Science.gov

Sample records for affecting local support

  1. Socioeconomic factors affecting local support for black bear recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Morzillo, Anita T; Mertig, Angela G; Hollister, Jeffrey W; Garner, Nathan; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-06-01

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species' historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery strategies prior to public release of a black bear conservation and management plan for eastern Texas, United States. Data were collected from 1,006 residents living in proximity to potential recovery locations, particularly Big Thicket National Preserve. In addition to traditional logistic regression analysis, we used conditional probability analysis to statistically and visually evaluate probabilities of public support for potential black bear recovery strategies based on socioeconomic characteristics. Allowing black bears to repopulate the region on their own (i.e., without active reintroduction) was the recovery strategy with the greatest probability of acceptance. Recovery strategy acceptance was influenced by many socioeconomic factors. Older and long-time local residents were most likely to want to exclude black bears from the area. Concern about the problems that black bears may cause was the only variable significantly related to support or non-support across all strategies. Lack of personal knowledge about black bears was the most frequent reason for uncertainty about preferred strategy. In order to reduce local uncertainty about possible recovery strategies, we suggest that wildlife managers focus outreach efforts on providing local residents with general information about black bears, as well as information pertinent to minimizing the potential for human-black bear conflict.

  2. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Local Support for Black Bear Recovery Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzillo, Anita T.; Mertig, Angela G.; Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Garner, Nathan; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-06-01

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species’ historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery strategies prior to public release of a black bear conservation and management plan for eastern Texas, United States. Data were collected from 1,006 residents living in proximity to potential recovery locations, particularly Big Thicket National Preserve. In addition to traditional logistic regression analysis, we used conditional probability analysis to statistically and visually evaluate probabilities of public support for potential black bear recovery strategies based on socioeconomic characteristics. Allowing black bears to repopulate the region on their own (i.e., without active reintroduction) was the recovery strategy with the greatest probability of acceptance. Recovery strategy acceptance was influenced by many socioeconomic factors. Older and long-time local residents were most likely to want to exclude black bears from the area. Concern about the problems that black bears may cause was the only variable significantly related to support or non-support across all strategies. Lack of personal knowledge about black bears was the most frequent reason for uncertainty about preferred strategy. In order to reduce local uncertainty about possible recovery strategies, we suggest that wildlife managers focus outreach efforts on providing local residents with general information about black bears, as well as information pertinent to minimizing the potential for human-black bear conflict.

  3. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Local Support for Black Bear Recovery Strategies(AED)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species’ historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery s...

  4. Missense mutations in Otopetrin 1 affect subcellular localization and inhibition of purinergic signaling in vestibular supporting cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euysoo; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Speck, Judith; Salles, Felipe T; Lundberg, Yunxia W; Goldberg, Mark P; Kachar, Bechara; Warchol, Mark E; Ornitz, David M

    2011-03-01

    Otopetrin 1 (Otop1) encodes a protein that is essential for the development of otoconia. Otoconia are the extracellular calcium carbonate containing crystals that are important for vestibular mechanosensory transduction of linear motion and gravity. There are two mutant alleles of Otop1 in mice, titled (tlt) and mergulhador (mlh), which result in non-syndromic otoconia agenesis and a consequent balance defect. Biochemically, Otop1 has been shown to modulate purinergic control of intracellular calcium in vestibular supporting cells, which could be one of the mechanisms by which Otop1 participates in the mineralization of otoconia. To understand how tlt and mlh mutations affect the biochemical function of Otop1, we examined the purinergic response of COS7 cells expressing mutant Otop1 proteins, and dissociated sensory epithelial cells from tlt and mlh mice. We also examined the subcellular localization of Otop1 in whole sensory epithelia from tlt and mlh mice. Here we show that tlt and mlh mutations uncouple Otop1 from inhibition of P2Y receptor function. Although the in vitro biochemical function of the Otop1 mutant proteins is normal, in vivo they behave as null alleles. We show that in supporting cells the apical membrane localization of the mutant Otop1 proteins is lost. These data suggest that the tlt and mlh mutations primarily affect the localization of Otop1, which interferes with its ability to interact with other proteins that are important for its cellular and biochemical function.

  5. Variation at Local Government Level in the Support for Families of Severely Disabled Children and the Factors that Affect It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Rob; McNally, Richard; James, Peter; Crossland, Kevin; Woolley, Mark; Colver, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine geographical variability in the support for families caring for children with severe disabilities as well as the relationships between this variability and local government social and educational performance indicators. Method: Data were collected from a cross-sectional, self-completed postal survey of the…

  6. [Emotional intelligence, social support and affect regulation].

    PubMed

    Verissimo, Ramiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to gain additional information about the relationship between emotional intelligence, social support, and affectivity. The subjects were 64 university students who completed the short form of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS-30), the Social Support Questionnaire, and the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (MAACL). The results show that Social Support is high and significantly related with both Mood Repair, on one hand, and more Positive Affects and Sensation Seeking, on the other. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that social support can be considered, somehow, as a way of mood repair; and thus not surprisingly is also associated with more Positive Affects and Sensation Seeking.

  7. Exposure to inequality affects support for redistribution.

    PubMed

    Sands, Melissa L

    2017-01-24

    The distribution of wealth in the United States and countries around the world is highly skewed. How does visible economic inequality affect well-off individuals' support for redistribution? Using a placebo-controlled field experiment, I randomize the presence of poverty-stricken people in public spaces frequented by the affluent. Passersby were asked to sign a petition calling for greater redistribution through a "millionaire's tax." Results from 2,591 solicitations show that in a real-world-setting exposure to inequality decreases affluent individuals' willingness to redistribute. The finding that exposure to inequality begets inequality has fundamental implications for policymakers and informs our understanding of the effects of poverty, inequality, and economic segregation. Confederate race and socioeconomic status, both of which were randomized, are shown to interact such that treatment effects vary according to the race, as well as gender, of the subject.

  8. Local support against gravity in magnetoturbulent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Collins, D. C.; Kritsuk, A. G.

    2013-06-01

    Comparisons of the integrated thermal pressure support of gas against its gravitational potential energy lead to critical mass scales for gravitational instability such as the Jeans and the Bonnor-Ebert masses, which play an important role in the analysis of many physical systems, including the heuristics of numerical simulations. In a strict theoretical sense, however, neither the Jeans nor the Bonnor-Ebert mass is meaningful when applied locally to substructure in a self-gravitating turbulent medium. For this reason, we investigate the local support by thermal pressure, turbulence and magnetic fields against gravitational compression through an approach that is independent of these concepts. At the centre of our approach is the dynamical equation for the divergence of the velocity field. We carry out a statistical analysis of the source terms of the local compression rate (the negative time derivative of the divergence) for simulations of forced self-gravitating turbulence in periodic boxes with zero, weak and moderately strong mean magnetic fields (measured by the averages of the magnetic and thermal pressures). We also consider the amplification of the magnetic field energy by shear and by compression. Thereby, we are able to demonstrate that the support against gravity is dominated by thermal pressure fluctuations, although magnetic pressure also yields a significant contribution. The net effect of turbulence in the highly supersonic regime, however, is to enhance compression rather than supporting overdense gas even if the vorticity is very high. This is incommensurate with the support of the highly dynamical substructures in magnetoturbulent fluids being determined by local virial equilibria of volume energies without surface stresses.

  9. 47 CFR 54.301 - Local switching support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICE Universal Service Support for High Cost Areas § 54.301 Local switching support. (a) Calculation of... area with 50,000 or fewer access lines shall receive support for local switching costs using the... area's 1996 unweighted interstate DEM factor to derive a new local switching support factor. If...

  10. Using Local History and Genealogy to Build Library Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelms, Willie

    1979-01-01

    Proposes a method of building local library support through the addition of genealogy and local history collections. Suggestions concerning types of information, media, collection development, and implementation are included. (JVP)

  11. Measures with locally finite support and spectrum.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The goal of this paper is the construction of measures μ on R(n)enjoying three conflicting but fortunately compatible properties: (i) μ is a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, (ii) the Fourier transform μ f μ is also a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, and (iii) μ is not a generalized Dirac comb. We give surprisingly simple examples of such measures. These unexpected patterns strongly differ from quasicrystals, they provide us with unusual Poisson's formulas, and they might give us an unconventional insight into aperiodic order.

  12. Measures with locally finite support and spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the construction of measures μ on Rn enjoying three conflicting but fortunately compatible properties: (i) μ is a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, (ii) the Fourier transform μ^ of μ is also a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, and (iii) μ is not a generalized Dirac comb. We give surprisingly simple examples of such measures. These unexpected patterns strongly differ from quasicrystals, they provide us with unusual Poisson's formulas, and they might give us an unconventional insight into aperiodic order. PMID:26929358

  13. Relationships among perceived career support, affective commitment, and work engagement.

    PubMed

    Poon, June M L

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to test the predictive effects of perceived career support and affective commitment on work engagement. It was hypothesized that perceived career support would relate positively to work engagement and this relationship would be transmitted through affective commitment. Survey data were collected from 115 full-time employees enrolled as part-time graduate students in a large public university in Malaysia. Multiple regression analysis yielded results indicating that the relationship between perceived career support and work engagement was mediated by affective commitment. This finding suggests that employers can promote employee work engagement by ensuring employees perceive their organization to be supportive of their career and increasing employees' level of affective commitment.

  14. Positive affect, negative affect, stress, and social support as mediators of the forgiveness-health relationship.

    PubMed

    Green, Michelle; Decourville, Nancy; Sadava, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to test a model in which positive affect, negative affect, perceived stress, and social support were hypothesized to mediate the relationship between forgiveness and mental and physical health. Six hundred and twenty-three undergraduates completed a battery of self-report measures. Results of the analyses indicated that the forgiveness-health relation was mediated by positive affect, negative affect, stress, and the interrelationship between negative affect and stress. There was limited support for social support and the interrelationship between positive affect and social support as mediators. The results suggested that the relationship between forgiveness and health is mediated rather than direct. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  15. Community Colleges: Federal Resources Supporting Local Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This publication summarizes the role community and technical colleges play in educating Americans. It also features a list of federal initiatives that support these valuable institutions and the growing number of students they serve in preparing America's future. Sections include: (1) Community Colleges: Economic Engines; (2) Who are Community…

  16. Community Support of Ethanol Plants: Does Local Ownership Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Carmen; Prokos, Anastasia; Liu, Hexuan

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on data from six communities in Kansas and Iowa, we explore the factors that are related to community members' current levels of overall support for local ethanol plants. What are residents' opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of local ownership of ethanol plants? How does that awareness lead to overall support of plants? Our…

  17. Using Student Support Systems to Increase Cognitive and Affective Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soled, Suzanne Wegener; Bosma, Jennifer F.

    1992-01-01

    Student support systems (small groups of students who meet to learn), help combat the problem of large student-to-teacher ratios and increase cognitive and affective outcomes. Small groups allow large amounts of participation and interaction, rapid error correction, individualized practice, and self-paced work that actively involves students in…

  18. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Zachary H.; Beasley, James C.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  19. ADP1 Affects Plant Architecture by Regulating Local Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  20. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  1. Strengthening families to support children affected by HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Linda M.; Sherr, Lorraine; Adato, Michèle; Belsey, Mark; Chandan, Upjeet; Desmond, Chris; Drimie, Scott; Haour-Knipe, Mary; Hosegood, Victoria; Kimou, Jose; Madhavan, Sangeetha; Mathambo, Vuyiswa; Wakhweya, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the arguments for the central role of families, defined very broadly, and we emphasise the importance of efforts to strengthen families to support children affected by HIV and AIDS. We draw on work conducted in the Joint Learning Initiative on Children and AIDS's Learning Group 1: Strengthening Families, as well as published data and empirical literature to provide the rationale for family strengthening. We close with the following recommendations for strengthening families to ameliorate the effects of HIV and AIDS on children. Firstly, a developmental approach to poverty is an essential feature of responses to protect children affected by HIV and AIDS, necessary to safeguard their human capital. For this reason, access to essential services, such as health and education, as well as basic income security, must be at the heart of national strategic approaches. Secondly, we need to ensure that support garnered for children is directed to families. Unless we adopt a family oriented approach, we will not be in a position to interrupt the cycle of infection, provide treatment to all who need it and enable affected individuals to be cared for by those who love and feel responsible for them. Thirdly, income transfers, in a variety of forms, are desperately needed and positively indicated by available research. Basic economic security will relieve the worst distress experienced by families and enable them to continue to invest in the health care and education of their children. Lastly, interventions are needed to support distressed families and prevent knock-on negative outcomes through programmes such as home visiting, and protection and enhancement of children's potential through early child development efforts. PMID:22380973

  2. A Novel Support Vector Machine with Globality-Locality Preserving

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng-Long; Yuan, Yu-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Support vector machine (SVM) is regarded as a powerful method for pattern classification. However, the solution of the primal optimal model of SVM is susceptible for class distribution and may result in a nonrobust solution. In order to overcome this shortcoming, an improved model, support vector machine with globality-locality preserving (GLPSVM), is proposed. It introduces globality-locality preserving into the standard SVM, which can preserve the manifold structure of the data space. We complete rich experiments on the UCI machine learning data sets. The results validate the effectiveness of the proposed model, especially on the Wine and Iris databases; the recognition rate is above 97% and outperforms all the algorithms that were developed from SVM. PMID:25045750

  3. Localization Corrections for Mobile Laser Scanner Using Local Support-Based Outlier Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtola, V. V.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Rönnholm, P.; Nüchter, A.

    2016-06-01

    Following the pioneering work introduced in [Lehtola et al., ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens. 99, 2015, pp. 25-29], we extend the state-of-the-art intrinsic localization solution for a single two-dimensional (2D) laser scanner from one into (quasi) three dimensions (3D). By intrinsic localization, we mean that no external sensors are used to localize the scanner, such as inertial measurement devices (IMU) or global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Specifically, the proposed method builds on a novel concept of local support-based filtering of outliers, which enables the use of six degrees-of-freedom (DoF) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) for the purpose of enacting appropriate trajectory corrections into the previous one-dimensional solution. Moreover, the local support-based filtering concept is platform independent, and is therefore likely to be widely generalizable. The here presented overall method is yet limited into quasi-3D by its inability to recover trajectories with steep curvature, but in the future, it may be further extended into full 3D.

  4. Sun/shade conditions affect recruitment and local adaptation of a columnar cactus in dry forests

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Jácome, Antonio; Montaña, Carlos; Fornoni, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Facilitation among plants in water-limited environments (i.e. where evapotranspiration overcomes the availability of water during the growing season) has been considered a local adaptation to water and light conditions. Among cacti, early life-history stages can benefit from the facilitative effects of nurse plants that reduce solar radiation and water stress. However, whether light condition itself acts as an agent of selection through facilitation remains untested. The aim of this study was to determine (1) whether light conditions affect seedling recruitment, (2) whether the positive effect of shade on seedling recruitment is more intense under more stressful conditions and (3) whether shade condition (facilitation) reduces the magnitude of local adaptation on seedling recruitment relative to full sunlight conditions. Methods A reciprocal transplant experiment, coupled with the artificial manipulation of sun/shade conditions, was performed to test for the effects of local adaptation on germination, seedling survival and growth, using two demes of the columnar cactus Pilosocereus leucocephalus, representing different intensities of stressful conditions. Key Results Full sunlight conditions reduced recruitment success and supported the expectation of lower recruitment in more stressful environments. Significant local adaptation was mainly detected under full sunlight conditions, indicating that this environmental factor acts as an agent of selection at both sites. Conclusions The results supported the expectation that the magnitude of local adaptation, driven by the effects of facilitative nurse plants, is less intense under reduced stressful conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that sun/shade conditions act as a selective agent accounting for local adaptation in water-limited environments, and that facilitation provided by nurse plants in these environments can attenuate the patterns of local adaptation among plants benefiting

  5. National ecosystem assessments supported by scientific and local knowledge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, J.E.; Lessard, V.C.; Spaeth, K.E.; Shaver, P.L.; Dayton, R.S.; Pyke, D.A.; Jolley, L.; Goebel, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the extent of land degradation and recovery is necessary to guide land-use policy and management, yet currently available land-quality assessments are widely known to be inadequate. Here, we present the results of the first statistically based application of a new approach to national assessments that integrates scientific and local knowledge. Qualitative observations completed at over 10 000 plots in the United States showed that while soil degradation remains an issue, loss of biotic integrity is more widespread. Quantitative soil and vegetation data collected at the same locations support the assessments and serve as a baseline for monitoring the effectiveness of policy and management initiatives, including responses to climate change. These results provide the information necessary to support strategic decisions by land managers and policy makers. ?? The Ecological Society of America.

  6. National ecosystem assessments supported by scientific and local knowledge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Lessard, Veronica C.; Spaeth, Kenneth E.; Shaver, Patrick L.; Dayton, Robert S.; Pyke, David A.; Jolley, Leonard; Goebel, J. Jeffery

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the extent of land degradation and recovery is necessary to guide land-use policy and management, yet currently available land-quality assessments are widely known to be inadequate. Here, we present the results of the first statistically based application of a new approach to national assessments that integrates scientific and local knowledge. Qualitative observations completed at over 10 000 plots in the United States showed that while soil degradation remains an issue, loss of biotic integrity is more widespread. Quantitative soil and vegetation data collected at the same locations support the assessments and serve as a baseline for monitoring the effectiveness of policy and management initiatives, including responses to climate change. These results provide the information necessary to support strategic decisions by land managers and policy makers.

  7. Understanding the Local Socio-political Processes Affecting Conservation Management Outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M.; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  8. Understanding the local socio-political processes affecting conservation management outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  9. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E.; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  10. Discrete localized modes supported by an inhomogeneous defocusing nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorić, Goran; Maluckov, Aleksandra; Hadžievski, Ljupčo; Malomed, Boris A.

    2013-09-01

    We report that infinite and semi-infinite lattices with spatially inhomogeneous self-defocusing (SDF) onsite nonlinearity, whose strength increases rapidly enough toward the lattice periphery, support stable unstaggered (UnST) discrete bright solitons, which do not exist in lattices with the spatially uniform SDF nonlinearity. The UnST solitons coexist with stable staggered (ST) localized modes, which are always possible under the defocusing onsite nonlinearity. The results are obtained in a numerical form and also by means of variational approximation (VA). In the semi-infinite (truncated) system, some solutions for the UnST surface solitons are produced in an exact form. On the contrary to surface discrete solitons in uniform truncated lattices, the threshold value of the norm vanishes for the UnST solitons in the present system. Stability regions for the novel UnST solitons are identified. The same results imply the existence of ST discrete solitons in lattices with the spatially growing self-focusing nonlinearity, where such solitons cannot exist either if the nonlinearity is homogeneous. In addition, a lattice with the uniform onsite SDF nonlinearity and exponentially decaying intersite coupling is introduced and briefly considered. Via a similar mechanism, it may also support UnST discrete solitons. The results may be realized in arrayed optical waveguides and collisionally inhomogeneous Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in deep optical lattices. A generalization for a two-dimensional system is briefly considered.

  11. Local bacteria affect the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lehouritis, Panos; Cummins, Joanne; Stanton, Michael; Murphy, Carola T.; McCarthy, Florence O.; Reid, Gregor; Urbaniak, Camilla; Byrne, William L.; Tangney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the potential effects of bacteria on the efficacy of frequently used chemotherapies was examined. Bacteria and cancer cell lines were examined in vitro and in vivo for changes in the efficacy of cancer cell killing mediated by chemotherapeutic agents. Of 30 drugs examined in vitro, the efficacy of 10 was found to be significantly inhibited by certain bacteria, while the same bacteria improved the efficacy of six others. HPLC and mass spectrometry analyses of sample drugs (gemcitabine, fludarabine, cladribine, CB1954) demonstrated modification of drug chemical structure. The chemoresistance or increased cytotoxicity observed in vitro with sample drugs (gemcitabine and CB1954) was replicated in in vivo murine subcutaneous tumour models. These findings suggest that bacterial presence in the body due to systemic or local infection may influence tumour responses or off-target toxicity during chemotherapy. PMID:26416623

  12. Trapped energetic ion dynamics affected by localized electric field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Trapped energetic ion orbits in helical systems are numerically simulated using the Lorentz model. Simulation results of precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions are benchmarked by those of analytic solutions. The effects of the electric field perturbation localized at the rational surface on trapped energetic ions are examined, where the perturbation has an arbitrary rotation frequency and an amplitude fixed in time. It is found that the trapped energetic ions resonantly interact with the perturbation, when the rotation frequency of the perturbation is comparable to the precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The simulation results are suggestive to a mechanism of the energetic-ion-induced interchange mode, which might be associated with the fishbone mode observed in helical systems.

  13. Neural systems supporting the control of affective and cognitive conflicts.

    PubMed

    Ochsner, Kevin N; Hughes, Brent; Robertson, Elaine R; Cooper, Jeffrey C; Gabrieli, John D E

    2009-09-01

    Although many studies have examined the neural bases of controlling cognitive responses, the neural systems for controlling conflicts between competing affective responses remain unclear. To address the neural correlates of affective conflict and their relationship to cognitive conflict, the present study collected whole-brain fMRI data during two versions of the Eriksen flanker task. For these tasks, participants indicated either the valence (affective task) or the semantic category (cognitive task) of a central target word while ignoring flanking words that mapped onto either the same (congruent) or a different (incongruent) response as the target. Overall, contrasts of incongruent > congruent trials showed that bilateral dorsal ACC, posterior medial frontal cortex, and dorsolateral pFC were active during both kinds of conflict, whereas rostral medial pFC and left ventrolateral pFC were differentially active during affective or cognitive conflict, respectively. Individual difference analyses showed that separate regions of rostral cingulate/ventromedial pFC and left ventrolateral pFC were positively correlated with the magnitude of response time interference. Taken together, the findings that controlling affective and cognitive conflicts depends upon both common and distinct systems have important implications for understanding the organization of control systems in general and their potential dysfunction in clinical disorders.

  14. Respecting and Supporting Students' Affective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Too often educators pay too little attention to the psychological and emotional impact subject matter has on students. Teaching effectiveness would be greatly enhanced if educators would consider students' affective reactions to material delivered in courses, workshops, and other collegiate learning experiences.

  15. Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Katzenberger, Marco; Duarte, Helder; Quintela, María; Tejedo, Miguel; Laurila, Anssi

    2015-08-01

    Although temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well-understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve and critical thermal maximum [CTmax]) and life-history (thermal developmental reaction norms) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the evolution of thermal adaptation. First, we found support for the faster-slower model, indicating an adaptive response to compensate for the thermodynamic constraint of low temperatures in colder environments. Second, we found evidence for the generalist-specialist trade-off with populations from colder and less thermally variable environments exhibiting a specialist phenotype performing at higher rates but over a narrower range of temperatures. By contrast, the local optimal temperature for locomotor performance and CTmax did not match either mean or maximum pond temperatures. These results highlight the complexity of the adaptive multiple-trait thermal responses in natural populations, and the role of local thermal variation as a selective force driving diversity in life-history and physiological traits in the presence of gene flow.

  16. LaRC local area networks to support distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Local Area Network (LAN) effort is discussed. LaRC initiated the development of a LAN to support a growing distributed computing environment at the Center. The purpose of the network is to provide an improved capability (over inteactive and RJE terminal access) for sharing multivendor computer resources. Specifically, the network will provide a data highway for the transfer of files between mainframe computers, minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers. An important influence on the overall network design was the vital need of LaRC researchers to efficiently utilize the large CDC mainframe computers in the central scientific computing facility. Although there was a steady migration from a centralized to a distributed computing environment at LaRC in recent years, the work load on the central resources increased. Major emphasis in the network design was on communication with the central resources within the distributed environment. The network to be implemented will allow researchers to utilize the central resources, distributed minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers to obtain the proper level of computing power to efficiently perform their jobs.

  17. Measuring natural pest suppression at different spatial scales affects the importance of local variables.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A B; Gratton, C

    2012-10-01

    The role biodiversity plays in the provision of ecosystem services is widely recognized, yet few ecological studies have identified characteristics of natural systems that support and maintain ecosystem services. The purpose of this study was to identify landscape variables correlated with natural pest suppression carried out by arthropod natural enemies, predators and parasitoids. We conducted two field experiments, one observational and one experimental, where landscape variables at broad and local scales were measured and related to natural pest suppression. The first experiment measured natural pest suppression at 16 sites across an urban to rural landscape gradient in south central Wisconsin. We found natural enemy diversity positively affected natural pest suppression, whereas flower diversity negatively affected pest suppression. No relationship was found between natural pest suppression and broad scale variables, which measured the percentage of different land cover classes in the surrounding landscape. In the second experiment, we established small (2- by 3-m) replicated plots that experimentally varied flower diversity (0, 1, or 7 species) within a plot. We found no significant relationship between natural pest suppression and the different levels of flower diversity. The fact that we only found differences in natural pest suppression in our first experiment, which measured natural pest suppression at sites separated by larger distances than our second experiment, suggests the more appropriate scale for measuring ecosystem services performed by mobile organisms like insects, is across broad spatial scales where variation in natural enemies communities and the factors that affect them become more apparent.

  18. Physical symptoms, perceived social support, and affect in adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Kimberly M; Zelikovsky, Nataliya; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment for cancer among adolescents is often more intense and lasts longer than treatment for older or younger patients. It typically causes pain, fatigue, and nausea and affects social and emotional well-being. This study examined the relationships among demographics, physical symptoms, perceived social support from friends and family, and affect (positive and negative) in 102 adolescents (age 13-19) with cancer using correlational analyses. Additionally, perceived social support was explored as a mediator and moderator of the relationship between physical symptoms and affect using regression. Females reported significantly lower friend support and higher negative affect compared to males. Minority participants were more likely to endorse physical symptoms and less negative affect compared to White respondents. Higher report of physical symptoms was significantly related to greater negative affect, whereas higher perceived social support from friends was related to higher positive affect. Adolescents consistently reported high levels of social support from family and friends. Additionally, adolescents tended to report average levels of positive affect and low levels of negative affect compared to healthy populations. No significant mediation or moderation effects were found. This research highlights that females and minorities, and those with greater physical symptoms, may be more vulnerable to poor adjustment to cancer during adolescence. However, overall this study lends support to the notion that adolescents with cancer are an especially resilient population, as these patients endorsed generally high levels of social support and positive affect, with low levels of negative affect.

  19. Phenosafranin inhibits nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 without affecting its transamidase activity.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yutaka; Toguchi, Mariko; Shrestha, Rajan; Kojima, Soichi

    2017-03-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) localizes to the nucleus and induces apoptosis through a crosslinking inactivation of Sp1 in JHH-7 cells treated with acyclic retinoid. We screened an inhibitor suppressing transamidase activity in the nucleus without affecting transamidase activity itself. Phenosafranin was found to inhibit nuclear localization of EGFP-tagged TG2 and dose-dependently reduce nuclear transamidase activity without affecting the activity in a tube. We concluded that phenosafranin was a novel TG2 inhibitor capable of suppressing its nuclear localization.

  20. 47 CFR 54.301 - Local switching support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (Account 6510); Network Operations Expenses (Account 6530); Marketing Expense (Account 6610); Services... Accounts 2005, 2680, 2690, 3410 Net Deferred Operating Income Taxes Accounts 4100, 4340 Network Support... Expenses Account 6510 Network Operations Expenses Account 6530 Access Expense Account 6540 Depreciation...

  1. 47 CFR 54.301 - Local switching support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (Account 6510); Network Operations Expenses (Account 6530); Marketing Expense (Account 6610); Services... Accounts 2005, 2680, 2690, 3410 Net Deferred Operating Income Taxes Accounts 4100, 4340 Network Support... Expenses Account 6510 Network Operations Expenses Account 6530 Access Expense Account 6540 Depreciation...

  2. Local network parameters can affect inter-network phase lags in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kopell, N

    2006-01-01

    Weakly coupled phase oscillators and strongly coupled relaxation oscillators have different mechanisms for creating stable phase lags. Many oscillations in central pattern generators combine features of each type of coupling: local networks composed of strongly coupled relaxation oscillators are weakly coupled to similar local networks. This paper analyzes the phase lags produced by this combination of mechanisms and shows how the parameters of a local network, such as the decay time of inhibition, can affect the phase lags between the local networks. The analysis is motivated by the crayfish central pattern generator used for swimming, and uses techniques from geometrical singular perturbation theory.

  3. New support for an old hypothesis: density affects extra-pair paternity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian; Pasinelli, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Density has been suggested to affect variation in extra-pair paternity (EPP) in avian mating systems, because increasing density promotes encounter rates and thus mating opportunities. However, the significance of density affecting EPP variation in intra- and interspecific comparisons has remained controversial, with more support from intraspecific comparisons. Neither experimental nor empirical studies have consistently provided support for the density hypothesis. Testing the density hypothesis is challenging because density measures may not necessarily reflect extra-pair mating opportunities, mate guarding efforts may covary with density, populations studied may differ in migratory behavior and/or climatic conditions, and variation in density may be insufficient. Accounting for these potentially confounding factors, we tested whether EPP rates within and among subpopulations of the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) were related to density. Our analyses were based on data from 13 subpopulations studied over 4 years. Overall, 56.4% of totally 181 broods contained at least one extra-pair young (EPY) and 37.1% of totally 669 young were of extra-pair origin. Roughly 90% of the extra-pair fathers were from the adjacent territory or from the territory after the next one. Within subpopulations, the proportion of EPY in broods was positively related to local breeding density. Similarly, among subpopulations, proportion of EPY was positively associated with population density. EPP was absent in subpopulations consisting of single breeding pairs, that is, without extra-pair mating opportunities. Our study confirms that density is an important biological factor, which significantly influences the amount of EPP within and among subpopulations, but also suggests that other mechanisms influence EPP beyond the variation explained by density. PMID:23533071

  4. Federal, State, and Local Roles Supporting Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nancy; Brand, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    This white paper examines the roles that various levels of government play through legislation, policy, and other initiatives that support quality alternative education programs to reconnect youth to education and the workplace. It raises issues for policymakers at all levels to consider in facilitating the development of expanded alternative…

  5. Cooperative Agreements to Support Communities Affected by the BP Oil Spill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The environmental justice cooperative agreements are designed to support communities in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas that are directly affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. Ordinary Social Interaction and the Main Effect Between Perceived Support and Affect.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Brian; Vander Molen, Randy J; Fles, Elizabeth; Andrews, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Relational regulation theory hypothesizes that (a) the main effect between perceived support and mental health primarily reflects ordinary social interaction rather than conversations about stress and how to cope with it, and (b) the extent to which a provider regulates a recipient's mental health primarily reflects the recipient's personal taste (i.e., is relational), rather than the provider's objective supportiveness. In three round-robin studies, participants rated each other on supportiveness and the quality of ordinary social interaction, as well as their own affect when interacting with each other. Samples included marines about to deploy to Afghanistan (N = 100; 150 dyads), students sharing apartments (N = 64; 96 dyads), and strangers (N = 48; 72 dyads). Perceived support and ordinary social interaction were primarily relational, and most of perceived support's main effect on positive affect was redundant with ordinary social interaction. The main effect between perceived support and affect emerged among strangers after brief text conversations, and these links were partially verified by independent observers. Findings for negative affect were less consistent with theory. Ordinary social interaction appears to be able to explain much of the main effect between perceived support and positive affect.

  7. Solitons supported by localized nonlinearities in periodic media

    SciTech Connect

    Dror, Nir; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-03-15

    Nonlinear periodic systems, such as photonic crystals and Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC's) loaded into optical lattices, are often described by the nonlinear Schroedinger or Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a sinusoidal potential. Here, we consider a model based on such a periodic potential, with the nonlinearity (attractive or repulsive) concentrated either at a single point or at a symmetric set of two points, which are represented, respectively, by a single {delta} function or a combination of two {delta} functions. With the attractive or repulsive sign of the nonlinearity, this model gives rise to ordinary solitons or gap solitons (GS's), which reside, respectively, in the semi-infinite or finite gaps of the system's linear spectrum, being pinned to the {delta} functions. Physical realizations of these systems are possible in optics and BEC's, using diverse variants of the nonlinearity management. First, we demonstrate that the single {delta} function multiplying the nonlinear term supports families of stableregular solitons in the self-attractive case, while a family of solitons supported by the attractive {delta} function in the absence of the periodic potential is completely unstable. In addition, we show that the {delta} function can support stable GS's in the first finite band gap in both the self-attractive and repulsive models. The stability analysis for the GS's in the second finite band gap is reported too, for both signs of the nonlinearity. Alongside the numerical analysis, analytical approximations are developed for the solitons in the semi-infinite and first two finite gaps, with the single {delta} function positioned at a minimum or maximum of the periodic potential. In the model with the symmetric set of two {delta} functions, we study the effect of the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the pinned solitons. Two configurations are considered, with the {delta} functions set symmetrically with respect to the minimum or maximum of the underlying

  8. Performance-Based Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis (OABA). Implementation and Supporting Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.; And Others

    This document contains two sections: implementation of the performance-based Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis (OABA), and supporting research. Section 1 presents OABA, an analytic procedure designed to identify those affective behaviors important to success in an occupation, and gives directions on how to implement the procedure. The…

  9. The Influence of Parental Support, Depressed Affect, and Peers on the Sexual Behaviors of Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitbeck, Les B.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used longitudinal data from 76 adolescent girls and their parents to investigate effects of parental warmth and supportiveness on adolescents' depressed affect, attitudes about sexuality, peer influence, and sexual experience. Girls with more emotionally distant parents were more likely to manifest symptoms of depression. Depressed affect was…

  10. Simulation to Support Local Search in Trajectory Optimization Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert A.; Venable, K. Brent; Lindsey, James

    2012-01-01

    NASA and the international community are investing in the development of a commercial transportation infrastructure that includes the increased use of rotorcraft, specifically helicopters and civil tilt rotors. However, there is significant concern over the impact of noise on the communities surrounding the transportation facilities. One way to address the rotorcraft noise problem is by exploiting powerful search techniques coming from artificial intelligence coupled with simulation and field tests to design low-noise flight profiles which can be tested in simulation or through field tests. This paper investigates the use of simulation based on predictive physical models to facilitate the search for low-noise trajectories using a class of automated search algorithms called local search. A novel feature of this approach is the ability to incorporate constraints directly into the problem formulation that addresses passenger safety and comfort.

  11. Protein subcellular localization prediction using multiple kernel learning based support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Al Mehedi; Ahmad, Shamim; Molla, Md Khademul Islam

    2017-03-28

    Predicting the subcellular locations of proteins can provide useful hints that reveal their functions, increase our understanding of the mechanisms of some diseases, and finally aid in the development of novel drugs. As the number of newly discovered proteins has been growing exponentially, which in turns, makes the subcellular localization prediction by purely laboratory tests prohibitively laborious and expensive. In this context, to tackle the challenges, computational methods are being developed as an alternative choice to aid biologists in selecting target proteins and designing related experiments. However, the success of protein subcellular localization prediction is still a complicated and challenging issue, particularly, when query proteins have multi-label characteristics, i.e., if they exist simultaneously in more than one subcellular location or if they move between two or more different subcellular locations. To date, to address this problem, several types of subcellular localization prediction methods with different levels of accuracy have been proposed. The support vector machine (SVM) has been employed to provide potential solutions to the protein subcellular localization prediction problem. However, the practicability of an SVM is affected by the challenges of selecting an appropriate kernel and selecting the parameters of the selected kernel. To address this difficulty, in this study, we aimed to develop an efficient multi-label protein subcellular localization prediction system, named as MKLoc, by introducing multiple kernel learning (MKL) based SVM. We evaluated MKLoc using a combined dataset containing 5447 single-localized proteins (originally published as part of the Höglund dataset) and 3056 multi-localized proteins (originally published as part of the DBMLoc set). Note that this dataset was used by Briesemeister et al. in their extensive comparison of multi-localization prediction systems. Finally, our experimental results indicate that

  12. The Influence of Perceived Social Support, Maternal Affect, and the Home on Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera, Karen F.; And Others

    The paper examined the impact of maternal personality and maternal social support variables on the security of mother-infant attachment. The influence of maternal intelligence, affect balance, and life stress were also examined. Measures used included Loevinger's Ego Development Scale, Crnic's Satisfaction with Social Support, the Peabody Picture…

  13. Total Variation Denoising and Support Localization of the Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambolle, A.; Duval, V.; Peyré, G.; Poon, C.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the geometrical properties of the solutions to the total variation denoising method. A folklore statement is that this method is able to restore sharp edges, but at the same time, might introduce some staircasing (i.e. “fake” edges) in flat areas. Quite surprisingly, put aside numerical evidences, almost no theoretical result are available to backup these claims. The first contribution of this paper is a precise mathematical definition of the “extended support” (associated to the noise-free image) of TV denoising. This is intuitively the region which is unstable and will suffer from the staircasing effect. Our main result shows that the TV denoising method indeed restores a piece-wise constant image outside a small tube surrounding the extended support. Furthermore, the radius of this tube shrinks toward zero as the noise level vanishes and in some cases, an upper bound on the convergence rate is given.

  14. National, State, and Local Trends: Environmental Scan of Trends and Key Issues Affecting Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Jon; Budros, Kathleen; Yoshioka, Joyce

    This document is a collection of one-page summaries, or "Trends Newsletters" (Numbers 50, 54-7, 59-60, 67-71, and 73-91), that analyze the national, state, and local trends affecting planning for the San Jose/Evergreen Community College District in California. The document is divided into two sections: External Scan and Internal Scan.…

  15. Does perceived teacher affective support matter for middle school students in mathematics classrooms?

    PubMed

    Sakiz, Gonul; Pape, Stephen J; Hoy, Anita Woolfolk

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the importance of perceived teacher affective support in relation to sense of belonging, academic enjoyment, academic hopelessness, academic self-efficacy, and academic effort in middle school mathematics classrooms. A self-report survey was administered to 317 seventh- and eighth-grade students in 5 public middle schools. Structural equation modeling indicated significant associations between perceived teacher affective support and middle school students' motivational, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. The structural model explained a significant proportion of variance in students' sense of belonging (42%), academic enjoyment (43%), self-efficacy beliefs (43%), academic hopelessness (18%), and academic effort (32%) in mathematics classrooms. In addition to providing the basis for a concise new measure of perceived teacher affective support, these findings point to the importance of students' perceptions of the affective climate within learning environments for promoting academic enjoyment, academic self-efficacy, and academic effort in mathematics.

  16. How the Relativistic Motion Affect Quantum Fisher Information and Bell Non-locality for Multipartite state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun Yu; Ma, Wenchao; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the quantum fisher information (QFI) and Bell non-locality of a multipartite fermionic system are investigated. Unlike the currently existing research of QFI, we focus our attention on the differences between quantum fisher information and Bell non-locality under the relativistic framework. The results show that although the relativistic motion affects the strength of the non-locality, it does not change the physical structure of non-locality. However, unlike the case of non-locality, the relativistic motion not only influence the precision of the QFI Fϕ but also broke the symmetry of the function Fϕ. The results also show that for a special multipartite system, , the number of particles of a initial state do not affect the Fθ. Furthermore, we also find that Fθ is completely unaffected in non-inertial frame if there are inertial observers. Finally, in view of the decay behavior of QFI and non-locality under the non-inertial frame, we proposed a effective scheme to battle against Unruh effect.

  17. How the Relativistic Motion Affect Quantum Fisher Information and Bell Non-locality for Multipartite state

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun Yu; Ma, Wenchao; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the quantum fisher information (QFI) and Bell non-locality of a multipartite fermionic system are investigated. Unlike the currently existing research of QFI, we focus our attention on the differences between quantum fisher information and Bell non-locality under the relativistic framework. The results show that although the relativistic motion affects the strength of the non-locality, it does not change the physical structure of non-locality. However, unlike the case of non-locality, the relativistic motion not only influence the precision of the QFI Fϕ but also broke the symmetry of the function Fϕ. The results also show that for a special multipartite system, , the number of particles of a initial state do not affect the Fθ. Furthermore, we also find that Fθ is completely unaffected in non-inertial frame if there are inertial observers. Finally, in view of the decay behavior of QFI and non-locality under the non-inertial frame, we proposed a effective scheme to battle against Unruh effect. PMID:28145437

  18. Temporal dynamics of a local fish community are strongly affected by immigration from the surrounding metacommunity.

    PubMed

    Stoffels, Rick J; Clarke, Kenneth Robert; Linklater, Danielle S

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year time series of annual censuses was collected from a large floodplain lake to determine how dynamics of the local fish community were affected by changes in hydrological connectivity with the surrounding metacommunity. The lake was disconnected from the metacommunity for 1 year prior to our study and remained disconnected until 3 months before our third annual census, when a flood reconnected the lake to the metacommunity. We determined how changes in connectivity affected temporal dynamics of (1) local community composition and (2) the population composition, condition, and growth of catfish, to shed light on how immigration of other species might affect local population dynamics. Before reconnection, the community was likely shaped by interactions between the local environment and species traits. The reconnection caused significant immigration and change in community composition and correlated with a significant and abrupt decline in catfish condition, growth, and abundance; effects likely due to the immigration of a competitor with a similar trophic niche: carp. The community was slow to return to its preconnection state, which may be due to dispersal traits of the fishes, and a time-lag in the recovery of the local catfish population following transient intensification of species interactions. The dynamics observed were concordant with the species sorting and mass-effects perspectives of metacommunity theory. Floods cause episodic dispersal in floodplain fish metacommunities, and so, flood frequency determines the relative importance of regional and local processes. Local processes may be particularly important to certain species, but these species may need sufficient time between floods for population increase, before the next flood-induced dispersal episode brings competitors and predators that might cause population decline. Accordingly, species coexistence in these metacommunities may be facilitated by spatiotemporal storage effects, which may in

  19. Temporal dynamics of a local fish community are strongly affected by immigration from the surrounding metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Stoffels, Rick J; Clarke, Kenneth Robert; Linklater, Danielle S

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year time series of annual censuses was collected from a large floodplain lake to determine how dynamics of the local fish community were affected by changes in hydrological connectivity with the surrounding metacommunity. The lake was disconnected from the metacommunity for 1 year prior to our study and remained disconnected until 3 months before our third annual census, when a flood reconnected the lake to the metacommunity. We determined how changes in connectivity affected temporal dynamics of (1) local community composition and (2) the population composition, condition, and growth of catfish, to shed light on how immigration of other species might affect local population dynamics. Before reconnection, the community was likely shaped by interactions between the local environment and species traits. The reconnection caused significant immigration and change in community composition and correlated with a significant and abrupt decline in catfish condition, growth, and abundance; effects likely due to the immigration of a competitor with a similar trophic niche: carp. The community was slow to return to its preconnection state, which may be due to dispersal traits of the fishes, and a time-lag in the recovery of the local catfish population following transient intensification of species interactions. The dynamics observed were concordant with the species sorting and mass-effects perspectives of metacommunity theory. Floods cause episodic dispersal in floodplain fish metacommunities, and so, flood frequency determines the relative importance of regional and local processes. Local processes may be particularly important to certain species, but these species may need sufficient time between floods for population increase, before the next flood-induced dispersal episode brings competitors and predators that might cause population decline. Accordingly, species coexistence in these metacommunities may be facilitated by spatiotemporal storage effects, which may in

  20. Supporting tobacco control: stimulating local newspaper coverage with a technical assistance website for local coalitions.

    PubMed

    Buller, David B; Bettinghaus, Erwin P; Helme, Donald; Young, Walter F; Borland, Ron; Maloy, Julie A; Cutter, Gary R; Andersen, Peter A; Walther, Joseph B

    2011-11-01

    A large and growing literature confirms that well-designed web-based programs can be effective in preventing or treating several chronic diseases. This study examined how the Internet can deliver information and train community activists and specifically tested the effects of web-based technical assistance on local tobacco control coalitions' efforts to use media advocacy to advance their agendas. The authors compared a highly interactive, Enhanced website (intervention) to a noninteractive, Basic text-based website (comparison) in Colorado communities. A total of 24 tobacco control coalitions led by local county health departments and nursing services were enrolled in the project and randomly assigned to use either the intervention or comparison website. A total of 73 local daily and weekly newspapers were identified in the service areas of 23 of the 24 coalitions. A posttest assessment of newspaper coverage was conducted to locate all newspaper articles with tobacco control information published between January 1 and April 9, 2004, the last 3 months of the intervention. Although there was no evidence of a treatment effect on the frequency of newspaper articles on tobacco-related issues, there was, however, evidence that newspapers in counties where the coalition had access to the Enhanced website printed more stories focused on local/regional issues and more anti-tobacco local/regional stories than in the counties where coalitions had access to the Basic website. Coalitions can improve their influence on local media for community tobacco control when high-quality online technical assistance, training, and resources are available to them.

  1. The Role of Cognitive and Affective Empathy in Spouses' Support Interactions: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Verhofstadt, Lesley; Devoldre, Inge; Buysse, Ann; Stevens, Michael; Hinnekens, Céline; Ickes, William; Davis, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined how support providers’ empathic dispositions (dispositional perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) as well as their situational empathic reactions (interaction-based perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) relate to the provision of spousal support during observed support interactions. Forty-five committed couples provided questionnaire data and participated in two ten-minute social support interactions designed to assess behaviors when partners are offering and soliciting social support. A video-review task was used to assess situational forms of perspective taking (e.g., empathic accuracy), empathic concern and personal distress. Data were analyzed by means of the multi-level Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Results revealed that providers scoring higher on affective empathy (i.e., dispositional empathic concern), provided lower levels of negative support. In addition, for male partners, scoring higher on cognitive empathy (i.e., situational perspective taking) was related to lower levels of negative support provision. For both partners, higher scores on cognitive empathy (i.e., situational perspective taking) correlated with more instrumental support provision. Male providers scoring higher on affective empathy (i.e., situational personal distress) provided higher levels of instrumental support. Dispositional perspective taking was related to higher scores on emotional support provision for male providers. The current study furthers our insight into the empathy-support link, by revealing differential effects (a) for men and women, (b) of both cognitive and affective empathy, and (c) of dispositional as well as situational empathy, on different types of support provision. PMID:26910769

  2. Design and Development of an Affective Interface for Supporting Energy-saving Activities and its Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kyoko; Tomita, Daisuke; Imaki, Tomotaka; Hongo, Taishiro; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    Toward a sustainable society, energy and environmental issues are very important and controversial problems, and it is expected to support various human activities for the measures by using Information Technology. The purpose of this study is to develop an affective interface for supporting people's energy-saving activities. First, a model for supporting people's energy-saving activities involving affective elements has been constructed for supporting people's energy-saving activities, based on social psychological approaches. Based on the proposed model, the requirements on an affective interface for people's energy-saving activities have been considered. In this study, the affective interface presents suitable energy-saving activities and current electric energy consumption by a character agent with a graphical shape and synthesized voice. The character agent recommends people's energy-saving activities, tells the method of energy-saving activities and the effectiveness, and so on. The affective interface for supporting energy-saving activities has been designed in detail and developed. Then, the evaluation experiment of the developed interface has been conducted, and the results of the experiments were analyzed.

  3. The Transfer of Local Authority School Support Services to External Social Enterprises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores an emerging and largely unresearched sector of the school education market, the transfer of local authority support services to external social enterprises. It locates these new social enterprises as a consequence of government strategies to reduce public spending, shrink local government and create competitive markets in…

  4. The ties that bind: perceived social support, stress, and IBS in severely affected patients

    PubMed Central

    LACKNER, J. M.; BRASEL, A. M.; QUIGLEY, B M.; KEEFER, L.; KRASNER, S. S.; POWELL, C.; KATZ, L. A.; SITRIN, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the association between social support and the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in a sample of severely affected IBS patients recruited to an NIH-funded clinical trial. In addition, we examined if the effects of social support on IBS pain are mediated through the effects on stress. Methods Subjects were 105 Rome II diagnosed IBS patients (F = 85%) who completed seven questionnaires which were collected as part of a pretreatment baseline assessment. Key Results Partial correlations were conducted to clarify the relationships between social support and clinically relevant variables with baseline levels of psychopathology, holding constant number of comorbid medical diseases, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, and education. Analyses indicated that social support was inversely related to IBS symptom severity. Social support was positively related with less severe pain. A similar pattern of data was found for perceived stress but not quality of life impairment. Regression analyses examined if the effects of social support on pain are mediated by stress. The effects of social support on bodily pain were mediated by stress such that the greater the social support the less stress and the less pain. This effect did not hold for symptom severity, quality of life, or psychological distress. Conclusions & Inferences This study links the perceived adequacy of social support to the global severity of symptoms of IBS and its cardinal symptom (pain). It also suggests that the mechanism by which social support alleviates pain is through a reduction in stress levels. PMID:20465594

  5. Removal of the local geomagnetic field affects reproductive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Wei, Shufeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yuxia; Chen, Chuanfang; Song, Tao

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the geomagnetic field-removed environment on Arabidopsis growth was investigated by cultivation of the plants in a near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field (45 µT) for the whole growth period under laboratory conditions. The biomass accumulation of plants in the near-null magnetic field was significantly suppressed at the time when plants were switching from vegetative growth to reproductive growth compared with that of plants grown in the local geomagnetic field, which was caused by a delay in the flowering of plants in the near-null magnetic field. At the early or later growth stage, no significant difference was shown in the biomass accumulation between the plants in the near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field. The average number of siliques and the production of seeds per plant in the near-null magnetic field was significantly lower by about 22% and 19%, respectively, than those of control plants. These resulted in a significant reduction of about 20% in the harvest index of plants in the near-null magnetic field compared with that of the controls. These results suggest that the removal of the local geomagnetic field negatively affects the reproductive growth of Arabidopsis, which thus affects the yield and harvest index.

  6. Obesity Metaphors: How Beliefs about the Causes of Obesity Affect Support for Public Policy

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Colleen L; Brescoll, Victoria L; Brownell, Kelly D; Schlesinger, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Context: Relatively little is known about the factors shaping public attitudes toward obesity as a policy concern. This study examines whether individuals' beliefs about the causes of obesity affect their support for policies aimed at stemming obesity rates. This article identifies a unique role of metaphor-based beliefs, as distinct from conventional political attitudes, in explaining support for obesity policies. Methods: This article used the Yale Rudd Center Public Opinion on Obesity Survey, a nationally representative web sample surveyed from the Knowledge Networks panel in 2006/07 (N = 1,009). The study examines how respondents' demographic and health characteristics, political attitudes, and agreement with seven obesity metaphors affect support for sixteen policies to reduce obesity rates. Findings: Including obesity metaphors in regression models helps explain public support for policies to curb obesity beyond levels attributable solely to demographic, health, and political characteristics. The metaphors that people use to understand rising obesity rates are strong predictors of support for public policy, and their influence varies across different types of policy interventions. Conclusions: Over the last five years, the United States has begun to grapple with the implications of dramatically escalating rates of obesity. Individuals use metaphors to better understand increasing rates of obesity, and obesity metaphors are independent and powerful predictors of support for public policies to curb obesity. Metaphorical reasoning also offers a potential framework for using strategic issue framing to shift support for obesity policies. PMID:19298414

  7. Teachers' Challenges, Strategies, and Support Needs in Schools Affected by Community Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maring, Elisabeth F.; Koblinsky, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to community violence compromises teacher effectiveness, student learning, and socioemotional well-being. This study examined the challenges, strategies, and support needs of teachers in urban schools affected by high levels of community violence. Methods: Twenty teachers from 3 urban middle schools with predominantly…

  8. Library Support for Academic Program Review--From an Evolving Local Model to What's Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Ming-Ming Shen

    A local model for support of periodic academic program reviews by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education (ICHE) has developed and evolved at the Ball State University library. The process of devising a format to systematically report library holdings statistics to support program reviews and other collections development duties began in 1975;…

  9. Relational self-esteem, psychological well-being, and social support in children affected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongfei; Li, Xiaoming; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2015-12-01

    Self-esteem can be derived from the relationships with significant others (relational self-esteem). However, it is unclear what the importance of relational self-esteem is for mental health and whether social support from others promotes relational self-esteem. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between relational self-esteem and a multitude of indicators of psychological well-being among children affected by HIV. We also examined how social support from others would affect relational self-esteem. Results indicated that relational self-esteem was positively associated with psychological well-being. Support from significant others rather than others predicted increased relational self-esteem. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  10. Children’s representations of school support for HIV-affected peers in rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV has left many African children caring for sick relatives, orphaned or themselves HIV-positive, often facing immense challenges in the absence of significant support from adults. With reductions in development funding, public sector budgetary constraints, and a growing emphasis on the importance of indigenous resources in the HIV response, international policy allocates schools a key role in ‘substituting for families’ (Ansell, 2008) in supporting child health and well-being. We explore children’s own accounts of the challenges facing their HIV-affected peers and the role of schools in providing such support. Methods Contextualised within a multi-method study of school support for HIV-affected children in rural Zimbabwe, and regarding children’s views as a key resource for child-relevant intervention and policy, 128 school children (10–14) wrote a story about an HIV-affected peer and how school assisted them in tackling their problems. Results Children presented harrowing accounts of negative impacts of HIV on the social, physical and mental well-being of peers, and how these manifested in the school setting. Whilst relationships with fellow learners and teachers were said to provide a degree of support, this was patchy and minimal, generally limited to small-scale and often one-off acts of material help or kindness (e.g. teachers giving children pens and exercise books or peers sharing school lunches), with little potential to impact significantly on the wider social drivers of children’s daily challenges. Despite having respect for the enormity of the challenges many HIV-affected peers were coping with, children tended to keep a distance from them. School was depicted as a source of the very bullying, stigma and social exclusion that undermined children’s opportunities for well-being in their lives more generally. Conclusions Our findings challenge glib assumptions that schools can serve as a significant ‘indigenous’ supports of

  11. Madness or sadness? Local concepts of mental illness in four conflict-affected African communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Concepts of ‘what constitutes mental illness’, the presumed aetiology and preferred treatment options, vary considerably from one cultural context to another. Knowledge and understanding of these local conceptualisations is essential to inform public mental health programming and policy. Methods Participants from four locations in Burundi, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, were invited to describe ‘problems they knew of that related to thinking, feeling and behaviour?’ Data were collected over 31 focus groups discussions (251 participants) and key informant interviews with traditional healers and health workers. Results While remarkable similarities occurred across all settings, there were also striking differences. In all areas, participants were able to describe localized syndromes characterized by severe behavioural and cognitive disturbances with considerable resemblance to psychotic disorders. Additionally, respondents throughout all settings described local syndromes that included sadness and social withdrawal as core features. These syndromes had some similarities with nonpsychotic mental disorders, such as major depression or anxiety disorders, but also differed significantly. Aetiological concepts varied a great deal within each setting, and attributed causes varied from supernatural to psychosocial and natural. Local syndromes resembling psychotic disorders were seen as an abnormality in need of treatment, although people did not really know where to go. Local syndromes resembling nonpsychotic mental disorders were not regarded as a ‘medical’ disorder, and were therefore also not seen as a condition for which help should be sought within the biomedical health-care system. Rather, such conditions were expected to improve through social and emotional support from relatives, traditional healers and community members. Conclusions Local conceptualizations have significant implications for the planning of mental

  12. Functions and sources of perceived social support among children affected by HIV/AIDS in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoxiang; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Junfeng; Hong, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-06-01

    While the relationship between perceived social support (PSS) and psychosocial well-being has been well documented in the global literature, existing studies also suggest the existence of multiple domains in definition and measurement of PSS. The current study, utilizing data from 1299 rural children affected by HIV/AIDS in central China, examines the relative importance of PSS functional measures (informational/emotional, material/tangible, affectionate, and social interaction) and PSS structural measures (family/relatives, teachers, friends, and significant others) in predicting psychosocial outcomes including internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and educational resilience. Both functional and structural measures of PSS provided reliable measures of related but unique aspects of PSS. The findings of the current study confirmed the previous results that PSS is highly correlated with children's psychosocial well-being and such correlations vary by functions and sources of the PSS as well as different psychosocial outcomes. The findings in the current study suggested the roles of specific social support functions or resources may need to be assessed in relation to specific psychosocial outcome and the context of children's lives. The strong association between PSS and psychosocial outcomes underscores the importance of adequate social support to alleviate stressful life events and improve psychosocial well-being of children affected by HIV/AIDS. Meanwhile, the study findings call for gender and developmentally appropriate and situation-specific social support for children and families affected by HIV/AIDS.

