallel runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace but poor visibility conditions reduce the use of these operations. The NextGen and SESAR Programs have identified the capacity benefits from increased use of closely-space parallel runway. Previous research examined the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This simulation study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s (+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that was about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation and auto speed control future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Results show the operations in this study were acceptable and safe. Subjective workload, when using the pairing procedures and tools, was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness was typically moderate to high. Pilot workload was influenced by display type and automation condition. Further research on pairing and off-nominal conditions is required however, this investigation identified promising findings about the feasibility of closely-spaced parallel runway operations.

  5. Seniority zero pair coupled cluster doubles theory.

    PubMed

    Stein, Tamar; Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2014-06-07

    Coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations accurately describes weak electron correlation but is known to fail in cases of strong static correlation. Fascinatingly, however, pair coupled cluster doubles (p-CCD), a simplified version of the theory limited to pair excitations that preserve the seniority of the reference determinant (i.e., the number of unpaired electrons), has mean field computational cost and is an excellent approximation to the full configuration interaction (FCI) of the paired space provided that the orbital basis defining the pairing scheme is adequately optimized. In previous work, we have shown that optimization of the pairing scheme in the seniority zero FCI leads to a very accurate description of static correlation. The same conclusion extends to p-CCD if the orbitals are optimized to make the p-CCD energy stationary. We here demonstrate these results with numerous examples. We also explore the contributions of different seniority sectors to the coupled cluster doubles (CCD) correlation energy using different orbital bases. We consider both Hartree-Fock and Brueckner orbitals, and the role of orbital localization. We show how one can pair the orbitals so that the role of the Brueckner orbitals at the CCD level is retained at the p-CCD level. Moreover, we explore ways of extending CCD to accurately describe strongly correlated systems.

  6. An asymmetric pair of vortices adjacent to a spinning cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iosilevskii, G.; Seginer, A.

    The two-dimensional flow field over a spinning circular cylinder is analyzed using an extension of the Foeppl method. Equilibrium equations for two asymmetric point vortices in the wake of the cylinder are solved for a case when both vortices are equidistant from the cylinder. The two Foeppl solutions for the cylinder are presented. It is observed that the spin does not affect the angle between the two vortices; however, it displaces the vortex pair in the spin direction and the sinus of the displacement angle is proportional to the spin rate.

  7. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  8. Pairing and reproductive success in two sympatric species of Hyalella (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Dogielinotidae) from southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Castiglioni, Daniela; Bond-Buckup, Georgina

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at characterizing pairing and reproductive success in relation to male and female sizes of the sympatric freshwater gammarideans Hyalella pleoacuta and H. castroi from southern Brazil. These amphipods exhibit precopulatory mate guarding, in which a male will carry a potential mate beneath its ventral surface, guarding the female for several days until it molts and lays its eggs. The specimens were collected monthly with nets, from November 2003 to July 2004 in two trout aquaculture ponds at Sítio Vale das Trutas locality, São José dos Ausentes County, southern Brazil. The precopulatory pairs and ovigerous females were identified and separated in the field. In the laboratory, they were measured (cephalothorax length in mm), using a micrometer eyepiece in a stereoscopic microscope. Pairing success was estimated from the proportion of mating males and females related to their respective non-pairing individuals by size classes. Reproductive success was estimated from egg production. The mean cephalothorax length of paired males was larger than that of the unpaired males. For females, however, body size not affect pairing success for either species, because mean cephalothorax length of paired females did not differ significantly from unpaired females. Paired and unpaired males of both species of Hyalella were larger than the females. Positive assortative mating by size was observed in both species; i.e., larger males tended to pair with larger females. Male pairing success increased sharply with size. In both species, reproductive success in males increased with body size; however, the females of intermediate size classes showed greater reproductive success. This result supports the hypothesis that loading constraints play a part in structuring size-assortative pairing in these species.

  9. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y.

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  10. Detection of Majorana Kramers Pairs Using a Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Pan, Wei; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a setup that integrates a quantum point contact (QPC) and a Josephson junction on a quantum spin Hall sample, experimentally realizable in InAs/GaSb quantum wells. The confinement due to both the QPC and the superconductor results in a Kramers pair of Majorana zero-energy bound states when the superconducting phases in the two arms differ by an odd multiple of π across the Josephson junction. We investigate the detection of these Majorana pairs with the integrated QPC, and find a robust switching from normal to Andreev scattering across the edges due to the presence of Majorana Kramers pairs. Such a switching of the current represents a qualitative signature where multiterminal differential conductances oscillate with alternating signs when the external magnetic field is tuned. We show that this qualitative signature is also present in current cross-correlations. Thus, the change of the backscattering current nature affects both conductance and shot noise, the measurement of which offers a significant advantage over quantitative signatures such as conductance quantization in realistic measurements.

  11. Polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2013-01-01

    Main-group classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (CLPs and FLPs) comprising strong Lewis acids (LAs) and strong Lewis bases (LBs) are highly active for polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes, affording typically high molecular weight polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Especially effective systems are the Lewis pairs (LPs) consisting of the strong LA Al(C6F5)3 and strong LBs, such as achiral phosphines and chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes, and phosphazene superbases, for polymerization of methacrylates and acrylamides as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones. Chain initiation involves cooperative addition of LPs to the monomer to generate zwitterionic active species, and chain propagation proceeds via a bimetallic, activated-monomer addition mechanism. Transition metal nucleophile/electrophile pairs comprising neutral metallocene bis(ester enolate)s and strong LAs E(C6F5)3 (E = Al, B) generate two drastically different polymerization systems, depending on the LA. With E = Al, catalyst activation and chain initiating events lead to dually active ion-pairs, thereby effecting ion-pairing polymerization that affords polymers with unique stereo-multiblock microstructures. With E = B, on the other hand, the FLP-induced catalyst activation generates metallacyclic cations paired with the hydridoborate anion [HB(C6F5)3](-); uniquely, such ion-pairs effect catalytic polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes by an H-shuttling mechanism, with the cation catalyzing chain growth and the anion promoting chain transfer by shuttling the hydride between the cation and anion centers through the neutral borane.

  12. Theoretical study of pair density wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhichao

    In conventional superconductors, the Cooper pairs are formed from quasiparticles. We explore another type of superconducting state, a pair density wave (PDW) order, which spontaneously breaks some of the translational and point group symmetries. In a PDW superconductor, the order parameter is a periodic function of the center-of-mass coordinate, and the spatial average value of the superconducting order parameter vanishes. In the early 1960s, following the success of the BCS theory of superconductivity, Fulde and Ferrell and Larkin and Ovchinnikov (FFLO) developed theories of inhomogeneous superconducting states. Because of this Zeeman splitting in a magnetic field, the Cooper pairs having a nonzero center-of-mass momentum are more stable than the normal pairing, leading to the FFLO state. Experiments suggest possible occurrence of the FFLO state in the heavy-fermion compound CeCoIn5, and in quasi-low-dimensional organic superconductors. FFLO phases have also been argued to be of importance in understanding ultracold atomic Fermi gases and in the formation of color superconductivity in high density quark matter. In all Fermi superfluids known at the present time, Cooper pairs are composed of particles with spin 1/2. The spin component of a pair wave function can be characterized by its total spin S = 0 (singlet) and S = 1 (triplet). In the discovered broken inversion superconductors CePt3Si, Li2Pt3B, and Li2Pd3B, the magnetic field leads to novel inhomogeneous superconducting states, namely the helical phase and the multiple-q phase. Its order parameter exhibits periodicity similar to FFLO phase, and the consequences of both phases are same: the enhancement of transition temperature as a function of magnetic field. We have studied the PDW phases in broken parity superconductors with vortices included. By studying PDW vortex states, we find the usual Abrikosov vortex solution is unstable against a new solution with fractional vortex pairs. We have also studied the

  13. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, Utpal; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  14. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Lacroix, Denis; Sandulescu, N.

    2013-09-01

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that the predictions of the FT-VAP approach are very accurate when compared to the results obtained by an exact diagonalization of the pairing Hamiltonian. The influence of pairing correlations on specific heat is analyzed for the isotopes 161,162Dy and 171,172Yb. It is shown that the FT-VAP approach, applied with a level density provided by mean field calculations and supplemented, at high energies, by the level density of the back-shifted Fermi gas model, can approximate reasonably well the main properties of specific heat extracted from experimental data. However, the detailed shape of the calculated specific heat is rather sensitive to the assumption made for the mean field.

  15. Pairing instabilities of Dirac composite fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, M. V.; Ćirić, M. Dimitrijević; Juričić, V.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a Dirac (particle-hole symmetric) description of composite fermions in the half-filled Landau level (LL) was proposed [D. T. Son, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031027 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031027], and we study its possible consequences on BCS (Cooper) pairing of composite fermions (CFs). One of the main consequences is the existence of anisotropic states in single-layer and bilayer systems, which was previously suggested in Jeong and Park [J. S. Jeong and K. Park, Phys. Rev. B 91, 195119 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.195119]. We argue that in the half-filled LL in the single-layer case the gapped states may sustain anisotropy, because isotropic pairings may coexist with anisotropic ones. Furthermore, anisotropic pairings with the addition of a particle-hole symmetry-breaking mass term may evolve into rotationally symmetric states, i.e., Pfaffian states of Halperin-Lee-Read (HLR) ordinary CFs. On the basis of the Dirac formalism, we argue that in the quantum Hall bilayer at total filling factor 1, with decreasing distance between the layers, weak pairing of p -wave paired CFs is gradually transformed from Dirac to ordinary, HLR-like, with a concomitant decrease in the CF number. Global characterization of low-energy spectra based on the Dirac CFs agrees well with previous calculations performed by exact diagonalization on a torus. Finally, we discuss features of the Dirac formalism when applied in this context.

  16. On the analysis of phylogenetically paired designs

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L; Rakovski, Cyril S; Macpherson, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As phylogenetically controlled experimental designs become increasingly common in ecology, the need arises for a standardized statistical treatment of these datasets. Phylogenetically paired designs circumvent the need for resolved phylogenies and have been used to compare species groups, particularly in the areas of invasion biology and adaptation. Despite the widespread use of this approach, the statistical analysis of paired designs has not been critically evaluated. We propose a mixed model approach that includes random effects for pair and species. These random effects introduce a “two-layer” compound symmetry variance structure that captures both the correlations between observations on related species within a pair as well as the correlations between the repeated measurements within species. We conducted a simulation study to assess the effect of model misspecification on Type I and II error rates. We also provide an illustrative example with data containing taxonomically similar species and several outcome variables of interest. We found that a mixed model with species and pair as random effects performed better in these phylogenetically explicit simulations than two commonly used reference models (no or single random effect) by optimizing Type I error rates and power. The proposed mixed model produces acceptable Type I and II error rates despite the absence of a phylogenetic tree. This design can be generalized to a variety of datasets to analyze repeated measurements in clusters of related subjects/species. PMID:25750719

  17. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T. A; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and −k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  18. Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace (NAS) however, poor visibility conditions reduce this capacity [1]. Much research has been conducted to examine the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s(+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that is about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: Two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation, and a prototype future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Data showed that the operations in this study were found to be acceptable and safe. Workload when using the pairing procedures and tools was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness (SA) was typically moderate to high. There were some differences based upon the display and automation conditions for the pilots. Future research should consider the refinement of the concepts and tools for pilot and controller displays and automation for parallel runway concepts.

  19. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    DOE PAGES

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; ...

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, wemore » report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.« less

  20. Probing the tides in interacting galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed spectroscopic and imaging observations of colliding elliptical galaxies revealed unmistakable diagnostic signatures of the tidal interactions. It is possible to compare both the distorted luminosity distributions and the disturbed internal rotation profiles with numerical simulations in order to model the strength of the tidal gravitational field acting within a given pair of galaxies. Using the best-fit numerical model, one can then measure directly the mass of a specific interacting binary system. This technique applies to individual pairs and therefore complements the classical methods of measuring the masses of galaxy pairs in well-defined statistical samples. The 'personalized' modeling of galaxy pairs also permits the derivation of each binary's orbit, spatial orientation, and interaction timescale. Similarly, one can probe the tides in less-detailed observations of disturbed galaxies in order to estimate some of the physical parameters for larger samples of interacting galaxy pairs. These parameters are useful inputs to the more universal problems of (1) the galaxy merger rate, (2) the strength and duration of the driving forces behind tidally stimulated phenomena (e.g., starbursts and maybe quasi steller objects), and (3) the identification of long-lived signatures of interaction/merger events.

  1. Hard Photodisintegration of a Proton Pair

    DOE PAGES

    Pomerantz, Ishay; Bubis, Nathaniel; Allada, Kalyan; ...

    2010-01-08

    We present the first study of high energy photodisintegration of proton-pairs through the gamma + 3He -> p+p+n channel. Photon energies from 0.8 to 4.7 GeV were used in kinematics corresponding to a proton pair with high relative momentum and a neutron nearly at rest. An s^{-11} scaling of the cross section was observed, as predicted by the constituent counting rule. The onset of the scaling is at a higher energy and the cross section is significantly lower then for pn pair photodisintegration. For photon energies below the scaling region, the scaled cross section was found to present a strongmore » energy-dependent structure not observed in deuteron photodisintegration.« less

  2. Pairing dynamics and the origin of species

    PubMed Central

    Puebla, Oscar; Bermingham, Eldredge; Guichard, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Whether sexual selection alone can drive the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. Here, we report a role for pairing dynamics of individuals when mate choice is mutual, which is sufficient for the evolution of assortative mating by sexual selection alone in the presence of gene flow. Through behavioural observation, individual-based simulation and population genetic analysis, we evaluate the pairing dynamics of coral reef fish in the genus Hypoplectrus (Serranidae), and the role these dynamics can play for the evolution of assortative mating. When mate choice is mutual and the stability of mating pairs is critical for reproductive success, the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is not only possible, but is also a robust evolutionary outcome. PMID:21937496

  3. ION PAIR DISSOCIATION: Spectroscopy and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, Arthur G.; Hepburn, John W.

    2006-05-01

    Ion pair dissociation processes may be studied using coherent vacuum ultraviolet laser sources in a manner entirely analogous to photoelectron spectroscopy, albeit with the anion playing the role of a heavy electron. If the excitation energy is above the dissociation energy and the kinetic energy of the fragment is measured using ion imaging, this approach is termed ion pair imaging spectroscopy (IPIS) and is related to conventional photoelectron spectroscopy. If the excitation energy is just below the dissociation energy and pulsed-field dissociation is employed, this approach is analogous to mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy and is termed threshold ion pair production spectroscopy (TIPPS). These approaches provide a novel means of investigating ion thermochemistry and spectroscopy and superexcited state decay dynamics at high resolution.

  4. The inverse problem for Schwinger pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The production of electron-positron pairs in time-dependent electric fields (Schwinger mechanism) depends non-linearly on the applied field profile. Accordingly, the resulting momentum spectrum is extremely sensitive to small variations of the field parameters. Owing to this non-linear dependence it is so far unpredictable how to choose a field configuration such that a predetermined momentum distribution is generated. We show that quantum kinetic theory along with optimal control theory can be used to approximately solve this inverse problem for Schwinger pair production. We exemplify this by studying the superposition of a small number of harmonic components resulting in predetermined signatures in the asymptotic momentum spectrum. In the long run, our results could facilitate the observation of this yet unobserved pair production mechanism in quantum electrodynamics by providing suggestions for tailored field configurations.

  5. Pairing dynamics and the origin of species.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Oscar; Bermingham, Eldredge; Guichard, Frédéric

    2012-03-22

    Whether sexual selection alone can drive the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. Here, we report a role for pairing dynamics of individuals when mate choice is mutual, which is sufficient for the evolution of assortative mating by sexual selection alone in the presence of gene flow. Through behavioural observation, individual-based simulation and population genetic analysis, we evaluate the pairing dynamics of coral reef fish in the genus Hypoplectrus (Serranidae), and the role these dynamics can play for the evolution of assortative mating. When mate choice is mutual and the stability of mating pairs is critical for reproductive success, the evolution of assortative mating in the presence of gene flow is not only possible, but is also a robust evolutionary outcome.

  6. Pair production in superstrong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The production of electron-positron pairs by single photons in magnetic fields 10 to the twelth power G was investigated in detail for photon energies near threshold as well as for the asymptotic limit of high photon energy. The exact attenuation coefficient, which is derived and then evaluated numerically, is strongly influenced by the discrete energy states of the electron and positron. Near threshold, it exhibits a sawtooth pattern as a function of photon energy, and its value is significantly below that predicted by the asymptotic expression for the attenuation coefficient. The energy distributions of the created pair are computed numerically near threshold and analytic expressions are derived in the asymptotic limit. These results indicate that as field strength and photon energy increase, it becomes increasingly probable for the pair to divide the photon energy unequally. This effect, as well as the threshold behavior of the attenuation coefficient, could have important consequences for pulsar models.

  7. Hard photodisintegration of a proton pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, I.; Bubis, N.; Allada, K.; Beck, A.; Beck, S.; Berman, B. L.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Cisbani, E.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Dutta, C.; Garibaldi, F.; Geagla, O.; Gilman, R.; Glister, J.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Jiang, X.; Katramatou, A. T.; Khrosinkova, E.; Lee, B. W.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; McCullough, E.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Petratos, G. G.; Piasetzky, E.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rodriguez, I.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sarty, A. J.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shneor, R.; Sparveris, N.; Subedi, R.; Strauch, S.; Sulkosky, V.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhan, X.; Zheng, X.

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of high energy photodisintegration of proton-pairs through the γ+He3→p+p+n channel. Photon energies, Eγ, from 0.8 to 4.7 GeV were used in kinematics corresponding to a proton pair with high relative momentum and a neutron nearly at rest. The s scaling of the cross section, as predicted by the constituent counting rule for two nucleon photodisintegration, was observed for the first time. The onset of the scaling is at a higher energy and the cross section is significantly lower than for deuteron (pn pair) photodisintegration. For Eγ below the scaling region, the scaled cross section was found to present a strong energy-dependent structure not observed in deuteron photodisintegration.

  8. Cooper-pair splitter: towards an efficient source of spin-entangled EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonenberger, Christian

    2011-03-01

    In quantum mechanics the properties of two and more particles can be entangled. In basic science pairs of entangled particles, so called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs, play a special role as toy objects for fundamental studies. They provide such things as ``spooky interaction at distance,'' but they also enable secure encoding and teleportation and are thus important for applications in quantum information technology. Whereas EPR pairs of photons can be generated by parametric down conversion (PDC) in a crystal, a similar source for EPR pairs of electrons does not exists yet. In several theory papers, it has been suggested to use a superconductor for this purpose. The superconducting ground state is formed by a condensate of Cooper-pairs which are electron pairs in a spin-singlet state. Since there are many Cooper pairs in a metallic superconductor like Al, the main tasks are to extract Cooper pairs one by one and to split them into different arms. A controlled and efficient splitting is possible if one makes use of Coulomb interaction. This has recently be demonstrated by two groups [2-4] using hybrid quantum-dot devices with both superconducting and normal metal contacts. In the present talk, I will discuss the Cooper-pair splitter results from the Basel-Budapest-Copenhagen team and compare with the other experiments. As an outlook we discuss approaches that aim at entanglement detection. The Cooper pair splitter holds great promises because very large splitting efficiencies approaching 100% and large pair current rates appear feasible. This work has been done by L. Hofstetter, S. Csonka, A. Geresdi, M. Aagesen, J. Nygard and C. Schönenberger

  9. Moral Appraisals Affect Doing/Allowing Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Fiery; Knobe, Joshua; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An extensive body of research suggests that the distinction between doing and allowing plays a critical role in shaping moral appraisals. Here, we report evidence from a pair of experiments suggesting that the converse is also true: moral appraisals affect doing/allowing judgments. Specifically, morally bad behavior is more likely to be construed…

  10. Age-dependent trajectories differ between within-pair and extra-pair paternity success.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y-H; Simons, M J P; Schroeder, J; Girndt, A; Winney, I S; Burke, T; Nakagawa, S

    2017-02-24

    Reproductive success is associated with age in many taxa, increasing in early life followed by reproductive senescence. In socially monogamous but genetically polygamous species, this generates the interesting possibility of differential trajectories of within-pair and extra-pair siring success with age in males. We investigate these relationships simultaneously using within-individual analyses with 13 years of data from an insular house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population. As expected, we found that both within- and extra-pair paternity success increased with age, followed by a senescence-like decline. However, the age trajectories of within- and extra-pair paternity successes differed significantly, with the extra-pair paternity success increasing faster, although not significantly, in early life, and showing a delayed decline by 1.5 years on average later in life compared to within-pair paternity success. These different trajectories indicate that the two alternative mating tactics should have age-dependent pay-offs. Males may partition their reproductive effort between within- and extra-pair matings depending on their current age to reap the maximal combined benefit from both strategies. The interplay between these mating strategies and age-specific mortality may explain the variation in rates of extra-pair paternity observed within and between species.

  11. Paired Learning: Tutoring by Non-Teachers. Incorporating "The Paired Reading Bulletin" No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paired Reading Bulletin, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The eight papers constituting the Proceedings of the fourth National Paired Reading Conference are published in an annual bulletin of the Paired Reading Project, together with seven papers constituting the Supplementary Proceedings of the Peer Tutoring Conference, and nine feature articles, as follows: (1) "Whole-School Policy on Parental…

  12. Communication: Multipole approximations of distant pair energies in local correlation methods with pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of multipole approximations for distant pair energies in local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) as introduced by Hetzer et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 290, 143 (1998)] is investigated for three chemical reactions involving molecules with up to 92 atoms. Various iterative and non-iterative approaches are compared, using different energy thresholds for distant pair selection. It is demonstrated that the simple non-iterative dipole-dipole approximation, which has been used in several recent pair natural orbitals (PNO)-LMP2 and PNO-LCCSD (local coupled-cluster with singles and doubles) methods, may underestimate the distant pair energies by up to 50% and can lead to significant errors in relative energies, unless very tight thresholds are used. The accuracy can be much improved by including higher multipole orders and by optimizing the distant pair amplitudes iteratively along with all other amplitudes. A new approach is presented in which very small special PNO domains for distant pairs are used in the iterative approach. This reduces the number of distant pair amplitudes by 3 orders of magnitude and keeps the additional computational effort for the iterative optimization of distant pair amplitudes minimal.

  13. Communication: Multipole approximations of distant pair energies in local correlation methods with pair natural orbitals.

    PubMed

    Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-28

    The accuracy of multipole approximations for distant pair energies in local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) as introduced by Hetzer et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 290, 143 (1998)] is investigated for three chemical reactions involving molecules with up to 92 atoms. Various iterative and non-iterative approaches are compared, using different energy thresholds for distant pair selection. It is demonstrated that the simple non-iterative dipole-dipole approximation, which has been used in several recent pair natural orbitals (PNO)-LMP2 and PNO-LCCSD (local coupled-cluster with singles and doubles) methods, may underestimate the distant pair energies by up to 50% and can lead to significant errors in relative energies, unless very tight thresholds are used. The accuracy can be much improved by including higher multipole orders and by optimizing the distant pair amplitudes iteratively along with all other amplitudes. A new approach is presented in which very small special PNO domains for distant pairs are used in the iterative approach. This reduces the number of distant pair amplitudes by 3 orders of magnitude and keeps the additional computational effort for the iterative optimization of distant pair amplitudes minimal.

  14. Extracting an entangled photon pair from collectively decohered pairs at a telecommunication wavelength.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Yoshiaki; Sugiura, Yukihiro; Ando, Makoto; Katsuse, Daisuke; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-18

    We experimentally demonstrated entanglement extraction scheme by using photons at the telecommunication band for optical-fiber-based quantum communications. We generated two pairs of non-degenerate polarization entangled photons at 780 nm and 1551 nm by spontaneous parametric down-conversion and distributed the two photons at 1551 nm through a collective phase damping channel which gives the same amount of random phase shift on the two photons. Through local operation and classical communication, we extracted an entangled photon pair from two phase-disturbed photon pairs. An observed fidelity of the extracted photon pair to a maximally entangled photon pair was 0.73 ± 0.07 which clearly shows the recovery of entanglement.

  15. Hydrodynamic interaction of a pair of bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanada, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-01

    Interaction effects on the motions of a pair of bubbles, which either rose in vertical line or side by side, in silicon oil pool were experimentally studied. A pair of bubbles rising in vertical line was generated by releasing bubbles successively from a single nozzle, while one rising side by side was generated, by releasing bubble simultaneously from a pair of horizontally placed orifices. Bubble diameter and liquid kinematic viscosity were taken as the experimental parameters. The motions of bubbles were recorded by a high-speed camera with 2000 fps. We observed that Reynolds number significantly affected the motions of a pair of bubbles rising both in vertical line and side by side. When a pair of bubbles rose in vertical line, the trailing bubble was attracted by the leading bubble wake, and then it collided with leading bubble, in the case of low Re, while a pair of bubbles kept a mutual equilibrium distance due to the balance between the leading bubble wake attractive force and potential repulsive force, in the case of intermediate Re. As Re further increased, the trailing bubble oscillated and then escaped from the vertical line. When a pair of bubbles rose side by side, they separated from each other as they rose in the case of low Re, while they attracted each other and then collided if the initial bubble horizontal distance was smaller than a critical value, in the case of large Re.

  16. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; ...

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  17. Analysis of Paired Comparison Data Using Mx

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Rung-Ching; Wu, Tsung-Lin

    2004-01-01

    By postulating that the random utilities associated with the choice options follow a multivariate normal distribution, Thurstonian models (Thurstone, 1927) provide a straightforward representation of paired comparison data. The use of Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization (MCEM) algorithms and limited information approaches have been proposed to…

  18. Assessing Paired Orals: Raters' Orientation to Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducasse, Ana Maria; Brown, Annie

    2009-01-01

    Speaking tasks involving peer-to-peer candidate interaction are increasingly being incorporated into language proficiency assessments, in both large-scale international testing contexts, and in smaller-scale, for example course-related, ones. This growth in the popularity and use of paired and group orals has stimulated research, particularly into…

  19. Pair Negotiation When Developing English Speaking Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohórquez Suárez, Ingrid Liliana; Gómez Sará, Mary Mily; Medina Mosquera, Sindy Lorena

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes what characterizes the negotiations of seventh graders at a public school in Bogotá when working in pairs to develop speaking tasks in EFL classes. The inquiry is a descriptive case study that follows the qualitative paradigm. As a result of analyzing the data, we obtained four consecutive steps that characterize students'…

  20. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  1. Phenomena, dynamics and instabilities of vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. H. K.; Leweke, T.; Asselin, D. J.; Harris, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Our motivation for studying the dynamics of vortex pairs stems initially from an interest in the trailing wake vortices from aircraft and the dynamics of longitudinal vortices close to a vehicle surface. However, our motivation also comes from the fact that vortex-vortex interactions and vortex-wall interactions are fundamental to many turbulent flows. The intent of the paper is to present an overview of some of our recent work concerning the formation and structure of counter-rotating vortex pairs. We are interested in the long-wave and short-wave three-dimensional instabilities that evolve for an isolated vortex pair, but also we would like to know how vortex pairs interact with a wall, including both two-dimensional interactions, and also the influence of the surface on the three-dimensional instabilities. The emphasis of this presentation is on physical mechanisms by which vortices interact with each other and with surfaces, principally from an experimental approach, but also coupled with analytical studies.

  2. Paired Field Placements: A Means for Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy; Robinson, Karen Shipley

    2009-01-01

    In this qualitative study, pairs of preservice teachers were placed with single cooperating teachers in a 100-hour urban field placement. The question guiding this research was would preservice teachers collaborate in ways that contributed to their professional development and if so why, how, and to what end? Results from field notes, multiple…

  3. Two New CPM Pairs in Libra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, Abdul

    2014-10-01

    In this paper two new double stars are reported in the constellation of Libra that are currently not in the WDS catalog, the components of which share common proper motions. On observed photometric characteristics, calibration of distances, and other assumptions, all the indications are that both pairs comprise possible wide physical systems.

  4. Diagnostics for conformity of paired quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Douglas M

    2002-07-15

    Matched pairs data arise in many contexts - in case-control clinical trials, for example, and from cross-over designs. They also arise in experiments to verify the equivalence of quantitative assays. This latter use (which is the main focus of this paper) raises difficulties not always seen in other matched pairs applications. Since the designs deliberately vary the analyte levels over a wide range, issues of variance dependent on mean, calibrations of differing slopes, and curvature all need to be added to the usual model assumptions such as normality. Violations in any of these assumptions invalidate the conventional matched pairs analysis. A graphical method, due to Bland and Altman, of looking at the relationship between the average and the difference of the members of the pairs is shown to correspond to a formal testable regression model. Using standard regression diagnostics, one may detect and diagnose departures from the model assumptions and remedy them - for example using variable transformations. Examples of different common scenarios and possible approaches to handling them are shown.

  5. Pairing the Adult Learner and Boutique Wineries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyoke, Laura; Heath-Simpson, Delta

    2013-01-01

    This study explored connections between adult learners and their experiences in the context of small boutique wineries operating in the start-up phase of the organizational life cycle. The research objective was to gain insight regarding the pairing of adult learners with the entering of a specialty industry. Fourteen individuals from four…

  6. A Novel Approach for Collaborative Pair Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Sanjay; Kathuria, Vanshi

    2010-01-01

    The majority of an engineer's time in the software industry is spent working with other programmers. Agile methods of software development like eXtreme Programming strongly rely upon practices like daily meetings and pair programming. Hence, the need to learn the skill of working collaboratively is of primary importance for software developers.…

  7. Sexually antagonistic selection during parental care is not generated by a testosterone-related intralocus sexual conflict–insights from full-sib comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Iserbyt, Arne; Eens, Marcel; Müller, Wendt

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of shared male and female traits can be hampered if selection favours sex-specific optima. However, such genomic conflicts can be resolved when independent male and female mechanisms evolve. The existence, extent and consequences of conflict and/or conflict resolution are currently debated. Endocrinological traits like plasma testosterone (T) are suitable test cases, given their important role in mediating correlated traits, plus their opposing sex-specific fitness effects. We compared full-sibling (brother/sister) captive canaries to test for (1) sexually antagonistic selection characterized by contrasting fitness patterns within pairs of relatives, (2) intersexual genetic correlation of plasma T (h² = 0.41  ±  0.31) and (3) intralocus sexual conflict over T levels featured by distinct sex-specific fitness optima. We found potential for sexually antagonistic selection, since high fledgling mass was reached by either brothers or sisters, but not by both. We report a positive intersexual correlation for T, as a requirement for intralocus sexual conflict. However, high levels of T were associated with increased female and decreased male fitness (fledgling mass), which contrasts our expectations and challenges the hypothesis of intralocus sexual conflict driven by T. We hypothesize that behavioural and physiological trade-offs differ between sexes when raising offspring, driving T levels towards a state of monomorphism. PMID:26625951

  8. Binaries and triples among asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Scheirich, Peter; Kušnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián

    2015-08-01

    Despite major achievements obtained during the past two decades, our knowledge of the population and properties of small binary and multiple asteroid systems is still far from advanced. There is a numerous indirect evidence for that most small asteroid systems were formed by rotational fission of cohesionless parent asteroids that were spun up to the critical frequency presumably by YORP, but details of the process are lacking. Furthermore, as we proceed with observations of more and more binary and paired asteroids, we reveal new facts that substantially refine and sometimes change our understanding of the asteroid systems. One significant new finding we have recently obtained is that primaries of many asteroid pairs are actually binary or triple systems. The first such case found is (3749) Balam (Vokrouhlický, ApJL 706, L37, 2009). We have found 9 more binary systems among asteroid pairs within our ongoing NEOSource photometric project since October 2012. They are (6369) 1983 UC, (8306) Shoko, (9783) Tensho-kan, (10123) Fideoja, (21436) Chaoyichi, (43008) 1999 UD31, (44620) 1999 RS43, (46829) 1998 OS14 and (80218) 1999 VO123. We will review their characteristics. These paired binaries as we call them are mostly similar to binaries in the general ("background") population (of unpaired asteroids), but there are a few trends. The paired binaries tend to have larger secondaries with D_2/D_1 = 0.3 to 0.5 and they also tend to be wider systems with 8 of the 10 having orbital periods between 30 and 81 hours, than average among binaries in the general population. There may be also a larger fraction of triples; (3749) Balam is a confirmed triple, having a larger close and a smaller distant satellite, and (8306) Shoko and (10123) Fideoja are suspect triples as they show additional rotational lightcurve components with periods of 61 and 38.8 h that differ from the orbital period of 36.2 and 56.5 h, respectively. The unbound secondaries tend to be of the same size or

  9. Asteroid clusters similar to asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Vokrouhlicky, David; Fatka, Petr; Kusnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián

    2016-10-01

    We study five small, tight and young clusters of asteroids. They are placed around following largest (primary) bodies: (11842) Kap'bos, (14627) Emilkowalski, (16598) 1992 YC2, (21509) Lucascavin and (39991) 1998 HR37. Each cluster has 2-4 secondaries that are tightly clustered around the primary body, with distance in the 5-dimensional space of mean orbital elements mostly within 10 m/s, and always < 23 m/s. Backward orbital integrations indicate that they formed between 105 and 106 yr ago. In the P1-q space, where P1 is the primary's spin period and q = Σ Mj/M1 is the total secondary-to-primary mass ratio, the clusters lie in the same range as asteroid pairs formed by rotational fission. We have extended the model of a proto-system separation after rotational fission by Pravec et al. (2010) for application to systems with more than one secondary and found a perfect match for the five tight clusters. We find these clusters to be similar to asteroid pairs and we suggest that they are "extended pairs", having 2-4 escaped secondaries rather than just one secondary as in the case of an asteroid pair. We compare them to six young mini-families (1270) Datura, (2384) Schulhof, (3152) Jones, (6825) Irvine, (10321) Rampo and (20674) 1999 VT1. These mini-families have similar ages, but they have a higher number of members and/or they show a significantly larger spread in the mean orbital elements (dmean on an order of tens m/s) than the five tight clusters. In the P1-q space, all but one of the mini-families lie in the same range as asteroid pairs and the tight clusters; the exception is the mini-family of (3152) Jones which appears to be a collisional family. A possibility that the other five mini-families were also formed by rotational fission as we suggest for the tight clusters ("extended asteroid pairs") is being explored.Reference:Pravec, P., et al. Formation of asteroid pairs by rotational fission. Nature 466, 1085-1088.

  10. Flavor violating processes with sgoldstino pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2012-04-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics (SM), goldstino superpartners—scalar and pseudoscalar sgoldstinos—can be light enough for emerging in decays of SM particles. Sgoldstino interaction with SM fields is suppressed by the scale of supersymmetry breaking in the whole theory. Hence, searches for sgoldstinos give an opportunity to probe the underlying mechanism of supersymmetry breaking. Sgoldstino couplings to SM fields are proportional to the supersymmetry breaking parameters—MSSM soft terms—and therefore can lead to flavor violating processes in quark and lepton sectors. We consider flavor violating processes involving sgoldstino pair production which are driven by sgoldstino couplings proportional to squark and slepton soft mass terms, m˜LL2 and m˜RR2. We find that present limits on off-diagonal entries in squark and slepton squared mass matrices allow t-, b-, c-quark and τ-lepton decays at levels available for study with existing data (BaBar, Belle, CLEOc) and in ongoing experiments (LHCb, CMS, ATLAS). In particular, we obtain the following branching ratios Br(t→cSP)≲10-7, Br(τ→μSP)≲10-7, Br(Bs→SP)≲10-4, Br(B→K(*)SP)≲10-4, Br(D→SP)≲10-7 with sgoldstino subsequent decays into kinematically allowed pairs of SM particles γγ, e+e-, μ+μ-, etc. Remarkably, the prominent signature of sgoldstino pair production is two muon pairs with pair momenta peaked at sgoldstino masses.

  11. Characteristics of compatible pair participants in kidney paired donation at a single center.

    PubMed

    Weng, Francis L; Grogan, Tracy; Patel, Anup M; Mulgaonkar, Shamkant; Morgievich, Marie M

    2017-03-25

    Compatible pairs of living kidney donors and their intended recipients can enter into kidney paired donation (KPD) and facilitate additional living donor kidney transplants (LDKTs). We examined 11 compatible pairs (the intended recipients and their intended, compatible donors) who participated in KPD, along with the recipients' 11 matched, exchange donors. The 11 pairs participated in 10 separate exchanges (3 were multi-center exchanges) that included 33 total LDKTs (22 additional LDKTs). All the intended donors were blood group O and female, with a mean living kidney donor profile index (LKDPI) of 27.6 (SD 16.8). The matched donors had a mean LKDPI of 9.4 (SD 31.7). Compatible pairs entered KPD for altruistic reasons (N=2) or due to mismatch of age (N=7) or body/kidney size (N=2) between the recipient and intended donor. In four cases, retrospective calculation of the LKDPI revealed that the matched donor had a higher LKDPI than the intended donor. Of the 22 recipients of LDKTs enabled by the compatible pairs, three were highly sensitized, with PRA >80%. In conclusion, most compatible pairs entered into KPD so that the recipient could receive a LDKT transplant from a donor whose age or body/kidney size were more favorable to post-transplant outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Schwinger pair creation of Kaluza-Klein particles: Pair creation without tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Tamar; Verlinde, Herman

    2005-03-15

    We study Schwinger pair creation of charged Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles from a static KK electric field. We find that the gravitational backreaction of the electric field on the geometry--which is incorporated via the electric KK-Melvin solution--prevents the electrostatic potential from overcoming the rest mass of the KK particles, thus impeding the tunneling mechanism which is often thought of as responsible for the pair creation. However, we find that pair creation still occurs with a finite rate formally similar to the classic Schwinger result, but via an apparently different mechanism, involving a combination of the Unruh effect and vacuum polarization due to the E-field.