  13. 34 CFR 222.65 - How may a State aid program affect a local educational agency's eligibility for assistance under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How may a State aid program affect a local educational agency's eligibility for assistance under section 8003(f)? 222.65 Section 222.65 Education Regulations of... Section 8003(f) of the Act § 222.65 How may a State aid program affect a local educational...

  14. Climate Change Adaptation Among Tibetan Pastoralists: Challenges in Enhancing Local Adaptation Through Policy Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R. Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  15. Climate change adaptation among Tibetan pastoralists: challenges in enhancing local adaptation through policy support.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  16. Relative Preference and Localized Food Affect Predator Space Use and Consumption of Incidental Prey.

    PubMed

    Schartel, Tyler E; Schauber, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Abundant, localized foods can concentrate predators and their foraging efforts, thus altering both the spatial distribution of predation risk and predator preferences for prey that are encountered incidentally. However, few investigations have quantified the spatial scale over which localized foods affect predator foraging behavior and consumption of incidental prey. In spring 2010, we experimentally tested how point-source foods altered how generalist predators (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus) utilized space and depredated two incidental prey items: almonds (Prunus dulcis; highly profitable) and maple seeds (Acer saccharum; less profitable). We estimated mouse population densities with trapping webs, quantified mouse consumption rates of these incidental prey items, and measured local mouse activity with track plates. We predicted that 1) mouse activity would be elevated near full feeders, but depressed at intermediate distances from the feeder, 2) consumption of both incidental prey would be high near feeders providing less-preferred food and, 3) consumption of incidental prey would be contingent on predator preference for prey relative to feeders providing more-preferred food. Mouse densities increased significantly from pre- to post-experiment. Mean mouse activity was unexpectedly greatest in control treatments, particularly <15 m from the control (empty) feeder. Feeders with highly preferred food (sunflower seeds) created localized refuges for incidental prey at intermediate distances (15 to 25m) from the feeder. Feeders with less-preferred food (corn) generated localized high risk for highly preferred almonds <10 m of the feeder. Our findings highlight the contingent but predictable effects of locally abundant food on risk experienced by incidental prey, which can be positive or negative depending on both spatial proximity and relative preference.

  17. Relative Preference and Localized Food Affect Predator Space Use and Consumption of Incidental Prey

    PubMed Central

    Schartel, Tyler E.; Schauber, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Abundant, localized foods can concentrate predators and their foraging efforts, thus altering both the spatial distribution of predation risk and predator preferences for prey that are encountered incidentally. However, few investigations have quantified the spatial scale over which localized foods affect predator foraging behavior and consumption of incidental prey. In spring 2010, we experimentally tested how point-source foods altered how generalist predators (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus) utilized space and depredated two incidental prey items: almonds (Prunus dulcis; highly profitable) and maple seeds (Acer saccharum; less profitable). We estimated mouse population densities with trapping webs, quantified mouse consumption rates of these incidental prey items, and measured local mouse activity with track plates. We predicted that 1) mouse activity would be elevated near full feeders, but depressed at intermediate distances from the feeder, 2) consumption of both incidental prey would be high near feeders providing less-preferred food and, 3) consumption of incidental prey would be contingent on predator preference for prey relative to feeders providing more-preferred food. Mouse densities increased significantly from pre- to post-experiment. Mean mouse activity was unexpectedly greatest in control treatments, particularly <15 m from the control (empty) feeder. Feeders with highly preferred food (sunflower seeds) created localized refuges for incidental prey at intermediate distances (15 to 25m) from the feeder. Feeders with less-preferred food (corn) generated localized high risk for highly preferred almonds <10 m of the feeder. Our findings highlight the contingent but predictable effects of locally abundant food on risk experienced by incidental prey, which can be positive or negative depending on both spatial proximity and relative preference. PMID:26978659

  18. Types and concentrations of metal ions affect local structure and dynamics of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xiao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    The roles that metal ions play in the structure and dynamics of RNA molecules are long-standing problems that have been studied extensively but are still not well understood. Here we show that metal ions have distributions around RNA molecules that strongly depend on the types and concentrations of the metal ions and also the electrostatic surface of the molecule. In particular, the ion distributions may not balance all the local electronegativity of the molecule. These ion distributions do not only greatly affect local structures but also lead to different local dynamics of RNA. We studied the effects of different ion solutions on the structure and dynamics of RNA by taking the pre Q1 riboswitch aptamer domain as an illustrative example and using molecular dynamics simulations. Since the local structures and dynamics of RNAs are important to their functions, our results also indicate that the selection of proper ion conditions is necessary to model them correctly, in contrast to the use of diverse ion solutions in current molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  20. Perceived Teacher Affective Support in Relation to Emotional and Motivational Variables in Elementary School Science Classrooms in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakiz, Gonul

    2017-01-01

    Background: In recent research, affective learning environments and affective support have been receiving increasing attention for their roles in stimulating students' learning outcomes. Despite its raising importance, little is known about affective support in educational contexts in developing countries. Moreover, international student…

  1. Negative support of significant others affects psychological adjustment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Mariko; Hirai, Kei; Koyama, Atsuko; Inui, Hiroki; Yoshida, Rika; Tokoro, Akihiro

    2011-11-01

    Significant others play an important role in providing support in patients' lives, but some types of support negatively affect the patients. This study was conducted in early-stage breast cancer patients to examine the structure of support, which was provided by their significant others and assessed negatively by the patients, and to identify negative support relating to the psychological adjustment of these patients. Thus, we first conducted interviews among 28 breast cancer patients to identify these support items assessed as negative; next, we conducted a questionnaire survey using the resulting items in 109 postoperative patients who had early-stage breast cancer. We performed exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and obtained a valid second-order factor structure, including superordinate factors (excessive engagement, avoidance of problems and underestimation) and subordinate factors (overprotection, encouragement and management). Among these factors, the avoidance of problems was the only factor to be negatively associated with psychological adjustment of the patients, suggesting that these patients receive problem-avoiding support. The results of our study suggest that such problem-avoiding support from significant others can be counter-productive and potentially worsen the psychological adjustment of breast cancer patients.

  2. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  3. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  4. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  5. The economic effects of supporting tuberculosis-affected households in Peru.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Tom; Tovar, Marco A; Huff, Doug; Boccia, Delia; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric; Lewis, James J; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2016-11-01

    The End TB Strategy mandates that no tuberculosis (TB)-affected households face catastrophic costs due to TB. However, evidence is limited to evaluate socioeconomic support to achieve this change in policy and practice. The objective of the present study was to investigate the economic effects of a TB-specific socioeconomic intervention.The setting was 32 shantytown communities in Peru. The participants were from households of consecutive TB patients throughout TB treatment administered by the national TB programme. The intervention consisted of social support through household visits and community meetings, and economic support through cash transfers conditional upon TB screening in household contacts, adhering to TB treatment/chemoprophylaxis and engaging with social support. Data were collected to assess TB-affected household costs. Patient interviews were conducted at treatment initiation and then monthly for 6 months.From February 2014 to June 2015, 312 households were recruited, of which 135 were randomised to receive the intervention. Cash transfer total value averaged US$173 (3.5% of TB-affected households' average annual income) and mitigated 20% of households' TB-related costs. Households randomised to receive the intervention were less likely to incur catastrophic costs (30% (95% CI 22-38%) versus 42% (95% CI 34-51%)). The mitigation impact was higher among poorer households.The TB-specific socioeconomic intervention reduced catastrophic costs and was accessible to poorer households. Socioeconomic support and mitigating catastrophic costs are integral to the End TB strategy, and our findings inform implementation of these new policies.

  6. The economic effects of supporting tuberculosis-affected households in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Marco A.; Huff, Doug; Boccia, Delia; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric; Lewis, James J.; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2016-01-01

    The End TB Strategy mandates that no tuberculosis (TB)-affected households face catastrophic costs due to TB. However, evidence is limited to evaluate socioeconomic support to achieve this change in policy and practice. The objective of the present study was to investigate the economic effects of a TB-specific socioeconomic intervention. The setting was 32 shantytown communities in Peru. The participants were from households of consecutive TB patients throughout TB treatment administered by the national TB programme. The intervention consisted of social support through household visits and community meetings, and economic support through cash transfers conditional upon TB screening in household contacts, adhering to TB treatment/chemoprophylaxis and engaging with social support. Data were collected to assess TB-affected household costs. Patient interviews were conducted at treatment initiation and then monthly for 6 months. From February 2014 to June 2015, 312 households were recruited, of which 135 were randomised to receive the intervention. Cash transfer total value averaged US$173 (3.5% of TB-affected households' average annual income) and mitigated 20% of households' TB-related costs. Households randomised to receive the intervention were less likely to incur catastrophic costs (30% (95% CI 22–38%) versus 42% (95% CI 34–51%)). The mitigation impact was higher among poorer households. The TB-specific socioeconomic intervention reduced catastrophic costs and was accessible to poorer households. Socioeconomic support and mitigating catastrophic costs are integral to the End TB strategy, and our findings inform implementation of these new policies. PMID:27660507

  7. Do Aging and Tactile Noise Stimulation Affect Responses to Support Surface Translations in Healthy Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular responses to support surface perturbations are crucial to prevent falls, but aging-related anatomical and physiological changes affect the appropriateness and efficiency of such responses. Low-level noise application to sensory receptors has shown to be effective for postural improvement in a variety of different balance tasks, but it is unknown whether this intervention may have value for improvement of corrective postural responses. Ten healthy younger and ten healthy older adults were exposed to sudden backward translations of the support surface. Low-level noise (mechanical vibration) to the foot soles was added during random trials and temporal (response latency) and spatial characteristics (maximum center-of-pressure excursion and anterior-posterior path length) of postural responses were assessed. Mixed-model ANOVA was applied for analysis of postural response differences based on age and vibration condition. Age affected postural response characteristics, but older adults were well able to maintain balance when exposed to a postural perturbation. Low-level noise application did not affect any postural outcomes. Healthy aging affects some specific measures of postural stability, and in high-functioning older individuals, a low-level noise intervention may not be valuable. More research is needed to investigate if recurring fallers and neuropathy patients could benefit from the intervention in postural perturbation tasks. PMID:27195007

  8. Integrative Review of the Supportive Care Needs of Arab People Affected by Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alananzeh, Ibrahim; Levesque, Janelle; Kwok, Cannas; Everett, Bronwyn

    2016-01-01

    This review aimed to identify the unmet supportive care needs to conduct an integrative review of the literature, to identify the unmet supportive care needs of Arab people affected by cancer (patients and caregivers), and the impact of these needs on quality of life and psychosocial well-being. In July 2015 databases, search engines and electronic list servers were searched, with no limit on the year of publication. Reference lists of included articles and published reviews were also hand searched. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies examined the supportive care/unmet needs of Arab cancer patients and their family caregivers. Language, communication, information, and the need to get relief from dependency were the most frequently reported unmet needs among Arab cancer patients. For immigrant Arab patients, physical unmet needs were higher than other migrant groups and native Anglo-Australians. Arab caregivers’ unmet needs included concerns about providing suitable care for their family member, sharing their experience with other caregivers, obtaining information, and, in the case of pediatric cancers, dealing with siblings’ emotional reactions. The existing literature exploring the unmet supportive care needs of Arab people affected by cancer is limited suggesting that comprehensive studies are needed to enhance our understanding of these needs and to inform service planning. PMID:27981153

  9. Factors Affecting Mental Health of Local Staff Working in the Vanni Region, Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Barbara Lopes; Crawford, Carol; Petit, Pilar; Ghitis, Frida; Sivilli, Teresa I.; Scholte, Willem F.; Ager, Alastair; Eriksson, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    In the aftermath of the civil war that extended from 1983–2009, humanitarian organizations provided aid to the conflict-affected population of the Vanni region in northern Sri Lanka. In August, 2010, a needs assessment was conducted to determine the mental-health status of Sri Lankan national humanitarian aid staff working in conditions of stress and hardship, and consider contextual and organizational characteristics influencing such status. A total of 398 staff members from nine organizations working in the Vanni area participated in the survey, which assessed stress, work characteristics, social support, coping styles, and symptoms of psychological distress. Exposure to traumatic, chronic, and secondary stressors was common. Nineteen percent of the population met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 53% of participants reported elevated anxiety symptoms, and 58% reported elevated depression symptoms. Those reporting high levels of support from their organizations were less likely to suffer depression and PTSD symptoms than those reporting lower levels of staff support (OR =.23, p < .001) and (OR =.26, p < .001), respectively. Participants who were age 55 or older were significantly less likely to suffer anxiety symptoms than those who were between 15 and 34 years of age (OR =.13, p = .011). Having experienced travel difficulties was significantly associated with more anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.35, p < .001). It was recommended that organizations provide stress-management training and increase support to their staff. PMID:27099648

  10. Local to regional emission sources affecting mercury fluxes to New York lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookman, Revital; Driscoll, Charles T.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Effler, Steven W.

    Lake-sediment records across the Northern Hemisphere show increases in atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic mercury (Hg) over the last 150 years. Most of the previous studies have examined remote lakes affected by the global atmospheric Hg reservoir. In this study, we present Hg flux records from lakes in an urban/suburban setting of central New York affected also by local and regional emissions. Sediment cores were collected from the Otisco and Skaneateles lakes from the Finger Lakes region, Cross Lake, a hypereutrophic lake on the Seneca River, and Glacial Lake, a small seepage lake with a watershed that corresponds with the lake area. Sediment accumulation rates and dates were established by 210Pb. The pre-anthropogenic regional atmospheric Hg flux was estimated to be 3.0 μg m -2 yr -1 from Glacial Lake, which receives exclusively direct atmospheric deposition. Mercury fluxes peaked during 1971-2001, and were 3 to more than 30 times greater than pre-industrial deposition. Land use change and urbanization in the Otisco and Cross watersheds during the last century likely enhanced sediment loads and Hg fluxes to the lakes. Skaneateles and Glacial lakes have low sediment accumulation rates, and thus are excellent indicators for atmospheric Hg deposition. In these lakes, we found strong correlations with emission records for the Great Lakes region that markedly increased in the early 1900s, and peaked during WWII and in the early 1970s. Declines in modern Hg fluxes are generally evident in the core records. However, the decrease in sediment Hg flux at Glacial Lake was interrupted and has increased since the early 1990s probably due to the operation of new local emission sources. Assuming the global Hg reservoir tripled since the pre-industrial period, the contribution of local and regional emission sources to central New York lakes was estimated to about 80% of the total atmospheric Hg deposition.

  11. Attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affects rapid scene categorization.

    PubMed

    Brand, John; Johnson, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we investigated how attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affected the selection of diagnostic spatial scale information used in scene categorization. We explored this issue by asking observers to classify hybrid images (i.e., images that contain low spatial frequency (LSF) content of one image, and high spatial frequency (HSF) content from a second image) immediately following global and local Navon tasks. Hybrid images can be classified according to either their LSF, or HSF content; thus, making them ideal for investigating diagnostic spatial scale preference. Although observers were sensitive to both spatial scales (Experiment 1), they overwhelmingly preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that LSF based hybrid categorization was faster following global Navon tasks, suggesting that LSF processing associated with global Navon tasks primed the selection of LSFs in hybrid images. In Experiment 4, replicating Experiment 3 but suppressing the LSF information in Navon letters by contrast balancing the stimuli examined this hypothesis. Similar to Experiment 3, observers preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content; however and in contrast, LSF based hybrid categorization was slower following global than local Navon tasks.

  12. Attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affects rapid scene categorization

    PubMed Central

    Brand, John; Johnson, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we investigated how attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affected the selection of diagnostic spatial scale information used in scene categorization. We explored this issue by asking observers to classify hybrid images (i.e., images that contain low spatial frequency (LSF) content of one image, and high spatial frequency (HSF) content from a second image) immediately following global and local Navon tasks. Hybrid images can be classified according to either their LSF, or HSF content; thus, making them ideal for investigating diagnostic spatial scale preference. Although observers were sensitive to both spatial scales (Experiment 1), they overwhelmingly preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that LSF based hybrid categorization was faster following global Navon tasks, suggesting that LSF processing associated with global Navon tasks primed the selection of LSFs in hybrid images. In Experiment 4, replicating Experiment 3 but suppressing the LSF information in Navon letters by contrast balancing the stimuli examined this hypothesis. Similar to Experiment 3, observers preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content; however and in contrast, LSF based hybrid categorization was slower following global than local Navon tasks. PMID:25520675

  13. Comparative community case studies as research tools: A national effort to support local sustainability planning

    EPA Science Inventory

    The provisioning of aquatic ecosystem goods and services (EGS) is a key concept in USEPA Office of Research and Development research programs. This is a national issue, yet many decisions affecting EGS sustainability are made at the local level where decisions can have substanti...

  14. Private and Local Support of Post-Secondary Public Vocational-Technical Institutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enger, John M.; Lacey, Candace H.

    Arkansas has 10 public postsecondary stand-alone vocational-technical institutes that collectively serve more than 3,000 full-time and 22,000 part-time students. Private sector and local government support of those 10 institutes was examined in a descriptive study based on semi-structured interviews of their presidents and directors and interviews…

  15. Government Initiatives to Encourage Employer-Supported Child Care: The State and Local Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dana E.

    A study was conducted to identify a range of strategies that New York State government could adopt to stimulate business and industry to provide supportive family benefits, services, and work policies. The investigation included a national survey of state and local government initiatives and a special analysis of policies appropriate for New York…

  16. Creating Synergies: Local Government Facilitating Learning and Development through Partnerships--Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Peter; Virgona, Crina; Brown, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to document and better understand four evolving learning communities in Victoria. It was based upon an earlier study by the Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA) (Snelling, 2003). The study was qualitative in nature, based on face-to-face interviews and case studies. This supporting document provides the literature…

  17. Changes in Capacity among Local Coordinated Community Response Coalitions (CCRs) Supported by the DELTA Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Pamela J.; Finkelstein, Daniel M.; Perez, Victoria E.; Rosenbach, Margo L.

    2010-01-01

    Coalitions are often the means through which communities plan and coordinate services for individuals and address larger environmental issues associated with social problems. Since 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has supported local coordinated community response coalitions (CCRs) in 14 states to prevent intimate partner…

  18. Life Experiences of People Affected by Crohn's Disease and Their Support Networks: Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    García-Sanjuán, Sofía; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel; Sanjuán-Quiles, Ángela; Gil-González, Diana; Richart-Martínez, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    This scoping review identifies and describes relevant studies related to the evidence published on life experiences and perceived social support of people affected by Crohn's disease. Twenty-three studies were definitely selected and analyzed for the topics explored. The overall findings show patients' needs and perceptions. There is a lack of evidence about patients' perceived needs as well as the understanding of social support that has contributed to improve their life experiences with that chronic illness. Lack of energy, loss of body control, body image damaged due to different treatments and surgeries, symptoms related to fear of disease, feeling burdened loss related to independence, and so on are some of the concerns with having to live with those affected by the Crohn. To underline those experiences through this scoping review provides valuable data for health care teams, especially for the nursing profession, considered by those affected as one of the main roles along the whole pathological process. This review provides the basis for developing broader research on the relatively underexplored topics and consequently improves specific programs that could address patients' needs.

  19. Personality, social support and affective states during simulated microgravity in healthy women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Michel

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the time-course of stress and recovery states and their relations to social support and personality traits in healthy women during a long-term head-down tilt bed rest. Personality, social support and affective states were assessed in 16 women exposed to simulated microgravity for a 60-day duration involving three stages: a 20-day baseline control period (BDC), a 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (HDT) and a 20-day post-HDT ambulatory recovery period (R+). Participants were divided into two groups: an exercise (Exe, n = 8) and a control group (Ctl, n = 8). All the participants experienced significantly more stress during the HDT period. But exercise did not improve the impaired effects of simulated microgravity. The Exe group perceived more stress and less recovery than the Ctl group during the HDT period. Among the five major personality factors, only Neuroticism was related to both social and affective variables. Neuroticism was positively associated with stress and negatively associated with recovery and social support (S-SSQ). Practical implications in psychological countermeasures for better dealing with the key human factor in spaceflights are discussed.

  20. Sticker Shock: How Information Affects Citizen Support for Public School Funding.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Beth E; West, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the role of information in shaping public opinion in the context of support for education spending. While there is broad public support for increasing government funding for public schools, Americans tend to underestimate what is currently spent. We embed a series of experiments in a nationally representative survey administered in 2012 (n = 2,993) to examine whether informing citizens about current levels of education spending alters public opinion about whether funding should increase. Providing information on per-pupil spending in a respondent's local school district reduces the probability that he or she will express support for increasing spending by 22 percentage points on average. Informing respondents about state-average teacher salaries similarly depresses support for salary increases. These effects are larger among respondents who underestimate per-pupil spending and teacher salaries by a greater amount, consistent with the idea that the observed changes in opinion are driven, at least in part, by informational effects, as opposed to priming alone.

  1. Relaying support in disaster-affected areas: the social implications of a 'pay-it-forward' network.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Tomohide

    2014-07-01

    When a disaster strikes a country, a temporary so-called post-disaster utopia emerges in which local residents help each other and outsiders support survivors and victims. However, this utopia does not last. Survivors are likely to have no chance to pay people back for the help they have received and thus return to their daily lives with a sense of debt. After the Great East Japan Earthquake the author motivated survivors of other disasters to help survivors in the Tohoku region in eastern Japan in return for the support they had received in the past. Two findings are revealed: firstly, this pay-it-forward support among disaster-affected areas allows for intermittent rebuilding of the post-disaster utopia. Secondly, a theoretical examination of the network theory also suggests that the pay-it-forward network is likely to expand and cover the whole of society very quickly. The psychological and sociological implications of these findings are also discussed.

  2. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  3. Local and regional factors affecting atmospheric mercury speciation at a remote location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manolopoulos, H.; Schauer, J.J.; Purcell, M.D.; Rudolph, T.M.; Olson, M.L.; Rodger, B.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of elemental (Hg0), reactive gaseous (RGM), and particulate (PHg) mercury were measured at two remote sites in the midwestern United States. Concurrent measurements of Hg0, PHg, and RGM obtained at Devil's Lake and Mt. Horeb, located approximately 65 km apart, showed that Hg0 and PHg concentrations were affected by regional, as well as local sources, while RGM was mainly impacted by local sources. Plumes reaching the Devil's Lake site from a nearby coal-fired power plant significantly impacted SO2 and RGM concentrations at Devil's Lake, but had little impact on Hg0. Our findings suggest that traditional modeling approaches to assess sources of mercury deposited that utilize source emissions and large-scale grids may not be sufficient to predict mercury deposition at sensitive locations due to the importance of small-scale sources and processes. We suggest the use of a receptor-based monitoring to better understand mercury source-receptor relationships. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  4. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  5. Socio-emotional support in French hospitals: Effects on French nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment.

    PubMed

    Ruiller, Caroline; Van Der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the differences in human resource management (HRM) practices between the non-profit health care sector and business life, the majority of health care sector research appears to be based on the HRM (for human resources management) blueprint for business life staff policy and practice. This study is aimed to better understand the impact of workplace social support in the context of French hospitals. Concrete, the first objective of this article comprises a thorough conceptualization and operationalization of workplace social support (i.e. both professional and personal social support). Data were collected in a French hospital among a sample of 62 respondents (for the qualitative part of our study), and among a sample of 171 health care professionals (nurses and nurse aids) (for the quantitative part of our study). Our outcomes indicate that, especially, personal support given by one's supervisor is strongly and positively related to nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment. After a discussion about the outcomes, followed by some recommendations for future research, the article concludes with some practical implications for management in hospitals.

  6. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields.

  7. Guide for the design and development of a local radiological defense support system. Civil preparedness guide

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, R.

    1981-06-01

    This publication was developed to provide guidance to local director/coordinators, and Radiological Defense (RADEF) staff, for designing and developing local RADEF support systems. In some communities, the application of this guidance may require only the realignment or improvement of already existing capabilities. In others, the design, development and implementation of additional capabilities may be necessary. The guide is designed to be a working tool. It contains guides, checklists, and worksheets to help in the development of the local RADEF support system. First, it should be read in total to provide a complete picture of the RADEF program. However, it is developed in sections which can stand alone and be used separately. This may result in minor repetition of some points. Most importantly, the guide is written from the point of view that a person need not be an expert in nuclear physics or fully understand the biological effects of radiation to help implement a local RADEF support system. If properly used, it will assist any community to develop a more reliable RADEF program.

  8. [Supporting local communities in their actions for children living in a situation of poverty].

    PubMed

    Brunet, Lyse

    2014-03-01

    Avenir d’Enfants [Future of Children] emerged from a partnership between the government of Quebec and the Lucie and André Chagnon Foundation. The organization aims to provide local communities with resources, in order to support synergy between the principal early childhood organizations: childcare services, healthcare services, schools, family community organizations and municipalities. This article presents the context in which Avenir d’Enfants came into being, explains how the organization helps create the right conditions for local and regional initiatives to have an impact on the development of children living in a situation of poverty, and presents the challenges and success factors of this approach.

  9. Stress, social support and negative affectivity in children with newly diagnosed cancer: a prospective transactional analysis.

    PubMed

    Varni, J W; Katz, E

    1997-12-01

    Conceptually-driven investigations on the potentially modifiable predictors of individual differences among children with newly-diagnosed cancer may facilitate the identification of pediatric cancer patients at risk for maladjustment during the profound adversity associated with this life-threatening disease and aversive biomedical treatment. Within a risk and resistance theoretical framework, perceived stress and social support were investigated concurrently and prospectively within an exploratory design as predictors of negative affectivity (anxiety and depressive symptoms composite construct) in newly-diagnosed pediatric cancer patients at Time 1 (within one month after diagnosis), Time 2 (6 months postdiagnosis), and Time 3 (9 months postdiagnosis). Hierarchical multiple regression analysis findings indicate that perceived stress and social support have direct and independent effects on negative affectivity principally at the 9-month time interval. These findings are discussed in terms of the cognitive-behavioral treatment implications for enhancing child adjustment during the transition from the initial cancer diagnosis and aversive biomedical treatment to subsequent school and social reintegration.

  10. How Are Local People Driving and Affected by Forest Cover Change? Opportunities for Local Participation in REDD+ Measurement, Reporting and Verification.

    PubMed

    Bong, Indah Waty; Felker, Mary Elizabeth; Maryudi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Deforestation and forest degradation are complex and dynamic processes that vary from place to place. They are driven by multiple causes. Local communities are, to some extent, driving and also affected by some of these processes. Can their knowledge aid and add to place-specific assessment and monitoring of Deforestation and forest Degradation (DD) drivers? Our research was conducted in seven villages across three provinces of Indonesia (Papua, West Kalimantan and Central Java). Household surveys and focus group discussions were used to investigate how local community knowledge of DD drivers contributes to place-specific assessment and monitoring of DD drivers. We analyzed the link between drivers and local livelihoods to see how attempts to address deforestation and forest degradation might affect local communities and how this link might influence their participation in climate change mitigation measures such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) and Measuring, Reporting and Verifying (MRV) activities. We found that local knowledge is fundamental to capturing the variety of drivers particularly in countries like Indonesia where forest and socio-economic conditions are diverse. Better understanding of drivers and their importance for local livelihoods will not only contribute to a more locally appropriate design of REDD+ and monitoring systems but will also foster local participation.

  11. How Are Local People Driving and Affected by Forest Cover Change? Opportunities for Local Participation in REDD+ Measurement, Reporting and Verification

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Indah Waty; Felker, Mary Elizabeth; Maryudi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Deforestation and forest degradation are complex and dynamic processes that vary from place to place. They are driven by multiple causes. Local communities are, to some extent, driving and also affected by some of these processes. Can their knowledge aid and add to place-specific assessment and monitoring of Deforestation and forest Degradation (DD) drivers? Our research was conducted in seven villages across three provinces of Indonesia (Papua, West Kalimantan and Central Java). Household surveys and focus group discussions were used to investigate how local community knowledge of DD drivers contributes to place-specific assessment and monitoring of DD drivers. We analyzed the link between drivers and local livelihoods to see how attempts to address deforestation and forest degradation might affect local communities and how this link might influence their participation in climate change mitigation measures such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) and Measuring, Reporting and Verifying (MRV) activities. We found that local knowledge is fundamental to capturing the variety of drivers particularly in countries like Indonesia where forest and socio-economic conditions are diverse. Better understanding of drivers and their importance for local livelihoods will not only contribute to a more locally appropriate design of REDD+ and monitoring systems but will also foster local participation. PMID:27806044

  12. Does social support affect development of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Feride T.; Sabancıogullari, Selma; Aldemir, Kadriye; Kumsar, Azime K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine cognitive functions and perceived social support (SS) among individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM), and the effects of SS on the development of cognitive dysfunction (CD). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 121 patients with DM presenting at the Endocrinology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Health Services Application and Research Hospital, Sivas, Turkey between April and June 2014. Data were collected utilizing the “Patient Assessment Form”, “Standardized Mini Mental State Examination (SMMSE)”, and “Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS)”. Results: The mean score obtained for DM patients from the SMMSE was 21.55±5.7, with 65.3% found to have cognitive impairment. The total mean score of the participants for MSPSS was considered moderate (66.61±14.42). There was a significant positive correlation between cognitive function and SS (r=0.273, p=0.002). It was determined that individuals with CD had low levels of perceived SS, and that insufficient support from families and significant others contributed to the development of CD (p=0.008). Conclusion: In this study, it was determined that the cognitive function of individuals with DM was impaired and would improve as the perception of SS increased, and that perceived SS would affect the development of CD. Therefore, health professionals can contribute to the improvement of cognitive function of individuals with DM by facilitating the use of SS sources. PMID:26620984

  13. Atrazine exposure affects the ability of crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) to localize a food odor source.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Rachelle M; Peters, Tyler J; Sabhapathy, Gita S; Khan, Sana; Katta, Juhi; Abraham, Noor K

    2015-05-01

    Environmental pollutants, found in aquatic ecosystems, have been shown to have an effect on olfactory-mediated behaviors including feeding, mate attraction, and other important social behaviors. Crayfish are polytrophic, meaning that they feed on and become prey for all levels of the aquatic food web as well as are also important for the transfer of energy between benthic and terrestrial food webs. Because crayfish are a keystone species, it is important to investigate any factors that may affect their population size. Crayfish are active at night and rely heavily on their sensory appendages (e.g., antennulues, maxillipeds, and pereopods) to localize food sources. In this experiment, we investigated the effects of atrazine (ATR) exposure on the chemosensory responses of male and female crayfish to food odors. We exposed crayfish to environmentally relevant, sublethal levels of ATR [80 ppb (µg/L)] for 72 h and then examined the behavioral responses of both ATR-treated and control crayfish to food odor delivered from one end of a test arena. We used Noldus Ethovision XT software to measure odor localization and locomotory behaviors of crayfish in response to food (fish) odor. We found that control crayfish spent more time in the proximal region of the test arena and at the odor source compared with ATR-treated crayfish. Furthermore, there were no differences in the time spent moving and not moving, total distance travelled in the tank, and walking speed (cm/s) when control and ATR-treated crayfish were compared. Overall, this indicates that acute ATR exposure alters chemosensory abilities of crayfish, whereas overall motor function remains unchanged.

  14. Fast Coalescent-Based Computation of Local Branch Support from Quartet Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Sayyari, Erfan; Mirarab, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    Species tree reconstruction is complicated by effects of incomplete lineage sorting, commonly modeled by the multi-species coalescent model (MSC). While there has been substantial progress in developing methods that estimate a species tree given a collection of gene trees, less attention has been paid to fast and accurate methods of quantifying support. In this article, we propose a fast algorithm to compute quartet-based support for each branch of a given species tree with regard to a given set of gene trees. We then show how the quartet support can be used in the context of the MSC to compute (1) the local posterior probability (PP) that the branch is in the species tree and (2) the length of the branch in coalescent units. We evaluate the precision and recall of the local PP on a wide set of simulated and biological datasets, and show that it has very high precision and improved recall compared with multi-locus bootstrapping. The estimated branch lengths are highly accurate when gene tree estimation error is low, but are underestimated when gene tree estimation error increases. Computation of both the branch length and local PP is implemented as new features in ASTRAL. PMID:27189547

  15. Integrating local and technical knowledge to support soil salinity monitoring in the Amudarya river basin.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R; Liersch, S; Vurro, M; Hirsch, D

    2010-08-01

    The role of monitoring is changing due to the increasing awareness of complexity and uncertainty in environmental resources management. Monitoring systems are required to support critical reflection about the effectiveness of actions toward the achievement of management objectives. To this aim, monitoring should be based on a strong integrated and multi-scale approach. Monitoring costs could be prohibitive if the monitoring is only based on traditional scientific methods of measurements. To deal with these issues, the design of an innovative monitoring system should be based on the integration between different sources of knowledge and information. In this work the usability of local knowledge to support environmental monitoring is investigated. A multi-step participatory monitoring design process has been implemented aiming to design a program for soil salinity monitoring in the lower Amudarya river basin in Uzbekistan. Although there is an increasing awareness of the importance of stakeholders being involved in decision processes, the current socio-cultural and institutional context is not favourable to the participatory approach. The choice of method to be implemented in this work was influenced by such conditions. The analysis of the lessons learned from the experiences gained in this project revealed some important clues concerning the development of a locally-based monitoring program. These lessons can be subdivided according to three fundamental issues: the long term involvement of local community members in monitoring activities, the acceptance of locally-based monitoring systems by decision makers, and the reliability of monitoring information.

  16. Localized β-adrenergic receptor blockade does not affect sweating during exercise.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Tabor, Brian; White, Ailish

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of a locally administered nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist on sweat gland function during exercise. Systemically administered propranolol has been reported to increase, decrease, or not alter sweat production during exercise. To eliminate the confounding systemic effects associated with orally administered propranolol, we used iontophoresis to deliver it to the eccrine sweat glands within a localized area on one forearm prior to exercise. This allowed for determination of the direct effect of β-adrenergic receptor blockade on sweating during exercise. Subjects (n = 14) reported to the laboratory (23 ± 1°C, 35 ± 3% relative humidity) after having refrained from exercise for ≥12 h. Propranolol (1% solution) was administered to a 5-cm(2) area of the flexor surface of one forearm via iontophoresis (1.5 mA) for 5 min. A saline solution was administered to the opposing arm via iontophoresis. Each subject then exercised on a motor-driven treadmill at 75% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate for 20 min, while sweat rate was measured simultaneously in both forearms. Immediately after cessation of exercise, the number of active sweat glands was measured by application of iodine-impregnated paper to each forearm. The sweat rate for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 0.62 ± 41 and 0.60 ± 0.44 (SD) mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively (P = 0.86). The density of active sweat glands for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 130 ± 6 and 134 ± 5 (SD) glands/cm(2), respectively, (P = 0.33). End-exercise skin temperature was 32.9 ± 0.2 and 33.1 ± 0.3°C for the control and propranolol-treated forearm, respectively (P = 0.51). Results of the current study show that when propranolol is administered locally, thus eliminating the potential confounding systemic effects of the drug, it does not directly affect sweating during the initial stages of high-intensity exercise in young, healthy

  17. Central System of Psychosocial Support to the Czech Victims Affected by the Tsunami in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Vymetal, Stepan

    2006-02-01

    The Tsunami disaster affected several countries in Southeast Asia in December 2004 and killed or affected many tourists, most of them from Europe. Eight Czech citizens died, and about 500 Czechs were seriously mentally traumatized. The psychosocial needs of tourists included: (1) protection; (2) treatment; (3) safety; (4) relief; (5) psychological first aid; (6) connecting with family members; (7) transportation home; (8) information about possible mental reactions to trauma; (9) information about the normality of their reaction; (10) procedural and environmental orientation; (11) reinforcement of personal competencies; and (12) psycho-trauma therapy. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic was in charge of general emergency management. General coordination of psychosocial support was coordinated under the Ministry of Interior of the Czech Republic, which is connected to the Central Crisis Staff of the Czech Government. The major cooperative partners were: the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Health, Czech Airlines, psychosocial intervention teams of the Czech Republic, and the Czech Association of Clinical Psychologists. The main goals of relief workers were: (1) to bring back home the maximum number of Czech citizens; (2) to provide relevant information to the maximum number of affected Czech citizens; (3) to provide relevant information to rescue workers and professionals; and (4) to prepare working psychosocial support regional network. Major activities of the Ministry of Interior (psychology section) included: (1) establishing a psychological helpline; (2) running a team of psychological assistance (assistance in the Czech airports, psychological monitoring of tourists, crisis intervention, psychological first aid, assistance in the collection of DNA material from relatives); (3) drafting and distributing specific information materials (brochures, leaflets, address lists, printed and electronic instructions

  18. Perturbation of chromatin structure globally affects localization and recruitment of splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Schor, Ignacio E; Llères, David; Risso, Guillermo J; Pawellek, Andrea; Ule, Jernej; Lamond, Angus I; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin structure is an important factor in the functional coupling between transcription and mRNA processing, not only by regulating alternative splicing events, but also by contributing to exon recognition during constitutive splicing. We observed that depolarization of neuroblastoma cell membrane potential, which triggers general histone acetylation and regulates alternative splicing, causes a concentration of SR proteins in nuclear speckles. This prompted us to analyze the effect of chromatin structure on splicing factor distribution and dynamics. Here, we show that induction of histone hyper-acetylation results in the accumulation in speckles of multiple splicing factors in different cell types. In addition, a similar effect is observed after depletion of the heterochromatic protein HP1α, associated with repressive chromatin. We used advanced imaging approaches to analyze in detail both the structural organization of the speckle compartment and nuclear distribution of splicing factors, as well as studying direct interactions between splicing factors and their association with chromatin in vivo. The results support a model where perturbation of normal chromatin structure decreases the recruitment efficiency of splicing factors to nascent RNAs, thus causing their accumulation in speckles, which buffer the amount of free molecules in the nucleoplasm. To test this, we analyzed the recruitment of the general splicing factor U2AF65 to nascent RNAs by iCLIP technique, as a way to monitor early spliceosome assembly. We demonstrate that indeed histone hyper-acetylation decreases recruitment of U2AF65 to bulk 3' splice sites, coincident with the change in its localization. In addition, prior to the maximum accumulation in speckles, ∼20% of genes already show a tendency to decreased binding, while U2AF65 seems to increase its binding to the speckle-located ncRNA MALAT1. All together, the combined imaging and biochemical approaches support a model where chromatin

  19. Perturbation of Chromatin Structure Globally Affects Localization and Recruitment of Splicing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Guillermo J.; Pawellek, Andrea; Ule, Jernej; Lamond, Angus I.; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin structure is an important factor in the functional coupling between transcription and mRNA processing, not only by regulating alternative splicing events, but also by contributing to exon recognition during constitutive splicing. We observed that depolarization of neuroblastoma cell membrane potential, which triggers general histone acetylation and regulates alternative splicing, causes a concentration of SR proteins in nuclear speckles. This prompted us to analyze the effect of chromatin structure on splicing factor distribution and dynamics. Here, we show that induction of histone hyper-acetylation results in the accumulation in speckles of multiple splicing factors in different cell types. In addition, a similar effect is observed after depletion of the heterochromatic protein HP1α, associated with repressive chromatin. We used advanced imaging approaches to analyze in detail both the structural organization of the speckle compartment and nuclear distribution of splicing factors, as well as studying direct interactions between splicing factors and their association with chromatin in vivo. The results support a model where perturbation of normal chromatin structure decreases the recruitment efficiency of splicing factors to nascent RNAs, thus causing their accumulation in speckles, which buffer the amount of free molecules in the nucleoplasm. To test this, we analyzed the recruitment of the general splicing factor U2AF65 to nascent RNAs by iCLIP technique, as a way to monitor early spliceosome assembly. We demonstrate that indeed histone hyper-acetylation decreases recruitment of U2AF65 to bulk 3′ splice sites, coincident with the change in its localization. In addition, prior to the maximum accumulation in speckles, ∼20% of genes already show a tendency to decreased binding, while U2AF65 seems to increase its binding to the speckle-located ncRNA MALAT1. All together, the combined imaging and biochemical approaches support a model where chromatin

  20. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: A gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, G.; Deak, P.; Hall, L.M.

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new {gamma}-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggests that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel {alpha}-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: a gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Deák, P; Kasbekar, D P; Gil, D W; Hall, L M

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new gamma-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggest that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel alpha-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation.

  2. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  3. Decision Support from Local Data: Creating Adaptive Order Menus from Past Clinician Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Jeffrey G.; Szolovits, Peter; Downs, Stephen; Schadow, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing care variability through guidelines has significantly benefited patients. Nonetheless, guideline-based clinical decision support (CDS) systems are not widely implemented or used, are frequently out-of-date, and cannot address complex care for which guidelines do not exist. Here, we develop and evaluate a complementary approach - using Bayesian network (BN) learning to generate adaptive, context-specific treatment menus based on local order-entry data. These menus can be used as a draft for expert review, in order to minimize development time for local decision support content. This is in keeping with the vision outlined in the US Health Information Technology Strategic Plan, which describes a healthcare system that learns from itself. Materials and Methods We used the Greedy Equivalence Search algorithm to learn four 50-node domain-specific BNs from 11,344 encounters: abdominal pain in the emergency department, inpatient pregnancy, hypertension in the urgent visit clinic, and altered mental state in the intensive care unit. We developed a system to produce situation-specific, rank-ordered treatment menus from these networks. We evaluated this system with a hospital-simulation methodology and computed Area Under the Receiver-Operator Curve (AUC) and average menu position at time of selection. We also compared this system with a similar association-rule-mining approach. Results A short order menu on average contained the next order (weighted average length 3.91–5.83 items). Overall predictive ability was good: average AUC above 0.9 for 25% of order types and overall average AUC .714–.844 (depending on domain). However, AUC had high variance (.50–.99). Higher AUC correlated with tighter clusters and more connections in the graphs, indicating importance of appropriate contextual data. Comparison with an association rule mining approach showed similar performance for only the most common orders with dramatic divergence as orders are less

  4. Factors Affecting Depression During Pregnancy and the Correlation Between Social Support and Pregnancy Depression

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Songul; Yesilcicek Calik, Kiymet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women are seriously subjected to psychiatric diseases during pregnancy and depression is the most prevailing one among these diseases. There is a relation between the social support and depression in pregnancy whose predisposing factors are genetic, psychological, biological, environmental, and hormonal. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the frequency of depression symptoms, and its risk factors. Also it studied the correlation between social support and pregnancy depression. Patients and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross-sectional study. It was conducted on 266 pregnant women selected by simple random method from all pregnant women admitted at the Maternity Hospital of Trabzon, Turkey from May 21 to June 13, 2008. The data were collected with a questionnaire form, the Beck depression inventory (BDI), and the multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). Results: The mean BDI score of the pregnant women was 11.12 ± 6.65. According to the BDI, 46.2% of the pregnant women had no depression symptoms, 34.59% of them had mild, 13.91% had moderate, and 4.89% had severe level of depression symptoms. It was found that such factors as the educational level of the pregnant women and their husbands, having an undesired pregnancy, suffering from a chronic disease before pregnancy, presence of pregnancy-related problems, having a child with disability or having relatives whose children had disability, and smoking during pregnancy were the risk factors affecting the severity of the depression symptoms and these results were statistically significant (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the mean MSPSS score was 67.89 ± 14.26 and it was found that the pregnant women got the highest social support from their husbands. It was found that there was a significant correlation between BDI and MSPSS total score and its subscale scores (P < 0.05). Conclusions: According to this study, one-fifth of pregnant women were found to experience depressive

  5. Automated foveola localization in retinal 3D-OCT images using structural support vector machine prediction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Mei; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Rehg, James M

    2012-01-01

    We develop an automated method to determine the foveola location in macular 3D-OCT images in either healthy or pathological conditions. Structural Support Vector Machine (S-SVM) is trained to directly predict the location of the foveola, such that the score at the ground truth position is higher than that at any other position by a margin scaling with the associated localization loss. This S-SVM formulation directly minimizes the empirical risk of localization error, and makes efficient use of all available training data. It deals with the localization problem in a more principled way compared to the conventional binary classifier learning that uses zero-one loss and random sampling of negative examples. A total of 170 scans were collected for the experiment. Our method localized 95.1% of testing scans within the anatomical area of the foveola. Our experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively identify the location of the foveola, facilitating diagnosis around this important landmark.

  6. An interactive local flattening operator to support digital investigations on artwork surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pietroni, Nico; Massimiliano, Corsini; Cignoni, Paolo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    Analyzing either high-frequency shape detail or any other 2D fields (scalar or vector) embedded over a 3D geometry is a complex task, since detaching the detail from the overall shape can be tricky. An alternative approach is to move to the 2D space, resolving shape reasoning to easier image processing techniques. In this paper we propose a novel framework for the analysis of 2D information distributed over 3D geometry, based on a locally smooth parametrization technique that allows us to treat local 3D data in terms of image content. The proposed approach has been implemented as a sketch-based system that allows to design with a few gestures a set of (possibly overlapping) parameterizations of rectangular portions of the surface. We demonstrate that, due to the locality of the parametrization, the distortion is under an acceptable threshold, while discontinuities can be avoided since the parametrized geometry is always homeomorphic to a disk. We show the effectiveness of the proposed technique to solve specific Cultural Heritage (CH) tasks: the analysis of chisel marks over the surface of a unfinished sculpture and the local comparison of multiple photographs mapped over the surface of an artwork. For this very difficult task, we believe that our framework and the corresponding tool are the first steps toward a computer-based shape reasoning system, able to support CH scholars with a medium they are more used to.

  7. The threat of a support surface translation affects anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Phanthanourak, Angel L; Cleworth, Taylor W; Adkin, Allan L; Carpenter, Mark G; Tokuno, Craig D

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how postural threat in the form of a potential perturbation affects an individual's ability to perform a heel raise. Seventeen adults completed three conditions: i) low threat, where participants performed a heel raise in response to a "go" tone, ii) high threat, where participants either heard the same "go" tone, for which they performed a heel raise, or experienced a support surface translation in the medio-lateral direction that disturbed their balance, and iii) choice reaction time task, where participants either completed a heel raise in response to the same "go" tone or a toe raise in response to a lower pitched tone. For all heel raise trials, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) were quantified from center of pressure (COP) recordings and electromyographic (EMG) activity from the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL). Results indicated that participants exhibited larger APAs, as reflected by the greater backward COP displacement (p=0.038) and velocity (p=0.022) as well as a larger TA EMG amplitude (p=0.045), during the high threat condition. During the execution phase of the heel raise, an earlier (p=0.014) and larger (p=0.041) SOL EMG activation were observed during the high threat condition. These results contrast with previous findings of reduced APAs when the postural threat was evoked through changes in surface height. Therefore, the characteristics of the postural threat must be considered to isolate the effects of threat on anticipatory movement control.

  8. The Push and Pull of Standards-Based Reform: How Does It Affect Local School Districts and Students with Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raber, Suzanne; Roach, Virginia; Fraser, Katherine, Ed.

    This report discusses findings from case studies in California, Missouri, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania that examined ways in which state-level general and special education reforms interact, impact local districts, and affect the educational programs for students with disabilities. Chapter 1 reviews two major state-level priorities for education…

  9. Maintaining a Local Data Integration System in Support of Weather Forecast Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.; Hoeth, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX have used a local data integration system (LDIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LDIS was developed by NASA's Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et ai, 2004) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national- or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features

  10. Hostility and social support explain physical activity beyond negative affect among young men, but not women, in college.

    PubMed

    Maier, Karl J; James, Ashley E

    2014-01-01

    We examined social support as a moderator of cynical hostility in relation to physical activity and body mass index among college students (n = 859; M = 18.71 years (SD = 1.22); 60% women, 84% White). After controlling for negative affect in hierarchical linear regression models, greater hostility was associated with lesser physical activity among those with low social support, as expected. Greater hostility was also associated with greater physical activity among those high in social support, ps < .05. Effects were observed for men only. Hostility and social support were unrelated to body mass index, ps > .05. Young men with a hostile disposition and low social support may be at risk for a sedentary lifestyle for reasons other than negative affect.

  11. Local-Scale Air Quality Modeling in Support of Human Health and Exposure Research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, V.

    2010-12-01

    Spatially- and temporally-sparse information on air quality is a key concern for air-pollution-related environmental health studies. Monitor networks are sparse in both space and time, are costly to maintain, and are often designed purposely to avoid detecting highly localized sources. Recent studies have shown that more narrowly defining the geographic domain of the study populations and improvements in the measured/estimated ambient concentrations can lead to stronger associations between air pollution and hospital admissions and mortality records. Traditionally, ambient air quality measurements have been used as a primary input to support human health and exposure research. However, there is increasing evidence that the current ambient monitoring network is not capturing sharp gradients in exposure due to the presence of high concentration levels near, for example, major roadways. Many air pollutants exhibit large concentration gradients near large emitters such as major roadways, factories, ports, etc. To overcome these limitations, researchers are now beginning to use air quality models to support air pollution exposure and health studies. There are many advantages to using air quality models over traditional approaches based on existing ambient measurements alone. First, models can provide spatially- and temporally-resolved concentrations as direct input to exposure and health studies and thus better defining the concentration levels for the population in the geographic domain. Air quality models have a long history of use in air pollution regulations, and supported by regulatory agencies and a large user community. Also, models can provide bidirectional linkages between sources of emissions and ambient concentrations, thus allowing exploration of various mitigation strategies to reduce risk to exposure. In order to provide best estimates of air concentrations to support human health and exposure studies, model estimates should consider local-scale features

  12. Verifying of endocrine disruptor chemical affect to the mouse testes: can raman spectroscopy support histology study?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriana, Bibin B.; Oshima, Yusuke; Takanezawa, Sota; Tay, Tat W.; Rosawati Soeratman, Catherine Linda; Alam, Mohammad S.; Mitsuoka, Hiroki; Zhu, Xiao B.; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    One of suspect environmental endocrine disruptors that affect mouse male reproduction by altering the morphology of Sertoli cells and spermatogenic cells is phthalate. The effects of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP), one of metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate , on immature mouse testes in vivo were examined. We have recently shown that MEHP induced Sertoli cells necrosis and spermatogenic cells apoptosis in mice by TUNEL method, F-actin staining, and ultrastructural study, but there is no data for biochemical changing of testes due to those methods could not explore. To verify in detail of it, we conducted Raman spectroscopy study with 785 nm wavelength laser line, 50mW of laser power and 3 minutes of exposure time to analysis the MEHP-treated testicular tissue, which has been fixatived by 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA). Five weeks old (5 w.o) male mice were used in this experiment. As the results, the alterations were observed by Raman spectroscopy that there are significantly differences of DNA, actin filament, type IV collagen and amide I between control group (0 μM MEHP) and treatment group (100 μM MEHP). These results significantly support histology staining observation (such as the apoptotic spermatogenic cells which is associated with DNA fragmentation and F-actin disruption) and ultrastructural observation (such as mitochondria rupture and disintegration of nucleus membrane). Raman spectroscopy can be used for 4% PFA-fixatived tissue observation. However, we recommend that Raman spectroscopy may be able to be expanded as an armamentarium not just for the clarification of histology staining and ultrastructural study, but furthermore, it may be as a non-invasion assessment for screening animal tissue toxicity of chemical in future.

  13. Increasing social support for depressed individuals: a cross-cultural assessment of an affect-expectancy approach.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jason T; Alvaro, Eusebio M; Crano, William D; Lienemann, Brianna A; Hohman, Zachary P; O'Brien, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Depression is a mental illness affecting 121 million people. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration recently launched a national, bilingual (English and Spanish) campaign to motivate young adults to support friends with mental illness. This article highlights and assesses the usefulness of two theoretically derived variables for increasing the social support received by all depressed individuals: (a) affect and (b) social support outcome expectations. In accord with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's bilingual campaign, the authors conducted two studies using intercepts at 2 swap meets in the U.S. Southwest. One study sample consisted of Spanish-dominant Hispanics, the other non-Hispanics. For both samples, results indicate that affect, social support outcome expectations, and their interaction accounted for more than 50% of the variance of social support intentions (67% in the Hispanic sample when familism was considered). Affect is commonplace in the helping behavior literature; results indicate social support outcome expectations deserve equal consideration. Moreover, an unexpected finding emerged: Perceiving a lack of willpower, need for attention, and lack of moral character to be the cause of depression resulted in increased sympathy among the Hispanic sample but increased anger among non-Hispanics.

  14. Understanding Locally, Culturally, and Contextually Relevant Mental Health Problems among Rwandan Children and Adolescents Affected by HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Rubin-Smith, Julia E.; Beardslee, William R.; Stulac, Sara N.; Fayida, Ildephonse; Safren, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In assessing the mental health of HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa, researchers often employ mental health measures developed in other settings. However, measures derived from standard Western psychiatric criteria are frequently based on conceptual models of illness or terminology that may or may not be an appropriate for diverse populations. Understanding local perceptions of mental health problems can aid in the selection or creation of appropriate measures. This study used qualitative methodologies (Free Listing [FL], Key Informant [KI] interviews, and Clinician Interviews [C-KIs]) to understand local perceptions of mental health problems facing HIV/AIDS-affected youth in Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. Several syndrome terms were identified by participants: agahinda kenshi, kwiheba, guhangayika, ihahamuka, umushiha and uburara. While these local syndromes share some similarities with Western mood, anxiety, and conduct disorders, they also contain important culture-specific features and gradations of severity. Our findings underscore the importance of understanding local manifestations of mental health syndromes when conducting mental health assessments and when planning interventions for HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in diverse settings. PMID:21271393

  15. Findings from an organizational network analysis to support local public health management.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jacqueline; Caldwell, Michael; Rockoff, Maxine L; Gebbie, Kristine; Carley, Kathleen M; Bakken, Suzanne

    2008-07-01

    We assessed the feasibility of using organizational network analysis in a local public health organization. The research setting was an urban/suburban county health department with 156 employees. The goal of the research was to study communication and information flow in the department and to assess the technique for public health management. Network data were derived from survey questionnaires. Computational analysis was performed with the Organizational Risk Analyzer. Analysis revealed centralized communication, limited interdependencies, potential knowledge loss through retirement, and possible informational silos. The findings suggested opportunities for more cross program coordination but also suggested the presences of potentially efficient communication paths and potentially beneficial social connectedness. Managers found the findings useful to support decision making. Public health organizations must be effective in an increasingly complex environment. Network analysis can help build public health capacity for complex system management.