  13. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  14. Motor Impairment in Sibling Pairs Concordant and Discordant for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Claudia List; Zhang, Yi; Whilte, Megan R.; Klohr, Cheryl L.; Constantino, John

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Although motor impairment is frequently observed in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the manner in which these impairments aggregate in families affected by autism is unknown. We used a standardized measure of motor proficiency to objectively examine quantitative variation in motor proficiency in sibling pairs concordant and…

  15. Direct Cavity Detection of Majorana Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartiailh, Matthieu C.; Kontos, Takis; Douçot, Benoit; Cottet, Audrey

    2017-03-01

    No experiment could directly test the particle-antiparticle duality of Majorana fermions, so far. However, this property represents a necessary ingredient towards the realization of topological quantum computing schemes. Here, we show how to complete this task by using microwave techniques. The direct coupling between a pair of overlapping Majorana bound states and the electric field from a microwave cavity is extremely difficult to detect due to the self-adjoint character of Majorana fermions which forbids direct energy exchanges with the cavity. We show theoretically how this problem can be circumvented by using photoassisted tunneling to fermionic reservoirs. The absence of a direct microwave transition inside the Majorana pair in spite of the light-Majorana coupling would represent a smoking gun for the Majorana self-adjoint character.

  16. Near-Unity Cooper Pair Splitting Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindele, J.; Baumgartner, A.; Schönenberger, C.

    2012-10-01

    The two electrons of a Cooper pair in a conventional superconductor form a spin singlet and therefore a maximally entangled state. Recently, it was demonstrated that the two particles can be extracted from the superconductor into two spatially separated contacts via two quantum dots in a process called Cooper pair splitting (CPS). Competing transport processes, however, limit the efficiency of this process. Here we demonstrate efficiencies up to 90%, significantly larger than required to demonstrate interaction-dominated CPS, and on the right order to test Bell’s inequality with electrons. We compare the CPS currents through both quantum dots, for which large apparent discrepancies are possible. The latter we explain intuitively and in a semiclassical master equation model. Large efficiencies are required to detect electron entanglement and for prospective electronics-based quantum information technologies.

  17. Extra-pair paternity in waved albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Huyvaert, K P; Anderson, D J; Jones, T C; Duan, W; Parker, P G

    2000-09-01

    We estimated the rate of extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs) in waved albatrosses (Phoebastria irrorata) on Isla Española, Galápagos, Ecuador, using multilocus minisatellite DNA fingerprinting. Waved albatrosses are socially monogamous, long-lived seabirds whose main population is on Española. Aggressive extra-pair copulation (EPC) attempts have been observed in the breeding colony during the days preceding egg-laying. Our genetic analyses of 16 families (single chicks and their attending parents) revealed evidence of EPFs in four families. In all cases males were the excluded parent. These data suggest that waved albatrosses have an unusually high rate of EPF relative to taxa with similar life histories. Future behavioural observations will determine the extent to which forced vs. unforced EPCs contribute to this high EPF rate.

  18. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.

  19. Satellite observations of transionospheric pulse pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, D.N.; Munson, C.P.; Devenport, J.C.

    1995-04-15

    The BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite has been making broadband observations in the VHF band of the radio spectrum. Since November of 1993 several hundred unusual signals have been recorded. The peculiar nature of these bursts of radio noise is that they have a duration of approximately 10 {mu}sec, are typically 20 to 40 dB brighter than the average background, and occur in pairs separated by approximately 50 {mu}sec. The authors have dubbed these emissions TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs, or TIPP events. They do not know what the source of these emissions is, but the dispersion of these signals is consistent with an origin at or near the earth`s surface. The satellite field of view and time of day when TIPP events are generally detected are consistent with regions of thunderstorm activity such as south-central Africa or Indonesia. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Pairing correlations in high-spin isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Odahara, A.; Gono, Y.; Fukuchi, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Sagawa, H.; Satula, W.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2005-12-15

    High-spin isomers with J{sup {pi}}=49/2{sup +} and 27{sup +} have been systematically observed in a number of N=83 isotones with 60{<=}Z{<=}67 at excitation energies {approx}9 MeV. Based on experimental excitation energies, an odd-even binding energy staggering has been extracted for the first time for these multi-quasiparticle states. Surprisingly, the magnitude of the odd-even effect in high-spin isomers turned out to be very close to that in ground states, thus challenging conventional wisdom that pairing correlations are reduced in highly excited states. Theoretical analysis based on mean-field theory explains the observed proton number dependence of the odd-even effect as a manifestation of strong pairing correlations in the highly excited states. Mean-field effects and the proton-neutron residual interaction on the odd-even staggering are also examined.

  1. Dissipative solitons in pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Adak, Ashish Khan, Manoranjan

    2014-01-15

    The effects of ion-neutral collisions on the dynamics of the nonlinear ion acoustic wave in pair-ion plasma are investigated. The standard perturbative approach leads to a Korteweg-de Vries equation with a linear damping term for the dynamics of the finite amplitude wave. The ion-neutral collision induced dissipation is responsible for the linear damping. The analytical solution and numerical simulation reveal that the nonlinear wave propagates in the form of a weakly dissipative compressive solitons. Furthermore, the width of the soliton is proportional to the amplitude of the wave for fixed soliton velocity. Results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  2. Supersymmetric pairing of kinks for polynomial nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosu, H.C.; Cornejo-Perez, O.

    2005-04-01

    We show how one can obtain kink solutions of ordinary differential equations with polynomial nonlinearities by an efficient factorization procedure directly related to the factorization of their nonlinear polynomial part. We focus on reaction-diffusion equations in the traveling frame and damped-anharmonic-oscillator equations. We also report an interesting pairing of the kink solutions, a result obtained by reversing the factorization brackets in the supersymmetric quantum-mechanical style. In this way, one gets ordinary differential equations with a different polynomial nonlinearity possessing kink solutions of different width but propagating at the same velocity as the kinks of the original equation. This pairing of kinks could have many applications. We illustrate the mathematical procedure with several important cases, among which are the generalized Fisher equation, the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation, and the polymerization fronts of microtubules.

  3. Superrotations and black hole pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Recent work has shown that the symmetries of classical gravitational scattering in asymptotically flat spacetimes include, at the linearized level, infinitesimal superrotations. These act like Virasoro generators on the celestial sphere at null infinity. However, due to the singularities in these generators, the physical status of finite superrotations has remained unclear. Here we address this issue in the context of the breaking of a cosmic string via quantum black hole pair nucleation. This process is described by a gravitational instanton known as the C-metric. After pair production, the black holes are pulled by the string to null infinity with a constant acceleration. At late times the string decays and the spacetime settles into a vacuum state. We show that the early and late spacetimes before and after string decay differ by a finite superrotation. This provides a physical interpretation of superrotations. They act on spacetimes which are asymptotically flat everywhere except at isolated singularities with cosmic string defects.

  4. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    DOE PAGES

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool formore » direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.« less

  5. Asteroid Systems: Binaries, Triples, and Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.-L.; Pravec, P.; Taylor, P.; Carry, B.; Jacobson, S.

    In the past decade, the number of known binary near-Earth asteroids has more than quadrupled and the number of known large main-belt asteroids with satellites has doubled. Half a dozen triple asteroids have been discovered, and the previously unrecognized populations of asteroid pairs and small main-belt binaries have been identified. The current observational evidence confirms that small (≲20 km) binaries form by rotational fission and establishes that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect powers the spin-up process. A unifying paradigm based on rotational fission and post-fission dynamics can explain the formation of small binaries, triples, and pairs. Large (>~20 km) binaries with small satellites are most likely created during large collisions.

  6. Multidimensional simulations of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.; Chardonnet, P.; Chechetkin, V. M.; Filina, A. A.; Popov, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    According to theoretical models, massive stars with masses within the 100-250 M⊙ range should explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). Since the first stars of the Universe are believed to be very massive, these supernovae should play a significant role in the early stages of its history. But these stars represent the last unobserved population, owing to detection limits of current telescopes. In this work we analyze pair-instability supernovae explosions using various numerical codes. We evolve series of the configurations of oxygen cores to establish a range of masses and initial conditions where this type of explosion is possible. We also study the role of possible instabilities in the propagation of shockwaves during the last stage of the explosion. This investigation could help us to predict the observational properties of PISNe for future space and ground telescopes.

  7. Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Dual Resolution Images from Paired Fingerprint Cards (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 30 is being distributed for use in development and testing of fingerprint compression and fingerprint matching systems. The database allows the user to develop and evaluate data compression algorithms for fingerprint images scanned at both 19.7 ppmm (500 dpi) and 39.4 ppmm (1000 dpi). The data consist of 36 ten-print paired cards with both the rolled and plain images scanned at 19.7 and 39.4 pixels per mm. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  8. Satellite observations of transionospheric pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, D. N.; Munson, C. P.; Devenport, J. C.

    1995-04-01

    The BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite has been making broadband observations in the VHF band of the radio spectrum. Since November of 1993 several hundred unusual signals have been recorded. The peculiar nature of these bursts of radio noise is that they have a duration of approximately 10 microseconds, are typically 20 to 40 dB brighter than the average background, and occur in pairs separated by approximately 50 microseconds. We have dubbed these emissions TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs, or TIPP events. We do not know what the source of these emissions is, but the dispersion of these signals is consistent with an origin at or near the earth's surface. The satellite field of view and time of day when TIPP events are generally detected are consistent with regions of thunderstorm activity such as south-central Africa or Indonesia.

  9. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  10. A search for resonant Z pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Boveia, Antonio

    2008-12-01

    I describe a search for anomalous production of Z pairs through a new massive resonance X in 2.5-2.9 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the CDFII Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. I reconstruct Z pairs through their decays to electrons, muons, and quarks. To achieve perhaps the most efficient lepton reconstruction ever used at CDF, I apply a thorough understanding of the detector and new reconstruction software heavily revised for this purpose. In particular, I have designed and employ new general-purpose algorithms for tracking at large η in order to increase muon acceptance. Upon analyzing the unblinded signal samples, I observe no X → ZZ candidates and set upper limits on the production cross section using a Kaluza-Klein graviton-like acceptance.

  11. Pair correlations in magnetic nanodispersed fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Elfimova, E. A. Ivanov, A. O.

    2010-07-15

    The pair distribution function of a monodisperse magnetic fluid simulated by a liquid made of dipolar hard spheres with constant magnetic moments is calculated. The anisotropy of the pair distribution function and the related structure factor of scattering in a dc uniform magnetic field are studied. The calculation is performed by diagrammatic expansion in the volume concentration of particles and the interparticle magnetic-dipole interaction intensity using a thermodynamic perturbation theory. Limitation by three-particle diagrams makes it possible to apply the results obtained to magnetic fluids with a moderate concentration. Even for low-concentration and weakly nonideal magnetic fluids, the anisotropic interparticle magnetic-dipole correlations in a magnetic field lead to the repulsion of particles in the direction normal to the field and to the formation of particle dimers along the field.

  12. Average prime-pair counting formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Jaap; Riele, Herman Te

    2010-04-01

    Taking r>0 , let π_{2r}(x) denote the number of prime pairs (p, p+2r) with p≤ x . The prime-pair conjecture of Hardy and Littlewood (1923) asserts that π_{2r}(x)˜ 2C_{2r} {li}_2(x) with an explicit constant C_{2r}>0 . There seems to be no good conjecture for the remainders ω_{2r}(x)=π_{2r}(x)- 2C_{2r} {li}_2(x) that corresponds to Riemann's formula for π(x)-{li}(x) . However, there is a heuristic approximate formula for averages of the remainders ω_{2r}(x) which is supported by numerical results.

  13. PAIR (Planning and Analysis of Inspection Resources)

    SciTech Connect

    Teichmann, T.; Santaniello, A.; Fishbone, L.G.

    1994-03-01

    The safeguards inspection effort of the International Atomic Energy Agency consists of the efforts for the Physical Inventory Verifications to close the annual material balance, Interim Inventory Verifications, conducted mainly to satisfy the Timeliness Criteria, Flow Verifications to verify the transfer of material, and Containment and Surveillance activities, which help preserve continuity of knowledge concerning the material. Estimating the requiring overall future inspection effort under a variety of conditions is an important part of Agency planning. As exemplified by the sample results provides a straightforward means to analyze `What if` situations in safeguards implementation. It thereby permits managers and analysts to study future scenarios and their effect on human resources. It is planned to introduce into PAIR a direct capability for studying costs associated with these hypothetical changes in safeguards implementation. In this way PAIR could more easily assist the Safeguards Department in its current program of investigating new safeguards approaches.

  14. Intelligent Pairing Assistant for Air Operation Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    center, intelligent user interface, reinforcement learning , pairing. ACM Classification Keywords H.4.1. Office Automation: Workflow management...took to learning how to adjust the weights associated with rules based on the user’s feedback falls into the category of reinforcement learning problems...Press, 93-100. 13. Sutton, R. and Barto, A, Reinforcement Learning : An Introduction. MIT Press, Cambridge MA, 1998. Figure 2. Annotation

  15. (Photoexcited charge pair escape and recombination)

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    Progress in four research areas on this project are summarized under the following topics: (1) Geminate charge pair recombination in hexane; (2) Fast current measurements resulting from excitation of charge transfer (CT) states; (3) Measurement of the dipole moment of excited states by DC conductivity; and (4) Charge separation at macroscopic interfaces between electron donor and acceptor solids. In a final section, personnel who have contributed to the project during the past budget period are described.

  16. Are all Linear Paired Comparison Models Equivalent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Previous authors (Jackson and Fleckenstein 1957, Mosteller 1958, Noether 1960) have found that different models of paired comparisons data lead to simi...ponential distribution with a location parameter (Mosteller 1958, Noether 1960). Formal statements describing the limiting behavior of the gamma...that are not convolu- tion type linear models (the uniform model considered by Smith (1956), Mosteller (1958), Noether (1960)) and other convolution

  17. On the pairing effects in triaxial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.

    2014-03-05

    Triaxial deformation effect on the pairing correlations is studied in the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Quantities such as binding energy, gap parameter and particle-number fluctuation are considered in neutron-rich Mo isotopes. The results are compared with those of axially symmetric calculation and with available experimental data. The role played by the particle-number projection is outlined.

  18. Precise predictions for slepton pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres Freitas; Andreas von Manteuffel

    2002-11-07

    At a future linear collider, the masses and couplings of scalar leptons can be measured with high accuracy, thus requiring precise theoretical predictions for the relevant processes. In this work, after a discussion of the expected experimental precision, the complete one-loop corrections to smuon and selectron pair production in the MSSM are presented and the effect of different contributions in the result is analyzed.

  19. Radiation damping in metal nanoparticle pairs.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Christian; Schmidt, Benjamin; von Plessen, Gero

    2007-02-01

    The radiation damping rate of plasmon resonances in pairs of spherical gold nanoparticles is calculated. The radiative line width of the plasmon resonance indicates significant far-field coupling between the nanoparticles over distances many times the particle diameter. The radiation damping of the coupled particle-plasmon mode alternates between superradiant and subradiant behavior when the particle spacing is varied. At small particle spacings where near-field coupling occurs, the radiation damping rate lies far below that of an isolated particle.

  20. Expression of myriapod pair rule gene orthologs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Segmentation is a hallmark of the arthropods; most knowledge about the molecular basis of arthropod segmentation comes from work on the fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this species a hierarchic cascade of segmentation genes subdivides the blastoderm stepwise into single segment wide regions. However, segmentation in the fly is a derived feature since all segments form virtually simultaneously. Conversely, in the vast majority of arthropods the posterior segments form one at a time from a posterior pre-segmental zone. The pair rule genes (PRGs) comprise an important level of the Drosophila segmentation gene cascade and are indeed the first genes that are expressed in typical transverse stripes in the early embryo. Information on expression and function of PRGs outside the insects, however, is scarce. Results Here we present the expression of the pair rule gene orthologs in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda). We find evidence that these genes are involved in segmentation and that components of the hierarchic interaction of the gene network as found in insects may be conserved. We further provide evidence that segments are formed in a single-segment periodicity rather than in pairs of two like in another myriapod, the centipede Strigamia maritima. Finally we show that decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation in Glomeris appears already at the level of the PRGs. Conclusions Although the pair rule gene network is partially conserved among insects and myriapods, some aspects of PRG interaction are, as suggested by expression pattern analysis, convergent, even within the Myriapoda. Conserved expression patterns of PRGs in insects and myriapods, however, may represent ancestral features involved in segmenting the arthropod ancestor. PMID:21352542

  1. Introduction to Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    King, Graham Missell

    2015-02-17

    By collecting a total scattering pattern, subtracting the non-sample background, applying corrections, and taking the Fourier transform, the real space pair distribution function can be obtained. A PDF gives the distribution of inter-atomic distances in a material and is an excellent probe of short and intermediate range structure. RMC refinements using multiple data types are an excellent method for multi-scale modeling, including the mesoscale range.

  2. Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M {sub ☉} die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ∼20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  3. Pair Instability Supernovae of Very Massive Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Woosley, Stan; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M ⊙ die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ~20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  4. Diversity of fate outcomes in cell pairs under lateral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara; Martinez-Corral, Rosa; Garcia Ojalvo, Jordi; de Navascués, Joaquín

    2017-02-07

    Cell fate determination by lateral inhibition via Notch/Delta signalling has been extensively studied. Most formalised models consider Notch/Delta interactions in fields of cells, with parameters that typically lead to symmetry breaking of signalling states between neighbouring cells, commonly resulting in salt-and-pepper fate patterns. Here we consider the case of signalling between isolated cell pairs, and find that the bifurcation properties of a standard mathematical model of lateral inhibition can lead to stable symmetric signalling states. We apply this model to the adult intestinal stem cell (ISC) of Drosophila, whose fate is stochastic but dependent on the Notch/Delta pathway. We observe a correlation between signalling state in cell pairs and their contact area. We interpret this behaviour in terms of the properties of our model in the presence of population variability in contact areas, which affects the effective signalling threshold of individual cells. Our results suggest that the dynamics of Notch/Delta signalling can contribute to explain stochasticity in stem cell fate decisions, and that the standard model for lateral inhibition can account for a wider range of developmental outcomes than previously considered.

  5. Imidazolium salt ion pairs in solution.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Hubert K; Ludwig, Ralf; Wulf, Alexander; Dupont, Jairton

    2015-06-01

    The formation, stabilisation and reactivity of contact ion pairs of non-protic imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) in solution are conceptualized in light of selected experimental evidence as well theoretical calculations reported mainly in the last ten years. Electric conductivity, NMR, ESI-MS and IR data as well as theoretical calculations support not only the formation of contact ion pairs in solution, but also the presence of larger ionic and neutral aggregates even when dissolved in solvents with relatively high dielectric constants, such as acetonitrile and DMSO. The presence of larger imidazolium supramolecular aggregates is favoured at higher salt concentrations in solvents of low dielectric constant for ILs that contain shorter N-alkyl side chains associated with anions of low coordination ability. The stability and reactivity of neutral contact species are also dependent on the nature of the anion, imidazolium substituents, and are more abundant in ILs containing strong coordinating anions, in particular those that can form charge transfer complexes with the imidazolium cation. Finally, some ILs display reactivities as contact ion pairs rather than solvent-separated ions.

  6. Pairing in the presence of a pseudogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalapino, Douglas; Maier, Thomas; Staar, Peter; Mishra, Vivek

    After 30 years, the quest to experimentally identify the mechanism responsible for pairing in the high Tc superconductors continues. Here we discuss an approach in which angle resolved photoemission (ARPES)data for BSCCO 2212(Tc=89K) is used to extract the single particle spectral weight A(k,w). This spectral weight is then used to calculate the BCS kernel and estimate the RPA spin-fluctuation d-wave pairing strength. Previously A(k,w) results at T=140K, extrapolated to lower temperatures, found that the BSCCO pseudo gap suppressed the logarithmic singularity of the BCS kernel and the spin-fluctuation interaction was too weak to produce superconductivity [V.Mishra et al.,Nat.Phys.10,357]. Here using results for A(k,w) at T=40K for this same system, we find that while the BCS kernel is suppressed, there is a significant increase in the d-wave pairing strength for the spin-fluctuation interaction when the temperature drops from T=140K and 40K. These results are shown to be consistent with DCA calculations for a 2D Hubbard model of a BSCCO like system which has a pseudo gap. We conclude that in spite of the suppression of the usual BCS logarithmic instability by the pseudo gap, the increase in strength of the spin-fluctuation interaction is sufficient to lead to superconductivity. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2015-03-01

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current-current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin-Lee-Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that l = 1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momentum channel l >= 3 . Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν =1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively. This work was supported by US NSF under the Grant DMR-1004520, the funds from the David S. Saxon Presidential Chair at UCLA(37952), and by the Institute for Basic Science in Korea through the Young Scientist grant (5199-2014003).

  8. Persistent ion pairing in aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Baer, Marcel D; Fulton, John L; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of chloride-hydronium (Cl(-)···H3O(+)) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counterions do not behave merely as spectators. Through comparison of recent extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements to state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain a unique view into the molecular structure of medium-to-high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl(-)···H3O(+) contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in microsolvated hydrochloric acid gas phase clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to view the reaction network for acid dissociation and how it relates to our picture of acid-base equilibria.

  9. Grandmothering life histories and human pair bonding

    PubMed Central

    Coxworth, James E.; Kim, Peter S.; McQueen, John S.; Hawkes, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of distinctively human life history and social organization is generally attributed to paternal provisioning based on pair bonds. Here we develop an alternative argument that connects the evolution of human pair bonds to the male-biased mating sex ratios that accompanied the evolution of human life history. We simulate an agent-based model of the grandmother hypothesis, compare simulated sex ratios to data on great apes and human hunter–gatherers, and note associations between a preponderance of males and mate guarding across taxa. Then we explore a recent model that highlights the importance of mating sex ratios for differences between birds and mammals and conclude that lessons for human evolution cannot ignore mammalian reproductive constraints. In contradiction to our claim that male-biased sex ratios are characteristically human, female-biased ratios are reported in some populations. We consider the likelihood that fertile men are undercounted and conclude that the mate-guarding hypothesis for human pair bonds gains strength from explicit links with our grandmothering life history. PMID:26351687

  10. Pair fireball precursors of neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Zivancev, Charles

    2016-10-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the NSs. If a modest fraction η of the extracted electromagnetic power extracted accelerates relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission a compact volume will result in the formation of an electron-positron pair fireball. Applying a steady-state pair wind model, we quantify the detectability of the precursor fireball with gamma-ray satellites. For η ˜ 1 the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ≈ 10(Bd/1014 G)3/4 Mpc is much closer than the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the NS surface magnetic field strength is very large, B_d ≲ 10^{15} G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, mergers with weaker NS fields could contribute a nearby population of short gamma-ray bursts. Power not dissipated close to the binary is carried to infinity along the open field lines by a large-scale Poynting flux. Reconnection within this outflow, well outside of the pair photosphere, provides a potential site for non-thermal emission, such as a coherent millisecond radio burst.

  11. Persistent Ion Pairing in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of a chloride-Hyronium (Cl-H3O+) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counter ions do not behave merely as spectators. Through the use of modern extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements in conjunction with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain an unprecedented view into the molecular structure of medium to high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl-H3O+ contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in micro-solvated hydrochloric acid clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to think about the activity of the proton that impacts our picture of the pH scale. Funding for CJM, GKS, and JLF was provided by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Funding for MDB was provided throught the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MB was funded through Argonne National Laboratory.

  12. Banach Algebras Associated to Lax Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazebrook, James F.

    2015-04-01

    Lax pairs featuring in the theory of integrable systems are known to be constructed from a commutative algebra of formal pseudodifferential operators known as the Burchnall- Chaundy algebra. Such pairs induce the well known KP flows on a restricted infinite-dimensional Grassmannian. The latter can be exhibited as a Banach homogeneous space constructed from a Banach *-algebra. It is shown that this commutative algebra of operators generating Lax pairs can be associated with a commutative C*-subalgebra in the C*-norm completion of the *-algebra. In relationship to the Bose-Fermi correspondence and the theory of vertex operators, this C*-algebra has an association with the CAR algebra of operators as represented on Fermionic Fock space by the Gelfand-Naimark-Segal construction. Instrumental is the Plücker embedding of the restricted Grassmannian into the projective space of the associated Hilbert space. The related Baker and tau-functions provide a connection between these two C*-algebras, following which their respective state spaces and Jordan-Lie-Banach algebras structures can be compared.

  13. Paired and interacting galaxies: Conference summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1990-01-01

    The author gives a summary of the conference proceedings. The conference began with the presentation of the basic data sets on pairs, groups, and interacting galaxies with the latter being further discussed with respect to both global properties and properties of the galactic nuclei. Then followed the theory, modelling and interpretation using analytic techniques, simulations and general modelling for spirals and ellipticals, starbursts and active galactic nuclei. Before the conference the author wrote down the three questions concerning pairs, groups and interacting galaxies that he hoped would be answered at the meeting: (1) How do they form, including the role of initial conditions, the importance of subclustering, the evolution of groups to compact groups, and the fate of compact groups; (2) How do they evolve, including issues such as relevant timescales, the role of halos and the problem of overmerging, the triggering and enhancement of star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei, and the relative importance of dwarf versus giant encounters; and (3) Are they important, including the frequency of pairs and interactions, whether merging and interactions are very important aspects of the life of a normal galaxy at formation, during its evolution, in forming bars, shells, rings, bulges, etc., and in the formation and evolution of active galaxies? Where possible he focuses on these three central issues in the summary.

  14. Pairing in half-filled Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Mandal, Ipsita; Chung, Suk Bum; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2014-12-15

    Pairing of composite fermions in half-filled Landau level state is reexamined by solving the BCS gap equation with full frequency dependent current–current interactions. Our results show that there can be a continuous transition from the Halperin–Lee–Read state to a chiral odd angular momentum Cooper pair state for short-range contact interaction. This is at odds with the previously established conclusion of first order pairing transition, in which the low frequency effective interaction was assumed for the entire frequency range. We find that even if the low frequency effective interaction is repulsive, it is compensated by the high frequency regime, which is attractive. We construct the phase diagrams and show that ℓ=1 angular momentum channel is quite different from higher angular momenta ℓ≥3. Remarkably, the full frequency dependent analysis applied to the bilayer Hall system with a total filling fraction ν=1/2 +1/2 is quantitatively changed from the previously established results but not qualitatively.

  15. Extra-pair copulations in Black Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Daniel; Sedinger, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Monogamy is the primary mating system among waterfowl, but extra-pair copulations (EPCs) have been documented in at least 39 species (McKinney et al. 1983). Extra-pair copulations occur in most Holarctic species of dabbling ducks (Anas spp.), but have been recorded in only three species of geese: Lesser Snow Geese, Chen caerulescens caerulescens (Mineau and Cooke 1979a), Ross’ Geese, C. rossii (J. Ryder in McKinney et al. 1984), and Greater White-fronted Geese, Anser albifrons frontalis (C.R. Ely, pers. comm.).In colonial Lesser Snow Geese, the close proximity of nesting conspecifics may enable males to pursue EPCs as a secondary reproductive strategy (Mineau and Cooke, 1979a, 1979b). Copulatory behavior of other geese has not been studied in sufficient detail to permit comparison with Lesser Sone Geese. Here we report on timing and rates of pair copulations (PCs) and EPCs, and describe behaviors associated with EPCs in colonially nesting Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans).

  16. Dressed electrostatic solitary waves in quantum dusty pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2010-05-15

    Quantum-hydrodynamics model is applied to investigate the nonlinear propagation of electrostatic solitary excitations in a quantum dusty pair plasma. A Korteweg de Vries evolution equation is obtained using reductive perturbation technique and the higher-nonlinearity effects are derived by solving the linear inhomogeneous differential equation analytically using Kodama-Taniuti renormalizing method. The possibility of propagation of bright- and dark-type solitary excitations is examined. It is shown that a critical value of quantum diffraction parameter H exists, on either side of which, only one type of solitary propagation is possible. It is also found that unlike for the first-order amplitude component, the variation of H parameter dominantly affects the soliton amplitude in higher-order approximation. The effect of fractional quantum number density on compressive and rarefactive soliton dynamics is also discussed.

  17. Effects of body weight and age on the time and pairing of American black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hepp, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    I used captive young and adult American Black Ducks (Anas rubripes) during October-February 1984-1985 to test whether body weight and age affected time of pair-bond formation. Eighty ducks were marked individually, and 10 ducks (6 males and 4 females, half of each age class) were assigned to each of 8 experimental pens. Ducks in 4 pens received an ad libitum diet of commercial duck food, and ducks in the other 4 pens received a restricted ration of the same food. During early winter ducks in both groups gained weight, but ducks on the restricted diet gained less than birds on the ad libitum diet; peak winter weight of ducks on the ad libitum diet averaged 22% greater than initial body weight compared with 6.5% for ducks on the restricted diet. In late winter ducks on the restricted diet lost 28.7% of peak winter weight, and ducks on the ad libitum diet lost 19.3%. Weight loss of ducks on the ad libitum diet began before weather conditions became severe and coincided with a reduction in food consumption. This result supports the idea that weight loss of waterfowl in late winter is controlled endogenously. Individuals on the ad libitum diet paired earlier than those on the restricted diet, and pair bonds were stronger. Adults of both sexes paired earlier than young ducks, but differences for females were not significant statistically. Age and energy constraints are factors that can affect intraspecific variation in pairing chronology.

  18. Effects of pairing stimuli with reinforcement on multiple schedule performance of children

    PubMed Central

    Birnbrauer, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    A nonsense word was paired with reinforcement to determine if pairing affected emission of a response that produced the word in the signalled absence of reinforcement. Children were trained on a multiple schedule that consisted of a reinforcement component, conditioned reinforcement component, and control component, each set of contingencies being signalled by a different colored light. In the primary reinforcement component, lever presses produced reinforcers which, in some phases, were paired with a word. In the other two components, lever presses were not reinforced and a button was made accessible. Button presses in the conditioned reinforcement component produced the word to be (or being) paired, e.g., “yafeh”, while button presses in the control component produced another word, e.g., “grunch”. Button pressing increased when one of the words was being paired and decreased when pairing was discontinued, but directly related rate changes occurred also in the control component. The order of components was shown to be a contributing variable. PMID:5150046

  19. Effects of Aging on Paired-Pulse Behavior of Rat Somatosensory Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dinse, Hubert R.

    2010-01-01

    Aging affects all levels of neural processing including changes of intracortical inhibition and cortical excitability. The paired-pulse stimulation protocol, the application of 2 stimuli in close succession, is used to investigate cortical excitability. The paired-pulse behavior is characterized by the fact that the second response is significantly suppressed at short interstimulus intervals (ISIs) but approaches the first response with increasing ISIs. However, there are controversial reports about the influence of age on paired-pulse behavior. We therefore used pairs of tactile stimuli (ISIs from tens to hundreds of milliseconds) to record extracellular responses of somatosensory cortical neurons of young and aged rats. Paired-pulse behavior was quantified as the ratio of the amplitude of the second response divided by the first. For all ISIs, we found significantly higher ratios in the old animals indicating reduced paired-pulse suppression (PPS). Evaluation of the single response components revealed a significant reduction of the response to the first stimulus for old animals but no age-dependent decrement to the second. Changes in PPS are usually mediated by modulating the second response characteristics. Thus, our data demonstrate reduced PPS due to an overall reduction of the first response as a form of modified PPS developing at old age. PMID:19745019

  20. Higher in vitro resistance to oxidative stress in extra-pair offspring.

    PubMed

    Losdat, S; Helfenstein, F; Saladin, V; Richner, H

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to act as a universal physiological constraint in life-history evolution of animals. This should be of interest for extra-pair paternity behaviour, and we tested here the prediction that offspring arising from extra-pair matings of female great tits show higher resistance to oxidative stress than within-pair offspring. Resistance to oxidative stress, measured as the whole blood resistance to a controlled free-radical attack, was significantly higher for extra-pair offspring as predicted although these were not heavier or in better body condition than within-pair offspring. Since resistance to oxidative stress has been suggested to enhance survival and reproductive rates, extra-pair offspring with superior resistance to oxidative stress, be it through maternal effects or paternal inheritance, may achieve higher fitness and thus provide significant indirect fitness benefits to their mothers. In addition, because oxidative stress affects colour signals and sperm traits, females may also gain fitness benefits by producing sons that are more attractive (sexy-sons hypothesis) and have sperm of superior quality (sexy-sperm hypothesis). Heritability of resistance to oxidative stress as well as maternal effects may both act as proximate mechanisms for the observed result. Disentangling these two mechanisms would require an experimental approach. Future long-term studies should also aim at experimentally testing whether higher resistance to oxidative stress of EP nestlings indeed translates into fitness benefits to females.

  1. Testosterone, Plumage Colouration and Extra-Pair Paternity in Male North-American Barn Swallows

    PubMed Central

    Eikenaar, Cas; Whitham, Megan; Komdeur, Jan; van der Velde, Marco; Moore, Ignacio T.

    2011-01-01

    In most monogamous bird species, circulating testosterone concentration in males is elevated around the social female's fertile period. Variation in elevated testosterone concentrations among males may have a considerable impact on fitness. For example, testosterone implants enhance behaviours important for social and extra-pair mate choice. However, little is known about the relationship between natural male testosterone concentration and sexual selection. To investigate this relationship we measured testosterone concentration and sexual signals (ventral plumage colour and tail length), and determined within and extra-pair fertilization success in male North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). Dark rusty coloured males had higher testosterone concentrations than drab males. Extra-pair paternity was common (42% and 31% of young in 2009 and 2010, respectively), but neither within- nor extra-pair fertilization success was related to male testosterone concentration. Dark rusty males were less often cuckolded, but did not have higher extra-pair or total fertilization success than drab males. Tail length did not affect within- or extra-pair fertilization success. Our findings suggest that, in North American barn swallows, male testosterone concentration does not play a significant direct role in female mate choice and sexual selection. Possibly plumage colour co-varies with a male behavioural trait, such as aggressiveness, that reduces the chance of cuckoldry. This could also explain why dark males have higher testosterone concentrations than drab males. PMID:21853105

  2. Failure to find linkage between a functional polymorphism in the dopamine D4 receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, S.; Gill, M.; Collier, D.A.

    1994-03-15

    We report the results of a linkage study in 24 families multiply affected with schizophrenia using a polymorphic DNA sequence encoding the third cytoplasmic loop of the dopamine D4 receptor. Two-point LOD score analyses with a range of single gene models ranging from near dominant to near recessive revealed no evidence for linkage. In addition, we examined the data by non-parametric sib-pair analysis and found no excess sharing of alleles between affected sib-pairs. We therefore conclude that mutations within the dopamine D4 receptor gene do not have a major aetiological role in schizophrenia in our collection of pedigrees. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Cognitive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pairs with ADHD: Familial Clustering and Dopamine Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Rich, Erika Carpenter; Ishii, Janeen; McGough, James; McCracken, James; Nelson, Stanley; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper examines familiality and candidate gene associations of cognitive measures as potential endophenotypes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The sample consists of 540 participants, aged 6 to 18, who were diagnosed with ADHD from 251 families recruited for a larger genetic study of ADHD. All members of…

  4. Relationship uncertainty linkage statistics (RULS): affected relative pair statistics that model relationship uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Ray, Amrita; Weeks, Daniel E

    2008-05-01

    Linkage analysis programs invariably assume that the stated familial relationships are correct. Thus, it is common practice to resolve relationship errors by either discarding individuals with erroneous relationships or using an inferred alternative pedigree structure. These approaches are less than ideal because discarding data is wasteful and using inferred data can be statistically unsound. We have developed two linkage statistics that model relationship uncertainty by weighting over the possible true relationships. Simulations of data containing relationship errors were used to assess our statistics and compare them to the maximum-likelihood statistic (MLS) and the Sall non-parametric LOD score using true and discarded (where problematic individuals with erroneous relationships are discarded from the pedigree) structures. We simulated both small pedigree (SP) and large pedigree (LP) data sets typed genome-wide. Both data sets have several underlying true relationships; SP has one apparent relationship--full sibling--and LP has several different apparent relationship types. The results show that for both SP and LP, our relationship uncertainty linkage statistics (RULS) have power nearly as high as the MLS and Sall using the true structure. Also, the RULS have greater power to detect linkage than the MLS and Sall using the discarded structure. For example, for the SP data set and a dominant disease model, both the RULS had power of about 93%, while Sall and MLS have 90% and 83% power on the discarded structure. Thus, our RULS provide a statistically sound and powerful approach to the commonly encountered problem of relationship errors.

  5. Interactions of the Watson-Crick nucleic acid base pairs with carbon nanotubes and graphene: DFT and MP2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, S. G.; Karachevtsev, M. V.; Karachevtsev, V. A.; Adamowicz, L.

    2014-08-01

    Structures and interaction energies of complexes formed by Watson-Crick base pairs and carbon surfaces (nanotubes and graphene) are investigated using the DFT M05-2X and MP2 quantum chemical computational methods. High structural flexibility of the complexes is demonstrated. Structures with approximately parallel and perpendicular orientations of the base pairs and the nanotube main axis are revealed. The complexes formed by the GC base pair and large-diameter zigzag nanotubes with the perpendicular orientation of the two systems are found to be the lowest energy configurations. Decomposition of the interaction energies into two-body contributions is applied to explain the nature of the interaction. The question of how the interaction between a base pair and a carbon surface affects the H-bonding between the nucleobases in the pair is elucidated.

  6. Alignment and Integration Techniques for Mirror Segment Pairs on the Constellation X Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo; Lehan, John; Olsen, Larry; Owens, Scott; Saha, Timo; Wallace, Tom; Zhang, Will

    2007-01-01

    We present the concepts behind current alignment and integration techniques for testing a Constellation-X primary-secondary mirror segment pair in an x-ray beam line test. We examine the effects of a passive mount on thin glass x-ray mirror segments, and the issues of mount shape and environment on alignment. We also investigate how bonding and transfer to a permanent housing affects the quality of the final image, comparing predicted results to a full x-ray test on a primary secondary pair.