  16. The South West Local Health Integration Network Behavioural Supports Ontario Experience.

    PubMed

    Gutmanis, Iris; Speziale, Jennifer; Van Bussel, Lisa; Girard, Julie; Hillier, Loretta; Simpson, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Creating a seamless system of care with improved system and patient outcomes is imperative to the estimated 35,000 older adults living with mental health problems and addictions in the South West Local Health Integration Network. Building on existing investments and those offered through the Behavioural Supports Ontario program, strategies to improve system coordination were put in place, cross-sectoral partnerships were fostered, interdisciplinary teams from across the care continuum were linked, and educational opportunities were promoted. This evolving, co-created system has resulted in a decrease in alternate level of care cases among those with behavioural specialized needs and improved client/family perceptions of care. Also, in fiscal year 2014/15, it provided more than 7,000 care providers with learning opportunities.

  17. Maintaining a Local Data Integration System in Support of Weather Forecast Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.; Hoeth, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LDIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. Each has benefited from 3-dimensional analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national- or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive and complete understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Recent efforts have been undertaken to update the LDIS through the formal tasking process of NASA's Applied Meteorology Unit. The goals include upgrading LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporating new sources of observational data, and making adjustments to shell scripts written to govern the system. A series of scripts run a complete modeling system consisting of the preprocessing step, the main model integration, and the post-processing step. The preprocessing step prepares the terrain, surface characteristics data sets, and the objective analysis for model initialization. Data ingested through ADAS include (but are not limited to) Level II Weather Surveillance Radar- 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) data from six Florida radars, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) visible and infrared satellite imagery, surface and upper air observations throughout Florida from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory/Global Systems Division

  18. Cyberinfrastructure to support Real-time, End-to-End, High Resolution, Localized Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Lindholm, D.; Baltzer, T.; Domenico, B.

    2004-12-01

    From natural disasters such as flooding and forest fires to man-made disasters such as toxic gas releases, the impact of weather-influenced severe events on society can be profound. Understanding, predicting, and mitigating such local, mesoscale events calls for a cyberinfrastructure to integrate multidisciplinary data, tools, and services as well as the capability to generate and use high resolution data (such as wind and precipitation) from localized models. The need for such end to end systems -- including data collection, distribution, integration, assimilation, regionalized mesoscale modeling, analysis, and visualization -- has been realized to some extent in many academic and quasi-operational environments, especially for atmospheric sciences data. However, many challenges still remain in the integration and synthesis of data from multiple sources and the development of interoperable data systems and services across those disciplines. Over the years, the Unidata Program Center has developed several tools that have either directly or indirectly facilitated these local modeling activities. For example, the community is using Unidata technologies such as the Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, Local Data Manger (LDM), decoders, netCDF libraries, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) in their real-time prediction efforts. In essence, these technologies for data reception and processing, local and remote access, cataloging, and analysis and visualization coupled with technologies from others in the community are becoming the foundation of a cyberinfrastructure to support an end-to-end regional forecasting system. To build on these capabilities, the Unidata Program Center is pleased to be a significant contributor to the Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) project, a NSF-funded multi-institutional large Information Technology Research effort. The goal of LEAD is to create an

  19. Both population size and patch quality affect local extinctions and colonizations.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2010-01-07

    Currently, the habitat of many species is fragmented, resulting in small local populations with individuals occasionally dispersing between the remaining habitat patches. In a solitary bee metapopulation, extinction probability was related to both local bee population sizes and pollen resources measured as host plant population size. Patch size, on the other hand, had no additional predictive power. The turnover rate of local bee populations in 63 habitat patches over 4 years was high, with 72 extinction events and 31 colonization events, but the pollen plant population was stable with no extinctions or colonizations. Both pollen resources and bee populations had strong and independent effects on extinction probability, but connectivity was not of importance. Colonizations occurred more frequently within larger host plant populations. For metapopulation survival of the bee, large pollen plant populations are essential, independent of current bee population size.

  20. Target Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Online Semi-Supervised Support Vector Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jaehyun; Kim, H. Jin

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning has been successfully used for target localization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) due to its accurate and robust estimation against highly nonlinear and noisy sensor measurement. For efficient and adaptive learning, this paper introduces online semi-supervised support vector regression (OSS-SVR). The first advantage of the proposed algorithm is that, based on semi-supervised learning framework, it can reduce the requirement on the amount of the labeled training data, maintaining accurate estimation. Second, with an extension to online learning, the proposed OSS-SVR automatically tracks changes of the system to be learned, such as varied noise characteristics. We compare the proposed algorithm with semi-supervised manifold learning, an online Gaussian process and online semi-supervised colocalization. The algorithms are evaluated for estimating the unknown location of a mobile robot in a WSN. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more accurate under the smaller amount of labeled training data and is robust to varying noise. Moreover, the suggested algorithm performs fast computation, maintaining the best localization performance in comparison with the other methods. PMID:26024420

  1. 34 CFR 222.31 - To which local educational agencies does the Secretary make basic support payments under section...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false To which local educational agencies does the Secretary make basic support payments under section 8003(b) of the Act? 222.31 Section 222.31 Education...) and (e) of the Act § 222.31 To which local educational agencies does the Secretary make basic...

  2. 34 CFR 222.38 - What is the maximum basic support payment that a local educational agency may receive under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... educational agency may receive under section 8003(b)? 222.38 Section 222.38 Education Regulations of the... Act § 222.38 What is the maximum basic support payment that a local educational agency may receive... assistance. (c) The comparable local contribution rate (LCR) determined in accordance with §§...

  3. Components of RNA granules affect their localization and dynamics in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Kazuhiko; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2017-04-12

    In neurons, RNA transport is important for local protein synthesis. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are transported along dendrites as large RNA granules. The localization and dynamics of Puralpha and Stau1, major components of RNA transport granules, were investigated in cultured hippocampal neurons. Puralpha-positive granules were localized in both the shafts and spines of dendrites. In contrast, Stau1-positive granules tended to be localized mainly in dendritic shafts. More than 90% of Puralpha-positive granules were positive for Stau1 in immature dendrites, while only half were positive in mature dendrites. Stau1-negative Puralpha granules tended to be stationary with fewer anterograde and retrograde movements than Stau1-positive Puralpha granules. After metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activation, Stau-1 positive granules remained in the dendritic shafts, while Puralpha granules translocated from the shaft to the spine. The translocation of Puralpha granules was dependent on Myosin Va, an actin-based molecular motor protein. Collectively, our findings suggest the possibility that the loss of Stau1 in Puralpha-positive RNA granules might promote their activity-dependent translocation into dendritic spines, which could underlie the regulation of protein synthesis in synapses.

  4. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  5. Principals and Local School Councils: An International Comparison of Judicial Policy Affecting School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menacker, Julius

    1996-01-01

    Compares the legal reasoning and results in two cases brought to courts by principals dismissed by local school governing boards under authority granted to these community groups by school reform laws in Chicago, Illinois, and New Zealand. Observations are made regarding the need for appropriate adjustments in school-based-management reform law…

  6. Probing Spatial Proximity of Supported Lipid Bilayers to Silica Surfaces by Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ferhan, Abdul Rahim; Jackman, Joshua A; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-04-04

    On account of high surface sensitivity, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors have proven widely useful for studying lipid membrane configurations at solid-liquid interfaces. Key measurement capabilities include distinguishing adsorbed vesicles from supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) as well as profiling the extent of deformation among adsorbed vesicles. Such capabilities rely on detecting geometrical changes in lipid membrane configuration on a length scale that is comparable to the decay length of the LSPR-induced electromagnetic field enhancement (∼5-20 nm). Herein, we report that LSPR sensors are also capable of probing nanoscale (∼1 nm) variations in the distance between SLBs and underlying silica-coated surfaces. By tuning the electrostatic properties of lipid membranes, we could modulate the bilayer-substrate interaction and corresponding separation distance, as verified by simultaneous LSPR and quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) measurements. Theoretical calculations of the expected variation in the LSPR measurement response agree well with experimental results and support that the LSPR measurement response is sensitive to subtle variations in the bilayer-substrate separation distance.

  7. Evaluation of local gas exchange in a pulsating respiratory support catheter.

    PubMed

    Eash, Heide J; Frankowski, Brian J; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2005-01-01

    An intravenous respiratory support catheter, the next generation of artificial lungs, is being developed in our laboratory to potentially support acute respiratory failure or patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute exacerbations. A rapidly pulsating 25 ml balloon inside a bundle of hollow fiber membranes facilitates supplemental oxygenation and CO2 removal. In this study, we hypothesized that non-uniform gas exchange in different regions of this fiber bundle was present because of asymmetric balloon collapse and the interaction of longitudinal flow. Four quarter regions and two rings around the central balloon were selectively perfused to evaluate local gas exchange in a 3.18 cm test section using helium as the sweep gas. Quarter region CO2 exchange rates at 400 beats per minute were 156.8 +/- 0.8, 162.5 +/- 1.8, 157.2 +/- 0.2, and 196.6 +/- 0.8 ml/min/m2 (top, front, bottom, and back, respectively). The back section, adjacent to convex balloon collapse, had 17-20% higher exchange than the other sections caused by higher relative velocities past its stationary fibers. Inner and outer ring maximum pulsation gas exchange rates were 174.4 +/- 1.8 and 174.6 +/- 0.9 ml/min/m2, respectively, showing that fluid flow was equally distributed throughout the fiber bundle.

  8. The NOAA Local Climate Analysis Tool - An Application in Support of a Weather Ready Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Horsfall, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    Citizens across the U.S., including decision makers from the local to the national level, have a multitude of questions about climate, such as the current state and how that state fits into the historical context, and more importantly, how climate will impact them, especially with regard to linkages to extreme weather events. Developing answers to these types of questions for locations has typically required extensive work to gather data, conduct analyses, and generate relevant explanations and graphics. Too frequently providers don't have ready access to or knowledge of reliable, trusted data sets, nor sound, scientifically accepted analysis techniques such that they can provide a rapid response to queries they receive. In order to support National Weather Service (NWS) local office forecasters with information they need to deliver timely responses to climate-related questions from their customers, we have developed the Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT). LCAT uses the principles of artificial intelligence to respond to queries, in particular, through use of machine technology that responds intelligently to input from users. A user translates customer questions into primary variables and issues and LCAT pulls the most relevant data and analysis techniques to provide information back to the user, who in turn responds to their customer. Most responses take on the order of 10 seconds, which includes providing statistics, graphical displays of information, translations for users, metadata, and a summary of the user request to LCAT. Applications in Phase I of LCAT, which is targeted for the NWS field offices, include Climate Change Impacts, Climate Variability Impacts, Drought Analysis and Impacts, Water Resources Applications, Attribution of Extreme Events, and analysis techniques such as time series analysis, trend analysis, compositing, and correlation and regression techniques. Data accessed by LCAT are homogenized historical COOP and Climate Prediction Center

  9. How Affective Is a "Like"?: The Effect of Paralinguistic Digital Affordances on Perceived Social Support.

    PubMed

    Wohn, Donghee Yvette; Carr, Caleb T; Hayes, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    A national survey asked 323 U.S. adults about paralinguistic digital affordances (PDAs) and how these forms of lightweight feedback within social media were associated with their perceived social support. People perceived PDAs (e.g., Likes, Favorites, and Upvotes) as socially supportive both quantitatively and qualitatively, even without implicit meaning associated with them. People who are highly sensitive about what others think of them and have high self-esteem are more likely to perceive higher social support from PDAs.

  10. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  11. Social Support and Behavioral and Affective School Engagement: The Effects of Peers, Parents, and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estell, David B.; Perdue, Neil H.

    2013-01-01

    School engagement has long been seen as an important component of school completion, and research shows that social support in the home and school promotes engagement. However, many researchers have argued that it is not a unitary construct but rather a multifaceted phenomenon, and the role of peer social support has not been as well studied as…

  12. Declining social support in adolescents prior to first episode psychosis: associations with negative and affective symptoms.

    PubMed

    Devylder, J E; Gearing, R E

    2013-11-30

    Social support for individuals with psychosis is associated with decreased symptom severity, improved outcomes, and recovery. In adolescents, declining social support prior to the first hospitalization has been shown to predict time to relapse, which may have implications for early intervention. Data were collected on adolescents (n=84) following a first hospitalization for a psychotic episode in order to examine how change in social support relates to the duration and type of untreated symptoms. Most adolescents experienced a decline in social support (n=46) prior to index hospitalization. Chi-square analyses showed that declining social support was related to negative symptoms and longer duration of untreated psychosis, whereas stable social support was associated with manic symptoms and diagnosis of Bipolar disorder. When entered together into a logistic regression model, the decline in social support was primarily explained by the type of symptoms, rather than by the duration of untreated symptoms. These findings are relevant for targeting psychosocial treatments toward adolescents who may have particular deficits in social support during the prodromal phase and first episode of psychosis.

  13. Internal and External Factors Affecting Teachers' Adoption of Formative Assessment to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izci, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Assessment forms an important part of instruction. Assessment that aims to support learning is known as formative assessment and it contributes student's learning gain and motivation. However, teachers rarely use assessment formatively to aid their students' learning. Thus reviewing the factors that limit or support teachers' practices of…

  14. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-value< 0.001), which are closely related to K562. That is, cell type specific binding patterns are crucial for choosing the correct transcription factors for the model. Comparison of predictors obtained from binding sites in the GM12878 cell line with those from K562 shows that the amount of difference between binding patterns is directly related to the quality of the prediction. By identifying individual genes whose expression is predicted accurately by the binding sites, we are able to link transcription factors FOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation. PMID:22721266

  15. Parameters Affecting Loads on Buried Structures Subjected to Localized Blast Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Structures Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180-6199...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Structures Laboratory, Technical Report SL-92-9...Loads on Buried Structures Subjected to Localized Blast Effects." These analyses were performed in the Structures Laboratory (SL), U.S. Army Engineer

  16. Should triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype affect local-regional therapy decision making?

    PubMed

    Moran, Meena S

    2014-01-01

    The more aggressive biologic characteristics and the current lack of targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) make local-regional management decisions challenging for physicians. TNBC is associated with patients of younger age, black race and BRCA1 mutation carriers. Distinctions between BRCA1-associated and sporadic TNBC include increased lifetime risk of ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancer after breast cancer therapy (BCT) for BRCA carriers, which is not shared by sporadic TNBC. However, the presence of a BRCA mutation should not preclude a breast-conservation approach in patients who are otherwise appropriate candidates for BCT. Data suggest that local-regional relapse (LRR) at baseline after BCT appears to be comparable for TNBC and the HER2-positive subgroups, but is about 50% greater than luminal tumors. LRR appears to be similarly increased after mastectomy; thus, TNBC should not be a contra-indication for BCT. Recent hypothesis-generating data suggest less LRR after BCT (where radiation is routinely delivered) than with mastectomy for early-stage TNBC. To date, no specific local-regional guideline recommendations for TNBC exist. Level I outcome data for TNBC using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (hWBRT) are lacking. TNBC should be treated with APBI only on clinical trials. Although hWBRT may be considered in TNBC, its association with younger age, advanced disease and use of systemic chemotherapy often precludes its use for this subtype. Until definitive treatment strategies are validated in large datasets and confirmed in randomized trials, TNBC subtype, in and of itself, should not direct local-regional management treatment decisions.

  17. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2010-07-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random-dot field paired with its spatially shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4- to 5.5-month-old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring visual-evoked potentials. Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image.

  18. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants

    PubMed Central

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random dot field paired with its spatially-shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4–5.5 month old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs). Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image. PMID:19642888

  19. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  20. Social Support as a Neglected E-Learning Motivator Affecting Trainee's Decisions of Continuous Intentions of Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Cathy; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Weng, Apollo

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from the social influence theory and acknowledging that the others' support within the work context affects employees' learning, values, and behaviours, an alternative framework was proposed to explain employees' learning satisfaction and future intention to participate in e-training programs in the current study. 578 survey data collected…

  1. The Role of Maternal Verbal, Affective, and Behavioral Support in Preschool Children's Independent and Collaborative Autobiographical Memory Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkina, Marina; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated the individual and relative contributions of different aspects of maternal support (i.e., verbal, affective, and behavioral) in relation to children's collaborative and independent reminiscing. Four-year-old children discussed personal past experiences with their mothers and with a researcher. In collaborative recall with…

  2. Case Study on the Effect of Word Repetition Method Supported by Neurological Affecting Model on Fluent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Erol

    2013-01-01

    This research is a case study which is a qualitative study model and named as example event as well. The purpose of this research is determining the effect of word repetitive reading method supported with neurological affecting model on fluent reading. In this study, False Analysis Inventory was used in order to determine the student's oral…

  3. Supporting breastfeeding In Local Communities (SILC) in Victoria, Australia: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della A; Amir, Lisa H; Cullinane, Meabh; Shafiei, Touran; Watson, Lyndsey F; Ridgway, Lael; Cramer, Rhian L; Small, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Breastfeeding has significant health benefits for mothers and infants. Despite recommendations from the WHO, by 6 months of age 40% of Australian infants are receiving no breast milk. Increased early postpartum breastfeeding support may improve breastfeeding maintenance. 2 community-based interventions to increase breastfeeding duration in local government areas (LGAs) in Victoria, Australia, were implemented and evaluated. Design 3-arm cluster randomised trial. Setting LGAs in Victoria, Australia. Participants LGAs across Victoria with breastfeeding initiation rates below the state average and > 450 births/year were eligible for inclusion. The LGA was the unit of randomisation, and maternal and child health centres in the LGAs comprised the clusters. Interventions Early home-based breastfeeding support by a maternal and child health nurse (home visit, HV) with or without access to a community-based breastfeeding drop-in centre (HV+drop-in). Main outcome measures The proportion of infants receiving ‘any’ breast milk at 3, 4 and 6 months (women's self-report). Findings 4 LGAs were randomised to the comparison arm and provided usual care (n=41 clusters; n=2414 women); 3 to HV (n=32 clusters; n=2281 women); and 3 to HV+drop-in (n=26 clusters; 2344 women). There was no difference in breastfeeding at 4 months in either HV (adjusted OR 1.04; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.29) or HV+drop-in (adjusted OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.08) compared with the comparison arm, no difference at 3 or 6 months, nor in any LGA in breastfeeding before and after the intervention. Some issues were experienced with intervention protocol fidelity. Conclusions Early home-based and community-based support proved difficult to implement. Interventions to increase breastfeeding in complex community settings require sufficient time and partnership building for successful implementation. We cannot conclude that additional community-based support is ineffective in improving breastfeeding

  4. Integrating Learning Styles and Personality Traits into an Affective Model to Support Learner's Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontidis, Makis; Halatsis, Constantin

    The aim of this paper is to present a model in order to integrate the learning style and the personality traits of a learner into an enhanced Affective Style which is stored in the learner’s model. This model which can deal with the cognitive abilities as well as the affective preferences of the learner is called Learner Affective Model (LAM). The LAM is used to retain learner’s knowledge and activities during his interaction with a Web-based learning environment and also to provide him with the appropriate pedagogical guidance. The proposed model makes use of an ontological approach in combination with the Bayesian Network model and contributes to the efficient management of the LAM in an Affective Module.

  5. The power of siblings and caregivers: under-explored types of social support among children affected by HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Sharer, Melissa; Cluver, Lucie; Shields, Joseph J.; Ahearn, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children affected by HIV and AIDS have significantly higher rates of mental health problems than unaffected children. There is a need for research to examine how social support functions as a source of resiliency for children in high HIV-prevalence settings such as South Africa. The purpose of this research was to explore how family social support relates to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress (PTS). Using the ecological model as a frame, data were drawn from a 2011 cross-sectional study of 1380 children classified as either orphaned by AIDS and/or living with an AIDS sick family member. The children were from high-poverty, high HIV-prevalent rural and urban communities in South Africa. Social support was analyzed in depth by examining the source (e.g. caregiver, sibling) and the type (e.g. emotional, instrumental, quality). These variables were entered into multiple regression analyses to estimate the most parsimonious regression models to show the relationships between social support and depression, anxiety, and PTS symptoms among the children. Siblings emerged as the most consistent source of social support on mental health. Overall caregiver and sibling support explained 13% variance in depression, 12% in anxiety, and 11% in PTS. Emotional support was the most frequent type of social support associated with mental health in all regression models, with higher levels of quality and instrumental support having the strongest relation to positive mental health outcomes. Although instrumental and quality support from siblings were related to positive mental health, unexpectedly, the higher the level of emotional support received from a sibling resulted in the child reporting more symptoms of depression, anxiety, and PTS. The opposite was true for emotional support provided via caregivers, higher levels of this support was related to lower levels of all mental health symptoms. Sex was significant in all regressions, indicating the presence of

  6. The contribution of schools to supporting the well being of children affected by HIV in eastern Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Pufall, Erica L.; Gregson, Simon; Eaton, Jeffrey W.; Masoka, Tidings; Mpandaguta, Edith; Andersen, Louise; Skovdal, Morten; Nyamukapa, Constance; Campbell, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Schools are often cited as a source of support for orphans and children affected by HIV/AIDS in populations experiencing generalized HIV epidemics and severe poverty. Here we investigate the success of schools at including and supporting the well being of vulnerable children in rural Zimbabwe. Design Data from a cross-sectional household survey of 4577 children (aged 6–17 years), conducted between 2009 and 2011, were linked to data on the characteristics of 28 primary schools and 18 secondary schools from a parallel monitoring and evaluation facility survey. Methods We construct two measures of school quality (one general and one HIV-specific) and use multivariable regression to test whether these were associated with improved educational outcomes and well being for vulnerable children. Results School quality was not associated with primary or secondary school attendance, but was associated with children’s being in the correct grade for age [adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2–3.5, P = 0.01]. General and HIV-specific school quality had significant positive effects on well being in the primary school-age children (coefficient 5.1, 95% CI 2.4–7.7, P < 0.01 and coefficient 3.0, 95% CI 0.4–5.6, P = 0.02, respectively), but not in the secondary school-age children (P > 0.2). There was no evidence that school quality provided an additional benefit to the well being of vulnerable children. Community HIV prevalence was negatively associated with well being in the secondary school-age children (coefficient −0.7, 95% CI −1.3 to −0.1, P = 0.03). Conclusions General and HIV-specific school quality may enhance the well being of primary school-age children in eastern Zimbabwe. Local community context also plays an important role in child well being. PMID:24991911

  7. Centrosomal Localization of the Psoriasis Candidate Gene Product, CCHCR1, Supports a Role in Cytoskeletal Organization

    PubMed Central

    Tervaniemi, Mari H.; Siitonen, H. Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Minhas, Gurinder; Vuola, Jyrki; Tiala, Inkeri; Sormunen, Raija; Samuelsson, Lena; Suomela, Sari; Kere, Juha; Elomaa, Outi

    2012-01-01

    CCHCR1 (Coiled-Coil α-Helical Rod protein 1), within the major psoriasis susceptibility locus PSORS1, is a plausible candidate gene with the psoriasis associated risk allele CCHCR1*WWCC. Although its expression pattern in psoriatic skin differs from healthy skin and its overexpression influences cell proliferation in transgenic mice, its role as a psoriasis effector gene has remained unsettled. The 5′-region of the gene contains a SNP (rs3130453) that controls a 5′-extended open reading frame and thus the translation of alternative isoforms. We have now compared the function of two CCHCR1 isoforms: the novel longer isoform 1 and the previously studied isoform 3. In samples of Finnish and Swedish families, the allele generating only isoform 3 shows association with psoriasis (P<10−7). Both isoforms localize at the centrosome, a cell organelle playing a role in cell division. In stably transfected cells the isoform 3 affects cell proliferation and with the CCHCR1*WWCC allele, also apoptosis. Furthermore, cells overexpressing CCHCR1 show isoform- and haplotype-specific influences in the cell size and shape and alterations in the organization and expression of the cytoskeletal proteins actin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The isoform 1 with the non-risk allele induces the expression of keratin 17, a hallmark for psoriasis; the silencing of CCHCR1 reduces its expression in HEK293 cells. CCHCR1 also regulates EGF-induced STAT3 activation in an isoform-specific manner: the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is disturbed in isoform 3-transfected cells. The centrosomal localization of CCHCR1 provides a connection to the abnormal cell proliferation and offers a link to possible cellular pathways altered in psoriasis. PMID:23189171

  8. Factors Affecting Auditory Localization and Situational Awareness in the Urban Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    resolving spatial locations of several simultaneous sound sources such as various musical instruments playing together or two or more vehicles...and they can affect the perceived size of the sound source, its loudness, and its timbre (Blauert, 1999). 2.2 Elevation Sound source elevation and...occurred (Perrott & Musicant , 1977; Chandler & Grantham, 1992). 3. Acoustics of the Urban Environment When gathering data about the environment and

  9. The magnitude and dynamics of interocular suppression affected by monocular boundary contour and conflicting local features

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yong R.; He, Zijiang J.; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2010-01-01

    A monocular boundary contour (MBC) rivalry stimulus has two half-images, a homogeneous grating and the same homogeneous grating with an additional disc region. The outline/frame of the MBC disc is created by relative phase-shift, or orientation difference. We found the increment contrast threshold and reaction time to detect a monocular Gabor probe elevated on the homogeneous half-image pedestal. The interocular suppression begins as early as 80 msec upon stimulus onset. Moreover, the suppression magnitude is larger when the MBC disc is defined by orientation difference rather than phase-shift, revealing the suppression caused by competing local features in addition to MBC. PMID:20624411

  10. Decision support system for localizing prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vijay; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Pang, Yuxi; Pohida, Thomas; Merino, Maria J.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Bernardo, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need to localize prostate cancers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to facilitate the use of image guided biopsy, focal therapy, and active surveillance follow up. Our goal was to develop a decision support system (DSS) for detecting and localizing peripheral zone prostate cancers by using machine learning approach to calculate a cancer probability map from multiparametric MR images (MP-MRI). Methods: This IRB approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study consisted of 31 patients (mean age and serum prostate specific antigen of 60.4 and 6.62 ng/ml, respectively) who had MP-MRI at 3 T followed by radical prostatectomy. Seven patients were excluded due to technical issues with their MP-MRI (e.g., motion artifact, failure to perform all sequences). Cancer and normal regions were identified in the peripheral zone by correlating them to whole mount histology slides of the excised prostatectomy specimens. To facilitate the correlation, tissue blocks matching the MR slices were obtained using a MR-based patient-specific mold. Segmented regions on the MP-MRI were correlated to histopathology and used as training sets for the learning system that generated the cancer probability maps. Leave-one-patient-out cross-validation on the cancer and normal regions was performed to determine the learning system's efficacy, an evolutionary strategies approach (also known as a genetic algorithm) was used to find the optimal values for a set of parameters, and finally a cancer probability map was generated. Results: For the 24 patients that were used in the study, 225 cancer and 264 noncancerous regions were identified from the region maps. The efficacy of DSS was first determined without optimizing support vector machines (SVM) parameters, where a region having a cancer probability greater than or equal to 50% was considered as a correct classification. The nonoptimized system had an f-measure of 85% and the

  11. The affective structure of supportive parenting: depressive symptoms, immediate emotions, and child-oriented motivation.

    PubMed

    Dix, Theodore; Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Meunier, Leah N; Miller, Pamela C

    2004-11-01

    This study investigated the maternal concerns and emotions that may regulate one form of sensitive parenting, support for children's immediate desires or intentions. While reviewing a videotape of interactions with their 1-year-olds, mothers who varied on depressive symptoms reported concerns and emotions they had during the interaction. Emotions reflected outcomes either to children (child-oriented concerns) or to mothers themselves (parent-oriented concerns). Child-oriented concerns were associated with fewer negative emotions and more supportive behavior. Supportive parenting was high among mothers who experienced high joy and worry and low anger, sadness, and guilt. However, relations depended on whether emotions were child or parent oriented: Supportive behavior occurred more when emotions were child oriented. In addition, as depressive symptoms increased, mothers reported fewer child-oriented concerns, fewer child-oriented positive emotions, and more parent-oriented negative emotions. They also displayed less supportive behavior. Findings suggest that support for children's immediate intentions may be regulated by parents' concerns, immediate emotions, and depressive symptoms.

  12. Local and serum IgE in patients affected by otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M L; Tabar, A I; Manrique, M; Oehling, A

    1986-01-01

    Various mechanisms intervene in the etiopathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME), but to date it is not clear which mechanism is the most important. We studied twenty children affected with persistent otitis media with effusion (OME) inspite of the indicated treatments, and the possible incidence of atopic features, total serum IgE and in effusion, obtained by myringotomy and aspiration were evaluated. In order to evaluate the presence of atopy, an allergic history and skin tests against the different suspected allergens (inhalants and foods) were realized.

  13. Local Plant Diversity Across Multiple Habitats Supports a Diverse Wild Bee Community in Pennsylvania Apple Orchards.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, Melanie A; Biddinger, David J; Rajotte, Edwin G; Mortensen, David A

    2016-02-01

    Wild pollinators supply essential, historically undervalued pollination services to crops and other flowering plant communities with great potential to ensure agricultural production against the loss of heavily relied upon managed pollinators. Local plant communities provision wild bees with crucial floral and nesting resources, but the distribution of floristic diversity among habitat types in North American agricultural landscapes and its effect on pollinators are diverse and poorly understood, especially in orchard systems. We documented floristic diversity in typical mid-Atlantic commercial apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) orchards including the forest and orchard-forest edge ("edge") habitats surrounding orchards in a heterogeneous landscape in south-central Pennsylvania, USA. We also assessed the correlation between plant richness and orchard pollinator communities. In this apple production region, edge habitats are the most species rich, supporting 146 out of 202 plant species recorded in our survey. Plant species richness in the orchard and edge habitats were significant predictors of bee species richness and abundance in the orchard, as well as landscape area of the forest and edge habitats. Both the quantity and quality of forest and edges close to orchards play a significant role in provisioning a diverse wild bee community in this agroecosystem.

  14. Intracellular degradation and localization of NS1 of TBEV affects its protective properties.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Yulia; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Shevtsova, Anastasia; Chernokhaeva, Lubov; Latanova, Anastasia; Preobrazhenskaia, Olga; Timofeev, Andrey; Karganova, Galina; Karpov, Vadim

    2016-12-30

    Currently many DNA vaccines against infectious diseases are in clinical trials however their efficacy is needed to be improved. Potency of DNA immunogen can be optimized by targeting technologies. In a current study to increase the efficacy of NS1encoded by plasmid the proteasome targeting was applied. NS1 variants with or without translocation sequence and with signal of proteasomal degradation of ornithine decarboxylase were tested for expression, localization, protein turnover, proteasomal degradation and protection properties. Deletion of translocation signal abrogated presentation of NS1 on the cell surface and increased proteasomal processing of NS1. Fusion with ODC signal led to increase of protein turnover and proteasome degradation rate of NS1. Immunization with NS1 variants with increased proteasome processing protected mice from viral challenge only partially, however, the survival time of infected mice was prolonged in these groups. This data can give a presupposition for formulation of specific immune therapy for infected individuals.

  15. Hepatic Microenvironment Affects Oval Cell Localization in Albumin-Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kristin M.; Thompson, Anne W.; Sandgren, Eric P.

    2003-01-01

    Mice carrying an albumin-urokinase type plasminogen activator transgene (AL-uPA) develop liver disease secondary to uPA expression in hepatocytes. Transgene-expressing parenchyma is replaced gradually by clones of cells that have deleted transgene DNA and therefore are not subject to uPA-mediated damage. Diseased liver displays several abnormalities, including hepatocyte vacuolation and changes in nonparenchymal tissue. The latter includes increases in laminin protein within parenchyma and the appearance of cytokeratin 19-positive bile ductule-like cells (oval cells) both in portal regions and extending into the hepatic parenchyma. In this study, we subjected AL-uPA mice to two-thirds partial hepatectomy to identify the response of these livers to additional growth stimulation. We observed several changes in hepatic morphology. First, the oval cells increased in number and often formed ductules in the parenchyma. Second, this cellular change was accompanied by a further increase in laminin associated with single or clusters of oval cells. Third, desmin-positive Ito cells increased in number and maintained close association with oval cells. Fourth, these changes were localized precisely to uPA-expressing areas of liver. Regenerating clones of uPA-deficient cells appeared to be unaffected both by stromal and cellular alterations. Thus, additional growth stimulation of diseased uPA-expressing liver induces an oval cell-like response, as observed in other models of severe hepatic injury, but the localization of this response seems to be highly regulated by the hepatic microenvironment. PMID:12507902

  16. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Nidhi; Nayak, Saumya; Lee, Jessie; Pai Raikar, Srinivas; Hou, David; Sockalingam, Senthil; Lee, Ken J

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. PMID:28255233

  17. Modeling of Membrane-Electrode-Assembly Degradation in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells - Local H2 Starvation and Start-Stop Induced Carbon-Support Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenbin; Yu, Paul T.; Carter, Robert N.; Makharia, Rohit; Gasteiger, Hubert A.

    Carbon-support corrosion causes electrode structure damage and thus electrode degradation. This chapter discusses fundamental models developed to predict cathode carbon-support corrosion induced by local H2 starvation and start-stop in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Kinetic models based on the balance of current among the various electrode reactions are illustrative, yielding much insight on the origin of carbon corrosion and its implications for future materials developments. They are particularly useful in assessing carbon corrosion rates at a quasi-steady-state when an H2-rich region serves as a power source that drives an H2-free region as a load. Coupled kinetic and transport models are essential in predicting when local H2 starvation occurs and how it affects the carbon corrosion rate. They are specifically needed to estimate length scales at which H2 will be depleted and time scales that are valuable for developing mitigation strategies. To predict carbon-support loss distributions over an entire active area, incorporating the electrode pseudo-capacitance appears necessary for situations with shorter residence times such as start-stop events. As carbon-support corrosion is observed under normal transient operations, further model improvement shall be focused on finding the carbon corrosion kinetics associated with voltage cycling and incorporating mechanisms that can quantify voltage decay with carbon-support loss.

  18. The inter-sample structural variability of regular tissue-engineered scaffolds significantly affects the micromechanical local cell environment

    PubMed Central

    Campos Marin, A.; Lacroix, D.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping techniques have been widely used in tissue engineering to fabricate scaffolds with controlled architecture. Despite the ability of these techniques to fabricate regular structures, the consistency with which these regular structures are produced throughout the scaffold and from one scaffold to another needs to be quantified. Small variations at the pore level can affect the local mechanical stimuli sensed by the cells thereby affecting the final tissue properties. Most studies assume rapid prototyping scaffolds as regular structures without quantifying the local mechanical stimuli at the cell level. In this study, a computational method using a micro-computed tomography-based scaffold geometry was developed to characterize the mechanical stimuli within a real scaffold at the pore level. Five samples from a commercial polycaprolactone scaffold were analysed and computational fluid dynamics analyses were created to compare local velocity and shear stress values at the same scaffold location. The five samples did not replicate the computer-aided design (CAD) scaffold and velocity and shear stress values were up to five times higher than the ones calculated in the CAD scaffold. In addition high variability among samples was found: at the same location velocity and shear stress values could be up to two times higher from sample to sample. This study shows that regular scaffolds need to be thoroughly analysed in order to quantify real cell mechanical stimuli so inspection methods should be included as part of the fabrication process. PMID:25844157

  19. A Rural Road: Exploring Economic Opportunity, Social Networks, Services and Supports That Affect Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voices for Children in Nebraska, Omaha.

    A study examined the unique conditions affecting quality of life for low-income rural children and their families in Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Qualitative data were gathered from 11 focus groups conducted in a variety of rural communities, including tribal reservations, across the three states, and from interviews with professional…

  20. Affective Teaching for Data Driven Learning: How Can Strengths-Based Training Support Urban Teacher Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Teri

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine urban teachers' identified strengths in varied cognitive, affective, and psychological capacities, and their impact on self-efficacy and teacher practices. Clifton and Anderson in the Gallup Organization's Strengths Quest (2004) presented compelling evidence suggesting a mind-set of "what's right with me"…

  1. Support Systems which Affect the Hispanic and Anglo Adolescent Mother's Decision To Continue Her Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ruth D.

    For an ethnographic study of the personal and educational needs of Hispanic and Anglo adolescent mothers and the services affecting their decision to remain in school, researchers interviewed eight teenage mothers--four in a special high school teen parents' program and four who had dropped out of the program. Two young women in each group were…

  2. No support for dual process accounts of human affective learning in simple Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Ottmar V; Purkis, Helena M

    2005-02-01

    Dual process accounts of affective learning state that the learning of likes and dislikes reflects a learning mechanism that is distinct from the one reflected in expectancy learning, the learning of signal relationships, and has different empirical characteristics. Affective learning, for example, is said not to be affected by: (a) extinction training; (b) occasion setting; (c) cue competition; and (d) awareness of the CS-US contingencies. These predictions were tested in a series of experiments that employed simple Pavlovian conditioning procedures. Neutral visual pictures of geometric shapes, or tactile conditional stimuli (CS) were paired with aversive electrotactile unconditional stimuli (US). Dependent measures were physiological (skin conductance, blink startle modulation) or verbal (US expectancy, on-line and off-line ratings of CS pleasantness). Different combinations of these dependent measures were employed across different experiments in an attempt to assess affective and expectancy learning simultaneously. Changes in CS pleasantness as indexed by ratings or blink startle modulation were readily observed. However, contrary to the predictions from dual-process accounts, results indicated that acquired CS unpleasantness is subject to extinction, occasion setting, cue competition, and not found in absence of CS-US contingency awareness.

  3. Does Neighborhood and Family Poverty Affect Mothers' Parenting, Mental Health, and Social Support?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebanov, Pamela Kato; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Estimated effects of neighborhood and family poverty on maternal psychological and behavioral characteristics using data from 895 mothers. Neighborhood poverty was associated with poorer home physical environment and with less maternal warmth, controlling for family conditions. Home environment was adversely affected by family poverty, large…

  4. Elementary Students' Affective Variables in a Networked Learning Environment Supported by a Blog: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Stéphane; Thériault, Pascale; Gagnon, Vincent; Lalancette, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    This study documents to what extent writing on a blog in a networked learning environment could influence the affective variables of elementary-school students' writing. The framework is grounded more specifically in theory of self-determination (Deci & Ryan, 1985), relationship to writing (Chartrand & Prince, 2009) and the transactional…

  5. Factors Affecting Counseling Services in Social Service Structures Providing Support to Women Who Are Victims of Violence: A Qualitative Research in Greece.

    PubMed

    Flora, Katerina; Argyroudi, Anthi

    2016-12-04

    This qualitative study examines the factors that affect counseling services in structures aimed to provide support to women who are victims of violence. What has created the need to investigate the above issues is the increase in events of violence against women in Greece, and the subsequent development of relevant support and accommodation structures. Despite the clinical experience accumulated, research data from Greece are incomplete. The main research question concerns the factors that affect counseling in violence counseling structures. The participants were 10 professional counselors employed in violence counseling structures. The research data were collected through semi-structured interviews and their analysis followed the interpretative phenomenological method. The results designate two main axes: the personal and that of the others The main categories of factors on the "personal" axis highlighted the importance of prior as well as continuing training for the counselor's work with the specific population; the crucial role of experience, which is characterized as dense and very rich; and the necessary presence of unfailing supervision. Regarding the axis of "the others," the main categories that emerged are cooperation with colleagues-in the light of interdisciplinarity as well as support-and cooperation with the local authorities and the central responsible body, as an important determinant of the operation of the structure. The results are discussed on the basis of the factors' importance and of possible implications for finding solutions.

  6. Saturation deficit and deer density affect questing activity and local abundance of Ixodes ricinus (Acari, Ixodidae) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tagliapietra, V; Rosà, R; Arnoldi, D; Cagnacci, F; Capelli, G; Montarsi, F; Hauffe, H C; Rizzoli, A

    2011-12-29

    The wood tick Ixodes ricinus, one of the most common arthropod-borne disease vectors, is of increasing relevance for human and animal health in Europe. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of several abiotic and biotic factors potentially affecting questing activity and local abundance of I. ricinus in Italy, considering the scale at which these factors interact with the host-seeking ticks. Within EDEN, a large-scale EU collaborative project on eco-epidemiology of vector-borne diseases, we collected questing ticks for three consecutive years using a standard protocol at eleven sites in the Italian Alps and Apennines. A total of 25 447 I. ricinus were collected. All sites showed the same annual pattern of tick activity (bimodal for nymphs and unimodal for larvae and adults), although the abundance of nymphs was statistically different between sites and years. A Generalized Linear Mixed Model and a Linear Mixed Model fitted to data for nymphs, showed that while the principal variables affecting the local abundance of questing ticks were saturation deficit (an index combining temperature and relative humidity) and red deer density, the most important variable affecting questing nymph activity was saturation deficit. As for the timing of seasonal emergence, we confirmed that the threshold temperature at this latitude for larvae is 10°C (mean maximum) while that for nymphs is 8°C.

  7. 34 CFR 222.121 - How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local educational agency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local educational agency not be withheld? 222.121 Section 222.121 Education... § 222.121 How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local...

  8. Family Members Affected by a Close Relative's Addiction: The Stress-Strain-Coping-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Templeton, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the stress-strain-coping-support (SSCS) model which underpins the whole programme of work described in this supplement. The need for such a model is explained: previous models of substance misuse and the family have attributed dysfunction or deficiency to families or family members. In contrast, the SSCS model assumes that…

  9. A rural road: exploring opportunities, networks, services, and supports that affect rural families.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Carole; Skillman, Gemma D; Rathge, Richard W; Moore, Kathy; Johnston, Janet; Lochner, Ann

    2002-01-01

    The Great Plains Rural Collaborative project explored rural poverty through the experiences of people living at or below 185% of poverty. Researchers collected information through qualitative and quantitative research methods. They designed focus group questions to identify obstacles rural families face when trying to access economic opportunities, social networks, and services and supports. The article highlights the salient findings.

  10. Restrictive and Supportive Parenting: Effects on Children's School Affect and Emotional Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annear, Karen D.; Yates, Gregory C. R.

    2010-01-01

    In this project upper primary school students were surveyed about their general liking for school, and reasons for going to school. Their parents were asked to respond on a questionnaire indicating their restrictiveness and also support for their child's autonomy. Data were collected from 92 middle SES two-parent families and analysed using…

  11. Implicit attitudes toward nuclear power and mobile phone base stations: support for the affect heuristic.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Keller, Carmen; Cousin, Marie-Eve

    2006-08-01

    The implicit association test (IAT) measures automatic associations. In the present research, the IAT was adapted to measure implicit attitudes toward technological hazards. In Study 1, implicit and explicit attitudes toward nuclear power were examined. Implicit measures (i.e., the IAT) revealed negative attitudes toward nuclear power that were not detected by explicit measures (i.e., a questionnaire). In Study 2, implicit attitudes toward EMF (electro-magnetic field) hazards were examined. Results showed that cell phone base stations and power lines are judged to be similarly risky and, further, that base stations are more closely related to risk concepts than home appliances are. No differences between experts and lay people were observed. Results of the present studies are in line with the affect heuristic proposed by Slovic and colleagues. Affect seems to be an important factor in risk perception.

  12. Interventions for Children Affected by War: An Ecological Perspective on Psychosocial Support and Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah E.; Charrow, Alexandra P.; Tol, Wietse A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children and adolescents exposed to armed conflict are at high risk of developing mental health problems. To date, a range of psychosocial approaches and clinical/psychiatric interventions has been used to address mental health needs in these groups. Aims To provide an overview of peer-reviewed psychosocial and mental health interventions designed to address mental health needs of conflict-affected children, and to highlight areas in which policy and research need strengthening. Methods We used standard review methodology to identify interventions aimed at improving or treating mental health problems in conflict-affected youth. An ecological lens was used to organize studies according to the individual, family, peer/school, and community factors targeted by each intervention. Interventions were also evaluated for their orientation toward prevention, treatment, or maintenance, and for the strength of the scientific evidence of reported effects. Results Of 2305 studies returned from online searches of the literature and 21 sources identified through bibliography mining, 58 qualified for full review, with 40 peer-reviewed studies included in the final narrative synthesis. Overall, the peer-reviewed literature focused largely on school-based interventions. Very few family and community-based interventions have been empirically evaluated. Only two studies assessed multilevel or stepped-care packages. Conclusions The evidence base on effective and efficacious interventions for conflict-affected youth requires strengthening. Postconflict development agendas must be retooled to target the vulnerabilities characterizing conflict-affected youth, and these approaches must be collaborative across bodies responsible for the care of youth and families. PMID:23656831

  13. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  14. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid‐derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. Methods In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. Results The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. Conclusions These data indicate that alterations in tumor‐reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci. PMID:28250928

  15. Newly identified CSP41b gene localized in chloroplasts affects leaf color in rice.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jiasong; Li, Feifei; Liu, Xuri; Hu, Guocheng; Fu, Yaping; Liu, Wenzhen

    2017-03-01

    A rice mutant with light-green leaves was discovered from a transgenic line of Oryza sativa. The mutant has reduced chlorophyll content and abnormal chloroplast morphology throughout its life cycle. Genetic analysis revealed that a single nuclear-encoded recessive gene is responsible for the mutation, here designated as lgl1. To isolate the lgl1 gene, a high-resolution physical map of the chromosomal region around the lgl1 gene was made using a mapping population consisting of 1984 mutant individuals. The lgl1 gene was mapped in the 76.5kb region between marker YG4 and marker YG5 on chromosome 12. Sequence analysis revealed that there was a 39bp deletion within the fourth exon of the candidate gene Os12g0420200 (TIGR locus Os12g23180) encoding a chloroplast stem-loop-binding protein of 41kDa b (CSP41b). The lgl1 mutation was rescued by transformation with the wild type CSP41b gene. Accordingly, the CSP41b gene is identified as the LGL1 gene. CSP41b was transcribed in various tissues and was mainly expressed in leaves. Expression of CSP41b-GFP fusion protein indicated that CSP41b is localized in chloroplasts. The expression levels of some key genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis, such as ChlD, ChlI, Hema1, Ygl1, POR, Cab1R, Cab2R, PsaA, and rbcL, was significantly changed in the lgl1 mutant. Our results demonstrate that CSP41b is a novel gene required for normal leaf color and chloroplast morphology in rice.

  16. Tipburn in salt-affected lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) plants results from local oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carassay, Luciano R; Bustos, Dolores A; Golberg, Alberto D; Taleisnik, Edith

    2012-02-15

    Tipburn in lettuce is a physiological disorder expressed as a necrosis in the margins of young developing leaves and is commonly observed under saline conditions. Tipburn is usually attributed to Ca(2+) deficiencies, and there has very limited research on other mechanisms that may contribute to tipburn development. This work examines whether symptoms are mediated by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Two butter lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) varieties, Sunstar (Su) and Pontina (Po), with contrasting tipburn susceptibility were grown in hydroponics with low Ca(2+) (0.5 mM), and with or without 50 mM NaCl. Tipburn symptoms were observed only in Su, and only in the saline treatment. Tipburn incidence in response to topical treatments with Ca(2+) scavengers, Ca(2+) transport inhibitors, and antioxidants was assessed. All treatments were applied before symptom expression, and evaluated later, when symptoms were expected to occur. Superoxide presence in tissues was determined with nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and oxidative damage as malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were assayed. Under control and saline conditions, tipburn could be induced in both varieties by topical treatments with a Ca(2+) scavenger (EGTA) and Ca(2+) transport inhibitors (verapamil, LaCl(3)) and reduced by supplying Ca(2+) along with a ionophore (A 23187). Tipburn symptoms were associated with locally produced ROS. O(2)(·-) and oxidative damage significantly increased in leaf margins before symptom expression, while topical antioxidant applications (Tiron, DPI) reduced symptoms in treated leaves, but not in the rest of the plant. Antioxidant enzyme activity was higher in Po, and increased more in response to EGTA treatments, and may contribute to mitigating oxidative damage and tipburn expression in this variety.

  17. Ergonomics support for local initiative in improving safety and health at work: International Labour Organization experiences in industrially developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Kogi, K

    2005-04-15

    Ergonomics has played essential roles in the technical cooperation activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in occupational safety and health in industrially developing countries. Ergonomics support focusing on practical day-to-day needs at the grass-root workplace has strengthened the local initiative in improving safety and health. Practical action-tools such as ergonomics checklists, local good example photos and group discussions have assisted workers and employers in identifying feasible solutions using locally available resources. Direct participation of workers and employers has been promoted in ergonomics training aimed at immediate solutions. ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems have played increasingly important roles in the systematic planning of local improvement actions. Policy-level programmes to develop network support mechanisms to the grass-root workplace were essential for following up and sustaining local achievements. Practical ergonomics support tools, such as action checklists and low-cost improvement guides, should be developed and widely applied so as to reach grass-root levels and help local people create safer and healthier workplaces.

  18. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle.

  19. Neonatal local noxious insult affects gene expression in the spinal dorsal horn of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ke; Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Dubner, Ronald; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-09-22

    Neonatal noxious insult produces a long-term effect on pain processing in adults. Rats subjected to carrageenan (CAR) injection in one hindpaw within the sensitive period develop bilateral hypoalgesia as adults. In the same rats, inflammation of the hindpaw, which was the site of the neonatal injury, induces a localized enhanced hyperalgesia limited to this paw. To gain an insight into the long-term molecular changes involved in the above-described long-term nociceptive effects of neonatal noxious insult at the spinal level, we performed DNA microarray analysis (using microarrays containing oligo-probes for 205 genes encoding receptors and transporters for glutamate, GABA, and amine neurotransmitters, precursors and receptors for neuropeptides, and neurotrophins, cytokines and their receptors) to compare gene expression profiles in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn (LDH) of adult (P60) male rats that received neonatal CAR treatment within (at postnatal day 3; P3) and outside (at postnatal 12; P12) of the sensitive period. The data were obtained both without inflammation (at baseline) and during complete Freund's adjuvant induced inflammation of the neonatally injured paw. The observed changes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. This study revealed significant basal and inflammation-associated aberrations in the expression of multiple genes in the LDH of adult animals receiving CAR injection at P3 as compared to their expression levels in the LDH of animals receiving either no injections or CAR injection at P12. In particular, at baseline, twelve genes (representing GABA, serotonin, adenosine, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, opioid, tachykinin and interleukin systems) were up-regulated in the bilateral LDH of the former animals. The baseline condition in these animals was also characterized by up-regulation of seven genes (encoding members of GABA, cholecystokinin, histamine, serotonin, and neurotensin systems) in the LDH ipsilateral to the neonatally-injured paw. The

  20. Hearing loss in older adults affects neural systems supporting speech comprehension.

    PubMed

    Peelle, Jonathan E; Troiani, Vanessa; Grossman, Murray; Wingfield, Arthur

    2011-08-31

    Hearing loss is one of the most common complaints in adults over the age of 60 and a major contributor to difficulties in speech comprehension. To examine the effects of hearing ability on the neural processes supporting spoken language processing in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to monitor brain activity while older adults with age-normal hearing listened to sentences that varied in their linguistic demands. Individual differences in hearing ability predicted the degree of language-driven neural recruitment during auditory sentence comprehension in bilateral superior temporal gyri (including primary auditory cortex), thalamus, and brainstem. In a second experiment, we examined the relationship of hearing ability to cortical structural integrity using voxel-based morphometry, demonstrating a significant linear relationship between hearing ability and gray matter volume in primary auditory cortex. Together, these results suggest that even moderate declines in peripheral auditory acuity lead to a systematic downregulation of neural activity during the processing of higher-level aspects of speech, and may also contribute to loss of gray matter volume in primary auditory cortex. More generally, these findings support a resource-allocation framework in which individual differences in sensory ability help define the degree to which brain regions are recruited in service of a particular task.

  1. An Automated System for Generating Situation-Specific Decision Support in Clinical Order Entry from Local Empirical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Jeffrey G.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support is one of the only aspects of health information technology that has demonstrated decreased costs and increased quality in healthcare delivery, yet it is extremely expensive and time-consuming to create, maintain, and localize. Consequently, a majority of health care systems do not utilize it, and even when it is…

  2. Improving Student Performance in California. A Catalog of Business and Community Programs in Support of Local Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Roundtable, San Francisco.

    This catalog contains more than 600 abstracts of model programs in California designed to help business, education, and community groups establish or expand partnerships in support of local education. An executive summary precedes the abstracts. The program abstracts are divided into 21 sections corresponding to specific forms of involvement.…

  3. Noncatalytic, N-terminal Domains of DNA Polymerase Lambda Affect Its Cellular Localization and DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Anthony A; Taggart, David J; Suo, Zucai

    2017-04-13

    Specialized DNA polymerases, such as DNA polymerase lambda (Polλ), are important players in DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. Knowing how DNA polymerases are regulated and recruited to sites of DNA damage is imperative to understanding these pathways. Recent work has suggested that Polλ plays a role in several distinct DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. In this paper, we report previously unknown roles of the N-terminal domains of human Polλ for modulating its involvement in DNA damage tolerance and repair. By using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and cell survival assays, we found that the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) and proline/serine-rich (PSR) domains of Polλ affect its cellular localization and DNA damage responses. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Polλ was necessary to overcome the impediment of its nuclear localization caused by its BRCT and PSR domains. Induction of DNA damage resulted in recruitment of Polλ to chromatin, which was controlled by its BRCT and PSR domains. In addition, the presence of both domains was required for Polλ-mediated tolerance of oxidative DNA damage but not DNA methylation damage. These findings suggest that the N-terminal domains of Polλ are important for regulating its responses to DNA damage.

  4. How local and state regulations affect the child care food environment: A qualitative study of child care center directors’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd-Williams, C. E.; Camp, E. J.; Mullen, P. D.; Briley, M. E.; Hoelscher, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-third of preschoolers spend regular time in child care centers where they can consume the majority of their daily dietary intake. The child care setting influences children’s dietary intake. Thus, it is important to examine factors, such as local and state regulations, that influence the food environment at the center. This qualitative study explored directors’ perceptions of how regulations influence the foods available at child care centers. Ten directors of centers in Travis County, Texas completed semi-structured interviews. Directors reported that changes in local health department regulations (e.g., kitchen specifications) result in less-healthful foods being served (e.g., more prepackaged foods). Directors of centers that do not participate in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) said the state licensing regulations clarify the portion size and nutritional requirements for preschoolers thereby improving the nutritional quality of the food served. Directors of centers participating in CACFP said they are not affected by state mandates, because the CACFP regulations are more stringent. These findings suggest that state regulations that specify and quantify nutritional standards may beneficially impact preschoolers’ diets. However, local health department regulations enacted to improve food safety may negatively influence the nutritional value of food served in centers. PMID:26251694

  5. Sustaining Local Tax Support for Community Colleges: Recommendations for College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael Thomas; Holt, Carleton R.

    2005-01-01

    Community colleges often rely on local taxes as an important revenue source and must occasionally seek voter approval for a local mill levy increase--a tax on property to fund a specific activity. This chapter describes strategies for planning and carrying out a campaign for securing that approval.