  7. Dynamic coupling of magnetic resonance modes in pairs of mesoscopic rectangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swoboda, Christian; Kuhlmann, Nils; Martens, Michael; Vogel, Andreas; Meier, Guido

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the magnetization dynamics in pairs of mesoscopic permalloy (Ni80Fe20) rectangles by means of broadband-ferromagnetic resonance measurements and micromagnetic simulations. Each pair consists of two rectangles that differ in their geometry. The local effective field at each element is significantly affected by the stray field of its neighbor for small center-to-center distances between the rectangles. In antiparallel magnetization alignment, this dynamic dipolar coupling becomes prominent and anticrossing between ferromagnetic resonance modes and higher-order spin-wave modes is observed. Combination of the experimental and the simulational findings provides a comprehensive understanding of dynamically coupled rectangles.

  8. Interference in the recombination of frequency-entangled photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Kevin A.; Garces, Veneranda G.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental studies of the recombination of frequency-entangled photon pairs into single photons in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. With a delay ? between pair members, the measured rate of pair recombination ? presents a width of 25.6 fsec. It is observed that, depending on experimental conditions, ? can contain interference fringes that arise from the spatial correlations of the photon pairs. In particular, these correlations imply that each photon of a pair interferes with itself in the experiment before pair recombination, leading to the fringes in ?. A theoretical model is developed that provides favorable comparisons with the experimental results.

  9. Long-term pair bonds in the Laysan Duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, M.H.; Breeden, J.H.; Vekasy, M.S.; Ellis, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We describe long-term pair bonds in the endangered Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis), a dabbling duck endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago. Individually marked birds were identified on Laysan Island between 1998 and 2006 (n = 613 marked adults). We recorded pair bonds while observing marked birds, and documented within and between year mate switches and multi-year pair bonds. Twenty pairs banded before 2001 had stable pair bonds lasting ???5 years with a maximum enduring pair bond of nine breeding seasons. Understanding reproductive strategy, including mate retention, would aid conservation planning and management efforts for the Laysan Duck. Further study is needed to characterize the social system of this endangered species.

  10. Series-Coupled Pairs of Silica Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Handley, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Series-coupled pairs of whispering-gallery-mode optical microresonators have been demonstrated as prototypes of stable, narrow-band-pass photonic filters. Characteristics that are generally considered desirable in a photonic or other narrow-band-pass filter include response as nearly flat as possible across the pass band, sharp roll-off, and high rejection of signals outside the pass band. A single microresonator exhibits a Lorentzian filter function: its peak response cannot be made flatter and its roll-off cannot be made sharper. However, as a matter of basic principle applicable to resonators in general, it is possible to (1) use multiple resonators, operating in series or parallel, to obtain a roll-off sharper, and out-of-band rejection greater, relative to those of a Lorentzian filter function and (2) to make the peak response (the response within the pass band) flatter by tuning the resonators to slightly different resonance frequencies that span the pass band. The first of the two microresonators in each series-coupled pair was a microtorus made of germania-doped silica (containing about 19 mole percent germania), which is a material used for the cores of some optical fibers. The reasons for choosing this material is that exposing it to ultraviolet light causes it to undergo a chemical change that changes its index of refraction and thereby changes the resonance frequency. Hence, this material affords the means to effect the desired slight relative detuning of the two resonators. The second microresonator in each pair was a microsphere of pure silica. The advantage of making one of the resonators a torus instead of a sphere is that its spectrum of whispering-gallery-mode resonances is sparser, as needed to obtain a frequency separation of at least 100 GHz between resonances of the filter as a whole.

  11. Augmenting Think-Pair-Share with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin M.; Siedell, C. M.; Prather, E. E.; CATS

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations are valuable tools for the teaching and learning of introductory astronomy. They enable students to link together small pieces of information into mental models of complex physical systems that are far beyond their everyday experience. They can also be used to authentically test a student's conceptual understanding of a physical system by asking the student to make predictions regarding its behavior. Students receive formative feedback by testing their predictions in simulations. Think-Pair-Share - the posing of conceptual questions to students and having them vote on the answer before and after discussion with their peers - can benefit considerably from the incorporation of simulations. Simulations can be used for delivering content that precedes Think-Pair-Share, as the prompt the questions is based upon, or as a feedback tool to illustrate the answer to a question. These techniques are utilized in ClassAction - a collection of materials designed to enhance the metacognitive skills of Astro 101 students by promoting interactive engagement and providing rapid feedback. The main focus is dynamic conceptual questions largely based upon graphics that can be projected in the classroom. Many questions are available in a Flash computer database and instructors have the capability to recast these questions into alternate permutations based on their own preferences and student responses. Outlines, graphics, and simulations are included which instructors can use to provide feedback. This poster provides examples of simulation usage in Think-Pair-Share related to sky motions, lunar phases, and stellar properties. A multi-institutional classroom validation study of ClassAction is currently underway as a Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) research project. All materials are publicly available at http://astro.unl.edu. We would like to thank the NSF for funding under Grant Nos. 0404988 and 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the

  12. Older Galaxy Pair Has Surprisingly Youthful Glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    A pair of interacting galaxies might be experiencing the galactic equivalent of a mid-life crisis. For some reason, the pair, called Arp 82, didn't make their stars early on as is typical of most galaxies. Instead, they got a second wind later in life -- about 2 billion years ago -- and started pumping out waves of new stars as if they were young again.

    Arp 82 is an interacting pair of galaxies with a strong bridge and a long tail. NGC 2535 is the big galaxy and NGC 2536 is its smaller companion. The disk of the main galaxy looks like an eye, with a bright 'pupil' in the center and oval-shaped 'eyelids.' Dramatic 'beads on a string' features are visible as chains of evenly spaced star-formation complexes along the eyelids. These are presumably the result of large-scale gaseous shocks from a grazing encounter. The colors of this galaxy indicate that the observed stars are young to intermediate in age, around 2 million to 2 billion years old, much less than the age of the universe (13.7 billion years).

    The puzzle is: why didn't Arp 82 form many stars earlier, like most galaxies of that mass range? Scientifically, it is an oddball and provides a relatively nearby lab for studying the age of intermediate-mass galaxies.

    This picture is a composite captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera with light at wavelength 8 microns shown in red, NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer combined 1530 and 2310 Angstroms shown in blue, and the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy Observatory light at 6940 Angstroms shown in green.

  13. Pair Potential of Charged Colloidal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Addas, K.; Ward, A.; Flynn, N. T.; Velasco, E.; Hagan, M. F.; Dogic, Z.; Fraden, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the construction of colloidal stars: 1μm polystyrene beads grafted with a dense brush of 1μm long and 10 nm wide charged semiflexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  14. Holographic pair and charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Sera; Li, Li; Ren, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We examine a holographic model in which a U (1 ) symmetry and translational invariance are broken spontaneously at the same time. Our construction provides an example of a system with pair-density wave order, in which the superconducting order parameter is spatially modulated but has a zero average. In addition, the charge density oscillates at twice the frequency of the scalar condensate. Depending on the choice of parameters, the model also admits a state with coexisting superconducting and charge-density wave orders, in which the scalar condensate has a uniform component.

  15. Slepton Pair Production at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, B.

    2007-04-01

    In R-parity conserving supersymmetric models, sleptons are produced in pairs at hadron colliders. We show that measurements of the longitudinal single-spin asymmetry at possible polarization upgrades of existing colliders allow for a direct extraction of the slepton mixing angle. A calculation of the transverse-momentum spectrum shows the importance of resummed contributions at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy in the small and intermediate transverse-momentum regions and little dependence on unphysical scales and non-perturbative contributions.

  16. Molecular associations from ab initio pair potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, E.; Sordo, T. L.; Sordo, J. A.

    1991-12-01

    A method of building up stable molecular associations by using pair potentials from ab initio calculations is presented. The Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine potential has been chosen to emulate the water-water interactions while 1-6-12 potentials are used to compute both solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. Parameters for neutral-amino-acid-water and neutral- amino-acid-neutral-amino-acid interactions are provided by the program. Supermolecules are constructed by minimization of the interaction energy of the molecules involved. Both steepest-decent and Fletcher-Powell algorithms are available to carry out such a minimization.

  17. A biometric signcryption scheme without bilinear pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingwen; Ren, Zhiyuan; Cai, Jun; Zheng, Wentao

    2013-03-01

    How to apply the entropy in biometrics into the encryption and remote authentication schemes to simplify the management of keys is a hot research area. Utilizing Dodis's fuzzy extractor method and Liu's original signcryption scheme, a biometric identity based signcryption scheme is proposed in this paper. The proposed scheme is more efficient than most of the previous proposed biometric signcryption schemes for that it does not need bilinear pairing computation and modular exponentiation computation which is time consuming largely. The analysis results show that under the CDH and DL hard problem assumption, the proposed scheme has the features of confidentiality and unforgeability simultaneously.

  18. Cooper pairs spintronics in triplet spin valves.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F; Citro, R

    2013-11-27

    We study a spin valve with a triplet superconductor spacer intercalated between two ferromagnets with noncollinear magnetizations. We show that the magnetoresistance of the triplet spin valve depends on the relative orientations of the d vector, characterizing the superconducting order parameter, and the magnetization directions of the ferromagnetic layers. For devices characterized by a long superconductor, the effects of a polarized current sustained by Cooper pairs only are observed. In this regime, a supermagnetoresistance effect emerges, and the chiral symmetry of the order parameter of the superconducting spacer is easily recognized. Our findings open new perspectives in designing spintronics devices based on the cooperation of ferromagnetic and triplet correlations.

  19. Pair creation in noncommutative space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, B.; Chetouani, L.

    2016-09-01

    By taking two interactions, the Volkov plane wave and a constant electromagnetic field, the probability related to the process of pair creation from the vacuum is exactly and analytically determined via the Schwinger method in noncommutative space-time. For the plane wave, it is shown that the probability is simply null and for the electromagnetic wave it is found that the expression of the probability has a similar form to that obtained by Schwinger in a commutative space-time. For a certain critical value of H, the probability is simply equal to 1.

  20. Relativistic thermal plasmas - Pair processes and equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightman, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    The work of Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Zel'dovich and Sunyaev (1971) is extended and generalized, through the inclusion of pair-producing photon processes and effects due to the finite size of the plasma, in an investigation of the equilibria of relativistic thermal plasmas which takes into account electron-positron creation and annihilation and photons produced within the plasma. It is shown that the bridge between an effectively thin plasma and an effectively thick plasma occurs in the transrelativistic region, where the dimensionless temperature value is between 0.1 and 1.0 and the temperature remains in this region over a great luminosity range.

  1. Computational complexity of projected entangled pair states.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Norbert; Wolf, Michael M; Verstraete, Frank; Cirac, J Ignacio

    2007-04-06

    We determine the computational power of preparing projected entangled pair states (PEPS), as well as the complexity of classically simulating them, and generally the complexity of contracting tensor networks. While creating PEPS allows us to solve PP problems, the latter two tasks are both proven to be #P-complete. We further show how PEPS can be used to approximate ground states of gapped Hamiltonians and that creating them is easier than creating arbitrary PEPS. The main tool for our proofs is a duality between PEPS and postselection which allows us to use existing results from quantum complexity.

  2. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies. PMID:27649177

  3. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  4. Mated Fingerprint Card Pairs 2 (MFCP2)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Mated Fingerprint Card Pairs 2 (MFCP2) (PC database for purchase)   NIST Special Database 14 is being distributed for use in development and testing of automated fingerprint classification and matching systems on a set of images which approximate a natural horizontal distribution of the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) fingerprint classes. A newer version of the compression/decompression software on the CDROM can be found at the website http://www.nist.gov/itl/iad/ig/nigos.cfm as part of the NBIS package.

  5. Pair correlation function for spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2012-10-01

    We extract a pair correlation function (PCF) from probability distributions of the spin-overlap parameter q. The distributions come from Monte Carlo simulations. A measure, w, of the thermal fluctuations of magnetic patterns follows from the PCFs. We also obtain rms deviations (over different system samples) δp away from average probabilities for q. For the linear system sizes L that we have studied, w and δp are independent of L in the Edwards-Anderson model but scale as 1/L and L, respectively, in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.

  6. Frustrated Lewis pair chemistry: development and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W; Erker, Gerhard

    2015-05-26

    Frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) are combinations of Lewis acids and Lewis bases in solution that are deterred from strong adduct formation by steric and/or electronic factors. This opens pathways to novel cooperative reactions with added substrates. Small-molecule binding and activation by FLPs has led to the discovery of a variety of new reactions through unprecedented pathways. Hydrogen activation and subsequent manipulation in metal-free catalytic hydrogenations is a frequently observed feature of many FLPs. The current state of this young but rapidly expanding field is outlined in this Review and the future directions for its broadening sphere of impact are considered.

  7. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-15

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  8. Generalized magnetofluid connections in pair plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Comisso, Luca; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2015-12-01

    We extend the magnetic connection theorem of ideal magnetohydrodynamics to nonideal relativistic pair plasmas. Adopting a generalized Ohm's law, we prove the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved by the plasma dynamics. We show that these connections are related to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields. The generalized magnetofluid connections set important constraints on the plasma dynamics by forbidding transitions between configurations with different magnetofluid connectivity. An approximated solution is explicitly shown where the corrections due to current inertial effects are found.

  9. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females' alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females' within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases.

  10. Synergy between pair coupled cluster doubles and pair density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-28

    Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has been recently studied as a method capable of accounting for static correlation with low polynomial cost. We present three combinations of pCCD with Kohn–Sham functionals of the density and on-top pair density (the probability of finding two electrons on top of each other) to add dynamic correlation to pCCD without double counting. With a negligible increase in computational cost, these pCCD+DFT blends greatly improve upon pCCD in the description of typical problems where static and dynamic correlations are both important. We argue that—as a black-box method with low scaling, size-extensivity, size-consistency, and a simple quasidiagonal two-particle density matrix—pCCD is an excellent match for pair density functionals in this type of fusion of multireference wavefunctions with DFT.

  11. Schwinger pair production at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Leandro; Ogilvie, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal corrections to Schwinger pair production are potentially important in particle physics, nuclear physics and cosmology. However, the lowest-order contribution, arising at one loop, has proved difficult to calculate unambiguously. We show that this thermal correction may be calculated for charged scalars using the worldline formalism, where each term in the decay rate is associated with a worldline instanton. We calculate all finite-temperature worldline instantons, their actions and fluctuation prefactors, thus determining the complete one-loop decay rate at finite temperature. The thermal contribution to the decay rate becomes nonzero at a threshold temperature T =e E /2 m , above which it dominates the zero-temperature result. This is the lowest of an infinite set of thresholds at T =n e E /2 m . The decay rate is singular at each threshold as a consequence of the failure of the quadratic approximation to the worldline path integral. We argue that higher-order effects will make the decay rates finite everywhere and model those effects by the inclusion of hard thermal loop damping rates. We also demonstrate that the formalism developed here generalizes to the case of finite-temperature pair production in inhomogeneous fields.

  12. ``Schooling'' of wing pairs in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif; AML, Courant Collaboration; Physics NYU Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The experimental setup implements two independent flapping wings swimming in tandem. Both are driven with the same prescribed vertical heaving motion, but the horizontal motion is free, which means that the swimmers can take up any relative position and forward speed. Experiments show however clearly coordinated motions, where the pair of wings `crystallize' into specific stable arrangements. The follower wing locks into the path of the leader, adopting its speed, and with a separation distance that takes on one of several discrete values. By systematically varying the kinematics and wing size, we show that the set of stable spacings is dictated by the wavelength of the periodic wake structure. The forces maintaining the pair cohesion are characterized by applying an external force to the follower to perturb it away from the `stable wells'. These results show that hydrodynamics alone is sufficient to induce cohesive and coordinated collective locomotion through a fluid, and we discuss the hypothesis that fish schools and bird flocks also represent stable modes of motion.

  13. Generalized quantum interference of correlated photon pairs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2015-01-01

    Superposition and indistinguishablility between probability amplitudes have played an essential role in observing quantum interference effects of correlated photons. The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and interferences of the path-entangled photon number state are of special interest in the field of quantum information technologies. However, a fully generalized two-photon quantum interferometric scheme accounting for the Hong-Ou-Mandel scheme and path-entangled photon number states has not yet been proposed. Here we report the experimental demonstrations of the generalized two-photon interferometry with both the interferometric properties of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect and the fully unfolded version of the path-entangled photon number state using photon-pair sources, which are independently generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our experimental scheme explains two-photon interference fringes revealing single- and two-photon coherence properties in a single interferometer setup. Using the proposed interferometric measurement, it is possible to directly estimate the joint spectral intensity of a photon pair source. PMID:25951143

  14. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire.

  15. The cavity-embedded-cooper pair transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei

    Nearly eight decades after Erwin Schrodinger proposed his famous cat paradox, the boundary between classical and quantum physics is becoming accessible to experimental study in condensed matter systems, in which macroscopic and microscopic degrees of freedom interact with each other. The cavity-embedded-Cooper pair transistor (cCPT) is an ideal candidate for such a study in that it is not only strongly and intrinsically nonlinear but also fully quantum mechanical. A novel technique, based on the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, is first introduced for applying a dc bias to a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity. The development and investigation of the cCPT system, in which a Cooper pair transistor acting as a single artificial atom is directly coupled to an on-chip dc-biased high-Q resonator, is then presented. Self-oscillations in the cCPT, internally driven by the ac Josephson effect, demonstrate the strong and phase coherent coupling between matter and light in the cCPT. Meanwhile, photons continually produced by the system are collected and characterized by quantum state tomography, which indicates the non-classical nature of the emitted light and the nonlinear quantum dynamics of the cCPT system.

  16. Odd frequency pairing of interacting Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen; Woelfle, Peter; Balatsky, Alexandar

    Majorana fermions are rising as a promising key component in quantum computation. While the prevalent approach is to use a quadratic (i.e. non-interacting) Majorana Hamiltonian, when expressed in terms of Dirac fermions, generically the Hamiltonian involves interaction terms. Here we focus on the possible pair correlations in a simple model system. We study a model of Majorana fermions coupled to a boson mode and show that the anomalous correlator between different Majorana fermions, located at opposite ends of a topological wire, exhibits odd frequency behavior. It is stabilized when the coupling strength g is above a critical value gc. We use both, conventional diagrammatic theory and a functional integral approach, to derive the gap equation, the critical temperature, the gap function, the critical coupling, and a Ginzburg-Landau theory allowing to discuss a possible subleading admixture of even-frequency pairing. Work supported by USDOE DE-AC52-06NA25396 E304, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, and ERC DM-321031.

  17. Investigation of the gravitational interaction between the components of the galaxy pairs Arp 242, CPG 165, and CPG 410

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Gamal B.; Tawfeek, Amira A.; Amin, Magdy Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the effect of interaction between the components of the galaxy pairs Arp 242, CPG 165, and CPG 410 on the symmetry of their morphologies and structures is studied by applying the technique of surface photometry. For each component of each pair we present the isophotal contours, profiles of surface brightness (SB), major-axis position angle (PA), and isophotal center-shift. The present analysis is done using the r- and i-band images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observation. It is found that the position angle and the isophotal center shift are strongly affected by the state of interaction between the components of the pairs.

  18. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. II. Recoupled pair bond dyads in carbon and sulfur difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Takeshita, Tyler Y.; Xu, Lu T.