  6. SUPPORT Tools for evidence-informed Policymaking in health 11: Finding and using evidence about local conditions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This article is part of a series written for people responsible for making decisions about health policies and programmes and for those who support these decision makers. Evidence about local conditions is evidence that is available from the specific setting(s) in which a decision or action on a policy or programme option will be taken. Such evidence is always needed, together with other forms of evidence, in order to inform decisions about options. Global evidence is the best starting point for judgements about effects, factors that modify those effects, and insights into ways to approach and address problems. But local evidence is needed for most other judgements about what decisions and actions should be taken. In this article, we suggest five questions that can help to identify and appraise the local evidence that is needed to inform a decision about policy or programme options. These are: 1. What local evidence is needed to inform a decision about options? 2. How can the necessary local evidence be found? 3. How should the quality of the available local evidence be assessed? 4. Are there important variations in the availability, quality or results of local evidence? 5. How should local evidence be incorporated with other information? PMID:20018101

  7. Training and capacity development: the foundation of interventions to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Linda; Louw, Julia; Naicker, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Many programs to support young children and families affected by HIV and AIDS depend substantially on a model of cascaded training from international nongovernmental organizations, through in-country groups and organizations to services on the ground. In this paper, we describe the training and capacity building – as described in proposals, progress reports, and individualized questionnaires – offered by 10 international organizations funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to provide supportive services for young children and their families in five southern and eastern African countries. We related the findings to effective features of training described in the literature. Training and capacity development were found to be the most substantial activities in rendering services to children and families, both in terms of effort and human and financial resources. A total of 67 trainings were conducted over a period of 18 months. Almost all trainings combine lecture-based instruction, group work/discussions, and role play, but only half of the trainings report some form of mentoring, supervision or coaching following the training. Drawing on the literature, it is likely that more purposeful planning is required in terms of the selection of trainees, local adaptation and development of materials, participatory training approaches, and techniques to develop and sustain skills as well as knowledge. Demonstration and mentorship in the field together with quality assurance procedures, pre-and post-assessment to evaluate training, processes to transfer learning into subsequent practice, as well as certification, are all fundamental steps to ensure that training plays a supportive role in the behavior changes necessary to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS and their families. PMID:26430466

  8. Training and capacity development: the foundation of interventions to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Richter, Linda; Louw, Julia; Naicker, Sara

    2015-04-03

    Many programs to support young children and families affected by HIV and AIDS depend substantially on a model of cascaded training from international nongovernmental organizations, through in-country groups and organizations to services on the ground. In this paper, we describe the training and capacity building - as described in proposals, progress reports, and individualized questionnaires - offered by 10 international organizations funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to provide supportive services for young children and their families in five southern and eastern African countries. We related the findings to effective features of training described in the literature. Training and capacity development were found to be the most substantial activities in rendering services to children and families, both in terms of effort and human and financial resources. A total of 67 trainings were conducted over a period of 18 months. Almost all trainings combine lecture-based instruction, group work/discussions, and role play, but only half of the trainings report some form of mentoring, supervision or coaching following the training. Drawing on the literature, it is likely that more purposeful planning is required in terms of the selection of trainees, local adaptation and development of materials, participatory training approaches, and techniques to develop and sustain skills as well as knowledge. Demonstration and mentorship in the field together with quality assurance procedures, pre-and post-assessment to evaluate training, processes to transfer learning into subsequent practice, as well as certification, are all fundamental steps to ensure that training plays a supportive role in the behavior changes necessary to support young children affected by HIV and AIDS and their families.

  9. Novel and recurrent CIB2 variants, associated with nonsyndromic deafness, do not affect calcium buffering and localization in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Giese, Arnaud P; Shafique, Sobia; Schraders, Margit; Oonk, Anne M M; Grossheim, Mike; Oostrik, Jaap; Strom, Tim; Hegde, Rashmi; van Wijk, Erwin; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Azam, Maleeha; Yntema, Helger G; Free, Rolien H; Riazuddin, Saima; Verheij, Joke B G M; Admiraal, Ronald J; Qamar, Raheel; Ahmed, Zubair M; Kremer, Hannie

    2016-04-01

    Variants in CIB2 can underlie either Usher syndrome type I (USH1J) or nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) (DFNB48). Here, a novel homozygous missense variant c.196C>T and compound heterozygous variants, c.[97C>T];[196C>T], were found, respectively, in two unrelated families of Dutch origin. Besides, the previously reported c.272 T>C functional missense variant in CIB2 was identified in two families of Pakistani origin. The missense variants are demonstrated not to affect subcellular localization of CIB2 in vestibular hair cells in ex vivo expression experiments. Furthermore, these variants do not affect the ATP-induced calcium responses in COS-7 cells. However, based on the residues affected, the variants are suggested to alter αIIβ integrin binding. HI was nonsyndromic in all four families. However, deafness segregating with the c.272T>C variant in one Pakistani family is remarkably less severe than that in all other families with this mutation. Our results contribute to the insight in genotype-phenotype correlations of CIB2 mutations.

  10. Public support for river restoration funding in relation to local river ecomorphology, population density, and mean income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchläPfer, Felix; Witzig, Pieter-Jan

    2006-12-01

    In 1997, about 140,000 citizens in 388 voting districts in the Swiss canton of Bern passed a ballot initiative to allocate about 3 million Swiss Francs annually to a canton-wide river restoration program. Using the municipal voting returns and a detailed georeferenced data set on the ecomorphological status of the rivers, we estimate models of voter support in relation to local river ecomorphology, population density, mean income, cultural background, and recent flood damage. Support of the initiative increased with increasing population density and tended to increase with increasing mean income, in spite of progressive taxation. Furthermore, we found evidence that public support increased with decreasing "naturalness" of local rivers. The model estimates may be cautiously used to predict the public acceptance of similar restoration programs in comparable regions. Moreover, the voting-based insights into the distribution of river restoration benefits provide a useful starting point for debates about appropriate financing schemes.

  11. Meteorological considerations and satellite retrievals in supporting to the assessment of local hydrologic homogeneity over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Salvatore; Laviola, Sante; Chiaravalloti, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Regional frequency analysis is a useful tool for estimating precipitation quantiles more accurately than at-site frequency analysis, especially in the case of regions with a brief history of short-time rainfall records. Since the rainfalls with short duration are mainly due to convective phenomena, usually affecting areas of few square kilometers, the description of these events with traditional tools such as in-situ rain gauges is often incomplete and not exhaustive. Thus, the application of these datasets to the regional analysis typically provides unrealistic description of the event and large miscalculations of the return time, usually higher than observation. Therefore, in order to evaluate the possible regional homogeneity and improve the performance of hydrologic models the inference analysis of the regional climatic regimes is revealed a useful tool. Starting from the intense rainfall of 19 November 2013 over Southern Italy, we demonstrate that the synoptic meteorological situation well-matched with results of Gabriele & Chiaravalloti (2013a, 2013b) where the regional homogeneity has been calculated on the basis of different climate indexes such as Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and the Q-vector Divergence (QD). In support to that analysis two different methodologies based on satellite microwave information have been applied: the Water vapor Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) (Laviola and Levizzani, 2011) algorithm provides to define the precipitation patterns while the MicroWave Cloud Classification (MWCC) (Miglietta et al., 2013) characterizes the cloud type in terms of stratiform and convective. Although, this study is still in progress the current results clearly demonstrate that the Mediterranean storms move on a sort of 'preferential trajectories' especially during the months September-November where the most intense convections have been found. Laviola, S., and V. Levizzani, 2011: The 183-WSL fast rainrate retrieval algorithm. Part I

  12. Modeling of Local BEAM Structure for Evaluation of MMOD Impacts to Support Development of a Health Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes initial modeling of the local response of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) to micrometeorite and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts using a structural, non-linear, transient dynamic finite element code. Complementary test results for a local BEAM structure are presented for both hammer and projectile impacts. Review of these data provided guidance for the transient dynamic model development. The local model is intended to support predictions using the global BEAM model, described in a companion report. Two types of local models were developed. One mimics the simplified Soft-Goods (fabric envelop) part of the BEAM NASTRAN model delivered by the project. The second investigates through-the-thickness modeling challenges for MMOD-type impacts. Both the testing and the analysis summaries contain lessons learned and areas for future efforts.

  13. 77 FR 39244 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting In accordance with Presidential Executive Order No. 13175, November 6... Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease...

  14. Local Release of Highly Loaded Antibodies from Functionalized Nanoporous Support for Cancer Immunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Liu, P.; Chen, Baowei; Mao, Yumeng; Engelmann, Heather E.; Shin, Yongsoon; Jaffar, Jade; Hellstrom, Ingegerd; Liu, Jun; Hellstrom, Karl E.

    2010-05-26

    We report that antibodies can be loaded in functionalized mesoporous silica (FMS) with super-high density to provide long-lasting local release at a given site. Preliminary data indicate that FMS-antibody injected directly into a mouse melanoma induces a greater inhibition of tumor growth than seen in various controls, including the antibody injected intraperitoneally. Our findings introduce a novel approach for local delivery of therapeutically active proteins to tumors and potentially, other diseases.

  15. How To Build Local Support for Comprehensive School Reform. Getting Better by Design, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Monica; Ferguson, Maria Voles

    This guide is designed to help school district leaders build public understanding and support for comprehensive school reform (CSR) by introducing the concept to schools, parents, and the community. Without broad-based public understanding and support, it will be difficult for the district to meet its central goal of improving student achievement.…

  16. Affected-sib-pair analyses reveal support of prior evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder, on 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Badner, J.A.; Goldin, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    In 22 multiplex pedigrees screened for linkage to bipolar disorder, by use of 18 markers on chromosome 21q, single-locus affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis detected a high proportion (57%-62%) of alleles shared identical by descent (IBD), with P values of .049-.0008 on nine marker loci. Multilocus ASP analyses revealed locus trios in the distal region between D21S270 and D21S171, with excess allele sharing (nominal P values <.01) under two affection-status models, ASM I (bipolars and schizoaffectives) and ASM II (ASM I plus recurrent unipolars). In addition, under ASM I, the proximal interval spanned by D21S1436 and D21S65 showed locus trios with excess allele sharing (nominal P values of .03-.0003). These findings support prior evidence that a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is on 21q. 38 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. CD147 mediates chemoresistance in breast cancer via ABCG2 by affecting its cellular localization and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangyuan; Liao, Liqiu; Chen, Chen; Zeng, Weiqi; Liu, Shuang; Su, Juan; Zhao, Shuang; Chen, Mingliang; Kuang, Yehong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Jie

    2013-09-01

    CD147 and ABCG2 both have been reported to mediate Multidrug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer. Recent study demonstrates that CD147 could form a complex with ABCG2 on the cell membrane in primary effusion lymphoma. However, whether these two molecules regulate each other in breast cancer and result in MDR is not clear. We established four MCF-7 cell lines transfected with CD147 and/or ABCG2 and found that CD147 could increase the expression and dimerization of ABCG2, affect its cellular localization and regulate its drug transporter function. The findings derived from cells were confirmed subsequently in clinic samples of chemotherapy-sensitive/resistant breast cancer.

  18. Mimicking the phosphorylation of Rsp5 in PKA site T761 affects its function and cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebska, Zaneta; Kaminska, Joanna; Chelstowska, Anna; Domanska, Anna; Rzepnikowska, Weronika; Sitkiewicz, Ewa; Cholbinski, Piotr; Gourlay, Campbell; Plochocka, Danuta; Zoladek, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase belongs to the Nedd4 family of proteins, which affect a wide variety of processes in the cell. Here we document that Rsp5 shows several phosphorylated variants of different mobility and the migration of the phosphorylated forms of Rsp5 was faster for the tpk1Δ tpk3Δ mutant devoid of two alternative catalytic subunits of protein kinase A (PKA), indicating that PKA possibly phosphorylates Rsp5 in vivo. We demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of GFP-HA-Rsp5 protein using the anti-phospho PKA substrate antibody that Rsp5 is phosphorylated in PKA sites. Rsp5 contains the sequence 758-RRFTIE-763 with consensus RRXS/T in the catalytic HECT domain and four other sites with consensus RXXS/T, which might be phosphorylated by PKA. The strain bearing the T761D substitution in Rsp5 which mimics phosphorylation grew more slowly at 28°C and did not grow at 37°C, and showed defects in pre-tRNA processing and protein sorting. The rsp5-T761D strain also demonstrated a reduced ability to form colonies, an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitivity to ROS-generating agents. These results indicate that PKA may downregulate many functions of Rsp5, possibly affecting its activity. Rsp5 is found in the cytoplasm, nucleus, multivesicular body and cortical patches. The rsp5-T761D mutation led to a strongly increased cortical localization while rsp5-T761A caused mutant Rsp5 to locate more efficiently in internal spots. Rsp5-T761A protein was phosphorylated less efficiently in PKA sites under specific growth conditions. Our data suggests that Rsp5 may be phosphorylated by PKA at position T761 and that this regulation is important for its localization and function.

  19. Can Schools Support HIV/AIDS-Affected Children? Exploring the 'Ethic of Care' amongst Rural Zimbabwean Teachers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Andersen, Louise; Mutsikiwa, Alice; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    How realistic is the international policy emphasis on schools 'substituting for families' of HIV/AIDS-affected children? We explore the ethic of care in Zimbabwean schools to highlight the poor fit between the western caring schools literature and daily realities of schools in different material and cultural contexts. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 44 teachers and 55 community members, analysed in light of a companion study of HIV/AIDS-affected pupils' own accounts of their care-related experiences. We conceptualise schools as spaces of engagement between groups with diverse needs and interests (teachers, pupils and surrounding community members), with attention to the pathways through which extreme adversity impacts on those institutional contexts and social identifications central to giving and receiving care. Whilst teachers were aware of how they might support children, they seldom put these ideas into action. Multiple factors undermined caring teacher-pupil relationships in wider contexts of poverty and political uncertainty: loss of morale from low salaries and falling professional status; the inability of teachers to solve HIV/AIDS-related problems in their own lives; the role of stigma in deterring HIV/AIDS-affected children from disclosing their situations to teachers; authoritarian teacher-learner relations and harsh punishments fuelling pupil fear of teachers; and lack of trust in the wider community. These factors undermined: teacher confidence in their skills and capacity to support affected pupils and motivation to help children with complex problems; solidarity and common purpose amongst teachers, and between teachers and affected children; and effective bridging alliances between schools and their surrounding communities-all hallmarks of HIV-competent communities. We caution against ambitious policy expansions of teachers' roles without recognition of the personal and social costs of emotional labour, and the need for significant

  20. Can Schools Support HIV/AIDS-Affected Children? Exploring the ‘Ethic of Care’ amongst Rural Zimbabwean Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine; Andersen, Louise; Mutsikiwa, Alice; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    How realistic is the international policy emphasis on schools ‘substituting for families’ of HIV/AIDS-affected children? We explore the ethic of care in Zimbabwean schools to highlight the poor fit between the western caring schools literature and daily realities of schools in different material and cultural contexts. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 44 teachers and 55 community members, analysed in light of a companion study of HIV/AIDS-affected pupils’ own accounts of their care-related experiences. We conceptualise schools as spaces of engagement between groups with diverse needs and interests (teachers, pupils and surrounding community members), with attention to the pathways through which extreme adversity impacts on those institutional contexts and social identifications central to giving and receiving care. Whilst teachers were aware of how they might support children, they seldom put these ideas into action. Multiple factors undermined caring teacher-pupil relationships in wider contexts of poverty and political uncertainty: loss of morale from low salaries and falling professional status; the inability of teachers to solve HIV/AIDS-related problems in their own lives; the role of stigma in deterring HIV/AIDS-affected children from disclosing their situations to teachers; authoritarian teacher-learner relations and harsh punishments fuelling pupil fear of teachers; and lack of trust in the wider community. These factors undermined: teacher confidence in their skills and capacity to support affected pupils and motivation to help children with complex problems; solidarity and common purpose amongst teachers, and between teachers and affected children; and effective bridging alliances between schools and their surrounding communities–all hallmarks of HIV-competent communities. We caution against ambitious policy expansions of teachers' roles without recognition of the personal and social costs of emotional labour, and the need for

  1. Locally harvested foods support serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D sufficiency in an indigenous population of Western Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Luick, Bret; Bersamin, Andrea; Stern, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low serum vitamin D is associated with higher latitude, age, body fat percentage and low intake of fatty fish. Little documentation of vitamin D concentrations is available for Alaska Native populations. Objective This study was undertaken to investigate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations of the Yup'ik people of southwestern Alaska in relation to demographic and lifestyle variables, particularly with the use of locally harvested (local) foods. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods We estimated 25(OH)D, dietary vitamin D and calcium, percent of energy from local foods and demographic variables in 497 Yup'ik people (43% males) aged 14–92 residing in southwestern Alaska. Sampling was approximately equally divided between synthesizing and non-synthesizing seasons, although the preponderance of samples were drawn during months of increasing daylight. Results Mean vitamin D intake was 15.1±20.2 µg/d, while local foods accounted for 22.9±17.1% of energy intake. The leading sources of vitamin D were local fish (90.1%) followed by market foods. Mean 25(OH)D concentration was 95.6±40.7 nmol/L. Participants in the upper 50th percentile of 25(OH)D concentration tended to be older, male, of lower body mass index, sampled during the synthesizing season, and among the upper 50th percentile of local food use. Conclusions A shift away from locally harvested foods will likely increase the risk for serum 25(OH)D insufficiency in this population. PMID:24665435

  2. Localization and density of phoretic deutonymphs of the mite Uropoda orbicularis (Parasitiformes: Mesostigmata) on Aphodius beetles (Aphodiidae) affect pedicel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajerlein, Daria; Witaliński, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    The phoretic stage of Uropodina mites is a deutonymph with developed morphological adaptations for dispersal by insects. Phoretic deutonymphs are able to produce a pedicel, a stalk-like temporary attachment structure that connects the mite with the carrier. The aim of our study was to determine whether localization and density of phoretic deutonymphs on the carrier affect pedicel length. The study was conducted on a common phoretic mite— Uropoda orbicularis (Uropodina) and two aphodiid beetles— Aphodius prodromus and Aphodius distinctus. Our results show that pedicel length is influenced by the localization of deutonymphs on the body of the carrier. The longest pedicels are produced by deutonymphs attached to the upper part of elytra, whereas deutonymphs attached to femora and trochanters of the third pair of legs and the apex of elytra construct the shortest pedicels. In general, deutonymphs attached to more exposed parts of the carrier produce longer pedicels, whereas shorter pedicels are produced when deutonymphs are fixed to non-exposed parts of the carrier. A second factor influencing pedicel length is the density of attached deutonymphs. Mean pedicel length and deutonymph densities were highly correlated: higher deutonymph density leads to the formation of longer pedicels. The cause for this correlation is discussed, and we conclude that pedicel length variability can increase successful dispersal.

  3. G0/G1 switch gene-2 regulates human adipocyte lipolysis by affecting activity and localization of adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martina; Paar, Margret; Eder, Christina; Brandis, Janina; Moser, Elena; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Grond, Susanne; Radner, Franz P W; Cerk, Ines; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Kersten, Sander; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2012-11-01

    The hydrolysis of triglycerides in adipocytes, termed lipolysis, provides free fatty acids as energy fuel. Murine lipolysis largely depends on the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which is regulated by two proteins annotated as comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and G0/G1 switch gene-2 (G0S2). CGI-58 activates and G0S2 inhibits ATGL activity. In contrast to mice, the functional role of G0S2 in human adipocyte lipolysis is poorly characterized. Here we show that overexpression or silencing of G0S2 in human SGBS adipocytes decreases and increases lipolysis, respectively. Human G0S2 is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation and inhibits ATGL activity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, C-terminally truncated ATGL mutants, which fail to localize to lipid droplets, translocate to the lipid droplet upon coexpression with G0S2, suggesting that G0S2 anchors ATGL to lipid droplets independent of ATGL's C-terminal lipid binding domain. Taken together, our results indicate that G0S2 also regulates human lipolysis by affecting enzyme activity and intracellular localization of ATGL. Increased lipolysis is known to contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, and G0S2 expression has been shown to be reduced in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients. Our data indicate that downregulation of G0S2 in adipose tissue could represent one of the underlying causes leading to increased lipolysis in the insulin-resistant state.

  4. NMDA-dependent mechanisms only affect the BOLD response in the rat dentate gyrus by modifying local signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Regina; Krautwald, Karla; Fincke, Anja; Angenstein, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The role of N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated mechanisms in the formation of a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was studied using electrical stimulation of the right perforant pathway. Stimulation of this fiber bundle triggered BOLD responses in the right hippocampal formation and in the left entorhinal cortex. The perforant pathway projects to and activates the dentate gyrus monosynaptically, activation in the contralateral entorhinal cortex is multisynaptic and requires forwarding and processing of signals. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 during stimulation had no effect on BOLD responses in the right dentate gyrus, but reduced the BOLD responses in the left entorhinal cortex. In contrast, application of MK801 before the first stimulation train reduced the BOLD response in both regions. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the initial stimulation trains changed the local processing of the incoming signals in the dentate gyrus. This altered electrophysiological response was not further changed by a subsequent application of MK801, which is in agreement with an unchanged BOLD response. When MK801 was present during the first stimulation train, a dissimilar electrophysiological response pattern was observed and corresponds to an altered BOLD response, indicating that NMDA-dependent mechanisms indirectly affect the BOLD response, mainly via modifying local signal processing and subsequent propagation. PMID:22167232

  5. Development of a decision support system for the introduction of alternative methods into local irritancy/corrosivity testing strategies. Creation of fundamental rules for a decision support system.

    PubMed

    Gerner, I; Zinke, S; Graetschel, G; Schlede, E

    2000-01-01

    The notification procedure of the European Union (EU) for new chemicals requires the application of protocols on physicochemical and toxicological tests for the evaluation of physicochemical properties and probable toxic effects of each notified substance. A computerised database was developed from data sets and toxicological test protocols relating to substance properties responsible for skin and eye irritation/corrosion. To develop specific structure-activity relationship (SAR) models and to find rules for a decision support system (DSS) to predict local irritation/corrosion, physical property data, chemical structure data and toxicological data for approximately 1300 chemicals, each having a purity of 95% or more, were evaluated. The evaluation demonstrated that the lipid solubility and aqueous solubility of a chemical are relevant to, or - in some cases - responsible for, the observed local effects of a substance on the skins and eyes of rabbits. The octanol/water partition coefficient and the measured value of the surface tension of a saturated aqueous solution of the substance give additional information that permits the definition of detailed SAR algorithms that use measured solubility values. Data on melting points and vapour pressure can be used to assess the intensity and duration of local contact with a chemical. Considerations relating to the reactivity of a pure chemical can be based on molecular weight and the nature of the heteroatoms present. With respect to local lesions produced following contact with the skin and eyes of rabbits, the data evaluation revealed that no general "local irritation/corrosion potential" of a chemical can be defined. A variety of mechanisms are responsible for the formation of local lesions on the skin or in the eyes: serious lesions are produced by mechanisms different from those that cause moderate irritation in these organs. In order to develop a DSS that uses the information extracted from the database, chemical main

  6. Nuclear localization of γ-tubulin affects E2F transcriptional activity and S-phase progression

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Greta; Zarrizi, Reihaneh; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Jonsson, Kristina; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria

    2011-01-01

    We show that the centrosome- and microtubule-regulating protein γ-tubulin interacts with E2 promoter binding factors (E2Fs) to modulate E2F transcriptional activity and thereby control cell cycle progression. γ-Tubulin contains a C-terminal signal that results in its translocation to the nucleus during late G1 to early S phase. γ-Tubulin mutants showed that the C terminus interacts with the transcription factor E2F1 and that the E2F1–γ-tubulin complex is formed during the G1/S transition, when E2F1 is transcriptionally active. Furthermore, E2F transcriptional activity is altered by reduced expression of γ-tubulin or by complex formation between γ-tubulin and E2F1, E2F2, or E2F3, but not E2F6. In addition, the γ-tubulin C terminus encodes a DNA-binding domain that interacts with E2F-regulated promoters, resulting in γ-tubulin-mediated transient activation of E2Fs. Thus, we report a novel mechanism regulating the activity of E2Fs, which can help explain how these proteins affect cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.—Höög, G., Zarrizi, R., von Stedingk, K., Jonsson, K., Alvarado-Kristensson, M. Nuclear localization of γ-tubulin affects E2F transcriptional activity and S-phase progression. PMID:21788450

  7. Nuclear β-catenin localization supports homology of feathers, avian scutate scales, and alligator scales in early development.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jacob M; Wagner, Günter P; Prum, Richard O

    2015-01-01

    Feathers are an evolutionary novelty found in all extant birds. Despite recent progress investigating feather development and a revolution in dinosaur paleontology, the relationship of feathers to other amniote skin appendages, particularly reptile scales, remains unclear. Disagreement arises primarily from the observation that feathers and avian scutate scales exhibit an anatomical placode-defined as an epidermal thickening-in early development, whereas alligator and other avian scales do not. To investigate the homology of feathers and archosaur scales we examined patterns of nuclear β-catenin localization during early development of feathers and different bird and alligator scales. In birds, nuclear β-catenin is first localized to the feather placode, and then exhibits a dynamic pattern of localization in both epidermis and dermis of the feather bud. We found that asymmetric avian scutate scales and alligator scales share similar patterns of nuclear β-catenin localization with feathers. This supports the hypothesis that feathers, scutate scales, and alligator scales are homologous during early developmental stages, and are derived from early developmental stages of an asymmetric scale present in the archosaur ancestor. Furthermore, given that the earliest stage of β-catenin localization in feathers and archosaur scales is also found in placodes of several mammalian skin appendages, including hair and mammary glands, we hypothesize that a common skin appendage placode originated in the common ancestor of all amniotes. We suggest a skin placode should not be defined by anatomical features, but as a local, organized molecular signaling center from which an epidermal appendage develops.

  8. Volunteers supporting older people in formal care settings in England: personal and local factors influencing prevalence and type of participation.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill

    2014-12-01

    In the UK context of financial austerity and the promotion of the social responsibility through the concept of the "Big Society," volunteers are becoming a more important part of the labor workforce. This is particularly so in the long-term care (LTC) sector, where both shortages of staff and demands for support are particularly high. This article investigate the levels and profile of contribution of volunteers in the LTC sector using a large national data set, National Minimum Data Set for Social Care, linked to local area levels of rurality and socio-economic status. The analysis shows that volunteer activity in formal care services varies between sectors and service types, with no strong relationship between local area deprivation, unemployment levels, and levels of volunteering. However, some significant association was found with level of rurality. The contribution of volunteers is most evident in provision of counseling, support, advocacy, and advice.

  9. Does Support for VET Reduce Employee Churn? A Case Study in Local Government. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Kath

    2010-01-01

    To what extent do local governments use vocational education and training as a staff retention strategy? Human resources personnel from a selection of councils around Australia believed that a lack of career development or training opportunities might cause an employee to leave their organisation. They had some reservations about the quality and…

  10. 76 FR 367 - Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (HHS) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Office of State, Tribal, Local and... with Indian Tribal Governments, CDC, OSTLTS announces the following meeting and Tribal Consultation..., 2011 (6th Biannual Tribal Consultation Session) Place: CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Building...

  11. 78 FR 949 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Office for State, Tribal, Local and... with Indian Tribal Governments, CDC/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), announces... Session will be held at CDC Headquarters, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Global Communications Center,...

  12. Growing Up Healthy: What Local Governments Can Do to Support Young Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakian, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The first five years of life are a period of profound growth and change as children begin to speak, think, reason, and feel. Brain research has found that both children's experiences and their relationships with others influence this early development in important and lasting ways. For local governments, the first five years represent a critical…

  13. Examples of Item Banks to Support Local Test Development: Two Case Studies With Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Gary D., Ed.

    This report and compilation of papers summarizes information collected by an Assessment Development and Use Project, initiated by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) to assist test development efforts by state and local agencies. Specific item banking applications are reported in two case studies, selected because they represent…

  14. Learning English Internationally While Engaging Communities Locally: Online EFL Supporting Community Learning for Young Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Beverly; Shin, Joan Kang; Taylor, Joby; Faust, Heidi; Penniston, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The clichés "it's a small world" and "the world is our classroom" are becoming practical realities for many educators. Increasingly accessible transnational contexts for English language teaching and learning offer new opportunities for local-global learning. This article reflects on a content-based online English course…

  15. A comprehensive linkage analysis of chromosome 21q22 supports prior evidence for a putative bipolar affective disorder locus.

    PubMed Central

    Aita, V M; Liu, J; Knowles, J A; Terwilliger, J D; Baltazar, R; Grunn, A; Loth, J E; Kanyas, K; Lerer, B; Endicott, J; Wang, Z; Penchaszadeh, G; Gilliam, T C; Baron, M

    1999-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated evidence of linkage to bipolar affective disorder (BP) in a single large, multigenerational family with a LOD score of 3.41 at the PFKL locus on chromosome 21q22.3. Additional families showed little support for linkage to PFKL under homogeneity or heterogeneity, in that study. We have expanded on that analysis, with 31 microsatellite markers at an average marker spacing of affecteds-only" method. As such, our results are based solely on genetic information from affected individuals, without assumptions about the disease-locus genotypes of the unaffecteds. Furthermore, for ease of comparison, this study was performed with the same approach as a 10-cM genome scan for BP loci, the results of which will be reported elsewhere. PMID:9915960

  16. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  17. Communication, support and psychosocial work environment affecting psychological distress among working women aged 20 to 39 years in Japan.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ayumi; Date, Yutaka; Abe, Yasuyo; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Honda, Sumihisa

    2016-01-01

    When compared with their older counterparts, younger women are more likely to have depressive symptoms because they more often experience interrupted work history and a heavy childrearing burden. The purposes of the present study were 1) to investigate the possible association of psychosocial work environment with psychological distress and 2) to examine the way by which communication and support in the workplace affect to psychological distress among young women. We studied 198 women aged 20 to 39 yr in a cross-sectional study. The Kessler Scale-10 (K10 Scale) was used to examine psychological distress. In employees who experienced interpersonal conflict, those who had little or no conversations with their supervisor and/or co-workers had a significantly increased risk of psychological distress (OR, 4.2), and those who received little or no support from their supervisor and/or co-workers had a significantly increased risk of psychological distress (OR, 3.8) compared to those who had more frequent communication and received more support. Harmonious communication in the workplace can help prevent psychological distress among employees, which in turn may enable them to be satisfied with their work.

  18. Research involvement, support needs, and factors affecting research participation: a survey of Mental Health Consultation Liaison Nurses.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Rose; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Andersson-Noorgard, Kurt; Cooper, Kerrie; McInnes, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this study were to identify research involvement and support needs of Mental Health Consultation Liaison Nurses (MHCLN) and the factors that affect participation in research. A self-administered, standardized, anonymous questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of MHCLN. Frequencies and univariate analyses were calculated to examine relationships between: (i) involvement in a research study by highest qualification and job designation; and (ii) current enrolment in a higher degree study, research goals, and current research involvement by level of research skill. Open-ended responses were collated and summarized. Of the 34 workshop attendees, 32 participated in the survey (response rate 94%). Seventy-five percent of respondents agreed that involvement in research is an expectation of their role; 75% reported no current involvement in research. Over half (53%) of participants reported having research goals over the next 12 months. Those enrolled in postgraduate degrees were more likely to be currently involved in a research project (P=0.013). Commonly reported barriers to research participation were competing commitments and lack of support, resources, confidence, and motivation. This study showed that access to research support and resources, including mentorship and funding, are required to engage these MHCLN in research and to build capacity.

  19. Local point sources that affect ground-water quality in the East Meadow area, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    The extent and chemical characteristics of ground water affected by three local point sources--a stormwater basin, uncovered road-salt-storage piles, and an abandoned sewage-treatment plant--were delineated during a 3-year study of the chemical characteristics and migration of a body of reclaimed wastewater that was applied to the watertable aquifer during recharge experiments from October 1982 through January 1984 in East Meadow. The timing, magnitude, and chemical quality of recharge from these point sources is highly variable, and all sources have the potential to skew determinations of the quality of ambient ground-water and of the reclaimed-wastewater plume if they are not taken into account. Ground water affected by recharge from the stormwater basin is characterized by low concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (less than 5 mg/L [milligrams per liter] as N) and sulfate (less than 40 mg/L) and is almost entirely within the upper glacial aquifer. The plume derived from road-salt piles is narrow, has high concentrations of chloride (greater than 50 mg/L) and sodium (greater than 75 mg/L), and also is limited to the upper glacial aquifer. The sodium, in high concentrations, could react with aquifer material and exchange for sorbed cations such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium. Water affected by secondary-treated sewage from the abandoned treatment plant extends 152 feet below land surface into the upper part of the Magothy aquifer and longitudinally beyond the southern edge of the study area, 7,750 feet south of the recharge site. Ground water affected by secondary-treated sewage within the study area typically contains elevated concentrations of reactive chemical constituents, such as potassium and ammonium, and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen. Conservative or minimally reactive constituents such as chloride and sodium have been transported out of the study area in the upper glacial aquifer and the intermediate (transitional) zone but remain in the less

  20. Pre-Consolidation Supply Support for NARF Alameda and NSC Oakland Local Customers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    NARF Alameda and NSC Oakland Local Customers by Bryan Hrabosky, Jr. Lieutenant Commander, Supply Corps, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval...Academy, 1969 and Wayne Allen Owen Lieutenant Commander, Supply Corps, United States Navy B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University at...Blacksburg, 1971 and Ronnald Gordon Popp Lieutenant, Supply Corps, United States Navy B.S., Kansas State University at Fort Hayes, 1971 Submitted in

  1. Bridging the Gap: Developing a Tool to Support Local Civilian and Military Disaster Preparedness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    administratively within Pierce County and geographically at the foot of Mount Rainier and along the shores of Commencement Bay. The city has a population (200,000...support in traffic routing, SAR, and pathways to community-produced information (e.g., Mount St. Helens information and contact information, disease

  2. Supporting the Implementation of Inquiry-based Elementary Science Programs: Setting the Stage for Local Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpe, Andrew T.; Czerniak, Charlene M.; Haney, Jodi J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the context and support structures involved in the implementation of a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded professional development program designed to train elementary teachers to use exemplary science curriculum materials. Identifies components for the successful implementation of systemic reform efforts including purposeful…

  3. A support system for assessing local vulnerability to weather and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coletti, Alex; Howe, Peter D.; Yarnal, Brent; Wood, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The changing number and nature of weather- and climate-related natural hazards is causing more communities to need to assess their vulnerabilities. Vulnerability assessments, however, often require considerable expertise and resources that are not available or too expensive for many communities. To meet the need for an easy-to-use, cost-effective vulnerability assessment tool for communities, a prototype online vulnerability assessment support system was built and tested. This prototype tool guides users through a stakeholder-based vulnerability assessment that breaks the process into four easy-to-implement steps. Data sources are integrated in the online environment so that perceived risks—defined and prioritized qualitatively by users—can be compared and discussed against the impacts that past events have had on the community. The support system is limited in scope, and the locations of the case studies do not provide a sufficiently broad range of sample cases. The addition of more publically available hazard databases combined with future improvements in the support system architecture and software will expand opportunities for testing and fully implementing the support system.

  4. How to maximally support local and regional biodiversity in applied conservation? Insights from pond management.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Pieter; Mergeay, Joachim; De Bie, Tom; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; De Meester, Luc; Declerck, Steven A J

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity and nature values in anthropogenic landscapes often depend on land use practices and management. Evaluations of the association between management and biodiversity remain, however, comparatively scarce, especially in aquatic systems. Furthermore, studies also tend to focus on a limited set of organism groups at the local scale, whereas a multi-group approach at the landscape scale is to be preferred. This study aims to investigate the effect of pond management on the diversity of multiple aquatic organism groups (e.g. phytoplankton, zooplankton, several groups of macro-invertebrates, submerged and emergent macrophytes) at local and regional spatial scales. For this purpose, we performed a field study of 39 shallow man-made ponds representing five different management types. Our results indicate that fish stock management and periodic pond drainage are crucial drivers of pond biodiversity. Furthermore, this study provides insight in how the management of eutrophied ponds can contribute to aquatic biodiversity. A combination of regular draining of ponds with efforts to keep ponds free of fish seems to be highly beneficial for the biodiversity of many groups of aquatic organisms at local and regional scales. Regular draining combined with a stocking of fish at low biomass is also preferable to infrequent draining and lack of fish stock control. These insights are essential for the development of conservation programs that aim long-term maintenance of regional biodiversity in pond areas across Europe.

  5. Foot and mouth disease risk assessment in Mongolia--local expertise to support national policy.

    PubMed

    Wieland, B; Batsukh, B; Enktuvshin, S; Odontsetseg, N; Schuppers, M

    2015-06-01

    To address weaknesses in the current foot and mouth disease (FMD) control system and to inform the formulation of a national control strategy, Mongolia conducted two separate risk assessments, one for the Eastern region which in the past has seen re-current introductions of infection, and one for the Western region, where freedom from disease had been demonstrated over several years until FMD was re-introduced in 2013. The risk assessment was conducted in three stages: first local experts developed entry, exposure and consequence pathways during separate workshops in both regions, then data was collected, compiled and analysed, and finally, during a second workshop local experts provided risk estimations for both regions and identified recommendations for risk management. Risk estimates for each pathway were individually recorded, which ensured that views of all experts were equally represented in the risk estimation and which allowed assessing possible impact of different factors related to the background of participating local experts on risk estimates. Entry risk pathways with highest risk estimates were related to livestock movements and in the consequence assessment due to direct contacts. Uncertainty, for which disagreement between participants acted as a proxy, was high in entry pathways and in the assessment of effectiveness of control measures. The risk assessment was conducted with local experts who had no previous risk assessment experience. Through their involvement in the whole process however, they assumed a high level of ownership and despite lively discussions for some risk pathways, a high level of agreement was achieved and credible results were communicated to decision makers. Especially valuable were the derived recommendations. Through the risk assessment the local experts gained a thorough understanding of the FMD risk which resulted in sensible and realistic recommendations, which, if implemented, can lead to a sustainable strengthening of

  6. Oxidative stress affects FET proteins localization and alternative pre-mRNA processing in cellular models of ALS.

    PubMed

    Svetoni, Francesca; Caporossi, Daniela; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2014-10-01

    FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15 are members of the FET family of DNA and RNA binding proteins, involved in multiple steps of DNA and RNA processing and implicated in the regulation of gene expression and cell-signaling. All members of the FET family contribute to human pathologies, as they are involved in sarcoma translocations and neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in FUS/TLS, in EWSR1 and in TAF15 genescause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal human neurodegenerative disease that affects primarily motor neurons and is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons and degradation of the neuromuscular junctions.ALS-associated FET mutations cause FET protein relocalization into cytoplasmic aggregates, thus impairing their normal function. Protein aggregation has been suggested as a co-opting factor during the disease pathogenesis. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of FET proteins contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may alter RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. Interestingly, oxidative stress, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, triggers the accumulation of mutant FUS in cytoplasmic stress granules where it binds and sequester wild-type FUS.In order to evaluate the role of FET proteins in ALS and their involvement in the response to oxidative stress, we have developed cellular models of ALS expressing ALS-related FET mutants in neuroblastoma cell lines. Upon treatment with sodium arsenite, cells were analysed by immunofluorescence to monitor the localization of wild-type and mutated FET proteins. Furthermore, we have characterized signal transduction pathways and cell survival upon oxidative stress in our cellular models of ALS. Interestingly, we found that EWS mutant proteins display a different localization from FUS mutants and neither wild-type nor mutated EWS protein translocate into stress granules upon oxidative stress treatment. Collectively, our data provide a new link between the oxidative stress

  7. Aging and aerobic fitness affect the contribution of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves to the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Saxton, John M; Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Ruddock, Alan D; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Sedentary aging results in a diminished rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating. We investigated whether this diminished response was due to altered contributions of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves by assessing 1) the age-related decline and 2) the effect of aerobic fitness. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in young (24 ± 1 yr) and older (64 ± 1 yr) endurance-trained and sedentary men (n = 7 per group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated forearm sites, 2) forearm sites treated with bretylium tosylate (BT), which prevents neurotransmitter release from noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, and 3) forearm sites treated with yohimbine + propranolol (YP), which antagonizes α- and β-adrenergic receptors. SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVC(max)) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. In the young trained group, the rapid vasodilator response was reduced at BT and YP sites (P < 0.05); by contrast, in the young sedentary and older trained groups, YP had no effect (P > 0.05), but BT did (P > 0.05). Neither BT nor YP affected the rapid vasodilator response in the older sedentary group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the age-related reduction in the rapid vasodilator response is due to an impairment of sympathetic-dependent mechanisms, which can be partly attenuated with habitual aerobic exercise. Rapid vasodilation involves noradrenergic neurotransmitters in young trained men and nonadrenergic sympathetic cotransmitters (e.g., neuropeptide Y) in young sedentary and older trained men, possibly as a compensatory mechanism. Finally, in older sedentary men, the rapid vasodilation appears not to involve the sympathetic system.

  8. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L; Granas, David M; Dutcher, Susan K

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating.

  9. Effects of Progressive Body Weight Support Treadmill Forward and Backward Walking Training on Stroke Patients’ Affected Side Lower Extremity’s Walking Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Lee, Kyoungbo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of progressive body weight supported treadmill forward and backward walking training (PBWSTFBWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill forward walking training (PBWSTFWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill backward walking training (PBWSTBWT), on stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 36 chronic stroke patients were divided into three groups with 12 subjects in each group. Each of the groups performed one of the progressive body weight supported treadmill training methods for 30 minute, six times per week for three weeks, and then received general physical therapy without any other intervention until the follow-up tests. For the assessment of the affected side lower extremity’s walking ability, step length of the affected side, stance phase of the affected side, swing phase of the affected side, single support of the affected side, and step time of the affected side were measured using optogait and the symmetry index. [Results] In the within group comparisons, all the three groups showed significant differences between before and after the intervention and in the comparison of the three groups, the PBWSTFBWT group showed more significant differences in all of the assessed items than the other two groups. [Conclusion] In the present study progressive body weight supported treadmill training was performed in an environment in which the subjects were actually walked, and PBWSTFBWT was more effective at efficiently training stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. PMID:25540499

  10. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  11. Prostate cancer localization with multispectral MRI using cost-sensitive support vector machines and conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Artan, Yusuf; Haider, Masoom A; Langer, Deanna L; van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Evans, Andrew J; Yang, Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N; Trachtenberg, John; Yetik, Imam Samil

    2010-09-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death for men in the United States. Fortunately, the survival rate for early diagnosed patients is relatively high. Therefore, in vivo imaging plays an important role for the detection and treatment of the disease. Accurate prostate cancer localization with noninvasive imaging can be used to guide biopsy, radiotherapy, and surgery as well as to monitor disease progression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed with an endorectal coil provides higher prostate cancer localization accuracy, when compared to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). However, in general, a single type of MRI is not sufficient for reliable tumor localization. As an alternative, multispectral MRI, i.e., the use of multiple MRI-derived datasets, has emerged as a promising noninvasive imaging technique for the localization of prostate cancer; however almost all studies are with human readers. There is a significant inter and intraobserver variability for human readers, and it is substantially difficult for humans to analyze the large dataset of multispectral MRI. To solve these problems, this study presents an automated localization method using cost-sensitive support vector machines (SVMs) and shows that this method results in improved localization accuracy than classical SVM. Additionally, we develop a new segmentation method by combining conditional random fields (CRF) with a cost-sensitive framework and show that our method further improves cost-sensitive SVM results by incorporating spatial information. We test SVM, cost-sensitive SVM, and the proposed cost-sensitive CRF on multispectral MRI datasets acquired from 21 biopsy-confirmed cancer patients. Our results show that multispectral MRI helps to increase the accuracy of prostate cancer localization when compared to single MR images; and that using advanced methods such as cost-sensitive SVM as well as the proposed cost-sensitive CRF can boost the performance significantly when compared to SVM.

  12. Localization of Southern Resident Killer Whales Using Two Star Arrays to Support Marine Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Sun, Yannan; Fu, Tao; Martinez, Jayson J.; Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.

    2012-10-19

    Tidal power has been identified as one of the most potential commercial-scale renewable energy sources. Puget Sound, Washington, is a potential site to deploy tidal power generating devices. The risk of injury for killer whales needs to be managed before the deployment of these types of devices can be approved by regulating authorities. A passive acoustic system consisting of two star arrays, each with four hydrophones, was designed and implemented for the detection and localization of Southern Resident killer whales. Deployment of the passive acoustic system was conducted at Sequim Bay, Washington. A total of nine test locations were chosen, within a radius of 250 m around the star arrays, to test our localization approach. For the localization algorithm, a least square solver was applied to obtain a bearing location from each star array. The final source location was determined by the intersection of the bearings given by each of the two star arrays. Bearing and distance errors were obtained to conduct comparison between the calculated and true (from Global Positioning System) locations. The results indicated that bearing errors were within 1.04º for eight of the test locations; one location had bearing errors slightly larger than expected due to the strong background noise at that position. For the distance errors, six of the test locations were within the range of 1.91 to 32.36 m. The other two test locations were near the intersection line between the centers of the two star arrays, which were expected to have large errors from the theoretical sensitivity analysis performed.

  13. Does the local food environment around schools affect diet? Longitudinal associations in adolescents attending secondary schools in East London

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The local retail food environment around schools may act as a potential risk factor for adolescent diet. However, international research utilising cross-sectional designs to investigate associations between retail food outlet proximity to schools and diet provides equivocal support for an effect. In this study we employ longitudinal perspectives in order to answer the following two questions. First, how has the local retail food environment around secondary schools changed over time and second, is this change associated with change in diet of students at these schools? Methods The locations of retail food outlets and schools in 2001 and 2005 were geo-coded in three London boroughs. Network analysis in a Geographic Information System (GIS) ascertained the number, minimum and median distances to food outlets within 400 m and 800 m of the school location. Outcome measures were ‘healthy’ and ‘unhealthy’ diet scores derived from adolescent self-reported data in the Research with East London Adolescents: Community Health Survey (RELACHS). Adjusted associations between distance from school to food retail outlets, counts of outlets near schools and diet scores were assessed using longitudinal (2001–2005 n=757) approaches. Results Between 2001 and 2005 the number of takeaways and grocers/convenience stores within 400 m of schools increased, with many more grocers reported within 800 m of schools in 2005 (p< 0.001). Longitudinal analyses showed a decrease of the mean healthy (−1.12, se 0.12) and unhealthy (−0.48, se 0.16) diet scores. There were significant positive relationships between the distances travelled to grocers and healthy diet scores though effects were very small (0.003, 95%CI 0.001 – 0.006). Significant negative relationships between proximity to takeaways and unhealthy diet scores also resulted in small parameter estimates. Conclusions The results provide some evidence that the local food environment around secondary schools

  14. Improved passive optical network architectures to support local area network emulation and protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elaine; Nadarajah, Nishaanthan; Chae, Chang-Joon; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Attygalle, Sanjeewa M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe two optical layer schemes which simultaneously facilitate local area network emulation and automatic protection switching against distribution fiber breaks in passive optical networks. One scheme employs a narrowband fiber Bragg grating placed close to the star coupler in the feeder fiber of the passive optical network, while the other uses an additional short length distribution fiber from the star coupler to each customer for the redirection of the customer traffic. Both schemes use RF subcarrier multiplexed transmission for intercommunication between customers in conjunction with upstream access to the central office at baseband. Failure detection and automatic protection switching are performed independently by each optical network unit that is located at the customer premises in a distributed manner. The restoration of traffic transported between the central office and an optical network unit in the event of the distribution fiber break is performed by interconnecting adjacent optical network units and carrying out signal transmissions via an independent but interconnected optical network unit. Such a protection mechanism enables multiple adjacent optical network units to be simultaneously protected by a single optical network unit utilizing its maximum available bandwidth. We experimentally verify the feasibility of both schemes with 1.25 Gb/s upstream baseband transmission to the central office and 155 Mb/s local area network data transmission on a RF subcarrier frequency. The experimental results obtained from both schemes are compared, and the power budgets are calculated to analyze the scalability of each scheme.

  15. Learn locally, think globally. Exemplar variability supports higher-order generalization and word learning.

    PubMed

    Perry, Lynn K; Samuelson, Larissa K; Malloy, Lisa M; Schiffer, Ryan N

    2010-12-01

    Research suggests that variability of exemplars supports successful object categorization; however, the scope of variability's support at the level of higher-order generalization remains unexplored. Using a longitudinal study, we examined the role of exemplar variability in first- and second-order generalization in the context of nominal-category learning at an early age. Sixteen 18-month-old children were taught 12 categories. Half of the children were taught with sets of highly similar exemplars; the other half were taught with sets of dissimilar, variable exemplars. Participants' learning and generalization of trained labels and their development of more general word-learning biases were tested. All children were found to have learned labels for trained exemplars, but children trained with variable exemplars generalized to novel exemplars of these categories, developed a discriminating word-learning bias generalizing labels of novel solid objects by shape and labels of nonsolid objects by material, and accelerated in vocabulary acquisition. These findings demonstrate that object variability leads to better abstraction of individual and global category organization, which increases learning outside the laboratory.

  16. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuron–astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (−astrocyte) within the same culture dish. −Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform

  17. Does MRI-detected cranial nerve involvement affect the prognosis of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Zong, Jingfeng; Lin, Shaojun; Chen, Yunbin; Wang, Bingyi; Xiao, Youping; Lin, Jin; Li, Rui; Pan, Jianji

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the common cancers in South China. It can easily invade into cranial nerves, especially in patients with local advanced disease. Despite the fact that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings are not always consistent with the symptoms of CN palsy, MRI is recommended for the detection of CN involvement (CNI). However, the prognostic impact of MRI-detected CNI in NPC patients is still controversial. To investigate the prognostic value of MRI detected CNI, we performed a retrospective analysis on the clinical data of 375 patients with NPC who were initially diagnosed by MRI. All patients had T3-4 disease and received radical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as their primary treatment. The incidence of MRI-detected CNI was 60.8%. A higher incidence of MRI-detected CNI was observed in T4 disease compared with T3 disease (96.8% vs. 42.8%, P<0.001), and a higher incidence was also found in patients with Stage IV disease compared with those with Stage III disease (91.5% vs. 42.3%; P<0.001). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients with T3 disease, with or without MRI-detected CNI, was superior to that of patients with T4 disease (P<0.05). No significant differences in LRFS, DMFS or OS were observed between T3 patients with or without MRI-detected CNI. The survival of Stage III patients with or without MRI-detected CNI was significantly superior to that of Stage IV patients (P<0.01), but there was no significant difference between Stage III patients with or without MRI-detected CNI for all endpoints. Therefore, when treated with IMRT, MRI-detected CNI in patients with NPC does not appear to affect the prognosis. In patients with clinical T3 disease, the presence of MRI-detected CNI is not sufficient evidence for defining T4 disease.

  18. Causal Factors Affecting Local Fiscal Stress in U.S. Northeast Counties. Cornell Rural Sociology Series. Bulletin No. 149.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberts, Paul; Khawaja, Marwan

    Conceptualizing high local fiscal stress as a variable which includes low fiscal capacity, high local tax effort and high local need requires building a typology reflecting this conceptualization. This study builds such a typology for 166 counties in the northeastern United States and examines the effects of variables taken from a series of…

  19. Salinity Impacts of the Indian Ocean Tsunami on Groundwater and Local Water Supply - Lessons Learned from Integrated Research and Support to Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villholth, K. G.; Vithanage, M.; Goswami, R. R.; Jeyakumar, P.; Manamperi, S.

    2008-05-01

    Huge devastation and human tragedy followed the Dec. 26, 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean. Sri Lanka was one of the hardest hit, with an estimated death toll of 31,000 people. Of immediate concern after the catastrophic event was the destruction of the traditional water supply system based on private shallow open wells in the rural and semi-urban areas of the coastal belt. Practically all wells within the reach of the flooding waves (up to a couple of km's inland) were inundated and filled with saltwater and contaminated with solid matter, pathogens, and other unknown chemicals, leaving the water unfit for drinking. It was estimated early on that the tsunami waves contaminated more than 50,000 wells in coastal Sri Lanka. This initial figure is highly underestimated, however, as the present research found that the total number of affected wells was more in the range of half a million. The total number of people affected by disruption in well water supply could have been in the range of 2.5 million. The present paper summarizes the outcomes and experiences gained from comprehensive research, collaboration and support work in eastern Sri Lanka related to the impact of the tsunami on groundwater, particularly with respect to salinity, and the destruction and rehabilitation of the local water supply systems. The area in focus was characterized by sandy, shallow, unconfined aquifers bounded by seawater and inland brackish lagoons and representative of the hydro-geological, climatic, demographic and land use setting on the east coast of Sri Lanka. Field monitoring investigations in shallow domestic wells showed that the salinity imprint of the tsunami on groundwater and water supply were detectable up to 1.5 years after the event. Field results also indicated that the well cleaning efforts which were quickly resorted to as part of the emergency and remediation activities were not efficient in terms of reducing salinity impacts. Rainfall was the most significant and

  20. Adaptation of a Published Risk Model to Point-of-care Clinical Decision Support Tailored to Local Workflow.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jeffrey L; Baker, Craig C; Levy, David; Cain, Carol H

    2015-01-01

    Electronic clinical decision support can bring newly published knowledge to the point of care. However, local organizational buy-in, support for team workflows, IT system ease of use and other sociotechnical factors are needed to promote adoption. We successfully implemented a multi-variate cardiac risk stratification model from another institution into ours. We recreated the model and integrated it into our workflow, accessing it from our EHR with patient-specific data and facilitating clinical documentation if the user accepts the model results. Our clinical leaders championed the change and led educational dissemination efforts. We describe the ad-hoc social and technical collaboration needed to build and deploy the tool. The tool complements a clinical initiative within a community of practice, and is correlated with appropriate use of nuclear imaging.

  1. Chromosome banding and gene localizations support extensive conservation of chromosome structure between cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Hediger, R; Ansari, H A; Stranzinger, G F

    1991-01-01

    By using three gene probes, one derived from the porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and two from bovine cytokeratin genes, type I (KRTA) and type II (KRTB), the hypothesis of conservation of genome structure in two members of the family Bovidae was examined. Gene mapping data revealed the MHC to be in chromosome region 23q15----q23 in cattle (BOLA) and 20q15----q23 in sheep (OLA). KRTA was localized to chromosome region 19q25----q29 in cattle and 11q25----q29 in sheep and KRTB to 5q14----q22 in cattle and 3q14----q22 in sheep. The banding patterns of the chromosome arms to which the loci were assigned were identical in both species. Moreover, the resemblances of GTG- or QFQ-banding patterns between the cattle and sheep karyotypes illustrated further chromosome homologies. These studies, based on gene mapping comparisons and comparative cytogenetics, document that within bovid chromosomes, homology of banding patterns corresponds to a homologous genetic structure. Hence, we propose that gene assignments on identified chromosomal segments in one species of the Bovidae can be extrapolated, in general, to other bovid species based on the banding homologies presented here.

  2. Developing local climate services to support climate adaptation policies for Greek region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, Ioannis; Grillakis, Manolis; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Jacob, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    The main aim of the Eclise EU FP6 project is to improve the delivery of climate services. The realization of climate service to Greek stakeholders is attempted in several sectors of interest within the project framework. High interest was raised for climate information related to solar energy, extremes of precipitation and temperature and information related to water resources. Technical University of Crete, partner of the ECLISE project has the role of delivering this information to relevant end users in the form of report and datasets with appropriate spatiotemporal resolution, as well as communication of the embedded uncertainties. Currently, simulations from 10 RCMs in the frame of ENSEMBLES FP6 under A1B emission scenario at a spatial resolution of 25km and data from 3 GCMs in the frame of WATCH FP6 for A2 and B1 emission scenarios interpolated at a spatial resolution of 0.5o were used for the analysis. Additionally, RCM runs of RCA model at various spatial resolutions (50, 25, 12.5 and 6km) were provided from SMHI in order to study the effect of model scale on the ability to simulate the present climate. The analysis of the climate simulations will assist in the long-term strategic water resources planning and climate hazard mitigation. Regarding solar energy information, historical and projected radiation data from 11 RCMs in the frame of ENSEMBLES FP6 under A1B emission scenario at a spatial resolution of 25km were downloaded for comparison with local measurements. The produced information will assist the future solar energy investments planning and security.