    2015-01-21

    Formation of a bond between a second ligand and a molecule with a recoupled pair bond results in a recoupled pair bond dyad. We examine the recoupled pair bond dyads in the a{sup 3}B{sub 1} states of CF{sub 2} and SF{sub 2}, which are formed by the addition of a fluorine atom to the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, both of which possess recoupled pair bonds. The two dyads are very different. In SF{sub 2}, the second FS–F bond is very strong (D{sub e} = 106.3 kcal/mol), the bond length is much shorter than that in the SF(a{sup 4}Σ{sup −}) state (1.666 Å versus 1.882 Å), and the three atoms are nearly collinear (θ{sub e} = 162.7°) with only a small barrier to linearity (0.4 kcal/mol). In CF{sub 2}, the second FC–F bond is also very strong (D{sub e} = 149.5 kcal/mol), but the bond is only slightly shorter than that in the CF(a{sup 4}Σ{sup −}) state (1.314 Å versus 1.327 Å), and the molecule is strongly bent (θ{sub e} = 119.0°) with an 80.5 kcal/mol barrier to linearity. The a{sup 3}B{sub 1} states of CF{sub 2} and SF{sub 2} illustrate the fundamental differences between recoupled pair bond dyads formed from 2s and 3p lone pairs.

  19. Physicochemical Properties of Ion Pairs of Biological Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Junji; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandarashvili, Levani

    2015-01-01

    Ion pairs (also known as salt bridges) of electrostatically interacting cationic and anionic moieties are important for proteins and nucleic acids to perform their function. Although numerous three-dimensional structures show ion pairs at functionally important sites of biological macromolecules and their complexes, the physicochemical properties of the ion pairs are not well understood. Crystal structures typically show a single state for each ion pair. However, recent studies have revealed the dynamic nature of the ion pairs of the biological macromolecules. Biomolecular ion pairs undergo dynamic transitions between distinct states in which the charged moieties are either in direct contact or separated by water. This dynamic behavior is reasonable in light of the fundamental concepts that were established for small ions over the last century. In this review, we introduce the physicochemical concepts relevant to the ion pairs and provide an overview of the recent advancement in biophysical research on the ion pairs of biological macromolecules. PMID:26437440

  20. Constrained-pairing mean-field theory. V. Triplet pairing formalism.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason K; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Henderson, Thomas M; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2011-07-21

    Describing strong (also known as static) correlation caused by degenerate or nearly degenerate orbitals near the Fermi level remains a theoretical challenge, particularly in molecular systems. Constrained-pairing mean-field theory has been quite successful, capturing the effects of static correlation in bond formation and breaking in closed-shell molecular systems by using singlet electron entanglement to model static correlation at mean-field computational cost. This work extends the previous formalism to include triplet pairing. Additionally, a spin orbital extension of the "odd-electron" formalism is presented as a method for understanding electron entanglement in molecules.

  1. On magnetic pair production above fast pulsar polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic pair production is one of high-energy electromagnetic conversion processes important to the development of pair-photon cascades in pulsars. On the basis of current polar cap models, the properties of magnetic pair production in fast pulsars are discussed. Suppose there is a roughly dipole magnetic field at the stellar surface, the author estimate the effects on non-zero curvature of magnetic field lines upon curvature radiation from primary particles and pair production rate near the surface of pulsars.

  2. Using Pair Programming to Teach CAD Based Engineering Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leland, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Pair programming was introduced into a course in engineering graphics that emphasizes solid modeling using SolidWorks. In pair programming, two students work at a single computer, and periodically trade off roles as driver (hands on the keyboard and mouse) and navigator (discuss strategy and design issues). Pair programming was used in a design…

  3. Linking Associative and Serial List Memory: Pairs Versus Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Jeremy B.; Glaholt, Mackenzie G.; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    Paired associates and serial list memory are typically investigated separately. An "isolation principle" (J. B. Caplan, 2005) was proposed to explain behavior in both paradigms by using a single model, in which serial list and paired associates memory differ only in how isolated pairs of items are from interference from other studied items. In…

  4. 47 CFR 22.813 - Technical channel pair assignment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical channel pair assignment criteria. 22....813 Technical channel pair assignment criteria. The rules in this section establish technical assignment criteria for the channel pairs listed in § 22.805. These criteria are intended to...

  5. Self-Injurious Behavior and Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Byiers, Breanne J.; Raspa, Melissa; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We used National Fragile X Survey data in order to examine reported self-injurious behavior (SIB) to (a) generate lifetime and point prevalence estimates, (b) document detailed features of SIB (frequency, types, location, severity) in relation to gender, and (c) compare comorbid conditions between matched pairs (SIB vs. no SIB). Results indicate…

  6. Depicting the MeV realm with the Compton Pair-Production Telescope (ComPair)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Buson, Sara; ComPair Mission Team

    2017-01-01

    The energy band from a few hundred keV to a few hundred MeV offers a unique window for studying both thermal and the non-thermal astrophysical processes. Important science can be gleaned from investigations of emission mechanisms and environments of the most extreme objects that populate this mostly unexplored energy range.The Compton-Pair Telescope (ComPair) is a next-generation mission concept building on the pioneering observations by COMPTEL, on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, and the heritage of recent successful missions, such as Fermi-LAT, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA. With its capability of detecting both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy, ComPair can explore the energy regime from 0.2 keV to > 500 MeV with unprecedented sensitivity. We describe the concept of this wide-aperture instrument and discuss its power to address fundamental questions from a broad variety of astrophysical topics.

  7. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS. II. REACTIVE VERSUS KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.; Supsar, M. E-mail: steffen.krakau@rub.de

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of TeV gamma-rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon-photon annihilation process. Using the linear instability analysis in the kinetic limit, which properly accounts for the longitudinal and the small but finite perpendicular momentum spread in the pair momentum distribution function, the growth rate of parallel propagating electrostatic oscillations in the intergalactic medium is calculated. Contrary to the claims of Miniati and Elyiv, we find that neither the longitudinal nor the perpendicular spread in the relativistic pair distribution function significantly affect the electrostatic growth rates. The maximum kinetic growth rate for no perpendicular spread is even about an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding reactive maximum growth rate. The reduction factors in the maximum growth rate due to the finite perpendicular spread in the pair distribution function are tiny and always less than 10{sup –4}. We confirm earlier conclusions by Broderick et al. and our group that the created pair beam distribution function is quickly unstable in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium. Therefore, there is no need to require the existence of small intergalactic magnetic fields to scatter the produced pairs, so that the explanation (made by several authors) for the Fermi non-detection of the inverse Compton scattered GeV gamma-rays by a finite deflecting intergalactic magnetic field is not necessary. In particular, the various derived lower bounds for the intergalactic magnetic fields are invalid due to the pair beam instability argument.

  8. Kink pair production and dislocation motion

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    The motion of extended defects called dislocations controls the mechanical properties of crystalline materials such as strength and ductility. Under moderate applied loads, this motion proceeds via the thermal nucleation of kink pairs. The nucleation rate is known to be a highly nonlinear function of the applied load, and its calculation has long been a theoretical challenge. In this article, a stochastic path integral approach is used to derive a simple, general, and exact formula for the rate. The predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental and computational investigations, and unambiguously explain the origin of the observed extreme nonlinearity. The results can also be applied to other systems modelled by an elastic string interacting with a periodic potential, such as Josephson junctions in superconductors. PMID:28004834

  9. The reality of comet groups and pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1977-01-01

    Although the common genetic origin of the Kreutz family of sun-grazing comets has generally been accepted, there remains uncertainty with regard to genetic identity among other groups of comets whose orbital elements are nearly alike. Porter (1952) has listed a number of such groups, and Opik (1971) has made a statistical study of the orbits of 472 comets with aphelion distances beyond Saturn. Opik lists 97 groups that show similarities among their three angular elements, calculates an overall probability of some 10 to the -39th power that these similarities could have occurred by chance, and thus concludes that 60% or more of such comets fall into genetic groups containing from two to seven members. This paper explores the statistical reality of Opik's groups utilizing the Monte Carlo method of statistics as well as ordinary probability theory. The conclusion is reached that except for a few pairs, the similarity among orbital elements within the groups is no greater than random expectation.

  10. Kink pair production and dislocation motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    The motion of extended defects called dislocations controls the mechanical properties of crystalline materials such as strength and ductility. Under moderate applied loads, this motion proceeds via the thermal nucleation of kink pairs. The nucleation rate is known to be a highly nonlinear function of the applied load, and its calculation has long been a theoretical challenge. In this article, a stochastic path integral approach is used to derive a simple, general, and exact formula for the rate. The predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental and computational investigations, and unambiguously explain the origin of the observed extreme nonlinearity. The results can also be applied to other systems modelled by an elastic string interacting with a periodic potential, such as Josephson junctions in superconductors.

  11. Aluminium Diphosphamethanides: Hidden Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    PubMed

    Styra, Steffen; Radius, Michael; Moos, Eric; Bihlmeier, Angela; Breher, Frank

    2016-07-04

    The synthesis and characterisation of two aluminium diphosphamethanide complexes, [Al(tBu)2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (3) and [Al(C6 F5 )2 {κ(2) P,P'-Mes*PCHPMes*}] (4), and the silylated analogue, Mes*PCHP(SiMe3 )Mes* (5), are reported. The aluminium complexes feature four-membered PCPAl core structures consisting of diphosphaallyl ligands. The silylated phosphine 5 was found to be a valuable precursor for the synthesis of 4 as it cleanly reacts with the diaryl aluminium chloride [(C6 F5 )2 AlCl]2 . The aluminium complex 3 reacts with molecular dihydrogen at room temperature under formation of the acyclic σ(2) λ(3) ,σ(3) λ(3) -diphosphine Mes*PCHP(H)Mes* and the corresponding dialkyl aluminium hydride [tBu2 AlH]3 . Thus, 3 belongs to the family of so-called hidden frustrated Lewis pairs.

  12. The Giant Pairing Vibration in Carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Agodi, C.; Azaiez, F.; Assié, M.; de Séréville, N.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    The 13C(18O,16O)15C and 12C(18O,16O)14C reactions at 84 MeV incident energy were explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed in both nuclei, attributed to the Giant Pairing Vibration (GPV). The neutron decay of the 15C resonances, including the GPV, populated via the two- neutron transfer reaction has been studied using an innovative technique, which couples MAGNEX with the EDEN neutron detector array. The data show that the 15C GPV mainly decays via two-neutron emission.

  13. The stratospheric arrival pair in infrasound propagation.

    PubMed

    Waxler, Roger; Evers, Läslo G; Assink, Jelle; Blom, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The ideal case of a deep and well-formed stratospheric duct for long range infrasound propagation in the absence of tropospheric ducting is considered. A canonical form, that of a pair of arrivals, for ground returns of impulsive signals in a stratospheric duct is determined. The canonical form is derived from the geometrical acoustics approximation, and is validated and extended through full wave modeling. The full caustic structure of the field of ray paths is found and used to determine phase relations between the contributions to the wavetrain from different propagation paths. Finally, comparison with data collected from the 2005 fuel gas depot explosion in Buncefield, England is made. The correspondence between the theoretical results and the observations is shown to be quite good.

  14. Nonclassical photon pair generation in atomic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhya, S. N.

    2007-07-15

    A scheme for the generation of nonclassical pairs of photons in atomic vapors is proposed. The scheme exploits the fact that the cross correlation of the emission of photons from the extreme transitions of a four-level cascade system shows antibunching, unlike the case of the three-level cascade emission, which shows bunching. The Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, which is the ratio of the cross-correlation to the autocorrelation function, in this case is estimated to be 10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} for controllable time delay, and is one to four orders of magnitude larger compared to previous experiments. The choice of Doppler-free geometry, in addition to the fact that at three-photon resonance the excitation and deexcitation processes occur in a very narrow frequency band, ensures cleaner signa0008.

  15. Disruption, beamstrahlung, and beamstrahlung pair creation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1988-12-01

    The two major effects from the interaction of e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ beams---beamstrahlung and disruption---are reviewed, with emphasis on flat beam collisions. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations, and scaling laws based on these are deduced whenever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects, we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. In addition to the generic studies on the beam-beam effects, we also list the relevant beam-beam parameters obtained from simulations on two sample designs: the TLC and the ILC. As an addendum, the newly discovered phenomenon of coherent beamstrahlung pair creation, together with the incoherent process, are discussed. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  17. Molecular recognition of DNA base pairs by the formamido/pyrrole and formamido/imidazole pairings in stacked polyamides

    PubMed Central

    Buchmueller, Karen L.; Staples, Andrew M.; Uthe, Peter B.; Howard, Cameron M.; Pacheco, Kimberly A. O.; Cox, Kari K.; Henry, James A.; Bailey, Suzanna L.; Horick, Sarah M.; Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W. David; Lee, Moses

    2005-01-01

    Polyamides containing an N-terminal formamido (f) group bind to the minor groove of DNA as staggered, antiparallel dimers in a sequence-specific manner. The formamido group increases the affinity and binding site size, and it promotes the molecules to stack in a staggered fashion thereby pairing itself with either a pyrrole (Py) or an imidazole (Im). There has not been a systematic study on the DNA recognition properties of the f/Py and f/Im terminal pairings. These pairings were analyzed here in the context of f-ImPyPy, f-ImPyIm, f-PyPyPy and f-PyPyIm, which contain the central pairing modes, –ImPy– and –PyPy–. The specificity of these triamides towards symmetrical recognition sites allowed for the f/Py and f/Im terminal pairings to be directly compared by SPR, CD and ΔTM experiments. The f/Py pairing, when placed next to the –ImPy– or –PyPy– central pairings, prefers A/T and T/A base pairs to G/C base pairs, suggesting that f/Py has similar DNA recognition specificity to Py/Py. With –ImPy– central pairings, f/Im prefers C/G base pairs (>10 times) to the other Watson–Crick base pairs; therefore, f/Im behaves like the Py/Im pair. However, the f/Im pairing is not selective for the C/G base pair when placed next to the –PyPy– central pairings. PMID:15703305

  18. Pair production close to black hole horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Philippe; Titarchuk, Lev

    2012-07-01

    Accreting stellar-mass black holes in Galactic binaries exhibit a ``bi-modal" spectral behavior - namely the so called high-soft and low-hard spectral states. An increase in the soft blackbody luminosity component leads to the appearance of an extended power law. An important observational fact is that this effect is seen as a persistent phenomenon only in BH candidates, and thus it is apparently a unique black hole signature. Although similar power law components are detected in the intermediate stages in neutron star systems, they are of a transient nature, i.e. disappearing with increasing luminosity. It thus seems a reasonable assumption that the unique spectral signature of the soft state of BH binaries is directly tied to the black hole event horizon. This is the primary motivation for the Bulk Motion Comptonization Model, introduced in several previous papers, and recently applied with striking success to a substantial body of observational data. We argued that the BH X-ray spectrum in the high-soft state is formed in the relatively cold accretion flow with a subrelativistic bulk velocity close to c and a temperature of a few keV. In such a flow the effect of the bulk Comptonization is indeed much stronger than the effect of the thermal ones. Another property of these accreted flow, that we will explore during this talk, is that, very close to horizon, X-ray photons may be upscattered by bulk electrons to MeV energy. Most of these photons fall down then in the black hole, but some of them anyway have time to interact with another X-ray photon by the photon-photon process to make an electron-positron pairs. We will then explore in details the consequences of this pair creation process close to horizon and what can be the observational evidences of this effect.

  19. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-07

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10(-8)-10(-7), corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  20. Near intron pairs and the metazoan tree.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jörg; Stadler, Peter F; Krauss, Veiko

    2013-03-01

    Gene structure data can substantially advance our understanding of metazoan evolution and deliver an independent approach to resolve conflicts among existing hypotheses. Here, we used changes of spliceosomal intron positions as novel phylogenetic marker to reconstruct the animal tree. This kind of data is inferred from orthologous genes containing mutually exclusive introns at pairs of sequence positions in close proximity, so-called near intron pairs (NIPs). NIP data were collected for 48 species and utilized as binary genome-level characters in maximum parsimony (MP) analyses to reconstruct deep metazoan phylogeny. All groupings that were obtained with more than 80% bootstrap support are consistent with currently supported phylogenetic hypotheses. This includes monophyletic Chordata, Vertebrata, Nematoda, Platyhelminthes and Trochozoa. Several other clades such as Deuterostomia, Protostomia, Arthropoda, Ecdysozoa, Spiralia, and Eumetazoa, however, failed to be recovered due to a few problematic taxa such as the mite Ixodesand the warty comb jelly Mnemiopsis. The corresponding unexpected branchings can be explained by the paucity of synapomorphic changes of intron positions shared between some genomes, by the sensitivity of MP analyses to long-branch attraction (LBA), and by the very unequal evolutionary rates of intron loss and intron gain during evolution of the different subclades of metazoans. In addition, we obtained an assemblage of Cnidaria, Porifera, and Placozoa as sister group of Bilateria+Ctenophora with medium support, a disputable, but remarkable result. We conclude that NIPs can be used as phylogenetic characters also within a broader phylogenetic context, given that they have emerged regularly during evolution irrespective of the large variation of intron density across metazoan genomes.

  1. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-01

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10-8-10-7, corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  2. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  3. Chiral organoborane Lewis pairs derived from pyridylferrocene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawei; Lalancette, Roger A; Jäkle, Frieder

    2014-07-14

    In an effort to develop a new class of redox-active chiral Lewis pairs, pyridine and borane moieties with different steric and electronic properties were introduced onto a planar chiral 1,2-disubstituted ferrocene framework. Metathesis of lithiated, stannylated, or mercuriated pyridylferrocenes with boron halides afforded (pR)-2-[bis(pentafluorophenyl)boryl]-1-(3,5-dimethylpyrid-2-yl)ferrocene (4-Pf), (pR)-2-[dimesitylboryl]-1-(3,5-dimethylpyrid-2-yl)ferrocene (4-Mes), (pS)-2-(bis(pentafluorophenyl)boryl)-1-(2-trimethylsilylpyrid-6-yl)ferrocene (5-Pf), or (pS)-2-[dimesitylboryl]-1-(2-trimethylsilylpyrid-6-yl)ferrocene (5-Mes). The borylated products were analyzed by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, HRMS, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Chiral HPLC and optical-rotation measurements were employed to assess the stereoselectivity of the borylation process and to establish the correct stereochemical assignments. The strength of the B-N interactions were investigated in solution and in the solid state. Compounds 4-Pf and 4-Mes formed robust 'closed' B-N heterocyclic systems that proved to be perfectly stable to air and moisture, whereas 5-Pf established a dynamic equilibrium, in which the B-N heterocycle was observed exclusively at room temperature, but opened up at high temperature according to (19)F NMR exchange spectroscopy data. As a consequence, 5-Pf reacted readily with a molecule of water to generate a ring-opened pyridinium borate. The combination of bulky borane and bulky pyridyl groups in 5-Mes led to a completely 'open' frustrated Lewis pair system with uncomplexed pyridine and borane groups, even at room temperature. Electrochemical studies were performed and the effect of preparative ferrocene oxidation on the structural features was also explored.