  3. Fine-Grained, Local Maps and Coarse, Global Representations Support Human Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; d'Avossa, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    While sensory processes are tuned to particular features, such as an object's specific location, color or orientation, visual working memory (vWM) is assumed to store information using representations, which generalize over a feature dimension. Additionally, current vWM models presume that different features or objects are stored independently. On the other hand, configurational effects, when observed, are supposed to mainly reflect encoding strategies. We show that the location of the target, relative to the display center and boundaries, and overall memory load influenced recall precision, indicating that, like sensory processes, capacity limited vWM resources are spatially tuned. When recalling one of three memory items the target distance from the display center was overestimated, similar to the error when only one item was memorized, but its distance from the memory items' average position was underestimated, showing that not only individual memory items' position, but also the global configuration of the memory array may be stored. Finally, presenting the non-target items at recall, consequently providing landmarks and configurational information, improved precision and accuracy of target recall. Similarly, when the non-target items were translated at recall, relative to their position in the initial display, a parallel displacement of the recalled target was observed. These findings suggest that fine-grained spatial information in vWM is represented in local maps whose resolution varies with distance from landmarks, such as the display center, while coarse representations are used to store the memory array configuration. Both these representations are updated at the time of recall. PMID:25259601

  4. Detection and localization of damage using empirical mode decomposition and multilevel support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushyanth, N. D.; Suma, M. N.; Latte, Mrityanjaya V.

    2016-03-01

    Damage in the structure may raise a significant amount of maintenance cost and serious safety problems. Hence detection of the damage at its early stage is of prime importance. The main contribution pursued in this investigation is to propose a generic optimal methodology to improve the accuracy of positioning of the flaw in a structure. This novel approach involves a two-step process. The first step essentially aims at extracting the damage-sensitive features from the received signal, and these extracted features are often termed the damage index or damage indices, serving as an indicator to know whether the damage is present or not. In particular, a multilevel SVM (support vector machine) plays a vital role in the distinction of faulty and healthy structures. Formerly, when a structure is unveiled as a damaged structure, in the subsequent step, the position of the damage is identified using Hilbert-Huang transform. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated in both simulation and experimental tests on a 6061 aluminum plate with dimensions 300 mm × 300 mm × 5 mm which accordingly yield considerable improvement in the accuracy of estimating the position of the flaw.

  5. Strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information of visual stimuli: an approach using large-size Navon letters.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Tomoike, Kouta

    2016-01-12

    Recent studies argue that strongly-motivated positive emotions (e.g. desire) narrow a scope of attention. This argument is mainly based on an observation that, while humans normally respond faster to global than local information of a visual stimulus (global advantage), positive affects eliminated the global advantage by selectively speeding responses to local (but not global) information. In other words, narrowing of attentional scope was indirectly evidenced by the elimination of global advantage (the same speed of processing between global and local information). No study has directly shown that strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information while excluding a bias for global information (global advantage) in a baseline (emotionally-neutral) condition. In the present study, we addressed this issue by eliminating the global advantage in a baseline (neutral) state. Induction of positive affects under this state resulted in faster responses to local than global information. Our results provided direct evidence that positive affects in high motivational intensity narrow a scope of attention.

  6. Public support for river restoration. A mixed-method study into local residents' support for and framing of river management and ecological restoration in the Dutch floodplains.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Arjen E

    2009-06-01

    In many European countries, accommodating water has become the dominant paradigm in river management. In the Netherlands, extensive river restoration projects are being implemented, many of which draw serious opposition from the public. To investigate the causes of such opposition, a comprehensive study of public attitudes towards river restoration was conducted in three floodplains, both before and after river restoration. The study combined quantitative questionnaires (N=562) with open interviews (N=29). This paper describes how local residents perceive the effects of river restoration on landscape quality and how residents and protest groups use landscape quality in combination with other arguments to strategically frame river management policies. Results show that measurement of the perceived outcomes of nature restoration needs to be complemented by a more dynamic type of research, focusing on the social processes of the framing of restoration plans. Theoretically, the paper aims to contribute to the development of a rigorous research strategy to study framing processes in environmental management, using a mixed-methods approach. In general, local residents are supportive of river restoration projects. Although restoration may diminish feelings of attachment to an area, for most people this negative effect is compensated by the positive effects on scenic beauty and perceived protection from flooding. However, these positive effects may become contested because of the active framing of river restoration by protest groups. Residents use three distinct frames to give meaning to river restoration projects: (i) an attachment frame, focusing on cultural heritage and place attachment (ii) an attractive nature frame, focusing on nature as attractive living space and the intrinsic value of nature (iii) a rurality frame, focusing on rural values, agriculture and cultural heritage. Resistance to river restoration plans stems from the attachment and rurality frames

  7. From Provider to Enabler of Care? Reconfiguring Local Authority Support for Older People and Carers in Leeds, 2008 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Yeandle, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article explores developments in the support available to older people and carers (i.e., caregivers) in the city of Leeds, United Kingdom, and examines provision changes during a period characterized by unprecedented resource constraint and new developments in national-local governance. Using documentary evidence, official statistics, and findings from recent studies led by the author, the effects of these changes on service planning and delivery and the approach taken by local actors to mitigate their impact are highlighted. The statistical data show a marked decline in some types of services for older people during a 5-year period during which the city council took steps to mobilize citizens and develop new services and system improvements. The analysis focuses on theories of social quality as a framework for analysis of the complex picture of change related to service provision. It concludes that although citizen involvement and consultations exerted a positive influence in delivering support to some older people and carers, research over a longer timescale is needed to show if these changes are adequate to protect older people and carers from the effects of ongoing budgetary constraints. PMID:27019540

  8. Persuading, protesting and exchanging favours: strategies used by Indian sex workers to win local support for their HIV prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Flora; Shukla, Anuprita; Banerji, Riddhi

    2010-01-01

    Given that the communities which are most vulnerable to HIV often have little control over their own lives and their health-related behaviour, HIV prevention policies increasingly recommend that HIV prevention projects work to build relationships with powerful external groups (i.e., build "bridging social capital"). To aid conceptualisation of how community organisations may build such social capital, this paper outlines a typology of strategies for influencing local stakeholders. We present a study of two successful Indian sex workers' organisations, VAMP and DMSC, focusing on how the organisations have influenced three groups of stakeholders, namely police, politicians and local social organisations. Interviews with project employees (45), with representatives of the three groups of stakeholders (12) and fieldwork diaries recording 6 months of observation in each site provide the data. Three approaches emerged. "Persuading" refers to the practice of holding information-giving meetings with stakeholders and requesting their support. It appears to build "weak social ties". "Protesting" entails a collective confrontation with stakeholders, and appears to be useful when the stakeholder has a public image to protect that would be tarnished by protest, and when the protestors can stake a legitimate claim that their rights are being denied. In "exchanging favours", the sex workers' organisations find creative ways to position themselves as offering valued resources to their stakeholders (such as useful information on criminal activities for the police, a stage and audience for politicians or a celebration for local social organisations) as incentives for their support. In conclusion, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, the implications for social capital theorising and implications for community HIV prevention.

  9. Apoplasmic loading in the rice phloem supported by the presence of sucrose synthase and plasma membrane-localized proton pyrophosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Kamesh C.; Zhang, Shangji; Gaxiola, Roberto A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although Oryza sativa (rice) is one of the most important cereal crops, the mechanism by which sucrose, the major photosynthate, is loaded into its phloem is still a matter of debate. Current opinion holds that the phloem loading pathway in rice could involve either a symplasmic or an apoplasmic route. It was hypothesized, on the basis of a complementary body of evidence from arabidopsis, which is an apoplasmic loader, that the membrane specificity of proton pyrophosphatases (H+-PPases; OVPs) in the sieve element–companion cell (SE-CC) complexes of rice source leaves would support the existence of either of the aforementioned phloem loading mechanisms. Additionally, it was contended that the presence of sucrose synthase in the SE-CC complexes would be consistent with an apoplasmic sucrose loading route in rice. Methods Conventional chemical fixation methods were used for immunohistochemical localization of H+-PPases and sucrose synthase in rice and arabidopsis at the light microscopy level, while ultrastructural immunogold labelling of H+-PPases and sucrose synthase was performed on high-pressure frozen source leaves of rice. Key Results Using immunogold labelling, it was found that OVPs predominantly localize at the plasma membrane (PM) of the SE-CC complexes in rice source leaf minor veins, while in the root meristematic cells, OVPs preferentially localize at the vacuoles. The PM specificity of OPVs in the SE-CC complexes was deemed to support apoplasmic loading in the rice phloem. Further backing for this interpretation came from the sucrose synthase-specific immunogold labelling at the SE-CC complexes of rice source leaves. Conclusion These findings are consistent with the idea that, in the same way as in arabidopsis and a majority of grasses, sucrose is actively loaded into the SE-CC complexes of rice leaves using an apoplasmic step. PMID:26614751

  10. Primary and Secondary Analysis of Local Elected Officials’ Decisions to Support or Oppose Pharmacy Sale of Syringes in California

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Valerie J.

    2010-01-01

    Under California law, local governments may authorize pharmacies within their jurisdictions to sell ten or fewer syringes to an adult without prescription, proof of identity, or proof of medical need. Local governments may simultaneously exempt adults from prosecution for violation of state drug paraphernalia codes for possession of ten or fewer syringes for personal use. Both of these provisions are temporary and sunset on December 31, 2010, unless subsequent state legislation amends that date. The objective of our study was to ascertain how and why local policymakers made their decisions regarding non-prescription syringe sale (NPSS). We examined influences on their decisions, including specific messengers and the arguments that were most salient to their decision making. We selected jurisdictions that were geographically representative of California counties; those with and without syringe exchange programs, and those that had passed or rejected NPSS. We conducted nine semi-structured interviews in five jurisdictions. To enrich primary data collection, we analyzed secondary data by reviewing audio, video, and written transcripts of public hearings and newspaper coverage in five jurisdictions, including three jurisdictions without primary interview data. Among proponents of NPSS, we identified common themes, including: (1) public health research provided conclusive evidence for reduction in HIV and hepatitis transmission without problems of crime, drug use, or unsafe discard of syringes; (2) the local health officer was the key to influencing local policymakers; (3) recall of prior debates over syringe exchange served to inform their decision making; and (4) a lack of local opposition or controversy. Common concerns among opponents of NPSS included: (1) that there would be an increase in unsafe discard of syringes; (2) loss of an important law enforcement tool; (3) that drug users were incapable of desired behavior change; and (4) that research was inconclusive

  11. 34 CFR 222.121 - How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local educational agency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local educational agency not be withheld? 222.121 Section 222.121 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY...

  12. Age-related hearing loss and ear morphology affect vertical but not horizontal sound-localization performance.

    PubMed

    Otte, Rik J; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Van Wanrooij, Marc M; Snik, Ad F M; Van Opstal, A John

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have attributed deterioration of sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) and vertical (elevation) planes to an age-related decline in binaural processing and high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). The latter might underlie decreased elevation performance of older adults. However, as the pinnae keep growing throughout life, we hypothesized that larger ears might enable older adults to localize sounds in elevation on the basis of lower frequencies, thus (partially) compensating their HFHL. In addition, it is not clear whether sound localization has already matured at a very young age, when the body is still growing, and the binaural and monaural sound-localization cues change accordingly. The present study investigated sound-localization performance of children (7-11 years), young adults (20-34 years), and older adults (63-80 years) under open-loop conditions in the two-dimensional frontal hemifield. We studied the effect of age-related hearing loss and ear size on localization responses to brief broadband sound bursts with different bandwidths. We found similar localization abilities in azimuth for all listeners, including the older adults with HFHL. Sound localization in elevation for the children and young adult listeners with smaller ears improved when stimuli contained frequencies above 7 kHz. Subjects with larger ears could also judge the elevation of sound sources restricted to lower frequency content. Despite increasing ear size, sound localization in elevation deteriorated in older adults with HFHL. We conclude that the binaural localization cues are successfully used well into later stages of life, but that pinna growth cannot compensate the more profound HFHL with age.

  13. Impact assessment and recommendation of alternative conjunctive water use strategies for salt affected agricultural lands through a field scale decision support system - a case study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Paul, Madhumita; Malik, Rashmi

    2007-06-01

    Conjunctive use of saline/non-saline irrigation waters is generally aimed at minimizing yield losses and enhancing flexibility of cropping, without much alteration in farming operations. Recommendation of location-specific suitable conjunctive water use plans requires assessment of their long-term impacts on soil salinization/sodification and crop yield reductions. This is conventionally achieved through long-term field experiments. However such impact evaluations are site specific, expensive and time consuming. Appropriate decision support systems (DSS) can be time-efficient and cost-effective means for such long-term impact evaluations. This study demonstrates the application of one such (indigenously developed) DSS for recommending best conjunctive water use plans for a, rice-wheat growing, salt affected farmer's field in Gurgaon district of Haryana (India). Before application, the DSS was extensively validated on several farmers and controlled experimental fields in Gurgaon and Karnal districts of Haryana (India). Validation of DSS showed its potential to give realistic estimates of root zone soil salinity (with R = 0.76-0.94; AMRE = 0.03-0.06; RMSPD = 0.51-0.90); sodicity (with R = 0.99; AMRE = 0.02; RMSPD = 0.84) and relative crop yield reductions (AMRE = 0.24), under existing (local) resource management practices. Long term (10 years) root zone salt build ups and associated rice/wheat crop yield reductions, in a salt affected farmer's field, under varied conjunctive water use scenarios were evaluated with the validated DSS. It was observed that long-term applications of canal (CW) and tube well (TW) waters in a cycle and in 1:1 mixed mode, during Kharif season, predicted higher average root zone salt reductions (2-9%) and lower rice crop yield reductions (4-5%) than the existing practice of 3-CW, 3-TW, 3-CW. Besides this, long-term application of 75% CW mixed with 25% TW, during Rabi season, predicted about 17% lower average root-zone salt reductions than

  14. Policy approaches to support local community control over the supply and distribution of kava in the Northern Territory (Australia).

    PubMed

    Clough, Alan R; Jones, Peter J

    2004-03-01

    The health consequences of kava abuse in Arnhem Land Aboriginal populations in the Northern Territory (NT) and the persistence of an illegal kava trade with its associated social harms have been a cause for concern for 20 years. Despite these concerns, some Arnhem Land groups seek to continue using kava and to control its sale, distribution and the profits from the enterprise. In response, policy makers in the NT have embraced principles of harm reduction and created regulatory mechanisms to address broader public concerns and to support local management of kava supply while reinforcing control over the consequences of its use. This paper describes the kava regulatory system now being implemented in the NT which features kava management plans developed in consultation between Aboriginal communities and licensing authorities. It complements the earlier Harm Reduction Digest 9 by McDonald & Jowitt which looked at Kava in the South Pacific.

  15. DOE Voluntary Partnership Program with Utilities and Local Governments Supports the Design of New Data Access Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Monisha; Burr, Andrew; Schulte, Andrew; Field-Macumber, Kristin; Cochran-Hameen, Erica; Marion, Flore

    2016-08-26

    The Better Buildings Energy Data Accelerator (BBEDA) is a unique effort that has supported 22 pairs of local governments and their utility companies to help building owners gain access to their whole-building energy data. Municipal and Utility BBEDA Partners committed to develop streamlined and easy-to-use solutions to provide whole-building energy data, especially for multitenant commercial buildings, by the end of 2015. As a result, building owners would be able to make data-driven decisions about their buildings by utilizing readily available energy consumption data for entire buildings. Traditionally, data access was difficult to implement due to technical barriers and the lack of clear value propositions for the utilities. During the past two years, BBEDA has taken a hands-on approach to overcome these barriers by offering a platform for the partners to discuss their challenges and solutions. Customized support was also provided to Partners building their local strategies. Based on the lessons learned from the partners, BBEDA developed a final toolkit with guiding documents that addressed key barriers and served as a resource for the other cities and utilities attempting to establish whole-building data access, including an exploration of opportunities to apply the whole-building data to various aspects of utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. BBEDA has been a catalyst for market transformation by addressing the upstream (to efficiency implementation) barrier of data access, demonstrated through the success of the BBEDA partners to address policy, engagement, and technical hurdles and arrive at replicable solutions to make data access a standard practice nationwide. As a result of best practices identified by the BBEDA, 18 utilities serving more than 2.6 million commercial customers nationwide will provide whole-building energy data access to building owners by 2017. This historic expansion of data accessibility will increase building energy

  16. Sanitary landfill local-scale flow and transport modeling in support of alternative concentrations limit demonstrations, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, V.A.; Beach, J.A.; Statham, W.H.; Pickens, J.F.

    1993-02-19

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina which is currently operated and managed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Sanitary Landfill (Sanitary Landfill) at the SRS is located approximately 2,000 feet Northwest of Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) on an approximately 70 acre site located south of Road C between the SRS B-Area and UTRC. The Sanitary Landfill has been receiving wastes since 1974 and operates as an unlined trench and fill operation. The original landfill site was 32 acres. This area reached its capacity around 1987 and a Northern Expansion of 16 acres and a Southern Expansion of 22 acres were added in 1987. The Northern Expansion has not been used for waste disposal to date and the Southern Expansion is expected to reach capacity in 1992 or 1993. The waste received at the Sanitary Landfill is predominantly paper, plastics, rubber, wood, metal, cardboard, rags saturated with degreasing solvents, pesticide bags, empty cans, and asbestos in bags. The landfill is not supposed to receive any radioactive wastes. However, tritium has been detected in the groundwater at the site. Gross alpha and gross beta are also evaluated at the landfill. The objectives of this modeling study are twofold: (1) to create a local scale Sanitary Landfill flow model to study hydraulic effects resulting from capping the Sanitary Landfill; and (2) to create a Sanitary Landfill local scale transport model to support ACL Demonstrations for a RCRA Part B Permit Renewal.

  17. On the Consideration of Adoption and Implementation of The Next Generation Science Standards in a Local-Control Context: Supporting the Epistemology of Science through Education Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, Christopher C.

    On the Consideration of Adoption and Implementation of The Next Generation Science Standards in a Local-Control Context: Supporting the Epistemology of Science through Education Policy. Christopher C Lazzaro. The primary purpose of this research is to understand how and why members at each of the three levels of the education system within a local-control state made the decisions they did in supporting or hindering the adoption and implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards. This research concentrates on three levels of the education system in a local-control state; 1) the state level, 2) the district level, and 3) the school/teacher level, while investigating the following questions: 1. To what extent, and in what ways, do members in each of the three levels of the state education system advocate for adoption and implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards? 2. Are the members in each of the three levels motivated or compelled to consider adoption and implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards, why or why not? 3. To what extent, and in what ways, do the members in each of the three levels take into account science epistemology in their overall consideration of adoption/implementation of the NGSS? The data drew from a series of interviews from a prior study, "Challenges of Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards in Local-Control States in the U.S." (Sevian, Foster, & Scheff, 2012). After these data were coded and analyzed around the three research questions, this phenomenographic research study identified four key findings: Key Finding 1 - As the District Coordinators are uniquely situated within the state education system to be able to see both the on-the-ground practical implications and the high-level policy pressures of adopting and implementing the NGSS, they reflect the deepest level of awareness of how to best advocate for adoption and implementation of the NGSS. Key Finding 2 - Motivation to adopt and

  18. Intergeneration social support affects the subjective well-being of the elderly: Mediator roles of self-esteem and loneliness.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qian

    2016-06-01

    The mental health of the elderly is an important issue in the area of health psychology. This study investigated the effect of intergeneration social support on the subjective well-being of 429 elderly participants. Results suggested that intergeneration social support, self-esteem, and loneliness were significantly correlated to subjective well-being. Structural equation modeling indicated that self-esteem and loneliness partially mediated the effect of intergeneration social support on subjective well-being. These findings provided insights into the effect of intergeneration social support on the subjective well-being of the elderly.

  19. The Moderating Role of Positive and Negative Affect on the Relationship between Perceived Social Support and Stress in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çivitci, Asim

    2015-01-01

    During college years, which are known as a stressful time, students may often face stress personally, socially, academically, economically, and so forth in various areas of life. One of the important sources that students use to cope with stress is social support. Students can cope with stress easier via the support they receive from their friends…

  20. Quantum efficiency affected by localized carrier distribution near the V-defect in GaN based quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong-Hee Shim, Mun-Bo; Hwang, Sangheum; Kim, Sungjin; Kim, Jun-Youn; Kim, Jaekyun; Park, Young-Soo; Park, Seoung-Hwan

    2013-12-23

    It is known that due to the formation of in-plane local energy barrier, V-defects can screen the carriers which non-radiatively recombine in threading dislocations (TDs) and hence, enhance the internal quantum efficiency in GaN based light-emitting diodes. By a theoretical modeling capable of describing the inhomogeneous carrier distribution near the V-defect in GaN based quantum wells, we show that the efficient suppression of non-radiative (NR) recombination via TD requires the local energy barrier height of V-defect larger than ∼80 meV. The NR process in TD combined with V-defect influences the quantum efficiency mainly in the low injection current density regime suitably described by the linear dependence of carrier density. We provide a simple phenomenological expression for the NR recombination rate based on the model result.

  1. Coilin is rapidly recruited to UVA-induced DNA lesions and γ-radiation affects localized movement of Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Foltánková, Veronika; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Sorokin, Dmitry V; Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cajal bodies are important nuclear structures containing proteins that preferentially regulate RNA-related metabolism. We investigated the cell-type specific nuclear distribution of Cajal bodies and the level of coilin, a protein of Cajal bodies, in non-irradiated and irradiated human tumor cell lines and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cajal bodies were localized in different nuclear compartments, including DAPI-poor regions, in the proximity of chromocenters, and adjacent to nucleoli. The number of Cajal bodies per nucleus was cell cycle-dependent, with higher numbers occurring during G2 phase. Human ES cells contained a high coilin level in the nucleoplasm, but coilin-positive Cajal bodies were also identified in nuclei of mouse and human ES cells. Coilin, but not SMN, recognized UVA-induced DNA lesions, which was cell cycle-independent. Treatment with γ-radiation reduced the localized movement of Cajal bodies in many cell types and GFP-coilin fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was very fast in nucleoplasm in comparison with GFP-coilin recovery in DNA lesions. By contrast, nucleolus-localized coilin displayed very slow fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, which indicates very slow rates of protein diffusion, especially in nucleoli of mouse ES cells.

  2. A Temperature-Sensitive Lesion in the N-Terminal Domain of the Rotavirus Polymerase Affects Its Intracellular Localization and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    McKell, Allison O; LaConte, Leslie E W; McDonald, Sarah M

    2017-04-01

    Temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of simian rotavirus (RV) strain SA11 have been previously created to investigate the functions of viral proteins during replication. One mutant, SA11-tsC, has a mutation that maps to the gene encoding the VP1 polymerase and shows diminished growth and RNA synthesis at 39°C compared to that at 31°C. In the present study, we sequenced all 11 genes of SA11-tsC, confirming the presence of an L138P mutation in the VP1 N-terminal domain and identifying 52 additional mutations in four other viral proteins (VP4, VP7, NSP1, and NSP2). To investigate whether the L138P mutation induces a ts phenotype in VP1 outside the SA11-tsC genetic context, we employed ectopic expression systems. Specifically, we tested whether the L138P mutation affects the ability of VP1 to localize to viroplasms, which are the sites of RV RNA synthesis, by expressing the mutant form as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein (VP1L138P-GFP) (i) in wild-type SA11-infected cells or (ii) in uninfected cells along with viroplasm-forming proteins NSP2 and NSP5. We found that VP1L138P-GFP localized to viroplasms and interacted with NSP2 and/or NSP5 at 31°C but not at 39°C. Next, we tested the enzymatic activity of a recombinant mutant polymerase (rVP1L138P) in vitro and found that it synthesized less RNA at 39°C than at 31°C, as well as less RNA than the control at all temperatures. Together, these results provide a mechanistic basis for the ts phenotype of SA11-tsC and raise important questions about the role of leucine 138 in supporting key protein interactions and the catalytic function of the VP1 polymerase.IMPORTANCE RVs cause diarrhea in the young of many animal species, including humans. Despite their medical and economic importance, gaps in knowledge exist about how these viruses replicate inside host cells. Previously, a mutant simian RV (SA11-tsC) that replicates worse at higher temperatures was identified. This virus has an amino acid mutation in VP

  3. Effects of optimism, social support, fighting spirit, cancer worry and internal health locus of control on positive affect in cancer survivors: a path analysis.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Kayleigh; Winstanley, Sue

    2012-12-01

    The psychological impact of a cancer diagnosis can extend through treatment, well into cancer survivorship and can be influenced by a range of psychosocial resources. At different stages in this trajectory, optimism is known to affect well-being directly. This study focusing upon the potential to flourish after cancer, investigates the relationship between optimism and positive affect during cancer survivorship together with four possible mediators: social support, fighting spirit, internal health locus of control and cancer worry, all of which have been shown to be important predictors of well-being in cancer patients. Participants (n = 102) from online cancer forums completed standardized questionnaires, and path analysis confirmed that optimism had a direct effect on positive affect in cancer survivors. Social support and fighting spirit were also shown to be significant mediators of this relationship, accounting collectively for 50% of the variance in positive affect. Whilst cancer worry and internal health locus of control could be predicted from levels of optimism, they did not mediate the optimism-positive affect relationship. Efforts to promote optimism and thus encourage fighting spirit at diagnosis through treatment may be worthwhile interventions, as would ensuring appropriate social support through the trajectory.

  4. N-linked glycans do not affect plasma membrane localization of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) but selectively alter its prostaglandin E2 transport activity.

    PubMed

    Miah, M Fahad; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C

    2016-01-22

    Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) is a member of subfamily C of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of membrane transport proteins. MRP4 mediates the ATP-dependent efflux of many endogenous and exogenous solutes across the plasma membrane, and in polarized cells, it localizes to the apical or basolateral plasma membrane depending on the tissue type. MRP4 is a 170 kDa glycoprotein and here we show that MRP4 is simultaneously N-glycosylated at Asn746 and Asn754. Furthermore, confocal immunofluorescence studies showed that N-glycans do not affect MRP4's apical membrane localization in polarized LLC-PK1 cells or basolateral membrane localization in polarized MDCKI cells. However, vesicular transport assays showed that N-glycans differentially affect MRP4's ability to transport prostaglandin E2, but not estradiol glucuronide. Together these data indicate that N-glycosylation at Asn746 and Asn754 is not essential for plasma membrane localization of MRP4 but cause substrate-selective effects on its transport activity.

  5. The 5% Lidocaine-Medicated Plaster: Its Inclusion in International Treatment Guidelines for Treating Localized Neuropathic Pain, and Clinical Evidence Supporting its Use.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Allegri, Massimo; Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Hans, Guy; Serpell, Michael; Mick, Gerard; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-12-01

    When peripheral neuropathic pain affects a specific, clearly demarcated area of the body, it may be described as localized neuropathic pain (LNP). Examples include postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy, as well as post-surgical and post-traumatic pain. These conditions may respond to topical treatment, i.e., pharmaceutical agents acting locally on the peripheral nervous system, and the topical route offers advantages over systemic administration. Notably, only a small fraction of the dose reaches the systemic circulation, thereby reducing the risk of systemic adverse effects, drug-drug interactions and overdose. From the patient's perspective, the analgesic agent is easily applied to the most painful area(s). The 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster has been used for several years to treat LNP and is registered in approximately 50 countries. Many clinical guidelines recommend this treatment modality as a first-line option for treating LNP, particularly in frail and/or elderly patients and those receiving multiple medications, because the benefit-to-risk ratios are far better than those of systemic analgesics. However, some guidelines make only a weak recommendation for its use. This paper considers the positioning of the 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in international treatment guidelines and how they may be influenced by the specific criteria used in developing them, such as the methodology employed by randomized, placebo-controlled trials. It then examines the body of evidence supporting use of the plaster in some prevalent LNP conditions. Common themes that emerge from clinical studies are: (1) the excellent tolerability and safety of the plaster, which can increase patients' adherence to treatment, (2) continued efficacy over long-term treatment, and (3) significant reduction in the size of the painful area. On this basis, it is felt that the 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster should be more strongly recommended for treating LNP, either as one component

  6. Implications for Social Support on Prolonged Sleep Difficulties among a Disaster-Affected Population: Second Report from a Cross-Sectional Survey in Ishinomaki, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shoko; Yamaoka, Kazue; Inoue, Machiko; Inoue, Mariko; Muto, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives This study aimed to investigate the role of social factors, especially social support for sleep, among victims living at home around 1–2 years after the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami. Design A cross-sectional household survey was conducted between May and December 2012 (14–21 months after the disaster) in the Ishinomaki area, Japan. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the association between social factors, including social support, and prolonged sleep difficulties (persisting over 1 month). Social support was divided into three functions: emotional, informational, and instrumental support. Participants Data were obtained on 2,593 individuals who were living at home after the disaster. Results The prevalence of prolonged sleep difficulties was 6.9% (5.8% male, 7.7% female). This study showed that lack of social support has a stronger association with prolonged sleep difficulties than non-modifiable or hardly modifiable consequences caused directly by the disaster, i.e., severity of home damage, change in family structure and income. Among the three dimensions of social support, lack of emotional support showed the strongest association with prolonged sleep difficulties. Conclusions Social support, especially emotional support, may positively affect sleep among victims living at home around 1–2 years after a disaster. PMID:26087305

  7. DNA 'barcoding' of Schistosoma mansoni across sub-Saharan Africa supports substantial within locality diversity and geographical separation of genotypes.

    PubMed

    Webster, Bonnie L; Webster, Joanne P; Gouvras, Anouk N; Garba, Amadou; Lamine, Mariama S; Diaw, Oumar T; Seye, Mohmoudane M; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Simoonga, Christopher; Mubila, Likezo; Mwanga, Joseph R; Lwambo, Nicholas J S; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Lange, Charles N; Kariuki, Curtis; Mkoji, Gerald M; Rollinson, David; Stothard, J Russell

    2013-11-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a widespread human helminth and causes intestinal schistosomiasis in 54 countries, mainly across Africa but also in Madagascar, the Arabian Peninsula and the neotropics. The geographical range of this parasite relies on the distribution of certain species of freshwater pulmonate snails of the genus Biomphalaria. Whilst S. mansoni is known to exhibit high population diversity the true extent of this diversity is still to be fully elucidated as sampling of this taxon progressively accrues. Here a DNA 'barcoding' approach is taken using sequence analysis of a 450bp region within the mitochondrial cox1 gene to assess the genetic diversity within a large number of S. mansoni larval stages collected from their natural human hosts across sub-Saharan Africa. Five hundred and sixty one individual parasite samples were examined from 22 localities and 14 countries. Considerable within-species diversity was found with 120 unique haplotypes splitting geographically into five discrete lineages. The highest diversity was found in East Africa with samples forming three of the five lineages. Less diversity was found in the Far and Central Western regions of Africa with haplotypes from the New World showing a close affinity to the Far Western African S. mansoni populations supporting the hypothesis of a colonisation of South America via the West African slave trade. The data are discussed in relation to parasite diversity and disease epidemiology.

  8. Safety assessment of allergic contact dermatitis hazards: an analysis supporting reduced animal use for the murine local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Haseman, Joseph K; Strickland, Judy; Allen, David; Salicru, Eleni; Paris, Michael; Tice, Raymond R; Stokes, William S

    2011-02-01

    The original Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Test Guideline 429 (OECD TG 429) for the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) required five mice/group if mice were processed individually. We used data from 83 LLNA tests (275 treated groups) to determine the impact on the LLNA outcome of reducing the group size from five to four. From DPM measurements, we formed all possible four- and five-mice combinations for the treated and control groups. Stimulation index (SI) values from each four-mice combination were compared with those from five-mice combinations, and agreement (both SI<3 or both SI ≥ 3) determined. Average agreement between group sizes was 97.5% for the 275 treated groups. Compared test-by-test, 90% (75/83) of the tests had 100% agreement; agreement was 83% for the remaining eight tests. Disagreement was due primarily to variability in animal responses and closeness of the SI to three (positive response threshold) rather than to group size reduction. We conclude that using four rather than five mice per group would reduce animal use by 20% without adversely impacting LLNA performance. This analysis supported the recent update to OECD TG 429 allowing a minimum of four mice/group when each mouse is processed individually.

  9. Evaluation of genetic isolation within an island flora reveals unusually widespread local adaptation and supports sympatric speciation

    PubMed Central

    Papadopulos, Alexander S. T.; Kaye, Maria; Devaux, Céline; Hipperson, Helen; Lighten, Jackie; Dunning, Luke T.; Hutton, Ian; Baker, William J.; Butlin, Roger K.; Savolainen, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    It is now recognized that speciation can proceed even when divergent natural selection is opposed by gene flow. Understanding the extent to which environmental gradients and geographical distance can limit gene flow within species can shed light on the relative roles of selection and dispersal limitation during the early stages of population divergence and speciation. On the remote Lord Howe Island (Australia), ecological speciation with gene flow is thought to have taken place in several plant genera. The aim of this study was to establish the contributions of isolation by environment (IBE) and isolation by community (IBC) to the genetic structure of 19 plant species, from a number of distantly related families, which have been subjected to similar environmental pressures over comparable time scales. We applied an individual-based, multivariate, model averaging approach to quantify IBE and IBC, while controlling for isolation by distance (IBD). Our analyses demonstrated that all species experienced some degree of ecologically driven isolation, whereas only 12 of 19 species were subjected to IBD. The prevalence of IBE within these plant species indicates that divergent selection in plants frequently produces local adaptation and supports hypotheses that ecological divergence can drive speciation in sympatry. PMID:24958917

  10. Community-wide validation of geospace model local K-index predictions to support model transition to operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glocer, A.; Rastätter, L.; Kuznetsova, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Singer, H. J.; Balch, C.; Weimer, D.; Welling, D.; Wiltberger, M.; Raeder, J.; Weigel, R. S.; McCollough, J.; Wing, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the latest result of a community-wide space weather model validation effort coordinated among the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), model developers, and the broader science community. Validation of geospace models is a critical activity for both building confidence in the science results produced by the models and in assessing the suitability of the models for transition to operations. Indeed, a primary motivation of this work is supporting NOAA/SWPC's effort to select a model or models to be transitioned into operations. Our validation efforts focus on the ability of the models to reproduce a regional index of geomagnetic disturbance, the local K-index. Our analysis includes six events representing a range of geomagnetic activity conditions and six geomagnetic observatories representing midlatitude and high-latitude locations. Contingency tables, skill scores, and distribution metrics are used for the quantitative analysis of model performance. We consider model performance on an event-by-event basis, aggregated over events, at specific station locations, and separated into high-latitude and midlatitude domains. A summary of results is presented in this report, and an online tool for detailed analysis is available at the CCMC.

  11. Does the personal lift-assist device affect the local dynamic stability of the spine during lifting?

    PubMed

    Graham, Ryan B; Sadler, Erin M; Stevenson, Joan M

    2011-02-03

    The personal lift-assist device (PLAD) is an on-body ergonomic aid that reduces low back physical demands through the restorative moment of an external spring element, which possesses a mechanical advantage over the erector spinae. Although the PLAD has proven effective at reducing low back muscular demand, spinal moments, and localized muscular fatigue during laboratory and industrial tasks, the effects of the device on the neuromuscular control of spinal stability during lifting have yet to be assessed. Thirty healthy subjects (15M, 15F) performed repetitive lifting for three minutes, at a rate of 10 lifts per minute, with and without the PLAD. Maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents, representing short-term (λ(max-s)) and long-term (λ(max-l)) divergence were calculated from the measured trunk kinematics to estimate the local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine. Using a mixed-design repeated-measures ANOVA, it was determined that wearing the PLAD did not significantly change λ(max-s) (μ(NP)=0.335, μ(P)=0.321, p=0.225), but did significantly reduce λ(max-l) (μ(NP)=0.0024, μ(P)=-0.0011, p=0.014, η(2)=0.197). There were no between-subject effects of sex, or significant interactions (p>0.720). The present results indicated that λ(max-s) was not statistically different between the device conditions, but that the PLAD significantly reduced λ(max-l) to a negative (stable) value. This shows that subjects' neuromuscular systems were able to respond to local perturbations more effectively when wearing the device, reflecting a more stable control of spinal movements. These findings are important when recommending the PLAD for long-term industrial or clinical use.

  12. Local variations in 14C - How is bomb-pulse dating of human tissues and cells affected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenström, Kristina; Skog, Göran; Nilsson, Carl Magnus; Hellborg, Ragnar; Svegborn, Sigrid Leide; Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the late 1950s and early 1960s almost doubled the amount of 14C in the atmosphere. The resulting 14C "bomb-pulse" has been shown to provide useful age information in e.g. forensic and environmental sciences, biology and the geosciences. The technique is also currently being used for retrospective cell dating in man, in order to provide insight into the rate of formation of new cells in the human body. Bomb-pulse dating relies on precise measurements of the declining 14C concentration in atmospheric CO 2 collected at clean-air sites. However, it is not always recognized that the calculations can be complicated in some cases by significant local variations in the specific activity of 14C in carbon in the air and foodstuff. This paper presents investigations of local 14C variations in the vicinities of nuclear installations and laboratories using 14C. Levels of 14C in workers using this radioisotope are also discussed.

  13. Supporting mental health in South African HIV-affected communities: primary health care professionals’ understandings and responses

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Rochelle Ann

    2015-01-01

    How do practitioners respond to the mental distress of HIV-affected women and communities? And do their understandings of patients’ distress matter? The World Health Organization (WHO) along with advocates from the Movement for Global Mental Health (MGMH) champion a primary mental health care model to address burgeoning mental health needs in resource-poor HIV-affected settings. Whilst a minority of studies have begun to explore interventions to target this group of women, there is a dearth of studies that explore the broader contexts that will likely shape service outcomes, such as health sector dynamics and competing definitions of mental ill-health. This study reports on an in-depth case study of primary mental health services in a rural HIV-affected community in Northern KwaZulu-Natal. Health professionals identified as the frontline staff working within the primary mental health care model (n = 14) were interviewed. Grounded thematic analysis of interview data highlighted that practitioners employed a critical and socially anchored framework for understanding their patients’ needs. Poverty, gender and family relationships were identified as intersecting factors driving HIV-affected patients’ mental distress. In a divergence from existing evidence, practitioner efforts to act on their understandings of patient needs prioritized social responses over biomedical ones. To achieve this whilst working within a primary mental health care model, practitioners employed a series of modifications to services to increase their ability to target the sociostructural realities facing HIV-affected women with mental health issues. This article suggests that beyond attention to the crucial issues of funding and human resources that face primary mental health care, attention must also be paid to promoting the development of policies that provide practitioners with increased and more consistent opportunities to address the complex social realities that frame the mental

  14. Supporting mental health in South African HIV-affected communities: primary health care professionals' understandings and responses.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rochelle Ann

    2015-09-01

    How do practitioners respond to the mental distress of HIV-affected women and communities? And do their understandings of patients' distress matter? The World Health Organization (WHO) along with advocates from the Movement for Global Mental Health (MGMH) champion a primary mental health care model to address burgeoning mental health needs in resource-poor HIV-affected settings. Whilst a minority of studies have begun to explore interventions to target this group of women, there is a dearth of studies that explore the broader contexts that will likely shape service outcomes, such as health sector dynamics and competing definitions of mental ill-health. This study reports on an in-depth case study of primary mental health services in a rural HIV-affected community in Northern KwaZulu-Natal. Health professionals identified as the frontline staff working within the primary mental health care model (n = 14) were interviewed. Grounded thematic analysis of interview data highlighted that practitioners employed a critical and socially anchored framework for understanding their patients' needs. Poverty, gender and family relationships were identified as intersecting factors driving HIV-affected patients' mental distress. In a divergence from existing evidence, practitioner efforts to act on their understandings of patient needs prioritized social responses over biomedical ones. To achieve this whilst working within a primary mental health care model, practitioners employed a series of modifications to services to increase their ability to target the sociostructural realities facing HIV-affected women with mental health issues. This article suggests that beyond attention to the crucial issues of funding and human resources that face primary mental health care, attention must also be paid to promoting the development of policies that provide practitioners with increased and more consistent opportunities to address the complex social realities that frame the mental distress

  15. Local adaptations to frost in marginal and central populations of the dominant forest tree Fagus sylvatica L. as affected by temperature and extreme drought in common garden experiments.

    PubMed

    Kreyling, Juergen; Buhk, Constanze; Backhaus, Sabrina; Hallinger, Martin; Huber, Gerhard; Huber, Lukas; Jentsch, Anke; Konnert, Monika; Thiel, Daniel; Wilmking, Martin; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Local adaptations to environmental conditions are of high ecological importance as they determine distribution ranges and likely affect species responses to climate change. Increased environmental stress (warming, extreme drought) due to climate change in combination with decreased genetic mixing due to isolation may lead to stronger local adaptations of geographically marginal than central populations. We experimentally observed local adaptations of three marginal and four central populations of Fagus sylvaticaL., the dominant native forest tree, to frost over winter and in spring (late frost). We determined frost hardiness of buds and roots by the relative electrolyte leakage in two common garden experiments. The experiment at the cold site included a continuous warming treatment; the experiment at the warm site included a preceding summer drought manipulation. In both experiments, we found evidence for local adaptation to frost, with stronger signs of local adaptation in marginal populations. Winter frost killed many of the potted individuals at the cold site, with higher survival in the warming treatment and in those populations originating from colder environments. However, we found no difference in winter frost tolerance of buds among populations, implying that bud survival was not the main cue for mortality. Bud late frost tolerance in April differed between populations at the warm site, mainly because of phenological differences in bud break. Increased spring frost tolerance of plants which had experienced drought stress in the preceding summer could also be explained by shifts in phenology. Stronger local adaptations to climate in geographically marginal than central populations imply the potential for adaptation to climate at range edges. In times of climate change, however, it needs to be tested whether locally adapted populations at range margins can successfully adapt further to changing conditions.

  16. Lead contamination of an old shooting range affecting the local ecosystem--A case study with a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, Minna-Liisa; Torkkeli, Minna; Strömmer, Rauni; Setälä, Heikki

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to uncover the consequences of lead pellet-derived heavy lead contamination at a cast-off shooting range in southern Finland, covering aspects from soil chemistry and biology up to ecosystem level. The observed changes in the soil properties of the most contaminated areas suggest that the contamination may be disturbing processes of decomposition and nutrient mineralisation. Also two functionally important groups of soil organisms, microbes (as analysed using the PLFA analysis) and enchytraeid worms, were negatively affected by the contamination. Furthermore, there was an indication of reduced pine litter production at the contaminated areas. On the other hand, lead contamination appears not to have affected pine growth or soil-dwelling nematodes and microarthropods, and the general outlook of the whole ecosystem is that of a healthy forest. Thus, the boreal forest ecosystem studied as a whole appears to bear strong resistance to contamination, despite negative effects of lead on many of its components. This resistance may result from e.g. low bioavailability of lead, avoidance of the most contaminated soil horizons and microsites by the organisms, and functional redundancy and development of lead-tolerant populations amongst the organisms. The relative importance of these factors and the mechanisms behind them will be investigated in forthcoming studies.

  17. Intracellular degradation and localization of NS1 of tick-borne encephalitis virus affect its protective properties.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Yulia V; Starodubova, Elizaveta S; Shevtsova, Anastasia S; Chernokhaeva, Liubov L; Latanova, Anastasia A; Preobrazhenskaia, Olga V; Timofeev, Andrey V; Karganova, Galina G; Karpov, Vadim L

    2017-01-01

    Currently, many DNA vaccines against infectious diseases are in clinical trials; however, their efficacy needs to be improved. The potency of DNA immunogen can be optimized by targeting technologies. In the current study, to increase the efficacy of NS1 encoded by plasmid, proteasome targeting was applied. NS1 variants with or without translocation sequence and with ornithine decarboxylase as a signal of proteasomal degradation were tested for expression, localization, protein turnover, proteasomal degradation and protection properties. Deletion of translocation signal abrogated presentation of NS1 on the cell surface and increased proteasomal processing of NS1. Fusion with ornithine decarboxylase led to an increase of protein turnover and the proteasome degradation rate of NS1. Immunization with NS1 variants with increased proteasome processing protected mice from viral challenge only partially; however, the survival time of infected mice was prolonged in these groups. These data can give a presupposition for formulation of specific immune therapy for infected individuals.

  18. Transforming Schools and Strengthening Leadership to Support the Educational and Psychosocial Needs of War-Affected Children Living in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative research study that examined the educational experiences of refugee students who have immigrated to Canada. Many children from war-affected countries have been denied basic human entitlements, and their immigration to Canada represents hope for their futures. Evidence suggests that these students are further…

  19. Supporting Affect Regulation in Children with Multiple Disabilities during Psychotherapy: A Multiple Case Design Study of Therapeutic Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuengel, C.; Sterkenburg, P. S.; Jeczynski, P.; Janssen, C. G. C.; Jongbloed, G.

    2009-01-01

    In a controlled multiple case design study, the development of a therapeutic relationship and its role in affect regulation were studied in 6 children with visual disabilities, severe intellectual disabilities, severe challenging behavior, and prolonged social deprivation. In the 1st phase, children had sessions with an experimental therapist…

  20. College Students' Comfort Level Discussing Death with Faculty and Perceptions of Faculty Support for Grief-Affected Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Students' comfort discussing death with faculty, views regarding faculty's likelihood to provide accommodations to grief-affected students, and perceived empathy of faculty were assessed. Undergraduate students (n = 371) attending a Midwestern university completed the Student Survey on Grief Issues. Twenty-six percent reported the death of at…

  1. Local overexpression of Su(H)-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Jasmin S.; Nagel, Anja C.; Schulz, Adriana; Wahl, Vanessa; Preiss, Anette

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Notch and EGFR signalling pathways are closely intertwined. Their relationship is mostly antagonistic, and may in part be based on the phosphorylation of the Notch signal transducer Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] by MAPK. Su(H) is a transcription factor that together with several cofactors regulates the expression of Notch target genes. Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H) variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H), a phospho-deficient Su(H)MAPK-ko and a phospho-mimetic Su(H)MAPK-ac isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(spl)m8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(spl)m8-lacZ, vgBE-lacZ). In general, Su(H)MAPK-ko induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H), whereas the response to Su(H)MAPK-ac was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vgBE-lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(spl)m8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H) proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DERact) or the MAPK (rlSEM) and individual Su(H) variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes) as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones. PMID:26702412

  2. Adaptation to local thermal regimes by crustose coralline algae does not affect rates of recruitment in coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Evenhuis, Christian; Logan, Murray; Motti, Cherie A.

    2015-12-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are well known for their ability to induce settlement in coral larvae. While their wide distribution spans reefs that differ substantially in temperature regimes, the extent of local adaptation to these regimes and the impact they have on CCA inductive ability are unknown. CCA Porolithon onkodes from Heron (southern) and Lizard (northern) islands on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (separated by 1181 km) were experimentally exposed to acute or prolonged thermal stress events and their thermal tolerance and recruitment capacity determined. A sudden onset bleaching model was developed to determine the health status of CCA based on the rate of change in the CCA live surface area (LSA). The interaction between location and temperature was significant ( F (2,119) = 6.74, p = 0.0017), indicating that thermally driven local adaptation had occurred. The southern population remained healthy after prolonged exposure to 28 °C and exhibited growth compared to the northern population ( p = 0.022), with its optimum temperature determined to be slightly below 28 °C. As expected, at the higher temperatures (30 and 32 °C) the Lizard Island population performed better that those from Heron Island, with an optimum temperature of 30 °C. Lizard Island CCA displayed the lowest bleaching rates at 30 °C, while levels consistently increased with temperature in their southern counterparts. The ability of those CCA deemed thermally tolerant (based on LSA) to induce Acropora millepora larval settlement was then assessed. While spatial differences influenced the health and bleaching levels of P. onkodes during prolonged and acute thermal exposure, thermally tolerant fragments, regardless of location, induced similar rates of coral larval settlement. This confirmed that recent thermal history does not influence the ability of CCA to induce settlement of A. millepora larvae.

  3. How Day of Posting Affects Level of Critical Discourse in Asynchronous Discussions and Computer-Supported Collaborative Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Allan; Frazier, Sue

    2008-01-01

    In asynchronous threaded discussions, messages posted near the end of the week provide less time for students to critically examine and respond to ideas presented in the messages than messages posted early in the week. This study examined how the day in which messages are posted (early, midweek and weekend) in computer-supported collaborative…

  4. Direct and indirect effects of caregiver social support on adolescent psychological outcomes in two South African AIDS-affected communities

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Marisa; Cluver, Lucie; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Kuo, Caroline; Lachman, Jamie M.; Wild, Lauren G.

    2015-01-01

    Caregiver social support has been shown to be protective for caregiver mental health, parenting and child psychosocial outcomes. This is the first known analysis to quantitatively investigate the relationship between caregiver social support and adolescent psychosocial outcomes in HIV-endemic, resource-scarce Southern African communities. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted over 2009-2010 with 2477 South African adolescents aged 10-17 and their adult caregivers (18 years or older) in one urban and one rural community in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province. Adolescent adjustment was assessed using adult caregiver reports of the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), which measures peer problems, hyperactivity, conduct problems, emotional symptoms and child prosocial behavior. Hierarchical linear regressions and multiple mediation analyses, using bootstrapping procedures, were conducted to assess for: a) direct effects of more caregiver social support on better adolescent psychosocial wellbeing; and b) indirect effects mediated by better parenting and caregiver mental health. Direct associations (p<.001), and indirect associations mediated through better parenting, were found for all adolescent outcomes. Findings reinforce the importance of social support components within parenting interventions but also point to scope for positive intervention on adolescent psychosocial wellbeing through the broader family social network. PMID:25623784

  5. The Role of Social Support in Negative and Positive Affect of Parents of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arm, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on parents of gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) people is significantly dated and has tended to focus on the experiences of parents as they learn they have a GLB child. This study sought to update and extend the research literature on parents of GLB people, by exploring associations between stress, social support, GLB related social…

  6. Computeer-based decision support tools for evaluation of actions affecting flow and water quality in the San Joaquin Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1993-01-01

    This document is a preliminary effort to draw together some of the important simulation models that are available to Reclamation or that have been developed by Reclamation since 1987. This document has also attempted to lay out a framework by which these models might be used both for the purposes for which they were originally intended and to support the analysis of other issues that relate to the hydrology and to salt and water quality management within the San Joaquin Valley. To be successful as components of a larger Decision Support System the models should to be linked together using custom designed interfaces that permit data sharing between models and that are easy to use. Several initiatives are currently underway within Reclamation to develop GIS - based and graphics - based decision support systems to improve the general level of understanding of the models currently in use, to standardize the methodology used in making planning and operations studies and to permit improved data analysis, interpretation and display. The decision support systems should allow greater participation in the planning process, allow the analysis of innovative actions that are currently difficult to study with present models and should lead to better integrated and more comprehensive plans and policy decisions in future years.

  7. Direct and Indirect Effects of Caregiver Social Support on Adolescent Psychological Outcomes in Two South African AIDS-Affected Communities.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa; Cluver, Lucie; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Kuo, Caroline; Lachman, Jamie M; Wild, Lauren G

    2015-06-01

    Caregiver social support has been shown to be protective for caregiver mental health, parenting and child psychosocial outcomes. This is the first known analysis to quantitatively investigate the relationship between caregiver social support and adolescent psychosocial outcomes in HIV-endemic, resource-scarce Southern African communities. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted over 2009-2010 with 2,477 South African adolescents aged 10-17 and their adult caregivers (18 years or older) in one urban and one rural community in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province. Adolescent adjustment was assessed using adult caregiver reports of the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), which measures peer problems, hyperactivity, conduct problems, emotional symptoms and child prosocial behavior. Hierarchical linear regressions and multiple mediation analyses, using bootstrapping procedures, were conducted to assess for: (a) direct effects of more caregiver social support on better adolescent psychosocial wellbeing; and (b) indirect effects mediated by better parenting and caregiver mental health. Direct associations (p < .001), and indirect associations mediated through better parenting, were found for all adolescent outcomes. Findings reinforce the importance of social support components within parenting interventions but also point to scope for positive intervention on adolescent psychosocial wellbeing through the broader family social network.

  8. Do Education and Income Affect Support for Democracy in Muslim Countries? Evidence from the "Pew Global Attitudes Project"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiq, M. Najeeb

    2010-01-01

    Using micro-level public opinion data from the "Pew Global Attitudes Project 2005", this study investigates the effect of educational attainment and income on support for democracy in five predominantly Muslim countries: Indonesia, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey. Holding all else constant and compared to not finishing primary…

  9. Do Education and Income Affect Support for Democracy in Muslim Countries? Evidence from the "Pew Global Attitudes Project"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiq, M. Najeeb

    2009-01-01

    Using micro-level public opinion data from the "Pew Global Attitudes Project" 2005, this study investigates the effect of educational attainment and income on support for democracy in five predominantly Muslim countries: Indonesia, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey. Holding all else constant and compared to not finishing primary…

  10. How Does Functional Disability Affect Depressive Symptoms in Late Life? The Role of Perceived Social Support and Psychological Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the process whereby functional disability amplifies depressive symptoms through decreasing perceived social support and psychological resources. The study analyzed two waves of panel data (1986 to 1992) of a large sample of older adults from the National Institutes of Aging Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of…

  11. The Mediation Effect of School Satisfaction in the Relationship between Teacher Support, Positive Affect and Life Satisfaction in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telef, Bülent Baki; Arslan, Gökmen; Mert, Abdullah; Kalafat, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships among teacher support, positive emotions, school satisfaction and life satisfaction in adolescences. The study had the participation of 344 adolescents from different socio-economic levels studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades of three public middle schools in the province of…

  12. Inclusive Education in Spain: How Do Skills, Resources, and Supports Affect Regular Education Teachers' Perceptions of Inclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiner, Esther; Cardona, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined regular education teachers' perceptions of inclusion in elementary and secondary schools in Spain and how these perceptions may differ depending on teaching experience, skills, and the availability of resources and supports. Stratified random sampling procedures were used to draw a representative sample of 336 general education…

  13. The Identification of Postsecondary Educational Barriers Affecting Single Mothers in Their Completion to Graduation; and Their Perceptions of Institutional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Renee M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what barriers to successful completion single mothers encountered in postsecondary education; and what support structures facilitated their success. Using qualitative research methods that included interviews, observations, and document analysis, this study discovered that single mothers needed both…

  14. Structural and ultrastructural localization of NGF and NGF receptors in the thymus of subjects affected by myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Tsvetana T; Velikova, Kamelia K; Petrov, Danail B; Kutev, Nikolai S; Stankulov, Ivan S; Chaldakov, George N; Triaca, Viviana; Manni, Luigi; Aloe, Luigi

    2004-12-01

    We have previously reported that the thymus of patients affected by myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by an elevated level of nerve growth factor (NGF), an endogenous polypeptide which plays a marked role in the cell biology of nervous and immune system. A consistent number of studies has shown altered expression of NGF in diseases associated with inflammatory and/or autoimmune responses. To evaluate the biochemical and molecular mechanisms implicated in NGF action in human myasthenic thymus, it is important to identify the cellular and structural organization of NGF receptors. To address this question, we investigated, both at light and electron microscopic levels, the cellular distribution of immunoreactivity for NGF and its low-affinity receptors, (p75) and its high-affinity receptor (TrkA) in the thymus of patients with MG. The present investigation shows that NGF and NGF receptors are overexpressed in the thymic cells of patients with MG compared to control subjects.