  4. Low level of extra-pair paternity between nearest neighbors results from female preference for high-quality males in the yellow-rumped flycatcher (Ficedula zanthopygia)

    PubMed Central

    E, Mingju; Gong, Ye; Yu, Jiangping; Zhang, Siyu; Fan, Qianxi; Jiang, Yunlei

    2017-01-01

    Extra-pair copulation is considered to be a means by which females can modify their initial mate choice, and females might obtain indirect benefits to offspring fitness by engaging in this behavior. Here, we examined the patterns of extra-pair paternity and female preferences in the yellow-rumped flycatcher (Ficedula zanthopygia). We found that female yellow-rumped flycatchers are more likely to choose larger and relatively highly heterozygous males than their social mates as extra-pair mates, that the genetic similarity of pairs that produced mixed-paternity offspring did not differ from the similarity of pairs producing only within-pair offspring, and that extra-pair offspring were more heterozygous than their half-siblings. These findings support the good genes hypothesis but do not exclude the compatibility hypothesis. Most female yellow-rumped flycatchers attained extra-pair paternity with distant males rather than their nearest accessible neighboring males, and no differences in genetic and phenotypic characteristics were detected between cuckolded males and their nearest neighbors. There was no evidence that extra-pair mating by female flycatchers reduced inbreeding. Moreover, breeding density, breeding synchrony and their interaction did not affect the occurrence of extra-pair paternity in this species. Our results suggest that the variation in extra-pair paternity distribution between nearest neighbors in some passerine species might result from female preference for highly heterozygous males. PMID:28257431

  5. Phospholipids and insulin resistance in psychosis: a lipidomics study of twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several theories have been proposed to conceptualize the pathological processes inherent to schizophrenia. The 'prostaglandin deficiency' hypothesis postulates that defective enzyme systems converting essential fatty acids to prostaglandins lead to diminished levels of prostaglandins, which in turn affect synaptic transmission. Methods Here we sought to determine the lipidomic profiles associated with schizophrenia in twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia as well as unaffected twin pairs. The study included serum samples from 19 twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia (mean age 51 ± 10 years; 7 monozygotic pairs; 13 female pairs) and 34 age and gender matched healthy twins as controls. Neurocognitive assessment data and gray matter density measurements taken from high-resolution magnetic resonance images were also obtained. A lipidomics platform using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied for the analysis of serum samples. Results In comparison to their healthy co-twins, the patients had elevated triglycerides and were more insulin resistant. They had diminished lysophosphatidylcholine levels, which associated with decreased cognitive speed. Conclusions Our findings may be of pathophysiological relevance since lysophosphatidylcholines, byproducts of phospholipase A2-catalyzed phospholipid hydrolysis, are preferred carriers of polyunsaturated fatty acids across the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, diminishment of lysophosphatidylcholines suggests that subjects at risk of schizophrenia may be more susceptible to infections. Their association with cognitive speed supports the view that altered neurotransmission in schizophrenia may be in part mediated by reactive lipids such as prostaglandins. PMID:22257447

  6. Antiferromagnetic Ising spin glass competing with BCS pairing interaction in a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, S. G.; Zimmer, F. M.; Kipper, C. J.; Calegari, E. J.

    2006-07-01

    The competition among spin glass (SG), antiferromagnetism (AF) and local pairing superconductivity (PAIR) is studied in a two-sublattice fermionic Ising spin glass model with a local BCS pairing interaction in the presence of an applied magnetic transverse field Γ. In the present approach, spins in different sublattices interact with a Gaussian random coupling with an antiferromagnetic mean J0 and standard deviation J. The problem is formulated in the path integral formalism in which spin operators are represented by bilinear combinations of Grassmann variables. The saddle-point Grand Canonical potential is obtained within the static approximation and the replica symmetric ansatz. The results are analysed in phase diagrams in which the AF and the SG phases can occur for small g (g is the strength of the local superconductor coupling written in units of J), while the PAIR phase appears as unique solution for large g. However, there is a complex line transition separating the PAIR phase from the others. It is second order at high temperature that ends in a tricritical point. The quantum fluctuations affect deeply the transition lines and the tricritical point due to the presence of Γ.

  7. Statistics of Simulated and Observed Pair Separations in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beron-Vera, Francisco J.; LaCasce, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Pair-separation statistics of in-situ and synthetic surface drifters deployed near the \\emph{Deepwater Horizon} site in the Gulf of Mexico are investigated. The synthetic trajectories derive from a 1-km-resolution data-assimilative Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) simulation. The in-situ drifters were launched in the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD). Diverse measures of the dispersion are calculated and compared to theoretical predictions. For the NCOM pairs, the measures indicate nonlocal pair dispersion at the smallest sampled scales. At separations exceeding 100 km, pair motion is uncorrelated, indicating absolute rather than relative dispersion. With the GLAD drifters however the statistics suggest local dispersion (in which pair separations exhibit power law growth), in line with previous findings. The disagreement stems in part from inertial oscillations, which affect the energy levels at small scales without greatly altering the net particle displacements. They were significant in GLAD but much weaker in the NCOM simulations. In addition the GLAD drifters were launched close together, producing few independent realizations and hence weaker statistical significance. Restricting the NCOM set to those launched at the same locations yields very similar statistics.

  8. Demographic mechanisms of inbreeding adjustment through extra-pair reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Duthie, A Bradley; Wolak, Matthew E; Arcese, Peter; van de Pol, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    One hypothesis explaining extra-pair reproduction is that socially monogamous females mate with extra-pair males to adjust the coefficient of inbreeding (f) of extra-pair offspring (EPO) relative to that of within-pair offspring (WPO) they would produce with their socially paired male. Such adjustment of offspring f requires non-random extra-pair reproduction with respect to relatedness, which is in turn often assumed to require some mechanism of explicit pre-copulatory or post-copulatory kin discrimination. We propose three demographic processes that could potentially cause mean f to differ between individual females’ EPO and WPO given random extra-pair reproduction with available males without necessarily requiring explicit kin discrimination. Specifically, such a difference could arise if social pairings formed non-randomly with respect to relatedness or persisted non-randomly with respect to relatedness, or if the distribution of relatedness between females and their sets of potential mates changed during the period through which social pairings persisted. We used comprehensive pedigree and pairing data from free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to quantify these three processes and hence investigate how individual females could adjust mean offspring f through instantaneously random extra-pair reproduction. Female song sparrows tended to form social pairings with unrelated or distantly related males slightly less frequently than expected given random pairing within the defined set of available males. Furthermore, social pairings between more closely related mates tended to be more likely to persist across years than social pairings between less closely related mates. However, these effects were small and the mean relatedness between females and their sets of potential extra-pair males did not change substantially across the years through which social pairings persisted. Our framework and analyses illustrate how demographic and social structuring

  9. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulik, Marta W; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P

    2014-12-12

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base-pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double-stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state-of-the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed.

  10. Scheduler for multiprocessor system switch with selective pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael Karl; Salapura, Valentina

    2015-01-06

    System, method and computer program product for scheduling threads in a multiprocessing system with selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). The method configures the selective pairing facility to use checking provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability and allocate threads to corresponding processor cores indicating need for hardware checking. The method configures the selective pairing facility to provide multiple independent cores and allocate threads to corresponding processor cores indicating inherent resilience.

  11. Electron-positron pair equilibrium in strongly magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.K.

    1984-11-01

    Steady states of thermal electron-positron pair plasmas at mildly relativistic temperatures and in strong magnetic fields are investigated. The pair density in steady-state equilibrium, where pair production balances annihilation, is found as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength and source size, by a numerical calculation which includes pair production attenuation and Compton scattering of the photons. It is found that there is a maximum pair density for each value of temperature and field strength, and also a source size above which optically thin equilibrium states do not exist. (ESA)

  12. Demographic mechanisms of inbreeding adjustment through extra-pair reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Duthie, A Bradley; Wolak, Matthew E; Arcese, Peter

    2015-07-01

    One hypothesis explaining extra-pair reproduction is that socially monogamous females mate with extra-pair males to adjust the coefficient of inbreeding (f) of extra-pair offspring (EPO) relative to that of within-pair offspring (WPO) they would produce with their socially paired male. Such adjustment of offspring f requires non-random extra-pair reproduction with respect to relatedness, which is in turn often assumed to require some mechanism of explicit pre-copulatory or post-copulatory kin discrimination. We propose three demographic processes that could potentially cause mean f to differ between individual females' EPO and WPO given random extra-pair reproduction with available males without necessarily requiring explicit kin discrimination. Specifically, such a difference could arise if social pairings formed non-randomly with respect to relatedness or persisted non-randomly with respect to relatedness, or if the distribution of relatedness between females and their sets of potential mates changed during the period through which social pairings persisted. We used comprehensive pedigree and pairing data from free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to quantify these three processes and hence investigate how individual females could adjust mean offspring f through instantaneously random extra-pair reproduction. Female song sparrows tended to form social pairings with unrelated or distantly related males slightly less frequently than expected given random pairing within the defined set of available males. Furthermore, social pairings between more closely related mates tended to be more likely to persist across years than social pairings between less closely related mates. However, these effects were small and the mean relatedness between females and their sets of potential extra-pair males did not change substantially across the years through which social pairings persisted. Our framework and analyses illustrate how demographic and social structuring within

  13. Stability and size of particle pairs in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Kompaneets, R.; Morfill, G.

    2014-11-15

    Particle pairing in a complex plasma was experimentally studied with the emphasis on pair spatial extent and stability. Micron-size particles were suspended in the (pre)sheath area above the lower electrode in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge in argon. They formed vertical pairs due to the ion wakes created by the flow of ions past particles. We discuss the confinement mechanism for the lower particle, resulting from a combination of the wake field and the field of non-uniform sheath. A model of particle pairs is proposed, which provides good description for the dependence of pair size and stability on experimental parameters.

  14. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  15. Nucleic Acid Duplexes Incorporating a Dissociable Covalent Base Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1999-12-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  16. Isolated galaxies, pairs, and groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuneva, I.; Kalinkov, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors searched for isolated galaxies, pairs and groups of galaxies in the CfA survey (Huchra et al. 1983). It was assumed that the distances to galaxies are given by R = V/H sub o, where H sub o = 100 km s(exp -1) Mpc(exp -1) and R greater than 6 Mpc. The searching procedure is close to those, applied to find superclusters of galaxies (Kalinkov and Kuneva 1985, 1986). A sphere with fixed radius r (asterisk) is described around each galaxy. The mean spatial density in the sphere is m. Let G (sup 1) be any galaxy and G (sup 2) be its nearest neighbor at a distance R sub 2. If R sub 2 exceeds the 95 percent quintile in the distribution of the distances of the second neighbors, then G (sup 1) is an isolated galaxy. Let the midpoint of G (sup 1) and G (sup 2) be O sub 2 and r sub 2=R sub 2/2. For the volume V sub 2, defined with the radius r sub 2, the density D sub 2 less than k mu, the galaxy G (sup 2) is a single one and the procedure for searching for pairs and groups, beginning with this object is over and we have to pass to another object. Here the authors present the groups - isolated and nonisolated - with n greater than 3, found in the CfA survey in the Northern galactic hemisphere. The parameters used are k = 10 and r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc. Table 1 contains: (1) the group number, (2) the galaxy, nearest to the multiplet center, (3) multiplicity n, (4) the brightest galaxy if it is not listed in (2); (5) and (6) are R.A. and Dec. (1950), (7) - mean distance D in Mpc. Further there are the mean density rho (8) of the multiplet (galaxies Mpc (exp -3), (9) the density rho (asterisk) for r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc and (10) the density rho sub g for the group with its nearest neighbor. The parenthesized digits for densities in the last three columns are powers of ten.

  17. Mechanically Biased, Hinged Pairs of Piezoelectric Benders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Frank E.

    2005-01-01

    The upper part of the figure depicts an actuator that comprises two mechanically biased piezoelectric benders hinged together at their ends and equipped with tabs at their mid-length points for attachment to the relatively moving objects that are to be actuated. In the example of the figure, the attachment tabs are labeled to indicate that the actuator is used to drive a pump piston relative to a base plate. Actuators of this type could be used to drive low-power, small-volume pumps in consumer, medical, and aerospace applications, and to generate and measure linear displacements in such robotic applications as teleoperation and tactile feedback. Each bender is a bimorph a unitary plate that comprises an upper and a lower piezoelectric layer plus electrode layers. Benders may also be made of several layers arranged to produce the same effect at the lower operating voltages. As stated above, each bender is mechanically biased; it is fabricated to have a small permanent curvature (the bias curvature) in the absence of applied voltage. As on other bimorphs, the electrical connections on each bender are arranged so that an applied voltage of suitable polarity causes the upper layer to expand and the lower layer to contract. In this case, the net effect of applying the voltage is that the plate becomes more concave as viewed from below. Conversely, an applied voltage of the opposite polarity causes the plate to become less concave as viewed from below. The benders in a hinged pair are oriented with their bias curvatures concave inward, so that there is a bias distance between the attachment tabs. The two benders are connected electrically in parallel, with their connection polarities chosen so that an applied voltage of one polarity causes both benders to become more convex inward (more bent), while an applied voltage of the opposite polarity causes both benders to become less convex inward (less bent). An increase or decrease in bend is accompanied by an increase or

  18. Affective processing requires awareness.

    PubMed

    Lähteenmäki, Mikko; Hyönä, Jukka; Koivisto, Mika; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    Studies using backward masked emotional stimuli suggest that affective processing may occur outside visual awareness and imply primacy of affective over semantic processing, yet these experiments have not strictly controlled for the participants' awareness of the stimuli. Here we directly compared the primacy of affective versus semantic categorization of biologically relevant stimuli in 5 experiments (n = 178) using explicit (semantic and affective discrimination; Experiments 1-3) and implicit (semantic and affective priming; Experiments 4-5) measures. The same stimuli were used in semantic and affective tasks. Visual awareness was manipulated by varying exposure duration of the masked stimuli, and subjective level of stimulus awareness was measured after each trial using a 4-point perceptual awareness scale. When participants reported no awareness of the stimuli, semantic and affective categorization were at chance level and priming scores did not differ from zero. When participants were even partially aware of the stimuli, (a) both semantic and affective categorization could be performed above chance level with equal accuracy, (b) semantic categorization was faster than affective categorization, and (c) both semantic and affective priming were observed. Affective categorization speed was linearly dependent on semantic categorization speed, suggesting dependence of affective processing on semantic recognition. Manipulations of affective and semantic categorization tasks revealed a hierarchy of categorization operations beginning with basic-level semantic categorization and ending with superordinate level affective categorization. We conclude that both implicit and explicit affective and semantic categorization is dependent on visual awareness, and that affective recognition follows semantic categorization.

  19. Nonequilibrium quasiparticles and 2e periodicity in single-Cooper-pair transistors.

    PubMed

    Aumentado, J; Keller, Mark W; Martinis, John M; Devoret, M H

    2004-02-13

    We have fabricated single-Cooper-pair transistors in which the spatial profile of the superconducting gap energy was controlled by oxygen doping. The profile dramatically affects the switching current vs gate voltage curve of the transistor, changing its period from 1e to 2e. A model based on nonequilibrium quasiparticles in the leads explains our results, including the observation that even devices with a clean 2e period are "poisoned" by small numbers of these quasiparticles.

  20. Mating strategies in dominant meerkats: evidence for extra-pair paternity in relation to genetic relatedness between pair mates.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, S; Nielsen, J F; Sharp, S P; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2013-07-01

    Rates of extra-pair paternity (EPP) have frequently been associated with genetic relatedness between social mates in socially monogamous birds. However, evidence is limited in mammals. Here, we investigate whether dominant females use divorce or extra-pair paternity as a strategy to avoid the negative effects of inbreeding when paired with a related male in meerkats Suricata suricatta, a species where inbreeding depression is evident for several traits. We show that dominant breeding pairs seldom divorce, but that rates of EPP are associated with genetic similarity between mates. Although extra-pair males are no more distantly related to the female than social males, they are more heterozygous. Nevertheless, extra-pair pups are not more heterozygous than within-pair pups. Whether females benefit from EPP in terms of increased fitness of the offspring, such as enhanced survival or growth, requires further investigations.

  1. Let's stay together? Intrinsic and extrinsic factors involved in pair bond dissolution in a recolonizing wolf population.

    PubMed

    Milleret, Cyril; Wabakken, Petter; Liberg, Olof; Åkesson, Mikael; Flagstad, Øystein; Andreassen, Harry Peter; Sand, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    For socially monogamous species, breeder bond dissolution has important consequences for population dynamics, but the extent to which extrinsic or intrinsic population factors causes pair dissolution remain poorly understood, especially among carnivores. Using an extensive life-history data set, a survival analysis and competing risks framework, we examined the fate of 153 different wolf (Canis lupus) pairs in the recolonizing Scandinavian wolf population, during 14 winters of snow tracking and DNA monitoring. Wolf pair dissolution was generally linked to a mortality event and was strongly affected by extrinsic (i.e. anthropogenic) causes. No divorce was observed, and among the pair dissolution where causes have been identified, death of one or both wolves was always involved. Median time from pair formation to pair dissolution was three consecutive winters (i.e. approximately 2 years). Pair dissolution was mostly human-related, primarily caused by legal control actions (36·7%), verified poaching (9·2%) and traffic-related causes (2·1%). Intrinsic factors, such as disease and age, accounted for only 7·7% of pair dissolutions. The remaining 44·3% of dissolution events were from unknown causes, but we argue that a large portion could be explained by an additional source of human-caused mortality, cryptic poaching. Extrinsic population factors, such as variables describing the geographical location of the pair, had a stronger effect on risk of pair dissolution compared to anthropogenic landscape characteristics. Population intrinsic factors, such as the inbreeding coefficient of the male pair member, had a negative effect on pair bond duration. The mechanism behind this result remains unknown, but might be explained by lower survival of inbred males or more complex inbreeding effects mediated by behaviour. Our study provides quantitative estimates of breeder bond duration in a social carnivore and highlights the effect of extrinsic (i.e. anthropogenic) and

  2. Efficient Implementation of the Pairing on Mobilephones Using BREW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, Motoi; Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Kiyomoto, Shinsaku; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    Pairing based cryptosystems can accomplish novel security applications such as ID-based cryptosystems, which have not been constructed efficiently without the pairing. The processing speed of the pairing based cryptosystems is relatively slow compared with the other conventional public key cryptosystems. However, several efficient algorithms for computing the pairing have been proposed, namely Duursma-Lee algorithm and its variant ηT pairing. In this paper, we present an efficient implementation of the pairing over some mobilephones. Moreover, we compare the processing speed of the pairing with that of the other standard public key cryptosystems, i. e. RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptosystem. Indeed the processing speed of our implementation in ARM9 processors on BREW achieves under 100 milliseconds using the supersingular curve over F397. In addition, the pairing is more efficient than the other public key cryptosystems, and the pairing can be achieved enough also on BREW mobilephones. It has become efficient enough to implement security applications, such as short signature, ID-based cryptosystems or broadcast encryption, using the pairing on BREW mobilephones.