  15. Evidence-Based Support for the Characteristics of Tsunami Warning Messages for Local, Regional and Distant Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, C. E.; Johnston, D. M.; Sorensen, J. H.; Vogt Sorensen, B.; Whitmore, P.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies since 2004 have documented the dissemination and receipt of risk information for local to distant tsunamis and factors influencing people's responses. A few earlier tsunami studies and numerous studies of other hazards provide additional support for developing effective tsunami messages. This study explores evidence-based approaches to developing such messages for the Pacific and National Tsunami Warning Centers in the US. It extends a message metric developed for the NWS Tsunami Program. People at risk to tsunamis receive information from multiple sources through multiple channels. Sources are official and informal and environmental and social cues. Traditionally, official tsunami messages followed a linear dissemination path through relatively few channels from warning center to emergency management to public and media. However, the digital age has brought about a fundamental change in the dissemination and receipt of official and informal communications. Information is now disseminated in very non-linear paths and all end-user groups may receive the same message simultaneously. Research has demonstrated a range of factors that influence rapid respond to an initial real or perceived threat. Immediate response is less common than one involving delayed protective actions where people first engage in "milling behavior" to exchange information and confirm the warning before taking protective action. The most important message factors to achieve rapid response focus on the content and style of the message and the frequency of dissemination. Previously we developed a tsunami message metric consisting of 21 factors divided into message content and style and receiver characteristics. Initially, each factor was equally weighted to identify gaps, but here we extend the work by weighting specific factors. This utilizes recent research that identifies the most important determinants of protective action. We then discuss the prioritization of message information

  16. Supporting affect regulation in children with multiple disabilities during psychotherapy: a multiple case design study of therapeutic attachment.

    PubMed

    Schuengel, C; Sterkenburg, P S; Jeczynski, P; Janssen, C G C; Jongbloed, G

    2009-04-01

    In a controlled multiple case design study, the development of a therapeutic relationship and its role in affect regulation were studied in 6 children with visual disabilities, severe intellectual disabilities, severe challenging behavior, and prolonged social deprivation. In the 1st phase, children had sessions with an experimental therapist stimulating therapeutic attachment, alternating with a control therapist providing positive personal attention only. In the 2nd phase, both therapists applied behavior therapy. Clients sought more proximity to the experimental therapist compared with the control therapist. Psychophysiological arousal (respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period) was lower when the experimental therapist applied behavior modification than when the control therapist did. Despite prolonged social deprivation, the attachment behavioral system appeared responsive to stimulation. The effects on affect regulation may explain the synergy between psychotherapy based on interpersonal and behavior modification approaches.

  17. Diversity and Composition of the Leaf Mycobiome of Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Are Affected by Local Habitat Conditions and Leaf Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Unterseher, Martin; Siddique, Abu Bakar; Brachmann, Andreas; Peršoh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Comparative investigations of plant-associated fungal communities (mycobiomes) in distinct habitats and under distinct climate regimes have been rarely conducted in the past. Nowadays, high-throughput sequencing allows routine examination of mycobiome responses to environmental changes and results at an unprecedented level of detail. In the present study, we analysed Illumina-generated fungal ITS1 sequences from European beech (Fagus sylvatica) originating from natural habitats at two different altitudes in the German Alps and from a managed tree nursery in northern Germany. In general, leaf-inhabiting mycobiome diversity and composition correlated significantly with the origin of the trees. Under natural condition the mycobiome was more diverse at lower than at higher elevation, whereas fungal diversity was lowest in the artificial habitat of the tree nursery. We further identified significant correlation of leaf chlorophylls and flavonoids with both habitat parameters and mycobiome biodiversity. The present results clearly point towards a pronounced importance of local stand conditions for the structure of beech leaf mycobiomes and for a close interrelation of phyllosphere fungi and leaf physiology. PMID:27078859

  18. Designing affective video games to support the social-emotional development of teenagers with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Mitu

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, comprised of three diagnostic entities - autistic disorder (AD), Asperger's disorder (AS), and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (including atypical autism) (PDD-NOS). A number of intervention techniques are currently used to reduce some of the associated challenges, with techniques ranging from behavioral therapy to dietary interventions and traditional counseling. This positional paper proposes the use of video games which leverage affective computing technologies as intervention in autism spectrum disorders in the context of the use of traditional play therapy with adolescents, who may feel uncomfortable engaging in traditional play with toys they may be too old for. It aims to explore the potential for greater 'social physics' made possible by affective computing technologies. This involves computationally 'recognizing' emotions in a user, often through the use of multimodal affective sensors, including facial expressions, postural shifts, and physiological signals such as heart rate, skin conductivity, and EEG signals. However, it is suggested that this should be augmented by researching the effect of social game design mechanisms on social-emotional development, particularly for those who experience difficulty with social interaction.

  19. GRP-3 and KAPP, encoding interactors of WAK1, negatively affect defense responses induced by oligogalacturonides and local response to wounding

    PubMed Central

    Gramegna, Giovanna; Modesti, Vanessa; Savatin, Daniel V.; Sicilia, Francesca; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) act as danger signals to activate the plant immune response. These molecules are recognized by surface receptors that are referred to as pattern recognition receptors. Oligogalacturonides (OGs), DAMPs released from the plant cell wall homogalacturonan, have also been proposed to act as local signals in the response to wounding. The Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase 1 (WAK1), a receptor of OGs, has been described to form a complex with a cytoplasmic plasma membrane-localized kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) and a glycine-rich protein (GRP-3) that we find localized mainly in the cell wall and, in a small part, on the plasma membrane. By using Arabidopsis plants overexpressing WAK1, and both grp-3 and kapp null insertional mutant and overexpressing plants, we demonstrate a positive function of WAK1 and a negative function of GRP-3 and KAPP in the OG-triggered expression of defence genes and the production of an oxidative burst. The three proteins also affect the local response to wounding and the basal resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. GRP-3 and KAPP are likely to function in the phasing out of the plant immune response. PMID:26748394

  20. Altered sucrose synthase and invertase expression affects the local and systemic sugar metabolism of nematode-infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Susana; Lorenz, Cindy; Crespo, Sara; Cabrera, Javier; Ludwig, Roland; Escobar, Carolina; Hofmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes of plants induce highly specific feeding cells in the root central cylinder. From these, the obligate parasites withdraw all required nutrients. The feeding cells were described as sink tissues in the plant's circulation system that are supplied with phloem-derived solutes such as sugars. Currently, there are several publications describing mechanisms of sugar import into the feeding cells. However, sugar processing has not been studied so far. Thus, in the present work, the roles of the sucrose-cleaving enzymes sucrose synthases (SUS) and invertases (INV) in the development of Heterodera schachtii were studied. Gene expression analyses indicate that both enzymes are regulated transcriptionally. Nematode development was enhanced on multiple INV and SUS mutants. Syncytia of these mutants were characterized by altered enzyme activity and changing sugar pool sizes. Further, the analyses revealed systemically affected sugar levels and enzyme activities in the shoots of the tested mutants, suggesting changes in the source-sink relationship. Finally, the development of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica was studied in different INV and SUS mutants and wild-type Arabidopsis plants. Similar effects on the development of both sedentary endoparasitic nematode species (root-knot and cyst nematode) were observed, suggesting a more general role of sucrose-degrading enzymes during plant-nematode interactions.

  1. In silico identification of new putative pathogenic variants in the NEU1 sialidase gene affecting enzyme function and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, Dario; Ravasio, Viola; Borsani, Giuseppe; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Bresciani, Roberto; Monti, Eugenio; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    The NEU1 gene is the first identified member of the human sialidases, glycohydrolitic enzymes that remove the terminal sialic acid from oligosaccharide chains. Mutations in NEU1 gene are causative of sialidosis (MIM 256550), a severe lysosomal storage disorder showing autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Sialidosis has been classified into two subtypes: sialidosis type I, a normomorphic, late-onset form, and sialidosis type II, a more severe neonatal or early-onset form. A total of 50 causative mutations are reported in HGMD database, most of which are missense variants. To further characterize the NEU1 gene and identify new functionally relevant protein isoforms, we decided to study its genetic variability in the human population using the data generated by two large sequencing projects: the 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) and the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP). Together these two datasets comprise a cohort of 7595 sequenced individuals, making it possible to identify rare variants and dissect population specific ones. By integrating this approach with biochemical and cellular studies, we were able to identify new rare missense and frameshift alleles in NEU1 gene. Among the 9 candidate variants tested, only two resulted in significantly lower levels of sialidase activity (p<0.05), namely c.650T>C and c.700G>A. These two mutations give rise to the amino acid substitutions p.V217A and p.D234N, respectively. NEU1 variants including either of these two amino acid changes have 44% and 25% residual sialidase activity when compared to the wild-type enzyme, reduced protein levels and altered subcellular localization. Thus they may represent new, putative pathological mutations resulting in sialidosis type I. The in silico approach used in this study has enabled the identification of previously unknown NEU1 functional alleles that are widespread in the population and could be tested in future functional studies.

  2. Wave Localization Does not Affect the Breakdown of a Schrödinger-Type Amplifier Driven by the Square of a Gaussian Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounaix, Philippe; Collet, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    We study the divergence of the solution to a Schrödinger-type amplifier driven by the square of a Gaussian noise in presence of a random potential. We follow the same approach as Mounaix, Collet, and Lebowitz (MCL) in terms of a distributional formulation of the amplified field and the use of the Paley-Wiener theorem (Mounaix et al. in Commun. Math. Phys. 264:741-758, 2006, Erratum: ibid. 280:281-283, 2008). Our results show that the divergence is not affected by the random potential, in the sense that it occurs at exactly the same coupling constant as what was found by MCL without a potential. It follows a fortiori that the breakdown of the amplifier is not affected by the possible existence of a localized regime in the amplification free limit.

  3. Teichoic Acid Polymers Affect Expression and Localization of dl-Endopeptidase LytE Required for Lateral Cell Wall Hydrolysis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Jun; Kiriyama, Yuuka; Miyashita, Mari; Kondo, Takuma; Yamada, Takeshi; Yazawa, Kazuya; Yoshikawa, Ritsuko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Bacillus subtilis, the dl-endopeptidase LytE is responsible for lateral peptidoglycan hydrolysis during cell elongation. We found that σI-dependent transcription of lytE is considerably enhanced in a strain with a mutation in ltaS, which encodes a major lipoteichoic acid (LTA) synthase. Similar enhancements were observed in mutants that affect the glycolipid anchor and wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthetic pathways. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the LytE foci were considerably increased in these mutants. The localization patterns of LytE on the sidewalls appeared to be helix-like in LTA-defective or WTA-reduced cells and evenly distributed on WTA-depleted or -defective cell surfaces. These results strongly suggested that LTA and WTA affect both σI-dependent expression and localization of LytE. Interestingly, increased LytE localization along the sidewall in the ltaS mutant largely occurred in an MreBH-independent manner. Moreover, we found that cell surface decorations with LTA and WTA are gradually reduced at increased culture temperatures and that LTA rather than WTA on the cell surface is reduced at high temperatures. In contrast, the amount of LytE on the cell surface gradually increased under heat stress conditions. Taken together, these results indicated that reductions in these anionic polymers at high temperatures might give rise to increases in SigI-dependent expression and cell surface localization of LytE at high temperatures. IMPORTANCE The bacterial cell wall is required for maintaining cell shape and bearing environmental stresses. The Gram-positive cell wall consists of mesh-like peptidoglycan and covalently linked wall teichoic acid and lipoteichoic acid polymers. It is important to determine if these anionic polymers are required for proliferation and environmental adaptation. Here, we demonstrated that these polymers affect the expression and localization of a peptidoglycan hydrolase LytE required for lateral cell wall

  4. Dorsolateral prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with major depression locally affects alpha power of REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Cordone, Susanna; Marzano, Cristina; Bignotti, Stefano; Gazzoli, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Sleep alterations are among the most important disabling manifestation symptoms of Major Depression Disorder (MDD). A critical role of sleep importance is also underlined by the fact that its adjustment has been proposed as an objective marker of clinical remission in MDD. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) represents a relatively novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of drug-resistant depression. Nevertheless, besides clinical evaluation of the mood improvement after rTMS, we have no clear understanding of what are the neurophysiological correlates of such treatment. One possible marker underlying the clinical outcome of rTMS in MDD could be cortical changes on wakefulness and sleep activity. The aim of this open-label study was to evaluate the efficacy of a sequential bilateral rTMS treatment over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to improve the mood in MDD patients, and to determine if rTMS can induce changes on the sleep structure, and if those changes can be used as a surrogate marker of the clinical state of the patient. Ten drug-resistant depressed patients participated to ten daily sessions of sequential bilateral rTMS with a low-frequency TMS (1 Hz) over right-DLPFC and a subsequent high-frequency (10 Hz) TMS over left-DLPFC. The clinical and neurophysiological effects induced by rTMS were evaluated, respectively by means of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and by comparing the sleep pattern modulations and the spatial changes of EEG frequency bands during both NREM and REM sleep, before and after the real rTMS treatment. The sequential bilateral rTMS treatment over the DLPFC induced topographical-specific decrease of the alpha activity during REM sleep over left-DLPFC, which is significantly associated to the clinical outcome. In line with the notion of a left frontal hypoactivation in MDD patients, the observed local decrease of alpha activity after rTMS treatment during the REM sleep suggests that alpha frequency

  5. Voices from Successful Schools: Elements of Improved Schools Serving At-Risk Students and How State Education Agencies Can Support More Local School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC.

    The effect of successful school practices on educational outcomes of disadvantaged students is examined in this project report. A second focus is to determine ways in which state education agencies can support local school improvement efforts in the secondary and middle schools. As part of a larger long-term effort to improve the educational…

  6. Commentary on "Building Local Capacity for Training and Coaching Data-Based Problem Solving with Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Teams"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Reinke, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This invited commentary includes observations about the article "Building Local Capacity for Training and Coaching Data-Based Problem Solving with Positive Behavior Interventions and Support Teams," published in the July 2011 issue of the "Journal of Applied School Psychology." In this article Newton and colleagues present an interesting field…

  7. Early Warning Implementation Guide: "Using the Massachusetts Early Warning Indicator System (EWIS) and Local Data to Identify, Diagnose, Support, and Monitor Students in Grades 1-12"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide information on how to use early warning data, including the Massachusetts Early Warning Indicator System (EWIS), to identify, diagnose, support and monitor students in grades 1-12. It offers educators an overview of EWIS and how to effectively use these data in conjunction with local data by following a…

  8. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Petra A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Anderson, Christine B.; Seifried, Harold E.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Howard, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake. PMID:26258789

  9. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Anderson, Christine B; Seifried, Harold E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Howard, Michael T

    2015-08-06

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  10. Developing young person’s Face IT: Online psychosocial support for adolescents struggling with conditions or injuries affecting their appearance

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heidi; Griffiths, Catrin; Harcourt, Diana

    2015-01-01

    A participatory action approach with potential users and clinical experts was employed to design and evaluate the acceptability of young person’s Face IT (YP Face IT), an online intervention incorporating cognitive behavioural therapy and social skills training for adolescents with appearance-related anxiety as a result of a visible difference. Workshops with adolescents and clinicians informed a prototype YP Face IT which underwent a usability analysis by 28 multidisciplinary health professionals and 18 adolescents, before 10 adolescents completed it at home. Acceptability data obtained online and via interview were analysed using content analysis. Participants found YP Face IT acceptable and believed it would provide much needed and easy access to psychosocial support. They requested that it should be made widely available either as a self-management tool requiring minimal supervision from a health professional or to compliment therapist-led care. PMID:28070380

  11. Knock-Down of a Tonoplast Localized Low-Affinity Nitrate Transporter OsNPF7.2 Affects Rice Growth under High Nitrate Supply

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui; Qiu, Diyang; Chen, Yi; Miller, Anthony J.; Fan, Xiaorong; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Mingyong

    2016-01-01

    The large nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF) has been shown to transport diverse substrates, including nitrate, amino acids, peptides, phytohormones, and glucosinolates. However, the rice (Oryza sativa) root-specific family member OsNPF7.2 has not been functionally characterized. Here, our data show that OsNPF7.2 is a tonoplast localized low-affinity nitrate transporter, that affects rice growth under high nitrate supply. Expression analysis showed that OsNPF7.2 was mainly expressed in the elongation and maturation zones of roots, especially in the root sclerenchyma, cortex and stele. It was also induced by high concentrations of nitrate. Subcellular localization analysis showed that OsNPF7.2 was localized on the tonoplast of large and small vacuoles. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that OsNPF7.2 was a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Knock-down of OsNPF7.2 retarded rice growth under high concentrations of nitrate. Therefore, we deduce that OsNPF7.2 plays a role in intracellular allocation of nitrate in roots, and thus influences rice growth under high nitrate supply. PMID:27826301

  12. But will I be re-elected? What happens to local level policy makers who support clean indoor air laws?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Merrill; McCotter, Orion; Sciacca, John

    2010-11-01

    This research was conducted to determine the impact of voting for clean indoor air ordinance on a local-level policy maker's re-election status. Secondary data were used to identify local tobacco ordinances in Arizona proposed between 2001 and 2005, score ordinance content for comprehensiveness, identify policy makers who voted and how they voted, and determine if the measure passed or failed. Participation in and outcomes of subsequent elections were documented from public records. Ninety-two local-level policy makers in 15 local jurisdictions considered clean indoor air laws between 2001 and 2005. Policy makers who voted for these ordinances were more likely to be re-elected than those who voted against them. Structured interviews revealed that policy makers did not believe the issue had an impact on re-election results and believed that although the issue may have been contentious, it was no longer salient in the community.

  13. What is below the support layer affects carbon nanotube growth: an iron catalyst reservoir yields taller nanotube carpets.

    PubMed

    Shawat, E; Mor, V; Oakes, L; Fleger, Y; Pint, C L; Nessim, G D

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate an approach to enhance the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by including a catalyst reservoir underneath the thin-film alumina catalyst underlayer. This reservoir led to enhanced CNT growth due to the migration of catalytic material from below the underlayer up to the surface through alumina pinholes during processing. This led to the formation of large Fe particles, which in turn influenced the morphology evolution of the catalytic iron surface layer through Ostwald ripening. With inclusion of this catalyst reservoir, we observed CNT growth up to 100% taller than that observed without the catalyst reservoir consistently across a wide range of annealing and growth durations. Imaging studies of catalyst layers both for different annealing times and for different alumina support layer thicknesses demonstrate that the surface exposure of metal from the reservoir leads to an active population of smaller catalyst particles upon annealing as opposed to a bimodal catalyst size distribution that appears without inclusion of a reservoir. Overall, the mechanism for growth enhancement we present here demonstrates a new route to engineering efficient catalyst structures to overcome the limitations of CNT growth processes.

  14. Application of an environmental decision support system to a water quality trading program affected by surface water diversions.

    PubMed

    Obropta, Christopher C; Niazi, Mehran; Kardos, Josef S

    2008-12-01

    Environmental decision support systems (EDSSs) are an emerging tool used to integrate the evaluation of highly complex and interrelated physicochemical, biological, hydrological, social, and economic aspects of environmental problems. An EDSS approach is developed to address hot-spot concerns for a water quality trading program intended to implement the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for phosphorus in the Non-Tidal Passaic River Basin of New Jersey. Twenty-two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) spread throughout the watershed are considered the major sources of phosphorus loading to the river system. Periodic surface water diversions to a major reservoir from the confluence of two key tributaries alter the natural hydrology of the watershed and must be considered in the development of a trading framework that ensures protection of water quality. An EDSS is applied that enables the selection of a water quality trading framework that protects the watershed from phosphorus-induced hot spots. The EDSS employs Simon's (1960) three stages of the decision-making process: intelligence, design, and choice. The identification of two potential hot spots and three diversion scenarios enables the delineation of three management areas for buying and selling of phosphorus credits among WWTPs. The result shows that the most conservative option entails consideration of two possible diversion scenarios, and trading between management areas is restricted accordingly. The method described here is believed to be the first application of an EDSS to a water quality trading program that explicitly accounts for surface water diversions.

  15. Hypoxia Affects the Structure of Breast Cancer Cell-Derived Matrix to Support Angiogenic Responses of Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Abigail; Qiu, Connie; Porterfield, Josh; Smith, Quinton; Gerecht, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common feature of the tumor environment and participant in tumor progression, is known to alter gene and protein expression of several Extracellular Matrix (ECM) proteins, many of which have roles in angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that ECM deposited from co-cultures of Neonatal Fibroblasts (NuFF) with breast cancer cells, supported 3-dimensional vascular morphogenesis. Here, we sought to characterize the hypoxic ECM and to identify whether the deposited ECM induce angiogenic responses in Endothelial Cells (ECs). NuFF and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were co-cultured, subjected to alternating cycles of 24 hours of 1% (hypoxia) and 21% (atmospheric) oxygen and de-cellularized for analyses of deposited ECM. We report differences in mRNA expression profiles of matrix proteins and crosslinking enzymes relevant to angiogenesis in hypoxia-exposed co-cultures. Interestingly, overt differences in the expression of ECM proteins were not detected in the de-cellularized ECM; however, up-regulation of the cell-binding fragment of fibronecin was observed in the conditioned media of hypoxic co-cultures. Ultrastructure analyses of the de-cellularized ECM revealed differences in fiber morphology with hypoxic fibers more compact and aligned, occupying a greater percent area and having larger diameter fibers than atmospheric ECM. Examining the effect of hypoxic ECM on angiogenic responses of ECs, morphological differences in Capillary-Like Structures (CLS) formed atop de-cellularized hypoxic and atmospheric ECM were not evident. Interestingly, we found that hypoxic ECM regulated the expression of angiogenic factors and matrix metalloproteinases in CLS. Overall, we report that in vitro, hypoxia does not alter the composition of the ECM deposited by co-cultures of NuFF/MDA-MB-231, but rather alters fiber morphology, and induces vascular expression of angiogenic growth factors and metalloproteinases. Taken together, these results have important implications for

  16. Development and Implementation of Dynamic Scripts to Support Local Model Verification at National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavordsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan L.; Gotway, John H.; White, Kristopher; Medlin, Jeffrey; Wood, Lance; Radell, Dave

    2014-01-01

    Local modeling with a customized configuration is conducted at National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) to produce high-resolution numerical forecasts that can better simulate local weather phenomena and complement larger scale global and regional models. The advent of the Environmental Modeling System (EMS), which provides a pre-compiled version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and wrapper Perl scripts, has enabled forecasters to easily configure and execute the WRF model on local workstations. NWS WFOs often use EMS output to help in forecasting highly localized, mesoscale features such as convective initiation, the timing and inland extent of lake effect snow bands, lake and sea breezes, and topographically-modified winds. However, quantitatively evaluating model performance to determine errors and biases still proves to be one of the challenges in running a local model. Developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the Model Evaluation Tools (MET) verification software makes performing these types of quantitative analyses easier, but operational forecasters do not generally have time to familiarize themselves with navigating the sometimes complex configurations associated with the MET tools. To assist forecasters in running a subset of MET programs and capabilities, the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed and transitioned a set of dynamic, easily configurable Perl scripts to collaborating NWS WFOs. The objective of these scripts is to provide SPoRT collaborating partners in the NWS with the ability to evaluate the skill of their local EMS model runs in near real time with little prior knowledge of the MET package. The ultimate goal is to make these verification scripts available to the broader NWS community in a future version of the EMS software. This paper provides an overview of the SPoRT MET scripts, instructions for how the scripts are run, and example use

  17. 34 CFR 222.38 - What is the maximum basic support payment that a local educational agency may receive under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... one of the following: (a) One-half of the State average per pupil expenditure for the third fiscal... per pupil expenditure for the third fiscal year preceding the fiscal year for which the LEA seeks.... (d) The State average per pupil expenditure multiplied by the local contribution percentage...

  18. How Unwavering Is Support for the Local Property Tax?: Voting on School District Budgets in New York, 2003-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Robert Mark

    2011-01-01

    This article examines voting results for school district budgets in New York from 2003-2010. Despite annual local property tax increases, 91.9% of proposed school district budgets were approved by voters during the period examined. Using data from the New York State Education Department (NYSED) and the American Community Survey (ACS), several…

  19. Brief Report: Suboptimal Auditory Localization in Autism Spectrum Disorder--Support for the Bayesian Account of Sensory Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skewes, Joshua C.; Gebauer, Line

    2016-01-01

    Convergent research suggests that people with ASD have difficulties localizing sounds in space. These difficulties have implications for communication, the development of social behavior, and quality of life. Recently, a theory has emerged which treats perceptual symptoms in ASD as the product of impairments in implicit Bayesian inference; as…

  20. A Study of Community Leaders in a Nuclear Host Community: Local Issues, Expectations and Support and Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfman, B. H.

    As part of a continuing effort to assess the social impacts on communities of energy facility planning, construction, operation, and decommissioning, a May 1977 survey of 37 community leaders in Hartsville, Tennessee (site of a nuclear power plant) establishes major local issues (past, present, and future) which leaders feel are important to…

  1. The Charter School Movement in Support of Rural Educational Reform: A History of Our Struggle for Local Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaramillo, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Describes how two rural Colorado communities, threatened by the loss of their elementary schools, established a charter school based in two existing facilities. Discusses the benefits of local autonomy, the value of networking with other rural charter schools, the role of the community in school innovations, and emphases on staff development and…

  2. Middle School Math Intervention in the Local Unified School District: Using Constructivist Strategies to Support Struggling Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggerman, Robert Starwalt

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effectiveness of a unique math intervention program in a local school district in Orange County, California in terms of academic achievement and student perceptions about their math abilities as a result of their experiences in the program. As the predominate instructional approach, the program provided students with…

  3. Forum Guide to Supporting Data Access for Researchers: A Local Education Agency Perspective. NFES 2014-801

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document recommends a set of core practices, operations, and templates that can be adopted and adapted by local education agencies (LEAs) as they consider how to respond to requests for both new and existing data about the education enterprise. These recommendations reflect core best practices for: (1) managing the flow of requests; (2)…

  4. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; vanDam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal amounts of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid, whereas the classical DRM/lipid raft markers Src, caveolin-1 and flotillin display the same gradient distribution. DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts themselves are severely depleted of sphingolipids. The fatty acid profile of the remaining sphingolipids as well as that of the glycerophospholipids shows several differences compared with control, most prominently an increase in highly saturated C16 species. The glycerophospholipid headgroup composition is unchanged in sphingolipid-depleted cells and cell-derived detergent-free lipid rafts. Sphingolipid depletion does not alter the localization of MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1) in DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts or MRP1-mediated efflux of carboxyfluorescein. We conclude that extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity in two cell lines and does not affect the function of the lipid-raft-associated protein MRP1. PMID:20604746

  5. Jury panel member perceptions of interpersonal-affective traits of psychopathy predict support for execution in a capital murder trial simulation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer; Clark, John C; Edens, John F; Smith, Shannon Toney; Magyar, Melissa S

    2013-01-01

    Recent research with college undergraduate mock jurors suggests that how psychopathic they perceive a criminal defendant to be is a powerful predictor of whether they will support a death verdict in simulated capital murder trials. Perceived affective and interpersonal traits of psychopathy are especially predictive of support for capital punishment, with perceived remorselessness explaining a disproportionate amount of variance in these attitudes. The present study attempted to extend these findings with a more representative sample of community members called for jury duty (N = 304). Jurors reviewed a case vignette based on an actual capital murder trial, provided sentencing verdicts, and rated the defendant on several characteristics historically associated with the construct of psychopathy. Consistent with prior findings, remorselessness predicted death verdicts, as did the affective and interpersonal features of psychopathy - though the latter effect was more pronounced among jurors who were Caucasian and/or who described their political beliefs as moderate rather than conservative or liberal. Results are discussed in terms of the potentially stigmatizing effects of psychopathy evidence in capital cases.

  6. Capturing socially motivated linguistic change: how the use of gender-fair language affects support for social initiatives in Austria and Poland

    PubMed Central

    Formanowicz, Magdalena M.; Cisłak, Aleksandra; Horvath, Lisa K.; Sczesny, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Gender-fair language consists of the symmetric linguistic treatment of women and men instead of using masculine forms as generics. In this study, we examine how the use of gender-fair language affects readers' support for social initiatives in Poland and Austria. While gender-fair language is relatively novel in Poland, it is well established in Austria. This difference may lead to different perceptions of gender-fair usage in these speech communities. Two studies conducted in Poland investigate whether the evaluation of social initiatives (Study 1: quotas for women on election lists; Study 2: support for women students or students from countries troubled by war) is affected by how female proponents (lawyers, psychologists, sociologists, and academics) are referred to, with masculine forms (traditional) or with feminine forms (modern, gender-fair). Study 3 replicates Study 2 in Austria. Our results indicate that in Poland, gender-fair language has negative connotations and therefore, detrimental effects particularly when used in gender-related contexts. Conversely, in Austria, where gender-fair language has been implemented and used for some time, there are no such negative effects. This pattern of results may inform the discussion about formal policies regulating the use of gender-fair language. PMID:26582996

  7. Population imaging at subcellular resolution supports specific and local inhibition by granule cells in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Wienisch, Martin; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Information processing in early sensory regions is modulated by a diverse range of inhibitory interneurons. We sought to elucidate the role of olfactory bulb interneurons called granule cells (GCs) in odor processing by imaging the activity of hundreds of these cells simultaneously in mice. Odor responses in GCs were temporally diverse and spatially disperse, with some degree of non-random, modular organization. The overall sparseness of activation of GCs was highly correlated with the extent of glomerular activation by odor stimuli. Increasing concentrations of single odorants led to proportionately larger population activity, but some individual GCs had non-monotonic relations to concentration due to local inhibitory interactions. Individual dendritic segments could sometimes respond independently to odors, revealing their capacity for compartmentalized signaling in vivo. Collectively, the response properties of GCs point to their role in specific and local processing, rather than global operations such as response normalization proposed for other interneurons. PMID:27388949

  8. A semi-structured MODFLOW-USG model to evaluate local water sources to wells for decision support

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feinstein, Daniel T.; Fienen, Michael N.; Reeves, Howard W.; Langevin, Christian D.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better represent the configuration of the stream network and simulate local groundwater-surface water interactions, a version of MODFLOW with refined spacing in the topmost layer was applied to a Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional groundwater-flow model developed by the U.S. Geological. Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids over large areas; this coarse spacing precludes model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. Implementation of an unstructured formulation within the MODFLOW framework (MODFLOW-USG) allows application of regional models to address local problems. A “semi-structured” approach (uniform lateral spacing within layers, different lateral spacing among layers) was tested using the LMB regional model. The parent 20-layer model with uniform 5000-foot (1524-m) lateral spacing was converted to 4 layers with 500-foot (152-m) spacing in the top glacial (Quaternary) layer, where surface water features are located, overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. This semi-structured version of the LMB model reproduces regional flow conditions, whereas the finer resolution in the top layer improves the accuracy of the simulated response of surface water to shallow wells. One application of the semi-structured LMB model is to provide statistical measures of the correlation between modeled inputs and the simulated amount of water that wells derive from local surface water. The relations identified in this paper serve as the basis for metamodels to predict (with uncertainty) surface-water depletion in response to shallow pumping within and potentially beyond the modeled area, see Fienen et al. (2015a).

  9. A Semi-Structured MODFLOW-USG Model to Evaluate Local Water Sources to Wells for Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Daniel T; Fienen, Michael N; Reeves, Howard W; Langevin, Christian D

    2016-07-01

    In order to better represent the configuration of the stream network and simulate local groundwater-surface water interactions, a version of MODFLOW with refined spacing in the topmost layer was applied to a Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional groundwater-flow model developed by the U.S. Geological. Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids over large areas; this coarse spacing precludes model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. Implementation of an unstructured formulation within the MODFLOW framework (MODFLOW-USG) allows application of regional models to address local problems. A "semi-structured" approach (uniform lateral spacing within layers, different lateral spacing among layers) was tested using the LMB regional model. The parent 20-layer model with uniform 5000-foot (1524-m) lateral spacing was converted to 4 layers with 500-foot (152-m) spacing in the top glacial (Quaternary) layer, where surface water features are located, overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. This semi-structured version of the LMB model reproduces regional flow conditions, whereas the finer resolution in the top layer improves the accuracy of the simulated response of surface water to shallow wells. One application of the semi-structured LMB model is to provide statistical measures of the correlation between modeled inputs and the simulated amount of water that wells derive from local surface water. The relations identified in this paper serve as the basis for metamodels to predict (with uncertainty) surface-water depletion in response to shallow pumping within and potentially beyond the modeled area, see Fienen et al. (2015a).

  10. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  11. Design for a Comprehensive Program of Training for Administrative, Teaching, and Support Personnel in a Local School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Marilyn E.; And Others

    This overview paper describes a comprehensive training program for three levels of personnel in Montgomery County, Maryland public schools. The three levels include teachers, administrators and supervisory personnel, and supporting services employees. This staff development program is unique in its comprehensive scope, its career-long professional…

  12. Building Local Capacity for Training and Coaching Data-Based Problem Solving with Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, J. Stephen; Algozzine, Bob; Algozzine, Kate; Horner, Robert H.; Todd, Anne W.

    2011-01-01

    Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Teams use data to guide decisions about student social and academic behavior problems. In previous evaluation and research efforts, the authors taught team members to use Team-Initiated Problem Solving, a model that embeds data-based decision making into a broader problem-solving framework. In this study,…

  13. 34 CFR 222.32 - Upon what information is a local educational agency's basic support payment based?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... basic support payment based? 222.32 Section 222.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b) and (e) of the Act § 222.32 Upon... described in §§ 222.33 through 222.35. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control...

  14. Viroid-like RNAs from cherry trees affected by leaf scorch disease: further data supporting their association with mycoviral double-stranded RNAs.

    PubMed

    Minoia, S; Navarro, B; Covelli, L; Barone, M; García-Becedas, M T; Ragozzino, A; Alioto, D; Flores, R; Di Serio, F

    2014-03-01

    Cherry trees from Spain affected by cherry leaf scorch (CLS), a fungal disease proposed to be caused by Apiognomonia erythrostoma, show symptoms (translucent-chlorotic leaf spots evolving into rusty areas) very similar to those of cherry chlorotic rusty spot disease (CCRS) and Amasya cherry disease, reported in Italy and Turkey, respectively. The three maladies are closely associated with 10-12 double-stranded viral RNAs, and CCRS is additionally associated with two cherry small circular RNAs (cscRNA1 and cscRNA2). Here, we report that a small viroid-like RNA similar to the CCRS-associated cscRNA1 is also present in CLS-affected trees, thus extending the link between the two diseases. Both CLS and CCRS cscRNA1 elements have common features, including sequence identity (88 %), a predicted quasi rod-like conformation with short bifurcations at both termini, and the presence of hammerhead ribozymes in the strands of both polarities. However, cscRNA2, apparently derived from cscRNA1 by deletion of a short hairpin, was not detected in CLS-affected material. Although the biological nature of cscRNAs is unknown, the identification of at least cscRNA1 in different cherry cultivars and in two distinct geographic areas (Spain and Italy), always in close association with the same mycoviral dsRNAs, supports that these viroid-like RNAs could be satellite RNAs.

  15. Viroid-like RNAs from cherry trees affected by leaf scorch disease: further data supporting their association with mycoviral double-stranded RNAs.

    PubMed

    Minoia, S; Navarro, B; Covelli, L; Barone, M; García-Becedas, M T; Ragozzino, A; Alioto, D; Flores, R; Di Serio, F

    2014-03-01

    Cherry trees from Spain affected by cherry leaf scorch (CLS), a fungal disease proposed to be caused by Apiognomonia erythrostoma, show symptoms (translucent-chlorotic leaf spots evolving into rusty areas) very similar to those of cherry chlorotic rusty spot disease (CCRS) and Amasya cherry disease, reported in Italy and Turkey, respectively. The three maladies are closely associated with 10-12 double-stranded viral RNAs, and CCRS is additionally associated with two cherry small circular RNAs (cscRNA1 and cscRNA2). Here, we report that a small viroid-like RNA similar to the CCRS-associated cscRNA1 is also present in CLS-affected trees, thus extending the link between the two diseases. Both CLS and CCRS cscRNA1 elements have common features, including sequence identity (88%), a predicted quasi rod-like conformation with short bifurcations at both termini, and the presence of hammerhead ribozymes in the strands of both polarities. However, cscRNA2, apparently derived from cscRNA1 by deletion of a short hairpin, was not detected in CLS-affected material. Although the biological nature of cscRNAs is unknown, the identification of at least cscRNA1 in different cherry cultivars and in two distinct geographic areas (Spain and Italy), always in close association with the same mycoviral dsRNAs, supports that these viroid-like RNAs could be satellite RNAs.

  16. How family support affects physical activity (PA) among middle-aged and elderly people before and after they suffer from chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Su-Chuan; Weng, Shuo-Chun; Chou, Ming-Chih; Tang, Yih-Jing; Lee, Shu-Hsin; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Yu, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Hsien-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The more support elderly people have from their family, the less likely they are to suffer from chronic diseases. The objective of this study is to investigate how family support affects the PA middle-aged and elderly people engage in before and after they suffer from chronic diseases. We interviewed 428 middle-aged and elderly people using a structured questionnaire to measure their aerobic PA. Eighteen percent of middle-aged and elderly people did participate in PA after suffering from chronic diseases. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found that middle-aged and elderly people who rely on family members when they are sick (OR=1.87, 95%CI=1.08-3.25) and who are accompanied by family members (OR=2.09, 95%CI=1.20-3.62) when they are healthy are more likely to exercise. The more middle-aged and elderly people are supported by their family, the more likely they are to exercise. Strengthening family relationships should help reduce the prevalence of chronic diseases among middle-aged and elderly people.

  17. Care for the most vulnerable children in Tanzania: a faith-based model of care and support for children affected by HIV.

    PubMed

    Mmbando, Paul; Hartwig, Kari A; Hofgren, Berit; Disorbo, Phil; Smith, Shelley; Hartwig, Kristopher N

    2009-01-01

    In the fight against HIV and AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa, the plight of orphaned and vulnerable children was long overlooked. The first United Nations report on orphans and vulnerable children did not emerge until 2002 after more than two generations of children and youth had struggled to survive with limited family, institutional, or government support. The major social determinants of health for infants and children with one or more parents dying or dead from HIV include pervasive poverty, weak community social support systems, lack of policy commitment by governments or foreign donors, lack of access to anti-retroviral drugs, limited access to schools, and gender. In this paper, we present a model of care and support to the most vulnerable children (MVC) affected by HIV that brings together faith-based institutions in partnership with the government and community volunteers in 13 rural districts of Tanzania. Although still being implemented, the project has a number of valuable lessons learned for program managers, donors, and researchers working with faith-based organizations in the development and delivery of services to the most vulnerable children in a resource-limited setting.

  18. Uncertainty Analysis of Coupled Socioeconomic-Cropping Models: Building Confidence in Climate Change Decision-Support Tools for Local Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, J. J.; Rojas, M.; Adamowski, J. F.; Gálvez, J.; Tuy, H. A.; Melgar-Quiñonez, H.

    2015-12-01

    While cropping models represent the biophysical aspects of agricultural systems, system dynamics modelling offers the possibility of representing the socioeconomic (including social and cultural) aspects of these systems. The two types of models can then be coupled in order to include the socioeconomic dimensions of climate change adaptation in the predictions of cropping models.We develop a dynamically coupled socioeconomic-biophysical model of agricultural production and its repercussions on food security in two case studies from Guatemala (a market-based, intensive agricultural system and a low-input, subsistence crop-based system). Through the specification of the climate inputs to the cropping model, the impacts of climate change on the entire system can be analysed, and the participatory nature of the system dynamics model-building process, in which stakeholders from NGOs to local governmental extension workers were included, helps ensure local trust in and use of the model.However, the analysis of climate variability's impacts on agroecosystems includes uncertainty, especially in the case of joint physical-socioeconomic modelling, and the explicit representation of this uncertainty in the participatory development of the models is important to ensure appropriate use of the models by the end users. In addition, standard model calibration, validation, and uncertainty interval estimation techniques used for physically-based models are impractical in the case of socioeconomic modelling. We present a methodology for the calibration and uncertainty analysis of coupled biophysical (cropping) and system dynamics (socioeconomic) agricultural models, using survey data and expert input to calibrate and evaluate the uncertainty of the system dynamics as well as of the overall coupled model. This approach offers an important tool for local decision makers to evaluate the potential impacts of climate change and their feedbacks through the associated socioeconomic system.

  19. The association of family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy with specific hypertension self-care behaviours in Chinese local community.

    PubMed

    Hu, H H; Li, G; Arao, T

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to test the role of family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy on specific self-care behaviours. In a local community health center, 318 patients with hypertension completed a questionnaire assessing self-care, family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy in 2012. Each self-care behaviour was separately analyzed with logistic regression models. The mean score of perceived family social support for hypertension treatment was 20.91 (maximum=60). Adult children were identified as the primary support source. Approximately 22.3% and 15.4% of participants reported symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively. Participants had moderately positive levels of confidence performing self-care (42.1±13.3 out of 60). After adjusting for demographic and health variables, a 10-unit increase in family social support increased the odds ratio (OR) of taking medication by 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.87) and increased the OR for measuring blood pressure (BP) regularly by 1.33 (95% CI 1.02-1.74). Depression and anxiety were not associated with any self-care behaviours. A10-unit increase in self-efficacy increased the adjusted OR for performing physical exercise to 1.25 (95% CI 1.04-1.49). In conclusion, family social support was positively associated with medication adherence and regular BP measurement. Strategies to improve family social support should be developed for hypertension control, yet further prospective studies are needed to understand the effects of family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy on self-care behaviours.

  20. Implementation of a Computerized Decision Support System to Improve the Appropriateness of Antibiotic Therapy Using Local Microbiologic Data

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Maresca, Manuel; Sorlozano, Antonio; Grau, Magnolia; Rodriguez-Castaño, Rocio; Ruiz-Valverde, Andres; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Jose

    2014-01-01

    A prospective quasi-experimental study was undertaken in 218 patients with suspicion of nosocomial infection hospitalized in a polyvalent ICU where a new electronic device (GERB) has been designed for antibiotic prescriptions. Two GERB-based applications were developed to provide local resistance maps (LRMs) and preliminary microbiological reports with therapeutic recommendation (PMRTRs). Both applications used the data in the Laboratory Information System of the Microbiology Department to report on the optimal empiric therapeutic option, based on the most likely susceptibility profile of the microorganisms potentially responsible for infection in patients and taking into account the local epidemiology of the hospital department/unit. LRMs were used for antibiotic prescription in 20.2% of the patients and PMRTRs in 78.2%, and active antibiotics against the finally identified bacteria were prescribed in 80.0% of the former group and 82.4% of the latter. When neither LMRs nor PMRTRs were considered for empiric treatment prescription, only around 40% of the antibiotics prescribed were active. Hence, the percentage appropriateness of the empiric antibiotic treatments was significantly higher when LRM or PMRTR guidelines were followed rather than other criteria. LRMs and PMRTRs applications are dynamic, highly accessible, and readily interpreted instruments that contribute to the appropriateness of empiric antibiotic treatments. PMID:25197643

  1. CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells prevent type 1 diabetes preceded by dendritic cell-dominant invasive insulitis by affecting chemotaxis and local invasiveness of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Heon; Lee, Wen-Hui; Todorov, Ivan; Liu, Chih-Pin

    2010-08-15

    Development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is preceded by invasive insulitis. Although CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) induce tolerance that inhibits insulitis and T1D, the in vivo cellular mechanisms underlying this process remain largely unclear. Using an adoptive transfer model and noninvasive imaging-guided longitudinal analyses, we found nTreg depletion did not affect systemic trafficking and tissue localization of diabetogenic CD4(+) BDC2.5 T (BDC) cells in recipient mice prior to development of T1D. In addition, neither the initial expansion/activation of BDC cells nor the number of CD11c(+) or NK cells in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes were altered. Unexpectedly, our results showed nTreg depletion led to accelerated invasive insulitis dominated by CD11c(+) dendritic cells (ISL-DCs), not BDC cells, which stayed in the islet periphery. Compared with control mice, the phenotype of ISL-DCs and their ability to stimulate BDC cells did not change during invasive insulitis development. However, ISL-DCs from nTreg-deficient recipient mice showed increased in vitro migration toward CCL19 and CCL21. These results demonstrated invasive insulitis dominated by DCs, not CD4(+) T cells, preceded T1D onset in the absence of nTregs, and suggested a novel in vivo function of nTregs in T1D prevention by regulating local invasiveness of DCs into islets, at least partly, through regulation of DC chemotaxis toward CCL19/CCL21 produced by the islets.

  2. Investigations of an urban area and its locale using ERTS-1 data supported by U-photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeden, H. A.; Borden, F. Y.; Applegate, D. N.; Bolling, N.

    1973-01-01

    An urban area in central Pennsylvania and the surrounding locality were investigated separately at first by photointerpretation of ERTS-1 imagery and by computer processing of MSS tapes. Next the photointerpretation and processing were coordinated. The results of the cooperative effort of photointerpreters and computer processing analysts were much improved over independent efforts. It was found that single frames of U-2 photography could be projected onto printer output maps with little recognizable distortion in areas 10 to 25 cm square. In this way targets could be identified for use as training areas for computer processed signature identification. In addition, at any stage of category mapping, the level of success in correct classification could be assessed by this method. The results of the classification of the study area are discussed.

  3. Probiotic-enriched foods and dietary supplement containing SYNBIO positively affects bowel habits in healthy adults: an assessment using standard statistical analysis and Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    Silvi, Stefania; Verdenelli, M Cristina; Cecchini, Cinzia; Coman, M Magdalena; Bernabei, M Simonetta; Rosati, Jessica; De Leone, Renato; Orpianesi, Carla; Cresci, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study assessed in healthy adults how daily consumption of the probiotic combination SYNBIO®, administered in probiotic-enriched foods or in a dietary supplement, affected bowel habits. Primary and secondary outcomes gave the overall assessment of bowel well-being, while a Psychological General Well-Being Index compiled by participants estimated the health-related quality of life as well as the gastrointestinal tolerance determined with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. Support Vector Machine models for classification problems were used to validate the total outcomes on bowel well-being. SYNBIO® consumption improved bowel habits of volunteers consuming the probiotic foods or capsules, while the same effects were not registered in the control groups. The recovery of probiotic bacteria from the faeces of a cohort of 100 subjects for each supplemented group showed the persistence of strains in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Reduced oxide sites and surface corrugation affecting the reactivity, thermal stability, and selectivity of supported Au-Pd bimetallic clusters on SiO2/Si(100).

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Sorek, Elishama; Murugadoss, Arumugam; Asscher, Micha

    2013-05-21

    The morphology and surface elemental composition of Au-Pd bimetallic nanoclusters are reported to be sensitive to and affected by reduced silicon defect sites and structural corrugation on SiO2/Si(100), generated by argon ion sputtering under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Metastable structures of the bimetallic clusters, where Au atoms are depleted from the top surface upon annealing, are stabilized by the interaction with the reduced silica sites, as indicated from CO temperature programmed desorption (TPD) titration measurements. Acetylene conversion to ethylene and benzene has been studied as a probe reaction, revealing the modification of selectivity and reactivity enhancement in addition to improved thermal stability on substrates rich in reduced-silica sites. These observations suggest that these unique sites play an important role in anchoring thermodynamically metastable conformations of supported Au-Pd bimetallic catalysts and dictate their high-temperature activity.

  5. Local atomic structure of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst support determined by pulsed neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Louca, D.; Egami, T.; Brezny, R.

    1997-12-31

    The capability of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} mixture as a catalyst support in automobile exhaust three-way catalytic converters depends critically upon processing conditions of the mixture. In order to understand this dependence the atomic structure of various forms of CeO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} fine powder was studied using pulsed neutron scattering and the atomic pair-distribution analysis. The results indicate that a sample with the highest oxygen storage capacity has an inhomogeneous structure, and is segregated into two nano-phases with severe local lattice distortion. It is suggested that distortion in the local atomic structure, particularly at the interfaces, facilitate the oxygen transport at the oxide/metal interface.

  6. Developing a Forest Health Index for public engagement and decision support using local climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, J. C.; Katzenberger, J.; Cundiff, J.

    2013-12-01

    Forest health is an oft-used term without a generally accepted definition. Nonetheless, the concept of forest health continues to permeate scientific, resource management, and public discourse, and it is viewed as a helpful communication device for engagement on issues of concern to forests and their surrounding communities. Notwithstanding the challenges associated with defining the concept of 'forest health,' we present a model for assessing forest health at a watershed scale. Utilizing the Roaring Fork Valley, Colorado--a mountain watershed of 640,000 forested acres--as a case study, we have created a Forest Health Index that integrates a range of climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic data into an assessment organized along a series of public goals including, 1) Ecosystem Services, 2) Public Health & Safety, 3) Sustainable Use & Management, and 4) Ecological Integrity. Methods for this index were adopted from an earlier effort called the Ocean Health Index by Halpern et al, 2012. Indicators that represent drivers of change, such as temperature and precipitation, as well as effects of change, such as primary productivity and phenology, were selected. Each indicator is assessed by comparing a current status of that indicator to a reference scenario obtained through one of the following methods: a) statistical analysis of baseline data from the indicator record, b) commonly accepted normals, thresholds, limits, concentrations, etc., and c) subjective expert judgment. The result of this assessment is a presentation of graphical data and accompanying ratings that combine to form an index of health for the watershed forest ecosystem. We find this product to have potential merit for communities working to assess the range of conditions affecting forest health as well as making sense of the outcomes of those affects. Here, we present a description of the index methodology, data results from engagement with forest watershed stakeholders, example results of data

  7. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations.

  8. The devil in the details: interactions between the branch-length prior and likelihood model affect node support and branch lengths in the phylogeny of the Psoraceae.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Stefan; Blaalid, Rakel

    2011-07-01

    In popular use of Bayesian phylogenetics, a default branch-length prior is almost universally applied without knowing how a different prior would have affected the outcome. We performed Bayesian and maximum likelihood (ML) inference of phylogeny based on empirical nucleotide sequence data from a family of lichenized ascomycetes, the Psoraceae, the morphological delimitation of which has been controversial. We specifically assessed the influence of the combination of Bayesian branch-length prior and likelihood model on the properties of the Markov chain Monte Carlo tree sample, including node support, branch lengths, and taxon stability. Data included two regions of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene, and the protein-coding largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Data partitioning was performed using Bayes' factors, whereas the best-fitting model of each partition was selected using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC). Given the data and model, short Bayesian branch-length priors generate higher numbers of strongly supported nodes as well as short and topologically similar trees sampled from parts of tree space that are largely unexplored by the ML bootstrap. Long branch-length priors generate fewer strongly supported nodes and longer and more dissimilar trees that are sampled mostly from inside the range of tree space sampled by the ML bootstrap. Priors near the ML distribution of branch lengths generate the best marginal likelihood and the highest frequency of "rogue" (unstable) taxa. The branch-length prior was shown to interact with the likelihood model. Trees inferred under complex partitioned models are more affected by the stretching effect of the branch-length prior. Fewer nodes are strongly supported under a complex model given the same branch-length prior. Irrespective of model, internal branches make up a larger proportion of total tree length under the shortest branch

  9. Temperature-dependent local structural properties of redox Pt nanoparticles on TiO2 and ZrO2 supports

    DOE PAGES

    Jeong, Eun -Suk; Park, Chang -In; Jin, Zhenlan; ...

    2015-01-21

    This paper examined the local structural properties of Pt nanoparticles on SiO2, TiO2–SiO2, and ZrO2–SiO2 supports to better understand the impact of oxide-support type on the performance of Pt-based catalysts. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements were taken for the Pt L3-edge in a temperature range from 300 to 700 K in He, H2, and O2 gas environments. The XAFS measurements demonstrated that Pt atoms were highly dispersed on TiO2–SiO2 and ZrO2–SiO2 forming pancake-shaped nanoparticles, whereas Pt atoms formed larger particles of hemispherical shapes on SiO2 supports. Contrary to the SiO2 case, the coordination numbers for Pt, Ti,more » and Zr around Pt atoms on the TiO2–SiO2 and ZrO2–SiO2 supports were nearly constant from 300 to 700 K under the different gas environments. These results are consistent with the improvements in thermal stability of Pt nanoparticles achieved by incorporating TiO2 or ZrO2 on the surface of SiO2 supports. XAFS analysis further indicated that the enhanced dispersion and stability of Pt were a consequence of the strong metal support interaction via Pt–Ti and Pt–Zr bonds.« less

  10. Temperature-dependent local structural properties of redox Pt nanoparticles on TiO2 and ZrO2 supports

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Eun -Suk; Park, Chang -In; Jin, Zhenlan; Hwang, In -Hui; Son, Jae -Kwan; Kim, Mi -Young; Choi, Jae -Soon; Han, Sang -Wook

    2015-01-21

    This paper examined the local structural properties of Pt nanoparticles on SiO2, TiO2–SiO2, and ZrO2–SiO2 supports to better understand the impact of oxide-support type on the performance of Pt-based catalysts. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements were taken for the Pt L3-edge in a temperature range from 300 to 700 K in He, H2, and O2 gas environments. The XAFS measurements demonstrated that Pt atoms were highly dispersed on TiO2–SiO2 and ZrO2–SiO2 forming pancake-shaped nanoparticles, whereas Pt atoms formed larger particles of hemispherical shapes on SiO2 supports. Contrary to the SiO2 case, the coordination numbers for Pt, Ti, and Zr around Pt atoms on the TiO2–SiO2 and ZrO2–SiO2 supports were nearly constant from 300 to 700 K under the different gas environments. These results are consistent with the improvements in thermal stability of Pt nanoparticles achieved by incorporating TiO2 or ZrO2 on the surface of SiO2 supports. XAFS analysis further indicated that the enhanced dispersion and stability of Pt were a consequence of the strong metal support interaction via Pt–Ti and Pt–Zr bonds.