  3. Stressed pairing in conventional color superconductors is unavoidable

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Schmitt, Andreas

    2006-02-15

    At sufficiently high densities, cold dense three-flavor quark matter is in the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, in which all nine quarks pair in a particularly symmetric fashion. Once the heaviness of the strange quark (mass m{sub s}) and the requirements of electric and color neutrality are taken into account, the CFL pattern of color superconductivity requires the pairing of quarks that would, in the absence of pairing, have Fermi momenta that differ by of order m{sub s}{sup 2}/{mu}, with {mu} the quark number chemical potential. This means that at sufficiently small {mu}, the 'stress' on the pairing is large enough that the system can lower its energy by breaking pairs, resulting in some unconventional color superconductor which includes gapless excitations, spatial inhomogeneity, counter-propagating currents, or all three. In this paper we ask whether there is some less symmetric but still conventional pattern of pairing that can evade the stress. In other words, is there a pattern of pairing in which, once electric and color neutrality are imposed by suitable chemical potentials, pairing only occurs among those quarks whose Fermi momenta would be equal in the absence of pairing? We use graph-theoretical methods to classify 511 patterns of conventional color-superconducting pairing, and show that none of them meet this requirement. All feel a stress, and all can be expected to become unstable to gapless modes at a density comparable to that at which the CFL phase becomes unstable.

  4. Silver(I)-mediated Hoogsteen-type base pairs.

    PubMed

    Megger, Dominik A; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Müller, Jens

    2011-11-01

    Metal-mediated Hoogsteen-type base pairs are useful for the construction of DNA duplexes containing contiguous stretches of metal ions along the helical axis. To fine-tune the stability of such base pairs and the selectivity toward different metal ions, the availability of a selection of artificial nucleobases is highly desirable. In this study, we follow a theoretical approach utilizing dispersion-corrected density functional methods to evaluate a variety of artificial nucleobases as candidates for metal-mediated Hoogsteen-type base pairs. We focus on silver(I)-mediated Hoogsteen- and reverse Hoogsteen-type base pairs formed between 1-deaza- and 1,3-dideazapurine-derived nucleobases, respectively, and cytosine. Apart from two coordinative bonds, these base pairs are stabilized by a hydrogen bond. We elucidate the impact of different substituents at the C6 position and the presence or absence of an endocyclic N3 nitrogen atom on the overall stability of a base pair and concomitantly on the strength of the hydrogen and coordinative bonds. All artificial base pairs investigated in this study are less stable than the experimentally established benchmark base pair C-Ag(+)-G. The base pair formed from 1,3-dideaza-6-methoxypurine is isoenergetic to the experimentally observed C-Ag(+)-C base pair. This makes 1,3-dideaza-6-methoxypurine a promising candidate for the use as an artificial nucleobase in DNA.

  5. DNA base-pair flipping with fluorescent perylenediimide pincers.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Tarek A; Hariharan, Mahesh; Siegmund, Karsten; Lewis, Frederick D

    2010-07-30

    The synthesis, structure, and electronic spectra of a series of DNA hairpins possessing two perylenediimide (PDI) base pair surrogates are reported. The PDI chromophores are located in opposite strands of the hairpin base pair domain opposite abasic sites and are either adjacent to each other or separated by a variable number of AT or GC base pairs. Molecular modeling of the conjugate having adjacent PDI chromophores shows that they adopt a slipped, pi-stacked geometry with an angle of 40 degrees between the PDI long axes. The electronic absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism of this conjugate are consistent with a stacked PDI structure. Conjugates having one or two GC base pairs between the PDI chromophores display spectra that are consistent with isolated PDIs. Conjugates having 1-4 AT base pairs have more complex spectra, suggestive of an equilibrium between base paired and flipped structures having stacked PDIs. Heating of the conjugates possessing isolated PDI chromophores results in base pair flipping. The free energy for PDI stacking is greater than that for a single AT base pair and comparable to that for a single GC base pair or two AT base pairs.

  6. Natural versus artificial creation of base pairs in DNA: origin of nucleobases from the perspectives of unnatural base pair studies.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Yamashige, Rie

    2012-12-18

    Since life began on Earth, the four types of bases (A, G, C, and T(U)) that form two sets of base pairs have remained unchanged as the components of nucleic acids that replicate and transfer genetic information. Throughout evolution, except for the U to T modification, the four base structures have not changed. This constancy within the genetic code raises the question of how these complicated nucleotides were generated from the molecules in a primordial soup on the early Earth. At some prebiotic stage, the complementarity of base pairs might have accelerated the generation and accumulation of nucleotides or oligonucleotides. We have no clues whether one pair of nucleobases initially appeared on the early Earth during this process or a set of two base pairs appeared simultaneously. Recently, researchers have developed new artificial pairs of nucleobases (unnatural base pairs) that function alongside the natural base pairs. Some unnatural base pairs in duplex DNA can be efficiently and faithfully amplified in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using thermostable DNA polymerases. The addition of unnatural base pair systems could expand the genetic alphabet of DNA, thus providing a new mechanism for the generation novel biopolymers by the site-specific incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids and proteins. Furthermore, the process of unnatural base pair development might provide clues to the origin of the natural base pairs in a primordial soup on the early Earth. In this Account, we describe the development of three representative types of unnatural base pairs that function as a third pair of nucleobases in PCR and reconsider the origin of the natural nucleic acids. As researchers developing unnatural base pairs, they use repeated "proof of concept" experiments. As researchers design new base pairs, they improve the structures that function in PCR and eliminate those that do not. We expect that this process is similar to the one functioning in the

  7. Pulsar Pair Cascades in Magnetic Fields with Offset Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron star magnetic fields may have polar caps (PC) that are offset from the dipole axis, through field-line sweepback near the light cylinder or non-symmetric currents within the star. The effects of such offsets on electron-positron pair cascades are investigated, using simple models of dipole magnetic fields with small distortions that shift the PCs by different amounts or directions. Using a Monte Carlo pair cascade simulation, we explore the changes in the pair spectrum, multiplicity and energy flux across the PC, as well as the trends in pair flux and pair energy flux with spin-down luminosity, L(sub sd). We also give an estimate of the distribution of heating flux from returning positrons on the PC for different offsets. We find that even modest offsets can produce significant increases in pair multiplicity, especially for pulsars that are near or beyond the pair death lines for centered PCs, primarily because of higher accelerating fields. Pair spectra cover several decades in energy, with the spectral range of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) two orders of magnitude higher than for normal pulsars, and PC offsets allow significant extension of all spectra to lower pair energies. We find that the total PC pair luminosity L(sub pair) is proportional to L(sub sd), with L(sub pair) approximates 10(exp -3) L(sub sd) for normal pulsars and L(sub pair) approximates 10(exp -2) L(sub sd) for MSPs. Remarkably, the total PC heating luminosity for even large offsets increases by less than a factor of two, even though the PC area increases by much larger factors, because most of the heating occurs near the magnetic axis.

  8. Paired Pulse Voltammetry for differentiating complex analytes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, Inyong; Chang, Su-Youne; Min, Hoon Ki; Arora, Kanika; Marsh, Michale P.; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.

    2012-01-01

    Although fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has contributed to important advances in neuroscience research, the technique is encumbered by significant analytical challenges. Confounding factors such as pH change and transient effects at the microelectrode surface make it difficult to discern the analytes represented by complex voltammograms. Here we introduce paired-pulse voltammetry (PPV), that mitigates the confounding factors and simplifies the analytical task. PPV consists of a selected binary waveform with a specific time gap between each of its two comprising pulses, such that each binary wave is repeated, while holding the electrode at a negative potential between the waves. This allows two simultaneous yet very different voltammograms (primary and secondary) to be obtained, each corresponding to the two pulses in the binary waveform. PPV was evaluated in the flow cell to characterize three different analytes, (dopamine, adenosine, and pH changes). The peak oxidation current decreased by approximately 50%, 80%, and 4% for dopamine, adenosine, and pH, in the secondary voltammogram compared with primary voltammogram, respectively. Thus, the influence of pH changes could be virtually eliminated using the difference between the primary and secondary voltammograms in the PPV technique, which discriminates analytes on the basis of their adsorption characteristics to the carbon fiber electrode. These results demonstrate that PPV can be effectively used for differentiating complex analytes. PMID:22299131

  9. Phenomenology of transionospheric pulse pairs: Further observations

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, R.S.; Holden, D.N.; Shao, X.

    1998-11-01

    We report on further observations of transionospheric pulse pairs (TIPPs), which are the most powerful transient radio signals observed by the Blackbeard broadband digital radio receiver on the ALEXIS satellite. The source of these signals is unknown but appears to be associated with thunderstorm activity. The signals do not resemble those reported for known lightning processes. We have previously reported observations of these events in the frequency band 28{endash}95 MHz. In this paper we report observations of TIPPs in the 117- to 166-MHz band, with the subsatellite point situated over the contiguous United States. The main results are that the measured pulse parameter statistics are nearly the same as reported for the low-frequency events, with the exception that the pulse separation distribution is biased toward smaller values in the high-frequency observations. The radiated power does not drop off appreciably even at 166 MHz, which further constrains the possible size and timescale of the source(s). We also report results of experiments designed to measure the apparent reflectivity of dry, flat ground at frequencies around 100 MHz. We find that the apparent reflectivity can exceed 90{percent}. This result helps to explain how the second pulse in a TIPP can have so much energy relative to the first. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  10. Invisible decays in Higgs boson pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shankha; Batell, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Observation of Higgs pair production is an important long term objective of the LHC physics program as it will shed light on the scalar potential of the Higgs field and the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. While numerous studies have examined the impact of new physics on di-Higgs production, little attention has been given to the well-motivated possibility of exotic Higgs decays in this channel. Here we investigate the consequences of exotic invisible Higgs decays in di-Higgs production. We outline a search sensitive to such invisible decays in the b b ¯+ ET channel. We demonstrate that probing invisible branching ratios of order 10% during the LHC's high-luminosity run will be challenging, but in resonance enhanced di-Higgs production, this final state can become crucial to establish the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model at collider energies. We also briefly discuss the outlook for other exotic Higgs decay modes and the potential to observe such exotic decays in the di-Higgs channel.

  11. Fast evolving pair-instability supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; ...

    2016-10-06

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the ques- tion of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova commu- nity. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the su- pernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In themore » cur- rent study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolu- tion with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydro- gen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.« less

  12. Fast evolving pair-instability supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Frohlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan Thomas; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley Paul; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-06

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the ques- tion of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova commu- nity. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the su- pernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the cur- rent study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolu- tion with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydro- gen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  13. Polarization of drifting pairs at decameter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.

    2006-08-01

    The results of polarization researches of drifting pairs (DP) observed during Type III bursts storm in July[S:,:S][Author ID2: at Fri Jul 14 10:33:00 2006 ] 11-21, 2002 with radio telescope URAN-2 are presented. The array of the radio telescope consists of 512 broadband cross dipoles, that enables to receive signals of two polarizations, has the area about of 28000 m^2 and works in 9-30 MHz range. Circular polarization measurements were made at frequency 24.75 MHz in frequency band 10 μHz with time resolution 10 ms. Some hundreds bursts, both forward and reverse DPs, which have been registered with radio telescope UTR-2 in the frequency range 18-32 μHz, were analyzed. For the first time we find that DP polarizations strongly depend on the location of the active area associated with these bursts. When an active area is near to the central meridian, polarizations of both DP components have the same signs and their values are up to 30%. In other days in most cases polarizations of both components have opposite signs and only for some bursts polarization reaches 10%. In all cases both DP components have comparable polarization degrees.

  14. Phenomenology of transionospheric pulse pairs: Further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Robert S.; Holden, Daniel N.; Shao, Xuan-Min

    1998-11-01

    We report on further observations of transionospheric pulse pairs (TIPPs), which are the most powerful transient radio signals observed by the Blackbeard broadband digital radio receiver on the ALEXIS satellite. The source of these signals is unknown but appears to be associated with thunderstorm activity. The signals do not resemble those reported for known lightning processes. We have previously reported observations of these events in the frequency band 28-95 MHz. In this paper we report observations of TIPPs in the 117- to 166-MHz band, with the subsatellite point situated over the contiguous United States. The main results are that the measured pulse parameter statistics are nearly the same as reported for the low-frequency events, with the exception that the pulse separation distribution is biased toward smaller values in the high-frequency observations. The radiated power does not drop off appreciably even at 166 MHz, which further constrains the possible size and timescale of the source(s). We also report results of experiments designed to measure the apparent reflectivity of dry, flat ground at frequencies around 100 MHz. We find that the apparent reflectivity can exceed 90%. This result helps to explain how the second pulse in a TIPP can have so much energy relative to the first.

  15. Pauli graphs, Riemann hypothesis, and Goldbach pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, M.; Anselmi, F.; Solé, P.

    2012-06-01

    We consider the Pauli group Pq generated by unitary quantum generators X (shift) and Z (clock) acting on vectors of the q-dimensional Hilbert space. It has been found that the number of maximal mutually commuting sets within Pq is controlled by the Dedekind psi function ψ(q) and that there exists a specific inequality involving the Euler constant γ ˜ 0.577 that is only satisfied at specific low dimensions q ∈ A = { 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 18, 30}. The set A is closely related to the set A∪{ 1, 24} of integers that are totally Goldbach, i.e., that consist of all primes p < n - 1 with p not dividing n and such that n-p is prime. In the extreme high-dimensional case, at primorial numbers Nr, the Hardy-Littlewood function R(q) is introduced for estimating the number of Goldbach pairs, and a new inequality (Theorem 4) is established for the equivalence to the Riemann hypothesis in terms of R(Nr). We discuss these number-theoretical properties in the context of the qudit commutation structure.

  16. Nonlinear backbone torsional pair correlations in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2016-10-01

    Protein allostery requires dynamical structural correlations. Physical origin of which, however, remain elusive despite intensive studies during last two and half decades. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories for ten proteins with different sizes and folds, we found that nonlinear backbone torsional pair (BTP) correlations, which are mainly spatially long-ranged and are dominantly executed by loop residues, exist extensively in most analyzed proteins. Examination of torsional motion for correlated BTPs suggested that such nonlinear correlations are mainly associated aharmonic torsional state transitions and in some cases strongly anisotropic local torsional motion of participating torsions, and occur on widely different and relatively longer time scales. In contrast, correlations between backbone torsions in stable α helices and β strands are mainly linear and spatially short-ranged, and are more likely to associate with harmonic local torsional motion. Further analysis revealed that the direct cause of nonlinear contributions are heterogeneous linear correlations. These findings implicate a general search strategy for novel allosteric modulation sites of protein activities.

  17. Nonlinear backbone torsional pair correlations in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Protein allostery requires dynamical structural correlations. Physical origin of which, however, remain elusive despite intensive studies during last two and half decades. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories for ten proteins with different sizes and folds, we found that nonlinear backbone torsional pair (BTP) correlations, which are mainly spatially long-ranged and are dominantly executed by loop residues, exist extensively in most analyzed proteins. Examination of torsional motion for correlated BTPs suggested that such nonlinear correlations are mainly associated aharmonic torsional state transitions and in some cases strongly anisotropic local torsional motion of participating torsions, and occur on widely different and relatively longer time scales. In contrast, correlations between backbone torsions in stable α helices and β strands are mainly linear and spatially short-ranged, and are more likely to associate with harmonic local torsional motion. Further analysis revealed that the direct cause of nonlinear contributions are heterogeneous linear correlations. These findings implicate a general search strategy for novel allosteric modulation sites of protein activities. PMID:27708342

  18. Changing US Attributes After CS-US Pairings Changes CS-Attribute-Assessments: Evidence for CS-US Associations in Attribute Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Förderer, Sabine; Unkelbach, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Attribute Conditioning (AC) refers to people's changed assessments of stimuli's (CSs) attributes due to repeated pairing with stimuli (USs) possessing these attributes; for example, when an athletic person (US) is paired with a neutral person (CS), the neutral person is judged to be more athletic after the pairing. We hypothesize that this AC effect is due to CSs' associations with USs rather than direct associations with attributes. Three experiments test this hypothesis by changing US attributes after CS-US pairings. Experiments 1 and 2 conditioned athleticism by pairing neutral men (CSs) with athletic and non-athletic USs. Post-conditioning, USs' athleticism was reversed, which systematically influenced participants' assessment of CS athleticism. Experiment 3 conditioned athleticism and changed USs' musicality after CS-US pairings. This post-conditioning change affected musicality assessments of CSs but did not influence athleticism-assessments. The results indicate that AC effects are based on an associative CS-US-attribute structure.

  19. ICF syndrome with variable expression in sibs.

    PubMed Central

    Gimelli, G; Varone, P; Pezzolo, A; Lerone, M; Pistoia, V

    1993-01-01

    We describe a new familial case of ICF syndrome (immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, facial anomalies) in a woman of 29 years and in her brother of 30 years. The proband showed mental retardation, facial anomalies, recurrent respiratory infections, combined deficit of IgM and IgE immunoglobulin classes, and paracentromeric heterochromatin instability of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. The brother had minor signs of the syndrome and had an apparently normal phenotype. Their parents were healthy and non-consanguineous. Chromosome anomalies consisted of homologous and non-homologous associations, chromatid and isochromatid breaks, deletions of whole arms, interchanges in the paracentromeric region, and multibranched configurations of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. CD bands and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with alphoid DNA sequence probes specific for the centromeres of chromosomes 1 and 16 showed that the centromere was not directly implicated in the formation of multibranched configurations. These cases indicate the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and the variable expressivity of the ICF syndrome. Images PMID:8320711

  20. The apolipoprotein epsilon4 allele confers additional risk in children with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Albert; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Rodenburg, Jessica; Defesche, Joep C; de Jongh, Saskia; Bakker, Henk D; Kastelein, John J P

    2003-06-01

    Children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) exhibit substantial variance of LDL cholesterol. In previous studies, family members of children with FH were included, which may have influenced results. To avoid such bias, we studied phenotype in 450 unrelated children with FH and in 154 affected sib-pairs. In known families with classical FH, diagnosis was based on plasma LDL cholesterol above the age- and gender-specific 95th percentile. Girls had 0.47 +/- 0.15 mmol/L higher LDL cholesterol, compared with boys (p = 0.002). Also in girls, HDL cholesterol increased by 0.07 +/- 0.03 mmol/L per 5 y (pfor trend = 0.005); this age effect was not observed in boys. The distribution of apolipoprotein (apo) E genotypes was not significantly different between probands, their paired affected siblings, or a Dutch control population. Carriers with or without one epsilon4 allele had similar LDL and HDL cholesterol levels. Within the affected sib-pairs, the epsilon4 allele explained 72.4% of the variance of HDL cholesterol levels (-0.15 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval -0.24 to -0.05, p = 0.003). The effect of apoE4 on HDL cholesterol differed with an analysis based on probands or on affected sib-pairs. The affected sib-pair model used adjustment for shared environment, type of LDL receptor gene mutation, and a proportion of additional genetic factors and may, therefore, be more accurate in estimating effects of risk factors on complex traits. We conclude that the epsilon4 allele was associated with lower HDL cholesterol levels in an affected sib-pair analysis, which strongly suggests that apoE4 influences HDL cholesterol levels in FH children. Moreover, the strong association suggests that apoE4 carries an additional disadvantage for FH children.