  11. Clinical Data Systems to Support Public Health Practice: A National Survey of Software and Storage Systems Among Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Context: Numerous software and data storage systems are employed by local health departments (LHDs) to manage clinical and nonclinical data needs. Leveraging electronic systems may yield improvements in public health practice. However, information is lacking regarding current usage patterns among LHDs. Objective: To analyze clinical and nonclinical data storage and software types by LHDs. Design: Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County and City Health Officials. Participants: A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures included LHD's primary clinical service data system, nonclinical data system(s) used, and plans to adopt electronic clinical data system (if not already in use). Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type, and other informatics capacities within the LHD. Bivariate analyses were performed using χ2 and t tests. Results: Up to 38.4% of LHDs reported using an electronic health record (EHR). Usage was common especially among LHDs that provide primary care and/or dental services. LHDs serving smaller populations and those with state-level governance were both less likely to use an EHR. Paper records were a common data storage approach for both clinical data (28.9%) and nonclinical data (59.4%). Among LHDs without an EHR, 84.7% reported implementation plans. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that LHDs are increasingly using EHRs as a clinical data storage solution and that more LHDs are likely to adopt EHRs in the foreseeable future. Yet use of paper records remains common. Correlates of electronic system usage emerged across a range of factors. Program- or system-specific needs may be barriers or facilitators to EHR adoption. Policy makers can tailor resources to address barriers specific to LHD size, governance, service

  12. One motif to bind them: A small-XXX-small motif affects transmembrane domain 1 oligomerization, function, localization, and cross-talk between two yeast GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Lock, Antonia; Forfar, Rachel; Weston, Cathryn; Bowsher, Leo; Upton, Graham J G; Reynolds, Christopher A; Ladds, Graham; Dixon, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell-surface receptors in mammals and facilitate a range of physiological responses triggered by a variety of ligands. GPCRs were thought to function as monomers, however it is now accepted that GPCR homo- and hetero-oligomers also exist and influence receptor properties. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe GPCR Mam2 is a pheromone-sensing receptor involved in mating and has previously been shown to form oligomers in vivo. The first transmembrane domain (TMD) of Mam2 contains a small-XXX-small motif, overrepresented in membrane proteins and well-known for promoting helix-helix interactions. An ortholog of Mam2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2, contains an analogous small-XXX-small motif which has been shown to contribute to receptor homo-oligomerization, localization and function. Here we have used experimental and computational techniques to characterize the role of the small-XXX-small motif in function and assembly of Mam2 for the first time. We find that disruption of the motif via mutagenesis leads to reduction of Mam2 TMD1 homo-oligomerization and pheromone-responsive cellular signaling of the full-length protein. It also impairs correct targeting to the plasma membrane. Mutation of the analogous motif in Ste2 yielded similar results, suggesting a conserved mechanism for assembly. Using co-expression of the two fungal receptors in conjunction with computational models, we demonstrate a functional change in G protein specificity and propose that this is brought about through hetero-dimeric interactions of Mam2 with Ste2 via the complementary small-XXX-small motifs. This highlights the potential of these motifs to affect a range of properties that can be investigated in other GPCRs.

  13. Light and low-CO2-dependent LCIB-LCIC complex localization in the chloroplast supports the carbon-concentrating mechanism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takashi; Tsujikawa, Tomoki; Hatano, Kyoko; Ozawa, Shin-Ichiro; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2010-09-01

    The carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is essential to support photosynthesis under CO2-limiting conditions in aquatic photosynthetic organisms, including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The CCM is assumed to be comprised of inorganic carbon transport systems that, in conjunction with carbonic anhydrases, maintain high levels of CO2 around ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in a specific compartment called the pyrenoid. A set of transcripts up-regulated during the induction of the CCM was identified previously and designated as low-CO2 (LC)-inducible genes. Although the functional importance of one of these LC-inducible genes, LciB, has been shown recently, the biochemical properties and detailed subcellular localization of its product LCIB remain to be elucidated. Here, using yeast two-hybrid, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses we provide evidence to demonstrate that LCIB interacts with the LCIB homologous protein LCIC in yeast and in vivo. We also show that LCIB and LCIC are co-localized in the vicinity of the pyrenoid under LC conditions in the light, forming a hexamer complex of approximately 350 kDa, as estimated by gel filtration chromatography. LCIB localization around the pyrenoid was dependent on light illumination and LC conditions during active operation of the CCM. In contrast, in the dark or under high-CO2 conditions when the CCM was inactive, LCIB immediately diffused away from the pyrenoid. Based on these observations, we discuss possible functions of the LCIB-LCIC complex in the CCM.

  14. 125I brachytherapy of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy: a comparison with best supportive care

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingjing; Fan, Xiaoxi; Zhao, Zhongwei; Chen, Minjiang; Chen, Weiqian; Wu, Fazong; Zhang, Dengke; Chen, Li; Tu, Jianfei; Ji, Jiansong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided 125I brachytherapy alone in improving the survival and quality of life of patients with unresectable locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy. Patients and methods Sixteen patients with locally advanced NSCLC were treated with CT-guided 125I brachytherapy after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy (group A). Sixteen patients who received only best supportive care (group B) were matched up with the patients in group A. Primary end point included survival, and secondary end point included assessment of safety, effectiveness of CT-guided 125I brachytherapy, and improvement in the quality of life. Results The two groups were well balanced in terms of age, disease histology, tumor stage, tumor location, and performance status (P>0.05). The median follow-up time was 16 months (range, 3–30). The total tumor response rate was 75.0% in group A, which was significantly higher than that in group B (0.0%) (P<0.01). The median progression-free survival time was 4.80 months for patients in group A and 1.35 months for patients in group B (P<0.001). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that the median survival time of group A was 9.4±0.3 months versus 8.4±0.1 months in group B (P=0.013). Tumor-related symptoms of patients were significantly relieved, and the quality of life was markedly improved in group A than in group B. Conclusion CT-guided 125I brachytherapy improved the survival of patients with locally advanced NSCLC and quality of life after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy compared with best supportive care. PMID:28280369

  15. Host DNA Damage Response Factors Localize to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus DNA Replication Sites To Support Efficient Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Sabrina H.; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. IMPORTANCE MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR

  16. Limited proteolysis differentially modulates the stability and subcellular localization of domains of RPGRIP1 that are distinctly affected by mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinrong; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2005-05-15

    The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) protein interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1). Genetic lesions in the cognate genes lead to distinct and severe human retinal dystrophies. The biological role of these proteins in retinal function and pathogenesis of retinal diseases is elusive. Here, we present the first physiological assay of the role of RPGRIP1 and mutations therein. We found that the monoallelic and homozygous mutations, DeltaE1279 and D1114G, in the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1, enhance and abolish, respectively, its interaction in vivo with RPGR without affecting the stability of RID. In contrast to RID(WT) and RID(D1114G), chemical genetics shows that the interaction of RID(DeltaE1279) with RPGR is resistant to various stress treatments such as osmotic, pH and heat-shock stimuli. Hence, RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) constitute loss- and gain-of-function mutations. Moreover, we find that the isoforms, bRPGRIP1 and bRPGRIP1b, undergo limited proteolysis constitutively in vivo in the cytoplasm compartment. This leads to the relocation and accumulation of a small and stable N-terminal domain of approximately 7 kDa to the nucleus, whereas the cytosolic C-terminal domain of RPGRIP1 is degraded and short-lived. The RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) mutations exhibit strong cis-acting and antagonistic biological effects on the nuclear relocation, subcellular distribution and proteolytic cleavage of RPGRIP1 and/or domains thereof. These data support distinct and spatiotemporal subcellular-specific roles to RPGRIP1. A novel RPGRIP1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic crosstalk and transport pathway regulated by RID, and hence by RPGR, emerges with implications in the molecular pathogenesis of retinopathies, and a model to other diseases.

  17. How the presence of a gas giant affects the formation of mean-motion resonances between two low-mass planets in a locally isothermal gaseous disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlewska-Gaca, E.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of a migration-induced resonance locking in systems containing three planets, namely an Earth analogue (1 M⊕), a super-Earth (4 M⊕) and a gas giant (one Jupiter mass). The planets have been listed in order of increasing orbital periods. All three bodies are embedded in a locally isothermal gaseous disc and orbit around a solar mass star. We are interested in answering the following questions: will the low-mass planets form the same resonant structures with each other in the vicinity of the gas giant as in the case when the gas giant is absent? More in general, how will the presence of the gas giant affect the evolution of the two low-mass planets? When there is no gas giant in the system, it has been already shown that if the two low-mass planets undergo a convergent differential migration, they will capture each other in a mean-motion resonance. For the choices of disc parameters and planet masses made in this paper, the formation of the 5:4 resonance in the absence of the Jupiter has been observed in a previous investigation and confirmed here. In this work we add a gas giant on the most external orbit of the system in such a way that its differential migration is convergent with the low-mass planets. We show that the result of this set-up is the speeding up of the migration of the super-Earth and, after that, all three planets become locked in a triple mean-motion resonance. However, this resonance is not maintained due to the low-mass planet eccentricity excitation, a fact that leads to close encounters between planets and eventually to the ejection from the internal orbits of one or both low-mass planets. We have observed that the ejected low-mass planets can leave the system, fall into a star or become the external planet relative to the gas giant. In our simulations the latter situation has been observed for the super-Earth. It follows from the results presented here that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet

  18. Enzyme function is regulated by its localization.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Stacey M; Meyer, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    To better understand how enzyme localization affects enzyme activity we studied the cellular localization of the glycosyltransferase MurG, an enzyme necessary for cell wall synthesis at the spore during sporulation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. During sporulation MurG was gradually enriched to the membrane at the forespore and point mutations in a MurG helical domain disrupting its localization to the membrane caused severe sporulation defects, but did not affect localization nor caused detectable defects during exponential growth. We found that this localization is dependent on the phospholipid cardiolipin, as in strains where the cardiolipin-synthesizing genes were deleted, MurG levels were diminished at the forespore. Furthermore, in this cardiolipin-less strain, MurG localization during sporulation was rescued by external addition of purified cardiolipin. These results support localization as a critical factor in the regulation of proper enzyme function and catalysis.

  19. Automated characterisation of ultrasound images of ovarian tumours: the diagnostic accuracy of a support vector machine and image processing with a local binary pattern operator

    PubMed Central

    Khazendar, S.; Sayasneh, A.; Al-Assam, H.; Du, H.; Kaijser, J.; Ferrara, L.; Timmerman, D.; Jassim, S.; Bourne, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Preoperative characterisation of ovarian masses into benign or malignant is of paramount importance to optimise patient management. Objectives: In this study, we developed and validated a computerised model to characterise ovarian masses as benign or malignant. Materials and methods: Transvaginal 2D B mode static ultrasound images of 187 ovarian masses with known histological diagnosis were included. Images were first pre-processed and enhanced, and Local Binary Pattern Histograms were then extracted from 2 × 2 blocks of each image. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) was trained using stratified cross validation with randomised sampling. The process was repeated 15 times and in each round 100 images were randomly selected. Results: The SVM classified the original non-treated static images as benign or malignant masses with an average accuracy of 0.62 (95% CI: 0.59-0.65). This performance significantly improved to an average accuracy of 0.77 (95% CI: 0.75-0.79) when images were pre-processed, enhanced and treated with a Local Binary Pattern operator (mean difference 0.15: 95% 0.11-0.19, p < 0.0001, two-tailed t test). Conclusion: We have shown that an SVM can classify static 2D B mode ultrasound images of ovarian masses into benign and malignant categories. The accuracy improves if texture related LBP features extracted from the images are considered. PMID:25897367

  20. Creating Locally-Resolved Mobile-Source Emissions Inputs for Air Quality Modeling in Support of an Exposure Study in Detroit, Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Michelle; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Isakov, Vlad; Talgo, Kevin; Naess, Brian; Valencia, Alejandro; Omary, Mohammad; Davis, Neil; Cook, Rich; Hanna, Adel

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a methodology for modeling the impact of traffic-generated air pollutants in an urban area. This methodology presented here utilizes road network geometry, traffic volume, temporal allocation factors, fleet mixes, and emission factors to provide critical modeling inputs. These inputs, assembled from a variety of sources, are combined with meteorological inputs to generate link-based emissions for use in dispersion modeling to estimate pollutant concentration levels due to traffic. A case study implementing this methodology for a large health study is presented, including a sensitivity analysis of the modeling results reinforcing the importance of model inputs and identify those having greater relative impact, such as fleet mix. In addition, an example use of local measurements of fleet activity to supplement model inputs is described, and its impacts to the model outputs are discussed. We conclude that with detailed model inputs supported by local traffic measurements and meteorology, it is possible to capture the spatial and temporal patterns needed to accurately estimate exposure from traffic-related pollutants. PMID:25501000

  1. Creating locally-resolved mobile-source emissions inputs for air quality modeling in support of an exposure study in Detroit, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Michelle; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Isakov, Vlad; Talgo, Kevin; Naess, Brian; Valencia, Alejandro; Omary, Mohammad; Davis, Neil; Cook, Rich; Hanna, Adel

    2014-12-01

    This work describes a methodology for modeling the impact of traffic-generated air pollutants in an urban area. This methodology presented here utilizes road network geometry, traffic volume, temporal allocation factors, fleet mixes, and emission factors to provide critical modeling inputs. These inputs, assembled from a variety of sources, are combined with meteorological inputs to generate link-based emissions for use in dispersion modeling to estimate pollutant concentration levels due to traffic. A case study implementing this methodology for a large health study is presented, including a sensitivity analysis of the modeling results reinforcing the importance of model inputs and identify those having greater relative impact, such as fleet mix. In addition, an example use of local measurements of fleet activity to supplement model inputs is described, and its impacts to the model outputs are discussed. We conclude that with detailed model inputs supported by local traffic measurements and meteorology, it is possible to capture the spatial and temporal patterns needed to accurately estimate exposure from traffic-related pollutants.

  2. Temperature affects long-term productivity and quality attributes of day-neutral strawberry for a space life-support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Chase, Elaine; Santini, Judith B.; Mitchell, Cary A.

    2015-04-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa L.) is a promising candidate crop for space life-support systems with desirable sensory quality and health attributes. Day-neutral cultivars such as 'Seascape' are adaptable to a range of photoperiods, including short days that would save considerable energy for crop lighting without reductions in productivity or yield. Since photoperiod and temperature interact to affect strawberry growth and development, several diurnal temperature regimes were tested under a short photoperiod of 10 h per day for effects on yield and quality attributes of 'Seascape' strawberry during production cycles longer than 270 days. The coolest day/night temperature regime, 16°/8 °C, tended to produce smaller numbers of larger fruit than did the intermediate temperature range of 18°/10 °C or the warmest regime, 20°/12 °C, both of which produced similar larger numbers of smaller fruit. The intermediate temperature regime produced the highest total fresh mass of berries over an entire production cycle. Independent experiments examined either organoleptic or physicochemical quality attributes. Organoleptic evaluation indicated that fruit grown under the coolest temperature regime tended to score the highest for both hedonic preference and descriptive evaluation of sensory attributes related to sweetness, texture, aftertaste, and overall approval. The physicochemical quality attributes Brix, pH, and sugar/acid ratio were highest for fruits harvested from the coolest temperature regime and lower for those from the warmer temperature regimes. The cool-regime fruits also were lowest in titratable acidity. The yield parameters fruit number and size oscillated over the course of a production cycle, with a gradual decline in fruit size under all three temperature regimes. Brix and titratable acidity both decreased over time for all three temperature treatments, but sugar/acid ratio remained highest for the cool temperature regime over the entire production

  3. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mayra; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind), a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box") present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh), a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic) also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator) and Cic (repressor) may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  4. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 1: The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions: Steady state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed first principle kinetic theory for electrons which is neither a classical fluid treatment nor an exospheric calculation is presented. This theory illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion that shape the observed features of the electron distribution function, such as its bifurcation, its skewness and the differential temperatures of the thermal and suprathermal subpopulations. Coulomb collisions are substantial mediators of the interplanetary electron velocity distribution function and they place a zone for a bifurcation of the electron distribution function deep in the corona. The local cause and effect precept which permeates the physics of denser media is modified for electrons in the solar wind. The local form of transport laws and equations of state which apply to collision dominated plasmas are replaced with global relations that explicitly depend on the relative position of the observer to the boundaries of the system.

  5. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. I - The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions - Steady state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic theory for the velocity distribution of solar wind electrons which illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion is proposed. By means of the Boltzmann equation with the Krook collision operator accounting for Coulomb collisions, it is found that Coulomb collisions determine the population and shape of the electron distribution function in both the thermal and suprathermal energy regimes. For suprathermal electrons, the cumulative effects of Coulomb interactions are shown to take place on the scale of the heliosphere itself, whereas the Coulomb interactions of thermal electrons occur on a local scale near the point of observation (1 AU). The bifurcation of the electron distribution between thermal and suprathermal electrons is localized to the deep solar corona (1 to 10 solar radii).

  6. Improving estimates of surface carbon fluxes to support emissions monitoring, reporting and verification at local and regional scales: quantifying uncertainty and the effects of spatial scaling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gately, C.; Hutyra, L.; Wofsy, S.; Nehrkorn, T.; Sue Wing, I.

    2015-12-01

    Current approaches to quantifying surface-atmosphere fluxes of carbon often combine inventories of fossil fuel carbon emissions (ffCO2) and biosphere flux estimates with atmospheric measurements to drive forward and inverse-atmospheric modeling at high spatial and temporal resolutions (1km grids, hourly time steps have become common). Given that over 70% of total ffCO2 emissions are attributable to urban areas, accurate estimates of ffCO2 at urban scales are critical to support emissions mitigation policies at state and local levels. A successful regional or national carbon monitoring system requires a careful quantification of the uncertainties associated with estimates of both ffCO2 and biogenic carbon fluxes. Errors in the spatial distribution of ffCO2 priors used to inform atmospheric transport models can bias posterior flux estimates, and potentially provide misleading information to decision makers on the impact of policies. Most current ffCO2 priors are either too coarsely resolved in time and space, or suffer from poorly quantified errors in spatial distributions at local scales. Accurately downscaling aggregate activity data requires a careful understanding of the potentially non-linear relationships between source processes and spatial proxies. We report on ongoing work to develop an integrated, high-resolution carbon monitoring system for the Northeastern U.S., and discuss insights into the impact of spatial scaling on model uncertainty. We use a newly developed dataset of hourly surface carbon fluxes for all human and biogenic sources at 1km grid resolution for the years 2013 and 2014. To attain these spatial and temporal resolutions, ffCO2 flux estimates were subject to varying degrees of aggregation and/or downscaling depending on the native source data for each sector. We will discuss several important examples of how the choice of scaling variables and priors influences the spatial distribution CO2 and CH4 retrievals.

  7. Support Vector Machine-Based Prediction of Local Tumor Control After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klement, Rainer J.; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. Methods and Materials: We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Results: Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED{sub ISO}) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED{sub ISO} and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED{sub ISO}, age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP

  8. Twins discordant for myositis and systemic lupus erythematosus show markedly enriched autoantibodies in the affected twin supporting environmental influences in pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of twin pairs discordant for autoimmune conditions provide a unique opportunity to explore contributing factors triggered by complex gene-environment interactions. Methods In this cross-sectional study, thirty-one monozygotic or dizygotic twin pairs discordant for myositis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), along with matched healthy controls were evaluated for antibodies against a panel of 21 autoantigens. Results Autoantibody profiling revealed that 42% of the affected twins showed significant seropositivity against autoantigens in the panel. In many of these affected twins, but none of healthy controls, there were high levels of autoantibodies detected against two or more autoantigens commonly seen in systemic autoimmune diseases including Ro52, Ro60, RNP-70 K and/or RNP-A. In contrast, only 10% (3/31) of the unaffected twins showed seropositivity and these immunoreactivities were against single autoantigens not seen in systemic autoimmune diseases. While no significant differences in autoantibodies were detected between the affected or unaffected twins against thyroid peroxidase, transglutaminase and several cytokines, 23% of the affected twins with myositis showed autoantibodies against the gastric ATPase. Analysis of the monozygotic twins separately also revealed a higher frequencies of autoantibodies in the affected twins compared to the unaffected twins (P = 0.046). Lastly, clinical analysis of both the affected monozygotic and dizygotic twins revealed that the autoantibody seropositive affected twins had a greater global disease activity score compared to seronegative affected twins (P = 0.019). Conclusion The findings of significantly more autoantibodies in the affected twins with myositis and SLE compared to the unaffected twins are consistent with potential non-genetic factors playing a role in autoantibody production and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. PMID:24602337

  9. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis.

  10. An Examination of Cultural Values and Employees' Perceptions of Support on Affective Reaction and the Desire to Participate in a Formal Mentoring Program in an Oilfield Services Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Hanna Bea

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have examined the effect of formal mentoring on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. However, there has been little or no focus on an employee's intent to participate in a formal mentoring program based upon an employee's perceived organizational support, and/or affective reaction (job satisfaction and…

  11. A Corporate Responsibility? The Constitution of Fly-in, Fly-out Mining Companies as Governance Partners in Remote, Mine-Affected Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheshire, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    In some remote parts of Australia, mining companies have positioned themselves as central actors in governing nearby affected communities by espousing notions of "voluntary partnerships for sustainability" between business, government and community. It is argued in this paper that the nature and extent of mining company interventions in…

  12. How much do tides affect the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea? From local processes in the Strait of Gibraltar to basin-scale effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, C.; Garcia-Lafuente, J.; Sannino, G.; Sanchez-Garrido, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of tidal forcing on the exchange flow through the Strait of Gibraltar and the circulation in the near-field region are revisited with a regional numerical model. Also a basin-scale model run is conducted in a first attempt to assess the impact of these local processes on the Western Mediterranean thermohaline circulation. In the Strait of Gibraltar, tides are found to (1) increase the exchange flow volume transport, (2) modify the hydrological properties of Atlantic inflowing waters through the enhancement of mixing, and (3) facilitate the drainage of Mediterranean deep water. In the far-field, the model reveals that these local processes can favor deep convection in the Gulf of Lion. Some thoughts are provided offering possible explanations.

  13. Two-locus admixture linkage analysis of bipolar and unipolar affective disorder supports the presence of susceptibility loci on chromosomes 11p15 and 21q22

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, C.; Kalsi, G.; O`Neill, J.

    1997-02-01

    Following a report of a linkage study that yielded evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder on the long arm of chromosome 21, we studied 23 multiply affected pedigrees collected from Iceland and the UK, using the markers PFKL, D21S171, and D21S49. Counting only bipolar cases as affected, a two-point LOD of 1.28 was obtained using D21S171 ({theta} = 0.01, {alpha} = 0.35), with three Icelandic families producing LODs of 0.63, 0.62, and 1.74 (all at {theta} = 0.0). Affected sib pair analysis demonstrated increased allele sharing at D21S171 (P = 0.001) when unipolar cases were also considered affected. The same set of pedigrees had previously been typed for a tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH) polymorphism at 11p15 and had shown some moderate evidence for linkage. When information from TH and the 21q markers was combined in a two-locus admixture analysis, an overall admixture LOD of 3.87 was obtained using the bipolar affection model. Thus the data are compatible with the hypothesis that a locus at or near TH influences susceptibility in some pedigrees, while a locus near D21S171 is active in others. Similar analyses in other datasets should be carried out to confirm or refute our tentative finding. 66 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Sequencing of Local Therapy Affects the Pattern of Treatment Failure and Survival in Children With Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Beltran, Chris; Wu, Shengjie; Sharma, Shelly; Boop, Frederick A.; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Helton, Kathleen J.; Wright, Karen D.; Broniscer, Alberto; Kun, Larry E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the pattern of treatment failure associated with current therapeutic paradigms for childhood atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with AT/RT of the central nervous system treated at our institution between 1987 and 2007 were retrospectively evaluated. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and cumulative incidence of local failure were correlated with age, sex, tumor location, extent of disease, and extent of surgical resection. Radiotherapy (RT) sequencing, chemotherapy, dose, timing, and volume administered after resection were also evaluated. Results: Thirty-one patients at a median age of 2.3 years at diagnosis (range, 0.45-16.87 years) were enrolled into protocols that included risk- and age-stratified RT. Craniospinal irradiation with focal tumor bed boost (median dose, 54 Gy) was administered to 18 patients. Gross total resection was achieved in 16. Ten patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. RT was delayed more than 3 months in 20 patients and between 1 and 3 months in 4; 7 patients received immediate postoperative irradiation preceding high-dose alkylator-based chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 48 months, the cumulative incidence of local treatment failure was 37.5% {+-} 9%; progression-free survival was 33.2% {+-} 10%; and OS was 53.5% {+-} 10%. Children receiving delayed RT ({>=}1 month postoperatively) were more likely to experience local failure (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23, p = 0.007); the development of distant metastases before RT increased the risk of progression (HR 3.49, p = 0.006); and any evidence of disease progressionbefore RT decreased OS (HR 20.78, p = 0.004). Disease progression occurred in 52% (11/21) of children with initially localized tumors who underwent gross total resection, and the progression rate increased proportionally with increasing delay from surgery to RT. Conclusions: Delayed RT is associated with a higher rate of local and metastatic

  15. Axonal localization of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 is critical for subcellular locality of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 release affecting proper development of postnatal mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Kakegawa, Wataru; Shinoda, Yo; Hosono, Mayu; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Sekine, Yukiko; Sato, Yumi; Saruta, Chihiro; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Kojima, Masami; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) is a protein that is essential for enhanced release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) from cerebellar granule cells. We previously identified dex3, a rare alternative splice variant of CAPS2, which is overrepresented in patients with autism and is missing an exon 3 critical for axonal localization. We recently reported that a mouse model CAPS2Δex3/Δex3 expressing dex3 showed autistic-like behavioral phenotypes including impaired social interaction and cognition and increased anxiety in an unfamiliar environment. Here, we verified impairment in axonal, but not somato-dendritic, localization of dex3 protein in cerebellar granule cells and demonstrated cellular and physiological phenotypes in postnatal cerebellum of CAPS2Δex3/Δex3 mice. Interestingly, both BDNF and NT-3 were markedly reduced in axons of cerebellar granule cells, resulting in a significant decrease in their release. As a result, dex3 mice showed developmental deficits in dendritic arborization of Purkinje cells, vermian lobulation and fissurization, and granule cell precursor proliferation. Paired-pulse facilitation at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses was also impaired. Together, our results indicate that CAPS2 plays an important role in subcellular locality (axonal vs. somato-dendritic) of enhanced BDNF and NT-3 release, which is indispensable for proper development of postnatal cerebellum.

  16. Can videoconferencing affect older people's engagement and perception of their social support in long-term conditions management: a social network analysis from the Telehealth Literacy Project.

    PubMed

    Banbury, Annie; Chamberlain, Daniel; Nancarrow, Susan; Dart, Jared; Gray, Len; Parkinson, Lynne

    2017-05-01

    Social support is a key component in managing long-term conditions. As people age in their homes, there is a greater risk of social isolation, which can be ameliorated by informal support networks. This study examined the relationship between changes in social support networks for older people living in a regional area following weekly videoconference groups delivered to the home. Between February and June 2014, we delivered 44 weekly group meetings via videoconference to participants in a regional town in Australia. The meetings provided participants with education and an opportunity to discuss health issues and connect with others in similar circumstances. An uncontrolled, pre-post-test methodology was employed. A social network tool was completed by 45 (87%) participants either pre- or post-intervention, of which 24 (46%) participants completed the tool pre- and post-intervention. In addition, 14 semi-structured interviews and 4 focus groups were conducted. Following the intervention, participants identified increased membership of their social networks, although they did not identify individuals from the weekly videoconference groups. The most important social support networks remained the same pre- and post-intervention namely, health professionals, close family and partners. However, post-intervention participants identified friends and wider family as more important to managing their chronic condition compared to pre-intervention. Participants derived social support, in particular, companionship, emotional and informational support as well as feeling more engaged with life, from the weekly videoconference meetings. Videoconference education groups delivered into the home can provide social support and enhance self-management for older people with chronic conditions. They provide the opportunity to develop a virtual social support network containing new and diverse social connections.

  17. Working within local funding trends.

    PubMed

    Pomales-Connors, Irma

    2004-06-01

    Like politics, environmentalism, and fashion, there are trends in health care research and funding. According to a series of reports by the Foundation Center-which collects, organizes, and communicates information on U.S. philanthropy-it is important to understand the significant financial and programmatic changes in the way foundations give. For pharmacists considering soliciting grant support, it is critical that they become aware of these trends and be responsive to the local or regional environments that affect funding.

  18. Fostering Teachers' Design Expertise in Teacher Design Teams: Conducive Design and Support Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizinga, Tjark; Handelzalts, Adam; Nieveen, Nienke; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Supporting Teacher Design Teams (TDTs) during local curriculum development efforts is essential. To be able to provide high-quality support, insights are needed about how TDTs carry out design activities and how support is valued by the members of TDTs and how it affects their design expertise. In this study, the design and support processes of…

  19. [For a coordination of the supportive care for people affected by severe illnesses: proposition of organization in the public and private health care centres].

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Ivan; Boureau, François; Bugat, Roland; Chassignol, Laurent; Colombat, Philippe; Copel, Laure; d'Hérouville, Daniel; Filbet, Marylène; Laurent, Bernard; Memran, Nadine; Meynadier, Jacques; Parmentier, Gérard; Poulain, Philippe; Saltel, Pierre; Serin, Daniel; Wagner, Jean-Philippe

    2004-05-01

    The concept of continuous and global care is acknowledged today by all as inherent to modern medicine. A working group gathered to propose models for the coordination of supportive care for all severe illnesses in the various private and public health care centres. The supportive care are defined as: "all care and supports necessary for ill people, at the same time as specific treatments, along all severe illnesses". This definition is inspired by that of "supportive care" given in 1990 by the MASCC (Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer): "The total medical, nursing and psychosocial help which the patients need besides the specific treatment". It integrates as much the field of cure with possible after-effects as that of palliative care, the definition of which is clarified (initial and terminal palliative phases). Such a coordination is justified by the pluridisciplinarity and hyperspecialisation of the professionals, by a poor communication between the teams, by the administrative difficulties encountered by the teams participating in the supportive care. The working group insists on the fact that the supportive care is not a new speciality. He proposes the creation of units. departments or pole of responsibility of supportive care with a "basic coordination" involving the activities of chronic pain, palliative care, psycho-oncology, and social care. This coordination can be extended, according to the "history" and missions of health care centres. Service done with the implementation of a "unique counter" for the patients and the teams is an important point. The structure has to comply with the terms and conditions of contract (Consultation, Unit or Centre of chronic pain, structures of palliative care, of psycho-oncology, of nutrition, of social care). A common technical organization is one of the interests. The structure has to set up strong links with the private practitioners, the networks, the home medical care (HAD) and the nurses

  20. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  1. Exploring the use of NOAA-NWS Local Three-Month Temperature Outlooks to support fisheries management in California's Sacramento Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, L. D.; Barsugli, J.; Yaworsky, R.; Tom, M.

    2008-05-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation operates many surface water storage facilities in the Western United States to support downstream fisheries stream habitat, including stream temperature conditions during summer and autumn. For example, the Central Valley Operations Office (CVOO) in Sacramento, California, conducts monthly in-season feasibility assessments of proposed stream temperature compliance objectives, from May through September. Objectives are defined by water temperature thresholds and compliance locations below Lake Shasta on the Sacramento River. Patterns of upstream "cold water" release are constrained by higher priority water allocations and stock of stored "cold" water resource in Lake Shasta (i.e. reservoir storage at-depth having temperature less than 52 degrees Fahrenheit). To support interagency discussions on compliance objectives, CVOO develops "through November" stream temperature management scenarios based on reservoir and river temperature simulations given initial cold water stock and assumed weather conditions during the plan-horizon (through November). CVOO currently assumes future weather based on monthly median conditions from historical records. This study explores the use of the NOAA-NWS Local Three-Month Temperature Outlook (L3MTO) product to influence CVOO's expected plan-horizon air temperature and related weather. Study considerations included: forecast availability, reliability, method for linking L3MTO to plan-horizon weather assumptions, and evaluation of retrospective decision-impact. Forecast reliability was assessed for May-July lead-1.5 L3MTO products at seven Sacramento Valley stations, generated from 1995-2005 data, with the purpose of selecting best locations for further application. Decision impact was evaluated through 2001-2005 retrospective analysis, where two CVOO plan developers redeveloped June-issue stream temperature operations plans (for July-November horizons) given weather assumptions based on no-forecast (i

  2. How gender affects patterns of social relations and their impact on health: a comparison of one or multiple sources of support from "close persons".

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, R; Stansfeld, S A

    2002-03-01

    Numerous studies have reported gender differences in the effects of social relations on morbidity and mortality. When studying health and associated factors, one cannot ignore that sex differences exist and methods that are not "gender-fair" may lead to erroneous conclusions. This paper presents a critical analysis of the health/social relations association from a measurement perspective, including the definitions of people's networks and how they differ by gender. Findings from the Whitehall II Study of Civil Servants illustrate that women report more close persons in their primary networks, and are less likely to nominate their spouse as the closest person, but both men and women report the same proportion of women among their four closest persons. Women have a wider range of sources of emotional support. To date, most epidemiological studies have habitually analysed support provided by the closest person or confidant(e). We compared the health effects of social support when measured for the closest person only and when information from up to four close persons was incorporated into a weighted index. Information from up to four close persons offered a more accurate portrayal of support exchanged, and gender differences were attenuated, if not eliminated, when this support index was used to predict physical and psychological health.

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of DPP10 in rat brain supports the existence of a Kv4/KChIP/DPPL ternary complex in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Chen; Cheng, Chau-Fu; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Subthreshold A-type K(+) currents (ISA s) have been recorded from the cell bodies of hippocampal and neocortical interneurons as well as neocortical pyramidal neurons. Kv4 channels are responsible for the somatodendritic ISA s. It has been proposed that neuronal Kv4 channels are ternary complexes including pore-forming Kv4 subunits, K(+) channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs), and dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins (DPPLs). However, colocalization evidence was still lacking. The distribution of DPP10 mRNA in rodent brain has been reported but its protein localization remains unknown. In this study, we generated a DPP10 antibody to label DPP10 protein in adult rat brain by immunohistochemistry. Absent from glia, DPP10 proteins appear mainly in the cell bodies of DPP10(+) neurons, not only at the plasma membrane but also in the cytoplasm. At least 6.4% of inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus coexpressed Kv4.3, KChIP1, and DPP10, with the highest density in the CA1 strata alveus/oriens/pyramidale and the dentate hilus. Colocalization of Kv4.3/KChIP1/DPP10 was also detected in at least 6.9% of inhibitory interneurons scattered throughout the neocortex. Both hippocampal and neocortical Kv4.3/KChIP1/DPP10(+) inhibitory interneurons expressed parvalbumin or somatostatin, but not calbindin or calretinin. Furthermore, we found colocalization of Kv4.2/Kv4.3/KChIP3/DPP10 in neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons and olfactory bulb mitral cells. Together, although DPP10 is also expressed in some brain neurons lacking Kv4 (such as parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive Golgi cells in the cerebellum), colocalization of DPP10 with Kv4 and KChIP at the plasma membrane of ISA -expressing neuron somata supports the existence of Kv4/KChIP/DPPL ternary complex in vivo.

  4. Chondrocyte-specific modulation of Cyp27b1 expression supports a role for local synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in growth plate development.

    PubMed

    Naja, Roy Pascal; Dardenne, Olivier; Arabian, Alice; St Arnaud, René

    2009-09-01

    The Cyp27b1 enzyme (25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase) that converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D into the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], is expressed in kidney but also in other cell types such as chondrocytes. This suggests that local production of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) could play an important role in the differentiation of these cells. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutant mice that do not express the Cyp27b1 gene in chondrocytes. Inactivation of both alleles of the Cyp27b1 gene led to decreased RANKL expression and reduced osteoclastogenesis, increased width of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate at embryonic d 15.5, increased bone volume in neonatal long bones, and increased expression of the chondrocytic differentiation markers Indian Hedgehog and PTH/PTHrP receptor. The expression of the angiogenic marker VEGF was decreased, accompanied by decreased platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 staining in the neonatal growth plate, suggesting a delay in vascularization. In parallel, we engineered strains of mice overexpressing a Cyp27b1 transgene in chondrocytes by coupling the Cyp27b1 cDNA to the collagen alpha(1)(II) promoter. The transgenic mice showed a mirror image phenotype when compared with the tissue-specific inactivation, i.e. a reduction in the width of the hypertrophic zone of the embryonic growth plate, decreased bone volume in neonatal long bones, and inverse expression patterns of chondrocytic differentiation markers. These results support an intracrine role of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) in endochondral ossification and chondrocyte development in vivo.

  5. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  6. Proposed method to study the factors affecting local control with combined external beam and interstitial implantation of mobile tongue and floor of mouth

    SciTech Connect

    Hintz, B.L.; Kagan, A.R.; Chan, P.; Rao, A.R.; Nussbaum, H.; Ryoo, M.C.; Wollin, M.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty-seven patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the mobile tongue and floor of the mouth were treated with external beam and interstitial radiation. Good prognostic factors were T1N0, T2N0, superficial tumors, tumor shrinkage by 75% with external beam, and no apparent tumor clinically 2 months after treatment. On the other hand, T3N0, T1-3N1, and deeply necrotic tumors had a poor prognosis. We recommend using a flexible afterloading system to implant the initial local tumor volume (not just the residual nidus) that does not exceed 45 cm3. The minimum (reference) dose was prescribed to a surface 1/2 cm beyond the most peripheral rim of radioactive sources. For acceptable local control and complication rates, our suggested minimum (reference) doses are less than or equal to 7500 rads for T1 (or a time-dose-fractionation (TDF) of 131-140), less than or equal to 8000 rads for T2 (TDF of 131-140), and probably less than 8500 rads for T3 (TDF of less than or equal to 150). These guidelines should be considered preliminary.

  7. Effect of long-term aging on microstructure and local behavior in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Ming-Liang Wang, De-Qiang; Xuan, Fu-Zhen

    2014-01-15

    Evolution of microstructure, micro-hardness and micro-tensile strength behavior was investigated in the heat-affected zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel welded joint after the artificial aging at 350 °C for 3000 h. After detailed characterization of microstructures in optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the change of martensite–bainite constituent promotes more homogeneous microstructure distribution. The aging treatment facilitates redistribution of carbon and chromium elements along the welded joint, and the micro-hardness is increased slightly through the welds due to enrichment of carbon. The types of precipitates in the weldment mainly include M{sub 3}C, MC, M{sub 2}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The carbides in base metal, weld metal and coarse-grained heat-affected zone are prone to change from ellipsoidal to platelet form whereas more uniform spherical carbides are observed in the fine-grained zone. Precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} near the fusion line, and formation of MC and M{sub 2}C, are responsible for the tensile strength decrease and its smooth distribution in the aged heat-affected zone. This implies that the thermal aging can relieve strength mismatch in the weldments. - Highlights: • Microstructure homogeneity improved in HAZ after long-term aging. • Tensile strength decreased in HAZ due to precipitation and coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. • Strength mismatch in NiCrMoV steel welds was relieved after aging at 350 °C × 3000 h.

  8. Perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulations as mediators of the relationship between enacted stigma and post-traumatic growth among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Tu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Some previous studies have revealed a negative impact of enacted stigma on post-traumatic growth (PTG) of children affected by HIV/AIDS, but little is known about protective psychological factors that can mitigate the effect of enacted stigma on children's PTG. This study aims to examine the mediating effects of perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulation on the relationship between enacted stigma and PTG among HIV-affected children. Cross-sectional data were collected from 790 children affected by parental HIV (382 girls, 408 boys) aged 6-17 years in 2012 in rural central China. Multiple regression was conducted to test the mediation model. The study found that the experience of enacted stigma had a negative effect on PTG among children affected by HIV/AIDS. Emotional regulation together with hopefulness and perceived social support mediated the impact of enacted stigma on PTG. Perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulation offer multiple levels of protection that can mitigate the impact of enacted stigma on PTG. Results suggest that future psychological intervention programs should seek strategies to reduce the stigmatizing experience of these children and promote children's level of PTG, and health professionals should also emphasize the development of these protective psychological factors.

  9. Perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulations as mediators of the relationship between enacted stigma and post-traumatic growth among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Tu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some previous studies have revealed a negative impact of enacted stigma on post-traumatic growth (PTG) of children affected by HIV/AIDS, but little is known about protective psychological factors that can mitigate the effect of enacted stigma on children's PTG. This study aims to examine the mediating effects of perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulation on the relationship between enacted stigma and PTG among HIV-affected children. Cross-sectional data were collected from 790 children affected by parental HIV (382 girls, 408 boys) aged 6–17 years in 2012 in rural central China. Multiple regression was conducted to test the mediation model. The study found that the experience of enacted stigma had a negative effect on PTG among children affected by HIV/AIDS. Emotional regulation together with hopefulness and perceived social support mediated the impact of enacted stigma on PTG. Perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulation offer multiple levels of protection that can mitigate the impact of enacted stigma on PTG. Results suggest that future psychological intervention programs should seek strategies to reduce the stigmatizing experience of these children and promote children's level of PTG, and health professionals should also emphasize the development of these protective psychological factors. PMID:26899475

  10. Grana-Localized Proteins, RIQ1 and RIQ2, Affect the Organization of Light-Harvesting Complex II and Grana Stacking in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ryo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Maki; Takeda, Satomi; Ifuku, Kentaro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Mikio; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Grana are stacked thylakoid membrane structures in land plants that contain PSII and light-harvesting complex II proteins (LHCIIs). We isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, reduced induction of non-photochemical quenching1 (riq1) and riq2, in which stacking of grana was enhanced. The curvature thylakoid 1a (curt1a) mutant was previously shown to lack grana structure. In riq1 curt1a, the grana were enlarged with more stacking, and in riq2 curt1a, the thylakoids were abnormally stacked and aggregated. Despite having different phenotypes in thylakoid structure, riq1, riq2, and curt1a showed a similar defect in the level of nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ). In riq curt1a double mutants, NPQ induction was more severely affected than in either single mutant. In riq mutants, state transitions were inhibited and the PSII antennae were smaller than in wild-type plants. The riq defects did not affect NPQ induction in the chlorophyll b-less mutant. RIQ1 and RIQ2 are paralogous and encode uncharacterized grana thylakoid proteins, but despite the high level of identity of the sequence, the functions of RIQ1 and RIQ2 were not redundant. RIQ1 is required for RIQ2 accumulation, and the wild-type level of RIQ2 did not complement the NPQ and thylakoid phenotypes in riq1. We propose that RIQ proteins link the grana structure and organization of LHCIIs. PMID:27600538

  11. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase 2 in brains of patients with Down's syndrome and dementia of Alzheimer type: specific localization in affected neurones and axons.

    PubMed

    Oka, A; Takashima, S

    1997-03-24

    Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting studies with an antibody against cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2) were performed in the cerebral cortex of patients with Down's syndrome (DS) and dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). A high level of COX2 expression was observed in DAT and older DS patients, specifically localized in neurones with neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and damaged axons. Furthermore, immunohistochemical study of patients with DS of varying age showed that the induction of COX2 correlated well with the appearance of NFT as well as with ageing. These findings demonstrated the induction of COX2 in DAT and DS, which may lead to the production of free radicals and may be causally related to neuronal degeneration.

  12. Remote Sensing of Urban Thermal Landscape Characteristics and Their Affects on Local and Regional Meteorology and Air Quality: An Overview of NASA EOS-IDS Project Atlanta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    As an entity, the city is a manifestation of human "management" of the land. The act of city-building, however, drastically alters the biophysical environment, which ultimately, impacts local and regional land-atmosphere energy exchange processes. Because of the complexity of both the urban landscape and the attendant energy fluxes that result from urbanization, remote sensing offers the only real way to synoptically quantify these processes. One of the more important land-atmosphere fluxes that occurs over cities relates to the way that thermal energy is partitioned across the heterogeneous urban landscape. The individual land cover and surface material types that comprise the city, such as pavements and buildings, each have their own thermal energy regimes. As the collective urban landscape, the individual thermal energy responses from specific surfaces come together to form the urban heat island phenomena, which prevails as a dome of elevated air temperatures over cities. Although the urban heat island has been known to exist for well over 150 years, it is not understood how differences in thermal energy responses for land covers across the city interact to produce this phenomenon, or how the variability in thermal energy responses from different surface types drive its development. Additionally, it can be hypothesized that as cities grow in size through time, so do their urban heat islands. The interrelationships between urban sprawl and the respective growth of the urban heat island, however, have not been investigated. Moreover, little is known of the consequential effects of urban growth, land cover change, and the urban heat island as they impact local and regional meteorology and air quality.

  13. Factors Affecting Examination Attrition: Does Academic Support Help? A Survey of ACN203S (Cost Accounting and Control) Students at Unisa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tladi, Lerato Sonia

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the attributing and contributing factors to examination absence as well as whether the academic and social support available to students had a role to play in discouraging or reducing absence from examinations using results from a quantitative survey of ACN203S (Cost Accounting and Control) students who were admitted…

  14. Environmental factors affecting the start of pollen season and concentrations of airborne Alnus pollen in two localities of Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rajo, Francisco Javier; Dopazo, Angeles; Jato, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Alnus pollen is an early component of the annual atmospheric aerosol of the north-west regions of Spain, which causes the first occurrence of allergic symptoms. Seasonal and intra-daily variation of Alnus pollination, and the influence that main meteorological parameters exert, was studied in this paper. Monitoring was carried out from 1993-2002, by using two Lanzoni VPPS 2000 volumetric samplers. Once the atmospheric behaviour of this pollen had been identified, the final objective was to elaborate predictive models to determine the onset of the Alnus pollen season and its concentrations during the pollination period in two localities of north-west Spain (Santiago and Ourense). Winter chilling required to overcome the bud-dormancy period was similar in both cities, with around 800 Chilling Hours (C.H.) and 5.5 degrees C threshold temperature. Calculation of heat requirement for bud growth was carried out with maximum temperature, with around 50 Growth Degree Days (G.D.D. degrees C) needed, with 6 degrees C threshold temperature. Data from 2002 were used in order to determine the real validity of the models. This year was not taken into account to establish the aforementioned models. The variation between the predicted start of the pollen season and the observed season was smallest in Ourense. Verifying the proposed models for predicting daily mean concentrations of Alnus pollen during the pollen season shows that the predicted curves fits the observed variations of daily mean concentrations.

  15. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4 and ACBP5 are subcellularly localized to the cytosol and ACBP4 depletion affects membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Li, Hong-Ye; Zhang, Jiao-Ping; Chan, Suk-Wah; Chye, Mee-Len

    2008-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are encoded by six genes, and they display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters. Recombinant ACBP4 and ACBP5 have been shown to bind oleoyl-CoA esters in vitro. In this study, the subcellular localizations of ACBP4 and ACBP5 were determined by biochemical fractionation followed by western blot analyses using anti-ACBP4 and anti-ACBP5 antibodies and immuno-electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of autofluorescence-tagged ACBP4 and ACBP5, expressed transiently in onion epidermal cells and in transgenic Arabidopsis, confirmed their expression in the cytosol. Taken together, ACBP4 and ACBP5 are available in the cytosol to bind and transfer cytosolic oleoyl-CoA esters. Lipid profile analysis further revealed that an acbp4 knockout mutant showed decreases in membrane lipids (digalactosyldiacylglycerol, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol) while acbp4-complemented lines attained levels similar to wild type, suggesting that ACBP4 plays a role in the biosynthesis of membrane lipids including galactolipids and phospholipids.

  16. A nuclear-localized protein, KOLD SENSITIV-1, affects the expression of cold-responsive genes during prolonged chilling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Sarah J; Bussell, John D; Nelson, David C; Villadsen, Dorthe; Smith, Steven M

    2011-02-15

    Plants respond to cold by transcriptional and metabolic responses which underlie tolerance and acclimation mechanisms, but details at the molecular level are incomplete. Here we describe KOLD SENSITIV-1 (KOS1), a new gene required for responses to cold. KOS1 protein is predicted to have coiled-coil, Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes and nuclear-targeting domains. GFP-labeled KOS1 localizes to the nucleus. Null mutants could not be isolated but two independent knockdown T-DNA mutants were obtained. Growth and development of kos1 knockdown mutant plants was comparable to wild type when grown at 21°C. However, when grown at 4°C these mutants exhibited accelerated leaf yellowing and smaller rosette size than wild type. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that in the cold kos1 mutants had reduced expression of cold-responsive transcripts COR15A, COR15B, BAM3 and AMY3. Metabolite profiling revealed that ascorbate levels were lower in the mutants in the cold relative to wild type. KOS1 therefore represents a new gene that influences the regulation of transcript and metabolite levels in response to prolonged chilling temperatures.

  17. Local forest environment largely affects below-ground growth, clonal diversity and fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the temperate deciduous forest herb Paris quadrifolia.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Honnay, Olivier; Hermy, Martin; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel

    2005-12-01

    Paris quadrifolia (herb Paris) is a long-lived, clonal woodland herb that shows strong differences in local population size and shoot density along an environmental gradient of soil and light conditions. This environmentally based structuring may be mediated by differences in clonal growth and seedling recruitment through sexual reproduction. To study the interrelationship between environmental conditions and spatial patterns of clonal growth, the spatial genetic structure of four P. quadrifolia populations growing in strongly contrasting sites was determined. In the first place, plant excavations were performed in order to (i) determine differences in below-ground growth of genets, (ii) investigate connectedness of ramets and (iii) determine total genet size. Although no differences in internode length were found among sites, clones in moist sites were much smaller (genets usually consisted of 1-3 interconnected shoots, most of them flowering) than genets in dry sites, which consisted of up to 15 interconnected shoots, the majority of which were vegetative. Further, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used. Clonal diversity was higher in populations located in moist and productive ash-poplar forests compared to those found in drier and less productive mixed forest sites (G/N: 0.27 and 0.14 and Simpson's D: 0.84 and 0.75, respectively). Patterns of spatial population genetic structure under dry conditions revealed several large clones dominating the entire population, whereas in moist sites many small genets were observed. Nevertheless, strong spatial genetic structure of the genet population was observed. Our results clearly demonstrate that patterns of clonal diversity and growth form of P. quadrifolia differ among environments. Limited seedling recruitment and large clone sizes due to higher connectedness of ramets explain the low clonal diversity in dry sites. In moist sites, higher levels of clonal diversity and small clone sizes

  18. Initial Stage Affects Survival Even After Complete Pathologic Remission is Achieved in Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Analysis of 70 Patients With Pathologic Major Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Lee, Gin Hyug; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and factors predictive for recurrence and survival in patients with operable esophageal carcinoma who achieved pathologic complete response (PCR) or microscopic residual disease (MRD) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: Outcomes were assessed in 70 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who achieved pathologic major response (53 with PCR and 17 with MRD) after preoperative CRT. Results: At a median follow-up of 38.6 months for surviving patients, 17 of 70 patients (24.3%) experienced disease recurrence and 31 (44.3%) died. Clinical stage (II vs III; p = 0.013) and pathologic response (PCR vs. MRD; p = 0.014) were independent predictors of disease recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) was 99.6 months (95% CI, 44.1-155.1 months) and the 5-year OS rate was 57%. Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 71.5 months (95% CI, 39.5-103.6 months) and the 5-year RFS rate was 51.3%. Median OS of patients with Stage II and Stage III disease was 108.8 months and 39.9 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.0%, respectively (p = 0.0003). In a subgroup of patients with PCR, median OS and RFS were also significantly different according to clinical stage. Multivariate analysis showed that clinical stage was an independent predictor of RFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.008). Conclusions: Even though patients achieved major response after preoperative CRT, pretreatment clinical stage is an important prognostic marker for recurrence and survival. Patients with MRD have an increased recurrence risk but similar survival compared with patients achieved PCR.

  19. Mycobiome of the Bat White Nose Syndrome Affected Caves and Mines Reveals Diversity of Fungi and Local Adaptation by the Fungal Pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Sunanda S.; Li, Xiaojiang; Okoniewski, Joseph C.; Hicks, Alan C.; Davis, April D.; Broussard, Kelly; LaDeau, Shannon L.; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS) and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans (Pd) are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010–2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD) and culture-independent (CI) methods to catalogue all fungi (‘mycobiome’). CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS). The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture) even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR) suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS. PMID:25264864

  20. Local activation of uterine Toll-like receptor 2 and 2/6 decreases embryo implantation and affects uterine receptivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier Arturo; Caballero, Ignacio; Montazeri, Mehrnaz; Maslehat, Nasim; Elliott, Sarah; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Calle, Alexandra; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex interaction between maternal endometrium and embryonic structures. Failure to implant is highly recurrent and impossible to diagnose. Inflammation and infections in the female reproductive tract are common causes of infertility, embryo loss, and preterm labor. The current work describes how the activation of endometrial Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 2/6 reduces embryo implantation chances. We developed a morphometric index to evaluate the effects of the TLR 2/6 activation along the uterine horn (UH). TLR 2/6 ligation reduced the endometrial myometrial and glandular indexes and increased the luminal index. Furthermore, TLR 2/6 activation increased the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in UH lavages in the preimplantation day and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the implantation day. The engagement of TLR 2/6 with its ligand in the UH during embryo transfer severely affected the rate of embryonic implantation (45.00% ± 6.49% vs. 16.69% ± 5.01%, P < 0.05, control vs. test, respectively). Furthermore, this interference with the embryo implantation process was verified using an in vitro model of human embryo implantation where trophoblast spheroids failed to adhere to a monolayer of TLR 2- and TLR 2/6-activated endometrial cells. The inhibition of TLR receptors 2 and 6 in the presence of their specific ligands restored the ability of the spheroids to bind to the endometrial cells. In conclusion, the activation of the innate immune system in the uterus at the time of implantation interfered with the endometrial receptivity and reduced the chances of implantation success.

  1. Supporting Families: A Nurturing Teacher Education Strategy in Nauru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Terence; Serow, Penelope; Taylor, Neil; Angell, Emily; Tarrant, Jodana; Burnett, Greg; Smardon, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    There has been little recent documentation concerning Pacific family support for family members locally involved in university study in their Pacific home country and how such responses affect both parties. Some studies dealing with family support for student family members, including Pacific families residing in the USA, have been published. A…

  2. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D.

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Topical medication utilization and health resources consumption in adult patients affected by psoriasis: findings from the analysis of administrative databases of local health units

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Valentina; Sangiorgi, Diego; Buda, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Aim The objectives of this study were to: 1) analyze the drug utilization pattern among adult psoriasis patients who were newly prescribed with topical medication; and 2) assess their adherence to topical therapy and the possibility of switching to other strategies in the treatment process. Methods An observational retrospective analysis was conducted based on administrative databases of two Italian local health units. All adult subjects who were diagnosed with psoriasis or who were newly prescribed for topical medication with at least one prescription between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014, were screened. Only patients who were “non-occasional users of topical drugs” (if they had at least two prescriptions of topical drugs in a time space of 2 years) were considered for the first and second objectives in the analysis. The date of the first prescription of topical agents was identified as the index date (ID), which was then followed for all time available from ID (follow-up period). The adherence to therapy was assessed on the basis of cycles of treatment covered in the 6 months before the end of the follow-up period. The mean health care costs in patients who switched to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or biologics after the ID were evaluated. Results A total of 17,860 patients with psoriasis who were newly prescribed for topical medication were identified. A total of 2,477 were identified as “non-occasional users of topical drugs”, of whom 70.2% had a prescription for a topical fixed combination regimen at ID. Around 19% adhered to their medication, whereas 6% switched to other options of psoriasis treatment. Multivariable logistic regression model shows that patients on fixed combination treatment were less likely to be non-adherent to treatment and less likely to switch to other treatments. The annual mean pharmaceutical costs were €567.70 and €10,606.10 for patients who switched to DMARDs and biologics, respectively

  4. Enhancing Decision Support For Climate Adaptation At Sub-Regional To Local Scales Through Collaborative And Interdisciplinary Global Change Research And Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, J. C.; Katzenberger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The science needed to inform society's response to global environmental change is increasingly demanded at sub-regional to local scales, placing a greater burden on the science community to respond to a wide variety of information needs. Oftentimes, communication barriers prevent even the basic articulation of information needs between the user and science research communities, and furthermore there is frequently a mismatch between available scientific talent within a sub region and the scientific resources demanded to respond appropriately to user inquiries. As a result, innovative approaches to the delivery of scientific information in response to user interests and needs at sub-regional to local levels is required. Here, the authors highlight lessons of three examples of delivering usable scientific information within a mountain watershed on questions relating to 1) local biomass energy production; 2) stream and forest health; and 3) watershed scale climate impacts assessment. We report that common elements to the success of these efforts include a) building relationships with both a broad range of disciplines within the science community as well as a wide range of stakeholder groups locally, b) collecting and translating existing monitoring data and filling monitoring gaps, c) gathering interdisciplinary teams to help answer difficult local scale questions not previously treated in literature, and d) communicating results through mechanisms such as stakeholder collaboratives, community forums, and innovative education and outreach products. We find that these components help communities at local to sub-regional scales identify vulnerabilities and adapative strategies.

  5. Autism as a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting communication and learning in early childhood: prenatal origins, post-natal course and effective educational support.

    PubMed

    Trevarthen, C

    2000-01-01

    Colwyn Trevarthen, working on autism, discussed the importance of time, rhythm and temporal processing in brain function. The brains of new born infants show highly coherent and coordinated patterns of activity over time, and their rhythms are remarkably similar to those of adults. Since the cortex has not yet developed, this coordination must be subcortical in origin. The likely source is the emotional motor system. He noted that the cerebellum might regulate the intricate timing of the development and expression of emotional communication. He also pointed out that emotional and motivational factors have often been seriously neglected in psychology (largely owing to a misplaced focus on 'cognition' as some isolated entity) and emphasized the potential importance of empathetic support and music therapy in helping autistic children.

  6. Different intervals of ovum pick-up affect the competence of oocytes to support the preimplantation development of cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li-Jun; Tian, Hai-Bin; Wang, Jing-Jun; Chen, Juan; Sha, Hong-Ying; Chen, Jian-Quan; Cheng, Guo-Xiang

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different frequencies of transvaginal ovum pick-up (OPU) on the quantity of recovered cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and subsequently the competence of matured oocytes to support the preimplantation development of cloned bovine embryos. The COCs were aspirated from the ovaries of 6 Chinese Holstein cows by transvaginal follicle aspiration twice a week (every 3 or 4 days) (Group I), every 5 days (Group II), once a week (every 7 days) (Group III), every 10 days (Group IV), and once every 2 weeks (every 14 days) (Group V). The developmental stages of the follicles were confirmed by the diameter of the dominant follicle (DF) and harvested COCs, and the dynamics of the follicular wave were clarified. In addition, extrusions of the first polar body (PB I) from the oocytes were observed at different time intervals after the initiation of in vitro maturation (IVM) to identify the appropriate culture time window for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Matured oocytes were used to produce cloned bovine embryos that were subsequently cultured in the goat oviduct. After 7 days, the embryos were flushed out, and the developmental rates of the blastocysts were compared among the five groups. The results showed that the aspirations of all follicles >or=3 mm in diameter (D1) induced and synchronized the dynamics of the follicular wave, and the subordinate follicles became atretic after 4 days (D5). Another follicular wave started between D7 and D10, and atresia in the subordinate follicles in the second follicular wave began on D14. The timing of meiotic progression (from the initiation of IVM to the extrusion of PB I) in the oocytes obtained by OPU was later than that of the oocytes obtained from the abattoir. Between 20 and 24 hr after the initiation of IVM, 20% of the oocytes extruded their PB I. Further, 80% (520/650) of the harvested COCs were arrested at metaphase II (MII) by 22 hr of the initiation of IVM and were used

  7. Paranasal bone: the prime factor affecting the decision to use transsinus vs zygomatic implants for biomechanical support for immediate function in maxillary dental implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole T; Adams, Mark W; Smith, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Paranasal bone affects the decision-making process for placement of implants for immediate function in the highly resorbed maxilla. The most important bone for apical fixation of implants in this setting is the lateral nasal bone mass. Maximum available bone mass found at the pyriform above the nasal fossa, designated M point, can most often engage two implants placed at 30-degree angles. The second most important area of paranasal bone mass is the subnasal bone of the premaxilla, which is required to engage an angled implant at the alveolar crest. However, only 4 to 5 mm in height is needed when implants are angled posterior to engage M point. The third most important paranasal bone site for implant fixation is the midline nasal crest extending upward to the vomer. This site, which is usually type 1/2 bone, can engage implants apically and provide enough fixation for immediate function even if implants are short. These anatomical bone sites enable placement of implants to obtain a 12- to 15-mm anterior-posterior spread, which is favorable for immediate function.

  8. Earth Observation and Indicators Pertaining to Determinants of Health- An Approach to Support Local Scale Characterization of Environmental Determinants of Vector-Borne Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchi, Serge Olivier; Brazeau, Stephanie; Ludwig, Antoinette; Aube, Guy; Berthiaume, Pilippe

    2016-08-01

    Environmental determinants (EVDs) were identified as key determinant of health (DoH) for the emergence and re-emergence of several vector-borne diseases. Maintaining ongoing acquisition of data related to EVDs at local scale and for large regions constitutes a significant challenge. Earth observation (EO) satellites offer a framework to overcome this challenge. However, EO image analysis methods commonly used to estimate EVDs are time and resource consuming. Moreover, variations of microclimatic conditions combined with high landscape heterogeneity limit the effectiveness of climatic variables derived from EO. In this study, we present what are DoH and EVDs, the impacts of EVDs on vector-borne diseases in the context of global environmental change, the need to characterize EVDs of vector-borne diseases at local scale and its challenges, and finally we propose an approach based on EO images to estimate at local scale indicators pertaining to EVDs of vector-borne diseases.

  9. Does an Open Recirculation Line Affect the Flow Rate and Pressure in a Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support Circuit With a Centrifugal or Roller Pump?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Spencer, Shannon B; Woitas, Karl; Glass, Kristen; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of an open or closed recirculation line on flow rate, circuit pressure, and hemodynamic energy transmission in simulated neonatal extracorporeal life support (ECLS) systems. The two neonatal ECLS circuits consisted of a Maquet HL20 roller pump (RP group) or a RotaFlow centrifugal pump (CP group), Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator, and Biomedicus arterial and venous cannulae (8 Fr and 10 Fr) primed with lactated Ringer's solution and packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 200 to 600 mL/min (200 mL/min increments) with a closed or open recirculation line at 36°C. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. In the RP group, the preoxygenator flow did not change when the recirculation line was open while the prearterial cannula flow decreased by 15.7-20.0% (P < 0.01). Circuit pressure, total circuit pressure drop, and hemodynamic energy delivered to patients also decreased (P < 0.01). In the CP group, the prearterial cannula flow did not change while preoxygenator flow increased by 13.6-18.8% (P < 0.01). Circuit pressure drop and hemodynamic energy transmission remained the same. The results showed that the shunt of an open recirculation line could decrease perfusion flow in patients in the ECLS circuit using a roller pump, but did not change perfusion flow in the circuit using a centrifugal pump. An additional flow sensor is needed to monitor perfusion flow in patients if any shunts exist in the ECLS circuit.

  10. The PIP training programme: building of ACP experts capacities in crop protection and food safety to support local companies to comply with EU regulations on pesticides residues.

    PubMed

    Schiffers, B C; Schubert, A; Schiffers, C; Fontaine, S; Gumusboga, N; Werner, B; Webb, M; Lugros, H; Stinglhamber, G

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory requirements, and in particular phytosanitary quality standards change rapidly. As ACP producers/exporters race to become more competitive, to keep their market share and to satisfay their customers' commercial demands (e.g. EUREP-GAP certification), the need for competent staff who are aware of the company's quality objectives and trained to follow instructions is crucial. Mastering sanitary quality is only possible if matched with a programme to build the skills of companies' human resources. The Pesticide Initiative Programme (PIP), mindful of the importance of making operators autonomous and of training them to monitor EU food safety regulations and technology on their own, has successfully developed a training programme while building a quality network of local/ACP service providers. By building the capacities of ACP experts and then securing their services as trainers, PIP also guarantees companies' access to expertise and the sustainability of their efforts to comply with new EU regulations. The training strategy developed by PIP rests on two pilars: instructor training and collective training. Instructor training consists in reinforcing the technical knowledge of local experts (agronomists, hygienists, etc.) by providing them with active teaching methods. Once the ACP experts have gained enough technical knowledge of the key areas of crop protection--mainly pesticides management--and food safety, and have demonstrated their capacity to train the technical staff of local companies, the PIP has carried out a collective training programme in 2004, 2005 and 2006. To date, more than 130 consultants covering about 15 ACP countries have received instructor training, and more than 700 people have participated in collective and in-company training sessions.

  11. Support for a link between the local processing bias and social deficits in autism: an investigation of embedded figures test performance in non-clinical individuals.

    PubMed

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N; Maybery, Murray T; Bayliss, Donna M; Sng, Adelln A H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the degree to which specific subsets of autistic-like traits relate to performance on the Embedded Figures Test (Witkin et al. in A manual for the embedded figures test. Consulting Psychologists Press, Palo Alto, CA, 1971). In the first group-based investigation with this focus, students were selected for their extreme scores (either high or low) on each of the 'Social Skills' and 'Details/Patterns' factors of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al. in J Austim Dev Disord 31:5-17, 2001). The resulting 2 × 2 factorial design permitted examination of the degree to which the social and non-social autistic-like traits separately relate to EFT performance. Surprisingly, in two studies, superior EFT performance was found to relate only to greater social difficulty, suggesting that the local processing bias in autism may be linked specifically to the social deficits.

  12. Incorporating Medium-Range Weather Forecasts in Seasonal Crop Scenarios over the Greater Horn of Africa to Support National/Regional/Local Decision Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S.; Husak, G. J.; Funk, C. C.; Verdin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The USAID's Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) provides seasonal assessments of crop conditions over the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) and other food insecure regions. These assessments and current livelihood, nutrition, market conditions and conflicts are used to generate food security scenarios that help national, regional and local decision makers target their resources and mitigate socio-economic losses. Among the various tools that FEWS NET uses is the FAO's Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI). The WRSI is a simple yet powerful crop assessment model that incorporates current moisture conditions (at the time of the issuance of forecast), precipitation scenarios, potential evapotranspiration and crop parameters to categorize crop conditions into different classes ranging from "failure" to "very good". The WRSI tool has been shown to have a good agreement with local crop yields in the GHA region. At present, the precipitation scenarios used to drive the WRSI are based on either a climatological forecast (that assigns equal chances of occurrence to all possible scenarios and has no skill over the forecast period) or a sea-surface temperature anomaly based scenario (which at best have skill at the seasonal scale). In both cases, the scenarios fail to capture the skill that can be attained by initial atmospheric conditions (i.e., medium-range weather forecasts). During the middle of a cropping season, when a week or two of poor rains can have a devastating effect, two weeks worth of skillful precipitation forecasts could improve the skill of the crop scenarios. With this working hypothesis, we examine the value of incorporating medium-range weather forecasts in improving the skill of crop scenarios in the GHA region. We use the NCEP's Global Ensemble Forecast system (GEFS) weather forecasts and examine the skill of crop scenarios generated using the GEFS weather forecasts with respect to the scenarios based solely on the climatological forecast

  13. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    PubMed Central

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively. PMID:27630511

  14. Variation in photosynthetic performance and hydraulic architecture across European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations supports the case for local adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Ismael; Cano, Francisco Javier; Gascó, Antonio; Cochard, Hervé; Nardini, Andrea; Mancha, Jose Antonio; López, Rosana; Sánchez-Gómez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide new insights into how intraspecific variability in the response of key functional traits to drought dictates the interplay between gas-exchange parameters and the hydraulic architecture of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Considering the relationships between hydraulic and leaf functional traits, we tested whether local adaptation to water stress occurs in this species. To address these objectives, we conducted a glasshouse experiment in which 2-year-old saplings from six beech populations were subjected to different watering treatments. These populations encompassed central and marginal areas of the range, with variation in macro- and microclimatic water availability. The results highlight subtle but significant differences among populations in their functional response to drought. Interpopulation differences in hydraulic traits suggest that vulnerability to cavitation is higher in populations with higher sensitivity to drought. However, there was no clear relationship between variables related to hydraulic efficiency, such as xylem-specific hydraulic conductivity or stomatal conductance, and those that reflect resistance to xylem cavitation (i.e., Ψ(12), the water potential corresponding to a 12% loss of stem hydraulic conductivity). The results suggest that while a trade-off between photosynthetic capacity at the leaf level and hydraulic function of xylem could be established across populations, it functions independently of the compromise between safety and efficiency of the hydraulic system with regard to water use at the interpopulation level.

  15. Support for a 'Center of Origin' in the Coral Triangle: cryptic diversity, recent speciation, and local endemism in a diverse lineage of reef fishes (Gobiidae: Eviota).

    PubMed

    Tornabene, Luke; Valdez, Samantha; Erdmann, Mark; Pezold, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Coral Triangle is widely regarded as the richest marine biodiversity hot-spot in the world. One factor that has been proposed to explain elevated species-richness within the Coral Triangle is a high rate of in situ speciation within the region itself. Dwarfgobies (Gobiidae: Eviota) are a diverse genus of diminutive cryptobenthic reef fishes with limited dispersal ability, and life histories and ecologies that increase potential for speciation. We use molecular phylogenetic and biogeographic data from two clades of Eviota species to examine patterns, processes and timing associated with species origination within the Coral Triangle. Sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA were used to generate molecular phylogenies and median-joining haplotype networks for the genus Eviota, with emphasis on the E. nigriventris and E. bifasciata complexes - two species groups with distributions centered in the Coral Triangle. The E. nigriventris and E. bifasciata complexes both contain multiple genetically distinct, geographically restricted color morphs indicative of recently-diverged species originating within the Coral Triangle. Relaxed molecular-clock dating estimates indicate that most speciation events occurred within the Pleistocene, and the geographic pattern of genetic breaks between species corresponds well with similar breaks in other marine fishes and sessile invertebrates. Regional isolation due to sea-level fluctuations may explain some speciation events in these species groups, yet other species formed with no evidence of physical isolation. The timing of diversification events and present day distributions of Eviota species within the Coral Triangle suggest that both allopatric speciation (driven by ephemeral and/or 'soft' physical barriers to gene flow) and sympatric speciation (driven by niche partitioning and assortative mating) may be driving diversification at local scales within the Coral Triangle. The presence of multiple young, highly

  16. Aging in Sweden: local variation, local control.

    PubMed

    Davey, Adam; Malmberg, Bo; Sundström, Gerdt

    2014-08-01

    Aging in Sweden has been uniquely shaped by its history-most notably the long tradition of locally controlled services for older adults. We considered how local variations and local control shape the experience of aging in Sweden and organized the paper into 3 sections. First, we examine aging in Sweden along demography, economy, and housing. Next, we trace the origins and development of the Swedish welfare state to consider formal supports (service provision) and informal supports (caregiving and receipt of care). Finally, we direct researchers to additional data resources for understanding aging in Sweden in greater depth. Sweden was one of the first countries to experience rapid population aging. Quality of life for a majority of older Swedes is high. Local control permits a flexible and adaptive set of services and programs, where emphasis is placed on improving the quality and targeting of services that have already reached a plateau as a function of population and expenditures.

  17. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  18. Governance reform, external support, and environmental regulation enforcement in rural China: the case of Guangdong province.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shui-Yan; Lo, Carlos Wing-Hung; Fryxell, Gerald E

    2010-10-01

    This paper examines how configurations of external support factors have evolved alongside governance reform in recent years and how these evolving configurations have affected regulatory enforcement in four counties in Guangdong Province in China. Based on in-depth interviews with leading officials in the local environmental protection bureaus (EPBs), we show that there have been increases in government and societal support for local EPBs in their regulatory work, thanks partly to a number of recent governance reform efforts, but many problems have remained. Based on a questionnaire survey of enforcement officials, we examine how the perceptions of government and societal support are related to EPB officials' self-perception of effectiveness. It is found that both local government support and societal support have an influence on enforcement officials' self-assessment of effectiveness, but the relationships varied considerably depending on various dimensions of effectiveness and the patterns of interactions between government and societal support.

  19. Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ETSC is EPA’s technical support and resource centers responsible for providing specialized scientific and engineering support to decision-makers in the Agency’s ten regional offices, states, communities, and local businesses.

  20. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially–locally

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. Schütz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, “local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate].” This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835–871 (2012)], relying on the “spectral flow technique” or “quasi-adiabatic continuation” [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique “bulk ground state” or “topological quantum order.” We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  1. Anticipation of Local Epidemics Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivy, Ivan

    2008-10-01

    Local epidemics are systems where temporary elements (infected ones) are distributed over a hexagonal or rectangular network of permanent elements (humans). Their relation of being neighbors is considered to be constant. The systems of this type can occur in rest homes, institutes of social care, nursery schools, summer camps, prisons, etc. The process of the infection propagation depends on the neighborhood relation and on the actual distance of the neighbors. It is influenced by delays during the transitive affecting the people and by random effects, the size of which can be diminished by the intervention of health care service. The anticipation of the health care intervention effects was supported by simulation models implemented by means of the object-oriented programming.

  2. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  3. The Golgi-localization of yeast Emp47p depends on its di-lysine motif but is not affected by the ret1-1 mutation in alpha-COP

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae EMP47 gene encodes a nonessential type-I transmembrane protein with sequence homology to a class of intracellular lectins defined by ERGIC-53 and VIP36. The 12-amino acid COOH-terminal cytoplasmic tail of Emp47p ends in the sequence KTKLL, which conforms with the consensus for di-lysine-based ER-localization signals. Despite the presence of this motif, Emp47p was shown to be a Golgi protein at steady-state. The di-lysine motif of Emp47p was functional when transplanted onto Ste2p, a plasma membrane protein, conferring ER localization. Nevertheless, the di-lysine motif was required for Golgi-localization of Emp47p and showed the same charge- independent, position-dependent characteristics of other di-lysine motifs. Alpha-COP has been shown to be required for ER localization of di-lysine-tagged proteins. Consistent with this finding, the Ste2p- Emp47p hybrid protein was mislocalized to the cell surface in the alpha- COP mutant, ret1-1. Surprisingly, the Golgi-localization of Emp47p was unaffected by the ret1-1 mutation. To investigate whether Emp47p undergoes retrograde transport from the Golgi to the ER like other di- lysine-tagged proteins we developed an assay to measure this step after block of forward transport in a sec12 mutant. Under these conditions retrograde transport led to a specific redistribution of Emp47p from the Golgi to the ER. This recycling occurred from a Golgi subcompartment containing alpha 1,3 mannose-modified oligosaccharides suggesting that it originated from a medial-or later Golgi compartment. Thus Emp47p cycles between the Golgi apparatus and the ER and requires a di-lysine motif for its alpha-COP-independent, steady state localization in the Golgi. PMID:7490292

  4. Identification of support conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Simmermacher, T.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.G.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, a support and preload system is presented in which the frequencies and damping of the test article are affected by the stiffness and damping of the supporting structure. A dynamic model is derived for the support system that includes the damping as well as the mass and stiffness of the supports. The frequencies, damping, and mode shapes are compared with the experimentally determined parameters. It is shown that for a seemingly simple support system, deriving a predictive model is not a trival task.

  5. Quality user support: Supporting quality users

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    During the past decade, fundamental changes have occurred in technical computing in the oil industry. Technical computing systems have moved from local, fragmented quantity, to global, integrated, quality. The compute power available to the average geoscientist at his desktop has grown exponentially. Technical computing applications have increased in integration and complexity. At the same time, there has been a significant change in the work force due to the pressures of restructuring, and the increased focus on international opportunities. The profile of the user of technical computing resources has changed. Users are generally more mature, knowledgeable, and team oriented than their predecessors. In the 1990s, computer literacy is a requirement. This paper describes the steps taken by Oryx Energy Company to address the problems and opportunities created by the explosive growth in computing power and needs, coupled with the contraction of the business. A successful user support strategy will be described. Characteristics of the program include: (1) Client driven support; (2) Empowerment of highly skilled professionals to fill the support role; (3) Routine and ongoing modification to the support plan; (4) Utilization of the support assignment to create highly trained advocates on the line; (5) Integration of the support role to the reservoir management team. Results of the plan include a highly trained work force, stakeholder teams that include support personnel, and global support from a centralized support organization.

  6. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience.

  7. Chronic Prostatitis Affects Male Reproductive Health and Is Associated with Systemic and Local Epigenetic Inactivation of C-X-C Motif Chemokine 12 Receptor C-X-C Chemokine Receptor Type 4.

    PubMed

    Schagdarsurengin, Undraga; Teuchert, Lisa M; Hagenkötter, Christina; Nesheim, Nils; Dansranjavin, Temuujin; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Gies, Sabrina; Pilatz, Adrian; Weidner, Wolfgang; Wagenlehner, Florian M E

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims/Objectives: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) has detrimental effects on the quality of life including the aspect of sexual dysfunction. The aim of the study was to identify if there was an adverse effect on the male genital compartment and if there are systemic or compartment-specific local signals for epigenetic dysregulation of inflammatory factors in CP/CPPS patients.

  8. Interaural Coherence and Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric

    2006-10-01

    In a study of the relationship between interaural coherence and localization ability, two experiments were performed. Both made use of a 1/3 octave band of low frequency sound and a 1/3 octave band of high frequency sound. Stimuli with coherences ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 were created in three recording environments using a KEMAR and digitally altered to eliminate interaural level differences (ILD). The environments had short, medium, and long reverberation times. The coherences were measured and were accurate to one significant figure. Experiment 1 had two goals: to determine the relationship between interaural coherence and the ability to localize using interaural time differences (ITD) and to determine if localization ability was dependent only on coherence. The relationship between coherence and localization was tested in a headphone lateralization experiment in which psychometric functions were generated. The functions revealed a linear relationship, with the ability to localize high coherence sounds breaking down quickly at small ITD. Within standard error, ITD localization appeared to be dependent only on coherence. In Experiment 2, a 3-down 1-up staircase method was employed to determine how opposing ILDs affected ITD localization. When the task could be completed, the threshold values were linearly related, however, the ability broke down at large ILDs. Both experiments provide a linear description of interaural coherence and localization, with thresholds being sharp deviations from these trends.

  9. Local gravitomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1990-10-01

    In a simple two-body system, the gravitomagnetic components of the metric in the local quasi-inertial frame of one of the bodies is calculated. The local geometry in this frame which is freely falling along the geodesic but is directionally fixed with respect to distant stars is primarily defined by the gravitomagnetic components of the local metric. This metric serves to track down the various contributions from the local and distant source and thus provides further insight to the nature of gravitomagnetism. As a result it is shown that in the quasi-inertial frame geodetic precession is a gravitomagnetic phenomenon. Furthermore a connection between local gravitomagnetic effects and Einstein's principle of equivalence is established.

  10. The Army’s Local Economic Effects: Appendix B, Volume II: Mississippi Through Wyoming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Office asked the RAND Arroyo Center to provide an empirical understanding of how Army spending affects communities and states. This report presents...findings from RAND Arroyo Center research on the economic activity supported by Army spending at the local level.

  11. Spin Alignment in Analogues of The Local Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conidis, George J.

    2016-10-01

    Tidal torque theory and simulations of large scale structure predict spin vectors of massive galaxies should be coplanar with sheets in the cosmic web. Recently demonstrated, the giants (K s <= -22.5 mag) in the Local Volume beyond the Local Sheet have spin vectors directed close to the plane of the Local Supercluster, supporting the predictions of Tidal Torque Theory. However, the giants in the Local Sheet encircling the Local Group display a distinctly different arrangement, suggesting that the mass asymmetry of the Local Group or its progenitor torqued them from their primordial spin directions. To investigate the origin of the spin alignment of giants locally, analogues of the Local Sheet were identified in the SDSS DR9. Similar to the Local Sheet, analogues have an interacting pair of disk galaxies isolated from the remaining sheet members. Modified sheets in which there is no interacting pair of disk galaxies were identified as a control sample. Galaxies in face-on control sheets do not display axis ratios predominantly weighted toward low values, contrary to the expectation of tidal torque theory. For face-on and edge-on sheets, the distribution of axis ratios for galaxies in analogues is distinct from that in controls with a confidence of 97.6% & 96.9%, respectively. This corroborates the hypothesis that an interacting pair can affect spin directions of neighbouring galaxies.

  12. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    PubMed

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery.

  13. Mutations of amino acids in the DNA-recognition domain of Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein alter its sub-nuclear localization and affect formation of replication compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Shedd, Duane; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2008-12-20

    ZEBRA, a transcription factor and DNA replication protein encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene, plays indispensable roles in the EBV lytic cycle. We recently described the phenotypes of 46 single amino acid substitutions introduced into the DNA-recognition region of ZEBRA [Heston, L., El-Guindy, A., Countryman, J., Dela Cruz, C., Delecluse, H.J., and Miller, G. 2006]. The 27 DNA-binding-proficient mutants exhibited distinct defects in their ability to activate expression of the kinetic classes of viral genes. Four phenotypic variants could be discerned: wild-type, defective at activating Rta, defective at activating early genes, and defective at activating late genes. Here we analyze the distribution of ZEBRA within the nucleus and the localization of EA-D (the viral DNA polymerase processivity factor), an indicator of the development of replication compartments, in representatives of each phenotypic group. Plasmids encoding wild-type (WT) and mutant ZEBRA were transfected into 293 cells containing EBV-bacmids. WT ZEBRA protein was diffusely and smoothly distributed throughout the nucleus, sparing nucleoli, and partially recruited to globular replication compartments. EA-D induced by WT ZEBRA was present diffusely in some cells and concentrated in globular replication compartments in other cells. The distribution of ZEBRA and EA-D proteins was identical to WT following transfection of K188R, a mutant with a conservative change. The distribution of S186A mutant ZEBRA protein, defective for activation of Rta and EA-D, was identical to WT, except that the mutant ZEBRA was never found in globular compartments. Co-expression of Rta with S186A mutant rescued diffuse EA-D but not globular replication compartments. The most striking observation was that several mutant ZEBRA proteins defective in activating EA-D (R179A, K181A and A185V) and defective in activating lytic viral DNA replication and late genes (Y180E and K188A) were localized to numerous punctate

  14. Can local communities 'sustain' HIV/AIDS programmes? A South African example.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Andrew; Campbell, Catherine; Maimane, Sbongile

    2015-03-01

    Globally, there is a renewed interest in building the local sustainability of HIV/AIDS programmes to ensure that once funders withdraw, local communities can sustain programmes. While the 'local sustainability assumption' is widespread, little research has assessed this. In this article, we assess the sustainability of the Entabeni Project, a community-based intervention that sought to build women's local leadership and capacity to respond to HIV/AIDS through a group of volunteer carers, 3 years after external support was withdrawn. Overall, the sustainability of the Entabeni Project was limited. The wider social and political context undermined volunteer carers' sense that they could affect change, with little external support for them from government and NGOs, who struggled to engage with local community organizations. At the community level, some church leaders and community members recognized the important role of health volunteers, many continued to devalue the work of the carers, especially once there was no external organization to support and validate their work. Within the health volunteer group, despite extensive efforts to change dynamics, it remained dominated by a local male leader who denied others active participation while lacking the skills to meaningfully lead the project. Our case study suggests that the local-sustainability assumption is wishful thinking. Small-scale local projects are unlikely to be able to challenge the broader social and political dynamics hindering their sustainability without meaningful external support.

  15. Coping and social support for parents of children with autism.

    PubMed

    Luther, Edith H; Canham, Daryl L; Young Cureton, Virginia

    2005-02-01

    Autism in children has increased significantly in the past 15 years. The challenges and stressors associated with providing services and caring for a child with autism affect families, educators, and health professionals. This descriptive study used a survey to collect data on parents' perceptions of coping strategies and social support. Instruments included the Social Support Index and the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales. One half of the families identified serious stressors in addition to autism. Acquiring social support and reframing were the most frequently used coping strategies. The school nurse is in a position to identify needs and refer families to local support groups and agencies, facilitating social support and development of coping strategies.

  16. Engaging local businesses in HIV prevention efforts: the consumer perspective.

    PubMed

    Phillips-Guzman, Christina M; Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Hovell, Melbourne F; Blumberg, Elaine J; Sipan, Carol L; Rovniak, Liza S; Kelley, Norma J

    2011-07-01

    Participation of different community sectors, including the private business sector, is necessary to fight the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Local businesses may be reluctant to participate in HIV prevention because of fear of negative customer reactions and loss of revenue. This study examines the extent to which residents of two communities in San Diego, California, would support HIV prevention initiatives in local businesses. A population-based household survey (N = 200) is conducted in two communities with higher versus lower risk for HIV. The survey includes questions regarding the acceptability of HIV prevention activities, such as condom and brochure distribution in businesses, and history of exposure to HIV prevention activities in local businesses. Most residents agree that (a) business involvement in prevention activities would reduce HIV (92%), (b) free or low-cost condoms available in businesses could prevent the spread of HIV (90.9%) and increase condom accessibility (87%), and (c) they would prefer to shop at businesses that supported HIV prevention versus those that did not (87.4%). These findings suggest that HIV prevention in local businesses would be supported by residents and would be unlikely to adversely affect business profits. This information could be used to design interventions to engage local businesses in HIV-prevention efforts.

  17. Nutritional Support

    MedlinePlus

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in ...

  18. Arts Inspire Community Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dan W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Southeastern Community College's efforts to focus on the arts, which included a campus visit by the artist Kenneth Larson and events centered on his Heroic Individual prints; a performing arts series supported by local corporations; an Associate in Fine Arts degree; regular art exhibits; and an artist-in-residence program. (DMM)

  19. The Affective Regulation of Cognitive Priming

    PubMed Central

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L.

    2008-01-01

    Semantic and affective priming are classic effects observed in cognitive and social psychology, respectively. We discovered that affect regulates such priming effects. In Experiment 1, positive and negative moods were induced prior to one of three priming tasks; evaluation, categorization, or lexical decision. As predicted, positive affect led to both affective priming (evaluation task) and semantic priming (category and lexical decision tasks). However, negative affect inhibited such effects. In Experiment 2, participants in their natural affective state completed the same priming tasks as in Experiment 1. As expected, affective priming (evaluation task) and category priming (categorization and lexical decision tasks) were observed in such resting affective states. Hence, we conclude that negative affect inhibits semantic and affective priming. These results support recent theoretical models, which suggest that positive affect promotes associations among strong and weak concepts, and that negative affect impairs such associations (Kuhl, 2000; Clore & Storbeck, 2006). PMID:18410195

  20. Affective Commitment among Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Student affairs professionals in the United States were surveyed to determine the predictive value of overall job satisfaction, organizational support, organizational politics, and work/nonwork interaction on affective organizational commitment. Results indicate that a supportive work environment leads to increased affective attachment to the…

  1. Local Employment Initiatives: Some Recent Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenstler, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Intergovernmental and governmental measures to promote local employment initiatives are underway in Europe. Local authorities are assuming responsibility for economic development in their areas, and the private sector is providing direct or indirect support. (SK)

  2. Cancer support groups: a critical review of empirical studies.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Benjamin H; Wachala, Elizabeth D

    2007-05-01

    Support groups for adults affected by cancer are widely offered by local community and national agencies in North America. This type of psychosocial intervention is defined in terms of its structure and functions, and its theoretical underpinnings and models of practice are described. Forty-four empirical studies of professionally led cancer support groups are summarized and critically reviewed. These studies include 32 outcome evaluations of randomized controlled trials, two process evaluations, and 10 consumer satisfaction studies. The findings reveal high levels of consumer satisfaction, and the outcome evaluations substantiate the morale and other quality of life benefits short of prolonging life. Discussion centers on priorities for future research and practice.

  3. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  4. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (LR) inhibitor, NSC47924, affects 37/67kDa LR cell surface localization and interaction with the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarnataro, Daniela; Pepe, Anna; Altamura, Gennaro; De Simone, Imma; Pesapane, Ada; Nitsch, Lucio; Montuori, Nunzia; Lavecchia, Antonio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The 37/67 kDa laminin receptor (LR) is a non-integrin protein, which binds both laminin-1 of the extracellular matrix and prion proteins, that hold a central role in prion diseases. The 37/67 kDa LR has been identified as interactor for the prion protein (PrPC) and to be required for pathological PrP (PrPSc) propagation in scrapie-infected neuronal cells, leading to the possibility that 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction is related to the pathogenesis of prion diseases. A relationship between 37/67 kDa LR and PrPC in the presence of specific LR inhibitor compounds has not been investigated yet. We have characterized the trafficking of 37/67 kDa LR in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, finding the receptor on the cell surface and nuclei, and identified the 67 kDa LR as the almost exclusive isoform interacting with PrPC. Here, we show that the treatment with the 37/67 kDa LR inhibitor, NSC47924, affects both the direct 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction in vitro and the formation of the immunocomplex in live cells, inducing a progressive internalization of 37/67 kDa LR and stabilization of PrPC on the cell surface. These data reveal NSC47924 as a useful tool to regulate PrPC and 37/67 kDa LR trafficking and degradation, representing a novel small molecule to be tested against prion diseases. PMID:27071549

  5. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  6. Peer Support.

    PubMed

    Forchuk, Cheryl; Solomon, Michelle; Viran, Tazim

    2016-01-01

    The Mental Health Commission of Canada defines peer support as "a supportive relationship between people who have a lived experience in common … in relation to a mental health challenge or illness … related to their own mental health or that of a loved one" (Sunderland et al. 2013: 11). In Ontario, a key resource for peer support is the Ontario Peer Development Initiative (OPDI), which is an umbrella organization of mental health Consumer/Survivor Initiatives (CSIs) and peer support organizations across the province of Ontario. Member organizations are run by and for people with lived experience of a mental health or addiction issue and provide a wide range of services and activities within their communities. The central tenet of member organizations is the common understanding that people can and do recover with the proper supports in place and that peer support is integral to successful recovery. Nationally, Peer Support Accreditation and Certification Canada has recently been established. The relatively new national organization focuses on training and accrediting peer support workers. This paper focuses on a range of diverse peer support groups and CSIs that operate in London and surrounding areas.

  7. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  8. Supporting Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesaux, Nonie K.; Burkhauser, Mary A.; Kelley, Joan G.

    2013-01-01

    Material resources, personalized support, time to collaborate, and strong principal leadership are necessary for making curricular and instructional shifts. The authors of this article share the lessons they learned about supporting implementation of the Common Core State Standards. They draw on interviews with teachers, as well as field notes…

  9. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the…

  10. Current State and Local Initiatives To Support Student Learning: Early Childhood Programs and Innovative Programs To Better Address the Needs of Youth. Selected Presentations from an "Ensuring Student Success through Collaboration Network" Conference (Louisville, Kentucky, September 12-15, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Burton

    The Ensuring Student Success Through Collaboration Network, administered by the Council of Chief State School Officers, is comprised of teams of state and local leaders from Arkansas, California, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Oregon, and Washington and works to connect education improvement efforts with other human service reforms, economic…

  11. Thermal support for scale support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal design work completed for the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the Space Shuttle System (TPS) of the space shuttle vehicle was documented. This work was divided into three phases, the first two of which reported in previous documents. About 22 separate tasks were completed in phase III, such as: hot gas facility (HGF) support, guarded tank support, shuttle external tank (ET) thermal design handbook support, etc.

  12. Representing properties locally.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K O; Barsalou, L W

    2001-09-01

    Theories of knowledge such as feature lists, semantic networks, and localist neural nets typically use a single global symbol to represent a property that occurs in multiple concepts. Thus, a global symbol represents mane across HORSE, PONY, and LION. Alternatively, perceptual theories of knowledge, as well as distributed representational systems, assume that properties take different local forms in different concepts. Thus, different local forms of mane exist for HORSE, PONY, and LION, each capturing the specific form that mane takes in its respective concept. Three experiments used the property verification task to assess whether properties are represented globally or locally (e.g., Does a PONY have mane?). If a single global form represents a property, then verifying it in any concept should increase its accessibility and speed its verification later in any other concept. Verifying mane for PONY should benefit as much from having verified mane for LION earlier as from verifying mane for HORSE. If properties are represented locally, however, verifying a property should only benefit from verifying a similar form earlier. Verifying mane for PONY should only benefit from verifying mane for HORSE, not from verifying mane for LION. Findings from three experiments strongly supported local property representation and ruled out the interpretation that object similarity was responsible (e.g., the greater overall similarity between HORSE and PONY than between LION and PONY). The findings further suggest that property representation and verification are complicated phenomena, grounded in sensory-motor simulations.

  13. Structural Investigation of Au Catalysts on TiO2-SiO2 Supports: Nature of the Local Structure of Ti and Au Atoms by EXAFS and XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz,V.; Mullins, D.; Yan, W.; Zhu, H.; Dai, S.; Overbury, S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was utilized to investigate both the Au particle size on several supports composed by silica and titanium oxide, and the coordination of TiO2 in the support phase. Particularly, we wanted to utilize the technique to probe mixing in the support phase, by using different synthetic methods such as by functionalizing silica or by ALD (atomic layer deposition) techniques as prepared in our laboratories, and the growth and stability of Au nanoparticles deposited on these supports. The study using cosynthesis techniques to dope bulk mesoporous SiO2 with TiO2 resulted in TiO2 being dispersed in the SiO2 matrix; however, a second phase starts forming as the TiO2 content increases as indicated by the EXAFS Ti-O shell shift in position and increase of coordination number. On the supports prepared by cosynthesis, Au particles were smaller and more stable. The study using the surface sol-gel technique for deposition of single monolayers of an oxide such as TiO2 produced Ti environments in which the Ti-O shell and the next two Ti-Ti shells lie on the same position as expected for an anatase structure. Although undercoordinated, the presence of the Ti-Ti shells indicate that the titania species are not molecularly dispersed on the SiO2 surface as hypothesized, but there is indeed a cross-linking of the titania moieties.

  14. Structural investigation of Au catalysts on TiO2-SiO2 supports - on the nature of the local structure of Ti and Au atoms by EXAFS and XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Viviane; Mullins, David R; Yan, Wenfu; Zhu, Haoguo; Dai, Sheng

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was utilized to investigate both the Au particle size on several supports composed by silica and titanium oxide, and the coordination of TiO2 in the support phase. Particularly, we wanted to utilize the technique to probe mixing in the support phase, by using different synthetic methods such as by functionalizing silica or by ALD (atomic layer deposition) techniques as prepared in our laboratories, and the growth and stability of Au nanoparticles deposited on these supports. The study using cosynthesis techniques to dope bulk mesoporous SiO2 with TiO2 resulted in TiO2 being dispersed in the SiO2 matrix; however, a second phase starts forming as the TiO2 content increases as indicated by the EXAFS Ti-O shell shift in position and increase of coordination number. On the supports prepared by cosynthesis, Au particles were smaller and more stable. The study using the surface sol-gel technique for deposition of single monolayers of an oxide such as TiO2 produced Ti environments in which the Ti-O shell and the next two Ti-Ti shells lie on the same position as expected for an anatase structure. Although undercoordinated, the presence of the Ti-Ti shells indicate that the titania species are not molecularly dispersed on the SiO2 surface as hypothesized, but there is indeed a cross-linking of the titania moieties.

  15. State and Local Compliance: a National Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beuke, Vernon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the Abt Study of State and Local Compliance which sought to describe state and local implementation of the provisions of the Vocational Education Amendments of 1965; to understand ways in which local environment affects compliance; and to provide Congress with recommendations for achieving greater adherence to federal intent. (JOW)

  16. Fostering Supportive Environments: A Case Study of Public Pedagogy in a Community-Based AIDS Service Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of the significance of public pedagogy for how community-based organizations that provide prevention, support, and educational services to people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS operate. The article reports on a case study analysis of a local AIDS service organization (ASO) in a small town in Ontario, Canada. The…

  17. Broadband local dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A route to extend the measurement bandwidth of local dielectric spectroscopy up to the MHz range has been devised. The method is based on a slow amplitude modulation at a frequency Ω of the excitation field oscillating at a frequency ω and the coherent detection of the modulated average electric force or force gradient at Ω. The cantilever mechanical response does not affect the measurement if Ω is well below its resonant frequency; therefore, limitations on the excitation field frequency are strongly reduced. Demonstration on a thin poly(vinyl acetate) film is provided, showing its structural relaxation spectrum on the local scale up to 45 °C higher than glass temperature, and nanoscale resolution dielectric relaxation imaging near conductive nanowires embedded in the polymer matrix was obtained up to 5 MHz frequency, with no physical reason to hinder further bandwidth extension.

  18. LULUs: locally unwanted land uses

    SciTech Connect

    Popper, F.J.

    1983-06-01

    A LULU is a locally unwanted land use. It may be an old-age home or a nuclear-waste-disposal site. People need it but do not want to live next to it. Some characteristics LULUs have in common are: opposition (more or less organized), costs to the neighborhood (real or perceived), support from conservatives for LULUs of the right, support from liberals for LULUs of the left, and some local support. Today's LULU may be tomorrow's prize; witness the 1982 competition for a state prison by 21 towns in depressed Illinois. Regional and national LULUs, while offering (or appearing to offer) a regional or national benefit, put financial and environmental costs and social stresses on a locality. Governmental and legal questions confront the decision-makers who must untangle these conflicts.

  19. 10 CFR 440.13 - Local applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Local applications. 440.13 Section 440.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.13 Local applications. (a) The Support Office Director shall give written notice to all local applicants throughout...

  20. Quantum transport localization through graphene.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kino, Hiori; Nakaharai, Shu; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Okawa, Yuji; Ogawa, Shinichi; Joachim, Christian; Aono, Masakazu

    2017-01-20

    Localization of atomic defect-induced electronic transport through a single graphene layer is calculated using a full-valence electronic structure description as a function of the defect density and taking into account the atomic-scale deformations of the layer. The elementary electronic destructive interferences leading to Anderson localization are analyzed. The low-voltage current intensity decreases with increasing length and defect density, with a calculated localization length ζ = 3.5 nm for a defect density of 5%. The difference from the experimental defect density of 0.5% required for an oxide surface-supported graphene to obtain the same ζ is discussed, pointing out how interactions of the graphene supporting surface and surface chemical modifications also control electronic transport localization.

  1. Quantum transport localization through graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kino, Hiori; Nakaharai, Shu; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Okawa, Yuji; Ogawa, Shinichi; Joachim, Christian; Aono, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    Localization of atomic defect-induced electronic transport through a single graphene layer is calculated using a full-valence electronic structure description as a function of the defect density and taking into account the atomic-scale deformations of the layer. The elementary electronic destructive interferences leading to Anderson localization are analyzed. The low-voltage current intensity decreases with increasing length and defect density, with a calculated localization length ζ = 3.5 nm for a defect density of 5%. The difference from the experimental defect density of 0.5% required for an oxide surface-supported graphene to obtain the same ζ is discussed, pointing out how interactions of the graphene supporting surface and surface chemical modifications also control electronic transport localization.

  2. Dynamic localized load balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Sergey I.; Heiner, Andreas P.

    2003-08-01

    Traditionally dynamic load balancing is applied in resource-reserved connection-oriented networks with a large degree of managed control. Load balancing in connectionless networks is rather rudimentary and is either static or requires network-wide load information. This paper presents a fully automated, traffic driven dynamic load balancing mechanism that uses local load information. The proposed mechanism is easily deployed in a multi-vendor environment in which only a subset of routers supports the function. The Dynamic Localized Load Balancing (DLLB) mechanism distributes traffic based on two sets of weights. The first set is fixed and is inverse proportional to the path cost, typically the sum of reciprocal bandwidths along the path. The second weight reflects the utilization of the link to the first next hop along the path, and is therefore variable. The ratio of static weights defines the ideal load distribution, the ratio of variable weights the node-local load distribution estimate. By minimizing the difference between variable and fixed ratios the traffic distribution, with the available node-local knowledge, is optimal. The above mechanism significantly increases throughput and decreases delay from a network-wide perspective. Optionally the variable weight can include load information of nodes downstream to prevent congestion on those nodes. The latter function further improves network performance, and is easily implemented on top of the standard OSPF signaling. The mechanism does not require many node resources and can be implemented on existing router platforms.

  3. Social environment affects juvenile dispersal in great tits (Parus major).

    PubMed

    Nicolaus, Marion; Michler, Stephanie P M; Jalvingh, Kirsten M; Ubels, Richard; van der Velde, Marco; Komdeur, Jan; Both, Christiaan; Tinbergen, Joost M

    2012-07-01

    1. Habitat selection can affect individual fitness, and therefore, individuals are expected to assess habitat quality of potential breeding sites before settlement. 2. We investigated the role of social environment on juvenile dispersal behaviour in the great tit (Parus major). Two main contradictory hypotheses can be formulated regarding social effects on juvenile dispersal as follows: (i) High fledgling density and sex ratio may enhance the intensity of local (kin) competition and, therefore, reduce individual survival chance, enhance emigration and reduce settlement ('repulsion' hypothesis) (ii) Alternatively, high fledgling density and sex ratio may signal high-quality habitat or lead to aggregation and thus increase individual survival chance, reduce emigration and enhance settlement ('attraction' hypothesis). 3. To disentangle positive from negative effects of high density and male-biased sex ratio on dispersal, we manipulated the social composition of the fledgling population in 12 semi-isolated nest-box areas (plots) via a change of fledgling density (low/high) as well as fledgling sex ratio (female-biased/balanced/male-biased) across 3 years. We then tested whether experimental variation in male and female fledgling densities affected variation in local survival, emigration and settlement of juveniles, and whether social effects on survival and dispersal support the 'repulsion' or 'attraction' hypothesis. 4. We found no experimental effects on local survival and emigration probabilities. However, consistent with the 'attraction' hypothesis, settlement was significantly and positively affected by local experimental sex ratio in each of the study years: both male and female juveniles avoided female-biased plots and settled more in plots that were balanced and male-biased the previous year. 5. Our study provides unprecedented experimental evidence that local sex ratio plays a causal role in habitat selection. We suggest that settlers avoid female

  4. Infectious disease and health systems modelling for local decision making to control neglected tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have complex life cycles and are challenging to control. The “2020 goals” of control and elimination as a public health programme for a number of NTDs are the subject of significant international efforts and investments. Beyond 2020 there will be a drive to maintain these gains and to push for true local elimination of transmission. However, these diseases are affected by variations in vectors, human demography, access to water and sanitation, access to interventions and local health systems. We therefore argue that there will be a need to develop local quantitative expertise to support elimination efforts. If available now, quantitative analyses would provide updated estimates of the burden of disease, assist in the design of locally appropriate control programmes, estimate the effectiveness of current interventions and support ‘real-time’ updates to local operations. Such quantitative tools are increasingly available at an international scale for NTDs, but are rarely tailored to local scenarios. Localised expertise not only provides an opportunity for more relevant analyses, but also has a greater chance of developing positive feedback between data collection and analysis by demonstrating the value of data. This is essential as rational program design relies on good quality data collection. It is also likely that if such infrastructure is provided for NTDs there will be an additional impact on the health system more broadly. Locally tailored quantitative analyses can help achieve sustainable and effective control of NTDs, but also underpin the development of local health care systems. PMID:28281704

  5. Supporting Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Betty, Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter feature issue focuses on services for persons with developmental disabilities that support the whole person by acknowledging, respecting, and incorporating aspects of identity such as race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, age, and class. Articles include: (1) "Serving the Whole Person: The Journey to Embracing…

  6. Mirror Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of making a mirror support comprising a composite, the composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes, wherein at least two of the plurality of carbon nanotubes are bonded to each other through a bridging moiety bound to each of the two carbon nanotubes, and a laminate comprising the composite.

  7. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    , in response to Griffiths' challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has described is flawed.

  8. Local Foods, Local Places Summary Reports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These summary reports describe Local Foods, Local Places projects in communities across the country, including farmers markets, cooperatives, community gardens, and other food-related enterprises that can boost local economies and drive revitalization.

  9. Affective processing requires awareness.

    PubMed

    Lähteenmäki, Mikko; Hyönä, Jukka; Koivisto, Mika; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    Studies using backward masked emotional stimuli suggest that affective processing may occur outside visual awareness and imply primacy of affective over semantic processing, yet these experiments have not strictly controlled for the participants' awareness of the stimuli. Here we directly compared the primacy of affective versus semantic categorization of biologically relevant stimuli in 5 experiments (n = 178) using explicit (semantic and affective discrimination; Experiments 1-3) and implicit (semantic and affective priming; Experiments 4-5) measures. The same stimuli were used in semantic and affective tasks. Visual awareness was manipulated by varying exposure duration of the masked stimuli, and subjective level of stimulus awareness was measured after each trial using a 4-point perceptual awareness scale. When participants reported no awareness of the stimuli, semantic and affective categorization were at chance level and priming scores did not differ from zero. When participants were even partially aware of the stimuli, (a) both semantic and affective categorization could be performed above chance level with equal accuracy, (b) semantic categorization was faster than affective categorization, and (c) both semantic and affective priming were observed. Affective categorization speed was linearly dependent on semantic categorization speed, suggesting dependence of affective processing on semantic recognition. Manipulations of affective and semantic categorization tasks revealed a hierarchy of categorization operations beginning with basic-level semantic categorization and ending with superordinate level affective categorization. We conclude that both implicit and explicit affective and semantic categorization is dependent on visual awareness, and that affective recognition follows semantic categorization.

  10. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  11. Community structure affects behavior.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, C

    1991-06-01

    AID's prevention efforts can benefit from taking into account 5 main aspects (KEPRA) of community structure identified by anthropologists: 1) kinship patterns, 2) economics, 3) politics, 4) religion, and 5) associations. For example, in Uganda among the Basoga and paternal aunt or senga is responsible for female sex education. Such culturally determined patterns need to be targeted in order to enhance education and effectiveness. Economics can reflect differing systems of family support through sexual means. The example given involves a poor family with a teenager in Thailand who exchanges a water buffalo or basic necessity for this daughter's prostitution. Politics must be considered because every society identifies people who have the power to persuade, influence, exchange resources, coerce, or in some way get people to do what is wanted. Utilizing these resources whether its ministers of health, factory owners, or peers is exemplified in the Monterey, Mexico factor floor supervisor and canteen worker introducing to workers the hows and whys of a new AID's education program. His peer status will command more respect than the director with direct authority. Religious beliefs have explanations for causes of sickness or disease, or provide instruction in sex practices. The example given is of a health workers in Uganda discussing AIDS with rural women by saying that we all know that disease and deaths are caused by spells. "But not AIDS - slim. AIDS is different." Associations can help provide educational, economic, and emotional assistance to the AID's effort or families affected.

  12. Affective Influences on the Attentional Dynamics Supporting Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Adam K.

    2005-01-01

    Identification of a 1st target stimulus in a rapid serial visual presentation sequence leads to transient impairment in report for a 2nd target; this is known as the attentional blink (AB). This AB impairment was substantially alleviated for emotionally significant target words. AB sparing was not attributable to a variety of nonaffective stimulus…

  13. Parental Support, Depressed Affect, and Sexual Experience among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitbeck, Les B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines the effect of unsupportive family relations and low self-esteem on teenage sexual activity and alcohol use. Data from a telephone survey of 301 male and 242 female adolescents in Iowa suggested significant gender differences, with young women in unsupportive contexts seeking compensatory intimacy outside the family. (JB)

  14. Local knowledge, pattern and diversity of use of Sclerocarya birrea

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growing interest is on food tree species in general, and particularly indigenous fruit tree species in developing countries since they are inherent to most tropical landscapes and serve the dual function of local livelihood support and biodiversity conservation. It is therefore relevant to assess the level of integration of these species in local cultures and the factors affecting them. This study aims at assessing knowledge and uses of Sclerocarya birrea subsp. birrea and factors affecting the use values within and between communities. Methods This study combines quantitative and qualitative ethnobotanical approaches to investigate uses and factors affecting the use value of S. birrea subsp. birrea. Nine group discussions as well as 161 individual interviews were held in the dry and typical Sudanian zones. Seven different ethnic groups were involved and the survey focused on local uses and perception of factors affecting the dynamics of S. birrea. Results The species has a multitude of uses; all organs are used for more than 20 different purposes. The study highlights how gender, local availability, ethnicity and community location interact to influence the utilization value of the species. People living in drier areas with high occurrence of the S. birrea use it more than those living in wetter areas with low occurrence. While domestic and subsistence uses do not appear to threaten the species, carving, clearing and drought stand out as the major causes of its decline. Conclusions Many factors and their interactions influence the use pattern of the species within and between communities. When compared to the level of exploitation of S. birrea subsp. caffra in southern Africa, the subspecies birrea is at this point relatively underutilized. A high commercial potential exists due to its simple propagation ability and makes it an interesting agroforestry resource. PMID:21284847

  15. Supporting members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  16. Prey dispersal rate affects prey species composition and trait diversity in response to multiple predators in metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Howeth, Jennifer G; Leibold, Mathew A

    2010-09-01

    1. Recent studies indicate that large-scale spatial processes can alter local community structuring mechanisms to determine local and regional assemblages of predators and their prey. In metacommunities, this may occur when the functional diversity represented in the regional predator species pool interacts with the rate of prey dispersal among local communities to affect prey species diversity and trait composition at multiple scales. 2. Here, we test for effects of prey dispersal rate and spatially and temporally heterogeneous predation from functionally dissimilar predators on prey structure in pond mesocosm metacommunities. An experimental metacommunity consisted of three pond mesocosm communities supporting two differentially size-selective invertebrate predators and their zooplankton prey. In each metacommunity, two communities maintained constant predation and supported either Gyrinus sp. (Coleoptera) or Notonecta ungulata (Hemiptera) predators generating a spatial prey refuge while the third community supported alternating predation from Gyrinus sp. and N. ungulata generating a temporal prey refuge. Mesocosm metacommunities were connected at either low (0.7% day(-1)) or high (10% day(-1)) planktonic prey dispersal. The diversity, composition and body size of zooplankton prey were measured at local and regional (metacommunity) scales. 3. Metacommunities experiencing the low prey dispersal rate supported the greatest regional prey species diversity (H') and evenness (J'). Neither dispersal rate nor predation regime affected local prey diversity or evenness. The spatial prey refuge at low dispersal maintained the largest difference in species composition and body size diversity between communities under Gyrinus and Notonecta predation, suggesting that species sorting was operating at the low dispersal rate. There was no effect of dispersal rate on species diversity or body size distribution in the temporal prey refuge. 4. The frequency distribution, but not

  17. Local conservation laws and the structure of the many-body localized states.

    PubMed

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papić, Z; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2013-09-20

    We construct a complete set of local integrals of motion that characterize the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Our approach relies on the assumption that local perturbations act locally on the eigenstates in the MBL phase, which is supported by numerical simulations of the random-field XXZ spin chain. We describe the structure of the eigenstates in the MBL phase and discuss the implications of local conservation laws for its nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. We argue that the many-body localization can be used to protect coherence in the system by suppressing relaxation between eigenstates with different local integrals of motion.

  18. Support effects studied on model supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gorte, R.G.

    1991-11-01

    We are studying model catalysts in which the active phase is deposited onto flat oxide substrates in order to understand how a catalyst is affected by its support. We have examined the following growth and stability of titania overlayers which had been vapor deposited onto a Rh foil; the growth of Pt films on ZnO(0001)Zn and O(0001)O and compared the results to those obtained for Pt on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001). Samples were prepared by vapor deposition of Pt onto flat substrates in ultra high vacuum, and metal coverages were measured using a quartz-crystal, film thickness monitor; the structure and CO adsorption properties of Pt films vapor deposited onto a ZrO{sub 2}(100) crystal; the deposition of Rh on a ZrO{sub 2}(100) crystal; The absorption of NO on Pt particles supported on CeO{sub 2}, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), and the Zn- and O-polar surfaces of ZnO(0001). We have investigated supported oxides in order to understand the acidic properties that have been reported for monolayer oxides. Our first studies were of amorphous, silicalumina catalysts. Finally, we have also begun to prepare model supported oxides in order to be able to used spectroscopic methods to characterize the sites formed on these materials. Our first studies were of niobia deposition on oxidized Al films and on an {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) crystal.